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SINCE 1940

C A LL 5 0 4 . 2 8 8 . 8 3 81 TO S I G N U P A N D K EE P Y O U R C LOT H ES LO O K I N G Y O U N G ’ S ! NEW ORLEANS

CONNECT

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LAKEVIEW | 905 HARRISON AVENUE | 872-0931

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UPTOWN | 6227 S. CLAIBORNE AVENUE | 866-5371

YOUNGSDRYCLEANING.COM


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CUE

CONTENTS

MARCH 2014

SHOPPING

FASHION

11

What Guys Want

22

Indie Friendly

29

CUE Tips

26

Style Setter

31

CUE Kids

12 16

Essentials for a well-groomed beard Three chic, local home furnishings stores Festive staples go from playgrounds to parades

32

HOME

Built in Style

Ginger Coffer’s salvaged mirrors

At Home

Mid-century modern style by the lake

Feathered fascinators by Beckie Wilson Blogger Juley Thuy Le’s spring essentials

BEAUTY

Lusterphile

Three braided hairstyles to try

PERSPECTIVES

09

From the Editor

35

Shop Dog

Modern revival

Lamb Chop of Rare Cuts

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hotgun houses, Creole cottages, double gallery homes … these are the structures most people associate with architecture in New Orleans. But there’s also a rich vein of mid-century modern designs in the city, especially in its northwestern tract along Lake Pontchartrain. This issue of CUE profiles a sleek, classic example by architect Victor Bruno (p. 16). As Lee Cutrone writes in the feature, mid-century modern architecture is enjoying a revival that doesn’t seem to be fading any time soon. Cutrone points to the popularity of shows like Mad Men and stores like West Elm as evidence. One also could cite a new wallpaper series by homegrown company Flavor Paper (now a Brooklyn transplant). The company recently launched a series of wallpapers inspired by Andy Warhol’s art — one paper is featured on the cover. It makes the perfect companion for an issue with a fine example of modernist architecture. As for the reasons for this modernist revival, I have my own theory. When I see a lowslung ranch house made of brick, embellished with concrete screens and metal gates, I feel

PHOTO BY JANINE JOFFE | M AKEUP BY M ARIA BARREDA

S

FROM T H E E DI TOR

a visceral pang for my grandparents’ Lakeview home. A casualty of Hurricane Katrina, it ain’t dere no more, but it displayed many of those same mid-century modern elements, which are forever seared into my memory. I suspect the same is true for Baby Boomers (and their offspring) who came of age in similar homes. Though the people and furnishings have changed since the mid-20th century, the style remains the same and continues to be celebrated — rightly so.

ON CUE

MARGO DUBOS |

MISSY WILKINSON |

EDITOR

EDITORIAL K ANDACE P OWER GR AVE S

M A N A G IN G ED I TO R

CO N T R IB U T IN G W R I T ER S

MEG AN BR ADEN-PERRY, LEE CUTRONE, L AUREN H AR TM AN, M ARY CROS S, K AT S TROMQUIS T

PUBLISHER

DORA SISON |

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

CHRIS TIN GREEN

A DV ER T I S IN G CO O R D IN ATO R 483-3138 christing@gambitweekly.com

IN T ER N

ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V ES JILL GIEGER

PRODUCTION

483-3131 jillg@gambitweekly.com

LY N V I C K N A I R , P A I G E H I N R I C H S , JULIE T MEEK S, DAVID K ROLL, J A S O N W H I T TA K E R

JEFFRE Y PIZ ZO 483-3145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com

P A I G E R I TA N U LT Y

G R A P HI C D E S I G NER S

P R E- P R E S S CO O R D IN ATO R

K AT H R Y N B R A D Y

DISPL AY A DV ERT ISI NG S ANDY S TEIN BRONDUM

A DV ER T I S IN G D IR EC TO R

483-3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com MICHELE SLONSKI

A DV ER T I S IN G A D M INI S T R ATO R

483-3140 micheles@gambitweekly.com

S ENI O R A CCO U N T E X EC U T I V E

LINDA L ACHIN 483-3142 lindal@gambitweekly.com SHANNON HINTON KERN 483-3144 shannonk@gambitweekly.com KRIS TIN HARTENS TEIN 483-3141 kristinh@gambitweekly.com KELLIE L ANDECHE 483-3143 kelliel@gambitweekly.com

G AM B I T | 3 9 2 3 B I E N V I L L E S T R E E T | N E W O R L E AN S , L A 7 0 119 50 4.486. 5 90 0 | response@gambitweekly.com

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W H AT G U Y S WAN T

Beards

SHOPPING

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of glory

TIPS FOR GROOMING THE ULTIMATE

SYMBOL OF MASCULINITY

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B Y

L A U R E N

H A R T M A N

For a trim or shave, this beard set can help improve the overall appearance of facial hair, $250 at Aidan Gill for Men (550 Fulton St., 504-5664903; 2026 Magazine St., 504-5879090; www.aidangillformen.com).

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Protect skin from razor burn with organic citrus shaving cream, $18 at Paris Parker (citywide; www.parisparker.com). Use the dropper to apply this black pepper-scented beard oil, $14.99 at Louisiana Beard & Facial Hair Association (www.louisianabeard.storenvy. com).

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This lotion can help repair sensitive skin and make a beard smoother, $20 at Aidan Gill for Men.

FOR A WELLGROOMED BEARD:

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After a shave, a refreshing splash of spearmint-scented oil calms irritated skin, $68 at Paris Parker.

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Aidan Gill’s Tips

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Trim stray hairs that cause you to look like an unkempt wild man. Sculpt your beard using a straight razor, which allows you to obtain that fresh-cut look while maintaining the manliness a beard represents. When trimming or shaving your neck, don’t trim to the outline of your face. Trimming that close can make you look like you are sporting a cardboard cutout instead of the clean-cut look you were going for. Take your time shaving, and always add water to your shaving cream for a nice, smooth shave. Go with the “grain” when shaving to avoid cuts. Place a cold towel on your face after shaving to prevent ingrown hairs. After shaving, moisturize with facial lotion or aftershave to keep skin smooth. M A RC H .2 0 1 4 <<<

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BUILT IN STYLE

Mirror Image DESIGNER GINGER COFFER’S REVAMPED ANTIQUE MIRRORS OFFER A LOVELY WAY TO REFLECT.

BY K AT S TROMQUIS T | PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

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f you’re the type to haunt Saturday estate sales or make sharp U-turns when you see “garage sale” signs, you might run into Ginger Coffer, founder of Ginger Coffer Designs (www.facebook.com/ GingerCofferDesigns). Coffer is always on the prowl for the antique mirrors that are the center of her design and refurbishing business. “An estate sale’s a great place to find beautiful mirrors, especially Uptown New Orleans, [since] there’s so many old houses here,” Coffer says. “I look for anything that has a good price … and that I think I can turn into something even better.” Using a subdued palette of neutrals, taupes and dusky blues, Coffer transforms old, new and artificially antiqued mirrors by using custom-painted frames and bronzed architectural details like medallions and crests. Inspired by the trumeau mirror, a rectangular mirror popular in 18th-century France, her work is a mix of classical and contemporary. One faux-antique mirror’s speckled glass contrasts with a clean wood frame, while another small mirror’s upper margin ascends into baroque curlicues. Like many small business owners, Coffer started with a problem to solve. She loved the visual effect of mirrors, but couldn’t track down the right ones for a focal point in her home. “I was looking for two [mirrors] to go on either side of my fireplace,” she says. “The French antique trumeau mirrors are very pricey, and they’re hard to find. That’s when I decided to try and make these myself. My dad is an engineer and very much a do-it-yourselfer — I guess I have a little bit of that in my blood.”

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She researched companies that sold the type of ornamentation she liked and found a carpenter to do the heavy lifting of frame assembly. The process was addictive, she says, and custom-built mirrors soon popped up in every room of her house. Coffer’s first finished product impressed friends and family so much that she began to receive commissions for other projects. With her work, Coffer brings this decorating tool to her circle and the community. “[When] you’re looking for something to fill your walls, everybody thinks of art,” she says. “I think you need a mix of art and mirrors. … [Mirrors] bring light in; if you have a small space, it’s definitely going to make it feel much larger.” Mirrors placed high on walls can miss out on some of this expansive effect, she says. Coffer also suggests placing a mirror where it can reflect other beautiful objects, like chandeliers or a great piece of furniture. If you aren’t looking to visually expand your space, use this strategy when installing a mirror, or make a large mirror the centerpiece of a room. Since creating her first mirrors in 2009, Coffer has established a comfortable creative cycle. She finds mirrors or frames to redesign, sends them to a carpenter to be cut or reassembled with new frames and hardware, and adds ornamental elements, paint and finishing touches in her garage or backyard. Her ideas come from a variety of sources: from Pinterest and decorating magazines to modern art and New Orleans itself. “I do a lot of custom work because if someone wants a mirror for a certain space … it’s hard to find a mirror out there that fits the exact size,” she says. “They’ll have ideas and I’ll just make what they need. Growing up in New Orleans with so many artists and the architectural surroundings helped a lot.” Coffer has moved from mirrors to furniture restoration. Her recent upcycling successes include a vintage drop-leaf table -turned-modern with a refinished surface and colored legs. She brought a pair of metal candleholders to life with a textured painting technique


BUILT IN STYLE that makes them appear snow-covered. Coffer puts these objects on display at Vita (1537 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-831-1111; www.vita-nola.com), the boutique on Metairie Road where she began selling her work last summer. Owned by longtime friend Erin Ewing, Vita sells of-the-moment apparel alongside Coffer’s home furnishings. “[Ewing] asked me to put my mirrors in [the store], and I was so excited; it’s a place for me to show what I’m doing,” Coffer says. “People come in for clothes and they see home [furnishings] and art and mirrors and furniture that they love; it’s a good mix.” In the future, Coffer hopes to stay inspired by estate sale treasures and designs of her own creation. To her, the business side of her work isn’t so important. She prefers to focus on the right finish or molding and the perfect paint color or embellishment. “I’m having a lot of fun with this,” she says. “I’m kind of just seeing where it takes me. Right now it’s really keeping my creative interest. The [mirror’s] frame itself is what I love to do. It’s like a piece of art.”

HOME

Ginger Coffer finds mirrors at garage and estate sales and transforms them with new hardware and paint.

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HOME

FEATURE

MODERN OASIS Stephanie and Jeff Haiglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mid-century modern house combines modernist style, present-day convenience and the comforts of home. B Y

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ST YLING BY M ARY SAT TERLEE PHOTOS BY GREG MILES


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esigned by modernist architect Victor Bruno for the Cuccia family and constructed in 1960, Stephanie and Jeff Haigler’s mid-century modern house in Lake Terrace has had only four owners. In preservationist terms, that’s a good thing because the house survived virtually untouched for many years. “It was like a time capsule,” says contractor/designer Tad Breaux, who renovated the house for his family before selling it to the Haiglers in 2011. “It was all original.” Few mid-century houses hit the real estate market in original condition. But thanks to shows like Mad Men and the influence of stores such as Design Within Reach and West Elm, mid-century modern architecture appeals to a growing number of buyers. While a student at the University of Arkansas, Jeff became acquainted with works by architect E. Fay Jones,

who apprenticed with Frank Lloyd Wright and taught at the university. Inspired by her husband, Stephanie also became a fan. When the two searched for a mid-century modern residence in New Orleans, they reached out to Breaux, a client of Jeff’s who coincidentally wanted to sell. Not only had the couple found a classic example of mid-century modern architecture, the house was move-in ready. Breaux had renovated the house with respect for Bruno’s architecture and the way families live today. The home’s original footprint was almost the same as it is now. By reworking elements of the interior, Breaux made it feel larger. He removed a wall between the living and dining rooms and replaced it with a curved, partial wall that houses a fireplace and flush-mounted television on one side and ebony-colored cabinetry on the other.

He also removed floor-to-ceiling Japanese-style doors that separated what now are the breakfast and dining areas. Breaux opened up the small kitchen, conceived as a behind-the-scenes prep area, by removing the doors, incorporating what had been the laundry room and carving a circular cutout in the wall. He covered the room’s clerestory windows and added horizontal cabinets above a wall of green glass, a linear configuration that echoes the shape of the kitchen. Because the original ash paneling had been damaged by cigarette smoke, Breaux replaced it with custom ash panels, laying out and numbering each naturally patterned piece like an artist’s collage. In the living room, he mimicked the ash’s shape and arrangement with minimalist white aluminum reglets, a detail more commonly found in commercial applications. The pool also is new.

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Aluminum reglets cover the front wall of the living room. The sofa and an Eames lounge chair from DWR feature crisp, clean white. Behind the sofa, a console diplays brightly colored glass vases. The Picasso-esque bull (a reference to Jeff’s financial career) was painted by artist Sarah Satterlee. The swivel chairs are covered with gray velvet embossed with a crocodile print.

(FACING PAGE) A cypress dining table custom made by artisan Shaun Wilkerson is combined with simple leather chairs and a one-of-kind rug. Breaux designed the eight stalactite pendant fixtures and positioned them as a six-foot chandelier.

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“The house just screamed for a lap pool,” says Breaux, who cut away and rebuilt part of the house to get the equipment necessary for digging the pool to the backyard. Breaux doubled the master bedroom’s size by vaulting the ceiling and absorbing square footage that had been a shed. He enlarged the master bath with a vaulted ceiling and a bay window that bumped out the existing wall. He remodeled the bath with new surfaces and fixtures. When the Haiglers stepped in, the house’s bones were perfectly in place. “Tad did everything,” Stephanie says. “He respected the period of the house but he also modified the kitchen and baths. It was refreshing. All we had to do was to pick out things like paint and carpet.” Jeff contacted Mary Satterlee, a

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friend and decorator who designed the interior of his previous home. “From the moment we bought the house, I never even thought about calling anyone else,” Jeff says. Combining Stephanie’s and Jeff’s tastes was key to the success of the project. “They had somewhat differing ideas of how to decorate the house,” Satterlee says. “Jeff was more of a purist, gravitating to true mid-century modern pieces, whereas Stephanie’s priorities focused around comfort. My job as the decorator was to marry these two desires together. I needed to find a balance between the sterile, clean lines of typical mid-century modern decor and the livability and coziness of a plusher style.” The Haiglers wanted the decor to jibe with its modernist back-

drop, but they also wanted it to be warm and inviting, have hints of red (Jeff’s favorite color), blend iconic mid-century pieces with other finds and include something local. Splashes of red are present throughout and there are timeless mid-century designs — Saarinen’s tulip table and womb chair, an Eames lounge chair and ottoman — as well as newer ones. To satisfy their desire for something local, the Haiglers commissioned craftsman Shaun Wilkerson to design and build a table for 12. The finished product – a thick slab of scallop-edged cypress mounted on a plain metal base – is one of their favorite furnishings and is used regularly because the couple entertains dinner guests nearly every Sunday. Original sliding glass doors and terrazzo floors lead seamlessly from

The leather used to upholster the master bedroom’s headboard and bench bears a pattern of ribbing and undulating curves similar to that in the rug. The painting at right, by decorator Mary Satterlee’s niece, Sarah Satterlee, is a copy of work by Melissa Herrington. Stephanie found the burled chests on 1st Dibs. The Saarinen womb chair is from DWR.

(FACING PAGE, TOP) The one-of-kind rug made by Liora Manne was inspired by the blue of the lap pool outside the glass doors and is accented with a school of koi in Jeff’s favorite color, red.

(FACING PAGE, BOTTOM) Original sliding glass doors and a terrazzo floor blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Once a storage closet, the built-in area at the far end of the patio is now an outdoor bar.


FEATURE

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the dining area to the patio and blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living, a concept that suits the Haiglers’ lifestyle. During warm months, they frequently place outdoor chairs in the shallow, wading-depth end of the pool while barbecuing for friends. On the north side, there’s a second outdoor area consisting of a patio paved with aggregate, a lawn and a raised flowerbed with a 25-foot wrap-around wooden bench – all original to the house. Roomy and secluded, it’s ideal for larger gatherings. But it’s the simple things that Stephanie, a nurse, and Jeff, a capital advisor with J.P. Morgan, enjoy most: relaxing after work, taking walks in their lakefront neighborhood and spending time with their two puppies. “This house feels very open to me with all the glass,” Jeff says. “But it’s also very private because you can’t see in from the street.” “I love coming home,” Stephanie adds. “Our house is an oasis.” (ABOVE) The breakfast area consists of a Saarinen table, Calligaris chairs and an animal skin rug. Custom oak cabinets are stained an opaque black. The left side houses storage and the right side is designed for media and audio equipment. (LEFT) Jeff’s 1972 Corvette Stingray in front of the couple’s 1960 mid-century modern house. The front entrance remains the same as when the house was built.

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BIRDS OF A

FEATHER CROWDS FLOCK TO ARTIST BECKIE WILSON’S FLAMBOYANT FASCINATORS

BY MISSY WILKINSON PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

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rtist Beckie Wilson describes her spirit animal as a peacock, and when she shows up for an interview with CUE, it’s easy to see why. The New Orleans native sparkles with glittery blue nail polish, matching eyeliner, a giant topaz ring and a feathered fascinator of her own creation. “I love how colorful peacocks are,” she says. “I’m a very colorful person.” Wilson is a jill-of-all-trades in the art world. After earning a fine arts degree at Delgado Community College, she created oil and acrylic paintings, costumes, murals, jewelry and stone sculptures, did interior design, sold chandeliers and antiques and taught figure drawing at Ann T. Cooper’s private studio. Fascinator by Beckie Wilson, $150 at Lynn Beck Collection (504-575-8858; www.etsy.com/shop/ LynnBeckCollection).

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FEATURE “I probably jumped around a lot,” Wilson says. “I have used so many different mediums.” In recent years, Wilson has become known for one project in particular: her fascinators. Fascinators originated as lace or crocheted head shawls worn by women in the late 19th century, but Wilson’s versions have very little in common with their Victorian ancestors. Beaded compilations of goose, rooster, peacock and duck feathers, her fascinators look like headpieces worn by Las Vegas showgirls — and they turn nearly as many heads. When Wilson started incorporating fascinators into her everyday ensembles, she was continually stopped by curious strangers. “People would ask me where I got them and want to buy them,” Wilson says. “So I started spending lots of time making many of them.” Wilson launched her business simply: by walking through the French Quarter wearing her creations. “From the time I would go from one end of the square to another, they were all gone,” Wilson says. “I’m known as the fascinator lady in the French Quarter.” Wilson now sells her designs through her Etsy shop (www.etsy.com/shop/ LynnBeckCollection) and at two French Quarter stores: Jewel’s Art (905 Decatur St., 504-481-1462) and Love It (713 Bienville St., 504-523-7888). She also does custom fascinators in football team colors or for costume accessories. There are smaller fascinators and barrettes appropriate for children. Wilson recently made a matching set

FASHION

for a bride and groom having a voodoo-themed wedding. “She wanted to have white feathers, but also the colors of her wedding,” Wilson says. “I put a big display on her fiancee’s top hat.” Wilson’s fascinators range in price from $15 for a small feathered barrette to $200 for an elaborate fascinator. She also makes feathered purses for $100. “I use high-quality feathers to make my fascinators,” says Wilson, who finds artistic inspiration in nature. “That is what really brings out the beauty in them.” Though splashy feathered headpieces might not be part of everyday wear in most parts of the country, Wilson builds her daily outfits around her fascinators, which she describes as “wearable art.” “If there is a particular fascinator I want to wear, I’ll pick out an outfit that will coordinate with it,” she says. “I like that they make me feel so good. They are beautiful and they cheer people up. People are just attracted to them.”

(BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT) Multi-colored fascinator $50, peacock fascinator $75, and barrette $15, all at Lynn Beck Collection.

(ABOVE) Artist Beckie Wilson started selling her fascinators during walks in the French Quarter.

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HEMLINE ME TAIRIE

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5 FASHION

key pieces

“This dreamy leather bag goes with just about everything. It’s classic, durable and makes a statement all on its own. Swooooon.” Bag, $625 at Billy Reid (3927 Magazine St., 504-208-1200; www.billyreid.com).

Earrings, $38 at Hattie Sparks (714 Adams St., 504-304-5975; www.hattiesparks.com).

“These earrings by Loren Hope mean business. I couldn’t think of a better accessory to polish off any outfit.”

GUEST EDITOR JULEY THUY LE SHARES HER FAVORITE FASHION PICKS FOR EARLY SPRING. Blouse, $120 at Hattie Sparks.

“Subtle snake print adds the right amount of edge while a shoulder detail elevates the classic buttondown blouse.”

JULEY THUY LE BLOGS ABOUT FOOD, STYLE AND NEW ORLEANS CULTURE AT WWW.UPPERLYNE.COM

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FASHION

Coat, $1,665 at Weinsteins (4011 Magazine St., 504-895-6278; www. weinsteinsinc.com).

“A floral coat is a great winter-to-spring transition and statement piece that could be worn with jeans during the day or over a dress for a night out.”

“Billy Reid makes the perfect staples, including these black leather ankle boots.” Boot, $495 at Billy Reid.

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Magazine St & Louisiana

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On The Mark

CUE T I P S

HOME

Three local stores are putting their stamps on the home furnishings market. B Y L E E C U T R O N E

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hile renovating several homes with her husband, Ani Kinyon repurposed vintage furniture and antiques. She soon found herself fielding requests to do the same for friends. In January, Kinyon opened Pavement (3811 Magazine St., 504-266-2133), where all can enjoy her design talents. The shop is home to a casually elegant mix of antiques, new and repurposed furnishings, a line of reproductions (based on French and Swedish designs) developed by Kinyon, rugs, lighting, garden accents, art, frames and more. Kinyon also accepts custom orders. Abode (2114 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-266-2135; www.shopatabode.com) owners Erin and Mark Jacobs opened a store on the Northshore in 2007. Three years ago, they moved their business to Metairie. With less than 3,000 square feet, the space requires a carefully edited inventory; Abode offers upholstered seating, case goods, rugs, fabrics, gifts and lighting.

Mark, who grew up working at his father’s furniture store, and Erin, who started working for a furniture manufacturer, manage the task while providing variety and cohesion. An in-home consultation with Erin, the design half of the business, is $50 (it’s deducted from the price of a purchase). Greige Home Interiors (2033 N. Hwy. 90, Covington, 985-875-7576; www.facebook.com/ greigehome), a 20,000-square-foot furniture and design emporium, shaped its brand by offering volume and immediate gratification (in most cases, you can have same-day delivery) while providing a cache of exclusive high-end design. Owner John Rabalais stocks products like Verellen upholstered goods but puts his own spin on them by ordering sizes, colors and finishes custom-made to his specifications. Greige’s soft palette is based on the colors of sand, sea and sky – with a few darker designs thrown in for contrast.

Greige Home Interiors offers a wide array of furniture and accessories in a muted palette.

CARNIVAL TIME NEW MARDI GRAS HALO BANGLES

HANDCRAFTED IN AMERICA 3801 MAGAZINE STREET 504.891.2005 • LAKESIDE 504.835.2244 WWW.MIGNONFAGET.COM

JH_HalfPgCUEad_v3.indd 1

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Carnival comfort

CUE K I D S

SHOPPING

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CUTE, W E A R-A LL-DAY PIECES LET K IDS SHOW THEIR FESTI V E SIDES

BY MEGAN BR ADEN-PERRY A N D M I S S Y W I L K I N S O N

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Parade T-shirt, $20 at Fun Rock’n (3109 Magazine St., 504-895-4102; www.funrockn.com). Purple, green and gold onesie, $6.15 at Accent Annex (100 N. Labarre Road, Metairie, 504-834-2003; www.accentannex.com).

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Metallic purple, green and gold leggings, $32 each at Orient Orient Expressed (3905 Magazine St., 504-899-3060; www.orientexpressed.com). Ruffle sock with a Mardi Gras mask accent, $10 at Accent Annex. Jester headband, $23 at Orient Expressed.

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LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

Our daily HOW TO PROTECT HAIR FROM THE ELEMENTS WITH FABULOUS, FUNCTIONAL BRAIDS B Y

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ind, rain, sleet, sun — the weather’s been unpredictable lately, which can wreak havoc on hair. A simple solution for windblown, dry or uncooperative hair is to tuck it away in a ponytail or bun, where it stays put all day. But these looks can be uninspiring. Janina Padilla, a hairstylist at Mariposa Salon & Spa (3700 Orleans Ave., Suite D, 504-4840440; www.mariposasalonandspa.com), recommends spicing up a hairstyle with braids. “With this weather, you always want to put your hair up in a bun or something, but that’s why braids are great,” Padilla says. “You can pull it away in a style that’s different from a bun or ponytail and it can be used for the same purpose: to keep the hair away from the face and protect it from the weather.” Braided hairstyles might appear complex, but the only necessary tools are small elastic bands, bobby pins, a comb, hairspray and imagination. “Anyone can do a braid,” Padilla says. “You can do all kinds of things and make it fun. Curly hair holds the shape better. For people with straight hair, I give it a little wave before I start so it will hold bobby pins.” Padilla recommends looking online for simple braid styles like the French braid, waterfall braid or fishtail braid. It can be difficult to braid your own hair, she says, but it is OK if the braid is a little disheveled. “That’s the beauty of the braid — it can be messy,” Padilla says. “I don’t believe braids are meant to be perfect.” For extra flair, Padilla recommends accessorizing braids with a scarf or colorful hairpiece. With or without accessories, these styles brighten up a blustery day while preparing hair for anything Mother Nature might have in store.

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braid |

P H OTO S

B Y

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Renaissance Princess

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Using the waterfall braid technique, braid hair on each side. Allow hair to hang like pigtails, but keep the braid loose for a webbed look in the back. Take the ends of each braid and cross them along the back of the head, twisting and pinning into place. For added body, Padilla takes the end of a rattail comb and pulls out small sections of hair, loosening the strands and giving the style more texture.


LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

Vintage-Inspired Look

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This style is a new twist on a vintage look perfect for a 1920s-themed party. Begin by tightly braiding the fringe around the face, a trick Padilla says works great with bangs that aren’t quite grown out. Continue braiding piece by piece, grabbing a new strand of hair each time and shaping the braid sideways around the head. Repeat the process on the other side, creating a braided crown. When the two ends meet, gently tease the unbraided hair and form into a bun. Secure with pins and hairspray.

Dutch Flower

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This detailed swirl design grows out of one creatively placed French braid. After braiding the bangs, following the hair’s natural part, Padilla directed the French braid across the back of the head. Once the braid reached the other side of the head, she braided the remainder in a traditional style. The look could stop there, but to form the petals of the Dutch flower, she created a twist with the braid’s remaining length and pinned it in place. M A RC H .2 0 1 4 <<<

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Lamb Chop

SHOP DOGS

PERSPECTIVES

B Y M A R Y C R O S S PHOTOS BY C H E R Y L G E R B E R

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hen shoppers drop in at Rare Cuts (801 Nashville Ave., 504-267-4687; www.rarecuts.com), an 11-monthold French bulldog named Lamb Chop happily hams it up. The pint-sized bulldog is a jaunty store greeter three days a week, perking up her bat-like ears and curiously sniffing new customers. Lamb Chop’s calm nature and sweet disposition make her one of a kind, according to owner Michaela Reid. “She’s a once-in-a-blue moon type of dog,” Reid says. When she searched for a new furry family member, Reid learned French bulldogs are known for providing great companionship. She heard a litter of Frenchie puppies was available in LaPlace, traveled to see the pups and immediately fell for Lamb Chop’s sweet personality. Lamb Chop spends her days sharing toys with customers in hopes they’ll play with her. She adores playing fetch, as it often comes with the reward of veal bones — an appropriate perk for Rare Cuts’ ongoing employee of the month and My Twitter star. Opened in August 2010, Rare Cuts specializes in expertly prepared fine meats. The store’s selection includes steaks, veal chops, racks of ... lamb, pork roasts and specialty sausages, along with finishing salts and marinades. “We wanted to provide a steak that tastes as if it belongs in a five-star restaurant,” Reid says. Meeting But she also wanted customers to have the option to “eat in their pajamas and crack open a new people bottle of wine.” For people who desire a night out, the shop also offers nightly dinners in its private dining room, which accommodates up to 20 guests. Playing fetch Customers are welcome to question chef Billy LaCrosse in the kitchen and watch as their meals are prepared. The shop is known for its focus on the imporVeal bones tance of aging beef. “[Our aging process] makes fantastic meat even better,” Reid says. The store ages all cuts Sharing my toys of beef for at least 20 days. However, the beef can also go through a wet-aged process for at with customers least 28 days or a dry-aged process, which takes 45 days.

Favorite Things

Rare Cuts emphasizes the simplicity of its products, and notes that the quality stems not from what’s added to the meat but from what isn’t. The meat is free of additives, antibiotics, hormones and pesticides. Sourcing from animals fed a vegetarian diet ensures a better tasting meat, says Reid. “There’s no mystery going on,” she says. “If you’re looking for an all-beef hot dog, you can have an all-beef hot dog without the fillers.” Partnering with hand-picked suppliers from across the country, Rare Cuts sources its meat from ranches and farms that practice humane handling procedures. Customers normally seek out Rare Cuts for its quality meats, but Lamb Chop also has proved good for business. After Reid posted pictures of her pup online, customers came in to see Lamb Chop and left with quality steaks. M A RC H .2 0 1 4 <<<

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