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A GAMBIT PUBLICATION | F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4

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Valentine’s Special

Valentine’s Special

Valentine’s Special

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CONTENTS

FEBRUARY 2014

SHOPPING

New & Cool We’re owl in

What Guys Want

Stylish ways to tote your tech

CUE Kids

Sweet stuff for Valentine’s Day and beyond

FASHION

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Playing to Wynne

The story behind Kelly Wynne handbags

BEAUTY

Lusterphile

High-tech local skin care lines

HOME

Built in Style

Eco-friendly, attractive cisterns

Closet Case

Amanda LeBlanc on closet organization

Beyond the Books

How to style your bookshelves

Outdoor Organization Tackle a messy garage or shed

PERSPECTIVES

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From the Editor Clean sweep

Shop Dogs

Lucky Girl of Miss Smarty Pants

ON THE COVER: Photo by Elizabeth Dondis (www. elizabethdondis.com); dress, $65 at Pippen Lane (2930 Magazine St.; 504-269-0106; www.pippenlane. com); model Camille Beard; closet styling by Susan Boyd (www.susanboyddesign.com). F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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ON CUE MARGO DUBOS |

PUBLISHER

MISSY WILKINSON | DORA SISON |

EDITOR

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL K ANDACE P OWER GR AVE S M A N A G IN G ED I TO R

CO N T R IB U T IN G W R I T ER S

K AT E G R A C E B A U E R , NICOLE C ARROLL, LEE CUTRONE, K AT S T R O M Q U I S T IN T ER N

L AUREN HARTM AN

PRODUCTION G R A P HI C D E S I G NER S

LY N V I C K N A I R , P A I G E H I N R I C H S , JULIE T MEEK S, DAVID K ROLL, J A S O N W H I T TA K E R P R E- P R E S S CO O R D IN ATO R

K AT H R Y N B R A D Y

DISPL AY A DV ERT ISI NG S ANDY S TEIN BRONDUM A DV ER T I S IN G D IR EC TO R

483-3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com MICHELE SLONSKI

A DV ER T I S IN G A D M INI S T R ATO R 483-3140 micheles@gambitweekly.com

CHRIS TIN GREEN

A DV ER T I S IN G CO O R D IN ATO R 483-3138 christing@gambitweekly.com

ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V ES JILL GIEGER S ENI O R A CCO U N T E X EC U T I V E

483-3131 jillg@gambitweekly.com JEFFRE Y PIZ ZO 483-3145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA L ACHIN 483-3142 lindal@gambitweekly.com SHANNON HINTON KERN 483-3144 shannonk@gambitweekly.com KRIS TIN HARTENS TEIN 483-3141 kristinh@gambitweekly.com KELLIE L ANDECHE 483-3143 kelliel@gambitweekly.com

G AM B I T | 3 9 2 3 B I E N V I L L E S T R E E T | N E W O R L E AN S , L A 7 0 119 50 4.4 86. 5 90 0 | response@gambitweekly.com

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NEW + COOL

SHOPPING

Hoot life OWL ACCESSORIES ARE COMING HOME TO ROOST AT BOUTIQUES CITYWIDE.

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Owl wallet, $22 at Pop City (940 Decatur St., 504-528-8559; www. popcitynola.com). Owl pendant, $8 at Pop City.

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Owl purse, $30 at Little Miss Muffin (244 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-8336321; 766 Harrison Ave., 504-482-8200; www.shoplittlemissmuffin.com).

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Owl pillow, $79 at SOPO (629 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-6092429; www.soponola.com). Owl blankets made from recycled T-shirts, $80 at SOPO. 

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Tote your tech

W H AT G U Y S WAN T

STYLISH WAYS TO STORE & PROTECT YOUR GADGETS

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BY LAUREN HARTMAN

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The MAKR iPad Attache case brings the styling of a briefcase to the world of technology. $240 at Fraques (821 Baronne St., 504-373-6153; www.fraques.com).

FASHION

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The rugged Herringbone Osprey Active Tech Pack features a touch window so you can use your tablet without unpacking it, $118.99 at Massey’s Professional Outfitters (509 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-648-0292; 816 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, 985-8097544; 3131 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-885-1144; www.masseysoutfitters.com). Never misplace your tablet again with this brightly hued case, $20 at Branch Out (2022 Magazine St., 504-3715913; www.branchoutshop.com).

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A hand-sewn leather case by MAKR offers classy protecion for the iPhone 5, $95 at Fraques. You’d never guess this handcrafted case is made of recycled bicycle inner tubes, $30 at Branch Out.

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UNBELIEVABLE PRICES WILL MAKE YOUR DREAM A REALITY.

DESIGN GALLERY 2801 Magazine Street New Orleans, LA 70115 504-891-3005

4 Westside Shopping Center Gretna, LA 70053 504-361-0501

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HOME

BUILT IN STYLE

Rainy dayplan RAIN BARRELS OFFER ATTRACTIVE, ECO-FRIENDLY WAYS TO WATER GARDENS. B Y

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n New Orleans, it’s advisable to keep an umbrella handy. Whether it’s in the form of dreary sprinkles or a thunderstorm, rain is inevitable in this humid subtropical climate. Rain catchment systems, often called rain barrels, put the inconvenience to work. Rain barrels typically connect to the end of a gutter or downspout to capture precipitation. Gardeners and landscapers then use what’s collected as a natural water source. The barrel is a simple, ecologically friendly device that has become one of the major fundraising efforts of the Second Chance project at Community Service Center Inc., a group that helps former criminal offenders reintegrate into the community. “Fundraising had become a very difficult animal,” says program director Octavia Edinburg. “After the storm, as things got worse financially for this population, we needed to look at other venues for fundraising. This is [a] nonthreatening way that people can support us.” Edinburg was attracted by the barrels’ green properties. The water they collect nourishes gardens, and the barrels are made of recycled materials. The reinforced red plastic drums once held imported food products. “It’s actually the barrels that Italian dressings and seasonings are packaged in,” Edinburg

says. “Usually when we get them you can smell the olives, or it might be chopped vegetables.” Volunteers and program participants clean and assemble the barrels, which the group then sells for $55 each on its website (www. s145498.gridserver.com). The finished product includes a half-dollar-sized hole in the top to channel water and a screen over the hole that prevents mosquitos from colonizing. An attached faucet or spigot at the bottom lets water out or attaches to a hose to bring rainwater to indoor or outdoor crops or animals such as chickens. The Community Service Center isn’t the only group that wants to capture runoff. Local gutter care and siding company Pioneer Gutters sells and installs several varieties of rain barrels, including an oak barrel and plastic barrels in decorative styles, like faux stone. Company owner Leslie Keating says rain barrels don’t have to be placed beneath a gutter, but they should always be mounted on some sort of elevated platform. Though it won’t ever provide as much pressure as the hose systems that accompany most homes, the higher a barrel sits, the greater the water pressure it can exert. Another concern when mounting a barrel is its slope. The ground underneath a rain barrel


BUILT IN STYLE should be level; when the company installs a rain barrel, it often sets down a concrete pad for stability. “These things have a lot of water in them; they’re extremely heavy. ... If it’s not heavy, [children or pets] could pull it down on top of themselves,” Keating says. “You want to make sure it’s good and sturdy and level for safety issues.” Keating likes rain barrels because the water they collect has properties that city water lacks. Indoor plants especially can benefit from rainwater. “The city includes all kinds of purification and chlorine in the water and takes out a lot of the minerals, and that’s what your plants thrive on,” Keating says. “Rainwater [is] a good substitute for Miracle-Gro.” To keep a rain barrel shipshape, store wood and thinner plastic barrels during the winter season, as rapid changes in temperature can crack the vessels. This maintenance period is a good time for cleaning. Though you shouldn’t need to use soap or a scrub brush, a rinse with a bit of pressure helps prevent algae and bacteria from building up inside the barrel. A monthly layer of Armor All on the exterior of a plastic barrel protects it from damaging UV rays. For rain barrels attached to a downspout, an additional filter inside the gutter cuts down on debris. Keating notes that in this area, barrels fill up quickly, so stagnant water isn’t much of a

HOME

concern but adds that it’s important to keep the screen of the barrel clean to prevent debris from falling in. Rain barrels can become a decorative element in a yard without much landscaping. Some homeowners are drawn to the look of classic oak barrels, while others prefer models that are sold with detachable planters for flowers. In these cases, the rain barrel becomes a pedestal for a flower box. “[Planters] are kind of like putting shutters on your house; it dresses things up a bit,” Keating says. The Second Chance project takes the decorative concept a step further. In the past, it has invited local artists to paint barrels to be raffled off as a benefit for the group. A prized neon-decorated rain barrel sits in the company’s office. Other barrel owners decorate their rain catchment systems with whimsical designs, though Edinburg says people should consider placement in a covered area to preserve any serious artistic efforts. “For people who have sun porches and patios that get some level of protection, it makes a wonderful conversation piece,” Edinburg says. “[Otherwise] it’s hassle-free, it can be really cute. … We had kids who painted shoes on them and fleurs-de-lis, just for the fun of it.” Barrels can be painted to serve as backyard accent pieces.

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Out with the old–

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ORGANIZED

Amanda LeBlanc on how to organize your closet.

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any people find organizing a closet stressful, but it doesn’t have to be that way. What you may not realize is that the end result — an efficient place for storing, viewing and selecting things used on a daily basis — actually helps reduce stress. That in turn can have major, long-term, even life-changing benefits. “Every day, we get dressed to go out and face the world and everyone wants to put their best foot forward,” says professional organizer Amanda LeBlanc. “That starts in your closet when you’re getting dressed. When your closet looks like a boutique and you can see everything, it feels good and that correlates into a positive attitude. It provides confidence and a sense of peace and that can change a person’s direction.”

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LeBlanc started her organizing business, The Amandas, with a partner, also named Amanda, a decade ago in New Orleans. The business still operates under the name, but today, LeBlanc is the sole owner. She splits her time between New Orleans and Birmingham, Ala., the home of her first storefront. Last November, she opened a store in Old Metairie (517 Metairie Road, 504-833-5400; www.theamandas.com). “I wanted a small location with a professional organizer on staff and I wanted to fill it with all the products I had seen work in people’s homes,” says LeBlanc, who starred in her own reality series, The Amandas, on Style Network in 2012. Undaunted by closets, kitchens, offices, garages and even attics during the peak of summer, LeB-

C U T R O N E lanc and her staff organize on-site. They also help do-it-yourself clients set up a personalized closet system using products from her store. Whether reworking the system you have or installing a new one, LeBlanc offers advice to anyone ready to create a beautiful, functional closet.

Visualize

LeBlanc suggests standing in the doorway of your closet, eyes closed, and imagining how you want the space to look. She emphasizes the importance of assessing how each individual uses his or her closet. “An organizational system has to be based around a person’s habits,” she says. According to LeBlanc, there are two main


FEATURE

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When your closet looks like a boutique and you can see everything, it feels good and that correlates into a positive attitude. -A M A N D A

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profiles that describe her clients: the “organized-in” person, who wants the look to be clean, sleek and minimalist, with everything tucked away out of sight; and the “organized-out” person, who is often visual and creative and likes to have things displayed in the open or in see-through containers. Figuring which profile best fits you is a great way to start. Then determine what you need, such as shelves and drawers, or if you travel and pack often, perhaps a valet rod.

Take An Inventory, Purge And Measure

LeBlanc advises evaluating your closet twice a year with the change of seasons: spring/summer and fall/winter. January is also a good time because it represents a fresh start. To avoid being overwhelmed, she advises her clients to break a closet organizing job into small, realistic tasks. Instead of overhauling the closet in one weekend, purge things that are no longer wanted or needed the first weekend and hang everything up, for example. The next weekend, group and categorize things by color and type and so on. “Each step builds confidence for the next,” she says. Once you’ve edited your closet (donate items that are in good shape and throw out badly worn ones), you can count items and calculate how much space each requires. Two hundred shirts, for example, occupy about 200 inches. If working with an off-site professional organizer like those at LeBlanc’s store (an expert consultation is free), pictures and dimensions of your closet are necessary for devising a tailor-made plan.

Put A System In Place

“I’m a realist, I know not everyone can have us in their homes,” LeBlanc says. However, professional organizers like LeBlanc and her staff can design closet systems without visiting clients’ homes. Currently, her favorite products include freedomRail, a customizable system of closet organizing components, acrylic shelf dividers and a collection of slim but sturdy wooden hangers carried in her store. If you can’t afford wooden hangers, she suggests using one type of hanger throughout your closet. It looks clean; your clothes will hang in a more orderly fashion, and using the same kind of hanger takes up less space.

Put Your Body In Motion

LeBlanc counsels procrastinators to start the process — however small the first chore. “We procrastinate not only what we don’t want to do but what we think we can’t do,” she says. “You just have to put your body in motion to do it.” (FACING PAGE, LEFT) An attractive case keeps a shoe collection organized and easily accessible. (FACING PAGE, RIGHT) Amanda LeBlanc starred in The Amandas, a reality show about her organizing business on Style Network. (TOP RIGHT) An organized closet lets you start the day with a sense of calm. (BOTTOM RIGHT) LeBlanc advises organizing by color and using the same type of hanger throughout a closet. F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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HOME

FEATURE

Shelf expression Melanie Fischmann and Nora Kuhlmann-Lasky on styling bookshelves with flair B Y L EE C U T R O N E P H O T O S B Y C H ER Y L

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ookshelves can speak volumes — and not just because of the tomes they contain. Accessorized with art, mementos, photographs and other favorite belongings, bookshelves can reveal a lot about their owners. “Built-in bookshelves can look very generic, so you have to make them look like your own,” says Nora Kuhlmann-Lasky, who co-owns Caravan Finds (2011 Magazine St., 504-407-0499; www.facebook.com/caravanfinds), a Magazine Street shop for vintage furnishings and decorative objects, with Melanie Fischmann. Kuhlmann-Lasky and Fischmann offer the following tips for styling bookshelves.

Start with the shelves

When arranging bookshelves, Kuhlmann-Lasky and Fischmann begin by removing everything, cleaning the shelves, moving or adjusting the height of shelves if necessary and sorting through existing books. (The latest paperback murder mystery may not be the most visually arresting volume.) Sometimes they accentuate shelves by painting or wallpapering the wall behind them. A trendy color or wallpaper pattern can make shelves a focal point. Installing lighting (recessed lights or overhead spots, for example) and changing hardware also can improve the design of built-in shelves.

Use a unique piece of furniture as a bookshelf

If you don’t have built-in bookshelves, Kuhlmann-Lasky and Fischmann recommend transforming a piece of furniture. For example, the partners recently renewed a Hollywood Regency pagoda they found at an auction. They raised its height and added sophistication with a black-lacquer finish.

Accessorize

Next, collect an interesting mix of objects to display with books. “We like to use a client’s collected items,” Fischmann says. “We go around the house pulling things. When we display an item on the bookshelves, it becomes more of an art object.” By perusing their client’s home for things to display, Kuhlmann-Lasky and Fischmann gain a clear idea of what the client likes. “The goal is to create a beautiful visual display that speaks personally to the client,” Kuhlmann-Lasky

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says. The process also helps the client see what sorts of new purchases would be complementary from a design perspective.

Make groupings

Grouping similar items and colors gives objects greater impact. A collection of vintage cigar boxes, pottery or seashells makes a stronger statement when viewed all together than scattered through the house. “One family collects bottles of sand from beaches they visit,” Kuhlmann-Lasky says. “We found different ways of elevating the bottles on Lucite stands and added more beach-like items.”

Nora Kuhlmann-Lasky and Melanie Fischmann found this pagodastyle bookshelf at an auction and updated it with a coat of black lacquer.


Incorporate art A work of art that has been overlooked in an outof-the way place gains new significance exhibited on a bookshelf. Paintings and photographs can be hung on the vertical face or back wall of a bookshelf or placed on top of a stack of books. “When you display something in a creative way, it all of a sudden becomes important,” Fischmann says. Art also brings attention to books that people gather and treasure.

Include organic things

Driftwood, antlers, rocks or a real tortoise shell are nature’s own works of art. They are beautiful, sculptural, tactile and timeless. They also add a customized quality to bookshelves. “You want to have moveable, touchable objects that draw people’s interest and that they can look at,” Kuhlmann-Lasky says.

Illuminate

Kuhlmann-Lasky and Fischmann like to include lamps in their arrangements or highlight items with library or art lighting. “It’s important to light the shelving as if you were lighting a piece of art,” Fischmann says. “The soft glow of a lamp in the bookshelves at night creates a completely different ambience compared to the day,” Kuhlmann-Lasky says.

Create symmetry

If shelves are double-sided (flanking an architectural feature such as a fireplace, for example), arrange books and decorative wares with an eye toward sym-

Consider symmetry and a variety of art objects when styling shelves.

metry and balance. If you use the top two shelves for books on one side, do the same on the other. Books don’t have to be displayed upright; they can be stacked or even placed on an easel. Likewise, you may want to divide things so you have similarly sized items and colors on both sides. Order, context and balance will make bookshelves look cohesive, collected and curated. F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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FEATURE

HOME

ORGANIZING the great outdoors Tips for tackling a messy garage or shed B Y

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eeping an organized, uncluttered home can be difficult. Maintaining a yard and garage can prove even more challenging. Luckily, there are tools and experts who can lend a helping hand. According to Virginia Barkley (www.virginiabarkley.com), professional organizer and author of Clutter Busting For Busy Women, focus is the key. Without focusing on the end result, it’s easy to feel defeated before you start. “Find a picture of an organized garage or shed, cut it out and start looking at it to shift your mindset from focusing on the current chaos to thirsting for the calm feelings that your newly clutter-free environment will give you,” Barkley says. “We have to know where we’re going in order to get motivated to begin any project.” One way to liven up the chore is to involve friends, roommates or family members who are enthusiastic about organizing and group projects. Their enthusiasm can help you loosen up and enjoy the process. To begin, make specific categories for grouping possessions. Magazines, websites and even Pinterest boards can serve as organizational inspiration. Then discard items you don’t want or need. “This gives you an opportunity to get comfortable with the idea of moving things around without taxing your brain too much,” Barkley says. “Think of yourself during this phase as an archaeologist in search of treasures and get rid of anything that doesn’t resonate with you.” Once you begin to toss items that no longer are used, you probably will find that a lot of space begins to open up. Some items are out of date or unusable. For instance, paint for touch-ups after a renovation is often tossed in the corner of the garage and forgotten (cans of paint require proper disposal). “Liquid paint should never be thrown into the trash, not to mention never poured down storm sewers,” says Phyllis Jordan, executive director of The Green Project (2831 Marais St., 504-945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org). “If the paint has truly dried out in the can and is now a solid, that can be tossed in your trash can.” After deciding what to toss and what to keep, it’s time to figure out which items will be used

most and least. Keep frequently used objects in a place that’s easy to access. “If items are not placed by categories and assigned specific locations, then it’s challenging at best to keep an area organized,” Barkley says. “Being disorganized wastes time and energy in so many ways, least of which is wasting years worrying over what’s beneath the clutter, and allowing the stagnant mess to chip away at our confidence that we’ll ever be able to tackle it.” Sometimes the organizing process can unearth the remnants of unfinished projects, whether they be a stack of lumber purchased years ago to build a shed or elements of light fixtures gathering dust in your storage shed. The process of getting organized can serve as a reminder of tasks that require completion … or an opportunity to scrap them and move on. Jordan recommends recycling or repurposing materials left over from renovations. These materials can get new life when they serve as organizing tools. For example, bikes can be corralled with a rack made of old iron work. “We get a lot of the iron work from houses, burglar bars and stair railings,” Jordan says. “We have used that material to make our own bike rack [at The Green Project]. I have edged flower beds at my house with ceramic tiles and that works really well.” For yard organization, Demetria Christo, owner of EcoUrban (4433 Ulloa St., 504-322-7025; ecourbanllc.com) recommends building a deck. The space underneath can be used to store hoses, toys and other necessities that aren’t visually appealing. “Replace static fascia [board] with aesthetic utility doors for under-deck storage,” Christo says. “Beyond uniting your indoor and outdoor living spaces, your deck offers a wealth of outdoor storage space.”

Keep frequently used tools in an easy to access place, and toss out anything you don’t need.

Barkley says everybody’s process for getting organized is different. What works for one person won’t necessarily work for another. The important thing is to get started. “(Albert) Einstein said, ‘Nothing happens until something moves,’ so take advantage of January being organizing month, clean out the garage and then celebrate for the rest of the year,” Barkley says. F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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If Ever I Cease to Love Handcrafted in America 3801 Magazine Street • 504.891.2005 • Lakeside Mall • 504.835.2244 • Canal Place • 504.524.2973 800.375.7557 • www.mignonfaget.com

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FEATURE

Playing toWynne FASHION

How the designer behind Kelly Wynne handbags plotted her course for success.

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hile a career in fashion is a glamorous but nebulous goal for many young women, Kelly White approached her dream with laser-like focus. She knew she wanted to create one must-have fashion accessory: handbags. “You know those dreams people have growing up that seem really unobtainable and are most likely just a dream? This was mine,” White says. “I love all accessories because it’s the best way to jazz up an outfit. I began researching, sketching and meeting with various professionals in the fashion industry during my college years.” After graduating from the University of Mississippi, White moved to Dallas, where she worked for a boutique. While there, she got a better understanding of the industry and took courses in sewing and business planning. She knew a unique, trendy look would give her the upper hand in a fiercely competitive industry, but keeping the audience’s attention would prove to be the real trick of the trade. White took a cautious approach in building her handbag line. One of her most pressing concerns was finding a seamstress who could keep pace if and when the business expanded. This proved to be challenging. “I met with a friend of a friend who used to design handbags,” White says. “She pointed me in the direction of the lady who ... hand-makes her clutches. When I met with this seamstress, I was very excited, but she couldn’t really produce what I had envisioned for my line. I needed more experienced artisans. … I met with a few other seamstresses in Dallas and Austin (Texas), but kept striking out. That’s when I decided to go to New York.” White found a U.S. company that specializes in handbags. After establishing a relationship with skilled craftspeople, White felt optimistic about her business plans. “I wanted to start a handbag line with a mid-range price point inspired by the stingray look,” White says. “I love stingray, but it can be pricey. I started developing unique printed leathers that mimic exotics in a luxe and eye-catching way.” There were two printed styles in White’s first two collections: the Lizard, which consists of repeating dots, and the Serpentine, a splattered look on printed suede. Both remain in her collections. A former graphic designer, White did not take her company’s logo lightly. “I wanted a subtle logo, which I feel like I accomplished because I have many people asking me what the logo means,” she says. She named her brand Kelly Wynne (www.kellywynne.com) as an homage to her grandmother. “Wynne is my middle name, my grandmother’s maiden name, and I wanted to incorporate her into my work,” White says. After she established her brand’s logo and name, White made her debut in April 2013 at a boutique in Austin, her The Paint the Town bag, $445, is a stylish take on a tote and features a stingray-inspired pattern.

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hometown. Her handbags sold out in three hours. “I was blown away by how many people came to the party and purchased bags,” White says. Kelly Wynne handbags were introduced in New Orleans in October 2013 at a trunk show at Hattie Sparks Boutique. “The reception was great,” says boutique owner Hattie Collins Moll. “People were buying multiple bags. I have a couple bags — I carry my big tote every day. They look amazing, and the construction is incredible.” White also grows her business through social networking. “I have new followers on Instagram (@shopkellywynne) every day,” she says. “It’s so much fun to see who is buying my bags and where they live.” From Texas to New York, White has won over audiences nationwide. Her most popular designs include the leopard print, black and camel “Pop the Champagne” shoulder bag and the gold platinum serpentine “Mingle Mingle Mini” clutch, but White has found her design options are limitless. “I definitely have a great team working to make these bags beautiful for all the fabulous women that want to carry a Kelly Wynne,” White says. Kelly Wynne handbags are available at www.kellywynne. com or in Baton Rouge at Head over Heels (7580 Corporate Blvd., Baton Rouge, 225-216-2002; www.headoverheelsonline.com). (RIGHT) The Pop the Champagne shoulder bag, $405 -$445, has a magnetic clasp and slip pocket on the back. (BELOW) The Mingle Mingle Mini, $310-$350, features a gold chain, printed suede and bright color.

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Stylish

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Sweethearts

SHOPPING

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GIFTS AND GOODIES TO LET KIDS KNOW YOU THEM — ON VALENTINE’S DAY AND BEYOND.

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A plush, heart-covered hedgehog makes a snuggly Valentine’s Day gift, $12.99 at Magic Box Toys (5508 Magazine St., 504899-0117; www.magicboxneworleans.com).

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Inspired by embroidered Mexican peasant blouses, this dress has just the right amount of hearts, $84 at Angelique Baby (5519 Magazine St., 504-899-8992; www.facebook.com/angeliquebaby).

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Terry cloth sandals are great to wear around the house, $12.99 at Le Jouet (1700 Airline Drive, Metairie, 504-837-0533; www.lejouet.com).

3

Send her off with love carrying a heart-patterned weekender bag, $45 at B. Kids (115 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-301-2954). Zig and zag through the maze of love in a pink dual deck tricycle, $94 at Le Jouet. Style and fun are perfectly paired in a cashmere sweater, $118 at Pippen Lane (2930 Magazine St., 504-269-0106; www.pippenlane.com).

6 5

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BEAUTY

LUSTERPHILE

Complexion connections

DermAware

Biochemist Gul Zone of St. Rose uses purified Abita Springs water in her cleansers, says Nicole Miler, product specialist at Earthsavers. The products also contain botanicals used for their aromas and healing properties. “The Deep & Clear cleanser has balancing and healing botanicals: arnica and tea tree oil,” Miler says. “It’s green because of chlorophyll.”

HIGH-TECH SKIN CARE LINES BY LOCAL DERMATOLOGISTS AND CHEMISTS. BY MISSY WILKINSON

LEFT TO RIGHT: Vital Retinol Gel also contains anti-aging peptides, starting at $44.95 at Earthsavers (Lakeside Shopping Center Annex, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-835-0225; The Premier Centre, 3414 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-674-1133; 5501 Magazine St., 504-899-8555; www.earthsaversonline.com). Deep & Clear Cleanser has salicylic acid to clear pores, $35.95 at Earthsavers. Wrinkle Free Cleanser is 15 percent glycolic acid. Miler recommends letting the cleanser sink into skin for a few minutes before rinsing. $35.95 at Earthsavers. Vital B hydrogel plumps fine lines with hyaluronic acid, a hydrating agent produced by skin which declines with age, $60.95 at Earthsavers

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Dr. Mary Lupo Skin Care System

Dermatologist Dr. Mary Lupo developed her skin care line 20 years ago because she wanted control over the ingredients. “It was about being more actively involved in the products (my patients) were using and making sure they chose things that wouldn’t cause a problem with things I was prescribing,” Lupo says.

Creating a positive awareness of literacy TURNTHEPAGE

LEFT TO RIGHT: Dualistic sunscreen antioxidant features broad-spectrum UVA and UVB protection, $38.15 at Lupo Center for Aesthetic and General Dermatology (145 Robert E. Lee Blvd., Suite 302, 504-777-3047; www.drmarylupo.com).

LetsTurnthePage.com

Intensive target moisturizer has essential fatty acids to nourish skin cells, $51.23 at Lupo Center. Vivifying vitamin C serum has a non-acidic formula that’s ideal for sensitive skin, $49.05 at Lupo Center. Gentle purifying cleanser is a one-step face wash that doesn’t require a toner, $30.52 at Lupo Center.

Green Cream and Unagel

Developed by Metairie dermatologist Dr. Nia Terezaki and now produced and distributed by Advanced Skin Technology, Green Cream has achieved cult status in the beauty world for its high-potency retinols and tiered strengths, which range from .3 to .9 percent retinol. LEFT TO RIGHT: Green Cream, $36.95 and up at Aesthetic Dermatology For Louisiana (3800 Houma Blvd. Suite 310, Metairie, 504-454-2997; www. niaterezakismd.com) and Earthsavers. Unagel by Green Cream is a 2 percent salicyclic acid acne treatment. Because the cream is a neutral pH, it doesn’t irritate skin, $35.95 at Earthsavers. F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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SHOP DOGS

Lucky Girl

I

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY NICOLE CARROLL

n Miss Smarty Pants’ (5523 Magazine St., 504-891-6141; www.facebook.com/misssmartypantsNOLA) bright Magazine Street storefront, a spunky Silky terrier sunbathes and watches passersby. “A lot of people go, ‘Oh my gosh, she’s real!’” owner Laura Hand says of her pooch, Lucky Girl. “[They think she’s] a little stuffed animal, and then she moves.” Hand got Lucky Girl six years ago after falling in love with a Yorkshire terrier her friend found on the street. Hand wanted to adopt the stray, but the friend decided to keep the dog for himself. “So I was like, ‘Fine I’ll just get my own then,’” Hand says. While researching Yorkshire terriers, she came across Silky terriers, which are said to be better with young children, as well as less skittish and yappy. She acquired Lucky Girl from a family in Slidell. Hand’s son, who was 6 years old at the time, gave Lucky Girl her name. “It wasn’t the name I had been thinking of giving her,” Hand says, “but how do you deny a sweet child naming his first puppy?”

Hand initially was reluctant to bring Lucky Girl to the shop, because the dog barks at guests in her home. But Lucky Girl surprised Hand by behaving on the job. “She did beautifully,” Hand says. “She somehow knew she had to put her manners on here at the shop.” Lucky Girl has worked at Miss Smarty Pants for about a year and loves attention from customers. “She thinks they all come to see her,” Hand says. “All you have to do is talk to her and her little tail wags.” Lucky Girl enjoys playing with her favorite toy, a leopard-print bone, and getting belly rubs. Lucky Girl also keeps men company in the “boyfriend chair,” a leather club chair where men relax while their female companions shop. Miss Smarty Pants has been open for nine years. Originally a housewares store called Importicos, it was one of three locations owned by Hand’s sister. After teaching special education for six years, Hand was looking for a career change, so she purchased this location from her sister. It became Miss Smarty Pants in 2005. Occasionally, the boutique gets celebrity guests. Most recently, stars of the series American Horror Story: Coven, which has been filming in the area, visited the shop. “Of course, we try to pretend like we don’t know who they are and respect their privacy,” Hand says. “But secretly we’re excited that they stopped in.” The shop specializes in fashion accessories for women such as jewelry, scarves and handbags, but also offers home items like candles, glasses and cocktail napkins, among other things. “It’s a great place to get gifts for a girlfriend, your mom, a little pick-me-up for yourself,” Hand says. “And it’s all very reasonably priced.” After observing her pup’s charmed life and happy times spent in the boutique, Hand has come to believe Lucky Girl is an appropriate name after all. “She is indeed a lucky dog, who’s been dealt a lucky hand,” she says. “But really, I’m the lucky one to have her. She is just a little love!”

PERSPECTIVES

My

Favorite

Things ... My leopardprint bone

Sunning in the window

Belly rubs

My lucky New Orleans Saints T-shirt

F E B R U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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CUE: Feb. 2014  

Owl accessories, tech totes for men, organizing closets and bookshelves and more

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