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contents

APRIL 5, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 14

...in your Easter Bonnet

>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

Market Place Real Estate / Rentals Employment Mind / Body / Spirit

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

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SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BIG RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS CARRIE MARKS, MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON

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FEEDBACK

WHAT YOU SAY?

SUNO Fits the Bill

I disagree with the opinion of Clancy DuBos in the March 22 column, “Merger Most Foul?”. Whether or not it is called a “merger,” the Board of Regents consultant’s recommendation has the same effect. Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO) and the University of New Orleans would be managed by the same president in a merged management structure. It is difficult to see how the consultant’s recommendation that the mission and culture of SUNO be preserved could be achieved under such an arrangement. SUNO’s mission and culture are defined by the fact that it is a Historically Black University (HBCU) that is part of the nation’s only HBCU system. If SUNO is moved as proposed, there is a real risk it will lose its HBCU designation — and that the Southern System will ultimately cease to exist. His reference to SUNO as a “fiefdom” belies a lack of recognition of the new Southern. As a system, we are committed to positive change, and our Project Positive Direction has us well down the road of reform. In addition, the work of SUNO’s Chancellor, Dr. Victor Ukpolo, and his administration, is completely student-centered. DuBos misses the main point made by the consultants. The demographics of New Orleans dictate that the greatest higher education task in New Orleans is the work of SUNO. It needs to and it will improve six-year graduation rates. Twenty-five percent of SUNO’s students are part time and 25 percent are transfer students. The latter are not counted in graduation numbers. In any event, we expect the rates to continue to rise and reach 25 percent in less than five years. More important, the average SUNO student works, is low income, and takes nine years to graduate. They are people, often in challenging circumstances, seeking to better themselves with a bachelor’s degree. They should be commended for persevering. SUNO should be commended for producing 52 percent of the bachelor degrees awarded to African-Americans by New Orleans public universities in 2010. The Southern System proposed — Honore Center for Undergraduate Student Achievement — which also was submitted to the Legislature by the Board of Regents, has most of the elements recommended by the consultants. It is student-focused, affordable and won’t require a constitutional amendment to implement. RONALD MA SON JR.

PRESIDENT, SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY SYSTEM

“The demographics of New Orleans dictate that the greatest higher education task in New Orleans is the work of SUNO.” — Ronald Mason Jr., President, Southern University System

The Real Mission

Ian McNulty (“In the Pool,” March 29) could’ve served the public interests 90 times better had he just listed the website for the Fully Informed Jury Association (www.fija.org). His “personal look at completing ... and survival guide of sorts” is good as far as informing one to bring a book, a sweater and lunch, but to really make a difference when picked to serve on a jury, reference fija.org. From their “Purpose” page: “The FIJA mission is to educate Americans regarding their full powers as jurors, including their ability to rely on personal conscience, to judge the merit of the law and its application, and to nullify bad law, when necessary for justice, by finding for the defendant.” In other words, you and me, as jurors have the power to change laws! What a responsibility! What a missed opportunity to really put some substance into a story. J. LÓPEZ Letters should not exceed 400 words and may be edited for space. Include home address and daytime phone number for verification. E-MAIL (PREFERRED):

response@gambitweekly.com MAIL:

3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119

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any formal gang affiliation. Additionally, only 13.7 percent were killed by a stranger, while more than 40 percent were killed by an “acquaintance.” The second report also noted the “diverse” nature of homicide cases in New Orleans — as well as the challenges confronting police investigators. In cities where drug sales drive the homicide rate, cops can reduce homicides by targeting the organized narcotics trade. In New Orleans, the problem isn’t just drug dealers or gangbangers; it also seems to be common street beefs that get settled at gunpoint. The studies recognize that Police Chief Ronal Serpas has already instituted a 65-point plan to rebuild NOPD and that his efforts are showing progress. Serpas’ plan includes specific steps to reduce violent crime, steps which the bureau called “strategies and practices that have proven

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effective in other cities.” The report noted, however, that more needs to be done. The bureau suggested several additional measures: establishing a homicide review team; improving crime analysis and intelligence operations; and devoting greater attention and resources to community collaboration. The report also calls for continued improvements to the Comstat system, which uses computers to analyze, predict and curtail criminal activity in the police districts. Clearly, NOPD needs a top-to-bottom overhaul. Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Chief Serpas have promised nothing less. Collectively, the federal reports present a thorough, honest, independent analysis of what’s working, what’s broken and what must be done to fix the department. The good news, as the homicide analysis noted, is that “most problems do not appear to be endemic — rather, they are resolvable, albeit some are easier than others.” In the long run, the cure for what ails NOPD is bound to revive all of New Orleans.

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f the U.S. Department of Justice’s March 17 report on the New Orleans Police Department’s constitutional abuses and chronic shortcomings was the equivalent of a doctor’s diagnosis, two reports released last week by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) were the prescription. Unfortunately, last week’s reports drew considerably less attention than the earlier DOJ report. All three are “must reads” for anyone concerned about the future of policing in New Orleans. In one of last week’s reports, “An Assessment of the New Orleans Police Department Homicide Section: Recommendations for Best Practices,” the bureau recommended a wholesale reorganization of NOPD’s Homicide Division. The suggestions included beefing up the division (from 22 investigators to 32), providing better training and giving officers more tools (such as smartphones) to do their jobs in the field. The report noted that parts of the Homicide Division’s operations manual had not been updated since 1995 — and there was only one copy of the manual for the entire department. Perhaps worst of all was this observation: “While there is more work that is needed to fully develop the Scientific Investigation Division, they do have a functional forensic analysis capability. Ironically, NOPD Investigators are not fully aware of the division’s analytic capability. Some investigators stated that the department did not have a functional crime laboratory. This obviously indicates a communication problem.” The second repor t, “Crime in New Orleans: Analyzing Crime Trends and New Orleans’ Responses to Crime,” compared local crime rates with those of the U.S. as a whole, with similarly sized cities and with one particular city — Orlando, Fla. The BJA chose Orlando for comparison because of its similar size, region and tourism industry. In 2009, New Orleans’ overall crime, violent crime and property crime rates were slightly lower than those of similarly sized cities and substantially lower than those of Orlando. However, New Orleans’ homicide rate that same year was more than 10 times the national average, more than four times the rate of cities of a similar size and more than four times the rate of Orlando. By any measure, our homicide rate is anomalous — and rightly a source of local as well as national concern. The BJA analyzed criminals and victims in homicide cases from mid-April 2009 through mid-May 2010. The findings were sobering if not surprising. Exactly 90 percent of the 200 homicides studied during that 13-month period were committed with firearms — 78 percent with handguns. Of those killed, 86.5 percent were male and 91.5 percent were black — but only 1 percent had

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For folks out there who don’t know, Bryan Batt is a New Orleansborn actor best known nationally for his role as Sal Romano in the hit television show Mad Men. His memoir, published in May 2010 and titled She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Mother, is a tribute to his mom, Gayle Batt, who died in December 2010. Bryan’s father John Batt was a member of the family that founded and ran Pontchartrain Beach. In 1928, the first Pontchartrain Beach opened across the bayou from the Old Spanish Fort levee HEY BLAKE, near the mouth of Bayou St. A poster commemorates Pontchartrain EARHART BOULEVARD’S John. There were fun rides, con- Beach with two IN A MESS THESE DAYS. cession stands, lunchrooms, a favored pasttimes IT GOT ME WONDERING bathhouse, a boardwalk and a at the amusement HOW IT GOT ITS NAME. I lifeguard at Pontchartrain Beach. park — playing on KNOW YOU CAN TELL ME When the Great Depression the beach and ridcame we thought the fun was ing the Zephyr roller THE ANSWER. over, but in 1933, the Batt family coaster. E. BROWN saved the day. Harry Batt Sr. had started as a conces- DEAR E.B., sionaire at the old Pontchartrain Beach. In 1933, the company he worked for went The boulevard, built in 1952 along the broke, and he took over. Five years later, former right of way of a railroad, was the Batts moved the site of Pontchartrain one of the first new expressways comBeach to Milneburg at the end of Elysian pleted in the city. It was named for Fred A. Fields Avenue. It was on land recently Earhart, who had served as commissioner reclaimed from Lake Pontchartrain, and of Public Utilities. But that was not his Pontchartrain Beach Amusement Park only accomplishment. obtained a lease from the Orleans Parish Earhart was born to German parents Levee Board to operate there. In 1939, the in New Orleans in 1875. He graduated old amusement park near Spanish Fort from Loyola University, where he later was demolished. taught pharmacy. In addition, he estabBefore “the Beach” closed in 1983, lished a successful chain of drugstores in patrons were treated to nightly shows, New Orleans. mostly of the circus-act variety such as He was active in politics and was a balancing acts and human cannonballs. state senator from 1912 to 1920. From For a while they could watch trained dol- 1920 to 1949, Earhart was a member of phins or see magic shows. And every year the City Council. He was even mayor of the Miss New Orleans beauty pageant New Orleans, but only for a day: July 15, was staged there. I recall the biggest star 1936. In the summer of that year, Earhart that graced the stage at Pontchartrain was one of three acting mayors who Beach was an up-and-coming young sing- served between the resignation of Mayor er from Mississippi named Elvis Presley. T. Semmes Walmsley and the accession Harry Batt Jr., who began working for of Robert Maestri. The other two fellows his father in 1948, was operating the were A. Miles Pratt and Jesse S. Cave. park when it closed in 1983. The lease Earhart continued to serve as commiswas expiring and times were changing. sioner of public utilities in the Maestri At the time, he said, “Progress made the administration. Beach obsolete.” Earhart died in 1952 at the age of 77.


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scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“The bigger the company, the less likely there will be individuals held accountable.” — Jane Barrett, a University of Maryland law professor who has studied the penalties levied against corporations after major accidents. Barrett told AOL News she doubted anyone from BP would be held personally accountable after the Deepwater Horizon disaster. “To me, this is a prime example of what is wrong with just letting companies buy their way out by paying fines,” she added. “The way you change corporate behavior is if you make people within the entity afraid that if they break the law, they can go to jail.”

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‘HATE’ SPEECH

BY JEREMY ALFORD

Caroline Fayard, who is believed to be testing the waters before possibly challenging incumbent Gov. Bobby Jindal in the fall statewide elections, raised hackles across Louisiana after her appearance at a Washington Parish Democratic Party function March 24. Fayard’s appearance went unremarked until the Washington Parish Daily News quoted part of her speech: “I hate Republicans. I hate Republicans. They are cruel and destructive. They eat their young. They don’t think. They don’t allow people to think. They are bullies.” The Louisiana GOP immediately jumped on Fayard’s incendiary remarks, with state party chair Roger Villere Jr. demanding an apology from his Democratic counterpart Buddy Leach (he didn’t get one). In a March 28 interview with Gambit, Fayard said she didn’t have notes from the speech, adding, “I spoke off the cuff, and I don’t remember the exact context. I think it was a contextual issue. Chalk it up to my naivete in politics.” Fayard, who had an unsuccessful run for lieutenant gov-

“Truth will rise above falsehood as oil above water.” — Miguel de Cervantes

W

PAGE 15

c'est what? IF THE NFL LOCKOUT CONTINUES INTO THE PRESEASON, WHO DO YOU THINK WILL BE TO BLAME?

Jindal apologists claim the governor avoids a conflict on this issue because Worley merely works for BP, which is the real adverse party. That defense is halfbaked at best. According to a search of state contracts, Worley Catastrophe also has a $380,000 consulting agreement with the Division of Administration, which makes it a state contractor. Moreover, the company’s contract was awarded on Jindal’s watch in August

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THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

received the Louisiana Center for Women and Government’s award for outstanding public service at a ceremony for the group’s Hall of Fame in New Orleans March 26. Kotb was an anchor at WWL-TV before moving to New York to work for NBC News, where she now co-anchors the last hour of the Today show. Last year, Kotb published a memoir, Hoda, which includes stories from covering Mardi Gras to covering Hurricane Katrina.

Melanie Newman

was sentenced to federal prison for two years for her role in a conspiracy to defraud her employer, the Medical Center of Louisiana Foundation, for $220,000. Her husband and co-conspirator, Michael Goodloe Jr., received an 18-month sentence. Newman, the government found, forged checks to pay for the couple’s personal items, including cars and wedding expenses.

Scott Angelle,

the secretary of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, accepted an award last week from the Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association — a group that his department is supposed to regulate. Angelle, who was in Washington, D.C., the week before to testify about wetlands to the U.S. House of Representatives, issued a statement saying he was “honored.” He should have been embarrassed.

Beau Gast & Thomas McMasters

were fired by the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) after an extensive review by the NOPD’s Public Integrity Bureau. The department found both officers had arrested women on prostitution charges without a valid warrant and falsified reports. Among the charges considered against the former officers: moral conduct related to false imprisonment and neglect of duty.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

ith more than $9 million in his campaign war chest, Gov. Bobby Jindal can afford to be choosy about where he draws down campaign cash, but why bother? Sure, $9 million is a lot of dough, but as former Gov. Edwin Edwards used to say, why leave any around for an opponent to use against him? “I’m running for re-election,” Jindal told reporters last week. “I’m not taking anything for granted.” Which is why, no doubt, Jindal agreed to a fundraiser hosted last week by Mike Worley of Hammond. Worley is the CEO of Worley Catastrophe Response, the company selected by BP to process claims related to last year’s oil spill. Worley Catastrophe Response’s contract with BP makes the company an official adversary of the State of Louisiana, legally speaking. Jindal, in his capacity as governor and ostensibly on behalf of aggrieved Louisiana citizens, asked a federal judge two months ago to take over the claims process that Worley oversees — arguing that claims processed by Worley on behalf of BP were not being processed promptly or fairly. So why is Jindal allowing Worley to raise campaign cash for him now, at a $1,000-per-plate event?

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the berm project, which was intended to stop the flow of oil from BP’s Deepwater Horizon well from contaminating wetlands and sensitive waterways. The experiment ultimately was deemed “not successful” by the national oil spill commission. Is it noteworthy that the Baton Rouge-based Shaw Group was charged with hiring subcontractors? Sure, but it’s equally noteworthy that all of the berm firms that donated money to Jindal — save C.F. Bean — have direct contracts with the state as well. Oh, but Jindal’s mouthpieces have declared that taking money from subcontractors somehow erases all conflicts — though they don’t quite explain how. In other contexts, the feds have been known to take a dim view of that ruse. Just ask our jailed former governor. Still, one cannot help spotting a trend when cross-referencing a list of the state’s oil spill contractors with Jindal’s campaign finance reports. For example, the plaintiff law firm of Kanner & Whiteley currently has a $1.8 million legal contract with the state related to the BP disaster. In March of last year, shortly before the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, Allan Kanner of New Orleans, the firm’s managing member, donated $2,000 to Jindal’s campaign. Then, roughly three months after its contract went into effect with the state last year, Kanner coughed up another $3,000 to the governor’s campaign. Two things are noteworthy about Kanner’s contribution: first, he’s a high-profile plaintiff lawyer and, as such, he’s not a natural political ally of a conservative Republican like Jindal; and second, Kanner got the contract on the recommendation of Attorney General Buddy Caldwell — but all such contracts have to be approved by the Division of Administration’s Office of Contractual Review, which is directly under the governor’s control. In March 2010, Jindal’s campaign received $5,000 from the Dallas-based personal injury and product liability firm Baron & Budd. About five months later, Forbes reported that Jindal hoped to hire the firm to pursue BP litigation on behalf of the state. A search of state records shows no current contracts for Barron & Budd — just its hefty donation to the governor, on file with the Louisiana Board of Ethics. At a minimum, accepting contributions from trial lawyers shows that the governor — who is no friend of the plaintiffs’ bar — really doesn’t care page 13

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2009 — and it was bankrolled with federal dough. Jindal may say he’s taking nothing for granted with regard to his re-election prospects, but when it comes to raising campaign money, he’s taking all he can handle — even from those adverse to the state. Quite expectedly, and rightly so, the Louisiana Democratic Party went nuts on this one. “It is a clear conflict for Gov. Jindal to take campaign cash from somebody who works for BP at the same time he’s supposed to be holding BP accountable,” said party chair Buddy Leach. Leach added that Jindal should have canceled the fundraiser. Two days later, state Rep. Jon Bel Edwards, D-Amite and chair of the House Democratic Caucus, excoriated Jindal from the House floor and called on the governor to return all the money raised for him at the Worley event and apologize to the people of Louisiana — “most especially to those claimants” who have been short-changed by BP and Worley. “His judgment on this one is wrong,” Edwards said of Jindal. “We’re not talking about the appearance of impropriety here. We’re talking about impropriety.” Turns out, however, that Worley’s political largesse knows no party bounds. He gave $5,000 to the Democratic State Central Committee last fall — after BP hired his firm. In fact, Worley has donated money to a wide range of Democrats, from state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson of New Orleans to President Barack Obama. For the time being, at least, Worley is Jindal’s millstone. “The governor wants the support of all people in Louisiana,” Kyle Plotkin, the governor’s press secretary, told The Associated Press. Really? Does the governor want money from death row inmates or from Planned Parenthood or from gun-control advocates? No, especially when there’s so much low-hanging fruit from state contractors and others who have to interface with state government. For example, Team Jindal has trousered $12,000 over the past two years from firms involved with the construction of the governor’s much ballyhooed but quickly forgotten coastal berms. Some of that moolah was delivered just months after the massive project got underway in 2010. The companies and their loot include Shaw Group, $6,000; B.F.M., $3,000; C.F. Bean, $2,000; and G.C.R. & Associates, $1,000. BP also put up $360 million for

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which Jindal has expounded for national audiences — the governor’s political financiers don’t seem too hard pressed for work these days, particularly when their paychecks come from the public treasury. As a candidate, Jindal promised voters an ethical “gold standard.” As a candidate for re-election, he has a different kind of gold standard: He goes for the gold, wherever he may find it. One recent statewide survey suggests that Jindal’s cozy relationships with contractors are finally beginning to eclipse his talking points about “ethics reform” in the minds of voters. This year’s Louisiana Survey, released last month by LSU’s Public Policy Research Lab, noted: “In 2008 during the first special session of the state Legislature [called by Jindal], a comprehensive package of ethics reforms was passed and signed into law. The immediate effect on public attitudes about corruption was striking — a six-point decrease in the percent of respondents saying the state had become more corrupt. Since the passage of ethics reform, however, there has been little or no subsequent movement in public attitudes toward corruption.” In fact, the survey shows that 20 percent of Louisiana residents believe the state is more corrupt now — and 40 percent contend the state is just as corrupt as ever. “Overall, perceptions of corruption appear to have stabilized,” the LSU survey concludes. Maybe that’s why Jindal is none too picky about where he gets his money. As long as he continues to say one thing while doing the opposite — while piously denying any conflicts — he truly cannot take anything for granted. Particularly voters’ tolerance for hypocrisy.

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CorreCtions

In “Pleading the Fifth” (News & Views, March 29), we mistakenly identified Jacques Morial as an attorney. He is not. In “Blake Pontchartrain” March 29, we misspelled the name of Reuther Baking Company. In the Annual Guide to Schools, March 29, we misstated the tuition amount for Louise S. McGehee school as per year instead of per semester. Gambit regrets the errors.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > APRIL 05 > 2011

where he gets his campaign money. Then there’s the peripheral action. Steve Theriot, Jindal’s first inspector general, who vacated the office in 2009, now has a $100,000 consulting contract with the state related to the oil spill. More recently, Angele Davis, Jindal’s former commissioner of administration, has been jockeying for a piece of the $15 million that BP ponied up for rebranding and marketing Louisiana and its products in the wake of the disaster. Davis is working with an international firm that is expected to bid on a project related to the fund for the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board (LSPMB). In response to a recent request from Davis, the Louisiana Board of Ethics told her that she would not be prohibited from consulting with FleishmanHillard, a worldwide communications firm, as it seeks to win the LSPMB marketing contract. In her request, Davis made it clear that she would not personally enter into any contract with the LSPMB, nor would she be advising Fleishman-Hillard in any transactions with the Division of Administration, which she left in August of last year. Elsewhere, plaintiff lawyer Walter Leger Jr., the father and law partner of state Rep. Walt Leger III of New Orleans, has been retained by St. Tammany, St. Bernard and Lafourche parishes to handle potential oil spill litigation. The senior Leger was named by then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco to the nowdefunct Louisiana Recovery Authority (LRA) after Hurricane Katrina — before his son ran for the state House — and was re-appointed by Jindal. He served as LRA’s vice chairman under Jindal and thus had a voice in allocating hurricane relief dollars to the parishes he now represents against BP. Leger’s law firm, Leger & Shaw, donated $5,000 to Jindal’s campaign last fall. That contribution coincides with a splashy Jindal fundraiser on St. Charles Avenue hosted by big-time trial lawyers in September 2010 — and it offers further evidence that Jindal doesn’t much care where he gets his campaign cash. (In the House, Rep. Leger, a staunch Democrat, is a frequent critic of Jindal. Just last week, he led the fight against a Jindal-backed amendment that would have carved up Democratic House districts in New Orleans in order to preserve Republican districts in Jefferson Parish. The amendment failed by just two votes.) For all the economic hardships inflicted upon coastal Louisiana — on

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ernor last year against Republican Jay Dardenne, previously worked for thenFirst Lady Hillary Clinton. Former President Bill Clinton raised money for her campaign. Today, she says, “I’m conservative. I’m against the president [Barack Obama], but I don’t need to see his birth certificate. … I’m a pro-life conservative from Tickfaw, and a registered Democrat.” She demurred when asked if she intended to run for governor, saying, “I don’t know what I’m doing next.” Asked if she, as a self-identified conservative, would consider joining the exodus from the Democratic party — following Attorney General Buddy Caldwell and the dozen or so high-profile Louisiana pols who’ve switched to the GOP in recent months — Fayard told Gambit, “I’m not an opportunist. I see myself as a conservative, and all I can tell you is that I see myself on the side of working families and middle-class people.” Apparently sensing both a campaign issue and a meme, the Louisiana Republican Party quickly printed up bumper stickers to give away on its website, lagop.com. The stickers feature a silhouette of an elephant and the words, “Caroline Fayard Hates Me.” None of this seemed to affect Fayard’s possible candidacy. On March 30, Fox News’ Greta van Susteren reported Fayard was in Washington, D.C., to meet with Martin O’Malley, chairman of the Democratic Governors Association, “to discuss her possible run” against Jindal. — Kevin Allman

BP, One Year Later

COOPer tenants stiLL Waiting

Public housing tenants and the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice charged last week that the Housing Authority of New Orleans (HANO) and its contractors aren’t hiring locally for the B.W. Cooper housing development construction — despite HANO director David Gilmore saying 40 percent of its crew would come from the community. The contractors already must comply with HUD “Section 3” rules that require 30 percent of the workforce be lowincome residents. Community residents, union organizers and other supporters gathered outside the B.W. Cooper development March 31 to demand that Gilmore and the city provide more jobs for locals. Some residents say they’ve been on a Section 3 waiting list for two years and that the site’s contractor, KPK Enterprises, has another waiting list. Residents call the hiring process “a shell game,” moving one set of promises and paperwork to another department and losing jobs in the process. When Gambit asked HANO to comment on the demonstration and Cooper residents’ complaints, HANO spokesman David Jackson responded by further explaining Section 3. A promised statement regarding the residents’ concerns was not available by presstime. “The residents of B.W. Cooper have been continually strung along for the last couple of years with promises of jobs, and we’ve seen that this is a pattern especially since Katrina — a real effort to lock out poor black people from accessing jobs,” says the justice center’s campaign and resource director Colette Tippy. “We’re standing with B.W. Cooper in their longterm fight to really push forward an agenda of investing in a community that just needs jobs to have a better community, to be role models.” Resident Derrick Butler says he’s waited nearly three years to hear from Section 3, but contractors told him all jobs are currently filled for the B.W. Cooper development — and to call back next month. The development’s plans call for 410 units, but if Congress fails to renew GO Zone funding by the end of September, the number of units could be slashed by 40 percent — which could cut the labor force and further shut out the B.W. Cooper community from employment. “People are being told if they don’t have a job they can’t get into this community once it’s rebuilt,” Tippy says. “There’s a combination of things going on to disperse this really long-term community.” — Woodward

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

It’s April 2011, which means national media crews are re-entering south Louisiana for one-year-anniversary followups to one of 2010’s biggest stories: the Deepwater Horizon disaster and ensuing BP oil leak across the Gulf Coast. One of the first arrivals in the Gulf is human rights reporter Mac McClelland with Mother Jones. What she finds is much of the same: ongoing (and ineffective) tar ball cleanup efforts and restricted access to beaches and coastal areas. “Like some lame iteration of Groundhog Day, the hundredth time I try to pull onto the Elmer’s Island access road from Highway 1 in southern Louisiana — some 200 days after the last time I tried it — I am, once again, stopped,” she wrote. “Last year, it was cops blocking the road. Now it’s private security hired by BP.” WDSU-TV reporter Scott Walker told Gambit while reporting in Grand Isle (“Blackout,” July 11, 2010) that residents there were concerned about the eventual disappearance of the press, as it would signal the “end of the spill” nationally. “One person I talked to said, ‘What I’m concerned about is three months from now, four months from now, when the

story’s not as big and there’s no one here,’ he said, ‘Then we’re going to have a bunch of problems.’” — Alex Woodward

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PATH

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THE YEAR NEW ORLEANS BECOMES

A BIKE DESTINATION.

M

ay I park your bike for you?” That’s Jamie Wine’s calling card this afternoon. At this year’s first Wednesday at the Square concert, Wine is offering valet parking — for bikes. The Young Leadership Council (YLC) and bike advocacy group the Metro Bicycle Coalition (MBC) launched their bicycle valet program last week at the annual spring and summer festival. MBC director Wine corraled a dozen bikes inside an orange plastic barrier around two tents set up across the street from Lafayette Square. “We’ve had bike parking at festivals, but it’s been kind of piecemeal,” Wine says. “Look at Jazz Fest — they have tons of bike parking and they want people to ride bikes. So this is the next step. It’s like coat check for bikes.” A valet service sounds over the top, but consider how it got to this: neighborhoods demanded bike lanes, the city received funding to build them and now they’re here. Now bicyclists need safe, secure parking and somewhere to go. A valet service means bike projects are booming enough to afford a little practical luxury — and one that offers “100 percent supervised” parking, Wine says. “It’s just like locking their bike, except it’s being watched so they don’t come back to a stripped bike later.” In City Park and throughout Bayou St. John, there are miles of lanes for recreational riders. But now bike paths and lanes are popping up on major streets, from Orleans Avenue to St. Charles Avenue. Carrollton Avenue’s lanes are completed, and St. Claude Avenue is shaping up to be the city’s most popular bike route. What will it take to get New Orleans on the map for biking in the U.S.? IN 2004, THE CITY SECURED A $4 MILLION, FIVE-YEAR BOND INITIATIVE FOR BIKE AND PEDESTRIAN projects — not enough for a top-to-bottom overhaul for cycling, but enough to make a dent. After Hurricane Katrina, however, the city received an additional $200 million to repair streets under the Submerged Roads program. The city also tapped into stimulus funding from the Obama administra-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

BY ALEX WOODWARD

19


PAGE 20

COVER STORY

Orleans’ Department of Public Works. “We were limited with what we were able to do with ($4 million) until we realized we were leveraging, after Katrina, a complete resurfacing of streets. All the work that’s going into the resurfacing projects, we just have to add our contribution to create a bike lane or something like that, at a very insignificant cost.” Her post, funded by a grant from the Entergy Corporation, allows the city to have a bicycle advocate working on its payroll when previously there was no person dedicated for working on bike projects. “It’s very uncommon for cities to actually have grants from outside entities paying for an engineer to do this work,” Ruley says. “In the past couple of years we’ve seen more cities realize that the public health messaging and policy changes only go so far — you really need someone inside the machine making the changes.” Ruley oversees projects in the Public Works pipeline and finds ways to integrate bikes into the picture. Getting more lanes on more roads is just the start. She also gets other city planners and engineers to ride bikes and talk the lingo. “I have that conversation with staff — ‘bicycle this, pedestrian that,’” she says. “The fact we’ve been able to open the door to (bike projects) as legitimate needs and worthy of our time and efforts is pretty tremendous. It affects livability, quality of life, and attracting and keeping people here.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

DESPITE THAT GROWTH, NEW ORLEANS RANKS nowhere close to other major biking hubs. Seattle is climbing to 100 miles of bike roadways, New York

22

Jennifer Ruley, who oversees bike projects for the city Department of Public Works, rides her bicycle along the newly paved bike lane on Orleans Avenue.

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he Young Leadership Council’s (YLC) Where Ya Rack initiative installed 45 bike racks in 2010, and schools, businesses and other sponsors have signed on for an additional 100. Once those are in place, the group plans to install 150 more. “Your route to get there has been improved, but once you get there, where do you put your bike?” asks MBC vice president Dan Jatres. Here’s a sample, from Uptown to Bywater. Find a full map of Where Ya Rack’s racks at www.whereyarack.org.

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1 rack


page 25

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City installed 250 miles within three years, and Los Angeles committed to 1,600 miles in a 20-year master plan. New Orleans didn’t even crack the top 50 in Bicycling Magazine’s best biking cities in 2010, and it only received an “honorable mention” from the League of American Bicyclists. But New Orleans, like bike meccas San Francisco and Portland, Ore., did rank in the top 10 of 51 U.S. cities for bicycle commuting. Last year, the Alliance for Bicycling & Walking found 9 percent of all trips in New Orleans are by bike, meeting the national average. Councilwoman Palmer wants the city to be No. 1, and Public Works thinks it can get there. “For us to say we’re successful is to really build the commuting population,” says Robert Mendoza, the city’s director of Public Works. “If we don’t get to that, I don’t know we’ll be able to say we were successful in doing this.” The challenge now? “The name of the game is increasing connectivity,” MBC director Wine says. Finding ways to connect bike lanes to other bike lanes means giving cyclists a place to go once they’ve arrived at their destination. There are bike paths in Mid-City near Bayou St. John, but how does the city connect those to Carrollton Avenue in Uptown? And from there to St. Charles Avenue? Streetcars and buses have similar budgetary and geographic gaps, but bikes have a bigger obstacle: bad roads. “I get calls: ‘Why does it stop there, why not continue on?’” Ruley says. “The reality is we don’t want to direct people to potholes.” Mendoza says his department’s goal this year is connecting those clusters of lanes and paths to others. “We’d like to see it extend to the whole city,” he says. “Why can’t someone from Gentilly also bike in? We have to get all the way out there. The St. Claude (bike lane) now reaches beyond Bywater into the Lower 9th Ward into St. Bernard. That’s where we can make a difference. It means less cars on the road, the roads last longer — there are lots of pluses to that whole process.”

St. Charles Vision

23


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

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24


PAGE 23

COVER STORY

Public Works also is looking to connect Earhart Boulevard at the parish line to its Uptown terminus. Once completed, the Lafitte Corridor project, which Ruley manages, will link the French Quarter to Lakeview. “We’re not just laying the paths, we’re linking them together, which increases their value,” Mendoza says. So what happens once the routes are improved? Where do bicyclists go? MBC partnered with YLC for its Where Ya Rack bike rack initiative, which installed 45 racks in 2010 and has another 100 racks sponsored and ready to be installed once the city approves. When those are in place, the groups plan to install 150 more. “There hasn’t been a lot of city investment in ‘end-of-trip facilities’ — the fancy term for bike parking,” Jatres says. “(Racks) encourage people. They know at their destination they have a safe place to put their bike. People have the confidence to know, ‘If I ride my bike, there’ll be a bike rack.’” MBC and Public Works last month combined forces to survey businesses and residents to see where bicyclists go in the French Quarter — and where they park their bikes. “Vehicles have been the primary focus for 30 years,” Mendoza says. “Pedestrians and cyclists have been getting the third and fourth tier. It should really be in reverse, with vehicles (last). A sustainable city really cares about its pedestrians, and cyclists are right behind them. Nobody shops inside a store when they drive past it.”

The Where Ya Rack initiative is working with the city, which installed this rack on Canal Street, to increase the number of racks available to cyclists across New Orleans.

bike parking and bike racks. “We clearly want to bring bikers to Magazine Street,” he says. (Where Ya Rack installed two racks outside Whole Foods Market, and seven along Lafayette Square across from Magazine Steet.) Back at Lafayette Square, Wine hands each rider a free bicycle kit, with a local bike resource guide, a tire repair kit, lights and reflectors. He also has a clipboard with a petition asking for more bike lanes.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM: FOR ALL THE resources and funding funneling into bike projects in the New Orleans area, is anyone using them? And is New Orleans healthy enough to use them? Louisiana consistently ranks in the highest percentile for obesity, according to the Centers for Disease Control. In 2010, America’s Health Rankings stuck Louisiana at 49th — second only to Mississippi. But bike ridership is increasing. Earlier this year, Tulane’s Prevention Research Center (PRC) found average ridership along

St. Claude Avenue increased 57 percent (or about 143 cyclists a day) since bike lanes were completed there in 2008. (The report also noted ridership by women increased 133 percent.) In New Orleans, bike advocates are focusing on schools to keep kids healthy. MBC partnered with the Kids Walk Coalition, a branch of PRC, to help students stay active — whether biking or walking — from home to school. Several schools (including Charles Drew Elementary and Esperanza Charter) also are part of the Safe Routes to School Network, which builds a neighborhoodwide system to ensure kids a safe bike ride or walk to school. Last year, Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development Secretary Sherri LaBas signed a Complete Streets initiative, making sure all transportation plans incorporate safe routes not only for motor vehicles but also pedestrians and, of course, bicycles. The PRC is continuing its public awareness campaign (“It’s Safe, It’s Courteous, It’s the Law”) for 2009’s Colin Goodier Bicycle Protection Act — better known as the “three-feet law,” which gives bicyclists at least three feet of space from passing motorists. Louisiana now joins 20 other states with similar laws. (New Mexico just passed a five-feet law.) Jatres says legislators will introduce bills this year to clarify — and expand — existing bike laws. It won’t be groundbreaking, he says, but it’ll finally bring Louisiana up to speed with other states. The Tulane PRC report also suggests that more bike traffic means potential economic boosts. Friends of the Lafitte Corridor organizers are talking to businesses along its route to brainstorm ways to attract the anticipated wave of bike traffic along the corridor. Where Ya Rack is gathering sponsorships from local businesses to install bike racks outside their doors. Bicyclists are a previously untapped market of which Public Works is finally taking notice. For example, Mendoza says Magazine Street is too narrow to safely plan a dedicated bike lane, but there’s room for

25


10-311 Complex Geography of Salsa Music Ad Gambit:Layout 1 3/29/11 8:26 AM Page 1

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies presents

26

THE COMPLEX GEOGRAPHY OF SALSA MUSIC:

CULTURE, NATION, AND MIGRATION A LECTURE BY DR. ÁNGEL QUINTERO-RIVERA Wednesday, April 13, 2011, at 7 p.m. Nunemaker Auditorium, Monroe Hall Free and open to the public. Salsa Music is one of the most exciting cultural expressions in the Americas, with deep, complex roots connecting the Caribbean and the U.S. Dr. Ángel G. Quintero Rivera, one of the most respected specialists in Salsa Music, will share the historical, sociological, and cultural aspects behind this joyful musical rhythm. For more information, contact Uriel Quesada at 865-2886 or e-mail uquesada@loyno.edu

www.loyno.edu/clacs


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SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Heart of Pine haun Wilkerson’s (3023 Chartres St., 208-7998; www.shaunwilkerson.com) dressers, headboards, bookshelves and tables are infused with the inner warmth and fine gold veining endemic to quality wood. The solid pine and cypress pieces seem to breathe with the seasons, contracting in the winter and expanding in heat. “Mostly, these are made with wood reclaimed from demolition sites and the bottom of Louisiana swamps,” says Wilkerson, a furniture maker for 25 years. “More than 100 years ago, they clear cut all the Louisiana swampland — something you could never do now. Land was bought just for the timber, hundreds of acres. They’d float the logs to mills near Ponchatoula, Houma and so on, and a lot of times, the logs sank. Now they’re so valuable, we’re pulling them up.” Wilkerson handcrafts his furniture For 10 years, Wilkerson has crafted furniture at the Chartres Street compound he from salvaged cypress and pine. shares with artist Dr. Bob, where an eclectic pastiche of paraphernalia (a mounted deer head, stacks of salvaged windows, a black school bus) and the constant whine of sanders are testament to their productivity. Most of Wilkerson’s furniture is sold Uptown at Wilkerson Row, but Wilkerson opened the Chartres Street showroom this year because he wanted a retail presence in the Bywater. “I’ve turned this shop into a venue to display all my new designs and inventions,” Wilkerson says. “The Bywater is the hottest neighborhood in the city, and I wanted to have a presence here. People who come (to this location) are more destination-oriented. They’re looking for something they can’t find elsewhere.” His furniture is solidly built — so solidly, in fact, that many customers report Wilkerson’s pieces were their only possessions to weather Hurricane Katrina’s floodwaters unscathed — and flourished with an artistic eye. Antique tin ceiling tiles lend texture to a headboard. Curlicues hand-carved on a bookshelf are reminiscent of the lacy jigsaw work and spandrels of Victorian-era Creole cottages. It’s not surprising to hear that Wilkerson looks to the city as his muse. “New Orleans gives me the most provocative palette an artist could ask for — the music, the architecture, the attitude,” Wilkerson says. “You ride through a New Orleans neighborhood, and you know you’re in a New Orleans neighborhood. New Orleans has soul, and you can feel it, and that’s what I think my furniture has.”

S

DOCTORS EXPRESS (3348 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, Metairie, 888-9988; www.doctorsexpress.com), a national urgent care franchise, recently opened a Metairie location. Among other services, the affordable health center provides travel immunizations, onsite prescriptions and minor surgical procedures and offers discounts to patients who have no insurance. It is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS linebacker Jonathan Vilma signs autographs from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 9 at PERRY ELLIS in Dillard’s (Lakeside Mall, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 833-1075; www.perryellis.com). The first 50 customers who spend $50 or more receive a Perry Ellis gift bag and a football. The CRESCENT CITY AUCTION GALLERY (1015 Julia St., 529-5057; www.crescentcityauctiongallery. com) holds an auction of the estate of former NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART curator John W. Keefe at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 9 and Sunday, April 10. Visit the website to view the catalog, which includes vintage jewelry, art and furniture. WELLINGTON & COMPANY (505 Royal St., 525-4855; www.wcjewelry.com) contributed a piece of fine jewelry as a raffle item for the PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER’s 34th annual Julia Jump fundraiser Friday, April 8, at the ROOSEVELT HOTEL (123 Baronne St., 748-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com). The event kicks off with a patron party from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., followed by a silent auction from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tickets for the event start at $125 and can be purchased at the PRC’s website (www.prcno.org) or by calling 581-7032.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

AFTER ROCK-N THE FESTS, KEEP YOUR PARTY ROLL-N!

27


Quartertime FRENCH QUARTER FEST APPEALS TO THE MASSES.

STAGE: BIG EASY AWARD WINNERS PAGE 35 ART: THE CAC: NOW AND THEN PAGE 45 CUISINE: SANTA FE EVOLVES PAGE 57

PAGE 31


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 33 42 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < APRIL >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

06

ART

45

STAGE

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EVENTS

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CUISINE

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BAND OF HORSES

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER WILSON

Band of Horses’ billowing 2010 album Infinite Arms (Fat Possum), its third overall and first apart from Pacific Northwest launching pad Sub Pop, completed the band’s transition from Seattle stargazers to South Carolina trailblazers: opening international tours for Pearl Jam and Snow Patrol and charting in the top 10 in six countries. Guitarist Tyler Ramsey opens. Tickets $25. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

A P R I L BREAK SCIENCE

08

Staging Area THE FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVAL EXPANDS TO FOUR DAYS OF MUSIC. BY MARTA JEWSON

F

the Lost Bayou Ramblers. Saturday’s headliners include Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue, Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers, bluesman Little Freddie King, chanteuse Ingrid Lucia, jazz duo Tom McDermott and Evan Christopher, and Russell Batiste and Friends featuring Jason Neville. Sunday brings the Latin grooves of Los Po-Boy-Citos, John Mooney and Bluesiana, the Mardi Gras Indian funk outfit 101 Runners, former Dirty Dozen Brass Band sousaphonist Kirk Joseph’s 504 Brass Band, Zydepunks, Wanda Rouzan and A Taste of New Orleans, Bill Summers and Orchestra Yoruba Afro America, Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. and the Zydeco Twisters and Sunpie and the Louisiana Sunspots. Local musician Ingrid Lucia grew up performing in the French Quarter and has witnessed the festival’s development over the years as well as its expanding audience. “It’s gotten larger and more organized,” Lucia says. “More people are coming from all over the world. “It’s great for local musicians. It gives them the opportunity to be exposed to new audiences and increase their fan base.” The festival is expanding its presence in the historic district both along the riverfront and on Decatur Street. This year’s total of 20 stages is the most the festival PAGE 32

PHOTO COURTESY OF FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVALS

New York’s Break Science features Adam Deitch and Borahm Lee (pictured) fusing funk, soul and hip-hop into their electronic music. For this show, they’re joined by Chali 2na, Eric Krasno of Soulive, and former Dirty Dozen Brass Band sousaphonist Kirk Joseph. Also on the bill are Gypsyphonik Disco, featuring Galactic’s Ben Ellman, and Gravity A. Tickets $16. 10 p.m. Friday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

A P R I L ORANGE FLOWER

08

WATER

In Craig Wright’s Orange Flower Water, longtime friends David and Beth get into an adulterous affair that’s too messy for their peaceful little community. Wright is an Emmy-nominated playwright who has also written for the TV series Lost, Six Feet Under and Brothers & Sisters. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; through May 14. The Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre.org French Quarter Festival THURSDAY-SUNDAY APRIL 7-10 WWW.FQFI.ORG

A P R I L JAMMIN’

10

FOR JAPAN

PHOTO BY RICK OLIVIER

Kermit Ruffins, Jeremy Davenport, Papa Grows Funk (pictured), Bonerama, plus George Porter Jr., Bruce Sunpie Barnes and other guests play a benefit for victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan. All proceeds go to the NOLA Japan Quake Fund, which was created by the honorary consul general for Japan along with several Japanese cultural groups and is administered by the Greater New Orleans Foundation. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m.-11 p.m. Sunday. Rock ’N’ Bowl, 3016 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rockandbowl.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

rench Quarter Festival is tempting New Orleanians to sneak out of work early Thursday afternoon and enjoy what it calls “locals lagniappe day.” The festival begins one day earlier than usual and has four stages offering music from midday through early evening. “We’re calling it ‘play hooky from work day,’” says festival director Marci Schramm. Music begins at noon with the Preservation Hall-Stars performing in Jackson Square. Bonerama headlines the eclectic Thursday lineup, which also includes funk band Iris May Tango, Irvin Mayfield and Bill Summers’ Los Hombres Calientes, Bag of Donuts and others. The number of stages varies the following days from 11 locations on Friday to 20 on Sunday. “There has been a lot of pressure to do two weekends,” Schramm says. Organizers have expanded the festival, but not that much. “We added stages and added a day,” she says. The growing festival showcases more than 350 musicians this year. Most performers are from Lousiana, but there are international acts as well. The festival features a wide array of musical genres. On Friday, musical highlights include Glen David Andrews teaming up with Amanda Shaw, and the Cajun sounds of

Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. plays French Quarter Festival.

WITH CHALI 2NA

31


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

PAGE 31

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has fielded. The Latin and world music stage returns to the festival after a two-year hiatus. The House of Blues is sponsoring the new stage on the 100 block of Decatur Street. The stage featuring Cajun and zydeco music has been moved to the Canal Street side of the Aquarium of the Americas, where there is more room to accommodate the crowd. Dance lessons will be offered as well. “The Cajun and zydeco stage was so popular we needed a lot more room for the zydeco dancers,” Schramm says. As usual, stages are spread throughout the French Quarter, with several smaller stages along Royal and Bourbon streets. Music venues Preservation Hall and Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse will host music through the day and evening during the festival. Special events include the 15th Annual New Orleans International Music Colloquium, held at the Jazz National Historic Park with different seminars Friday and Saturday. On both of those nights, the documentary The Sound After the Storm, about local musicians dealing with post-Katrina recovery, will screen at Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre. A crawfish-eating contest is scheduled Saturday at noon at the Old U.S. Mint. The festival closes Sunday evening with Dancing at Dusk, featuring big band standards from the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s on the 400 block of Royal Street. A family and kids’ area is located on the riverfront. Activities include face painting, tai chi, karate and yoga for kids, activities presented by the Louisiana Children’s Museum, a collage project, music in the Kid’s Tent and more. The festival also is keeping up with technology via a new app for iPhone. (Forget your lighter? Don’t worry; the app has an encore flame feature). The French Quarter Festival iPhone app allows users to access live schedule updates, artist descriptions, a map detailing music, food and other activities, and it has a schedule-planning function. French Quarter Festival attendance has increased steadily post-Katrina, with last year’s more than half a million guests surpassing 2005 attendance numbers — and there’s an increasing percentage of out-of-town attendees. What’s next for the festival? Schramm says expanding into the Marigny or Armstrong Park is a possible next step. Visit www.fqfi.org for a full schedule of music and special events.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve called Peggy Wang to talk about her New York-based pop band, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, and its second record Belong, out this week on Slumberland Records. She wants to talk about boiled crawfish and the Neutral Ground Coffeehouse. Fair trade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is it still open?â&#x20AC;? she asks of the all-ages Danneel Street hangout, beginning a funny story about mistakenly covering the Vaselines during an open-mic night there as a 13-year-old (â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought it was a Nirvana songâ&#x20AC;?). A native of Metairie, Wang attended sixth through 12th grades at neighboring Isidore Newman School, and the Neutral Ground was her musical sandbox. (The band: Tabitha 101.) Singing and playing keys in Pains â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whose nostalgic self-titled debut was one of 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most celebrated LPs, awakening memories of indie-pop mixtapes from 1980s England â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wang now performs all over the world. But sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never far removed from home. This, too, leads to a funny story: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We recently played a show in Hamburg, Germany. We went to a bar across the street afterward and Quintron was there! I really, really wanted to say something, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be a dumb fangirl. My bandmates kept egging me on: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You have to!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? She pauses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ended up not saying anything.â&#x20AC;? That relatable bashfulness extends to the Painsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; aesthetic, all teenage angst and trebly melancholy. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storybook beginning was a birthday party for Wang in February 2007, opening (with pals Titus Andronicus) for Manhattan Love Suicides, a U.K. outfit Wang and frontman Kip Berman worshiped. Inside a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brooklyn loft, Pains played â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Love is Fâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;king Right!â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey Paul,â&#x20AC;? anchors of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first album. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those were two of the earliest Pains songs,â&#x20AC;? Wang says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your first show, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not really

MAR

THU

THE PAINS OF BEING PURE AT HEARTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BELONG

MUSIC LINE-UP

FREE BLTS

SAT

Growing Pains

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

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YOUR SUMMER JUST GOT MORE ENTERTAINING HARRAH’S THEATRE

UNCLE KRACKER SATURDAY, APRIL 23

GUY FIERI

SATURDAY, JUNE 4

Tickets on sale now. Purchase tickets online at HarrahsNewOrleans.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

AVERAGE WHITE BAND SATURDAY, JUNE 18 ON SALE SATURDAY

Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

V1_51213.1_9.625x5.33_4c_Ad.indd 1

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3/31/11 11:46 AM

Events

On the Air

is a rollicking rendition of a live radio broadcast from 1945! The cast of five and a live band brings the era to life with a timeless musical score, comedy and more!

Friday & Saturday Evenings Dinner seating 6pm, Show 8pm Show only

Sunday Brunch Matinee

Brunch seating 11am, Show 1pm

$60 $30 $60

SponSored in part by the LouiSiana economic deveLopment’S office of entertainment deveLopment and the inStitute of muSeum & Library ServiceS.

ReseRvations Recommended! call 504-528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org WW2-14271_OnTheAir_Gambit_newphoto.indd 2

3/15/11 2:28 PM

HEYOKA and OCTOPUS NEBULA KOURTNEY HEART LIVE HOOKAH HIP-HOP w/DJ E.F. CUTTIN EAR CANDY with DJ RIK DUCCI Upcoming Events

APR 13: MOUNT KIMBIE + Special Guests APR 14: SUB SWARA + EPROM + Rus + HighTop APR 21: Road Warrior Tour w/MARY ANNE HOBBS/ Gonjasufi / Lorn + Secret Special Guest

RESERVATIONS:


BIG EASY THEATRE WINNERS

GET IN ON THE ACT STAGE

Starry Night THE 2011 BIG EASY THEATRE AWARDS GALA BROUGHT OUT NEW ORLEANS’ LEADING LIGHTS OF THE STAGE. BY KEVIN ALLMAN

he biggest ovation of the night at the Big Easy Theatre Awards, held March 28 at Harrah’s New Orleans, wasn’t for an actor or a singer; it was for a techie. Su Gonczy, the stage operations manager at Le Chat Noir, had probably worked with most of the people at the ceremony, and they rose to their feet when Gonczy received the Big Easy’s inaugural Standing Ovation Award for behind-the-scenes contribution to New Orleans theater. “When I moved here 30 years ago,” Gonczy said, “they told me if you thought you could do something, New Orleans was willing to let you try it.” At this year’s awards, there were 27 categories of nominees for work done in 2010, along with four special commendations. Le Petit Theatre’s production of Hairspray, the Crescent Theatre Collective’s Frozen and Theatre 13’s 39 Steps were the evening’s most-lauded productions, each with multiple wins. Actor Bryan Batt served as emcee. Gambit, Harrah’s New Orleans Hotel and Casino and Coleman E. Adler & Sons returned as sponsors of the Big Easy Theatre Awards Gala. Proceeds from the event benefit the Foundation for Entertainment Development and Education, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that gives grants and gifts to projects that nurture performing artists and future talent in our area.

T

ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD STANDING OVATION AWARD THEATRE CHAIRPERSON BUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARD

BEST DRAMA 2010 Frozen, Crescent Theatre Collective BEST COMEDY 2010 39 Steps, Theatre 13 BEST DIRECTOR OF A MUSICAL 2010 Dennis Monn, The Threepenny Opera BEST DIRECTOR OF A DRAMA 2010 Glenn Meche, Frozen BEST DIRECTOR OF A COMEDY 2010 Ricky Graham, 39 Steps BEST CHOREOGRAPHY 2010 Blake Coheley, Hairspray

Bryan Batt channeled Dean Martin as master of ceremonies of the Big Easy Awards.

Southern Rep artistic director Aimee Hayes with Le Chat Noir owner Barbara Motley.

BEST MUSICAL DIRECTOR 2010 Harry Mayronne & Walter McClements, The Threepenny Opera BEST SET DESIGN 2010 Jeff Becker, Go Ye Therefore … BEST LIGHTING DESIGN 2010 Joan Long, In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) BEST COSTUME DESIGN 2010 Cecile Casey Covert, The Mystery of Irma Vep BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL 2010 Tracey E. Collins, Curtains BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL 2010 Roland “Butch” Caire Jr., Dirty Rotten Scoundrels PAGE 36

Best Actress in a Drama Diana Shortes with Best Director of a Drama Glenn Meche, Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Liz Mills and Keith Launey, all from Frozen.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

BEST MUSICAL 2010 Hairspray, Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre

Jeffery Roberson (Varla Jean Merman) John O’Neal Su Gonczy Dennis Assaf Mystic Krewe of Satyricon

Best Supporting Actor in a Musical Roland “Butch” Caire Jr. with Best Cabaret Winner Lisa Picone.

35


STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

preview Rapid Evolution

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 5 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 10 BMC — Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Open Mic, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Tom Paines, 6 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Scissor Sisters, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Del the Funky Homosapien, DJ Yamin, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 6; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

Twenty years hardly seems enough time to cover every creative alias of Teren Delvon Jones, the funky Homo sapiens better known as Del. In 2001, at his 10-year mark, the Hieroglyphics vet and Handsome Boy Modeling School valedictorian went mainstream meta, lending his cartoonish flow to the Ghost Rapper, the sunshine-bagging, drummer-inhabiting drive-by victim dropping mocking verses on the self-titled debut by Damon Albarn’s animated antiheroes Gorillaz. Silly/ insidious singles “Clint Eastwood” and “Rock the House” drew graphic novelizations of Del’s first decade, in which his loopy delivery became hip-hop shorthand stylized in a sonic Comic Sans: cousin Ice Cube’s fresh heir in Da Lench Mob, the yearling solo artist on commencement addresses I Wish My Brother George Was Here and No Need For Alarm, and the frontman for Oakland, Calif.’s Hieroglyphics crew, the West Coast Tribe Called Quest. (First word “Mistadobalina” was “Bonita Applebum” rebroadcast on Pacific Standard Time.) In the year 2000, with help from former Handsome Boy/future Gorilla Dan the Automator, Del introduced Deltron 3030, a revolutionary Blade Rapper dystopia that bested Andre 3000 by five months (or three decades). The independent hiphop world is still playing catch-up. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 day of show. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

BMC — Geb Rault Band, 6; Lynn Drury, 8:30; Blues4Sale, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Battle of the Bands, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8

Wednesday 6 12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Big Fat & Delicious, Kernal Garner & the New Strangers, 9 BLUE NILE — Snarky Puppy, Eastern Blok, 10

STARTERS:

Savory Crawfish & Alligator Sausage Cheesecake Topped w/ a Chipotle Aioli

Fried Chicken Livers w/ House Made Pepper Jelly

The Rathborne Baby Greens, Blue Cheese, Apples & Spiced Pecans Topped w/ Fried Oysters & a Blue Cheese Vinaigrette SANDWICHES & ENTREES:

Fried Green Tomato & Crab Cake Po-Boy Our Famous Fried Green Tomatoes & Crab Cakes w/ New Orleans Remoulade & Red Pepper Aioli

Meatloaf Po-Boy House Made Meatloaf Dressed w/ Lettuce, Mayo, Pickles & Chow Chow

05

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Residents, Consortium of Genius, 8

TIPITINA’S — Wailers, Duane Stephenson, 9

LUNCH MENU

Del The Funky A P R I L Homosapien's 20th Anniversary Tour 9 p.m. Tuesday The Parish at House of Blues, 229 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Rob Wagner Trio, 8 & 10

FESTIVAL

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers Ballroom, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — French Quarter Festival Kickoff Party feat. Rockin’ Dopsie, Little Freddie King, 7

The Widow Maker Fried Oysters Topped w/ Blue Cheese & Bacon, Dressed w/ Lettuce & Tomatoes

Bronzed Flounder

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Kicks ’N Snares Celebrity Beat Battle feat. Mannie Fresh, 9

Served w/ a Zucchini, Squash & Asparagus Medley & Stone Ground Goat Cheese Grits

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

Roasted Pork Tenderloin

THE JAZZ QUARTER — Alex Bosworth, 6; Chris Alford, 9

Stuffed w/ Goat Cheese & Pine Nuts, Topped w/ a Red Pepper Balsamic Vinaigrette, Served w/ Sauteed Spinach & Goat Cheese-Thyme Grits

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — David Mahoney Quartet, 6; BTM Brass Band, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Topsy Chapman & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny J & the Hitmen feat. Derek Huston, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett

LUNCH HOURS 4/5 Del The Funky Homosapien 20th Anniversary Tour plus DJ Yamin

4/8 Jermaine Quiz presents MashUp NOLA

featuring Pete Murano, Joey Peebles and Mike Bass of Tromobone Shorty’s Orleans Ave 4/12 Fair To Midland plus Periphery, Scale The Summit and Oceans of the Addict

TUES-FRI 11AM-2PM

DINNER HOURS MON-THUR 5:30-10PM FRI & SAT 5:30-10:30PM 4501 TCHOUPITOULAS ST.

504-894-9880 www.dickandjennys.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MUSIC

PARISH

LISTINGS

39


MUSIC

LISTINGS

Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

THREE MUSES — Monty Banks, 7 TIPITINA’S — Band of Horses, Tyler Ramsey, 9

WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, 5

Thursday 7 BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; ChaWa Mardi Gras Indians, 8:30; Low-Stress Quintet, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Boot Hill, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Amanda Wuerstlin, Michael Girardot, Natalie Mae & Skyler Stroup, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Love and Electrocution, 10; Dirt Bag Love Affair, 11:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tuba Skinny & Erika Lewis, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6 D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Darrian Douglas Project, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Benefit for Mission Honduras feat. Benjy Davis Project, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Erika Flowers, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha & Steve Masakowski, 2:30; Tom McDermott & Evan Christopher, 5; Bill Summers & Irvin Mayfield, 8 THE JAZZ QUARTER — Matt Bell, 6; Joshua Gouzy Trio, 9 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 3; Colin Lake, 6 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Dana Abbot Band, 6; Louisiana Hellbenders, 9:30 OAK — Honey Island Swamp Trio, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9 ONE EYED JACKS — Pains of

40

Being Pure at Heart, Twin Shadow, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Black Eagle Jazz Band, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 11:30

PRIME EXAMPLE — Theolonius Monk Institute Sextet, 8 & 10

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Warpaint, PVT, Family Band, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rosie Ledet, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Larry Willis feat. Jason Marsalis & Jesse Boyd, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

THREE MUSES — Luke WinslowKing, 7; Jayna Morgan, 10

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 8 12 BAR — John Lisi, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Lavish Radish, Jiggleswitch, 10

BMC — One Mind Brass Band, 1; Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Rue Fiya, 10 BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Tim Laughlin & Trio, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Vieux Carre, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson, Susan Cowsill, Russ Broussard & friends, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Rotton Cores, 6; Damn Frontier, 7:30; By and By, 10; Happy Talk Band, 11:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Vaud & the Villains feat. Paul Sanchez & Debbie Davis, 8 D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 6; Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Jermaine Quiz & guests, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Lillian Axe, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Strange Roux, Wasted Lives, Artisans, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Victor Atkins, Ed Petersen & Steve Masakowski, 2:30; Tom Worrell, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

THE JAZZ QUARTER — Sasha Masakowski Trio, 5; Fredrick Sanders & Funksion, 8 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 11

THE MAISON — Ingrid Lucia, 7; Brass-a-holics, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL —

Freddie King, 11

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Soul Project, 10

preview Birds of a Feather

As he recounts in his memoir Song for My Fathers, Tom Sancton’s mentoring in jazz came from legends like George Lewis at Preservation Hall. When Sancton went to Harvard University in the late 1960s, he didn’t meet many other undergraduates interested in playing traditional New Orleans Jazz, but eventually he found older fans in the Boston area. He put together the Black Eagle Jazz Band, named for one of Lewis’ early bands, and it became a regular feature at Passim’s Coffee House in Cambridge. In 1971, the Black Eagles played the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and got a record deal (album pictured) with Sire, which, Sancton notes, put out Madonna’s first album. Sancton graduated and left Cambridge, but the band played on as the New Black Eagle Jazz Band. It still tours, and several members will return to New Orleans for the first local shows since 1971. They’ll be joined by Shannon Powell, Lars Edegran and Jesse Boyd. — Will Coviello Tom Sancton's Black Eagle Reunion Band A P R I L 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Thursday 7&10 Palm Court Jazz Cafe, 1206 Decatur St. At French Quarter Festival 1:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m. Sunday 600 block of Bourbon Street

Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 6; Jayna Morgan, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Ernie Buscio Jazz Band, 7; Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band feat. Bob Havens, David Boeddinghaus, Otis Bazoon, Gerald Adams & Hal Smith, 8:15 PRESERVATION HALL — New Orleans Old Style Open Jam Session feat. Seva Venet, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Jean-Eric, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 9:30

SHAMROCK BAR — Leaving Soho, 9

SIBERIA — Die Rotzz, Rayon Beach, Flesh Lights, Vomettes, Cowabunga Babes, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 TIPITINA’S — Break Science, Chali2na, Eric Krasno & Kirk Joseph, Gypsyphonic Disko, Gravity A, 10

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 9 12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

BABYLON LOUNGE — Calibrate the Massacre, Dropkik, Mothercell, Pursuance, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, Lushingtons, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Penguin, Interior Decorating, 9

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Jamie Hayes & the Pianoeaters CD release, 7

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Shamar Allen, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Gashouse Gorillaz, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Vox & the Hound, New Grass Country Club, Felix, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Remedy Krewe, 7; Mumbles, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sunpie Barnes & Buckwheat Zydeco, 9 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Little

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown Trio, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — War Amps, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Zydepunks, My Graveyard Jaw, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Guster, Jukebox the Ghost, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Baby Boyz Brass Band, 2:30; Joe Krown, 5; Irvin Mayfield & the Jazz Playhouse Revue, 8; Hot 8 Brass Band, midnight

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; Forever the Sickest Kids, Breathe Carolina, This Century, Before Their Eyes, Tonight Alive, 5:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Leo Jackson & the Melody Clouds, 12; Glen David Andrews, 2:30; Bill Summers & Orchestra Yoruba Afro America, 5; Shannon Powell Trio, 7

THE JAZZ QUARTER — Cristina Perez Trio, 5; Matt Marantz, 8

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Sunday Brass, 9

THE MAISON — Caroline Fourmy, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10; Big Easy Brawlers, 11:30; Pinettes Brass Band, 11:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 1 a.m.

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Johnny Angel & the Swinging Demons, 11

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Deluxe, 11:30 a.m; Kristina Morales, 5; Bob Heavens, 8; Blues4Sale, 11 NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Lady Gaga, 8

OAK — Amanda Walker Band, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Brother Tyrone, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Vaud & the Villians, 8; Fleur de Lindy, midnight

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band feat. John Parker, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — New Orleans Old Style Open Jam Session feat. Darryl Adams, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Austin Sicard & the Medics, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Vieux Carre, 9:30 SIBERIA — A.C., Flesh Parade, Vulkodlak, Fat Stupid Ugly People, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dr. Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jammin’ for Japan Benefit feat. Kermit Ruffins, Jeremy Davenport, Papa Grows Funk, Bonerama, 7:30 SIBERIA — Sluts, Pallbearers, Bills, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Tom McDermott & Evan Christopher CD release, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10 THREE MUSES — Linnzi Zaorski, 7 TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont Band, 5:30

Monday 11 BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Evan Christopher’s International Jazz Jam, 7

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9

Sunday 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes Open Mic feat. Kim Carson, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Christina Perez, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Leroy Jones Quintet, 7

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Iris May Tango, 10

HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin Party, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Lyrics Born, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatter, 8

SIBERIA — Gene Loves Jezebel, Kindest Lines, Killing Moon, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10


YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

1/11

1:05 PM

Page 1

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

“THE SCARIEST MOVIE IN DECADES!” -Ed -Ed Douglas, Douglas, COMINGSOON.net COMINGSOON.net

FILM

OR

MI

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) —

A politician poised to win a Senate seat falls for a beautiful ballet dancer, but mysterious men want to keep the two apart. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14 BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) —

After Earth is attacked by unknown forces, Los Angeles becomes the last stand for mankind as the world’s cities crumble. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 Beauty and the Beast follows a New York teen transformed into a monster in order to find true love. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

BELIZAIRE THE CAJUN (PG) — Glen Pitre’s 1986 award-winning romantic adventure is set in 1859 Louisiana. Chalmette Movies BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) —

The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — Martin Lawrence reprises

his role as FBI agent Malcolm Turner, who disguises himself as an old woman. AMC Palace 16

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

CEDAR RAPIDS (R) — In the comedy,

(circle one:)

Staci Steve

a sheltered insurance agent (Ed Helms) has his boundaries pushed while representing his company at a convention. Canal Place DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2: RODERICK RULES (PG) — Zachary Gordon

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stars in the film adaptation of the second book of Jeff Kinney’s popular children’s series. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences expe-

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rience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX

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DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) — David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The

animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. Hollywood 14 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford narrates a 15-day

river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HALL PASS (R) — Two women, sens-

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HOP (PG) — A slacker accidentally

hits the teenage son of the Easter Bunny with his car, and then takes him in while he recovers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen

BEASTLY (PG-13) — The modern-day

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decide to grant them one week of ART APPROVED freedom to do whatever they want. AMC Palace 16, Hollywood 14 AE APPROVED CLIENT APPROVED

who hides a secret identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him. Grand

INSIDIOUS (PG-13) — A family

begins to experience inexplicable phenomena after their son falls into a coma. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

JANE EYRE (PG-13) — Mia

Wasikowska stars in the adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s brooding novel about a girl working in the house of a wealthy bachelor with a dark secret. Canal Place, Prytania

JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) — Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic surgeon who enlists the help of his assistant and her kids to woo a much younger schoolteacher. AMC Palace 20 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne, in the Oscar Best Picture winner. AMC Palace 20, Grand LIMITLESS (PG-13) — A loser tries

a designer pharmaceutical that makes him extremely focused and confident, propelling him on a meteoric rise that comes at a price. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) — A slick

Los Angeles attorney who operates out of the back of his Lincoln lands a case that isn’t what it appears to be. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MARS NEEDS MOMS (PG) — In the

animated film, a 9-year-old finds out just how much he needs his mom when she’s abducted by Martians. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

PAUL (R) — An alien (voiced by Seth

Rogen) and some English sci-fi nerds have a close encounter while journeying to Area 51. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 RANGO (PG) — Johnny Depp is the voice of a chameleon who finds himself in a Western town plagued by bandits. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) —

Amanda Seyfried stars in the reboot of the fairy tale. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE SOURCE CODE (PG-13) — Jake Gyllenhaal stars as a soldier who becomes part of a government experiment to thwart a bombing.

AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) — Zack Snyder’s vivid action-adventure follows a girl who, while locked in an mental asylum awaiting a lobotomy, escapes to a fantasy world. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY ARTHUR (PG-13) — Russell Brand stars in the remake of the 1981 comedy about a lovable, but irresponsible, playboy who must decide between love or money. WIN WIN (R) — A lawyer (Paul

Giamatti) who volunteers as a high school wrestling coach finds himself in a complicated situation after some questionable business dealings.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AN AMERICAN IN PARIS (NR) — Gene

Kelly stars in the 1951 movie-musical inspired by George Gershwin’s compositions. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com.

DOUBLE TRIPLE ZERO (NR) — In local filmmaker Drew Chastain’s comedy, a man relies solely on faith and drugs in his training for the Crescent City Classic. Live music and a Q&A with the director, cast and crew follows the screening. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Satuday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net THE ELEPHANT IN THE LIVING ROOM (NR) — Michael Webber’s docu-

mentary is about the subculture of Americans who raise dangerous animals as household pets. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students

In the science fiction fantasy Sucker Punch (PG-13), Babydoll (Emily Browning) fights for her freedom. ©2011 WARNER BROS. PICTURES

and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net LAURA (NR) — A police detec-

tive falls in love with the woman whose murder he’s investigating in the 1944 film noir. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and April 13, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

PELADA (NR) — The film documents the culture of pick-up soccer games in 25 countries through the eyes of two former college soccer stars. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net SAN FRANCISCO (NR) — Clark Gable,

Jeanette MacDonald and Spencer Tracy star in the 1936 film about a singer and a priest who try to reform a saloon owner in the days before the 1906 earthquake. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

TRON (PG) — The 1982 film star-

ring Jeff Bridges follows a hacker who is abducted into a computer world. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 2624386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 3631117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

ART

review Remember the Warehouse

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com —

“Growth Patterns,” paintings, ceramics and installation by Morgana King, through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Thursday.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “How To

Build A Forest,” installation/ performance by Shawn Hall, PearlDamour and others, through May 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “I Love You,

Goodnight,” folk tales written and illustrated by Cameo Olson, through May 11. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 7220876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Petrichor,” oil

paintings by Erica Lambertson Philippe, through May 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — Hypotheti-

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — “The Bride’s

Deadly Sins,” works by Cynthia Scott, through May 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Dancing String

Bean,” paintings and drawings by Eugene Martin, through May 28. Opening Wednesday.

THE OLD IRONWORKS. 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — “Automata,” an exhibition of kinetic, robotic and mechanical sculpture, through Saturday. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily, or by appointment, through Saturday. SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 — “Salad Days,” a

juried student art exhibition, through June 10. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — MFA

Exhibitions: Paintings and drawings by Regina Scully, installations by Holis Hannan,

THRU JUNE

12

Then and Now: 35th Anniversary Exhibition of Works by 14 Artists Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org

through May 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — Paintings by Tim Trapolin, through April 18. 811 GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www.francoalessandrini.net — Photographs by Riccardo Lorenzi, through Sunday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Michael

Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through April 30.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Works by

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Tony Benjamin and R. Tucker Fitz-Hugh Jr., through May 12.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — “The Art

of Dr. Seuss: Rare Editions Collections,” prints and sculpture by Dr. Seuss, through May 31. PAGE 47

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

cal architectural renderings of under-used buildings by Hypothetical Development Organization, through May 7. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

In the mid-1970s, a group of local artists had an idea: Why not stage an art show in an underutilized old building and throw a party with live music in the opening? So they did it and a grand time was had by all. One thing led to another and in 1976 the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) was born in a huge warehouse donated by Sydney Besthoff. Flash forward 35 years and much has changed. Most of the artists are still around, the warehouse is all spiffed up, and the CAC is part of the establishment. Then and Now, curated by Dan Cameron, explores what remains and what has changed in the art and artists that defined the center’s funky but fertile early years. CAC co-founder and proto-conceptual artist Robert Tannen’s new piece is an electric clothes dryer filled with houseshaped blocks of wood. Turn it on and it roars like a hurricane. His earlier work — a 54-foot-long hammock-like concoction made from steel and aluminum panels — was more hopeful, a bridge for spanning the imagination, but his modus operandi is much the same. Similarly, in Douglas Bourgeois’ recent work, his subjects are as exotic as they were in his funky Twilight High Yearbook, 1978, painting of students in an imaginary Cajun high school yearbook, only now they’re rendered in the dazzling style of a renaissance master on mushrooms. Robert Warrens, Jim Richard and Clifton Webb remain true to imagism, and in the work of Wayne Amedee, Dawn DeDeaux, George Dureau, Lin Emery, Gene Koss, Martin Payton and Elizabeth Shannon, evolutionary refinement amid continuity prevails. Lynda Benglis’ elegant knots are still elegantly knotty, and Keith Sonnier’s, circa 2009, Konsa (pictured) neon sculpture may be even more true to his baroque Louisiana roots than his work from the late 1960s, when he and Benglis helped to melt the hard edges off minimalism and launch postminimalism as an art movement. — D. Eric Bookhardt

45


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 45 ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Taft

McWhorter, jewelry by Belle Bijoux and glass photography by Drake, through April 30. ASYLUM. 608 Julia St., 525-4633 — “Horses,” works by Joshua Walsh, through May 31. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com —

“Byrdie’s Landing,” carved wood sculpture installation by Swamp Deville, through Wednesday.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective. com — “Shoot for the Wall,” pho-

tographs by Zack Smith, through May 31.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Time Line,”

work on canvas by Karen Jacobs, through April 30.

ART JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Today’s Specials,”

works by Will Smith Jr., through April 30.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “Wrapped,” sculp-

ture by Sidonie Villere, through Saturday. “The Theatre of Cultural Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Archeology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jusrisich, through May 2. “Halcyon Days,” paintings by Justin Forbes, through May 8.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “Spring Buzz,” oil on canvas

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity. com — “An Artist’s Rage: Crimes

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org —

by Carolyn Evans; “Walk About,” monotypes by Barbara Brainard, through April 30.

Against Humanity,” paintings and installations by Gustavo Duque, through April 20.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 —

“Things I Couldn’t Find,” mixed-media sculpture by Adam Farrington, through May 5.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com —

“Introspection,” mixed media on canvas by Sean Self, through May 5. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Ghost Fleet,” sculpture and works on paper by Raine Bedsole, through May 22.

River,” a group invitational exhibit featuring local and regional artists, through April 30. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Koosh,” works by Paul

Campbell, through April 30.

HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — “The Shamrock Shim-

my,” prints, paintings, handmade jewelry and oil paintings by Serene Bacigalupi, Forrest Bacigalupi, Luiny Ripera and Brian Poirier, through April 15. ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www.jazzandheritage.org — “Femme Fest,” an exhibition of female artists curated by the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana, through April 15.

“Knead,” works by Kristian Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes

in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings

by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Confluence,” works by Kathryn

Hunter, through April 16. “Moments Behind the Eyes,” works by Nathan Durfee, through April 23.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings

by Mallory Page, ongoing.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Altered States,” works by Herman Mhire, through April 23.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Cuba on my Mind,” photographs by Katie Wainwright and Denise TullierHolly, through April 30. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Deep Blues Outsider Menagerie,” a group exhibition of music-inspired works, through May 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and

national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by

Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing. STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glass work, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

ongoing.

Lettering Arts Association Annual Calligraphy Exhibit, through April 30.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — “Grandeur,” acrylic paintings by Michael Marlowe, through April 30.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org

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504.304.4861

WWW.ISABELLASGALLERY.COM

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “The Glass Menagerie,” a group exhibition of glass works, through May 30. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing.

NEXT TO LAKESIDE MALL

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

cardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

3331 SEVERN IN METAIRIE

Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by Sarah Stiehl,

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

MYSTIC BLUE SIGN SHOP. 2212 Magazine St., 525-4691 — New Orleans

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

watercolor on paper and graphite on paper by Jan Aronson, through April 14.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

Williams, ongoing.

and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by Ri-

Introducing this season’s hottest, new styles and four new colors!

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool. org — “Water,” oil on canvas,

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

New! Spring 2011 Colors & Styles

— Photographs by Robert Dutruch, through Saturday.

through May 15.

Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty

Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BELLA NOLA. 4236 Magazine St., 8979499; www.bellanola.net — Paint-

ings by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by Andrew

Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

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CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 246-6992; www.campbellscoffee.com — Mul-

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DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www. dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by

4601 Freret St. (corner of Freret & Cadiz)

timedia works by Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

PAGE 48

Your Pet’s Home Away From Home! 504.304.4718

www.zeusplace.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “The

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

tulane.edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24.

47


FEATURE

GET IN ON THE ACT STAGE

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Political commentator and New Orleans native Cokie Roberts contributed a piece to the foodthemed edition of Native Tongues. Not all the pieces in Native Tongues are fictional. Both Cokie Roberts and cousin Suzanne Stouse wrote pieces reflecting on food and their extended political family. A longtime reporter for National Public Radio and commentator in Washington, D.C., Roberts has not lived in New Orleans since leaving for college, but among the ways she maintains her connections to the city is cooking. “I’m a good New Orleans cook,” she says. “I make great red beans and rice.” The piece she’s contributing also reflects reporting on news after Hurricane Katrina. “After the storm, people were sifting around in the debris for recipes,” she says. “Clotheslines were set up and people were drying out their recipes. … Only in New Orleans are your family recipes treated the same as your family photos or family jewels.”

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s often as New Orleanians talk about food, it shouldn’t be surprising that local authors dwell on it as well. But that was a surprise for novelist Sheila Bosworth. “With my first novel (Almost Innocent), the first time I went to a book group, the lady organizing it had underlined all the food references in the book,” Bosworth says. “She made some of the dishes for the event. I hadn’t realized I included so much food in my writing.” For the fifth installment of Native Tongues, it’s a deliberate choice for participating writers. Director Carl Walker proposed the theme of food and an array of veteran Native Tongues participants and newcomers took the bait. The evening of monologues blends fictional stories and short memoir pieces by contributors including TV journalist Cokie Roberts, novelist Robert Olen Butler, Southern Foodways Alliance director John T. Edge, Randy Fertel, Bosworth, Gambit editor Kevin Allman, All Kinds of Theatre co-producer Suzanne Stouse, Mindy Mayer and others. “Food is something that’s interesting to everyone,” Bosworth says. “The challenge is to make food into something you can use dramatically.” Bosworth cooked up a story called “Forbidden.” In it, Catherine is a convicted felon who has been assisted by a priest who hired her to cook for him. But she’s still struggling with temptation. Bosworth participated in the original Native Tongues in 1993. Walker organized the initial one as a group of monologues on life in New Orleans. The run filled True Brew Theater and then moved to a larger space at Tulane University and ran for three more months. The fourth Native Tongues was in 2005, and the run was ended by Hurricane Katrina. Another returning alumnus from the first installment is novelist Robert Olen Butler. Two weeks after the opening of the first show, he won a Pulitzer Prize for A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain, a collection of stories about the Vietnamese community at Versailles in eastern New Orleans. “In that book, I was doing voices,” he says. “Even as a fiction writer, I’m known for stuff close to monologues.” Butler has never lived in New Orleans, but he has visitored often. He estimates

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LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

STAGE Ronald Reagan. Email nolatrouserhouse@gmail.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. April 9, 8 p.m. April 15-16.

review Two By Tenn

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

PHOTO BY JOHN BARROIS

THEATER ALMOST, MAINE. Nunez Community

College, 3710 Paris Road, Chalmette, 278-7497; www.nunez.edu — In John Cariani’s play, characters in a remote town experience unexpected romance against the backdrop of a midwinter chill. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Saturday.

THE ARISTOCATS. Teatro Wego, 177

Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The all-kids casts performs the stage adaptation of the Disney animated musical. Tickets $18 general admission, $15 students and seniors, $10 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. GYPSY. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The musical based on the memoirs of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee focuses on her and her sister’s childhood with their overbearing stage mother. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH.

Backyard Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave., 945-9936; www.frontmanshow.com — The musical tells the story of an East German rock ’n’ roll star who was the victim of a botched sex-change operation. Email skinhorsetheater@gmail.com or visit www.skinhorsetheater.org for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday, midnight Saturday.

MARRIAGE CAN BE MURDER. Le Cafe De Bon Temps, 40261 Hwy. 190 East, Slidell — The comedic murder-mystery takes place at a wedding and reception, which turns sour after someone kills a mother-in-law. Reservations are required. Tickets $50 (includes dinner). 6 p.m. Sunday. THE MOTHER-IN-LAW. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 6166066; www.dcc.edu — Michael Aaron Santos directs the comedy by ancient Roman playwright Terence. Call 671-6360 for details. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through April 17. NATIVE TONGUES 5: THE FOOD EDITION. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles

Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Carl Walker directs the monologue series featuring works by a variety of award-winning

novelists, journalists and nonfiction writers. Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. Thursday. Tickets are $30; call 525-4498 for tickets for that show only. General admission tickets $33 Friday-Saturday, $29 Sunday (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through April 24. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen at

The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the stage musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for

details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26. ORANGE FLOWER WATER. Elm The-

atre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — Two friends begin an adulterous affair that results in disastrous consequences in Craig Wright’s drama. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, then ThursdaySaturday through May 14.

OUR MAN. Trouser House, 4105 St. Claude Ave. — In the Goat in the Road Productions play, two 1950sera radio show hosts get carried away while tasked with narrating the life and accomplishments of

atre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — C. Patrick Gendusa and Kevin Smith star in the gender-bending comedy that is a lighthearted take on the battle of the sexes. Visit www. noctc.org for details. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through April 16.

THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Northshore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — The Jefferson Performing Arts Society cast of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical presents a special sing-along performance of the show. Call 885-2000 or visit www. jpas.org for details. Tickets $25 general admission, $20 students, $15 children ages 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES. Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — The production of Eve Ensler’s monologue play benefits the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network and women and children in Haiti. Tickets $15. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday. WIN, PLACE & SHOW. Studio A at the Steak Knife, 888 Harrison Ave., 4888981; www.steakkniferestaurant. com — Chris Champagne performs monologues based on stories from behind the betting windows at the Fair Grounds. Call 330-9117 for tickets. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 8 p.m. Thursday.

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field’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

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SLOW BURN BURLESQUE. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The burlesque troupe performs “The Big Sleazy,” a tribute to New Orleans. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 VIP. 11 p.m. Saturday.

AUDITIONS ANNIE. River Region Performing Arts & Cultural Center, 15146 River Road, Norco, 904-1129; www.rrpa.org — Girls ages 8 to 13 are sought for the June production of the musical. Those auditioning for principal roles should have a song prepared; a song will be taught to others. Email joylynnchun@aol.com for details. 10 a.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL.

Burlesque dancers (men and women), singers, comics, magicians, contortionists, duos, troupes, novelty and other variety acts are sought for the September festival. Email neworleansburlesque@yahoo. com or visit www.neworleansburlesquefest.com for details. There is a $15 application fee. Application deadline is April 25.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

MARISOL. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. marignytheatre.org — José Rivera’s play follows a young woman who gets swept up in a war being waged in Heaven that spills over into New York City. Tickets available at www.cripplecreekplayers.org or at the box office 30 minutes before performances. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday through April 24.

Tennessee Williams is the unrivaled master of the one-act play. Southern Rep’s recent premieres of Williams’ one-acts from the 1930s gave us a chance to see the young playwright at work. Aimee Hayes directed the diverse pieces with verve and sensitivity. The Pretty Trap is an early sketch of The Glass Menagerie. The domineering Amanda (Rebecca Taliancich) is determined to marry off her timid daughter Laura (Lucy Faust), and she’s prevailed upon son Tom (Sean Glazebrook) to bring his coworker Jim (Chris Marroy) to dinner. The dynamics of Menagerie are in place. Mother Amanda is, as Tom puts it, “a perennial Southern belle.” And Jim calls Tom “Shakespeare,” alluding to his penchant for writing poetry instead of focusing on work. The glass figures that symbolize Laura’s beauty and fragility play a central role. She finally relaxes with Jim when he asks to see a piece from her collection. His gentleness leads to her trust. They dance. They kiss. They go for a walk in the park at night. Many aspects of Menagerie are not yet developed. The most salient is Tom’s role as tortured narrator — the alienated artist who sets out at the end, like his father did, and gets lost in a whirlwind of cities. The Magic Tower encapsulates themes that haunted Williams all his life. The tower in question is a sordid attic occupied by a couple of young bohemians. Linda (Lara Grice) is a 26-year-old ex-vaudevillian who has hooked up with Jim (Alex Lemonier), an aspiring artist several years younger. Linda swirls and dances and emotes in her bright satin robe, as might be expected from someone who is used to being in the spotlight. But she’s given all that up and her fantasy now is dedicated to the intimate world she shares with Jim. Like Blanche Dubois, she wants magic, not reality. Unfortunately, magic is a delicate refuge. Jim is broke, and when he leaves Linda alone even for a few minutes, she fears the tower will begin to crumble. The truth is it’s already crumbling. Jim and Linda are months behind on the rent, and the landlady, Mrs. O’Fallon (Cecile Monteyne) is sweet on Jim but can’t stomach Linda. When an important art dealer arrives in town, Jim runs off to show his paintings. Meanwhile, Mitch (Chris Marroy) and Babe (Monteyne again), who are members of the vaudeville troupe Linda left, visit to offer Linda her job back. They also predict Jim will come to resent her as she ages and their finances remain wretched. Jim returns after being rejected by the art dealer and he’s crushed. Linda realizes the vaudevillians are right, and reality with all its faults trumps magic doomed to expire. The cast was uniformly engaging and the production was smooth and crisp. — Dalt Wonk

PARALLEL LIVES. Shadowbox The-

51


LISTINGS

STAGE

review Hedlining Act

Much more than the sum of its estranged parts, Hedwig and the Angry Inch is both a flamboyant punk rock musical and droll transvestite cabaret full of snide quips about German philosophy, gay sex, multiple genocides and rock stardom. Hedwig is a musician down on his luck, living in the shadow of his former creative partner Tommy Gnosis, who’s selling out arenas while Hedwig is stuck playing venues like the Backyard Ballroom, which is mentioned in the play. Hedwig recounts the events of his bizarre and unique life — growing up in East Germany, coming out of the closet, marrying a U.S. serviceman, and finding himself alone in a trailer in Kansas, where he started making music with his teenaged neighbor Tommy, whom he loves. John Cameron Mitchell wrote and starred in the original show in New York in 1998 as well as the film version in 2001. The musical relies almost entirely on animating Hedwig’s furious punk rock energy without obliterating the vulnerable side of his personal life. In Skin Horse Theater’s production, Evan Spigelman turns in a great performance as the strutting and catty Hedwig, the jilted war bride, the jilted band member and bearer of a strangely broken heart. He also sings well, and many of the songs, especially “The Origin of Life” and “Wig in a Box,” are infectiously catchy and get the audience to join in. The band Whom Do You Work For provides the music as Hedwig’s backing band, The Angry Inch. The production values have a suitable punk rock feel. Animated projections by Nat Kusinitz, who also plays Yitzhak, were cleverly presented on a school classroom-style overhead projector. A latter day Rocky Horror Show, it’s a really fun and at times absurdly joyous and cathartic musical. But it’s also got a lot of smart monologues and asides, and at times some combination of the tight space at the Backyard Ballroom and the pacing almost let some moments get lost in the shuffle. One of the show’s crucial exchanges between Hedwig and Tommy needed more of a spotlight. But it’s a musical, and the arc of the narrative and tone of the show make up the difference in this very enjoyable production. Tickets $10. — Will Coviello

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7-9 Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

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Hedwig and the Angry Inch 8 p.m. Thu.-Fri.; midnight Sat. Backyard Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave.; www.skinhorsetheater.org

COMEDY BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

City Bar, 3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola. com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde and others. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, followed by an open mic. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a comedy show with live music, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300;

www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY.

The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets.

Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings: www.bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Saturday 9 ABRACADABRA MAGIC SHOW.

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Irwin Royes, the World’s Smallest Magician, presents a magic show. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

AIRBORNE SCHOOL . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Children ages 8 to 12 can design, build and test their own parachutes and learn about Normandy drop zones. Pre-registration is required. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 or email lauren.handley@nationalww2museum.org for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. FABERGÉ EGG HUNT. New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The event features music, spacewalks, entertainers, refreshments and an egg hunt. Visit www.noma.org/ egghunt.html for details. Admission $10 members, $12 non-members in advance; $15 at the door. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

JPAS LEADING LADIES EASTER EGG HUNT. Private residence,

EVENTS Tuesday 5 CAROUSEL BAR BOOTH DEDICATION CEREMONY. Hotel

Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 523-3341; www.hotelmonteleone.com — The hotel dedicates bar booths to Dr. John, Allen Toussaint, Pete Fountain, Etta James and Louis Prima. Event is followed by a luncheon and panel discussion. Call 681-4452 or visit www.hotelmonteleone.com/ legacy-2 for details. Luncheon admission is $35. 11 a.m. ceremony, noon to 1:30 p.m. luncheon.

C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — The program

topic is “The Darkly Shining Heart: An Exploration of Anger’s Paradoxical Nature.” Admission free for members, $10 nonmembers. 7:30 p.m. DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 529-1477; www.jesuitchurch.net — Franklin Avenue Baptist Church pastor Reverend Fred Luter Jr. discusses “How to Reach This Generation.” Visit www. loyno.edu/lplc/downtown for details. 12:30 p.m.

EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239

St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia, with prizes. 8 p.m. Tuesdays.

FR. RICHARD ROHR. The priest

discusses “Practicing the Presence of God in Spiritual Leadership” 11 a.m. Tuesday at Parker United Methodist Church (1130 Nashville Ave.), “Practicing the Presence of God: Bridging the Divides, Healing the Wounds” 2 p.m. Wednesday at Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church (3900 St. Charles Ave.) and 6 p.m. at Loyola University (Nunemaker Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave.). Visit www.thescl.net for details. JADE BUDDHA TOUR . Lien

Hoa Temple, 1731 Stumpf Blvd. — The Jade Buddha for Universal Peace, the largest Buddha carved from gemstone-quality jade in the world, is at the Buddhist temple for a two-week long exhibition. There is a prayer service for Hurricane Katrina and Japanese tsunami victims 2:30 p.m. Saturday and a closing ceremony 1 p.m. Sunday. THE PEOPLE SAY PROJECT.

Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh. org — Louisiana Humanities Center program director Brian Boyles moderates a discussion with local artists and musicians, followed by a reception. This week’s meeting features Andrew Vaught of Cripple Creek Theater and John O’Neal of Junebug Productions. Call 620-2632 or email boyles@leh.org for details. 6 p.m.

TRANSFORMATION IN THE GARDEN: PUBLIC & PRIVATE SPACES. Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — Bill Noble, director of Preservation at the Garden Conservancy, and landscape architect René J. L. Fransen address the evolution of landscape in public and private gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4723 for details. Admission $70 members, $75 non-members.

Wednesday 6 DELGADO ART STUDENT ASSOCIATION . Isaac Delgado

Fine Arts Gallery, Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www. dcc.edu — Author and illustrator Virginia Howard, with Pelican Publishing’s Kathleen Nettleton and Terry Callaway, discuss “Making a Living as a Writer and Artist.” Call 2585011 for details. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno. org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

M A R CH 3 0 - J U N E 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 APRIL 6 APRIL 13 APRIL 20 APRIL 27 MAY 4 MAY 11 MAY 18 MAY 25 JUNE 1

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Ave + Soul Rebels Brass Band Kermit Ruffins + Coot Anders Osborne + Honey Island Swamp Band Irvin Mayfield & the Jazz Playhouse Revue Marcia Ball + Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue George Porter, Jr. + The Lee Boys The Iguanas + Los Po-Boy-Citos Tab Benoit + Navy Band New Orleans Full Steam Brass Band

Eric Lindell

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JUNE 08

Galactic

JUNE 15

Cyril Neville & Monk Boudreaux

+ Marc Stone

+ Gravy

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING .

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — Newell Normand discusses “Technology: The Sheriff’s Newest Crime Fighting Tool.” Visit www.nopc.org for details. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

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NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING . Whitney Bank

Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www.whitneybank.com — The meeting discusses caring for roses in springtime. Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m. TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. A WOMAN’S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY SERIES. St. Francis

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(504)464-8884

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

9811 Elm Place, River Ridge — The event benefiting Jefferson Performing Arts Society youth programs features face painting, a raffle, prizes, photos with the Easter Bunny and more. Call 885-2000 ext. 202 for details. Tickets $20 general admission, $10 children. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

EVENTS

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

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email awaldron@arch-no.org for details. 8 a.m.

Thursday 7 COMMUNITY OUTREACH HOME BUYING SEMINAR . Mandeville

Community Center, 3090 E. Causeway Approach — A variety of representatives provide information on the home buying process from start to finish. The event also features refreshments and door prizes. Call 207-7600 or visit www.1stchoicenola.com for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS.

Pravda, 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m. INTERNATIONAL FAIR & FASHION SHOW. Delgado Community

College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 616-6066; www. dcc.edu — The event features crafts, fashion and food from all over the world, as well as live music by Julio & Caesar. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. LE CLUB DE LECTURE POUR TOUS. St. Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany. lib.la.us/covington.html — The group for those who speak and read French provides a language immersion experience through reading and discussing books. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

TIBETAN CULTURAL FESTIVAL . Tulane

54

University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-8000; www.tulane.edu — The festival includes a variety of presentations on Tibetan life and culture by students and other guests. Call (858) 699-3468, (318) 512-2711 or visit http://tulane.edu/socialwork/tsswevent-calendar.cfm for the complete schedule. Thursday-Sunday.

WORLD WAR II DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Tony Kiser discusses “Japanese Use of Comfort Women.” 7 p.m.

Friday 8 ADDICTIVE DISORDERS PUBLIC FORUM . St. Tammany Parish

Council Chambers, 21490 Koop Drive, Mandeville — Guests can receive information and give input regarding addictive disorders programs and services in Livingston, St. Helena, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa and Washington parishes. Call (985) 646-6406 ext. 206 or email jackie. lambert@la.gov for details. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

ANNUAL BILL RUSSELL LECTURE . Williams Research Center, Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — Tom Sancton and Lars Edegran discuss “Ragtime’s Roots

and Revival: How a New Orleans– Based Orchestra Gave New Life to the Works of Early Ragtime Composers.” Reservations recommended. Email wrc@hnoc.org for details. Admission $10. 6:30 p.m. BIG BROTHER CASTING CALL .

Gordon Biersch, 200 Poydras St., 552-2739; www.gordonbiersch. com — Cast members are sought for an upcoming season of the CBS reality show. Visit www.cbs. com/bigbrother for details. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

edu — The professional design association’s event provides an opportunity to get feedback from professionals and hone interviewing skills. Visit www.aiganeworleans.org for details. Admission $10-$50. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ARNO CAT ADOPTION EVENT.

PETCO, 3500 Williams Blvd., 4691880; www.petco.com — Animal Rescue New Orleans volunteers facilitate pet adoptions. Visit www.animalrescueneworleans.org for details. Noon to 4 p.m.

FISH FRYDAYS. Our Lady of the

CAN I EAT THAT? Fontainebleau

FRIENDS OF THE SLIDELL LIBRARY USED BOOK SALE . St. Tammany

HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA SPRING PLANT SALE . Private residence,

Rosary Church, 1322 Moss St., 4882659 — The church hosts weekly fish fry events during Lent. Visit http://fsjna.org for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 8936280; www.stpl.us — The sale features a variety of magazines and paperback, hardcover and children’s books. Email fsl70458@ yahoo.com for details. Membersonly sale 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, general admission 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. HOLY NAME OF JESUS SCHOOL GOLF CLASSIC . North Course, City Park,

1 Palm Drive, 483-9410 — The event benefits the Holy Name of Jesus School Athletic Department and features food, drinks and prizes. Call 861-1466 or visit www.hnjschool.org for details. Admission $100. 11 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS GEM, JEWELRY & BEAD SHOW. Pontchartrain Center,

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The site ranger leads a hike focusing on edible plants that can be found along the nature trail. 10:30 a.m.

2202 General Pershing St. — The sale features a variety of plans and herbs, and it benefits New Orleans Botanical Gardens, Longue Vue Gardens and the Herb Society New Orleans Unit’s educational programs. Call 899-3391 or email agbarnes2000@yahoo.com for details. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. LOUISIANA IRIS DAY. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — The event features a walk through the gardens’ iris path, planted in the 1950s by conservationist, educator and native plant advocate Caroline Dormon. Free admission. Noon to 4 p.m. MEMOIR WRITING WORKSHOP.

Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — Linda Yasnyi and David O’Donaghue lead the workshop. Call 596-2625 for details.

4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 4659985; www.pontchartraincenter. com — The show features jewelry, gems, beads, beading supplies and more. Visit www.aksshow.com for details. Admission $5. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

SKATE AGAINST CRIME CELEBRITY MIXER . Airline Skate Center, 6711

OCH ART MARKET. Zeitgeist Multi-

Airline Drive, 733-2248; www. airlineskatecenternola.com — The event benefiting TDL Community Development Corp. features radio personalities DJ Chicken and Wild Wayne, as well as other local celebrities. Call 214-5341 for details. Admission $10. 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.

WARREN EASTON CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL GOLF TOURNAMENT.

Colonial Golf and Country Club, 42 Colonial Club Drive, Harahan, 7370601 — The tournament benefiting the school features drinks and a barbecue buffet. Call 338-6800 or email janet_gaudet@nops.k12. la.us for details. 1 p.m. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, familyfriendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 9 AIGA NEW ORLEANS PORTFOLIO REVIEW. Loyola University, 6363 St.

Charles Ave., 865-2011; www.loyno.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The indoor and outdoor market features locally made arts and crafts and food. Visit www.ochartmarket.com for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

SEASONS: CHANGES IN TIME .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — The site ranger discusses seasonal changes and the effects on the natural world. 11 a.m. TEEN TECH DAY. New Orleans Tech, 3400 Tulane Ave., Suite 1000 — The event exposes teens ages 14 to 17 to technologies such as web design, programming, photography, podcasting, videography and game development. Preregistration is required. Visit www. neworleanstech.net for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. TRAIL HIKE . Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger leads a walk through one of the park’s trails to teach about the wildlife and habitat of the area. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. TULANE ATHLETICS 5K . Westfeldt

Practice Facility, Ben Weiner Drive, behind the James W. Wilson Jr. Center — The race through Tulane’s uptown campus benefits the Tulane Athletics Fund and features a post-race party with free food and drinks for participants. Call 865-5356 or visit www.tulanegreenwave.com/5k for details. 6:30 a.m. registration, 8 a.m. race. THE UNSUNG HEROES OF THE HOLOCAUST. National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum. org — Orlin Corey presents the story of “Righteous Gentiles,” the non-Jews who risked their lives to shelter Jews from the Holocaust. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www.utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 10 BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S. Tiffany

Lanes, 4400 Hwy. 22, (985) 6264441 — Proceeds from the brunch and bowling event benefit Habitat for Humanity. Call (985) 893-3172 ext. 232 or visit www.habitatstw. org/tiffanys for details. Tickets $25 general admission, $5 children.

PANEL: INTERFAITH CHAPLAINCY. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Military chaplains of different faiths speak about their experiences administering and receiving services from those of other faiths. The panel is in conjunction with the museum’s “Ours to Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War” exhibit. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM . Audubon

Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Aaron Viles of the Gulf Restoration Network discusses the lessons learned one year after the BP oil disaster. Call 780-8889 or visit www.louisiana.sierraclub.org/ neworleans for details. Free admission. 7 p.m.

ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA SCHOOL FAIR. St. Anthony of Padua School,

4600 Canal St., 488-4426; www. stanthonyofpadua.net — The fair features a variety of Hispanic food, games, raffles and more. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Monday 11 INSTITUTE FOR FAITH AND THE PUBLIC SQUARE EVENT. New Orleans

Baptist Theological Seminary, 3939 Gentilly Blvd., 282-4455 — The conference topic is “The Role of Faith-Based Organizations in the


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Rebuilding of New Orleans” and features presentations by local, state and federal government officials. Visit www. faithandpublicsquare.com for details. 9 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS HORNETS.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The Hornets play the Houston Rockets (Wednesday), Phoenix Suns (Friday) and the Utah Jazz (Monday). Visit www.hornets.com for details. 7 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS ARTS COUNCIL OF NEW ORLEANS GRANTS. The council

awards grants to support arts activities in Orleans, Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes. Visit www.artscouncilofneworleans.org for details. Application deadline is April 27.

NEW ORLEANS REGIONAL LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE . The

nine-month program seeks business, civic and publicsector leaders for its 2011-2012 class. Call 527-6922 or visit www.gnoinc.org/norli for details. Application deadline is May 6.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The authors discuss Artful Misdirection. 7 p.m. Tuesday. COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Troy Gilbert discusses Dinner With Tennessee Williams. Bringing food is encouraged but not required. 6 p.m. Monday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The group discusses Patti Smith’s Just Kids. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FOOD BOOK CLUB. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The group discusses Amy Trubek’s Haute Cuisine. 10 a.m. Saturday. JASON BERRY. Octavia Books,

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

ALAN G. GAUTHREAUX. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The author discusses An Extreme Prejudice: Anti-Italian Sentiment and Violence in Louisiana. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

ANDRE PERRY. Afro-American

Book Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 243-2436 — The author signs, discusses and reads from The Garden Path: The Miseducation of a City. Noon Saturday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. BOOK TO MOVIE DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses Stephen King’s The Mist. 6:30 p.m. Monday.

CARLA LEDBETTER & MARILYN HENDERSON . East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W.

JASON GOODWIN . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs An Evil Eye. 1 p.m. Saturday. LAURA DODD. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Dig This Gig: Find Your Dream Job or Invent it. 11 a.m. Saturday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MARC BROWN . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The children’s author signs and reads from Arthur Turns Green. 1 p.m. Saturday. NONFICTION BOOK CLUB.

Terrytown Library, 680 Heritage Ave., 364-2717 — The group discusses Nora Titone’s My Thoughts Be Bloody: The Bitter Rivalry Between Edwin

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

France St., 944-0441; www. yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/ rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays.

Your serious injury deserves our personal attention. George Recile, Attorney at Law Serious Personal Injur y

PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes, L.L.P.

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POPULAR FICTION BOOK CLUB. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. 7 p.m. Wednesday. ROB GUILLORY, KODY CHAMBERLAIN & NICK JONES.

Big Easy Comics, 5150 Hwy. 22, (985) 792-7800 — Guillory, artists and co-author of Chew, Chamberlain, author of Sweets and actor Jones appear at the comic signing event. 10 a.m. Saturday. SARA GRUEN . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Ape House. 6 p.m. Monday.

SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB.

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Amitav Ghosh’s The Calcutta Chromosome: A Novel of Fevers, Delirium & Discovery. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

DOGGIE DAYCARE, BOARDING, DOGGIE SWIMMING POOL, & 7 OUTDOOR PLAY AREAS. 24-HOUR ON-SITE SUPERVISION

218-4098

Stylish & Affordable $4-$9/each.

267-4143

4920 TCHOUPITOULAS ST. | WWW.CANINECONNECTIONNOLA.COM

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. For complete listings, vist www. bestofneworleans.com.

Rosalie Loves Canine Connection because they rescued her from a wooded area, had her vetted, & found her a great forever home!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — The series features poet Sunday Angleton. Jimmy Ross hosts an open mic following the reading. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Earl Long in Purgatory. 6 p.m. Thursday.

and John Wilkes Booth That Led to an American Tragedy. 11 a.m. Tuesday.

55


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <WEST BANK INDIAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Saffron NOLA (505 Gretna Blvd., Suite 5, Gretna, 363-2174; www.saffronnola.com), a catering company specializing in < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Indian food, is now serving dinner on Fridays only in a newly remodeled dining room in Gretna. The menu includes some Indian standards, like naan and chicken tikka masala, as well as fusion-style dishes, like curried seafood gumbo, tuna chimiWHAT churri and pulled pork vindaloo. Santa Fe Restaurant

am

B

WHERE

3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 WHEN

Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. RESERVATIONS

Accepted

HOW MUCH

Moderate

WHAT WORKS

Seafood, Tex-Mex basics, the patio

WHAT DOESN'T

Mixing divergent styles, sometimes neither hits the mark

BRENNAN EXPANDS IN METAIRIE

The Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group has opened Heritage Grill (Heritage Plaza, 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 934-4900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com) and will open Cafe B this month. Heritage Grill serves lunch Monday through Friday. Chef Haley Bittermann’s menu features updated Louisiana classics, like blackened redfish with corn and Anaheim pepper salad, barbecue shrimp with grits, oysters gratin with Pernod cream and banana cream pie with vanilla wafer crust.

five 5 IN

Five Places For Barking Good Hot Dogs

AMERICAN SECTOR

945 MAGAZINE ST., 528-1940 www.american-sector.com

House-made, foot-long franks come with caramelized onions.

CHECK, PLEASE

A long-lived restaurant remade as a unique Latin hybrid

Santa Fe Today MANY CHANGES LATER, AN OLD NAME HAS A NEW GAME.

Diners enjoy a drink on the patio at Santa Fe. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULTY

H

Lourenco took over with a plan to redo Santa Fe. They brought in chef Mario Abdu, who began testing more ambitious dishes on the specials board, and they also initiated an attractive renovation, creating a covered patio of timbers and terra cotta to take full advantage of the restaurant’s verdant surroundings. This incarnation is somewhere between an everyday Tex-Mex joint with a well-known name and a more ambitious pan-Latin bistro striving for notice. It must be challenging for one kitchen to produce such a range from ticket to ticket, and sometimes that strain shows. The salmon I was recently served was poorly trimmed, cooked tough and draped with an unappetizing patch of wobbly skin. The ultra-smooth guacamole seems to be piped onto plates only after all life has been squeezed from it. But generally, the basic tortilla-based fare is solid enough and some Santa Fe standards have been respectfully rekindled, especially the chicken Maximilian, an indulgent ooze of chorizo and asadero cheese in a chicken roulade. Delve into the newer specialties, and you’ll find a precisely arranged salpicon of octopus, shrimp and squid lashed with sherry vinaigrette, a chipotle-spiced version of barbecue shrimp and a pepper-bitten rib-eye layered with mushrooms and served with fried yuca logs like cross-cultural steak frites. The gaps in intent, quality and style between dishes at Santa Fe can still be disconcerting, but a shaded table with a view of Esplanade oaks and a boozy margarita in hand certainly makes a pleasant way to parse it out.

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-7675 www.cochonbutcher.com

The frank and bun are made in house. Try one with pimento cheese.

DAT DOG

5031 FRERET ST., 899-6883 www.datdognola.com

European and Louisiana options abound at this new hot dog emporium.

GOTT GOURMET CAFE

3100 MAGAZINE ST., 373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

Chicago-style dogs feature peppers and relish.

KINGFISH GRILLE

500 LAFAYETTE ST., GRETNA, 309-0680

Chili dogs are pressed in their loaves for the “weenie panini.”

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2007 Domaine de Ferrand Cotes du Rhone Cuvee Antique RHONE VALLEY, FRANCE / $16 RETAIL

This exciting wine is a is made from 80 percent Grenache, 15 percent Syrah and 5 percent Cinsault. Produced from 65- to 75-year-old vines, the wine was aged in oak casks, with a portion resting in used barriques before bottling. In the glass, bouquets of violets mingle with ripened dark berries, herbs, spices, garrigue and a smoky gaminess. On the palate, taste currants, plum, black cherry, fig, black pepper and firm tannins. Drink it with roast meats, fowl and game, hearty stews, cheeses and casseroles. Buy it at: Hopper’s Wines and Spirits. Drink it at: Clancy’s and Cafe Minh. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

ow much can one restaurant change before it becomes an entirely different restaurant? Santa Fe is an ongoing case study in the matter. The restaurant looks, tastes and functions quite differently from the place some associate with its name, though many of its old hallmarks endure. Meals still begin with chips and salsa and potent house margaritas. But today what follows could be croquettes of bacalao, the Spanish salt-dried cod, or beet salad with goat cheese. The same kitchen makes average chicken quesadillas and fat diver scallops topped with grilled pineapple salsa. Enchiladas drenched in cheese provide comfort food coddling, and rack of lamb with chorizo and mushroom risotto and garlicwine reduction for $25 would be at home at a finedining destination. The restaurant’s path to this culinary crossroads has been a bumpy one. Santa Fe was a Faubourg Marigny fixture through two decades, though its name never really did fit. German-born chef Mark Hollger built its durable reputation on his own interpretation of Southwestern cuisine and the occasional, quizzical Bavarian special. New owners reopened Santa Fe after Hurricane Katrina with Hollger’s recipes but none of the chemistry that made the idiosyncratic old place work. It quickly folded. In April 2009, the restaurant reemerged at the former home of Gabrielle in Faubourg St. John. The sputtering resumed immediately. Service was weak, preparations were sloppy and many longtime fans justifiably decried the place as Santa Fe in name only. A few months later, however, Lale Ergun and Carlos

BUTCHER

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

Sandwich Specials! monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

bines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

515 HARRISON AVE.

865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Daisy Dukes (121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com) serves boiled seafood, breakfast anytime and an array of po-boys and local favorites. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Hara-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

Weekly Specials

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614 South Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-866-9301 • www.jazminecafe.com Tuesday-Sunday 11am-9pm

han, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River

Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Cred-

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

it cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Panseared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish poboys. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage

served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606

Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad com-

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Me-

morial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben PAGE 60


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OUT2EAT page 58 ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

60

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine

series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer

Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$ STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles

Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ BISTRO

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

MARTINIQUE

Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

5908

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs pre-

pare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and char-

cuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for page62


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OUT2EAT page 60 salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

D S . C H E S S A L A I W . D N A S P I Z Z A A . P A S T A C A L Z O N E . F O C A C C I

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > APRIL 05 > 2011

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

62

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4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

OFFICE: 504.568.1239 | REQUEST LINE: 504.568.1234

Got Your Brass Pass Yet? Come on and groove with WWOZ at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival! A Brass Pass gets you into all 7 days of the Fest and access to our hospitality tent. For more information visit wwoz.org or call the Membership Office at 504-568-1239.

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Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11

a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations

recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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1

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

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reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe MANDEVILLE

GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

HARAHAN

GENTILLY

Beautiful 4 bdrm home in Monterey Subd! Scored cement floors, tile, carpet! Open Kit with Island. Wall of Windows! $258,000. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates C: 504-669-4677 • O: 504-838-7649 Licensed in Louisiana, USA

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

823 S. Clearview Unit 323

4336 St Anthony $120,000

REAL ESTATE MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN! REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

OLD METAIRIE VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

64

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

SLIDELL

BAYOU LIBERTY AREA

Elegant Contemp., 2 MSTR STES, 4 Bd, 3.5 Bth, 2 Wood Burn Fpl, 4k Sq. Ft. Rear Yard. Wide Gate Street Access. Park Like Setting. $299,500.

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities.

2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, freshly renovated. $127,500

Ann de Montluzin Farmer de Monthluzin Investments 504-895-1493 504-430-8737

Call Property New Orleans Susan 504 231-2445 or Greg 985 781-4504

Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

CLASSIFIEDS FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

LOTS/ACREAGE Own 20 Acres.

Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures 866-2574555 www.sunsetranches.com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

OLD METAIRIE

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

KENNER

227 CODIFER BLVD

3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504-913-4803.

METAIRIE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

METAIRIE TOWERS

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

LUXURY APTS

3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

APARTMENTS with

2119 Soniat

Smart, Renovated Uptown Camelback w/Driveway 3 bedroom, 3 bath $299K Call Jean-Paul 504-818-6032

2912 Calhoun Street

4 BR/3 BA Uptown home nr Tulane & Loyola Univ. Studsup renov w/ new plumb & elec, tankless wtr htr, plentiful closets, detached artist`s studio, offst pkg. Hidden passageway to private office. O/A. $359,000.

Open House: Apr 6 11-2pm Apr 10 noon-3

Jean-Paul Villere 504-818-6032

Sean Gerowin 504.669.0342

4921 Freret • 504-818-6032

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

BROKER

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services Features vary by community.

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE ALGIERS POINT

FRENCH QUARTER

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

BYWATER

LAKEFRONT

1023 PIETY ST

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/ mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY

CARROLLTON

217 N. SCOTT ST.

8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

800 sq/ft., wd flrs, 2 firepl mantels, ceil fans, LR, DR, kit, bath w/clawfoot, hall closet, BR w/closet. Cent a/h, DW, fridge w/ice & wtr, Stackable W&D, small front yd, EZ on st pkg. Walk to Rouses, bars & restaurants. Pets OK w/fee. Avail April 1. $780/lse. (504) 908-5210 for appt.

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

COMPLETELY REMODELED

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4014 ORLEANS AVE 1 BR

Hi ceil, wd flrs, w/d on site, cent air, walk to Park or Bayou. On Canal St Car line. $775/mo. 713/204-5342

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY FRENCH QTR LOFT

3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

RENTALS

1220 Chartres. 2 bdrm apt. w/balc. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $1500/mo. Mike, 919-4583.

TREME 1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May 1

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-2396566 or mballier@yahoo.com 1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com 4328 BANCROFT DRIVE $625,000 A LARGE WATERFRONT HOME ON PRESTIGIOUS STREET. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

GRT LOCATIONS!

St. Andrew

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2735 NAPOLEON AVE 1 brm, Coin op lndry, $625/mo 2100 BARONNE 2 bdrms, w&d hkups, wd flrs. Newly renov. $850/mo 891-2420

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, scrn porch. $1050 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813.

O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/ mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

3 BR, $1800; 1BR, $1100. Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apts you’ll see. Beautifuln’ghborhd. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smoke no pets. Paula 504-952-3131

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. Cat only. $1156/mo. Must make LESS than $33,000/year. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" 7522 Benjamin 1br/1ba "Cool Pool Condo" 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency"

REAL ESTATE AUCTION

419 BELLECASTLE

Recently renov dplx. 1 br, 1 ba, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceramic tile ba/kit, new appls, granite counters, w/d hkps, sm fenc yd. No pets. $825/mo + $825/ dep, 1 yr lse. 985-974-4164.

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

7722 HICKORY ST.

Close to univer. 2/1 furn kit w/stove, mw, fridge w/ice, dw & w&d. Hdwd flrs, ceil fans, CA & H. Water paid by owner. Nice shared backyd. $975/mo. + same dep. (504) 282-1346 or 628-0557

Sper r y Van Ness Gilmor e Auction By Order of Local Banks & Others

By Order of Local Banks & Others 17 Properties - April 9th - 14th

Kenner - 3648 W. LA State Dr. (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon 3713 E. LA State Dr. (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon 431 Holy Cross (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon 506 John Hopkins (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon 629 Chablis (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon Metairie - 1617 S. Arnoult (Residential Lot) 4/12 - 3 p.m. Luling - Lot 71 Lac Verrette (Residential Lot) 4/12 - 5 p.m. New Orleans - 2010 - 12 Second St. (4-Plex) 4/12 - 11 a.m. 2520 - 22 N. Derbigny St. (Duplex) 4/12 - 10 a.m. 7740 Allison (Home) 4/13 - 12 Noon 2432-34 St. Phillip (Duplex) 4/14 - 10 a.m. Lot 29, Eastover (Reidential Lot) 4/14 - 12 Noon Hammond - 44286 Range Rd 4/13 - 4 p.m. Gretna - Lots 29E & 29F Fried St. (R-2 Lots) 4/12 - 1:30 p.m. Algiers - 11 Sugarberry Pl. (Residential Lot) 4/12 - 12:30 p.m. Waveland - 1320 Dubuc Ln. (Home) 4/9 - 11 a.m.

9 PROPERTIES SELL ABSOLUTE

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

5400 block of STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

Adorable gated condo. 1 bdrm/1bath. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $1100. Call (504) 432-1034.

$1000 $1200 $700 $600

504 468-6800

Sperry Van Ness A C C E L E R AT E D M A R K E T I N G w w w. g i l m o re a u c t i o n . co m ®

AUCTION & REALTY CO.

David E. Gilmore, CCIM, CAI, AARE • LA #447

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900. ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

2011 GEN PERSHING 2 APARTMENTS

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

Full Service Property Management

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426.

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

6317 S. PRIEUR

Properties For Lease and For Sale

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

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EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT Barber

Performs a variety of barbering services for authorized military and civilian personnel.

Salon Front Desk Coordinator

Part time. Evening hours & Sat. to start. More flexibility after training. Personable & fashion forward a must. Please apply in peraon at: 4033 Veterans Blvd., #C (2nd Floor), Metairie,

Softlines Divisional Manager

Responsible for the development and effective execution of business strategies and programs for assigned retail divisions to maximize sales opportunities within the individual stores.

Retail Operations Support Supervisor

Supervises operational support functions under close supervision of the GM. Implement programs, control/reduce operating expenses.

Fax resume to: Arlinda Metoyer 504-678-2716 or email: arlinda.metoyer@nexweb.org

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS

in the Warehouse District

in search of talented HAIRSTYLIST COLORIST APRENTICE

Please Call 722.3584 for interview

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS

Some Local & Out/Back. Free Health Ins.& Benefits. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp. Required Martin Transport, 1-888-380-5516

PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST

New Orleans, LA. Plan & implement market research & business development to increase sales/profit. Collect data & analyze market conditions, industry & competitors’ startgs. Conduct budget planning & produce sales forcst reprts. Develop region specifics to increase market share in Latin America. Bachelor’s in Bus. Admin or Mngmnt + 24 mnths exp in job offrd or rltd manag./financ. exp. Resume to: Robert G. Evans, Jr., President, Container Technology and Supply International Inc., 1046 Annunication Street, New Orleans, LA 70130.

GUIDES/TOURS LA’S TOP TOUR ATTRACTION seeks articulate, personable guide. Bilingual a plus. PT/FT. Call 9-5, Laura Plantation 225-265-7690.

FARM LABOR

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Clark & Co., shelby, MS, has 2 positions for rice, cotton & oilseed crops. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools, \ equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.10/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/171/11 12/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 30795.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR THE BEACH HOUSE

VOLUNTEER

GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

Coaches needed for Gymnastic & Tumbling classes. PT schedule is avail & flexible. For more info: 884-0907

FT or PT Tailor is needed for ladies clothing store.

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Experience preferred.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

Metairie Restaurant seeks Experienced GRILL/FRY COOK Call Lynn 456-7470 for interview

RETAIL COOKING SCHOOL/STORE

is looking to fill 2 positions: Sales, a Prep/Serve/Clean helper, Must be able to work weekends. Call Crescent City Cooks!, Riverwalk 529-1600.

MISCELLANEOUS ** ABLE TO TRAVEL ** Hiring 10 people, Free to travel all states, resort areas. No experience necessary. Paid training & transportation. OVER 18. Start ASAP. 1-970-773-3165 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

SALES/BRIDAL

Excellent opportunity for long term employment. Retail sales preferred. Salary+commision. We will train.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

café b

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Now Hiring Experienced Cooks, Experienced Servers & Valets Competitive Salary and great benefits! Apply online rbmet@neworleans-food.com or fax resume to 504-581-9795 Drug Free Workplace

Professional training in mixology and casino dealing

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

RALPH’S BRENNAN’S newest restaurant at 2700 Metairie Road Opening Soon

Dealingschool.com • 1-800-BARTEND


CLASSIFIEDS APPLIANCES

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

18 Cubic Ft Fridge

LICENSED MASSAGE

ELECTRIC RANGE

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

NOTICE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

MISC. BUILDING MATERIALS

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

& remodeling materials & some new appliances, wall tiles, roofing shingles, moulding, wooden floor planks, etc. (504) 578-6486.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278 Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-7172577. www.amazinghands.us

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

2209 LaPalco Blvd

Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘02 MERCEDES C240 ONLY 62K Miles $10,995 504-368-5640

‘03 MERCEDES BENZ E320 64K miles, $10,995 504-368-5640

BOOKS

Hands With A Heart SPECIAL

1 HOUR

$55

Swedish & Deep Tissue

60/90/120 Minutes Available Appts

9am-9pm • M - Sa

LA Lic# 520

call

601.303.7979

MERCHANDISE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES Large Chandelier

Beautiful Crystal Chandelier. Unusual, 2 ft 5 inch circumference Steal at $900 Lakeview 504-296-1554

‘03 VW PASSAT

Readers Digest condensed. 25 - 30 books. Exc condition. Call (504) 578-6486.

PARTS ONLY $1,995 504-368-5640

‘06 ACURA TL

ELECTRONICS ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES! COME TRY THE BEST - CLEARVIEW MALL - SMOKE WHEREVER - WWW. iSMOKEWHEREVER.COM (504) 455-4411.

River Ridge Location

504-258-3389

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com

$8,995 504-368-5640

BOOKS

Alicia Whittington

$16,995 504-368-5640

‘06 INFINITI G35 $16,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA $14,995 504-368-5640

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘08 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

BLDG. MATERIALS

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

STRESS? PAIN?

Princess Leila

AUTOMOTIVE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘03 TOYOTA SEQUOIA $10,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘07 jEEP WRANGLER $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘02 CHEVY TAHOE $8,995 Call 504-368-5640

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

PET ADOPTIONS ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

IF YA COUGHING AND YA SNEEZING YOUR DUCTS COULD BE THE REASON Improving the Health Of your Indoor Air! Locally owned, lic, ins. Free Est. Residential, Comm’l, Marine HEALTHY AIR DUCT CLEANING www.healthyairductcleaning.org 376-2444

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Elijah

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968 PEG Kennel #A12422153

Kirin

Gorgeous 4 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

NICK, BEAGLE/TERRIER MIX

50# Sweetheart. Young, loves everything and everyone. VetCk/Vacs/ Neut./Hsbkn/microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru April Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

MISC. HOME SERVICES CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL Self Contained & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15, 20, 30, 40 Cu. Yds.) Fully Insured. Construction, Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Service, No Delivery Fee. RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

ANDROID Kennel #A12384389

Peg is a 10-month-old, spayed, Rottie/Shepherd mix. Peg is a bit timid around new friends, gets along well with other dogs and will require TLC during her complimentary heartworm treatment. To meet Peg or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Android is a 1-year-old, neutered, DSH, with orange tabby markings. He’s a PLAYFUL, champion biscuit-maker, who greets everyone with a booming MEOW! To meet Android or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

CHATTY CAT

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

BOOK NOW TO SPRAY YOUR OAK TREES

For Buckmoth Caterpillars & Termites Natural, non-chemical pesticide ADRIAN’S TREE SERVICE Call Jean, 504-367-1160

Weekly Tails

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

Itty Bitty Inky

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

DELTA SOD

BASHFUL

$10 OFF

GROUT WORKS, LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning, Color Sealing, Grout repair, Shower Restoration, Natural Stone Care, Tile Replacement, Recaulking. Commercial & Residential. Free Estimates. Jay Broadwell, 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

AIR COND/HEATING PETS

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS UPTOWN HOME • 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Wonderful renov $2,700,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 67

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John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

3506 ANNUNCIATION CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

office

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

BETWEEN UPTOWN & OCHSNER

131 BROOKLYN AVE. CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $114,131


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for SAVINGS AND GREAT OFFERS From The Following Advertisers:

• Alamo Cleaners • Chinese Health Spa • EcoUrban LLC. • Red Mango • Suzette’s • Transform Nola For Your Savings go to bestofneworleans.com

Join us for the next MfC Meeting

Multifamily Report by Schedler & Associates with Madderra & Cazalot Thursday, April 7, 2011 • 12 noon Vincent’s Restaurant 4411 Chastant St., Metairie $30 members • $35 non-members

BeechGroVe & cLaiBorne hoMes tammy schindler 504- 373-5581 804 sherry lane westwego, lA 70094 managed by nDC real estate management

Downtown Development Group

& metro wiDe ApArtments 304-hoUse (4687) www.Brunoinc.com PartnershiP in Protection Commercial services 137 Canvasback Drive, st. rose, lA 70087

(504) 486-5846

interested in Joining the CounCil? ContaCt: Kathy d. BartheleMy, CounCil direCtor (504) 837-2700 or Kathy@hoMe-Builders.org www.MfCno.CoM Affiliated with

H O M E B U I L D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F G R E AT E R N E W O R L E A N S 2424 N Arnoult Rd • Metairie, LA 70001

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > aPril 05 > 2011

5403 PoweLL street

new orleans, La 70123-2306 (504) 731-8777 www.fd-cf.com

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