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SPRING ROCKS THE RAW ELEGANCE OF GEMSTONE JEWELRY

HOW TO GET

VIBRANT LIPS AND LASHES

A GAMBIT PUBLICATION | A P R I L 2 0 1 4

THE SCOOP ON

FASHION WEEK

HOME FASHION BEAUTY

TWO FRESH TAKES ON

HOME DECOR


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SINCE 1940

C A LL 5 0 4 . 2 8 8 . 8 3 81 TO S I G N U P FO R F R EE P I C K - U P A N D D ELI V ERY. NEW ORLEANS

CONNECT • LAKEVIEW | 905 HARRISON AVENUE | 872-0931 • UPTOWN | 6227 S. CLAIBORNE AVENUE | 866-5371 • YOUNGSDRYCLEANING.COM •

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Activewear that goes anywhere

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CONTENTS

APRIL 2014

SHOPPING

11 13 33

New & Cool

Bold florals in full bloom

What Guys Want

Men’s scents you’ll want to steal

CUE Kids

Essentials for baby’s first Jazz Fest

HOME

15

Office Space

19

Fresh Starts

Sleek shared offices are a boon for entrepreneurs

Two homes get top-to-bottom makeovers

FASHION

27 34

Ready to Rock

Raw stone and gem jewelry

CUE Tips

The lowdown on fashion weeks and a jewelry retrospective

BEAUTY

36

Lusterphile

Accent colors for lips, lids and lashes

PERSPECTIVES

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From the Editor On the rocks

Shop Dogs

Joe and Loretta of Tanner Gallery

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once had a thing for rocks. Not diamonds or rubies or any of the other stones said to be a girl’s best friend — raw, unpolished rocks. I trolled lapidary stores for hunks of rose quartz and geodes bristling with crystals. I scoured eBay for a perfect Herkimer diamond, a double-pointed quartz crystal so named for its unique clarity. I slept with rocks under my pillow and carried them in my pockets to take advantage of their purported metaphysical properties (rose quartz is said to summon love; the Herkimer diamond brings vivid dreams). These days, I keep rocks around for their beauty and not much else. But judging by the mother lode of jewelry made from natural stones and gems (p. 27), I’m not alone in being captivated by rocks. Thomas Mann’s totemic jewelry incorporates beach pebbles and river stones. Local jeweler Lydia Ksionda’s earrings are crafted from cross sections of stalactites; there are tiny glinting universes concealed in these slim slices. The pieces are part of the trend of incorporating organic elements in fashion and interior decor: deer antlers hung over a mantel, a dish of seashells on a desk or a fur rug in a French Quarter guesthouse

PHOTO BY JANINE JOFFE | MAKEUP BY MARIA BARREDA

I

F R OM T H E EDI TOR

(p. 19). We might not live in caves any longer, but there’s something grounding about pieces that would be at home in one. And as for those stalactite earrings: Ksionda says its stone is associated with “hidden inner growth and the secret expansion of the higher self.” If that’s a fringe benefit of wearing gemstones, I’ll take it.

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MARGO DUBOS |

MISSY WILKINSON |

EDITOR

EDITORIAL K ANDACE P OWER GR AVE S

M A N A G IN G ED I TO R

CO N T R IB U T IN G W R I T ER S

PUBLISHER

DORA SISON |

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

CHRIS TIN GREEN

A DV ER T I S IN G CO O R D IN ATO R 483-3138 christing@gambitweekly.com

LEE CUTRONE, L AUREN H A R TM A N

IN T ER N

ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V ES JILL GIEGER

PRODUCTION

483-3131 jillg@gambitweekly.com

LY N V I C K N A I R , P A I G E H I N R I C H S , JULIE T MEEK S, DAVID K ROLL, J A S O N W H I T TA K E R

JEFFRE Y PIZ ZO 483-3145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com

P A I G E R I TA N U LT Y

G R A P HI C D E S I G NER S

P R E- P R E S S CO O R D IN ATO R

K AT H R Y N B R A D Y

DISPL AY A DV ERT ISI NG S ANDY S TEIN BRONDUM

A DV ER T I S IN G D IR EC TO R

483-3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com MICHELE SLONSKI

A DV ER T I S IN G A D M INI S T R ATO R 483-3140 micheles@gambitweekly.com

S ENI O R A CCO U N T E X EC U T I V E

LINDA L ACHIN 483-3142 lindal@gambitweekly.com SHANNON HINTON KERN 483-3144 shannonk@gambitweekly.com KRIS TIN HARTENS TEIN 483-3141 kristinh@gambitweekly.com KELLIE L ANDECHE 483-3143 kelliel@gambitweekly.com

G AM B I T | 3 9 23 B I E N V I L L E S T R E E T | N E W O R L E AN S, L A 7 0119 5 04. 48 6. 590 0 | response@gambitweekly.com

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NEW + COOL

Wild

Flowers BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL, THIS SEASON’S FLORALS PACK A PUNCH.

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PA I G E

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SHOPPING

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Flower-shaped ceramic plates, $44 for a set of four at Hazelnut (2735 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-626-8900; 5515 Magazine St., 504-891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com). Shift dress, $49 at Armoire Boutique (4222 Magazine St., 504-304-3537; www.armoireboutique.com).

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Scarves, $12 each at Trendz (4511 Magazine St., 504-8910601; www.shoptrendz.com). Crop top, $28 at Funky Monkey (3127 Magazine St., 504-899-5587). Vases, two for $250 at OoPs Decor (1119 Josephine St., 504-528-2216; www.oopsdecor.com).

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W H AT G U Y S WAN T

SHOPPING

Scents of taste GUYS’ FRAGRANCES YOU’LL WANT TO STEAL

BY LAUREN HARTMAN

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Spicy and citrusy, Karma is intense and long-lasting, $34.95 at Lush Cosmetics (407 Decatur St., 504-525-0730; www.lush.com). La Vie Nouveau blends woody notes of teak and bamboo, $28 at New Orleans Perfume (805 Royal St., 504-522-4074; www.neworleansperfume.com). Light citrus makes El Capitan a fresh, clean scent, $43 at Hove (434 Chartres St., 504-525-7827; www.hoveparfumeur.com). Devil’s Nightcap is an earthy fragrance that contains bitter oakwood, oakmoss and sage, $64.95 at Lush Cosmetics. Infused with citrus, lime and a hint of rosemary, Eau de Cologne evokes Napoleon Bonaparte’s signature fragrance, $15 at New Orleans Perfume. For a fragrance as unique as he is, have a specialist concoct a custom blend, starting at $55 at New Orleans Perfume.

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OfficeSPACE

FEATURE

BY LEE CUTRONE

FOR FREELANCERS AND ENTREPRENEURS, CO-WORKING OFFICES OFFER THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS. | P H O T O S B Y C H E R Y L G E R B E R

Beta’s shared workspace features sleek design — and free coffee.

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orking for yourself has its perks. If you work from home, there’s no clock to punch and greater flexibility. It also has drawbacks. Household chores can be distracting and you miss out on the face-to-face exchange of ideas you have in an office. These days however, self-employed people can enjoy the positives without the negatives. A growing number of co-working spaces make it possible to have the freedom of self-employment and the camaraderie of an office. Launch Pad (643 Magazine St., Suite 102, 504-267-9111; www.lp.co), an 11,000-square-foot co-working office, was the first of its kind in New Orleans when it opened in 2009. It provides complete technological support – Wi-Fi, printers, scanners, faxes, mail delivery, projectors and more — in a spacious environment with modern furnishings and contemporary art. Shared and semi-private space can be rented month-to-month. Traditional offices can be leased six months at a time. It offers three levels of membership ranging from $275 to $750 a month. Founders Chris Schultz, Barre Tanguis and Will Donaldson designed Launch Pad for the startup and creative community. Marketing itself as “culture without the corporate,” the business’s diverse mix of professionals includes CPAs, attorneys, graphic artists, financial advisors and marketing specialists. “We tend to attract tech-focused companies but we’re really for anyone,” says Katy Tackett, Launch Pad’s community manager. “We have a little bit of everything you need. We have someone who could notarize something for you and someone who could make an app for your com-

pany, all under one roof. And we have our own email group so you can reach out and probably find someone to help you.” The in-house network of more than 100 members allows employers to find new workers and vice versa. “We actively try to foster relationships,” Tackett says. There are more than 100 events, programs and meet-ups each year, including two major annual conferences — TribeCon in the Fall and Launch Fest in the spring. “The real amenity of Launch Pad is the community,” Tackett says. “You’re surrounded by people who can support you.” Community is the lifeblood of Propeller Incubator (4035 Washington Ave., 504-564-7816; www.gopropellor.org) as well. Propeller’s 10,000 square feet are occupied by 15 companies that are part of its nonprofit accelerator program and approximately 70 individual and organization memberships, many with social or environmental missions. “We market ourselves as an opportunity to network with like-minded people, change makers and people who are inspired,” says Julia Stewart, the programs and business manager at Propeller. The Propeller Incubator facility, a joint venture between Propeller and Green Coast Enterprises, is located at Washington Avenue and Broad Street. It includes private offices, permanent desk spaces, shared desk spaces, conference rooms, event rental space, a lounge area and a kitchen with unlimited coffee. Like Launch Pad, it provides tech equipment (including 3-D printers, laptops for checkout and audio/ visual equipment), as well as workshops, seminars and events on topics PAGE 17

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related to technology, entrepreneurship and design. The daily price for all of the above, according to Stewart, is what you would pay for a couple of drinks at a coffeeshop (rental options start at $10 for a day and go to $700 a month). Propeller’s goal is to provide workspaces that are affordable for startups and people on a budget. “One thing to consider is the cost of being productive,” Stewart says. “If you work from home or a coffeeshop and you’re being distracted, that has an indirect economic cost.” Stewart says Propeller’s philosophy is that when people work together, they get things done. She notes that its internal community has been a boon for the greater Broadmoor community. Members patronize the newly opened coffeeshops, bakery, cafe and health clinic. The historic Maritime Building in the CBD is home to Beta (800 Common St., Suite 220, 504- 681-6183; www.betaneworleans. com), a shared workspace serving locals and visitors since 2012. Designed by architect Marcel Wisznia, who led the renovation of the 19th-century building, Beta offers a sophisticated design scape of iconic mid-century modern furnishings amid a backdrop of huge arched windows providing a view of downtown. “People tend to be drawn to the design and aesthetics of the space,” says Christopher Brancato, director of special projects at Wisznia Architecture and Development, which owns the Maritime Building. “I feel great every time I walk in. We think the environment should be of a quality that you want to represent yourself. That’s important to us because we think it’s important to the tenant.” Named for the phase when a company or business has passed the incubator stage but is not yet fully formed, Beta caters to a variety of renters, from residents of the Maritime to entrepreneurs stoking full-time careers and side businesses. In addition to tech support and multiple work space options ($495 to $895 a month), member advantages include a 24-hour doorkeeper, 24-hour access, use of the Maritime’s amenity deck and health club, discounts at the restaurant in the building and more. Brancato says shared workspaces are not only a desirable alternative to the freelancer’s coffeeshop office (or what he calls “the coffice”), but they also have become part of the corporate landscape. “Companies are creating more shared workspaces so that different departments interact more and there are more open environments,” he says. “We are working in a more social way in the physical world as well as the Web.” Beta has a mobile app (developed in conjunction with one of its tenants) that allows customers to pay rent, ask questions and connect with other tenants. Workspaces at Beta, Propeller and other venues also can be reserved through Liquidspace.com, a website listing numerous shared space venues.

Propellor Incubator’s 10,000-squarefoot space includes meeting rooms and places for events.

The industrial-chic space at Propellor Incubator provides workplaces for more than 70 individuals.

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Fresh starts BY LEE CUTRONE | PHOTOS BY EUGENIA UHL

An Uptown home & a downtown guesthouse are renewed top to bottom.


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ecorating a house usually means working with what you already have. But the respective owners of these two abodes — an Uptown home and a French Quarter guesthouse — furnished the spaces almost entirely from scratch. The result in both cases is a fresh interior that pays homage to the past but is planted squarely in the design ethos of today. Gina Goings’ Uptown house had already been renovated when she purchased it in 2008, so the professional lobbyist and owner of The Goings Group began decorating. “At first, I tried to do everything on my own and it wasn’t working so well,” says Goings, whose busy work schedule includes a lot of time in Baton Rouge. “I needed to furnish an entire house.” When friends recommended interior designer Penny Francis of Eclectic Home, a daunting project became fun. Francis’ organized approach and self-professed furniture obsession combined with Goings’ clear vision was a winning formula. Goings wanted a calm, sophisticated retreat that would be comfortable, relaxing and guest-friendly. She also wanted to incorporate purple, her favorite color and a reflection for her love of all things LSU, her alma mater. To keep the decorating process from becoming overwhelming and the rooms from feeling

A pillow Beth Harris found at market inspired the gray accents in the informal living room. Harris and Castro used gray for the wingback chair and the backs of the bookshelves. The seating is covered with washable slipcovers and combined with custom pillows, an iron and marble coffee table and an iron and marble end table from the same line.

(OPENING PAGE) The dining room’s simple arrangement includes a custom pedestal table and slipper chairs and a large chandelier made of frosted glass beads.

(LEFT) Painted panels (there’s another to the right of the mantel) found at the High Point furniture market inspired the use of robin’s-egg blue in the formal living room. PAGE 22

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Neutral hues of orchid, a nod to Gina Goingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; love of LSU and the color purple, were used in the living room and adjacent dining room. Retro-inspired pieces (a round 1960s-style chandelier, a pair of 1970s-style end tables used as cocktail tables and a shag rug) bring a contemporary edge to the roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s updated classics, which include a pair of neoclassical chairs upholstered with velvet.


disjointed, Francis put together a cohesive presentation that included countertops, cabinet glazing, colors, fabrics, wallpapers and fixtures. “Penny helped me push the envelope and steered me toward things I wouldn’t select on my own,” says Goings, citing an antique reproduction bar in the dining room that is now one of her favorite pieces. For Francis, the process was equally satisfying. “Gina was an open book and that made it easy for me,” says Francis, who owns a store stocked with furniture, accessories and art. “[Having a store] helps break down the problem of scale and texture and furniture and how to pull it all together,” Francis says. “It helps to see what an 80-inch sofa looks like. It gives [the client] perspective.” In addition to pieces from the store, Francis incorporated custom items that had sentimental value: a pine hutch in the dining area and a demilune table with an iron base. Francis delineated areas with furniture and lighting, an element of design she and Goings appreciate. She sought to soften the angles of the open, linear spaces by incorporating softer shapes; she brought in a mix of metallic accents to complement the subtle tones of soft gray, neutral orchid and pale turquoise; and she paid careful attention to creating an evolved-over-time look. “Since I was making a clean start, I didn’t want it to look like it was done in two months,” Goings says. “Penny did a great job with that. When you walk in, it doesn’t look like everything is completely new.” What emerged is a home filled with new interpretations of classics, a feminine palette that’s refined rather than frilly and a mix of carefully edited details. “It’s everything I hoped it would be,” Francis says. “But the most rewarding thing is that people say, ‘It’s so Gina.’ ” When Beth Harris, owner of The Garden Gates, and Emily Castro, the visual display coordinator, took on the task of decorating a French Quarter guesthouse, they too started with a blank canvas. They also had a furniture and accessories store, and presented a complete vision of the proposed design to their client. The owner, a local businessman, raised his children in the 19th-century Victorian but now uses it as a guesthouse for friends and family. Like Goings, he wanted the

The office has a desk with an embossed metal top and forged iron legs, a lantern light fixture with antique mirror spheres, a chair with an antique brass frame and white faux fur upholstery, a mirror with a handmade horn frame and an espresso cabinet with silver-leafed doors and a mother-of-pearl pull.

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The master bedroom’s sophisticated femininity comes from its palette of gray, taupe-infused orchid and pale turquoise, which reads as monochromatic. The headboard was raised 10 inches above the standard height for added impact. The glass-bead chandelier and the bedding are custom designs.

house to be comfortable and suitable for entertaining. He also liked the airy, mostly white look for which The Garden Gates is known. According to Harris and Castro, the challenge was achieving that time-honored, cottage-inspired ambience in a house without full-time residents. “The owner wanted it to feel inviting and peaceful and we felt like we needed to accomplish that through details and accessories,” says Castro, who has an architecture degree from Tulane University. “We wanted to make the home feel lived in.” Harris and Castro meticulously measured every space, then selected furnishings and put together vision boards that included computerized floor plans and pictures of each piece. In the casual living room adjacent to the kitchen and informal dining area, inspiration came from the gray of an embroidered pillow Harris saw at market. She and Castro carried the color from the custom pillows to a roomy wingback chair and a variety of accessories, using it to highlight the backs of the bookshelves. “The taupey-gray added a little bit of warmth and a masculine feel,” Harris says. Inspiration for the palette in the formal living area also came from an item Harris found at a market — a pair of painted antique reproduction panels depicting jugglers that remind Harris of Mardi Gras. Displayed on either side of the mantel, they are married with matching settees and painted chests, an acrylic waterfall coffee table and billowy drapes of robin’s-egg blue silk. With a brief five-month timeline for decorating the four-bedroom house, Harris and Castro had to rush the custom pieces. Yet the combination of antique, reproduction and contemporary pieces, custom window treatments that include delicate sheers from Paris, and beds dressed with washable Bella Notte linens looks as if it was years in the making. “After working on it for months, the reward was finally seeing it all come together,” Harris says. “And that the client loved it.” A PR I L. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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Ready

Rock to

Raw rock and gemstone jewelry is powerfully elemental yet refined.

P H OTO S

B Y

R O M N E Y

P H OTO G R A P H Y

S T Y L I N G B Y PA I G E R I TA N U LT Y A N D M I S S Y W I L K I N S O N

Turqoise pendant, $24 at gae-tanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Above: Handmade raw peridot crystal and sterling silver ring, $225 (also featured on the cover), raw pyrite and sterling silver ring, $155, raw pink kunzite crystal and sterling silver ring, $290, all at Leda Jewel Co. Right: Geode tassel pendant, $44 at gae-tana’s. [FACING PAGE] Caged stone necklace, $1,100 at Thomas Mann Gallery I/O. Arrowhead pendant, $18 at gae-tana’s. Cuff, $1,200 at Thomas Mann Gallery I/O. Handmade stalactite drop earrings, $285 at Leda Jewel Co. PAGE 30

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Stacked beach stone and lava rock ring, $400 at Thomas Mann Gallery I/O. Cabochon earrings, $65 at Trashy Diva.

STORE INFORMATION gae-tanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7732 Maple St., 504-865-9625; www.gaetanas.com Leda Jewel Co. www.ledajewelco.com Thomas Mann Gallery I/O 1812 Magazine St., 504-581-2113; www.thomasmann.com Trashy Diva Citywide; www.trashydiva.com

Magazine St & Louisiana

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Baby’s first

Jazz Fest

CUE K I D S

SHOPPING

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ESSENTIALS FOR A HAPPY, HEALTHY TIME AT THE FEST. B Y

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H A R T M A N

This sun hat protects little ones from harsh rays, $10 at Sopo (629 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-609-2429; www.soponola.com).

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A light chambray romper lets kids fest comfortably all day, $52 at Angelique Baby (5519 Magazine St., 504-899-8992; www.facebook. com/angeliquebaby). A handy strap keeps these red shades secure, $20 at Sopo. This water-repellent Monkey Mat provides a clean surface for napping, playing or watching a show and comes with a storage pouch, $39.99 at Zuka Baby (2122 Magazine St., 504-596-6540; www.zukababy.com). Glittery sunscreen fades when it’s time to reapply, $18 at Angelique Baby. Keep kids’ ears safe from loud noise with insulated ear muffs, $30 at Sopo Sopo.

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FASHION

CUE T I P S

Modelorganizations

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ow through March 22, two organizations hold fashion weeks highlighting the local apparel industry’s autumn/winter 2014 collections. Both NOLA Fashion Week (NOLAFW) and Fashion Week New Orleans (FWNOLA) present runway shows, workshops, parties and other events. NOLAFW (www.nola-fashionweek.com) focuses on independent and emerging designers. Now in its seventh season, NOLAFW includes events like photography, styling and sewing workshops, public relations presentations and runway shows at an eclectic array of venues that includes the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum, Marigny Opera House and Martine Chaisson Gallery. “[NOLAFW] acts as a year-round resource for emerging and established designers and various professionals connected to the fashion industry,” says founder Andi Eaton. “The week of shows is a celebration of the work those folks put in all year long.” FWNOLA (www.fashionweeknola.com) kicks off Tuesday, March 18 with a party at The Saint Hotel. Focusing on local fashion retailers and designers, this organization spotlights local labels including Harold Clarke, Pedram Couture and Starr Hagenbring. FWNOLA takes place at the New Orleans Board of Trade and the Joy Theater. It includes a Top Design competition, a career day and many runway shows. New this year is the Fashion Awards Gala, which takes place at the Joy Theater at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 22. “The Fashion Awards Gala will honor fashion industry professionals who have paved the way as well as help those who build the Southern fashion industry,” says founder Tracee Dundas.— PAIGE RITA NULTY Models walk NOLA Fashion Week’s runway. PHOTO BY GEOVANNI VEL A SQUE Z

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su ite f4 - in th e r iv er s id e ma r ket 5 04 .895 . 2 9 1 1

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hairloftnola.com


Past & present

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FASHION

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n 1976, one year after Tom Mathis opened Symmetry Jewelers and Designers (8138 Hampson St., 504-861-9925; www.symmetry-jewelers.com), the jeweler created a custom piece for a new client’s wife: a sea scene featuring a starfish. Over the years, the client, David James, would request more than 140 custom pieces. His collection tells the story of evolving aesthetics and manufacturing techniques over five decades. It is on display at Symmetry now. “You can tell the older pieces are the ones with the frillier, more fanciful designs,” says Symmetry president Richard Mathis, citing the Pegasus brooch and unicorn pendant as examples. “The ’70s are really represented by all the fantasy pieces, while the sea scene and all the fish pieces are very ’80s.” Earlier pieces were manufactured by hand using sheet metal, engravings and pierce work, Richard says. They often incorporate multiple colors of gold that range from white and yellow to rose and green. “You can tell that anything in multiple colors of gold was rendered by hand,” Richard says. While modern pieces are still handcrafted, the initial rendering is done with computer graphics. 3-D printers create the translated sketches from thermal plastic before they are cast. The use of mathematically precise computer modeling hasn’t dimmed the unique personalities of Tom’s pieces. Technology has made them more intricate and original. Some trends have continued over the years, such as the floral and art nouveau pieces, which were in style in the ’90s, Richard says. Pieces such as a pink flower pearl ring demonstrate the marriage of coloring techniques perfected in the past and today’s technology. — PAIGE RITA NULTY (TOP) This koi pin is made with the yellow, green, rose and white gold combination that is one of Tom Mathis’ hallmarks. (BOTTOM) Tom Mathis crafted this Pegasus brooch for longtime client David James in the 1970s.

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LUSTERPHILE

Wear the rainbow BEAUTY

A MAKEUP ARTIST’S TIPS FOR INCORPORATING SPRING’S BOLDEST COLORS | B Y M I S S Y W I L K I N S O N

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rom fuchsia lips to baby-blue eyelashes, spring’s most on-trend cosmetics have the vibrant hues of a garden in full bloom. “The bold look is definitely a trend,” says makeup artist and aesthetician Amanda Mahoney of NOLA Faces (504-250-3732; www.facebook.com/nolafaces). Fortunately, it’s simple to get the look, because the best way to pull off rainbow shades is to use them to accentuate one feature. “Pick one feature and stick with it — lips, cheeks or eyes — and then keep the other features softer,” Mahoney says.

B ABY-D O L L B L U S H A pop of bright blush on the apples of the cheeks gives a trendy baby-doll look, Mahoney says. Choose a bright blush in a pink or coral shade, like these Pure Color Cello Shots by Estee Lauder, $28 each at Saks Fifth Avenue (The Shops at Canal Place, 301 Canal St., 504-524-2200 ext. 5361; www.saksfifthavenue.com). The sheer gel can be layered for a more intense look and was voted “Best Cream Blush” by Allure magazine in 2013.

P OW E R P O U T S Mahoney says lipstick is the simplest way to incorporate bold color, especially for people who don’t usually wear a lot of makeup. “You can throw on one color; you don’t have to blend it, and you can make the lips pop,” Mahoney says. Bright lavender is a trendy color right now, she says, but oranges and fuchsias are also popular. For an extra bold accent color, try a blue or green tone. Matte finishes are growing in popularity, Mahoney says, partly because they have longer staying power. Above: Clinique High Impact Lip Color is highly pigmented and long-lasting, $15 at Ulta (1126 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 504-7316628; www.ulta.com). Right: LipScape lipstick in Lafourche, $12 at Rise Boutique (3650 Magazine St., 504- 304-5485; www.rise-nola.com).

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LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

M U LT ICOLORED M A S C AR A Colored mascaras in a rainbow of hues are making a comeback. To pick your perfect shade, consider your eye color. “If you have eyes that are blue, go with blue mascara,” Mahoney says. “If you have green eyes, go with green mascara.” Keep the rest of the eye makeup simple. “Make the eye a soft, smoky eye so you can see the color on the lashes stand out,” Mahoney says. “If you use makeup that’s too dark, you won’t be able to tell the mascara is colored.” Make Up For Ever’s Smoky Lash in dark blue is heavily pigmented with minerals, $23 at Sephora (Oakwood Shopping Center, 197 Westbank Expwy., 504227-2112; 197 Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 74, 504-837-9880; www.sephora.com). A PR I L. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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Loretta & Joe

SHOP DOGS

PERSPECTIVES

BY L AUREN HARTMAN PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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t Tanner Art Gallery (830 Royal St., 504-524Our 8266; 2855 Magazine St., 504-267-0772; www.hauntingart. com), two rescue mutts, Joe and Loretta, hold down the fort. While Joe and Loretta are Spending time the best of friends, the stories with Tanner of how they came to the gallery are very different. Tanner (who prefers not Socializing with to use his first name) found Joe lying in the middle of St. fellow pups Claude Avenue at midnight 15 years ago. The two-yearGetting cozy on a old pooch was badly injured. Tanner thought the dog might pillow in the gallery be dead but took him to a veterinarian, then another and another. They discovered Cuddling up with Joe was infested with hearteach other worms, had mange and was paralyzed in his back legs. Every veterinarian suggested Tanner should euthanize the injured dog. “Eventually, after taking [Joe] to so many different doctors and receiving the same answer, I decided to care for him and make him comfortable,” Tanner says. “I couldn’t euthanize him. I even told one doctor that if Joe was a human, the suggestion would never have come about.” At the time, Tanner sold his art on the street and was barely making ends meet. Though adopting an ailing furry friend did not seem like a practical choice, Tanner’s friend, veterinarian Cheri Hansen, offered to assist him in nurturing Joe back to health. After several days with the vet, Joe’s health improved but the dog was still suffering. “He really was miserable,” Tanner says. “You could just tell he did not feel good, but I took him home and cared for him. … A man recognized Joe and told me the kids around his neighborhood in Treme used to throw fireworks at him.” Under Tanner’s care, Joe recovered. Now he spends his days on a pillow in Tanner Art Gallery, which Tanner opened in March 2010. Tanner Art Gallery displays Tanner’s work exclusively. The art depicts forest and swamp scenes Tanner observed during his

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years in Semmes, Ala., a small, wooded town that inspired Tanner to create majestic treescapes. “My inspiration came early on in life, but it took quite a while for me to see any profit,” Tanner says. “Being a street artist was difficult, especially when the city would not allow me to sell reproductions.” Last year, Tanner opened a second location on Magazine Street. He also acquired a new dog, Loretta. Tanner says he adopted her after his other dog, Kelly, died last year and Joe seemed lonely. “I was looking for a foster dog to see how things would go, and my only request was that I get a senior dog,” Tanner said. “Instead, I get a puppy. After a week, it was time to return Loretta to the SPCA, but after hearing that she may or may not be put to sleep, I kept her.” Two-year-old Loretta has charmed Joe, Tanner and the people and pets who visit the Royal Street gallery. “The gallery has seldom slowed down since opening,” Tanner says. “Loretta stands in the doorway greeting each customer with her wagging tail while Joe enjoys his retirement.”  A PR I L. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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