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ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

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CONTENTS

4 IN THE ’HOOD A guide to New Orleans’ neighborhoods.

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GEL MANICURES | KERATIN TREATMENTS

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FACIALS | WAXING | YOGA

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GOTTA HAVE IT! Where to buy the things you need.

11 Twitter feeds to follow.

13 THE BIG SCREEN Special deals on movies.

15 GO-TUNE GUYS

ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

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Radio stations in New Orleans.

03


NEIGHBORHOODS

STREET WISE Getting to Know New Orleans Neighborhoods

ith roads bending along the curves of the Mississippi River, a slew of one-way streets and difficult-to-pronounce thoroughfares like Tchoupitoulas Street, learning to navigate New Orleans requires an education all its own. But it’s well worth the effort to explore the city’s many unique and historic neighborhoods. Below is a primer on the city’s neighborhoods and their main attractions.

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Also known as the Vieux Carre, or “old square,” the French Quarter is the original military-style grid the French colonists set up when the city was founded in 1718. Canal Street is its most notable border, and the district is bounded by North Rampart Street, Esplanade Avenue and the river. After three centuries of regime changes, wear and tear and a couple of catastrophic fires, the district features a blend of French and Spanish architecture and narrow streets lined by art and antique galleries, quaint shops, intimate cafes, dive bars, tourist attractions and colorful cottages and homes. The Quarter is best explored on foot, and one can walk from the historic center of Jackson Square and the landmark Cafe du Monde (800 Decatur St., 525-4544; www.cafedumonde.com) to the French Market and a more bohemian side of the district. At night, one can head to music clubs like the House of Blues (225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com) and One Eyed Jacks (615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net) for a mix of touring acts and local bands, or wade into the raucous nightlife on Bourbon Street.

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Neighboring the French Quarter is the Faubourg Marigny (or just

Marigny), a predominantly residential neighborhood just downriver. Its main attraction is the busy stretch of music clubs and bars on Frenchmen Street. Often called the locals’ alternative to Bourbon Street, it is home to bars and clubs featuring traditional and contemporary jazz, brass bands, New Orleans’ funky rock and blues. Roots music and string bands are increasingly common. The cluster of restaurants includes the vegetarian friendly 13 (517 Frenchmen St., 9421345; www.13monaghan.com), Creole soul-food hub The Praline Connection (542 Frenchmen St., 943-3943; www. pralineconnection.com) and more. Sprinkled through the neighborhood are popular bars like Mimi’s in the Marigny (2601 Royal St., 872-9868) and the Lost Love Lounge (2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com) and breakfast spots like the New Orleans Cake Cafe and Bakery (2440 Chartres St., 943-0010; www.nolacakes.com) and La Peniche (1940 Dauphine St., 943-1460).

{ BY EMILY JENSEN }

BYWATER

Continuing further downriver from the Marigny, one enters the Bywater, a more bohemian and artsy neighborhood sandwiched between St. Claude Avenue and the Mississippi River levee. One of the most popular destinations is Vaughan’s Lounge (4229 Dauphine St., 947-5562) on Thursday nights when trumpeter Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers host a jazz jam late into the night. The wine shop Bacchanal (600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine.com) hosts live music in its backyard several nights a week, and there’s food from either the house chef or a visiting chef. Dining options include Satsuma Cafe (3218 Dauphine St., 3045962; www.satsumacafe.com), which highlights fresh produce, the Southern cooking at Elizabeth’s (601 Gallier St.) and barbecue at The Joint (801 Poland Ave., 949-3232; www.alwayssmokin. com). The Country Club (634 Louisa St., 945-0742; www.thecountryclubneworleans.com) is a gay-friendly bar with a large pool, which is clothing-optional.

Mimi's in the Marigny draws young hipsters, people hungry for Spanish-influenced tapas, and fans of DJ Soul Sista, who spins upstairs on Saturdays. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER


NEIGHBORHOODS Treme

The HBO series Treme took its name from the neighborhood adjacent to the French Quarter across North Rampart Street. It’s the nation’s oldest AfricanAmerican neighborhood, and it’s been home to many notable jazz musicians and extended musical families. Louis Armstrong Park is on the edge of the neighborhood, and it’s home to the Mahalia Jackson Theater (1419 Basin St., 287-0351; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com), which hosts big-name concerts and traveling Broadway productions. The Candlelight Lounge (925 N. Robertson St., 571-1021) hosts brass bands on Wednesday nights, and Lil’ Dizzy’s Cafe (1500 Esplanade Ave., 569-8997) serves Creole cuisine. A few blocks over from Esplanade Avenue is St. Bernard Avenue, a lively home to Mardi Gras Indian and brass bandbacked social aid and pleasure club parades, the backbones of the city’s street-level music culture.

mid-CiTy

CBd/Warehouse disTriCT Downtown New Orleans has a narrow strip of skyscrapers in the Central Business District punctuated by the Louisiana Superdome (1500 Sugar Bowl Drive, 587-3663; www.superdome. com). The strip edges the Warehouse District, defined by century-old warehouses converted into museums, art galleries, law offices, urbane restaurants and music clubs. It’s a business district by day, but nightlife blossoms after 5 p.m. The neighborhood is as clubby as New Orleans gets, and Republic New

LoWer Garden disTriCT

Heading Uptown and up river from the Warehouse District, one enters the Lower Garden District, best known for funky antique and clothing shops, cheap eats and a handful of bars and watering holes. The Saint (961 St. Mary St., 523-0050; www.thesaintneworleans.com) is a windowless vault, home to an eclectic mix of doom rockers, tiki-themed karaoke nights and late-night antics. Juan’s Flying Burrito (2018 Magazine St., 569-000; www. juansflyingburrito.com) adds some local twists to inexpensive CaliforniaMexican food. Surrey’s Cafe and Juice Bar (1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com) serves fresh squeezed juices.

Garden disTriCT

In the middle of Uptown, the Garden District — bounded by Magazine Street and St. Charles, Louisiana and Jackson avenues — is a block of historic homes and mansions. Get your parents to splurge on dinner at Commander’s Palace (1403 Washington Ave., 8998221; www.commanderspalace.com) or pay your own way at The Rum House (3128 Magazine St., 941-7560; www. rumhousenola.com), which offers $2 tacos on Tuesdays. The Bulldog (3236 Magazine St., 891-1516; www.draftfreak.com) offers a wide array of domestic and imported beers on tap, and the Wednesday special lets you take your pint glass home. The Magazine Street border of the Garden District is also home to coffee shops, vintage and new clothing stores, home decor shops, galleries, a couple of gelato and sweets shops and more.

universiTy neiGhBorhoods

Tulane and Loyola universities are flanked by a couple of thoroughfares with student-friendly cheap eats and bars. Heading downtown, Freret Street is blossoming with relatively new places like Dat Dog (5031 Freret St., 8996883; www.datdognola.com), which

serves a variety of hot dogs and sausages, and Freret Street Po-Boys and Donuts (4701 Freret St., 872-9676), which offers a menu of New Orleans staples. On the other side, Maple Street features coffee shops, a bookstore, fashion shops, restaurants and taverns.

riverBend/CarroLLTon

The very tip of Uptown is marked by the end of St. Charles Avenue, where the Riverbend neighborhood begins and South Carrollton Avenue gives rise to the area known as Carrollton. Sportswatching and beer emporium Cooter Brown’s Tavern (509 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9104; www.cooterbrowns.com) and the Camellia Grill (626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679; www.camelliagrill.net) are at the beginning of the strip. The Riverbend cluster includes upscale restaurants like Dante’s Kitchen (736 Dante St., 861-3121; www.danteskitchen.com) and Brigtsen’s (723 Dante St., 861-7610; www.brigtsens.com) as well as Oak Street’s popular Jacques-Imo’s (8324 Oak St., 861-0886; www.jacquesimoscafe. com). The area is home to the music venues The Maple Leaf Bar (8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com) and Carrollton Station (8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com).

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LakefronT/ WesT end Along the Lakefront, University of New Orleans students can head to Lakeview and the wealth of restaurants along Harrison Avenue or literally on the lakefront at West End, near the municipal harbor. The Lakefront is a popular stretch for biking and Rollerblading. Harrison Avenue is booming with new restaurants including the kitschy Tex-Mex cantina The Velvet Cactus (6300 Argonne Blvd., 301-2083; www.thevelvetcactus.com) and a new edition of the creative Mexican kitchen, El Gato Negro (300 Harrison Ave., 488-0107; www.elgatonegronola.com).

Jefferson Parish

After crossing into Jefferson Parish (Louisiana doesn’t have counties), you’ll find Harahan, Metairie and Kenner, suburbs with plenty of big-box shopping. Elmwood has the 20-screen AMC Palace (1200 Elmwood Park Blvd., 888262-4386; www.amcentertainment. com) as well as all kinds of stores. Veterans Memorial Boulevard is a main artery through Metairie and Kenner, along which you’ll find major retailers like Target (4500 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 888-2184; www.target.com) and department stores including Macy’s, Dillard’s (Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd.; www.lakesideshopping.com) and Sears (Clearview Mall, 4400 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-8200; www.sears.com).

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Mid-City is the sprawling neighborhood radiating out from the thoroughfares of Canal Street and Esplanade and Carrollton avenues. It’s got all the charm of Uptown or Downtown, but with better parking, and it borders the tranquil expanses of New Orleans City Park and Bayou St. John. Some people like the neighborhood for its proximity to the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, held at the Fair Grounds Race Course (1751 Gentilly Blvd., 942-8328; www.fairgroundsracecourse.com). The neighborhood has a couple of prominent restaurant clusters, one on Esplanade Avenue that includes Santa Fe (3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077), Cafe Degas (3127 Esplanade Ave., 9455635; www.cafedegas.com) and Lola’s (3312 Esplanade Ave., 488-6946), and another near the intersection of Canal Street and Carrollton Avenue, with everything from pizza to Mexican and Italian cuisine and the long-time ice cream and sweet shop Angelo Brocato (214 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1465; www. angelobrocatoicecream.com).

Orleans (828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com) even sets up a velvet rope. A music hall with more casual ambience is The Howlin’ Wolf (907 S. Peters St., 529-5844; www.thehowlinwolf.com). Museums include the National World War II Museum (945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.nationalww2museum.org), the Contemporary Arts Center (900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org), which features visual and performing arts, and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art (925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org), which hosts a Thursday evening music series called Ogden After Hours.

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DINING

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et’s face it: If you’re a college student, you’re likely either broke or cheap. If not, you’ll like a good deal. A good place to start is printing coupons for campus-area restaurants from www.campusmenus.com. On the site you’ll also find food and drink specials within walking distance from your dorm. If you have a little scratch to spare, head to Mid-City and find Finn McCool’s Irish Pub (3701 Banks St., 4869080; www.finnmccools.com). Whatever the occasion — international soccer matches, Treme-watching parties, anniversary of the Titanic disaster — Finn McCool’s has a complementary (and often complimentary) dish. Nearby is Twelve Mile Limit (500 Telemachus St., 488-8114) — sip fancy craft cocktails without spending fancy money. It also has a menu of barbecue and baked goods.

{ BY ALEX WOODWARD }

At Twelve Mile Limit, super-high-end cocktails run $6 — and the bar menu includes both barbecue and homemade doberge cupcakes. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

The city’s Monday tradition of red beans and rice is a barroom staple. You’ll find $2 red beans and rice at Hi-Ho Lounge (2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net) and free bowls of it at Banks Street Bar (4401 Banks St., 486-0258; www.banksstreetbar. com), Mick’s Irish Pub (4801 Bienville St., 482-9113) and Pal’s Lounge (949 N. Rendon St., 488-7257). Grab a $1 domestic longneck beer at Theo’s (4024 Canal St., 3021133; 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; www.theospizza. com) to wash it all down. (The pizza joints also pour $1 pints on Tuesdays.) At Bridge Lounge (1201 Magazine St., 299-1888; www.bridgeloungenola.com) during its Tuesday night trivia contest, pay $5 for the all-you-can-eat buffet (as long as there’s food to go around and you haven’t overstayed your welcome). Tacos, barbecue, curry, pasta, salads, hot dogs and vegetarian dishes — it has you covered. More on the veggies-and-trivia tip: The Korean kitchen The Wandering Buddha also dishes up vegetarian and vegan Korean food from 5 p.m. to midnight every day except Monday at Hi-Ho Lounge, which hosts Tuesday night music trivia. Fill up on bibimbap, kimchi, scallion pancakes, Korean sliders and other dishes for $10 a plate. Refresh your palate with a $2 beer pitcher from Reginelli’s (at any of its locations). Snack on free appetizers while sipping cheap drinks ($2 Abitas, $4 mimosas) during Il Posto Cafe’s (4607 Dryades St., 895-2620; www.ilpostofcafe-nola.com) happy hour from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. The cafe offers cheeses, olives, roasted Brussels sprouts and other gourmet bar snacks and desserts. Still hungry? Banks Street Bar has free BLT


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sandwiches (and the music hall has a “no cover charge” policy). If you can’t shell out $20 for a full pie, grab a slice (cheese and pepperoni only) without a wait at Pizza Delicious (3444 N. Rampart St., 6768482; pizzadelicious.blogspot.com), which opens at 5 p.m. Thursdays and Sundays only. The pop-up pizza joint has massive, New York-style, perfectly crispy slices for $2 (cheese) and $2.50 (pepperoni). At Wit’s Inn (141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004; www.witsinn.com) order a 10-inch onetopping pizza for $5 on Thursdays. Not in the mood for pizza? Order $2 tacos on Thursdays at Rusty Nail (1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.biz). For an after-dinner drink, Cork & Bottle (3700 Orleans Ave., Suite 1C, 483-6314; www.cbwines.com) hosts free wine tastings every Thursday and Friday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bonus: Grab some inexpensive snacks (or sample them) from local vendors at the Crescent City Farmers Market, open from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays just steps from Cork & Bottle. (More farmers markets: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 700 Magazine St., and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 200 Broadway St. — perfect for a before- or after-school snack.) Enjoy the patio — in the middle of the downtown medical district — outside Handsome Willy’s (218 S. Robertson St., 525-0377; www.handsomewillys.com) for Funk & Crunk Fridays. The bar’s catering service offers free food from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., whether it’s ice cream, a crawfish boil, chicken and sausage gumbo, hot dogs, smoked ribs or something else — with Jell-O (in shot form) for dessert. But the week’s piece de resistance for frugal diners is the Hare Krishna Love Feast at International Society for Krishna Consciousness (2936 Esplanade Ave., 486-3583; www.iskconneworleans.org). The 30-yearold weekly event serves vegetarian Indian food from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sundays. Dancing, chanting, prayer services and inviting vibes surround the “by donation” vegetarian dining experience. It attracts travelers, broke students and neighbors — so you can make a few friends.

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SHOPPING

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ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

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2 Enlivened with a pretty print, this collapsible storage bin offers a chic and efficient way to get organized, $24 at The Occasional Wife (4306 Magazine St., 302-9893; www.theoccasionalwife.com).

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A neoprene combo bag protects and serves: It organizes gadgets, and its cushioned back pocket keeps an iPad or MacBook safe, $24.99 to $49.99 at the Apple Store (Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 830-1400; www.apple.com).


SHOPPING

4

Thanks to a speedy screen-printing service (it takes a maximum of 24 hours to process an order), it can all be Greek to you, including the letters on this canvas tote, $31.32 at Fun Rock’n (1125 Decatur St., 524-1122; 3109 Magazine St., 895-4102; www.funrockn.com).

5 This elasticized towel is an essential way to preserve one’s sense of modesty during the long, cold trek from dorm room to bathroom, $36 at Gentry (6047 Magazine St., 899-4223).

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7 Flower power takes a turn for the magnetic with this bulletin board, $25 at The Occasional Wife (4306 Magazine St., 302-9893; www.theoccasionalwife.com).

ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

Almost every TOMS fan knows about the company’s altruistic mission (it donates a pair of shoes to a child in need for every pair purchased), but not everybody knows the comfortable shoes can be pink and sparkly, $54 at Massey’s Professional Outfitters (509 N. Carrollton Ave., 648-0292; 816 Hwy. 190, Covington, 985-809-7544; 3363 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-1144; www.masseysoutfitters.com).

PAGE 10

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TWITTER

SOCIAL MEDIA @01

Tweet dreams are made of this. You love Twitter, and so does New Orleans — but who (and what) to follow? Here are some suggestions for beefing up your timeline …

Gambit (@The_Gambit)

Links to stories, breaking news, weather and whatever we feel like talking about.

Gambit Goods (@GambitGoods)

Gambit’s line on giveaways — movie passes, concert tickets and more.

Alex Woodward (@alexwoodward) Staff writer Alex Woodward’s personal Twitter feed.

Lauren LaBorde (@laurenlaborde)

Listings editor Lauren LaBorde’s personal Twitter feed.

Clancy DuBos (@clancygambit)

FOOD MV Burger (@MVBurger)

Burger pop-up restaurant inside Slim Goodies on Sundays (which seems to be on a summer break right now). You can find a post of that day’s burger and milkshake special.

MUSIC Tipitina’s (@tipitinas)

Find out about bookings before they’re announced elsewhere.

Basin Street Records (@BasinStRecords)

Label repping some of New Orleans’ best local music.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (@jazzfest)

The official Twitter feed of the city’s biggest music fest.

Political editor Clancy DuBos’ personal Twitter feed.

Avoid gridlock.

Info on midnight and classic movie screenings, plus general movie info.

RADIO WWOZ-FM (@wwoz_neworleans) The city’s 24-7 jazz and heritage music station (with no commercials!).

WTUL-FM (@wtul)

Progressive sounds from the on-campus station at Tulane University.

Wild Wayne (@wildwayne)

Q93 DJ and all-around man on the scene.

Taco truck that also has a kitchen in Chickie Wah Wah. It posts its truck location and menu items.

Cochon Butcher (@cochonbutcher) Mouthwatering tweets about daily specials.

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Lorin Gaudin (@loringaudin)

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NOLA Eats (@LeslieJAlmeida)

WWW.OHENRYS.COM

Local food/dining writer.

461-9840

Voodoo Music Experience (@VoodooNola)

The Halloween weekend rock festival in New Orleans.

Lil Wayne (@Liltunechi)

New Orleans’ busiest and most prolific rap star.

Kristin Hersh (@kristinhersh)

The former Throwing Muse is a popular local indie artist.

DJ Soul Sister (@djsoulsister) The platter-spinning queen of New Orleans.

Juvenile (@juviethegreat) New Orleans rap icon.

Curren$y (@CurrenSy_Spitta) Crescent City rapper.

Mannie Fresh (@mannieisfresh) Cash Money co-hort and Big Tymer.

Quintron (@mrquintron)

Bywater organist, musician and Drum Buddy inventor.

Keep your shopping dollars in the New Orleans community.

PEOPLE Mayor Mitch Landrieu (@MayorLandrieu)

Keep up on official city business.

Drew Brees (@drewbrees)

Everyone’s favorite quarterback.

Harry Shearer (@theharryshearer)

He’s Mr. Burns. He’s Nigel Tufnel. He’s a director, a documentarian and a passionate defender of all things New Orleans.

STUFF TO DO Ogden Museum of Southern Art (@OgdenMuseum)

Museum officials will sometimes tweet ways to get into Ogden After Hours for free.

New Orleans Hornets (@Hornets) The city’s NBA team.

New Orleans Saints (@official_Saints)

ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

The Prytania Theatre (@PrytaniaTheatre)

Taceaux Loceaux (@TLNola)

Stay Local! (@staylocal)

Sports (@wwltvsports)

Updates on NOLA Drive-In events.

Pizza pop-up in the Bywater on Thursdays and Sundays. Its Twitter carries posts of that day’s menu.

Posts from the fashion blogger, as well as news about local fashion events.

The frequently updated feed of the WWL-TV meteorology staff.

NOLA Drive-In (@NolaDriveIn)

BUFFALO WING FLING

Christy Lorio (@slowsouthstyle)

Weather (@wwltvweather)

Frequent updates about screenings and other film events.

OPEN TO CLOSE

Information about sales, new arrivals and the occasional funny tweet.

Traffic (@wwltvtraffic)

New Orleans Film Society (@NOFS)

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United Apparel Liquidators, French Quarter (@U_A_L)

The city’s No. 1 news channel.

FILM

TUESDAY BURGERS & BEERS

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WWL-TV (@wwltv)

The Saints, the Hornets and everything else sports-related.

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Pizza Delicious (@pizzadelicious)

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ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

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Drive, bike or walk to NOLA Drive-In. PHOTO BY SERGIO LOBO-NAVIA

The Prytania Theatre screens a free movie every month for New Orleans Film Society members. PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE

selections, Oscar-winning documentaries and quirky comedies. The space’s concession stand is also more colorful than that of your average movie house, with offbeat offerings like homemade Popsicles, Japanese candy and vegan snacks. For a retro twist on cheap flicks, NOLA Drive-In screens drive-in (or bike-in or walk-in) movies in the parking lot of the former Schwegmann’s grocery store at the corner of St. Claude and Elysian Fields avenues. Admission at the most recent screening was $5. Follow NOLA Drive-In on Twitter (@NolaDriveIn) for upcoming screenings. See a free movie and get a cheap meal at the French Quarter location

of La Divina Gelateria (621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com), which hosts a monthly Monday Movie Madness series. There’s a different theme each month, with past categories for free screenings including Alfred Hitchcock, Christmas and Laurel & Hardy movies. During the screenings at 7:30 p.m. on Mondays, the cafe runs a special offering a panino, a cup of soup or house salad, a hot double espresso and a 4-ounce espresso for $15. You sometimes can find free movie passes in the pages of Gambit, online at www.bestofneworleans.com and on our Twitter “schwag” feed @GambitGoods.

ANNUAL COLLEGE GUIDE > AUGUST 16 > 2011

ven with a student discount, multiplex tickets can be expensive for those on ramengrade budgets. Fortunately, there are ways to get your film fix on the cheap other than relying on dusty VHS tapes in your campus library or streaming bootleg movies from Swedish websites in your dorm. New Orleans offers many inexpensive — or free — ways to see movies, and you don’t have to borrow your roommate’s car and drive out to Metairie to see them. Unless you’re a 12-year senior, chances are you’re younger than 30 and are eligible for the New Orleans Film Society’s (NOFS) steal of a membership deal. Yearly membership to the society, which hosts film events around town, is only $25 for people under 30 (regular memberships start at $60). Membership comes with a number of perks: Every month the Prytania Theatre (5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com) screens a free movie for NOFS members, and Chalmette Movies (8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 3049992; www.chalmettemovies.com) does the same thing on Thursdays. Members also get discounts at regular NOFS

screenings — held at venues including the Prytania, New Orleans Museum of Art, the Contemporary Arts Center and Coliseum Square Park — as well as the NOFS-sponsored film festivals Film-o-Rama, the French Film Festival and the upcoming New Orleans Film Festival (Oct. 14-20). Interested in learning more about all those social problems your freshmanlevel sociology classes are exploring? The Charitable Film Network (CFN) (8967333; www.charitablefilmnetwork.org) collaborates with local artists, nonprofits and community groups to screen free films, usually those with a socially conscious bent. The CFN partners with the NOFS for some events, as well as The Green Project (2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org) for its monthly Green Screen series, Antenna Gallery (3161 Burgundy St.; www.press-street.com/ antenna) and other organizations. Check CFN’s website and Facebook page for more information. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center (1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net) — which offers a student ticket for $6 — also screens socially conscious films, but selections also can include horror movies, animated features, foreign

{ BY LAUREN LABORDE }

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