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A GAMBIT PUBLICATION | F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 2

HOME FASHION BEAUTY


TWO GREAT STORES, ONE GREAT LOCATION

Celebrate in Style! GIFTS JEWELRY HOME DECOR Mon - Sat 10-5:30 504-891-6141

Activewear that goes anywhere

New Year

New You! 504-899-2212

5523 MAGAZINE

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CUE 03


The Perfect Mardi Gras Fit THIERRY RABOTIN � ARAVON � MBT � MUNRO � LA PLUME � THINK � FINN COMFORT � DREW SANITA CLOGS � TAOS � KORK EASE � EARTHIES � ORTHAHEEL � HELLE � AEROSOLES

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Comfort Couture • Nutritive Footwear PERSONAL SHOE FITTING - CUSTOM ORTHOTIC FABRICATION/FITTING

Perfect Fit Shoes Unique to New Orleans

Shoe Brands known on East & West Coasts now available in NOLA

Gini Davis, Physical Therapist, Foot/Ankle Specialist - Crescent City Physical Therapy Presenting an outstanding collection of stylish, comfortable shoes for any season (or reason)!

5525 MAGAZINE STREET ( B E T W E E N S P R I N G A N D P R I O R I T I E S • C A D DY C O R N E R F R O M W H O L E F O O D S )

OPEN MON–FRI, 10 AM –6 PM • SAT, 10 AM –5 PM | 504.456.5993 W W W. PE R F EC TF IT S H O E S . N E T 04 CUE

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CUE

16 25 30 12

CONTENTS

FASHION

WHAT GUYS WANT

33

CUE TIPS

09 19 34 39

PERSPECTIVES

37

BEAUTY

Wardrobe consulting and downtown fashion

Rugged, fur-trimmed accessories

ANTIQUES AND OLD LACE Vintage-inspired lingerie

CUE KIDS Mardi Gras play clothes for little princes and princesses

HOME

BUILT IN STYLE Enhance your walls with bamboo tiles.

SHOPPING

11

FEBRUARY 2012

NEW&COOL Winter brights for chilly nights

FROM THE EDITOR Time to ponder

CUE IN Coyote Ugly founder Lil Lovell’s urban-luxe style

THE LOGIC OF BEAUTY Why do beautiful things recharge us?

SHOP DOGS Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald’s happy pack

YOU & IMPROVED A new ultrasound treatment for aging skin

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CUE 05


MARDI GRAS GLOW ON & OF F-SITE AIRBRUSH FANTA S Y TA N + CARNIVAL MA KE- UP {BY APPOINTMENT}

LADIES CLOTHING ACCESSORIES COSMETICS EVENT MAKE-UP

A BEAUTY BOUTIQUE 6250 GENERAL DIAZ • LAKEVIEW • 304-0633 • WWW.FINIBOUTIQUE.COM

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DOMINIQUE

GIOR DA NO

JEWELRY DESIGN

New Mavi denim will be rolling in all Spring and Summer in a rainbow of colors! We are so excited! Red, white, yellow, green, and of course...Blue.

Hardtail for the masses! We adore this brand and we know you do too! We just got this beautiful maxi dress in an ombre tie dye. There are plenty of other delectable dresses and basics for you to swoon over! See you soon!

CLOTHING JEWELRY ACCESSORIES GIFTS 622 S. CARROLLTON 路 NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118 504.301.9410 路 MON-SAT 10AM-6PM 路 SUN 10AM-3PM

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m i S SY W i L K i N S o N |

RELAX. RENEW. RECONNECT.

HAIR SALON Even though we’re approaching the time when most people either discard their resolutions or see them harden into habit, I think I’m going to pick up a new one. It’s not too late. There’s still time to slow down time.

NAIL SPA MASSAGE FACIALS facial

mArGo dUBoS | editor

MASSAGE

N

oN CUE

GET A

I

LO EN YS SA P A IR O ND A H OW O NNM O

was talking to an acquaintance this morning, and he shared his New Year’s resolution. It was one I hadn’t heard before. “This year, I resolved to slow down time,” he said. People are always talking about time moving too fast, he explained. It does seem that every passing year barrels down the steep slope of the changing seasons faster than the one before. At work, I live in a perpetual future. I could tell you the publication date for this issue of CUE without a moment’s hesitation, but it would take a few seconds and maybe a glance at the calendar to figure out today’s date. Most people experience this phenomenon to varying degrees, and I’d wager that our forwardthinking habit contributes to the momentum with which the days, weeks and years hurtle by. But if my friend is right, we have more control over time than we think. Slowing down time might seem like an insurmountable, Jay Gatsby-esque endeavor (“Can’t repeat the past? Why, of course you can!”), but my friend claims it can be done. He quiets his mind with mantras. He pays attention to new things he spots during his early-morning commute to his office in Chalmette. “We’re only 12 days into January,” he said. “But I have lived those 12 days.”

PHoTo BY QuE DuoNG AND THE MAkEuP L AB ArTISTrY

from the editor

dorA SiSoN |

editorial

K A N dAc e p o W e r G r Av eS

WAXING

massage

p u bl i s h e r

YOGA GEL MANICURES

KERATIN TREATMENTS

production director

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GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

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con t r i bu t i n g w r i t e rs

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ac c o u n t e x e c u t i v e s intern

m eGA N B r A d e N - p e r rY production g r a ph i c d e s i g n e rs

S h e r i e d e L Ac r o i x-A L fA r o , L i N d S AY W e i S S , LY N B r A N t L e Y, Britt BeNoit, mArK WAGUeSpAcK pr e- pr e ss coor d i n ato r

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GA MB IT | 392 3 Bi eN v i LL e Stree t | N e W o r L e A N S , L A 7 0 1 1 9 504. 4 8 6.5900 | response@gambitweekly.com

GoT An IdeA for cue ? Email Us: cue@gambitweekly.com

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HOME OF THE

MINUTE WORKOUT

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CUE 09


®

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WINTER

NEW + COOL

BRIGHTS

SHOPPING

BY MEGAN BR ADEN-PERRY AND MISSY WILKINSON

Keep the February doldrums at bay with all things bright and beautiful

MULTICOLORED NECKLACE, $45 AT FIFI MAHONY’S.

MINERAL EYESHADOW BY KILLER COSMETICS, $30 AT FIFI MAHONY’S (934 ROYAL ST., 525-4343; WWW.FIFIMAHONYS.COM).

PEEP-TOE HEELS BY POETIC LICENSE, $109.99 AT FEET FIRST (526 ROYAL ST., 5690005; 4119 MAGAZINE ST., 899-6800; WWW.FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM).

HOBNAIL PITCHER, $78 AT ANTHROPOLOGIE (THE SHOPS AT CANAL PLACE, 333 CANAL ST., 592-9972; WWW.ANTHROPOLOGIE.COM).

MURANO-STYLE CHANDELIER, $1,950 AT PERCH. (2844 MAGAZINE ST., 899-2122; WWW.PERCH-HOME.COM).

AVEDA HAIR COLOR SERVICES, $55 AND UP AT PARIS PARKER SALONS (CITYWIDE; WWW.PARISPARKER.COM). PHOTO COURTESY OF AVEDA.

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11


HomE

BUILT IN STYLE

NATURAL

HABITATS Organic wall and flOOr cOverings are an ecO-friendly way tO freshen up hOme decOr B y A l e x P e nc e ith the new year upon us, it’s a great time to invest in statement pieces that have a subtle yet transformative effect on the home. Organic, environmentally friendly wall and floor coverings made from materials like cork, bamboo and grasscloth offer several options for breathing new life into rooms in need of a pick-me-up. Not only are they free of chemicals or dyes, they possess an unconventional, compelling texture that amplifies a space’s visual appeal. “Textural surfaces provide a lot of options,” says Nomita Joshi-Gupta, co-owner of Spruce Eco-Studio (2043 Magazine St., 265-0946; www.sprucenola. com). “You can paint them to match your decor or leave them as is. You can also make a statement with a few well-placed tiles or create a striking surface for an entire wall.” Spruce offers a variety of organic wall adornments ranging from European-inspired, hand-blocked wallpa-

W

per colored with vegetable dyes to paintable plasters. Three-dimensional Inhabit bamboo wall flats (22.5-inch decorative tiles) are a popular way to spice up walls. “Bamboo is one of the world’s most sustainable resources, and each tile is 100 percent biodegradable,” Joshi-Gupta says. Spruce also stocks mother-of-pearl laminate ($70 per square foot), which lends an instant sheen of glamour to any room. Joshi-Gupta says a major benefit of wall coverings is their flexibility and versatility. “(Organic wallpapers) are multipurpose and can be used to design things like custom drapes or shades, or even to re-cover pieces of furniture.” Organic materials also offer health benefits. “Renewable resources and products … do not emit volatile organic compounds, typically known as VOCs,” says Michael Ward, owner of New Orleans Bamboo (6065 Magazine St., 897-5001; www.nolabamboo.com). “Chemicals like these, such as formaldehyde, are

“ You can make a statement with a few wellplaced tiles or create a striking surface for an entire wall. ” ThREE-dIMENSIONal INhaBIT BaMBOO Wall flaTS, WhICh aRE 22.5-INCh dECORaTIVE TIlES ThaT COME 10 TO a BOx ($95), hElp SpICE up Wall SpaCE.

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BUILT IN STYLE often found in lesser-grade adhesives.” Joshi-Gupta agrees, saying that good indoor air quality can lead to a decrease in allergies and breathing problems, as well as better overall health. To avoid these harmful byproducts, Ward suggests that homeowners use natural, reusable products and check the ingredients. Ward opened New Orleans Bamboo in 2007 after traveling extensively through Japan. “I was blown away by the vast array of uses the Japanese have found for renewable resources, and I felt compelled to provide customers with long-lasting, quality products that cut down on unnecessary destruction of forestry,” Ward says. New Orleans Bamboo specializes in green building materials, including 100 percent wool carpets, recycled rubber flooring, cork flooring and wall tile, bamboo plywood and wall coverings ($4 per square inch), and wallpaper made from banana leaves. Ward manufactures a decorative wall covering called Kirei, which is made from sorghum stock and means “beautiful” in Japanese. New Orleans Bamboo also distributes American Clay, a mud from New Mexico that contains its own natural glue and resembles marble glass. “It’s like Venetian plaster at a fourth of the price,” says Ward, who adds that American Clay helps dehumidify a room by absorbing moisture. Both Spruce Eco-Studio and New Orleans Bamboo can recommend contractors and installation specialists, and Joshi-Gupta advises not to treat new wall covering or flooring as a DIY project. “Wall and floor coverings are an investment and a major design statement, one that we feel is best left to professionals to ensure the best quality,” she says. “If you ... do it yourself, it would be wise to schedule a consultation with an expert beforehand.”

HOME

PrINTED WITh VEGETABlE DYES AND NONTOxIC INKS, ThIS WAllPAPEr IS hANDMADE IN INDIA.

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STA RTS JA NUA RY 1 7

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vintage-inspired women's clothing & accessories for work, play, night, day sizes XS–2X

OPEN SEVEN DAYS 11AM-7PM 6010 Magazine Street (near State Street) New Orleans (504) 891-GIRL (4475)

agirlisagun.com

GET READY FOR

VALENTINE’S DAY T I N Y H E A R T N E C K L AC E by boe

A tiny heart is set on a vintage tablet, making for a fun & playful modern piece. $ 40

8110 HAMPSON STREET

at Le Visage

IN THE RIVERBEND

504.265.8018 MO N - SAT O PE N E A RLY - O P EN LAT E B Y A P P O I N T M E N T & WA L K I N S

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

F AC I A L S | M A S S AG E S | M I C R O D E R M A B R A S I O N |

B O DY T R E AT M E N T S | WA X I N G

M A N I C U R E S | P E D I C U R E S | M A K E - U P | M A K E - U P A P P L I C AT I O N & L E S S O N S T H R E A D I N G | O R G A N I C S P R AY TA N N I N G | L A S H T I N T I N G f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

CUE 15


FA S H I O N

W H AT G U Y S W A N T

JUST

FUR HIM

BY M O RG A N R I B ER A

FUZZY, COZY ACCESSORIES GUYS CRAVE UGG AUSTRALIAN COALSON BOOT, $217 AT MASSEY’S PROFESSIONAL OUTFITTERS (509 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 648-0292; 816 HWY. 190, COVINGTON, 985-809-7544; 3363 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 8851144; WWW.MASSEYS.NET).

VINTAGE CORDUROY VEST, $25 AT TRUCK STOP CLOTHING (2209 MAGAZINE ST., 302-1895).

VINTAGE COAT, $45 AT TRUCK STOP CLOTHING.

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BADGER SHAVING BRUSH, $90 AT AIDAN GILL FOR MEN (550 FULTON ST., 566-4903; 2026 MAGAZINE ST., 5879090; WWW.AIDANGILLFORMEN.COM).


W H AT G U Y S W A N T

FA S H I O N

SOREL CARIBOU BOOT, $127 AT MASSEY’S PROFESSIONAL OUTFITTERS.

GRAY FAUX SHEARLING-LINED HOODIE, $100 AT VERNON (2049 MAGAZINE ST., 3095929; WWW.VERNONCLOTHING.COM).

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CUE 17


It’s Carnival Time!

1915 Hickory Ave ( just minutes off of Earhart in River Ridge)

(504) 324-2454 • www.facebook.com/hickor ychicksboutique

swap boutique has every designer label you can think of, in one little shop. including: Gucci, Cynthia Steffe, Theory, Rebecca Taylor, Marc Jacobs, Chloe. Great deals. Every day.

swap for kids is a consignment bou tique for fine chil dren dren’s apparel. including: Orient Expressed, Burb erry, erry Oilily, True Religion, Feltman Bros, Olive Juice. Always a sale. Every day.

designer children’s Mardi Gras It's

time...

clothes • bags • accessories

accessories • maternity • ages 0-12

consignment

consignment

visit us to shop or consign

visit us to shop or consign

7716 maple street

7722 maple street

swapboutique.com

swapforkids.com

Great Selection of Formal Gowns. Shop or Consign. 18 CUE

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504.304.6025

504.218.5996


Coyote ChiC Coyote Ugly FoUnder lil lovell Works A look thAt’s rooted in the roCk ’n’ roll AesthetiC oF her World-FAmoUs BArs By Lee Cutrone

|

Photos By theresA CAssAGne PAGe 20

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CUE 19


page 19

n summer 2010, a coyote made news when it migrated Uptown near Audubon Park. But there’s another “coyote” in that area who’s been subject to far more media coverage over the years. Entrepreneur Lil Lovell, who started New York’s Coyote Ugly bar in 1993, has been profiled in numerous newspaper and magazine articles. In 2000, a feature film turned her Lower East Side watering hole into a household name, and she spent three seasons (2003 to 2006) filming the Country Music Television reality television series, The Ultimate Coyote Ugly Search. Nearly two decades after opening the first Coyote Ugly bar, Lovell prefers to live a little more under the radar. With seven franchises and 10 bars of her own, she travels often (the newest Coyote Ugly bar is in Kazan, Russia). When she’s at home, Lovell spends her time raising her 12-year-old son Jackson, running her businesses from her home office and enjoying what she calls the “little big city” atmosphere of New Orleans. Lovell came to New Orleans 10 years ago to open a Coyote Ugly bar in the French Quarter. “When I came here, I was just going to stay for six months and then move back to New York,” she says. “But I found that life with my son was just easier here. Coming from New York, where you walk everywhere, it was nice that I could live Uptown and walk to the supermarket, coffee shops and boutiques. And I really like that there’s a definite culture specific to New Orleans.” Lovell’s home, which she chose for its tropical backyard and pool, pays homage to her brand’s signature rock ’n’ roll sensibility as well as Mediterranean design. “I would describe

I

LoveLL wears a nicoLe miLLer dress. designer natasha shah found the wroughtiron gates used to partition the famiLy room.

on page 19: LoveLL worked with designer natasha shah to renovate the kitchen. an iron chandeLier iLLuminates the space. the stove is by La cornue; the marbLe used for the countertops is itaLian; the hood was custommade, and the bar stooLs were purchased onLine.

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LoveLL’s Living room is an ecLectic mix of oLd and new. sofa and chair from scandinavia inc.; tiffany reproduction Lamp purchased in new york; curtains by caLico corners.

I was always impressed by Italian style. You see that in the faux painting on the walls and the Mediterranean feel of the Italian marble.

page 23

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CUE 21


THE ROW available at

4011 MAGAZINE STREET 895.6278 weinsteinsinc@bellsouth.net THE ROW

T. 3900 Magazine Street at General Taylor open Monday - Saturday 504.891.8101

Inhabit • Graham & Spencer • Genetic Denim • Raquel Allegra • Rag & Bone • Etoile by Isabel Marant • Jerome Dreyfuss 22 CUE

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PAGE 21

2

1

1

LOVELL SOAKS UP THE SUN IN HER TROPICAL BACKYARD WEARING A COYOTE UGLY TANK TOP, EXPRESS VEST, CITIZENS OF HUMANITY JEANS AND JEFFREY CAMPBELL BOOTS.

2

A FAVORITE WORK OF ART PURCHASED A DECADE AGO ON ROYAL STREET

3

COYOTE UGLY WHISKEY SCHEDULED TO BE INTRODUCED THIS SPRING

4

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN MULITCOLOR GLITTER SLINGBACK.

5

VINTAGE TOPAZ COCKTAIL RING HANDED DOWN FROM LOVELL’S GRANDMOTHER

PURPLE DOLCE & GABBANA HANDBAG

6 3 5

6 4

the house as Mediterranean/bar lounge,” she says. “I was always impressed by Italian style. You see that in the faux painting on the walls and the Mediterranean feel of the Italian marble.” She also was drawn to its spacious kitchen and family room, which she renovated with designer Natasha Shah to accommodate her love of cooking and the needs of her growing son. Lovell’s day-to-day life may have gone from the fast lane to the carpool lane, but her distinctive style is still rooted in the rock ’n’ roll biker look she honed while bartending in the ’90s. Petite and fit, Lovell works a wardrobe she describes as eclectic and unconventional. In some ways, living in New Orleans has influenced her wardrobe choices. “It’s hotter here, so I wear a lot more dresses,” she says. But Lovell styles them in a way that expresses her edgy, urban aesthetic. She pairs vintage handbags and Louboutin, Fendi and Prada stilettos with everything from Levis and tank tops to sequined miniskirts. “Lately, I’ve been into sequins,” she says. “And I have an obsession with heels. It’s almost embarrassing how many I have. It might sound weird, but it calms me to

buy shoes online.” Rocket Dog shoes are a staple in her closet as well. In New Orleans, Lovell likes to shop at Hazelnut and Royal Street galleries. Clothes shopping is a pastime Lovell indulges while in New York and London, where new trends keep her inspired. Trash and Vaudeville, an East Village purveyor of punk rock-inspired clothing, shoes, boots and vintage items, is a favorite destination. In Park City, Utah, where she and her son vacation, she opts for ski-inspired wear; in London, she gravitates toward trendy British designs, and in New York, her ensembles mix metropolitan polish with a streak of downtown rebel. “The beauty of my job,” she says, “is that I can wear whatever I want.” While the Coyote Ugly image is wild and spontaneous, Lovell knows the importance of discipline. “There are a lot of failures in this business,” she says. “One of the reasons [for failure] in my mind is when [people in the business] decide to make it their lifestyle. You can’t drink every day and think you’re going to be successful. I never wanted the adverse things from the day-to-day

bar life to affect my life. It’s important to be healthy. It was always important to try to combat that lifestyle and to avoid burnout.” To that end, Lovell works out daily on home gym equipment or by practicing yoga. She recently added a new element to her regimen. “Now, instead of only exercising indoors, I try to run or walk a few miles outdoors every day,” she says. “It’s calming.” Lovell credits her success to her skills as a salesperson and her ability to take care of daily details, develop and grow her business, surround herself with knowledgeable people and see the next big thing. “I’m very lucky; my business is booming,” says Lovell, who will introduce a new Coyote Ugly brand of rye whiskey this spring. “[Even] with the economy the way it is, my company had the best quarter we’ve ever had,” she says. “I love doing new things. I love scouting; I love going into a place that’s well-managed and dissecting it, going into a place that’s not well-managed and dissecting that. I love working with the merchandise we sell; I love making deals. I’m not only in the bar business. That’s what keeps it fresh and interesting.” f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

CUE 23


30% 50% TO

OFF! FALL AND WINTER

STYLES

create a buzz clothing, shoes & accessories

8438 oak street, new orleans, la corner of joliet & oak across from ninja

new hours >>> mon - fri 10-5 路 sat 11-5

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Antiques And

Old lAce

Lace, siLk and 1920s-inspired styLing Lend eLegance to Loungewear. Photos by theresa Cassagne

gold silk gown, $259, gold silk and laCe jaCket, $149, both at Yvonne LaFLeur.


Handmade fur flower barrette, $13 at Trashy Diva shoes; Ivory empIre-waIst sIlk gown, $198, and robe, $290, botH at house of Lounge.


Pale green lace-trimmed gown, $89, fox tail wraP, $595, both at Yvonne LaFLeur.


Pink retro teddy by Mary Green, $83 at Trashy Diva CorseT & Lingerie; tassel-triMMed robe, $249 at yvonne LaFLeur; VintaGe Glass Pearls by andrea barnett, $124.99 at FeeT FirsT.


on the cover: Burgundy lace-trimmed nightgown By coemi, $149.95 at InDIscreet LIngerIe; Scarlet chandelier necklace, $33 at trashy DIva corset & LIngerIe.

STORE infORmaTiOn fEET fiRST (526 ROyal ST., 569-0005; 4119 magazinE ST., 899-6800; www.fEETfiRSTSTORES.cOm) HOuSE Of lOungE (2044 magazinE ST., 671-8300; www.HOuSEOflOungE.cOm) inDiScREET lingERiE (4610 magazinE ST., 566-1240; www.inDiScREETlingERiE.cOm) TRaSHy Diva cORSET & lingERiE (831 cHaRTRES ST., 581-4555; 2048 magazinE ST., 2998777; www.TRaSHyDiva.cOm) TRaSHy Diva SHOES (839 cHaRTRES ST., 522-8200; www.TRaSHyDiva.cOm) yvOnnE laflEuR (8131 HampSOn ST., 866-9666; www.yvOnnElaflEuR.cOm)

mODEl paTTy RaTERmann

pHOTOgRapHy THERESa caSSagnE (232-3282; www.caSSagnEpHOTOgRapHy.cOm)

makEup ERica yOung fOR paRiS paRkER SalOn anD Spa (ciTywiDE; www.paRiSpaRkER.cOm)

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STyling miSSy wilkinSOn

SHOOT aSSiSTanT mEgan BRaDEn-pERRy

RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE ON

JACKSON SQUARE

PHOTOS BY KIM WELSH

UPPER PONTALBA SHOPS AVAILABLE FOR RETAIL VENTURES RETAIL LOCATIONS Square footage ranges from 392 504 Saint Peter • 510 Saint Peter • 514 Saint Peter to approximately 1500 square feet. 518 Saint Peter • 522 Saint Peter • 524 Saint Peter Deadline for proposals: Tuesday January 31, 2012. For an RFP packet please contact Darrin at dduplissey@frenchmarket.org or 504-525-6875. Showings may be set up with 24 hour advance notive. f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

CUE 29


FA S H I O N

CUE K I D S

CLOTHES FOR

THROWS

FEATURING AN ALLIGATOR IN A FLEUR-DELIS CROWN AND LSU TUTU, THIS ONESIE LETS A LITTLE ONE SHOW LOUISIANA PRIDE, $21.99 AT SWAP FOR KIDS (7722 MAPLE ST., 218-5996; WWW.SWAPFORKIDS.COM).

GO FROM PLAYGROUND TO PARADE ROUTE IN THESE FESTIVE GARMENTS. BY MEGAN BR ADEN-PERRY

WHICH SIDE ARE YOU ON? WITH THIS ONESIE, THERE’S NO CONFUSION, $22 AT FLEURTY GIRL (CITYWIDE; WWW.FLEURTYGIRL.NET).

STERLING SILVER KING CAKE BABY CHARMS, HANDCRAFTED BY LOCAL ARTIST MOLLY MCNAMARA, MAKE ANY ENSEMBLE CARNIVAL-READY, $30 AT PLUM (5430 MAGAZINE ST., 8973388; WWW.PLUMNEWORLEANS.COM).

YOUR LITTLE PRINCESS WILL FEEL LIKE A CARNIVAL QUEEN IN THIS FESTIVE FROCK, $64 AT ORIENT EXPRESSED (3905 MAGAZINE ST., 8993060; WWW.ORIENTEXPRESSED.COM).

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CUE K I D S

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CUE T I P S

LOOKING

HAUTE

ttention, ladies of New Orleans: The Warehouse District is officially open for fashion business. Haute Boutique (725 Magazine St., 5228687; www.hautenola.com) celebrated its grand opening in November 2011. “The CBD is such a trendy, up-and-coming area for people to work and live, which is why I was so shocked that there really isn’t much in the way of shopping here,” says owner Sanja Alickovic. “I wanted to provide a cool, contemporary space that offered classic lifestyle pieces as well as new, edgy designers.” Alickovic’s passion for fashion is apparent in her animated descriptions of the little-known brands her store carries. One is Dora Mae, a jewelry line of vintage beads and chains repurposed to create flashy, one-of-a-kind pieces with whimsical titles like Distant Star and Talent Unlimited. Alickovic, who previously worked in pharmaceutical and medical device sales, has always taken an interest in ferreting out emerging designers. Her love for apparel finally prompted her to devote herself full time to Haute. “Opening a boutique is always a risky venture, but in an area with this kind of amazing energy and potential, you honestly have to wonder why no one else thought of it first,” she says. Haute’s selection of merchandise includes clothing (red leather leggings are selling like hotcakes), accessories, handbags (by designers Tory Burch and Kate Spade), jewelry, fragrances, knickknacks and shoes. “We found that a lot of tourists came in seeking cute flats or flip-flops to ease their aching feet, so we began selling those as well,” she says. According to Alickovic, store items are “haute cou-

SHOPPING

CHIC DRESSING IS A S.N.A.P.

A

YOCHI GOLD CHAIN NECKLACE WITH PYRITE PENDANT, $145 AT HAUTE BOUTIQUE.

ture without the haute prices,” averaging between $80-$250. Haute is one of five retailers sharing space in a former parking garage, and the renovated building’s sleek design lends a sophisticated and storied air. The boutique is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays. Alickovic encourages shoppers to bring their significant others along for the ride: “We want everyone to feel comfortable and happy in the store, even guys, which is why we provide snacks, Wi-Fi and magazines for your reading pleasure.” — ALEX PENCE

JENNY CARR WANTS TO ORGANIZE YOUR WARDROBE.

f getting organized is among your New Year’s resolutions, consider letting Jenny Carr, owner of S.N.A.P. New Orleans (617 Metairie Road, 849-9988; www.snapneworleans.com), give your wardrobe a makeover. Carr offers three closet restructuring services: the Mini ($100), the Midi ($300) and the Maxi ($500). During the Mini, Carr determines which clothing items should be kept, sold, donated or altered. “The Mini is a great start for anyone who’s just trying to get more organized,” Carr says. The Midi provides this service and includes Carr demonstrating how selected pieces from her boutique can spruce up your newly streamlined wardrobe. In addition to this service, for the Maxi, Carr compiles a photo portfolio of outfits. “To make daily dressing easy, the Maxi should be done at the beginning of every season,” Carr says. If you wait until the last minute to pack before you travel, or if you never seem to bring the right pieces, try Carr’s $150 travel service: She assembles ensembles for each day and night of your trip, taking into consideration the climate and location of your destination. — MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY

I

HAUTE BOUTIQUE BRINGS FASHION TO THE WAREHOUSE DISTRICT.

f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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PERSPEcTiVES

F E AT U R E

THE logic

OF BEAUTY For the most stress-reducing interior decor, think landscapes. By karen lehrman Bloch

f you’ve felt a greater need to surround yourself with beauty in the past few years, you’re hardly alone. During difficult periods, we gravitate toward beauty — whether in the form of lipsticks or vases or gardens. But researchers are now able to show that during times of acute emotional or physical stress, beauty can be particularly useful, and they believe they finally understand why. A handful of social, environmental and evolutionary psychologists are creating the new science of beauty, and it’s sure to influence everything from landscape preservation to the art hanging in hospital rooms. Leading the pack is Roger Ulrich, an environmental psychologist who heads up the Center for Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M University. Ulrich has repeatedly found that, when shown scenes of natural beauty, people — across cultures and socioeconomic groups — recover more quickly from surgery, ask for less pain medication, have shorter hospital stays, function more effectively, and are in general less irritable and hostile. Ulrich goes so far as to argue that our minds and bodies are actually hard-wired to need beauty when we’re stressed. “Evolution favored humans who were able to recharge from viewing natural beauty,” Ulrich says. “We’ve inherited that capacity.” The new beauty research builds on cross-cultural “preference” studies, which consistently show that people prefer natural to man-made environments, especially savannah-type scenes — low, open grassland, quiet water, verdant foliage, distant views, scattered trees, birds or other unthreatening wildlife. We’re drawn to these scenes, the new theory goes, and they make us feel calm and comfortable because, for our hunter-gatherer ancestors, a healthy savannah-type landscape represented safety and security. We also apparently like to see people in these scenes, as long as they have clearly “positive” facial expressions and friendly body language. According to Ulrich, viewing happy landscapes can have substantial beneficial effects within five minutes. Muscles slacken, blood pressure drops and heart rate slows; we become more relaxed and reflective, less worried, angry, and anxious. And this happens no matter how undistinguished the scene or painting, and whether we’re in the hospital or a testing room. By contrast, Ulrich says, viewing “built” environments or modern materials such as concrete produce no positive effects. Nor did natural elements that signaled threats

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distriButed By FeatureWell

I

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If yoUR HoME LACkS A vERDANT vIEW, HANg A PASToRAL SCENE oN THE WALL foR A SIMILARLy RELAxINg EffECT.

or dangers throughout evolution — from snakes and spiders to shadowy enclosed spaces. Moreover, three studies have found that “highly jumbled” abstract art, especially dominated by “straight-edged forms,” worsened outcomes compared with having no pictures at all. Patients in a Swedish psychiatric hospital were attacking abstract works so frequently that the works had to be removed; the nature scenes were unharmed. So if you’ve ever wondered why it’s hard to get upset about anything when you’re on the beach or in the

mountains, here’s your explanation: unclogging your head and recharging your spirit with natural beauty is as essential as recharging your body with food and water. But what about unnatural beauty? Why do many of us gain satisfaction from art that looks nothing like a landscape? That’s complicated and even provocative? Why do some of us even like abstract art? The simple answer is most of us don’t live on a daily basis with the kind of acute stress experienced by those recovering from surgery or immediate trauma. Ulrich, who collects abstract art, believes that some


F E AT U R E When people vieW idyllic landscapes, muscles relax, blood pressure drops and heart rates sloW.

PERSPECTIVES

of the negative reactions to abstract art in his studies may be due to what he calls “emotional congruence theory”: A healthy person in good spirits may react to an ambiguous painting positively; the same person under acute stress may be vulnerable to interpreting ambiguous art in a negative, especially frightening, way. That’s why health care facilities should probably follow Ulrich’s advice and limit their art collections to “unambiguously positive subject matter,” be it landscapes, flowers or friendly people. The more complicated answer is it’s been a long time since we’ve been hunter-gatherers. Our more artistically inclined ancestors created all sorts of things — from Greek sculpture to Japanese calligraphy to African pottery — that have universally been considered beautiful. The reason we consider these things beautiful may be that they contain shapes or patterns that exaggerate or enhance shapes and patterns that exist in healthy nature. Consider, for example, Jackson Pollock’s “drip” paintings, which are thought to have an almost lyrical beauty even though they don’t look like anything but colorful chaos. It turns out, however, that there’s a subtle order to that chaos. Through computer analysis, researchers have found that Pollock’s drips and swirls create squiggly “fractal” patterns, similar to the outlines of trees, clouds and coastlines. Like many great artists and designers, Pollock (consciously or unconsciously) manipulated natural forms, expanding our notions of beauty in the process. Beauty in art and design may turn out to be very much like beauty in women: Certain underlying features — curved waists or curved forms, wide-set eyes or wide-open plains — have had universal appeal because they had survival value for our ancestors. But just as individual taste and culture ultimately determines what overall female package a person will go for, so do taste and culture dictate whether we prefer, say, Vermeer or Picasso. The fact that artists and designers throughout the ages have tried to manipulate and expand our beauty consciousness also explains why sometimes beauty doesn’t just calm us down; sometimes it also stirs us up. We use words like “breathtaking” when seeing something that overwhelms us both physically and emotionally. Beauty can touch something so deep that we feel not just moved but elevated and inspired. There’s a Paolo Roversi photograph that I can’t look at because I find it too beautiful: I’m awestruck. It’s not a coincidence that some people will describe an aesthetic experience — whether in art or nature — as “spiritual.” Moreover, what’s calming for one person may be stimulating for someone else. And our response can change with our moods and over time. Monet’s water lilies used to take my breath away; now I find them supremely peaceful. Whatever form it takes, beauty should now begin to lose its “guilty pleasure” aura. And when you’re not in the hospital or under acute emotional stress, you might want to give your mind a new aesthetic frontier to explore. That doesn’t mean you have to learn to like art, or modern furniture. But if a work makes you stop and pause, even for just a second, look again. The artist or designer may have successfully pierced your rational defenses in an attempt to stoke your emotions, rouse your soul, and ultimately, turn your world upside down. Right now your brain may be signaling: “Complicated beauty alert!” With time, though, you may find yourself pronouncing: “That would look great over the sofa.” f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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T H E B I G E A S Y E N T E R TA I N M E N T AWA R D S P R E S E N T S

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SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD 2011

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2011 CLASSICAL ARTS PATRON AWARD

Sammy Steele III


YOU & Improved

Beauty

Layers Of BeaUtY

a new ultrasound procedure strengthens and rejuvenates skin from the inside out. By MeG FArrIs nti-aging technology is always evolving, and a new, FDA-approved ultrasound device called Ulthera shows promise in tightening and lifting the face and neck skin without any downtime for healing. “It’s newer than anything we’ve been doing with the radio frequency or the lasers,” says Dr. Felix Bopp, a Metairie-based plastic surgeon. “Both of those treatments are very superficial in the dermis and epidermis (layers of the skin). But this device penetrates much deeper to the fascia layer, which is the same layer I lift when I’m doing a face-lift, and it creates a tightening effect at that layer.” Here’s how it works: The face and bones are marked and measured with a pencil. Then, the doctor numbs the face. Gel is rubbed on the skin, then the machine shows the technician exactly where to deliver the thermal energy. The first pass goes deep to lift and tone loose skin. The second, more shallow pass, helps improve lines and skin texture. There’s an instant improvement in the skin’s appearance, and the full effect can be seen over a few months as skin, stimulated by the heat, builds new collagen. Only one treatment is necessary. Bopp’s wife and business partner, dermatologist Dr. Barbara Bopp, tried the Ulthera. “I’m seeing a little lift and a change in my skin and in the structure of my face,” she says. “It’s only been a month and a half or two months. I still have another month to go

A

and I know more remodeling’s going to take place.” Christine Thompson, a laser technician at Bopp Dermatology, remembers what happened when she treated only one side of her face. she began the treatment without using numbing anesthesia and said it was too painful to do the other side that same day. “I looked uneven to the point that everyone did notice a change but could not quite pinpoint what that change was,” Thompson says. The next time she tried the Ulthera, she used the nerve block and was fine. Patients found the procedure very painful when they skipped the numbing process, says New Orleans dermatologist Dr. Mary Lupo, who evaluated the Ulthera on test patients two years ago. One-third of patients experienced some bruising afterward, she said. Felix Bopp has not seen bruising result from the newest version of the Ulthera. The key, he says, is picking the ideal patient. People in their 40s, 50s and 60s are best. People with a lot of fat under their skin won’t see as much of an effect. The Ulthera won’t affect skin pigment, nor will it prevent a man’s beard from growing, so it can be used by men and people with darker skin. “(A colleague in seattle) does 10 (Ulthera procedures) a week, and he said that 100 percent of patients saw improvement,” Bopp says. “some of them saw more than others. some of them saw wow improvement, and some just saw some improve-

before

a sUbtle lifting of the eye area and redUction of fine lines can be seen after a single Ulthera treatment, which helPs the body rebUild collagen over a series of months.

after

Prior to the Ulthera ProcedUre, doctors mark target areas on the Patient’s face. thoUgh the effect is sUbtler than a face-lift, it reqUires no sUrgery or downtime.

ment, but they all saw improvement.” so far there have been no permanent complications, but some patients experienced temporary nerve tingling, weakness or numbness. The cost at Bopp’s office is $1,500 to treat the mid-face, neck or forehead. It costs $4,000 to treat all three areas. Doctors are using the Ulthera in Metairie, Baton rouge, Lafayette and Biloxi, Miss. Currently there are 33 different studies testing to see if the Ulthera will tighten skin on other parts of the body, such as the arms, knees and abdomen. “The studies (on ultrasound technology) have been positive … because it delivers energy deeply into the skin,” says Metairie dermatologist Dr. Patricia Farris. “It does cause that tissue contraction.” “As long as patients understand that you cannot duplicate the results of a face-lift with any of these devices (lasers, radio frequency), I think there’s a place for these devices,” Lupo says. “I certainly think there is science behind the [Ulthera]. It gives modest improvements, and it is an option for the patient wanting to avoid surgery.” Look for Meg Farris’ Medical Watch reports weeknights on WWL-TV Channel 4 and anytime on wwltv.com. f e b r u a ry. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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shop dogs

pERspECTIVEs

JACQUEs, boNNIE, bANdIT, sCARLET ANd bEAR By Missy Wilkinson Photo By Cheryl GerBer

ust as members of a pop band are defined by one signature characteristic (e.g., Paul McCartney was the cute one; Victoria Beckham was the posh one), each of the five resident shop dogs at Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald (748 Camp St., 524-3342; www.ebmf.com) has a sharply defined quirk. When their owners talk about the dogs, they sound like they’re gushing over their favorite larger-than-life media personalities. Which, in a way, they are — especially considering that the shop is a PR firm. “Scarlet’s a strong, independent woman,” owner Katherine Olivard says of her Pomeranian. “She’s the most fashionable one.” “Bonnie is very sensitive. She’s a little bit shy,” says Shannon Stewart, who owns the Cairn terrier mix. “Jacques loves jazz. If I have an evening meeting, I put on Miles Davis and he’s fine,” Virginia Miller says of her four-year old Vizsla. “He has the biggest personality.” “Bandit is the old man of the group,” says Greg Beuerman, who owns the Cavalier King Charles spaniel. “And Bear is a frequent guest … well, a frequent terror.” “They’re all like our children,” Olivard adds. Founded in 1926, Beuerman Miller Fitzgerald is situated near Lafayette Square, where the dogs fraternize with colleagues, including a bulldog named Peaches who belongs to a judge in the neighboring courthouse. When Miller was scoping out a new home for the agency in 2006, a dog-friendly space was high on her priority list. “We wanted to make it so you could bring your dog

J

to work,” she says. “I was looking for space that would be dog-friendly, so that played a role in finding our new office. I don’t think we realized how dog-friendly we would be.” The number of canine guests ranges from three (“Three is a great number,” Miller says) to five (“Five is a bit much”) most days, but the airy, 5,000-square-foot space offers ample play space and floor-to-ceiling windows so dogs can keep an eye on the neighborhood. Exposed cypress beams and soaring ceilings speak to the building’s history as a tobacco warehouse. The Fats Domino, Little Richard and Ray Charles album covers lining the brick walls are a nod to its former life as a recording studio owned by Cosimo Matassa. Beuerman and Miller say the space’s creative lineage helps inspire them in their work for clients ranging from Tabasco to Southern Comfort. The dogs’ comforting presence keeps both employees and clients grounded. “(They) create a familial setting, which is nice,” Miller says. “We’re so focused and businesslike that it’s a really fun little diversion. They disarm people — even the stiffest person, you get to see a lot more of their personality because of the dogs. It’s wonderful.” Employees share the responsibility of taking the dogs on twice-daily walks, which creates a sense of camaraderie, Miller says. “We’ve had people apply for jobs here, and they say, ‘I love the fact that you have dogs,’” she says. “When we do interviews, the first words out of our mouths are, ‘How are you with dogs?’”

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CUE 39


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CUE, February 2012  

This month: Vintage lingerie in style; Mardi Gras parade wear for little ones; and more

CUE, February 2012  

This month: Vintage lingerie in style; Mardi Gras parade wear for little ones; and more

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