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KINDRA ARNESEN, COASTAL WHISTLEBLOWER

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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03


D I N N E R D R E S S E S> > > > > > >

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AUGUST 10, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 32

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 17 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES The World Trade Center was once one of New Orleans’ most prestigious addresses. Today no one seems to know what to do with it

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

9

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

C’est What?

9

Scuttlebutt

9

The facts

New Orleans know-it-all

Kindra Arnesen emerges as an unlikely, tireless voice for Plaquemines Parish

09

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Shop Talk

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine

Buy one Get one Free

VIEWS

and free chips & salsa

When it comes to all things Katrina, he’s Mr. Information. Not.

BUD LIGHT PITCHERS Reserve your date in advance!!!

24

Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

13

Clancy DuBos / Politics

15

Tentative peace between a pair of local pols

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

27

A&E News

27

Gambit Picks

29

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

31

Cuisine

43

The New Orleans Photo Alliance mounts an exhibition about the Gulf of Mexico

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Best bets for your busy week

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New CDs, reviewed

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EVENTS

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working together in difficult times

I

it’s during times like this when our community comes together. the Crescent river Pilots would like to acknowledge the many people who have been affected by the Gulf oil spill and thank those in our community who are contributing to the recovery and clean up effort. A special thanks to the Coast Guard and industry workers who have coordinated with the Crescent river Pilots to create cleaning stations to monitor the situation and keep the largest port complex in the world open and operating.

CresCent river Port Pilots’ AssoCiAtion Photos courtesy of the U.S. Coast Guard

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

8712 Highway 23 • Belle Chasse louisiana 70037 • 504-392-5018 • www.crescentpilots.com

06 OHS_1992_BB Saints ad_Gambit.indd 1

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thinking out loud

The Facts

A

horror of strip mining. Speaking of ecological horrors: Many environmental groups were disgusted by the lax safety procedures aboard the Deepwater Horizon and the blatant corruption of the U.S. Minerals Management Service. They wondered how things got so bad. The truth is they bear some responsibility. Environmental groups could make a big difference for a state as polluted as Louisiana, but for decades they clustered in the Northeast and Northwest and ignored the Gulf of Mexico. Kieran Suckling, a founder of the Center for Biological Diversity, summed it up nicely in The New York Times: “The environmental movement was either so far removed from it that it was unaware, or it was aware and afraid to challenge it because of local politics. Or it was unwilling to challenge because it has written off the Gulf as America’s dumping ground.” clothes + accessories

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Gulf Coast residents are not lazy chiselers; they have had their lives ripped apart by corporate carelessness. The biggest fact of all: Cleaning the oil from Louisiana’s marshes and marine life will be meaningless if America does not embark on a sustained, aggressive campaign to restore the Gulf wetlands. As John Barry, author of Rising Tide, The Story of the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, tells Gambit, “After the 1927 flood, the entire nation sympathized with Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas. The result was the most expensive thing the federal government had ever done, except fight World War I — the 1928 Flood Control Act. … The question, ultimately, as usual, comes down to money. Not entirely money, however. The one thing more precious to us than money right now is sand [to restore wetlands]. You can get more money, eventually, sometime, somewhere, from someplace. But you can’t get more sand.” And those are the facts.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

fter Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods, Louisianans got used to a lot of misconceptions about the storm, our state and the recovery (or lack thereof). In the wake of the BP oil disaster, similar misconceptions have arisen. America needs to stick to the facts. Some have questioned the need for personal charity toward the Gulf Coast, reasoning that BP can and should be paying for cleanup and restitution. Fact: They’re half-right. The public must hold BP’s feet to the fire, but making BP pay will take years. Exxon settled in 2009 for some of the damages from its Valdez spill, which occurred two decades earlier. On Aug. 3, Kenneth Feinberg, who is responsible for administering the restitution fund, announced that BP would not pay mental health claims — an unconscionable position, considering the mental health crisis that ensued among Alaskans after the Valdez’ decimation of their fishing waters. In addition, the $20 billion escrow fund is not a “shakedown” or “slush fund” as some far-right politicians and pundits have described it. The fund is a way of ensuring BP meets its obligations to those coastal residents whose livelihoods have been destroyed. If a private company took away your ability to make a living, you would demand compensation, and rightfully so. Gulf Coast residents are not lazy chiselers; they have had their lives ripped apart by corporate carelessness. Moreover, as of Aug. 3, BP had not paid one cent into the escrow fund. In fact, it is still negotiating terms with the feds. A report last week by the nonprofit journalism organization ProPublica shows the oil giant is also dragging its feet on compensating claimants who are not explicitly covered by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Sadly, it’s not just the usual right-wing chorus that’s shown ignorance about this disaster. When polls were released showing a significant majority of Louisianans approved of ending the moratorium on deepwater drilling, some “progressives” suggested coastal residents were somehow getting what they deserved — and some were downright gleeful at the thought of losing what TV host Bill Maher sneered at as “redneck jobs.” Fact: There are two ways to make a living on the Louisiana coast: oil and fishing. The loss of the fisheries is a body blow to south Louisiana, and people are afraid the loss of drilling will be a deathblow. Green energy is a laudable but long-term goal. The people who live near Louisiana’s coast need work now. They are not anticonservationists. They are not ignorant, and they are no more responsible for the BP oil disaster than Appalachian coal miners are responsible for the ecological

07


southern

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DEAR MARLENE, New Orleanians love naming things and applying our own descriptive monikers to places we cherish and frequent. That’s the case with the highrise. There’s nothing official about the term, but it is perpetuated each morning and afternoon by traffic reporters who tell us, “Traffic across the I-10 highrise is backed up to Louisa Street.” The Industrial Canal itself is a locally applied term as well. When the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the 5.5-mile waterway that connects the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, it was officially named the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, but even commercial mariners refer to it as the Industrial Canal. The Danziger Bridge has a more interesting story. Alfred David Danziger was an assistant state attorney general in 1934 and an executive counsel to Mayor Robert Maestri from 1936 to 1946. He also was very rich. One of Danziger’s family members told us of a ring the size of a “small Creole tomato” made from one of Danziger’s tie tacks. His wealth may account for the fact that he was a crony of political boss and Gov. Huey Long during Long’s heyday, an association that probably led to Danziger’s two political positions. Long supposedly once promised to build a road to Danziger’s proposed Grand Isle development, but the governor didn’t come through and the road project failed. The present Danziger lift bridge on U.S. Hwy. 90 (a/k/a Chef Menteur Highway) was completed in 1988 and at the time was the widest lift bridge in the world, with seven vehicular lanes. It replaced a drawbridge of earlier vintage, which also bore Danziger’s name. There are many interesting stories about Danziger. One has to do with an attempt in 1929 to impeach Long, who was accused of many crimes, including — as mentioned in the impeachment hearings — taking part in wild parties. The hearings didn’t include details of just

what happened at the parties, however. Here is the story as handed down through the Danziger family and told to us many years ago by his grandniece, Cathy Kahn. She says Danziger invited Long to a private party in the French Quarter complete with champagne and dancing girls. Kahn says at one point, a dancing girl was sitting on Long’s lap and mentioned she was having a hard time believing he was the governor of Louisiana. To prove his

The Danziger Bridge was named for Alfred David Danziger, but is likely to be remembered as the scene of police shootings of civilians after Hurricane Katrina. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

truthfulness, Long picked up the phone and called out the National Guard. We assume the young lady was impressed. Nowadays, the Danziger Bridge may be known across the country as the site of police shootings of residents seeking shelter following Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of the city in 2005. Two people died and four others were injured in the incident. On July 13, 2010, six current or former police officers were indicted by a federal grand jury. The charges included civil rights violations, conspiracy to cover up details in the case, obstruction of justice, making false statements and using a weapon in a crime. Two of the indicted officers are charged with killing the two victims, and the other four face charges associated with the alleged cover-up. Five other officers have pleaded guilty to a cover-up.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> cHRIs RosE clancy dubos < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < knowledge < < < < < < < < < < <is < <power <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 15 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QuoTES of ThE WEE WEEk

“First Hit, First Forgotten” Kindra arnesen fights to tell the story of Plaquemines Parish.

“I find it very hard to believe — impossible, actually — that they have three-quarters of the oil accounted for.” — Samantha Joye, professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia.

By ale x woodward

K

“There are still boats out there every day working, finding turtles with oil on them and seeing grass lines with oil in it. Certainly all the oil isn’t accounted for. There are millions of pounds of tar balls and oil on the bottom.” — Orange Beach, Ala. charter boat captain Randy Boggs, dismissing the government’s claim.

foWl PlAy

The Washington, D.C.-based group Americans United for Change (AUC), a liberal advocacy organization, had Metairie motorists squawking Aug. 2 when it erected a 20-foot inflatable ostrich outside the regional headquarters of Sen. David Vitter. The stated reason was Vitter’s “refusal to hold BP accountable for the worst oil spill in U.S. history,” but the motivation was more clearly political, as Vitter is seeking re-election to his Senate seat this fall. Later in the week, the ostrich traveled to Vitter’s offices in Baton Rouge, Lafayette and New Orleans. (Vitter spokesman Joel DiGrado did not return a request for comment.) Local political watchers may not have been surprised to page 12

ily being pulled in Community activist Kindra separate directions, Arnesen is fighting to save and the future of Plaquemines Parish, her Plaquemines Parish, neighbors and their way its fisheries, its liveof life. lihoods, its people. She’s tired and getting sick. Arnesen lost 33 pounds in 100 days. (“Someone said I look like I’m on drugs, I’m like, ‘Yeah, f—ing have some Corexit.’”) There’s little optimism. But there’s hope in the Coastal Heritage Society of Louisiana, a small, freshoff-the-ground nonprofit group Arnesen has helped put together. The society is raising money to help struggling families with school supplies, electricity

c'est what? should the elevated i-10 over the north ClaiBorne avenue Corridor Be torn down and replaCed By a ground-level Boulevard?

64%

Mary-jo Webster

No

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com this week’s QUesTIoN

page 11

BoUQuets

36%

Yes

Do you believe the White House’s claim that 75 percent of the oil in the Gulf has been captured or eliminated?

this week’s heroes and zeroes

is being honored this month as HGTV’s “Community Crusader” for August. Webster is a volunteer who sits on the executive committee of Rebuilding Together New Orleans, a national nonprofit group offering free home renovations to the poor. In 2008, Webster, then a director of business operations for Starbucks, organized more than 4,000 volunteers to help rebuild local homes damaged in the floods following Hurricane Katrina.

Pamela Anderson

came to New Orleans City Park Aug. 2 to pose for photos with 48 dogs that had been relinquished to Louisiana animal shelters since the BP oil disaster. According to the Associated Press, the St. Bernard Parish animal shelter took in 117 dogs in June, compared to 17 in June 2009. Anderson, who also is a spokesperson for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, is picking up the tab to move the pooches to shelters in Virginia — all but one, which she adopted herself.

Terri Goulette,

a Houma resident, organized a backpack drive to assist Louisiana families affected by the oil disaster. Goulette’s church, Northland, gathered more than 1,000 backpacks and school supplies over the July 31 weekend for coastal Louisiana kids. The twist? Northland is a church in Longwood, Fla., which streams interactive services over the Internet, and Goulette worships with them online.

Bruce Edwards Sr.

was sentenced to four years in prison and ordered to pay restitution July 29 by U.S. District Judge Jay Zainey after being convicted of wire fraud and tax evasion. Edwards, the brother of former New Orleans Sewerage & Water Board member Benjamin Edwards, pleaded guilty to conspiring with his brother on a kickback scheme that involved millions of dollars of S&WB money and a sham company. Benjamin Edwards pleaded guilty to federal wire fraud and tax evasion in February.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

indra Arnesen’s targets are big and across the map. She aims high, and she prefers buckshot. There’s Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser (“He’s nonexistent”), media heavyweights like The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times (“They’re a joke”), Environmental Protection Agency officials (“I had that poor dude stuttering”), but she’s most damning to BP. Since the early days of the Gulf oil disaster, she only has to look to her Plaquemines Parish neighbors and tell their stories — sick, out of work, struggling — to raise eyebrows and arms. She doesn’t want to abandon the parish, but she’s looking out for her children, ages 5 and 8, and she’s not sure what the future may hold for them at home. She moves back and forth from Venice, La., to New Orleans, keeping close to her neighbors and husband, David. Today, she’s in New Orleans to meet with a documentary crew. The heat index is well over 100 degrees — her hair is pulled back in pigtails, and she cranks up the air conditioning in her car, parked at the back of a small lot in the Warehouse District. “Since day seven, I haven’t been a mom, I haven’t been a wife — all I’ve been is a community activist. That’s it,” she says. “I’ve been all over the place. I’ve sat down with every documentary crew, every film crew, every newspaper, camera crew. I realized … someone had to say something.” She beams when she talks about a July 28 WVUE report in which the television station awarded her a Thomas Jefferson Community Leadership Award for her activism in the parish. Cameras followed her as she handed Walmart gift cards to fishermen and their families. The station aired the report the following night. “I wasn’t expecting it,” she says with a rare smile. But she’s soon brought back to reality: endless paperwork, interviews, parish-wide illness, her fam-

“The vast majority of the oil has been contained, it’s been burned, it’s been cleaned.” — White House energy adviser Carol Browner on Aug. 4, the day the National Incident Command released a report estimating 74 percent of the spill has been burned, skimmed or otherwise recovered.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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and medical bills, mortgage payments and other necessities. The group also is paying for independent tests of air and water quality in the parish. “Thank God I finally found somebody to work with, because finding somebody to work with is like pulling teeth,” she says. “I’m not trying to attack BP through the organization. I’ve done that plenty on my own.” Is the nonprofit worried that having an outspoken critic like Arnesen on board could compromise its credibility? “Who, me?” she says. “No. They love me.”

DAVID Is sTIll IN VeNICe, TrYING To keep fisheries in the parish alive. A successful “static kill” of the well and waters open to fishing won’t cure the community. After failed attempts to cap the well, Arnesen says she never was discouraged. “I wasn’t worried about my livelihood. I’m a survivor. I’ve done everything under the sun to survive in life financially and have always done well,” she says. “I’m going to do something else, eventually. We’ll have to. We have no choice.” The waters are open, but shrimpers and fishermen aren’t back to work —

docks are closed or closing. They’re not buying, and neither are the factories. she says freezers are full of imports, leaving fishermen out to dry. “But they don’t want to f—k with this shrimp out here anyway,” Arnesen says. Potentially tainted seafood would land a domino-effect blow to fishermen, restaurants and factories in the Gulf, she says, and nobody trusts the agencies performing the tests. With no fisheries, there are more claims to be filed. “When I brought my paperwork to BP, it was a stack of papers like this,” Arnesen says, holding her hands about a foot apart. she prepared tax documents from 2007 to 2009 and brought 2010 up to date. “They wanted every paper,” she says. The Arnesens sold about $200,000 worth of seafood a year — after rebuilding the business following hurricane Katrina. But Arnesen predicts they’ll only see a fraction of that. once you file, how much will you get, and when will you know? “You don’t,” she says. “That’s the beauty. People like me are a pain in the ass. And I told them the last time they contacted me, the only way they were going to get another f—ing slice of paper from me is if they sent me the formula they were figuring our claim on. And they did. I don’t know what to expect from here. I’m going to take it to my accountant, with my tax papers, and have her write everything that’s f—d up, and I’m going to take it to the attorney and say, ‘This is what they’re trying to do to people.’ “I don’t know what to do … at this point. I could either just stop what I’m doing and bury my head in the sand, but I know my people are still being poisoned down there, I know they’re going to get screwed in the long run,” Arnesen says. “It’s not just BP and public opinion we’re fighting. While the other oil companies have sat back and let BP hang itself with its own noose, when it comes to litigation, (we’re) going to be fighting every oil company out there. They’re not going to let us win because it sets a precedent. We are not going to be able to win this, not even settle. If they pay us, it sets forth a precedent for future litigants. They’re not going to let it happen.” so how does it end? “A dead fishery, contaminated land, a box of bills and a court date — in at least 10 or 20 (years),” she says. “It’s already happened overnight. our docks are closed, our factories aren’t buying, nobody wants to eat louisiana seafood. It’s not ‘Is it going to happen?’ It’s already occurred. Where do we go from here?”

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BorN IN ANAheIm, CAlIf., ArNeseN is Plaquemines Parish-raised, having grown up around fisheries — her father was a commercial fisherman — and Arnesen’s first job was shucking oysters. she’s been married 11 years to David, also a commercial fisherman. But any comments on her successes quickly turn conversation back to the plight of south louisiana. Arnesen has been to countless town meetings in and around Venice and New orleans, holding BP, the ePA, the U.s. Coast Guard and other agencies accountable for the devastation the oil disaster has wreaked upon the people of Plaquemines Parish. “I really didn’t want to be first hit, first forgotten again,” she says, recalling the wake of hurricane Katrina when national attention shifted to New orleans. she’s become something of a viral star, with YouTube videos — viewed thousands of times — capturing her frank, angry and emotional accounts of her husband and other fishermen getting sick during cleanup. she also turned to the media. she represented the Gulf Coast in a massive Australian 60 Minutes piece in June. (“This is going to affect the entire world,” she said.) But more than 300 interviews later, she’s still fighting public perception of the disaster and capturing the media’s attention, which she says is a battle in itself. “It’s a huge picture, and a picture’s worth 1,000 words,” she says. “If it’s not painted correctly, that’s one of the problems I have with the media.” A July 23 video (“spilling over”) on The Washington Post’s website shows Arnesen going face to face with Kenneth feinberg. Arnesen wasn’t shy. The video also documents the family before Arnesen moved the children into New orleans. David tells them, “It’ll be oK. … We want to send you up there where you’re not breathing all this oil stuff. We want to keep you all safe, oK?” “my husband was pissed,” Arnesen says. “he was so mad at me … for making my kids leave, he was like, ‘I cannot

believe you sent them out.’ I said, ‘You can just be mad.’ That’s the first real problem we’ve had in 11 years. he’s not as upset now. he’s still in Venice, with brown shit leaking out his ear. he feels like shit all the time.” And it’s not just David who’s sick. Arnesen names the ailments plaguing the parish: “nosebleeds, people bleeding out of their rectum, major slamming migraines, nausea when they go outside for a prolonged period of time, rashes.” large, red bumps on her arms and legs recently kept Arnesen awake at night — she says she felt like her body was attacking itself. Nausea and sties forming on her eyes accompanied the bumps. A skin disease specialist in hammond diagnosed her with a staph infection. Twenty-four hours later, she visited Plaquemines medical Center, where doctors diagnosed her with scabies. And not just her — there are reports throughout the parish of misdiagnosed skin lesions, what Arnesen says are likely due to continued exposure of Corexit dispersant and oil-based chemicals. stress from the disaster also is taking a toll on residents’ mental health. Arnesen’s close friend of 20 years called her in tears threatening suicide, fearing he couldn’t feed his kids or provide for his family. “When I got that call, it wasn’t just a call from a fisherman,” she says. “It was a call from someone I’ve been friends with since I was 13. … I know his kids, I introduced him to his wife.” Arnesen called Venice Vessels of opportunity coordinator scott Thomas and asked to get the fisherman a job. Instead, her friend was placed in protective custody. “he didn’t talk to me for two weeks,” she says. When he did, “he jumps out the car, screaming and hollering coming toward me, and I went right back in his face, forehead to forehead, and said, ‘how dare you. You think me, of all people, called the cops?’ … I’m damned if I do and damned if I don’t.”

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see the name of Alex Morgan behind the stunt. Morgan managed James Perry’s failed campaigns for mayor and state senator, and he achieved a level of local fame for Perry’s commercials, which featured New Orleanians swearing in frustration with their choices for mayor (with the actual words bleeped out). Morgan is now the AUC’s Louisiana state director, so expect more colorful campaigning before the year is out. Nevertheless, the tradition of using fowl symbolism at campaign events and headquarters isn’t a new one. In the 1992 presidential election, supporters of Bill Clinton sent campaign operatives dressed in chicken suits to campaign rallies for President George H.W. Bush to underscore their contention the thenpresident was afraid to debate. Earlier this year, Nevada Democrats wore chicken suits to campaign appearances by Sue Lowden, the GOP challenger to Sen. Harry Reid who ultimately lost the primary to Tea Party candidate Sharron Angle. In response to the Lowden situation, the state of Nevada in May declared it illegal to wear a chicken suit within 100 feet of a polling place. — Kevin Allman

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The first major survey of families living within 10 miles of the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Coast presented no surprises, but it did uncover some sobering statistics. According to the poll, conducted by Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness (NCDP), more than one-third of parents said their children had experienced either physical symptoms or mental distress directly related to the BP oil disaster. Researchers interviewed more than 1,200 adults for the survey, and found 21 percent of parents reported their children were spending less time playing outdoors. Nearly 27 percent of respondents said they thought they might have to move away, and the children in those families were exhibiting signs of mental health distress at a rate three times higher than their counterparts. “There is a significant and persistent public health crisis underscored by the large number of children with medical and psychological problems related to the disaster,” says Dr. Irwin Redlener, the center’s director and president of the Children’s Health Fund (CHF). “Over the last few days we are seeing an effort by officials who are suggesting that, as the oil is less visible on the surface [of the water], the ‘crisis is over.’ Clearly, this is far from the case.” The NCDP says it intends to follow more than 1,000 of the respondents to gauge their progress, and the CHF will dispatch mobile pediatric help to

the affected parishes soon. Among the NCDP’s other findings in the survey, says Redlener: “There are literally no pediatricians in the lower two-thirds of Plaquemines Parish.” — Allman

lAying iT down

Mayor Mitch Landrieu last week directly addressed one of the city’s most pervasive — yet least discussed by public officials — political issues: race. Landrieu broached the subject in the context of the city repossessing blighted properties from black property owners who have failed to return to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. It came at a community budget meeting Aug. 2. Approximately 1,000 residents of eastern New Orleans and the Lower 9th Ward attended the standing-room-only meeting at the Household of Faith church on the I-10 Service Road in eastern New Orleans. The residents raised a familiar array of issues themselves — blight and the lack of hospital facilities, jobs and retail outlets in the area. “I want to talk about race,” answered Landrieu at the end of the evening. “You start taking people’s homes, people start asking, ‘Why you trying to stop people coming home, Mr. Mitch, looking the way you do?’ Do I need to say it?” Landrieu queried. The crowd murmured its support, and he continued: “The question is, Is this about race? Or is this about the city? And when is the day when we start focusing on these properties? Is it now? Is it September? Is it November? Or yesterday?” The crowd cheered when Landrieu said, “yesterday.” “I’m just asking,” Landrieu continued. “I just want to make sure I heard you. Because I promise you as soon as I lay it down, somebody’s going to lay it down, and there’s going to be a march.” “We got your back, Mitch,” yelled several people in the crowd. The idea of repossessing vacant properties in eastern New Orleans and the Lower 9th Ward — two hard-hit neighborhoods populated mostly by AfricanAmericans — has been increasingly on City Council’s radar in recent months. At a meeting of the council’s Recovery Committee on June 30, consultant Greg Rigamer said that of 52,800 New Orleans applicants to the state’s Road Home program, 34,921 have closed on their homes and are moving forward — but about 14,000 are showing no signs of progress after having received the money. Rigamer urged the council to look into donating out-of-compliance properties to the Louisiana Land Trust. A fight is sure to ensue, and no doubt that’s part of what Landrieu wanted to “lay down” up front. — Matt Davis


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don’t have Ray Nagin’s cell phone number. But that would be great, no? Instead, I mostly try to avoid the duty altogether. It’s a big responsibility, framing up someone else’s portrait of our region at this critical time period in our recovery, the fifth anniversary. Editors love fifth anniversaries. It gives them the first opportunity since a Big Event occurred to dig in and render forth the Big Picture of the Big Event. And editors love the Big Picture. So I duck, shift and parry. I tell them I lost my Rolodex from Katrina. If they’re under 30, they ask me: What’s a Rolodex? If they’re over 30, I give them a quick overview of my resume: During my

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Think of me as a sort of anthropomorphic version of Katrina for Dummies. Thus it is these days I am incessantly tweeted, Faced, Googled and poked. 25-year career in newspapering, I’ve gone from The Washington Post to The TimesPicayune to Gambit. I ask them: Is that really the kind of career arc that indicates the expertise you seek on the most significant meteorological event and engineering catastrophe of the 21st century? It’s more the career maneuverings of a guy who found a place he really likes living and has managed to cadge someone into paying him paltry sums so that he can stay there. Er, here. Yes, that’s what I tell them: That I like it here. Most of us do. Otherwise we would leave. Or would not have come back after The Whole Damn Thing in the first place. And that if they’d get off the phone with me and get out of their hotel rooms and walk around town — leaving their cells and their laptops behind — they would find that this alluring region can tell its own fantastical story better than I ever could, can reveal her own secrets, mysteries, tangents, legends and fables better than anyone I know. Except maybe one guy. Which reminds me: Anybody got Ray’s cell phone number?

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

y phone rings more than usual these days. My email inbox is jammed up every day. It’s mostly reporters from other states, even other countries. They’re all looking for me. It would be flattering to interpret this flurry of activity in my electronic hardware as testimony to my above-average workmanship and reputation for insightful commentary, observation and analysis. It would be flattering. But it would also be incorrect. What’s unfolding is an aspect of journalism’s inside baseball: The fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is nigh, and when out-of-state reporters launch an investigation into a topic, they often begin by contacting in-state peers in the business who may have developed more expertise regarding the matter, and, more important, more contacts, and who might — in the time-honored fashion of collegial benevolence — be willing to share such information. To wit: I have written a lot of stories about Katrina, talked to a lot of people about Katrina, know a lot about Katrina. Me and Katrina, we’re like this. But most journalists seeking my input for their stories don’t want to interview me or plumb the depths of my own personal knowledge and experience on the subject. Truthfully, what they mostly want is contact information for other people whose depths of personal knowledge and experience they would like to plumb. So when they start looking up “Katrina” online, they come across my name and see I have filed about 20,000 stories about The Whole Damn Thing. Therefore, I am a good beginner’s reference for reporters from Detroit, Denver or Dusseldorf who have just been assigned to write up their own report on the fifth anniversary of The Whole Damn Thing. Think of me as a sort of anthropomorphic version of Katrina for Dummies. Thus it is these days, I am incessantly tweeted, Faced, Googled and poked. Now, 15 years ago, if you told me that I was being tweeted, Faced, Googled and poked, I’m not sure whether the proper response would have been to swat my arms, scratch myself, call the police — or do right by the young woman and marry her. Funny, how vocabulary changes over time. But I stray. The point I’m trying to make: I can end up being the gatekeeper of information for people coming to town this month to peruse the emotional landscape of the populace. It’s not an enviable position to be in. Mostly, I just give them Ray Nagin’s cell phone number and wish them good luck. Actually, that’s not what happens. I

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Some Big Ifs

R

epublican Congressman Anh “Joseph” Cao’s bid for reelection in Louisiana’s heavily Democratic 2nd District is one of the most closely watched races in the country, but most of the action so far has been on the Democratic side. Cao has no GOP opponent, while several Democrats have lined up to oppose him. Many expected the Aug. 28 Democratic primary to be a slugfest between state Reps. Cedric Richmond of eastern New Orleans and Juan LaFonta, whose district includes parts of the French Quarter, Treme, Marigny, Bywater and Gentilly. Two other Democrats also are running, but neither can match Richmond and LaFonta’s money or the name recognition. Eugene Green once served as a top aide to Congressman Bill Jefferson, and Gary Johnson is a New Orleans native who worked on Capitol Hill for the House Rules Committee. Green has run for office before, but this is Johnson’s first race. There is little love lost between Richmond and LaFonta, and that was supposed to provide the fireworks of this

campaign. It also gave the Cao campaign hope that Richmond, the consensus Democratic frontrunner, would be bloodied by the time he faces Cao in the Nov. 2 general election. Some Cao backers even hoped that Richmond would be forced into an Oct. 2 Democratic runoff, which would leave him strapped for cash. Those expectations may have fizzled. The outspoken LaFonta, who never retreats from a fight and isn’t shy about picking one, recently told his supporters not to attack Richmond. He likewise promised to take the high road himself. If that promise holds up, and if LaFonta’s supporters honor his request, it should solidify Richmond’s early advantage in the polls and fundraising. In the context of Louisiana’s politics, however, those are big “ifs.” LaFonta says he doesn’t think negative campaigning works, but both men say, warily, “If attacked, I will defend myself.” Meanwhile, Richmond has racked up key endorsements in the district, which includes most of Orleans Parish, most of the West Bank of Jefferson and a hand-

ful of precincts in Kenner and unincorporated East Jefferson. Most of LaFonta’s and Richmond’s area colleagues in the House are backing Richmond, as are several prominent local officials in Orleans and Jefferson — District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro, Gretna Police Chief Arthur Lawson, Jefferson Parish Councilman Byron Lee (who was one of Richmond’s opponents for this seat two years ago) and, just last week, U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu. On the national front, Richmond has won endorsements from the Congressional Black Caucus and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, effectively making him the party’s choice even before Democratic voters in the district weighed in. While all this gives Richmond comfort, LaFonta has taught his past opponents not to underestimate him. He is a skillful street politician who always manages to

Cedric Richmond (left) leads Juan LaFonta in prominent endorsements. turn out his supporters on election day. Moreover, the last Saturday in August is not a day that voters in Louisiana typically go to the polls, which means the turnout for the Democratic primary could be exceedingly low — which means that anything can happen. Stay tuned.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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SukhoThai’s menu is diverse and loaded with specialty dishes such as Volcano whole redfish, grilled Waterfall Beef salad and Chiang Mai chili dip, all featured in the photo on left. The blend of local produce and seafood with Thai herbs and spices results in an irresistibly fresh and vibrant cuisine. The effort has been recognized by many food lovers searching for a true taste of Thailand, and the enthusiasm is reflected in critical acclaim about SukhoThai: 100 Great Places to Eat, The Times Picayune, 2009 (SukhoThai was the only Thai restaurant listed) “SukhoThai is a strong contender for best Thai kitchen in the entire New Orleans area. Its menu is large and for the most part sticks with traditional Thai dishes. The ingredients are fresh and vivid, they’re not afraid of using chili peppers and the presentations are as lovely as great Thai food often is.” Tom Fitzmorris, 2007.

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TALL ORDER CAN ANYBODY FIGURE OUT HOW TO MAKE THE CITY’S MOST VALUABLE REAL ESTATE LIVE UP TO ITS PROMISE? EFFORTS TO REVIVE THE FIRST WORLD TRADE CENTER KEEP STALLING. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

I

n its heyday, the World Trade Center (WTC) at the foot of Canal Street was a bustling destination, its 33 floors teeming with consulates from Latin America, Europe and Asia as well as maritime and other businesses. Designed by architect Edward Durrel Stone, the X-shaped, 404-foot tower — the first world trade center — opened in 1967. Throughout the oil boom of the 1970s and early ’80s, an estimated 5,000 workers and visitors walked through the doors at 2 Canal Street every day, according to Gene Schreiber, who managed the nonprofit trade organization WTC Inc. for 30 years before retiring in June. Those heady days are long gone. What remains is a largely gutted, once-iconic edifice that has become a hot-button issue among developers, real estate experts and politicos charged with making the site an economic driver once again. Proposed uses have varied from converting it to a hoteloffice complex to demolishing it altogether. The latest recommendation is to tear it down — but there is no definitive public policy on what to put in its place. Or when. Meanwhile, WTC Inc. struggles to rebuild its membership while it negotiates with City Hall for a graceful exit from the tower it built more than four decades ago. The city owns the building and the land beneath it, as well as a nearby parking garage. Mayor Mitch Landrieu is now the fourth mayor to have to figure out how to make what some call

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COVERSTORY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

New Orleans’ most valuable piece of real estate live up to its promise. It’s a tall order.

18

FROM A DISTANCE, THE WTC STILL STANDS AS AN architectural gem dominating the city’s skyline. But today the building is virtually empty except for the posh 29th-floor offices and meeting rooms of WTC Inc. Its vibrant Plimsoll Club, which played host to dignitaries and business leaders from all over the world, moved from the 30th floor of the WTC to the Westin Hotel at Canal Place in March. The aging tower has become an albatross, leaving WTC Inc., which built and paid for the structure, in financial straits. At the same time, the cash-strapped city is losing millions of dollars in payments it was promised if the building were redeveloped into a hotel. In fact, the city has not received a dime of revenue from the WTC since 1963, when International Trade Mart (ITM), which preceded WTC Inc., paid $56 for a 56-year lease. In the early 1960s, the riverfront at the foot of Canal Street was a shell-covered parking lot surrounded by dilapidated sheds. Locals knew the area as a haven for homeless men and fighting seamen and dockworkers. Mayor Victor Schiro and ITM manager and director Clay Shaw changed all that when they inked a deal in which ITM prepaid the city for a $1-per-year lease that expires in 2019. When completed in 1967, the ITM Building — still known to an older generation as “the Trade Mart” — quickly became the city’s premier office address. Flanked by Spanish Plaza, which was built at the same time, the ITM building preceded by several decades the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel, the Riverwalk Mall, the Aquarium of the Americas and Woldenberg Park. In 1985, ITM merged with International House, another private organization established in 1943 to promote international trade, to form the nonprofit WTC Inc., whose goal remained promoting international trade. Before then, members of ITM and International House mingled at what today is International House Hotel, developed and owned by Sean Cummings. The idea of putting a hotel in the tower was first discussed in 1994, when WTC of New Orleans past presidents W. James Amoss Jr. and F. Walker Tucei Jr. approached Mayor Sidney Barthelemy about converting the first 19 floors of the building into a hotel. Barthelemy, who was in the last year of his term, deferred the issue to incoming Mayor Marc Morial. Morial’s administration and WTC Inc. issued a request for proposals in 1997 to develop a hotel at the site. Bidders leapt at the opportunity, and a proposal by WTC Development LLC, led by longtime bond broker Larry Sisung, was declared the winner. The $70 million deal included a 638-room Crowne Plaza Hotel and redevelopment of 10 floors of office space for use by WTC Inc. The city required the developers to partner with Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) — minority or woman-owned businesses historically left out of most public-private deals. The two initial DBE partners working with Sisung eventually grew to 13 and did business as Pelican Holdings LLC and Pelican Ventures LLC. Over the next eight years, Sisung’s plan morphed into a $200 million, 1,200-room Westin Hotel, but that deal eventually died in 2006. It was never smooth sailing. When the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, froze the nation’s hospitality sector, the hotel partner pulled out, and with it went a commitment of $20 million in equity. Sisung responded by seeking, with the city’s help, a Tax Increment Financing District (TIF), which state lawmakers adopted in 2002. The TIF was designed to help create $40

(left) Construction of the World Trade Center, finished in 1967. (below)A napkin from the popular Top of the Mart rotating bar shows the sights visitors could see from the bar crowning the WTC.

million in equity by capturing the site’s 13 percent hotel-motel tax (which all New Orleans hotels pay) and using it to build the developers’ equity. The TIF drew immediate fire. Competing hotels challenged the TIF in court. In June 2005, the Louisiana Supreme Court labeled it “a misuse of public funds” and declared the TIF District unconstitutional. Sisung, who says his development group “spent millions” in its attempts to redevelop the building, insists the TIF was necessary because of the effect the 9/11 attacks had on lenders who invest in hotels. Sisung’s deal had other problems as well. In 2003, new Mayor Ray Nagin put the brakes on Sisung’s deal, claiming its benefits to the city were minimal. He directed Sean Cummings, whom Nagin appointed to lead the New Orleans Building Corp. (which manages some of the city’s most valuable real estate holdings), to revamp the project. Cummings is credited with sweetening the deal for the city by demanding the developer repay $40 million in projected hotel-motel taxes, plus a $24 million up-front payment. But even that didn’t quell critics of the TIF. Several times between 2003 and 2009, the Bureau of Governmental Research (BGR) and the Metropolitan Crime Commission (MCC) blasted the project. BGR noted that the TIF was unfair to existing hotels, all of which have to pay the 13 percent tax, and claimed it would cannibalize guests from other hotels. The MCC issued a scathing report in 2003, stating, “We note that this deal, which was assembled as almost a fait accompli under the prior (Morial) administration, certainly has the appearance of political cronyism.” Who were those alleged cronies? The minority partners, who would own 50 percent of the deal, included a who’s who of local African-American power brokers: • Doug Evans, who at the time chaired the New Orleans Aviation Board and is the longtime president of the Central City-based political organization BOLD. Evans is a close ally of former City Councilman Jim Singleton — a

Morial foe while on the council — and former 1st Municipal District Assessor Kenneth Carter, another BOLD leader. Carter lost a bid for mayor to Morial in 1994. Carter’s daughter, State Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, was a state representative in 2002 — and she cosponsored the bill that created the TIF District for the WTC building conversion. • David Guidry, a West Bank businessman and former chairman of the Dock Board. He was once a staunch supporter of former New Orleans District C City Councilman Troy Carter, whose district included the French Quarter. • Former 1st Municipal District Assessor Darren Mire, another BOLD ally. • Dale Valdery, a cousin of then-state Sen. Jon Johnson, who now is District E’s city councilman. • Dr. Angela Barthe, who now is Councilman Johnson’s spouse. As a state senator, Johnson voted for the TIF District when he was engaged to Barthe. Hurricane Katrina, which struck in August 2005, dealt a deathblow to the Sisung proposal. He pulled out six months later. A year after that, in March 2007, the Nagin Administration received proposals from eight teams of developers which were given only 30 days to submit their plans and 120 days to secure financing — a deadline that foreshadowed Nagin’s accelerated but doomed attempt to redevelop Municipal Auditorium. As in the auditorium deal, critics blasted the timetable, saying it shut out potential national investors and hotel operators. Project finalists included Darryl Berger, Pres Kabacoff, and Patrick Quinn and his business partner Mickey Palmer. Palmer and Quinn were then the largest independent owners of boutique hotels in the city. Berger’s team proposed a Hard Rock Hotel & Resort. Other proposals came from PAGE 20


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

An old postcard shows the WTC and the Rivergate Convention Center (lower left) dominating the Central Business District at the foot of Canal Street. The Rivergate opened in September 1968, about a year after the WTC, and was demolished in 1995 to make room for Harrah’s Casino.

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a team led by local hoteliers and developers Henry Lambert and Carey Bond of RCB Builders. Nagin’s administration chose Full Spectrum of New York, led by Carlton Brown, as the winning team. Full Spectrum proposed to develop an Indigo Hotel by InterContinental Hotels with 300 rooms as well as residential units, retail outlets and a cultural museum. Full Spectrum initially sidestepped the 90-day requirement for signing a lease by getting Nagin and the City Council to approve extensions. The 800-page lease gave Full Spectrum a 99-year lease on the building, but by August 2008 the developer pulled out of the project after failing to secure financing. In hindsight, Berger says losing the 2007 bid for WTC redevelopment was “fortuitous” in the present economic climate. He and his partners last year bought the Westin Hotel at Canal Place, where the Plimsoll Club has relocated. “We don’t need 400 more hotel rooms there,” Berger says. “We need a people mover, something that will flow 4,000 people attending conventions into the city’s core tourism areas.” Did politics foul the deal? “Any time you have a project that involves the city through a quasi-public agency like the NOBC and the interests of the World Trade Center organization, no matter how the deal is or has been structured, politics is going to play a role,” says Ivan Miestchovich, director of the University of New Orleans Institute of Economic Development and Real Estate Research. “You’re just dealing with entities that never figured out how to play together in the same sandbox.” MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU AND THE NEW ORleans City Council face a long list of daunting issues, including ongoing federal corruption investigations, an estimated $67 million budget hole (left by Nagin) and the ongoing oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. What to do with the WTC building and site is just one more dilemma. At potential risk are millions in public dollars and a building worth less than the land on which it sits. “The World Trade Center building has long been an underperforming city asset,” Ryan Berni, Landrieu’s press secretary, said in a statement prepared in response to Gambit’s inquiries. “Mayor Landrieu has long appreciated the history of the building, the world’s first world trade center, and its strategic location on the Mississippi River.

Landrieu is currently evaluating a number of scenarios regarding the building itself.” A hotel doesn’t appear to be a viable option. Hotel occupancy in 2005, right before Hurricane Katrina, averaged 73 percent in New Orleans, with room rates comparable to those in New York and San Francisco, says John Williams, director of the Lester E. Kabacoff School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration at UNO. But for all of 2009, average occupancy was at 62 percent for the city, and room rates were down. Miestchovich says by the end of May this year, occupancy levels in the city dipped below 50 percent. The value of the site is also in question. “All of the appraisals so far have been done with vested interests,” says City Councilwoman-at-large Jacquelyn Clarkson, a licensed Realtor. “I have never seen a World Trade Center (building redevelopment) lease that benefited my city. An independent appraisal has to be done, including the building or not. We have to compensate the encumbrances (WTC Inc.’s leasehold), and consider … the highest and best use of the property.” The best use of the property may not include the tower, which sits on what has been called the single-most valuable site in the city. Williams, a UNO hospitality expert who consulted on the move of the Plimsoll Club to the Westin Hotel, says the WTC building is deteriorating. It has moisture intrusion problems and floors four through 14 were gutted for a hotel that never materialized. “It’s an embarrassment,” he says. Cummings, who so far has retained his position as NOBC executive director under Landrieu, says seven years of negotiating to convert the building have convinced him that demolition is the best way to go. “The reality is that the building is functionally obsolete at this time and it makes sense to clear the site rather than … maintaining a vacant building and mothball it,” he says. WTC Inc.’s strongest bargaining chip for keeping the structure is that its original lease doesn’t end until 2019. Negotiations to buy out WTC Inc. and

remove the group from the building are on hold until Landrieu tackles the issue, Cummings says. The site also dovetails with the NOBC-steered “Reinventing the Crescent” project, a $300 million, six-mile swath of proposed redevelopment along the riverfront. The tower also potentially stands in the way of a $400 million proposal for riverfront development designed by the Strategic Hospitality Task Force, a group Landrieu formed when he was lieutenant governor with a mandate to boost the hospitality industry in New Orleans. Berger co-chaired the task force. While $30 million of the first phase of the Reinventing the Crescent plan is funded and slated for completion in 2011, Cummings has proposed using proceeds from selling the WTC site to kick-start additional development of a riverfront park. For now, no funding exists for the remainder of the project or for the master plan devised by the hospitality task force. When the riverfront park project gained the backing of city leaders, Cummings faced fire for a potential conflict of interest because he and his father, John Cummings III, own numerous properties in the Central Business District, the Warehouse District and downriver neighborhoods. Neighborhood organizations questioned whether the park plan would unfairly benefit father and son. The Louisiana Board of Ethics has cleared Sean Cummings of any conflict of interest in the Reinventing the Crescent Plan. HOW DID THE CITY, WTC INC. AND DEvELOPERS miss landing a redevelopment deal for one of the city’s iconic riverfront properties? “Hindsight is 20-20,” real estate consultant Arthur Sterbcow says. “[Between 1995 and 2005] residential and commercial values and the hospitality sectors were booming. Developers were looking for projects and [were] flush with cash.” After Hurricane Katrina, billions of federal dollars — primarily through low-interest bonds issued

WTC Inc. has hired Dominik Knoll to rejuvenate the flagging trade organization by bringing in younger members and new ideas.

page 23


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COVERSTORY The WTC building is a prominent feature of the Canal Street riverfront, but its fate is uncertain. Photo Courtesy of the New orleaNs MetroPolitaN CoNveNtioN & visitors Bureau Page 20

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and suggests that if it does, funding should come from a direct public revenue stream and not through a “convoluted real estate deal.” Cummings sees the building put into civic use with the creation of an iconic structure, a monument that would serve as a catalyst to move visitors from the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center and Warehouse District hotels to core tourism corridors along Canal and Poydras streets and the French Quarter. “In the 19th century, St. Louis Cathedral was New Orleans’ preeminent architectural icon,” Cummings says. “In the 20th century, it was the Superdome.” As the city nears its 300year anniversary, he sees a “21st century iconic civic monument at the site of the WTC building.” Kabacoff has his doubts about iconic architecture replacing the building. “Something akin to the Sydney Opera House or the Eiffel Tower certainly creates intrinsic value for a city,” he says, “but you don’t tear down the World Trade Center building until you have the funding for that architecture.” Berger and Kabacoff looked at the deal again in 2009. Both have developed hotels locally and nationally, and both maintain that without heavy public subsidies, no project is viable at the site. Berger, co-chairman of the Strategic Hospitality Task Force, says the task force’s plan “implies” demolition of the WTC building along with a renovated ferry terminal and expanded Spanish Plaza. But, he says, the task force has not expressly recommended tearing down the structure. “What we did is take the blinders off and look [at the entire riverfront area] holistically” to determine how to boost tourism, Berger says. A footprint of the task force plan shows the WTC site as a new

Tricentennial Plaza Welcome Center. The plan also calls for development on the huge parking lot owned by Hilton Corp. between the Hilton and the convention center. WITH OR WITHOuT THE WTC TOWER, the nonprofit WTC Inc. faces problems. It now relies on dozens of volunteer consuls to represent foreign nations (Willems represents the Netherlands), and its revenues, which once came from leases for WTC office space, are derived almost entirely from membership dues (membership is 1,600, down from 2,000) and grants from corporate members. It must find other ways to fund its business seminars, traveling trade missions and trade conferences, once held at the WTC, to support its stated mission to foster “wealth and jobs in Louisiana through international trade, port activities and allied activities.” Willems, who met with Landrieu during his transition, declined to discuss the organization’s financial situation in detail, though she admits it needs money — but says the Plimsoll Club is operating in the black. She notes that most world trade centers are directly tied to and financed by port authorities, chambers of commerce or city, state or

national economic development agencies. New Orleans’ group, however, has always generated its funds through memberships and office leases. To reinvigorate membership, WTC Inc. in May hired 27-year-old Dominik Knoll of Italy as its CEO, with a primary mandate to boost membership. He is searching for new, younger and more diverse members. “I’m going to reach out to the younger entrepreneurs, the campuses, the small start-up companies, locally and regionally, focusing on technology, and new media … connecting them with international businesses. I’m targeting the migration of so many talented young people who came to New Orleans after Katrina,” he says. The WTC Inc.’s board of directors has made no official decision to vacate the building until negotiations resume, Willems says. “The city should recognize our economic impact today” and provide funding to bolster programs, missions and seminars promoting international trade, she says. “We would like to see the building in use, but we accept that development at this point is unlikely. We’re focusing on the buyout, and we’ll let the city decide the building’s fate.”

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

by the Louisiana Bond Commission — were available for new commercial projects, and investors were again eyeing New Orleans for opportunities. “In that context and in that timeline … there would be a hotel there today,” Sterbcow says. Another issue left to be resolved is how much it will cost the city to remove the nonprofit trade organization from the building. WTC Inc. President Connie Howard Willems, a partner in the law firm McGlinchey Stafford, says her group seeks $5 million in compensation for preparing the building for hotel conversion and $1.2 million for the remaining nine years on its lease. Cummings’ last proposal was $1 million for the WTC Inc.’s costs related to redevelopment preparations and $1.2 million to buy out the organization’s leasehold. Cummings says the money that WTC Inc. put into the building for hotel development and lost office lease revenues pales in comparison to the decades the building generated zero tax dollars for the city. Cummings says a 2009 appraisal valued the three-acre WTC site at $16 million to $24 million — and the tower at only $10 million. No plans have mentioned demolishing the WTC’s garage, which sits adjacent to the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel and can be mistaken for part of the hotel complex. The garage’s value is incorporated into projections of the site’s worth, excluding the tower. A BGR report last year recommended the city sell the site. “Although past efforts have suffered from a variety of economic, financial, and political problems … the long delays raise questions about the city’s underlying approach to redevelopment,” the BGR report states. It questions whether WTC Inc. warrants taxpayer subsidy,

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sHTo P aLK

BY JENNIFER KILBOURNE

All In The Family alking into Vincent’s Italian Cuisine (4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7813 St. Charles Ave., 8669313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com) is like stepping on to an old movie set. Even at noon, the restaurant is cool and dim. Thick, well-thumbed wine lists sit atop white tablecloths, and Italian-themed artwork and photographs of the restaurant’s original owners line the walls. Vincent’s comes by its old-school aura naturally. While coowners Anthony Imbraguglio and Vincent Catalanotto opened Vincent’s Uptown location in 1998 (the Metairie location has been open since 1989), the venue has housed an Italian restaurant since 1929. Compagno’s Restaurant operated there for 69 years. In true Italian fashion, passing down the building was a family affair. The Compagno’s grandson Michael Compagno works at the restaurant alongVincent’s co-owner Anthony side Vincent Catalanotto Jr. Vincent’s still sells bottles of limoncello made from the Imbraguglio introduces himself Compagno’s family recipe. to a new customer. Imbraguglio recounts how a tearful Mrs. Compagno made Catalanotto promise to take good care of the restaurant. “She was all worried about giving it to the right people and that her ‘baby’ was going to be fine. Vincent walked up to her and he said, ‘Your baby is about to become a man.’” Innovation appeared in the form of Chef Billy LaCrosse, who walked in from the street shortly after Hurricane Katrina and was welcomed into the staff’s family. Though LaCrosse updates his menu regularly, his canneloni are a mainstay that have developed something of a cult following on sites like Yelp.com. “People think it’s pasta, but it’s actually a crepe,” Imbraguglio says. Other draws include seafood medallions — eggplant heaping with crabmeat — and homemade pasta. Vincent’s clientele is a mixture of regulars, tourists off the streetcar and an occasional celebrity. Imbraguglio credits the restaurant’s location for drawing a diverse crowd and adding to its Old World ambience. “Being on this corner (St. Charles Avenue and Fern Street) is very, very special,” he says. “You can see the world go by through these windows.”

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

New Orleans’ award-winning star performs with our own swing band!

AUGUST 2010

Friday & Saturday evenings: Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 8pm; $60; Show Only $30

Dine and Dance with The Victory Six & our Stage Door Idol August 27-28

Who will it be? Come enjoy the talents of our first Idol champion! Friday & Saturday evenings: Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 8pm; $60; Show Only $30

Monday 9, 16, 23, 30

BOB FRENCH and the ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND Tuesday 10

AARON FLETCHER Tuesday 17

NOVA NOLA Tuesday 24

DON VAPPIE Tuesday 17

ED “SWEETBREAD” PETERSEN

Play HOUR

EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Wednesday 11, 18, 25

IRVIN MAYFIELD and the NOJO JAM

Burlesque Ballroom starring

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

Saturday 14

SHANNON POWELL Saturday 21

GLENN DAVID ANDREWS GLENN DAVID ANDREWS Saturday 28 Thursday 19 SHANNON POWELL KIPORI WOODS Sunday 15 Thursday 26 VICTOR ATKINS ROMAN SKAKUM Sunday 22 Friday 16, 23, 30 DEREK DOUGET LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” Sunday 29 BROWN NOVA NOLA Thursday 12

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

The Victory Belles Sunday Brunch August 22 & 29

Join our charming vocal trio on a nostalgic journey through 1940s musical treasures! Brunch 11am Show 1pm

$55

Back by Popular Demand! Our signature show returns for 3 months only, weekends beginning September 10

Beginning September 15: The Victory Belles Wednesday Matinees with a delectable John Besh buffet lunch!

Sponsored in part by LA Office of Entertainment Development and IMLS

H Magazine Street at Poeyfarre H Reservations at www.stagedoorcanteen.org or call 504-528-1943

26 WW2-00000_SummerSwings_Gambit_4c_ad_No7.indd 1

8/6/10 12:50 PM


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 31 35 36 38 39 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < A U G 39 STEPS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.;

CUISINE

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13 through Aug. 22 NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St., (800) 838-3006; www.theatre-13.com

A hit in both New York and London, 39 Steps distills Alfred Hitchcock’s 1935 film version of John Buchan’s spy novel into a spoof in which an innocent man is dragged into international intrigue. The play takes the whodunit story’s stream of characters and man-on-therun scheme as a comedic dare. Tickets $30.

DAVIS ROGAN WITH CHEEKY AND JOHN BOUTTE 13 BLAKK 10 p.m. Friday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 899-4206; www.tipitinas.com AUG

Perhaps no one has had more fun with the HBO-ing of New Orleans than musician Davis Rogan, Treme consultant, episode 7 co-writer and Steve Zahn acting coach, who capitalized on the show’s success with gigs as Davis and the Traveling McAlarys and the “real” Davis. His guests for Tip’s Free Friday Series include themesong writer John Boutte and true bounce queen Cheeky Blakk. Free admission.

AUG

Oil and Water

Gulf Shores, Eugenia Uhl

THE NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE OPENS A PHOTO EXPO ABOUT THE GULF. BY W ILL COV IELLO

T

protesters and CNN’s Anderson Cooper reporting from Woldenberg Park on the riverfront. Photos not related to the spill outnumbered spill shots three to one, Willour says. And even the oil spill drew a range of treatments. There are several photos about the spill’s effect on wildlife, complete with oily pelicans and a dolphin swimming below a surface of oil sheen. Jean Fulton Alt’s Life Guards is a stark image of oily lifeguards, but it was staged — on the shore of Lake Michigan. And Irwin Poché’s Rig Divers looks up through clear blue water at fish and divers circling the underwater apparatus of a rig. Many photographers focused on the uses and resources of the Gulf before or away from the spill. Eugenia Uhl’s Gulf Shores features a beachgoer holding up a live crab. There also are several panoramic beach scenes, and a duck blind set up in a marsh. Willour has been the director of the Galveston Arts Center for two decades. He’s done portfolio reviews for the New Orleans Photo Alliance, but this is the first show he’s curated. He’ll lead a gallery walk-through and talk at the show’s opening reception. PAGE 29

Royal Street art and antique galleries and merchants open for Dirty Linen Night. Originally an event highlighting local artists represented by galleries on the lower end of Royal Street, Dirty Linen has become more of a French Quarter block party. Many galleries offer complimentary refreshments. Free admission.

NORAH JONES ELVIS PERKINS 14 WITH 8 p.m. Saturday UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7222; www.arena.uno.edu AUG

PHOTO BY DANNY CLINCH

GULF NOON-4 P.M. SAT.SUN.; AUG. 14-SEPT. 18 NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE GALLERY, 1111 ST. MARY ST., 610-4899; WWW.NEWORLEANSPHOTOALLIANCE.ORG OPENING RECEPTION AND GALLERY TALK 6 P.M.-9 P.M. SAT., AUG. 14

Norah Jones’ Diamond-selling debut, 2002’s Come Away With Me, made her three platinum follow-ups the most successful busts in the history of the recording industry. The cooing daughter of Ravi Shankar is on tour with sterling folkie Elvis Perkins, son of Psycho’s Anthony. Insert “sitar shower scene” jokes here. Tickets $52.60-$68.05 (including fees).

Sure you’ve seen horrible things on YouTube — some of them multiple times. The creators of www.everythingisterrible.com BY WILL COVIELLO have made it easier by curating the truly worst stuff out there, and they’ve salvaged and digitized the most bizarre and infamous VHS scenes to boot. The crew is on tour to host and comment on material in its second feature-length compilation 2Everything2Terrible 2: Tokyo Drift, which runs at Zeitgeist (1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.; www.zeitgeistinc.net) 8 p.m. Thursday. Tickets $10.

Terrible Two

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

he New Orleans Photo Alliance cast a wide net in its call for entries for Gulf, its photography show opening Saturday. “We didn’t want it to be a disaster show,” says Owen Murphy, program director for the alliance. “We wanted to make it about the bounty of the sea: a photo representation of the marshes, the people who live there, the industries that work there — what is the physical beauty there?” The call for submissions kept the rules broad, soliciting photos about the Gulf and Gulf Coast, so subjects include inland bayous and landlocked sites as well as some abstract works. More than 250 entries arrived from across the nation, and guest juror Clint Willour, curator and former director of the Galveston Arts Center, selected 30 photos and one video. “I could have done a show entirely about birds or shrimping, or at least fishing,” Wilfour says. Instead, he whittled down the entries to a diverse show of black and white and color photography in artistic and documentary styles depicting beaches, fishermen, oil industry shots, spill cleanup efforts and plants and animals in habitats with and without oil. A couple of shots capture the response of

14

DIRTY LINEN NIGHT 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday 200 – 1000 blocks of Royal St.

27


Wilkerson Row Bywater Warehouse & Cypress Works one day Sale Sat. August 14th, 10am-5pm

Every Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday

top shelf margaritas made with herradura blanco for the same price as house margaritas!

100% blue agave

tableS • armoireS • bedS • bookcaSeS

All up to 60% off retail! 3023 Chartres Street • 504.208.7998

81 F R E N C H M A R K E T P L A C E • 5 2 5 - 9 7 5 2 W W W. E L G AT O N E G R O N O L A . CO M

LOBSTER NIGHT

EVERY THURSDAY!

with salad and a side dish, $25

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

RESERVATIONS R ECOMM ENDED

28

COOLINARY SPECIAL

JOIN THE BOMBAY CLUB THIS SUMMER,

3 COURSES FOR $25!

WED • THUR • SUN 5-10PM FRI • SAT 5-7PM

1ST

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

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3RD

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

APPLE,BRIE & WALNUT SALAD

ENGLISH STOUT Braised Beef Shepherd’s Pie with Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

SOUP DU JOUR

FRIED CALAMARI

CURRY & CITRUS STEAMED MUSSELS

ENGLISH STYLE FISH & CHIPS

CREOLE CARLBONARA LINGUINE

BAKED STUFFED LOUISIANA SHRIMP

with Fresh Cut Fries & Apple-Jalapeño Tartar Sauce

Chicken, Andouille, Asparagus, Garlic, Cream & Cheese

stuffed with Crabmeat, $30 with Sautéed Spinach and Choron Sauce

PRALINE CRÈME BRULEE

ASSORTED ICE CREAM

BREAD PUDDING

Subject to availability • Not available with any other promotions No substitutions, please

The Bombay Club Restaurant & Martini Bistro 830 Conti Street | New Orleans, LA 70112 | 504.586.0972 1.800.699.7711 | Validated Parking Available (Corner of Iberville & Dauphine)

Restaurant Closed on Monday & Tuesday Until Sept 6.


FEATURE

PAGE 27

Couple and Shadow, Lewis Hodnett

Port Arthur Fishing, Dalton Scott

Life Guards, Jean Fulton Alt

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Rig Divers, Irwin PochĂŠ

29


r e m m u S

Entertainment Series

Wednesday Night Comedy Slade Ham

August 18 • 7:30pm & 9:30pm Coming soon: Mike Toomey • August 25

Thursdays - Karaoke, Live Band & Ladies Night Budweiser specials throughout the night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials.

Karaoke • 8:30pm-9:30pm Groovy 7 August 12 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Hip Boot Joe • August 19 Karaoke Contest Win A Cruise For Two! Semi Finals • Aug. 26 & Sept. 23 Finals • Sept. 30

Local Favorite Fridays Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Foret Tradition

30

August 13 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Burgundy • August 20

Saturday Night Music Bash Fleur De Tease

August 14 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: The Band Perry • August 21

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

SM

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road • Harvey

boomtownneworleans.com/boomers-nightclub Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? C A L L 8 7 7. 7 7 0 . S T O P


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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

(Roc-A-Fella)

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Pilot Talk

ith Lil Wayne in jail, Juvenile treading creative water and Master P a motivational speaker, New Orleans hip-hopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national spotlight is, for the first time in a while, ripe for the taking. Enter Shante Anthony Franklin, aka Curren$y; Pilot Talk, his hot-boxed, decade-coming â&#x20AC;&#x153;debut,â&#x20AC;? doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t blow the chance. Franklin started at age 19 with Master Pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No Limit Records, switching teams in 2005 to run with Wayneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Money crew. But he split before the latter become the biggest little MC in the world, choosing to cut underground mixtapes instead of multiplatinum albums â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an odd, if admirable, career detour for a guy with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;$â&#x20AC;? in his name. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dollar signs my only language,â&#x20AC;? he claims on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hangover,â&#x20AC;? but of course that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t true. Pilot Talk, the first release from rebooted Roc-A-Fella Records, is about as far from a cash grab as major-label hip-hop gets, a locked-down vault of paradoxes unlike anything this rap-rich city has produced: dense but bright, old-school yet space-age, sharply blunted and stoned sober. Franklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cadence is distinctly Louisianan, leaning on the lead syllable of every word as he coasts through each finish line, boasting on his backgammon skills and flowing about smoking broccoli (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come through with that killer weed/ Alfred Hitchcock in a Ziplocâ&#x20AC;?). But his backing tracks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an inviting swirl of analog instrumentation and sky-streaking synths â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are so foreign to current hip-hop production, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like relearning a lost language. Eleven of 13 come courtesy of Camp Lo and Jay-Z collaborator Ski Beatz, who clearly revels in revisiting his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Luchiniâ&#x20AC;? salad days on chinoissmooth â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breakfastâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life Under the Scope.â&#x20AC;? Guest spots are equally inspired, and range from homeboy Jay Electronica to a reinvigorated Snoop Dogg, who drops his best verse in years that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t involve Sookie Stackhouse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This changes everything,â&#x20AC;? Mos Def summarizes on jackhammer single â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Day.â&#x20AC;? Yes indeed.

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he year 2009 was a game of musical chairs for Park the Van and its flagship act, Dr. Dog. In July, the Philadelphia rockers announced they were jumping ship, moving from the New Orleans imprint it helped christen to Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; AntiRecords. Around the same time, the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drummer, Juston Stens, jumped ship himself, traveling instead to Arizona and North Carolina to write songs with labelmates Golden Boots and Floating Action. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a year later, and while this fast introduction to Stensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new group might not be intended to fill Dr. Dogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park the Van seat, it does so regardless; the EPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five tracks stack up surprisingly well against the best 18 minutes of the latterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uneven Anti- debut, Shame, Shame. If Stensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; droopy, hangdog voice and spot behind the kit reinforce him as the Ringo Starr of that Beatles-aping outfit, the fulfillment of backseat songwriting aspirations also makes him its George Harrison. And like All Things Must Pass, his first outing fires perhaps a veiled parting shot: springy pop centerpiece â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outta Here,â&#x20AC;? which burns its Led Zeppelin, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rain Songâ&#x20AC;? bridge (â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am here and you are gone/ And we just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get along, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clearâ&#x20AC;?). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a testament to Stensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chops that no two songs here sound alike. Opener â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hard Wayâ&#x20AC;? is the closest he comes to Dr. Dog, before the interruption of an impeccably voiced Southern guitar solo is itself interrupted by the release of female-backed â&#x20AC;&#x153;bah-bah-bahâ&#x20AC;?s; his dreamy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fallingâ&#x20AC;? resembles a Floating Action island seance for Roy Orbison, and epic, excellent Harrison-borrowed ballad â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lonely Lonely Nightâ&#x20AC;? explodes midsong, carried away in pieces by drowsy brass and broken drums. If this is what Stens terms his B-material â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s available for free this week at www.parkthevan.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; his A-game should be quite a show.

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

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ON THE RECORD

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BONAPARTE PAIS

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31


Music

Lis LisTinGs

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

stick this in yoUr eAr

preview

8/10 WED

8/11

COMEDY NIGHT 8 PM ANDREW DUHON 6PM FOR EVERY INCH STILETTO NIGHT $1NO OFF COVER FOR LADIES

THURS VINCENT 6PM

8/12 FRI

8/13

TREME BRASS BAND 10PM

REX GREGORY 8PM LATIN QUARTERS DANCE PARTY 12AM

SAT RUSSELL BATISTE & FRIENDS

8/14 SUN

8/15

W/ JASON NEVILLE 9:30PM

SWING NIGHT W/ JOHNNY ANGEL

& THE SWINGING DEMONS

DANCE LESSONS AT 6:30 PM; SHOW AT 7:30 PM

608 Fulton Street New Orleans • (504) 212-6476

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 10 Bacchanal — Mark Weliky, 7:30

Banks sTreeT Bar — Viva Da Lay, 9 Bayou Park Bar — Parishioners, 9

BMc — Ed Barrett, 7; Mumbles, 9:30

chickie Wah Wah — John Mooney, 8 circle Bar — Tom Paines, 6; Pleasure Kills, 10

d.B.a. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9 dos Jefes uPToWn cigar Bar — Tom Hook, 9:30

hosTel neW orleans — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 house of Blues — Mat Kearney, Jane Carrey, 8

hoWlin’ Wolf (The den) — Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque and Live Music, 9

irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Aaron Fletcher, 8 kerry irish PuB — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 9

liTTle TroPical isle — Ian Taylor, 4:30; Rain Makers, 9

gennaro’s — Marc Stone, 8

Tonight Only

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

TUES

dos Jefes uPToWn cigar Bar — Todd Duke Trio, 9:30

If King Louie Bankston is on a mission to document power pop’s past and present, he is succeeding admirably. In late July, the Harahan-cum-Memphis frontman-of-many-bands crashed Quintron and Miss Pussycat’s party at One Eyed Jacks for Paul Collins, the drummer and singer, respectively, for 1970s Los Angeles guitar heroes the Nerves and the Beat. This week, Bankston’s Missing Monuments prime the pump for Douchemaster labelmate Gentleman Jesse & His Men (pictured), whose eponymous 2008 debut plays Jenga with the basic architecture of the guitar pop song, removing every unnecessary piece until all that’s left are load-bearing beams. Harmonized heartaches chase six-string-driven racetrack rhythms around circular hooks, letting off steam over whatever girl is doing Jesse Smith damage tonight — never yesterday or tomorrow, always tonight. Smith, an Atlanta throwback who gigs with the Black Lips, bests the Monuments’ brilliant single “Tailspin” (“Tonight, all right/ I’m in a tailspin tonight”) with not one but two immediateclassic compositions about decomposing immediacy: nervy album linchpin “All I Need Tonight Is You” and 2007’s browbeating breakthrough 7-inch “I Don’t Wanna Know (Where You Been Tonight),” two push/pull titles that, as the majority of their tracks’ lyrics, say everything. Barreracudas also open. Admission $6. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

AUG

11

Gentleman Jesse & His Men with King Louie's Missing Monuments 10 p.m. Wednesday Saturn Bar, 3067 St. Claude Ave., 949-7532

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

32

rock ’n’ BoWl — Glen David Andrews, 8:30

snug harBor Jazz BisTro — Hector Gallardo Trio, 8 & 10

sPoTTed caT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

TroPical isle BourBon — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9 TroPical isle original — Rainmakers, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Radio Active, 9 yuki izakaya — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 11 12 Bar — Andrew Duhon, 6

61 Blues highWay — Blues Highway Jam feat. Lefty Keith, 8 Bacchanal — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

Banks sTreeT Bar — Major Bacon, 9 Big al’s saloon — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 Blue nile — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10; Gravity A (upstairs), 10 BMc — Domenic, 7; Rue Fiya, 9:30

cafe negril — World Jazz Project, 9:30

hi-ho lounge — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 house of Blues — Mystikal, 9

irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Roman Skakun, 5; Glen David Andrews, 8 kerry irish PuB — Kelcy Mae Band, 9

liTTle TroPical isle — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MaPle leaf Bar — The Trio, 10

old PoinT Bar — Andre Bouvier & the Royal Bohemians, 9 PreservaTion hall — Survivors Brass Band, 8

rock ’n’ BoWl — Geno Delafose, 8:30

snug harBor Jazz BisTro — Ocie Davis Quartet, 8 & 10

vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 yuki izakaya — Wazozo, 8

friday 13 12 Bar — Rex Gregory, 8

3 ring circus’ The Big ToP gallery — Seven Year Existence, Through What Was, Blackwater Burial, Cauldron, 9 61 Blues highWay — Jack Yoder & Li’l G Delta Blues, 8 Banks sTreeT Bar — N.O. Lowgeaux Trio, 10

Blue nile — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8

The Maison — No Name Trio, 8

MaPle leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

harrah’s casino (Masquerade) — Real Love, 6

candlelighT lounge — Treme Brass Band, 9 circle Bar — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

d.B.a. — Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

deckBar & grille — John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 7:30; Dr. Porkchop Blues Band, 10 dragon’s den — Fatter Than Albert, A Billion Ernies, Bomb the Music Industry, Reagabomb, O’ Pioneers, 10 hi-ho lounge — Ratty Scurvics, 7

hoWlin’ Wolf (The den) — Booty Trove Brass Band, 9

lacava’s sPorTs Bar — Crossfire, 9 liTTle TroPical isle — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

The Maison — Influencia de Jazz, 6:30; Cat’s Pajamas, 9:30

MoJo sTaTion — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

neuTral ground coffeehouse — Paul Boquet, 9 rock ’n’ BoWl — Moonshiners, 8:30

saTurn Bar — Gentleman Jesse & His Men, Barreracudas, King Louie’s Missing Monuments, 10

snug harBor Jazz BisTro — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

sPoTTed caT — Brett Richardson, 4;

Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

TroPical isle Bayou cluB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Pain Perdou, 9 TroPical isle BourBon — Damien Louvier, 5; Jason Bishop & the Garlic Truck Band, 9 yuki izakaya — By and By, 8

Thursday 12 12 Bar — Vincent, 6; Treme Brass Band, 10

Banks sTreeT Bar — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 Bayou Park Bar — Ron Hotstream, 9

The Beach — Chicken on the Bone, 7 Big al’s saloon — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BMc — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; J.P. Carmody & the Micro Brues, 10

BooMToWn casino — Groovy 7, 8:30

carrollTon sTaTion — Cortland Burke, 9

check PoinT charlie — Filligar, 10

chickie Wah Wah — Mama’s Love, 9

circle Bar — Sam and Boone, 6; Geraniums, Tangle, 10

BMc — Sasha Masakowski, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; We Are One Brass Band, 1 a.m. BooMToWn casino — Foret Tradition, 9:30

check PoinT charlie — Mumbles, 9 chickie Wah Wah — Jeff & Vida, 5:30; Creole String Beans, 8 circle Bar — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6; Sun Hotel, Alexis Marceaux Band, Filligar, 10 cluB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

d.B.a. — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10 dos Jefes uPToWn cigar Bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10

funky PiraTe — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 harrah’s casino (harrah’s TheaTre) — Marc Broussard, 8

herMes Bar — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11 house of Blues — Andre Nickatina, Bizzy Bone, T Mills, Dot Dot Curve, 9 hoWlin’ Wolf — Scorseses, American Tragedy, Hydrovibe, 10

irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Josh Paxton, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Band, midnight


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Le Bon Temps RouLe — Joe Krown, 7; Lynn Drury Band, 11 The maison — Some Like it Hot!, 7:30; Margie Perez, 10; Vagabond Swing, midnight

neuTRaL GRound Coffeehouse — Ross Hallen, 7; Medina, 8; Bloomin’ Onions, 9; John Parker, 10 oLd poinT BaR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio, 9:30 one eyed JaCks — Honky, Joecephus & the George Jonestown Massacre, Vagabond Swing, 9

pReseRvaTion haLL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

RoCk ’n’ BowL — Eric Lindell, 9:30

snuG haRBoR Jazz BisTRo — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10

sT. RoCh TaveRn — The Way, 9 TipiTina’s — Davis Rogan, Cheeky Blakk, John Boutte and others, 10

TooLouLas — V-Street, 9 p.m. TRopiCaL isLe BouRBon — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

saturday 14 12 BaR — Russell Batiste & friends feat. Jason Neville, 9:30

BaCChanaL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8

The BaR — Hourstruck, Suspended Obscurity, Slow the Knife, 10 Bayou paRk BaR — Hex, Dives, Lovey Dovies, 10

BLue niLe — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7

BomBay CLuB — Judy Spellman, 9

CiRCLe BaR — Jazzholes, 6; Vox & the Hound, Empress Hotel, 10 d.B.a. — John Boutte, 8; Supagroup, 11

deCkBaR & GRiLLe — Miche & MixMavens, 8

dos Jefes upTown CiGaR BaR — Roman Street, 10

fRedeRiCk J. siGuR CiviC CenTeR — Chubby Checker & the Wild Cats, 6 heRmes BaR — Luke Winslow King Trio, 9:30 & 11 house of BLues — Steve Oliver, 9

iRvin mayfieLd’s Jazz pLayhouse — Shannon Powell, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

keRRy iRish puB — Mark Hessler, 5; Lynn Drury Band, 9 kinGpin — Clockwork Elvis, 10

Le Bon Temps RouLe — Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 11

Louisiana musiC faCToRy — Brother Dege, 3

The maison — Loose Marbles, 7; Rue Fiya, 10 oLd poinT BaR — Dana Abbott, 9:30

one eyed JaCks — Lost Bayou Ramblers, Brother Dege, 9 RiveRshaCk TaveRn — Drunkin’ Drinkin’ Mustard Brothers, 9:30 RoCk ’n’ BowL — Kermit Ruffins, 9:30

snuG haRBoR Jazz BisTRo — Chris Thomas King, 8 & 10 spoTTed CaT — Luke Winslow King, Saturdays; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

yuki izakaya — Luke Winslow King, 7

monday 16 BaCChanaL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

Banks sTReeT BaR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9 BJ’s LounGe — King James & the Special Men, 10

ChiCkie wah wah — Andrew Duhon, 7 CiRCLe BaR — Bellys, Dives, 10 donna’s BaR & GRiLL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

dos Jefes upTown CiGaR BaR — John Fohl, 9:30

TipiTina’s — Thriving Ivory, Ryan Star, 10

fouR poinTs By sheRaTon (m!x uLTRaLounGe) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

TRopiCaL isLe Bayou CLuB — Sammy Naquin, 1; Jimmy Thibodeaux, 5; T’Canaille, 9

keRRy iRish puB — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 9

TooLouLas — Backflow, 9

sunday 15 Banks sTReeT BaR — New Funk, 9

BmC — Joe Kennedy Project, 5:30; John Autin, 7; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight

CiRCLe BaR — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Giant Cloud, Run On Sentence, Trouble in the Wind, 10 d.B.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mumbles, 10 donna’s BaR & GRiLL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9 house of BLues — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

howLin’ woLf (The den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

iRvin mayfieLd’s Jazz pLayhouse — Victor Atkins, 7 keRRy iRish puB — Schatzy & Company, 8 oLd poinT BaR — WilsonMoore, 3:30

The pReCinCT — Funk Express, 7:30

RoCk ’n’ BowL — Paul Varisco & the Milestones, 5 snuG haRBoR Jazz BisTRo — John Wooton & Caribbean Jazz Project, 8 & 10

souThpoRT haLL — Pelicanpalooza feat. 5 Finger Discount, Weathered, Bag of Donuts, Contraflow, 1 spoTTed CaT — Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10

The maison — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Musicians Open Jam feat. Rue Fiya, 10 RiveRshaCk TaveRn — John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 9:30

snuG haRBoR Jazz BisTRo — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

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spoTTed CaT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

sT. RoCh TaveRn — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

classical/ concerts aLGieRs feRRy doCk — 200 Morgan St. — Wednesdays at the Point presents Jon Cleary, 6

Le ChaT noiR — 715 St. Charles

Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Fri-Sat: New Orleans Bingo! Show, 8

oGden museum of souTheRn aRT — 925 Camp

St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Fri-Sat: Celebrating Eudora Welty: A Tribute in Song and Art feat. Claire Holley, Kate Campbell & Caroline Herring, 8

paviLion of The Two sisTeRs — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Twilight in the Garden Concert Series presents M.I. Scoggin, 6 ponTChaRTRain vineyaRds — 81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old

TipiTina’s — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

whiskey dix — Gypsy Elise &

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

voiLà — Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m.

$89.50

hi-ho LounGe — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards.com — Sat: Jazz ’n the Vines presents Chuck Cavette & the AllStars, 6:30

sT. ChaRLes TaveRn — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

WHO DAT

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

BmC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Rue Fiya, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

LiTTLe TRopiCaL isLe — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

music

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“SIT BACK AND LAUGH YOUR *** OFF, THE OTHER GUYS IS A RIOT.” Peter Travers

“★★★★.

A MUST-SEE MOVIE.” Michael Sauter LIFE & STYLE WEEKLY

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A PLAN B ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION “EAT PRAY LOVE” JAMES FRANCO RICHARD JENKINS VIOLA DAVIS BILLY CRUDUP AND JAVIER BARDEM EXECUTIVE BRAD PITT STAN WLODKOWSKI JEREMY KLEINER THEBASEDBOOK ONBY ELIZABETH GILBERT SCREENPLAYBY RYAN MURPHY & JENNIFER SALT PJ BLOOM MUSICBY DARIO MARIANELLI PRODUCERS PRODUCED DIRECTED BY DEDE GARDNER BY RYAN MURPHY SOUNDTRACK INCLUDES “BETTER DAYS” PERFORMED BY EDDIE VEDDER

MUSIC SUPERVISION BY

STARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 13

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) TUE 8/10 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A GARY SANCHEZ/MOSAIC PRODUCTION A FILMMUSICBY ADAM McKAY EXECUTIVE “THE OTHER GUYS” EVA MENDES MICHAEL KEATON STEVE COOGAN RAY STEVENSON WITH SAMUEL L. JACKSON AND DWAYNE JOHNSON BY JON BRION PRODUCERS DAVID HOUSEHOLTER CHRIS HENCHY KEVIN MESSICK WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY ADAM McKAY & CHRIS HENCHY BY WILL FERRELL ADAM McKAY JIMMY MILLER PATRICK CROWLEY BY ADAM McKAY INCLUDES “PIMPS DON’T CRY” PERFORMED BY CEE-LO GREEN FEATURING EVA MENDES

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

4.729" X 8.083" (3/8 PG VERT) TUE 8/10 Thursdays at T NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY wilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

M.I. Scoggin “Regeneration” AUGUST 12 @ the Pavilion of Two Sisters NEW ORLEANS BOTANICAL GARDEN

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FILM

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Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE (PG) — Kitty Galore,

a former cat agent, goes rogue to try and take down canines as well as her kitten comrades. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CHARLIE ST. CLOUD (PG-13) — Zac Efron plays an accomplished sailor whose dreams are derailed after tragedy strikes. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CYRUS (R) — A down-and-out

divorcee meets the woman of his dreams, only to discover she has a 21-year-old son with whom she shares an unconventional relationship. Canal Place DESPICABLE ME (PG) — Steve Carell,

Kristen Wiig, Jason Segel and others provide the voices in this animated comedy about orphans who see dad potential in a diabolical supervillan. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) — Steve Carell, Zach Galifianakis

to exact revenge against an arms manufacturer with the help of a motley crew of junkyard dealers. Canal Place THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) — A lesbian couple’s lives are turned upside down when their children successfully find their biological father. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

SALT (PG-13) — A CIA agent

CASABLANCA (PG) — A cynical

(Angelina Jolie) goes rogue when superiors think she is out to assassinate the president. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) — Nicholas Cage stars in the mod-

ern take on the classic short film sequence from Disney’s Fantasia. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 14

STEP UP 3-D (PG-13) — High-stakes street-dance showdowns come alive with 3-D in this sequel. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 TOY STORY 3 (G) — Woody, Buzz

and the rest of the toys return to the big screen when Andy prepares to go to college. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 14

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) — Julia Roberts starts in the film adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert’s memoir about finding herself through a journey around the world.

GROWN UPS (PG-13) — Childhood

best friends get together during Fourth of July weekend to meet each other’s families for the first time. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

INCEPTION (PG-13) — A thief

(Leonardo DiCaprio) skilled at extracting secrets from deep within the subconscious gets a chance at redemption. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK (R) — The film is a glimpse into the

comedic process and private life of the pop culture icon. Chalmette 9

MICMACS (R) — An orphan tries

OPENING FRIDAY

THE EXPENDABLES (R) — A group of

mercenaries is hired to infiltrate a South American country and overthrow its ruthless dictator.

SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG13) — Michael Cera stars in Edgar

Wright’s film adaptation of the graphic novel series.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 2 EVERYTHING IS 2 TERRIBLE 2: TOKYO DRIFT — The blog that

mines old VHS tapes for viral clips presents a Mystery Science Theatre-esque film screening with live performances and prize giveaways. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

ALAMAR (NR) — Before he leaves him to live with his mother, a young man of Mayan roots and his halfItalian son embark on a journey into the open sea. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

American expatriate meets a former lover in unoccupied Africa during World War II, and unforeseen complications ensue. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

DOGTOOTH (NR) — The Greek film

is a surreal look at three teenagers kept under oppressive rule and regimen by their parents. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then Aug. 17-18, Aug. 20 and 22. 4 p.m. Aug. 21, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

FROM CHOCOLATE CITY TO AN ENCHILADA VILLAGE (NR) — In

conjunction with the Los Invisibles photography exhibit opening, the gallery screens José TorresTama’s short film about Latino laborers working in New Orleans. Free admission. Call gallery for screening time. Saturday, Barrister’s Gallery, 2331 St. Claude Ave., 5252767; www.barristersgallery.com THE LAST FLIGHT OF LIEUTENANT ESTILL (NR) — A war orphan trav-

els to Germany in search of her father’s story and remains. A Q&A with film writer and director Kay Siering and Dr. Sharon Taylor, the subject of the film, follows. Free admission. 6 p.m. Wednesday, National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 THE OATH (NR) — The documentary

follows two men on divergent courses with Al-Qaeda, Osama bin Laden, 9/11, the Guantanamo Bay Prison and the U.S. Supreme Court. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then Aug. 17-18 and 20-22, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

RESPIRO (PG-13) — A free-spirited

woman on an impoverished Italian island is accused of madness by townspeople fed up with her antics. The screening is a part of the library’s Italian Film Festival and features commentary by Paul Cimino. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. Monday, St. Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 8936280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/ covington.html

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) — Tim Curry stars in the rock

movie-musical that lends itself to audience participation. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com SHANE (NR) — The Oscar-winning

Western from director George Stevens follows reformed gunslinger Shane (Alan Ladd). Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

SOUTH OF THE BORDER (NR) —

Oliver Stone travels across five countries in South America, exploring their movements and misperceptions while interviewing seven of their elected presidents. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

TO CATCH A THIEF (NR) — Cary

Grant and Grace Kelly star in the film about a reformed jewel thief who cops wrongly suspect is up to his old ways. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Aug. 18, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

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THE TROTSKY (NR) — A high school

student claiming to be the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky is sent to public school. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayWednesday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

& each Friday and Saturday through October 23

VIEUX CARRE MATINEES — The Historic New Orleans Collection screens short films on Louisiana history and culture. Visit www. hnoc.org for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com

FESTIVALS FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL — Film

screenings include Mesrine: Killer Instinct, Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1, Mademoiselle Chambon, Beauty and the Beast, Father of My Children and Let it Rain. Screening times vary. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org for details. Tickets $8.50 general admission, $6.50 New Orleans Film Society members. Tuesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 4299090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette 9, 2774778; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 4687231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

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EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP (R) — A French shopkeeper-turned-

of Stieg Larsson’s Millenium trilogy, computer hacker Lisbeth Salander is on the run after being framed for murder. Canal Place

Theaters screen kid-friendly movies every week, with admission and concession proceeds benefiting charities. Films vary. Visit www. amcentertainment.com/smc for details. Tickets $1. 10 a.m. Tuesday.

BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

WINTER’S BONE (R) — A 17 year old must track down her drug-dealing father to keep her family from losing their home. Canal Place

THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) — In the second film installment

AMC SUMMER MOVIE CAMP — AMC

THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) — Two mediocre cops (Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg) stumble into a case that gives them a chance to prove their worth. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 14

and Paul Rudd star in the comedy about a dinner awarding bragging rights to the guest who brings the biggest idiot. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette 9, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 filmmaker documents the notoriously private graffiti artist Banksy. Chalmette 9

members. 6 p.m. Friday-Monday, then Aug. 17-18 and 20-22, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Ursulines Ave.

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

FOOTBALL FANS

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LISTINGS

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LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

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NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. 1111 St. Mary St., 610-4899; www.neworleansphotoalliance.blogspot.com — “GULF,” a group exhibition

of photographs exploring the Gulf of Mexico, through Sept. 18. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street; www.aortaprojects.blogspot. com — “Blue Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

Myra Williamson-Wirtz; jewelry by Belle Bijoux; wood works by Paul Troyano; “Alley-Gator,” paintings by chef Daniel Bonnot; all through Aug. 30. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www. arthurrogergallery.com — New sculptures by Lin Emery; “Opera Houses,” photographs by David Leventi; both through Sept. 11. CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Let Them Eat

Crude,” acrylic paintings by Tony Nozero, through Sept. 29. “Images from the End of the Earth,” photographs of Grand Isle by Zack Smith.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com —

“Details: Works on Paper,” paperworks by Robert Berguson, Robert Lansden and Dale Newkirk, through Sunday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 7220876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “In Proportion

to Obsession,” drawings and paintings by Patrick Sart and sculptures by Michele Basta, through Aug. 28.



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BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Los

Invisibles,” photographs depicting post-Katrina Latino immigrant presence, through Sept. 4. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ALL PRINTS, MAPS & HARD COVERS.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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2801 MARAIS ST. non-profit organization • mon-sat 9am-4:30pm

504-947-0038 www.rtno.org

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Singing Over the Bones,”

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “The Wrench Series,” incised paintings by Mitchell Lonas, through Sept. 25. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HENRY HOOD GALLERY. 325 E. Lockwood St., Covington, (985) 789-1832 — “Louisiana’s

Endangered Coast,” a group exhibition of paintings, sculptures, photographs, mixed media and ceramics, through Aug. 28.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “Broken Time,” new paintings and pastel drawings by Pinkney Herbert, through Sept. 18. HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — Global Gala

2010, a collection of folk art from six continents, through Aug. 30.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “The River of Forget,”

new paintings and sculptures by Kathleen Ariatti Banton; “Nothing is Nothing,” new works on paper by Kyle Bravo; both through Aug. 28.

JUPITER ARTPROJECTS. 1901 Royal St., 281-4230; www.jupiterartprojects.com — “The New Black,” works by Paige Valente, through Aug. 18. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Anting,”

paintings and pastels by Jesse Poimboeuf, through Sept. 25.

tional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com —

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www. neworleansglassworks.com —

“A Culinary Extravaganza: The Sweet Sounds of Satchmo and the Sugarfoot Stomp,” works by Chad Gilchrist, Lisa Liggett, Melissa Clark and Cathy DeYoung, through Sept. 30.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 8219 Oak St., 912-3304 — “Industry Zoo,” sculptural paintings by Sherry Francalancia, through August. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Simultaneous Horizons,” mixedmedia and acrylic works by Edith Moseley and Brad Robertson, through Sept. 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Southern

Life After Death,” a group exhibition featuring five artists depicting afterlife in various mediums, through September.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — Works by

Teri Walker, Chad Ridgeway, Tamra Carboni, Caren Nowak and others, ongoing RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Art Chaud,”

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Fanciful Fauna,” oil on canvas by Hunt Slonem, through Sept. 25.

works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www. mpcds.com — “The Unconven-

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing.

ceramics by Beverly Morris, through September.

a summer group exhibition featuring new work by 17 local artists, through Sept. 4.


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

— “Summer Show,” a group exhibition of juried works by artists across the country, through Sunday.

review Parade Roots

Thomas Woodruff’s two concurrent shows are aptly named Fever Dreams and Freak Parade, respectively, and both explore his intimately carnivalesque and neo-Victorian vision. Like the Victorians of yore, Woodruff gravitates to things mythic, mystical and naturalistic. Sun Study No. 1 (pictured) at Taylor-Bercier is a demonic female head suspended in space with strawberry blond locks that morph into a corona of fire. Between ears resembling oversize butterfly wings, her head supports yet another head — a leering gargoyle with fangs over which more demonic heads appear upside down — and the sense of a Kali-like demon viewing us hungrily from above is palpable enough to lend a whole new frisson to notions of global warming. But the real masterpiece here is Sleepy, a pastel painting of a sleepwalking adolescent female with rows of candles mounted on the oversize snails that crawl along her outstretched arms. It is weirdly psychological, a twisted gift from fairyland. The larger Freak Parade show at the CAC builds on an ongoing series that often strikingly resembles fantastic 19th century Mardi Gras float illustrations, not to mention carnival sideshows. The participants range from animal, vegetable, mineral and human to various combinations thereof. Bambi-Lynn is a drum majorette twirling a flaming baton as she struts her stuff in a short skirt, boots and a little jacket left open to display her lovely breasts, all nine of them. Cobra Balloon is a bejeweled airship, something like a floating Faberge egg with a wicker basket of cobras suspended below. There are also unicorns, ice ghosts and a cigar-smoking skull. Bringing up the rear is a hooded and bejeweled figure sweeping up the glittery litter after the parade has passed, leaving things tidy enough to ensure eternal encores of the beautiful strangeness that Woodruff says is the best defense against the relentless onslaught of globalized sameness. — D. Eric Bookhardt

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Fever Dreams: Recent Works by Thomas Woodruff Through Oct. 22 Taylor Bercier Gallery, 233 Chartres St., 527-0072; www.taylorbercier.com Freak Parade: Works by Thomas Woodruff Through Oct. 24 Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

sculptures; serigraphs and digital prints by R.G. Brown and Karen Eustis, through August. SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out

of the Blue,” a group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3.

ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery.com — “A Decade ... ,” works on paper and encaustic works on panel by Tony Hernandez; “Walkes & Waltzes,” ceramic works by Dana Chapman; both through August.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Beginning the Journey,” bronze, paper and wax

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

by Murielle White, through Sept. 27. TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Fever Dreams,” drawings and paintings by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 22.

CALL FOR ARTISTS CLARENCE JOHN LAUGHLIN AWARD.

The New Orleans Photo Alliance awards $5,000 to recognize a fine art photographer who is creating, or has completed, a significant body of work. Visit www.neworleansphotoalliance.org for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 15.

MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The festival

seeks film submissions, as well as Arab, Persian or Middle Eastern musicians, multi-media installations and performance pieces for the November event. Visit www. nolamideastfilmfest.blogspot.com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 30.

VAMPIRE FILM FESTIVAL. Filmmakers and musicians are encouraged to submit vampire or gothic-themed short films, feature films, music videos and experimental films for the October festival. Visit www. vampirefilmfestival.com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 17.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Tom Dent:

A Heavy Trip Through the South,” an exhibition highlighting the New Orleans poet, playwright and historian, through September.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “Freak Parade,” works by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 24. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “Katrina + 5: Document-

ing Disaster,” an oral history and photography project with historical maps, documents and a multimedia presentation, through Sept. 12. LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other

exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe

Become a Counselor

Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — “Loyal Forces: The Animals of World War II,” artifacts focusing on animals employed and encountered in the war, through Oct. 17. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 5661136; www.noaam.com — “Sumpt’n

to See, Native Son Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — “Swamp

Tours,” a group exhibition featuring contemporary Louisiana artists, through Aug. 29. “Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965–2010,” an exhibition featuring female artists who have lived or worked in New Orleans, through Sept. 12, and more. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “The Art of

Tennessee,” works from the collection of Gertrude and Ben Caldwell; “Place Meets Time,” photographs by Tom Rankin; “Flight Lab,” a multimedia piece by Jenny K. Hager; “Art Speaks,” a video project by YA/YA; all through Sept. 19. . PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www. prcno.org — “American Memories,” postcards from Geoffrey Snodgrass’s collection depicting American cityscapes, buildings and monuments, through Sunday. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Wish You Were Here,” private collection of postcards depicting African Americans and food; “The Birth of Coffee,” black-and-white photographs documenting worldwide coffee works; all ongoing.

Our Lady of Holy Cross College graduates are highly regarded in the workplace for their exceptional knowledge, skills and compassion. Undergraduate degrees majoring in: • A.S. and B.S. in Addictions counseling • B.S. in Applied Behavioral Science • A.S. in Juvenile Counseling • B.S. in Psychology • B.S. in Social Counseling

Master’s degrees with specializations in: • Clinical Mental Health counseling • Marriage and Family counseling • School counseling

Nationally accredited by CACREP To learn more, contact Dr. Carolyn White cwhite@olhcc.edu • (504)398-2149

TEKREMA CENTER FOR ART AND CULTURE. 5640 Burgundy St., 247-2612 — “Healing Waters: Reflections of

the Gulf,” an exhibition and meditation site centering around “Healing Waters” by Niko Ciglio, through August.

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

A ministry of the Marianites of Holy Cross

w w w . o l h c c . e d u 4123 Woodland Dr., New Orleans, LA 70131

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THRU OC T

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Melting Lines,” works

ART

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STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

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THE 39 STEPS. NOCCA|Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The play’s four actors perform Alfred Hitchcock’s film nearly verbatim onstage, portraying more than 150 characters. Tickets $30. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 22. BLACKBIRD. Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre. org — A Gulf War veteran and a drug-addicted former stripper cling to each other in hopes of escaping their grim lives. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. DINNER WITH FRIENDS. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — After learning of their friends’ divorce, a happily married couple feels pressured to choose sides and question their own relationship. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 28. EVITA. Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 643-0556; www.slidell-slt.org — The theater presents Andrew Lloyd Webber’s stage musical portrait of Argentine political leader Eva Perón. Tickets start at $14. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 5. THE FANTASTICKS. Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The parents of two neighboring teens build a wall between them, but the two nonetheless meet and fall in love. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors and military, $20 students, $15 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 29. HUGHIE. Backyard Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave., 945-9936; www.frontmanshow.com — Four Humours Theater presents Eugene O’Neill’s intense two-man character study. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Monday, 5 p.m. Sunday, through August. STAGE DOOR IDOL. Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Contestants in the museum’s 1940s-themed singing contest vie to star in a show with the Victory Six Swing Band. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. THE UNACQUAINTED. Tulane University, Lupin Theatre, 16 Newcomb Place — Pamela Davis-Noland’s play is a modern day retelling of the story of Jesus Christ. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300

38

GET IN ON THE ACT

review I'll Drink to That

Drinking has to be one of the most inviting and accessible of subjects. And just in case anyone needed extra incentives, Bob Edes Jr. and Elizabeth Pearce’s show New Orleans Down the Hatch: A Cabaret in Two Cocktails included two small drinks. Ably accompanied by Jim Walpole on piano, Edes served as master of ceremonies, master of double entendre and Rat Packish bon vivant. He opened the show by twisting “When You’re Smiling” into “When You’re Drinking,” and it set the tone for a gleeful celebration of all things alcoholic. Elizabeth Pearce, a food writer, educator and researcher at the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, mostly served as the straight person, providing recipes and distilling New Orleans’ history from two cocktails: the Sazerac and the hurricane. Edes was effortlessly entertaining whether singing, sipping, quipping, refreshing old jokes or guiding the show through the occasional hiccup. Pearce has a good voice and sang too little. Though the material about the revolution in Saint-Domingue (Haiti), rum, sugar, bitters, Prohibition and speakeasies is ripe for a wry version of local history, her delivery was at times more tour guide than raconteur. The show was put together on short notice, and could use some polish before it is reprised in late September. Le Chat Noir has become a second home for Running With Scissors regulars to do cabaret. Lisa Picone recently sang Peggy Lee songs. Dorian Rush won a 2010 Big Easy Award for her tribute to Janis Joplin. Bob Edes Jr. is no stranger at Le Chat. And Pearce has been a behind-the-scenes figure for Scissors as well as a rare stage presence. It’s good to see more local talents delving into cabaret and making use of Le Chat’s intimate space. — Will Coviello

Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta. com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday. THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark. com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday. FLEUR DE TEASE. Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The burlesque troupe performs. 9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Saturday.

DANCE LASTING IMAGES. Contemporary

Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Crescent City Choreographers presents new works choreographed by Kesha McKey and Giselle Nakhid. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 CAC members and students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

OPERA OPERA RETURNS TO BOURBON STREET. The Inn on Bourbon Hotel,

541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon.com — The hotel and the New Orleans Opera Association present the free performance by

Bon Operatit. 7 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursdays. BLUE MONDAY STAND-UP COMEDY.

Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the weekly open mic. 9 p.m. Monday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 4006145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday. COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY LIVES. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300;

www.nolacomedy.com — Comedy teams Dr. Awkward and Men Not Mars perform weekly improvisational comedy. Admission $10. 9 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-allages comedy competition between two teams. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. rubyfruit-jungle.com — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m. HUMANE SOCIETY COMEDY BENEFIT SHOW. Gut-Buster Comedy Room,

Holiday Inn, 501 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (800) 465-4329; www. holidayinn.com — Comedians Tim Bateman and Terry Comeaux perform at the benefit show. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Saturday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturdays. ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Fridays. STAND UP NOLA PRESENTS MO AMER. Boomtown Casino, Boomers

Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. Avenue Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243 — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.


listings

Be there do thAt

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

family Tuesday 10 KIDS JAZZY ART WORKSHOP.

New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — Artist Cynthia Zmetronak leads a workshop focusing on painting to the sounds of jazz. 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday.

Wednesday 11 START WITH ART. Ogden Museum

of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — Parents and children 18 months to 5 years old experience music and art in a museum setting to nurture rhythm, movement and self-expression. Call 539-9608, or email kbarron@ogdenmuseum.org for details. Admission $45 for the three-week session, $15 for each additional child; free for members. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 14 ABRACADABRA MAGIC SHOW.

CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Children learn to make their own books in this monthly program. Pre-registration recommended. Email artboxrhino@gmail.com for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. GEEK SQUAD SUMMER ACADEMY. Kingsley House,

1600 Constance St., 523-6221; www.kingsleyhouse.org — The two-day program teaches children 10 to 18 years old about PC basics, Internet communications and digital music and video. Visit www.gssummeracademy.com for details. Admission $15. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

events Tuesday 10 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 8615898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market

features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

sion. 5:30 p.m.

preview

HOMEBUYERS’ WORKSHOP: HOME MAINTENANCE 101 .

Preservation Resource Center, 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — The program teaches to prevent home repair catastrophes by conducting routine maintenance and inspections. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

TEA ON TUESDAY: CAJUN, CREOLE AND REGIONAL CUISINE . Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Pamela D. Lyles, author of Da Cajn Critter, explores the regional recipes featured in her cookbook. A traditional tea follows. Contact 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. Admission $30 general admission, $25 members. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday 11 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE .

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

MEET THE ARTISTS. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Historic New Orleans Collection curator Judith Bonner and the artists featured in the Women Artists in Louisiana exhibit lead a discussion. Free admission. 6 p.m.

QUILTING 101 . St. Tammany

Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The library hosts a seven-week series of quilting classes tailored for beginners. Call 768-6294 for details. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

Friday 13

in the Red Photo by Curt MCClain

Red dresses are flying off the shelves at local thrift stores in preparation for Saturday’s New Orleans Red Dress Run. The annual event is hosted by the New Orleans Hash House Harriers, a chapter of the international drinking/running club. “We are a beer-drinking club that runs,” says Kendall Daigle, leader of NOHHH, which registered more than 5,000 participants in 2009. “Last year, we finished 116 kegs in the three-and-ahalf hours before the run,” Daigle says. The pre-race party kicks off at 9 a.m. in Washington Square with live music by the Blackened Blues Band and the Boogie Men, plus food and kegs of Abita Amber. The run begins at noon, and the participants follow a course into the French Quarter toward a designated stop at a cluster of bars on Bourbon Street. They eventually return to the park, where festivities continue until 7 p.m. “Historically, only half the pack comes back,” Daigle says. “The key is to pace yourself so you can make it the whole day.” The original red dress run was in San Diego 23 years ago, but there are Hash House running clubs around the world; the earliest one was formed in Kuala Lumpur in 1938. Daigle says participants should buy their dresses as soon as possible. “It’s tough to find them right now,” he says. “Especially for guys, because they’ve got to find a dress in a big enough size.” Red dresses are mandatory. Proceeds go to local charities, and more than $90,000 was donated in 2009. Advance registration is $60; day-of registration is $70. — Sarah Eddington

AUG

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new Orleans Red Dress Run 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday Washington Square, Royal Street at Elysian Fields Avenue; www.neworleanshashhouse.com

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

YAPPY HOUR . Ruby’s Roadhouse,

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. 840 Lamarque St., Mandeville, (985) 626-9748; www.rubysroadhouse.com — The benefit for Pelican Bark Park features drink specials, pet fashion show, pet adoption tent and more. Pets welcome. Admission $5. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday 12 FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. —

WGIRLS NOLA FISH FRY.

Handsome Willy’s, 218 S. Robertson St., 525-0377; www. handsomewillys.com — The event featuring food, raffles and the New Orleans Saints preseason game benefits the Adopt-A-Fisherman Program. Visit www.wgirls.org/neworleans for details. Free admis-

EXHIBITION WALK-THROUGH . New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — Museum curator George Roland leads guests through Every Year Something New. Free with museum admission. Noon. HEAT OF BATTLE WARGAMING CONFERENCE . National World

War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The annual wargaming convention draws more than 200 participants from across the country. Preregistration is recommended. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 email walt.burgoyne@nationalww2museum.org for details. Friday-Sunday. LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Mark Mod discusses “Bittersweet Victory: Combating Commerce Raiders in WWII.” Noon to 1 p.m.

Saturday 14 BACK TO SCHOOL EXTRAVAGANZA . Old U.S. Mint,

400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/mintex. htm — The Dinneral Shavers Education Fund’s event features free school supplies, free health screenings and a scavenger hunt, as well as performances from local bands. Noon to 4 p.m. BETHANY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH SUMMERFEST. Bethany

United Methodist Church, 4533 Mendez St., 324-5057; www. bethanyumcneworleans. org — The event features live music, vendors selling a variety of wares, a silent auction, children’s activities, food and empowerment sessions. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www. broadcommunityconnections. org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The museum’s chief curator and co-director David Houston and board chairwoman Julia Reed discuss the importance of Welty’s writing and photography. 11 a.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

HISTORY OF HERBSAINT.

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Jay Hendrickson, an expert on the absinthe substitute, presents a lecture followed by a demonstration and tasting. Admission $10 general admission, $5 members. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

JAMAICA ME CRAZY. Greater

Covington Center, 317 N. Jefferson St., Covington, (985) 867-1206 — The American Cancer Society’s Jamaicanthemed fundraiser features live music, food from local restaurants, a cash bar and an auction. Visit www.jamaicamecrazysttammany.org for details. Admission $35 per individual, $50 per couple in advance; $40 day of event. 7 p.m. to midnight.

MENTAL HEALTH WALK-A-THON . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The Holistic Educational Rehabilitation Center sponsors a one-mile walk for mental health support and awareness. Call 367-6630 or email hercrehab1@aol.com for details. Registration 8 a.m., walk 9 a.m. NEW ORLEANS BOOK FESTIVAL . Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St., (800) ITS-A-ZOO; www.auduboninstitute.org — The festival features book signings by local authors, book giveaways, book sales, children’s activities and more. Free with zoo admission. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DIRTY LINEN NIGHT. French

PET ADOPTIONS. Jefferson Feed,

EUDORA WELTY DISCUSSION .

SLIDELL LOOKING GLASS SHOW & SALE . Northshore Harbor Page 41

Quarter, the 200-1000 blocks of Royal Street — More than 60 galleries and shops provide an exclusive shopping experience with refreshments and special surprises. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Pet & Garden Center, 4421 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson — LA/SPCA volunteers facilitate pet adoptions. Call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Irwin Royes, the World’s Smallest Magician, presents a magic show. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

events

39


40

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EvEnts

ST. CLAUDE SANKOFA MARKETPLACE. Sankofa

Marketplace, St. Claude and Caffin avenues — The monthly market features health screenings, children’s activities, a farmers market, art, live music and more. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

TRESTLEFEST ARTMART. Dixie Art Supplies, 5005 Bloomfield St., 733-6503; www.dixieart. com — The monthly indoor art market features art vendors, demonstrations, prizes, refreshments and more. Noon to 5 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET.

Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. VJ DAY ANNIVERSARY. National

WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www. utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 15

THE 70124 HOUSE TOUR . Burk Brokerage Real Estate, 6260 Vicksburg St. — The event features informative seminars and an array of housing options available to families looking to rebuild in the area. Call 324-3964 or visit www. buildnownola.com for details. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. BAKE DAY FUNDRAISER . Great Harvest Bread Company, 4700 Hwy. 22, Suite 21; Mandeville, (985) 845-9431; www.greatharvestnorthshore.com — Sales of bakery goods benefit the Covington Food Bank. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Captain Rick Jacobs discusses “Battle of France: Dunkirk.” Noon to 1 p.m. MARDI GRAS INDIAN HALL OF FAME . Ashé Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The event includes an induction with awards and a memorial ceremony. 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

PELICANPALOOZA . Southport

Hall, 200 Monticello Ave., 8352903 — The concert featuring 5 Finger Discount, Weathered, Bag of Donuts and Contraflow benefits Camp Pelican, a camp for children with pulmonary disorders. Admission $15. Noon. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SWING WITH INGRID LUCIA . Stage Door Canteen

at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while musicians play World War II-era hits. Lessons 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., live music 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Monday 16 CBT GROUP. Counseling

Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details.

Call for appliCations CENTER FOR CULTURAL INTERCHANGE . The center

seeks families to host foreign exchange students during the upcoming school year. Email ayp@cci-exchange.com or visit www.cci-exchange. com/host.htm for details. Application deadline is Aug. 31.

and Music, 3131 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8351363 — The author discusses Why People Live in New Orleans. 1 p.m. Saturday. 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs Losing Ground: Identity and Land Loss in Coastal Louisiana. 6 p.m. Tuesday. HERMANN-GRIMA/GALLIER HISTORIC HOUSES BOOK CLUB.

Gallier House Museum, 1132 Royal St., 525-5661; www. hgghh.org — The group discusses Jacqueline Kelly’s The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate. 2 p.m. Thursday.

NOMA BOOK CLUB. New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The group discusses Tracy Chevalier’s Burning Bright. Noon Wednesday. OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

France St., 944-0441; www. yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

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OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery,

2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spoken word and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday. POETRY MEETING . New

Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St.

Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square,

4215 Magazine St., 343-2406 — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

PLACE ST. CHARLES 201 ST. CHARLES AVE.

Mon-Fri 7am-2pm • Free Delivery 522-8198 • www.steves-diner.com

spanish food

Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www. ladivinagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday. 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.rubyfruit-jungle.com — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

COMBO SPECIAL

230 DECATUR

www.attikineworleans.com 587-3756

Sandwich Platter House Salad + Assorted Dessert Platter $11.85 per person

CATERING

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OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La

words

CHRISTINE EWY. Borders Books

experience the mediterranean

DAVID BURLEY. Octavia Books,

SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Peter Watts’ Blindsight. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

bar & grill

Check Out Nightly The Gambit’s MUSIC SCHEDULE – Top 50 Bars –

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum celebrates the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II with a performance by the Victory Belles and a Times Square kissing contest. Noon to 4 p.m.

a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

HOURS

page 39

Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — Nationally known glass dealers display and sell glass from the Victorian era through the Mid Century, with emphasis on Depression era items. Visit www.meyershows.com for details. Admission $5. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.

Attiki

41


Presents

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

2 GREAT REASONS TO VISIT BAYONA!

42

Happy Birthday Julia! This iconic woman, who taught us how to cook French, was Celebrated at Bayona in 1992.

Featuring Lying In Wait

3:00 pm

Riverdog

4:15 pm

Kandeeside

5:30 pm

Kyle Turley Band

8:00 pm

Bout It Brass Band

9:30 pm

Julia Child inspired dishes prepared by our Celebrated woman in the kitchen, Chef Susan Spicer.

EVENINGS, AUGUST 9-14 3 COURSE MENU $38 430 R UE Da U phin E • 504. 525. 4455 • w w w. b ayo n a . co m

invites you for lunch to toast...

20Years 20¢martinis $ 20 LUNCH SPECIAL with

Mellow Mushroom 1645 U.S. 190 Covinton, LA 70433

includes soup or bayona salad, any entree and ice cream or sorbet

Validated parking Chateau Lemoyne Hotel, 301 Dauphine


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <UPTOWN SLEEPER > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Cara Benson, former pastry chef at Muriel’s Jackson Square, recently opened the casual French cafe Tartine (7217 Perrier St., < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <866-4860; www.tartineneworleans.com), which serves breakfast and lunch with specialties like pate sandwiches on housemade baguette, salad Nicoise and baked eggs in brioche. WHAT Coulis

am

B

WHERE

3625 Prytania St., 304-4265 WHEN

Breakfast daily, lunch Mon.-Fri., brunch Sat. and Sun. RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

Creative twists elevate solid brunch basics.

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

T

IN

FIVE PLACES TO GORGE ON GARLIC MOSCA’S RESTAURANT

CHECK, PLEASE

UPPERLINE RESTAURANT

Chef James Leeming gets creative with the morning meal at Coulis. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

caught on quickly. Weekend brunch has people waiting in line outside for tables, much like the Bluebird had when it was open. Leeming takes a revisionist approach to breakfast standards, which must come naturally after a career at contemporary Creole’s creative high end. Corned beef hash is made into patties and crisped on the grill, topped with poached eggs, hollandaise and grilled mirliton. A simple bagel is layered with thin– sliced salmon, a tangle of shoestring-cut beets and dabs of beet coulis, which add refreshing crunch and sweetness. Tenderloin medallions in onion gravy anchor the steak and eggs plate, and the French toast is enhanced with smoked sausage and caramelized apples. Lunch takes a backseat to breakfast and brunch at Coulis, and this part of the menu could use some work. For instance, the Cuban sandwich I tried was mystifyingly bad, combining soggy pork with suspiciously uniform ham slices on sourdough rather than the traditional crisp, chewy loaf. But Leeming’s artful presentations return with chicken flautas, which balance over concentric rings of salsa and black beans and sprout an attractive blossom of avocado and carrot ribbons. The burger is basic but proved to be another lunch highlight, with its substantial handformed patty and seeded French roll. Most important, especially for those who have been waiting in line for a while, the coffee is fresh and admirably strong. After all, while the chef’s creative flair sets Coulis apart, anyone serving breakfast in this town needs to start with good coffee.

Whole cloves are used with abandon, especially in chicken a la grande.

1413 UPPERLINE ST., 891-9822 www.upperline.com

Now serving its “garlic festival” menu, including garlic ice cream.

TUJAGUE’S RESTAURANT

823 DECATUR ST., 525-8676 www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Fried chicken bonne femme, available on request, is showered with garlic.

LOLA’S

3312 ESPLANADE AVE., 488-6946

Spanish alioli spread is electrifying and addictive. Try the garlic soup, too.

ANGELI ON DECATUR

1141 DECATUR ST., 566-0077

Pizzas at this late-night spot get whole roasted cloves and garlic sauce.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Ique Malbec

MENDOZA, ARGENTINA / $10-$15 RETAIL This Malbec is produced from old-vine grapes from the Enrique Foster estate 3,000 feet above sea level. The medium-bodied, intensely focused wine is made without oak and offers a fresh, pure fruit expression as well as some complexity. It offers aromas of ripe blackberry and spice followed by bright fruit flavors of plum and cherry with soft, lush tannins, a balanced acidity and long finish. Open an hour before serving to aerate. It pairs well with a variety of foods including steaks, grilled sausages, barbecue, empanadas, leg of lamb, burgers and hard cheeses. Buy it at: Dorignac’s, Bacchanal, Cellars of River Ridge and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Mike’s on the Avenue, La Boca and Bar Tonique. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

he Bluebird Cafe closed for good last spring, but the legacy of the popular Uptown diner lives on in countless renditions of huevos rancheros around town. The Bluebird helped popularize the Mexican breakfast classic during more than two decades in business — in the same way that Drago’s sparked a wide-ranging craze for charbroiled oysters. So when local chef James Leeming opened his own breakfast/lunch spot last fall in the former Bluebird building, there was no question huevos rancheros would be a set piece of his menu. But Coulis is much different than the Bluebird Cafe — and so is its rendition of the dish. All the expected components are there, but the composition is unique. The plate is neatly split between black beans and smoky, dark tomato sauce. Tortillas rest on top, but they form a crisp pepper Jack quesadilla, while long corn chips rise dramatically from the dish like the petals of a carnivorous plant. Of course there are eggs, but these fried huevos are speckled with finely chopped green onion and drizzled with an abstract pattern of cool crema. Such touches are characteristic of Leeming’s style. The native of Nicaragua has had a long run in local fine-dining circles, including a dozen years at Commander’s Palace, where his position as saucier earned him the nickname “Coulis,” a handle that still appears on his business cards. More recently he was chef at Dick & Jenny’s, though he decided to develop his own place as a break from the late-night hours of the dinner shift. Coulis opened in October 2009 and

five 5

4137 HWY. 90, AVONDALE, 436-9942 www.moscasrestaurant.com

The familiar Bluebird template redrawn with an artistic touch.

A FINE-DINING CHEF REVISES BREAKFAST AT A REBORN UPTOWN CLASSIC.

A diverse collection of restaurants around town offer prix fixe lunch and dinner menus through “COOLinary New Orleans,” a promotion from the Convention and Visitors Bureau. COOLinary menus include three courses for $20 at lunch and $34 at dinner through September. Visit www.coolinaryneworleans.com for details. On each Thursday this month, a separate roster of restaurants will host “We Live to Eat” prix fixe dinners, named for a promotional campaign from the local chapter of the Louisiana Restaurant Association. Visit www.welivetoeatnola.com for details.

WHAT DOESN'T

Brief lunch menu lacks excitement; Cuban sandwich needs work.

Nuevo Huevos

HOT DEALS FOR HOT TIMES

43


& cafe

(

YOUR NEW FAVORITE )

Neighborhood Restaurant! 5209 W. Napoleon (Near Transcontinental) 504.883.5513 • www.rajuncajuncafe.com

Lots of New Menu Items for Breakfast & Lunch OPEN 7 DAYS 8AM - 3PM

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504-483-8828

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jambalaya

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$21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

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AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

44

roses

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

COUPON

any color

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COUPON

orchid plan ts

30 % OFF

EXPIRES 09/09/10 NOT VALID CASH & CARRY ONLY W/ ANY OTH ER COU MUST BE PRE SENT AT TIM PONS. COUPON E OF PURCHA SE.

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

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catering

Po-Boys Seafood • Muffalettas Daily Specials

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THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 8835905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetiz-

ers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224 Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ELIZABETH’S

RESTAURANT

601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www. elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe.com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139

N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www. therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Pryta-

nia St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and


OP & D EN L A E T A st VA I L I V E R E Breakfad One L AB Y y n A y LE! 2n Bu Get the onday-

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Car-

rollton Ave., 865-1428; wwww. chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafay-

ette St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8875656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND — 1823

Metairie Road, Metairie, 666-1823 — Enjoy something cold and sweet from this 50-year-old business, which offers an assortment of flavored sno-balls, soft-serve ice cream, malts, banana splits or ice cream cones dipped in chocolate. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www. mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations

accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI

0% OFF

M Friday INNER H OR D PETIZER! C N U L P EE A NY 2 BUY A & GET A FR S E E R T EN

& Entree

5

& GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams

Blvd., Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 7340301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 738-9678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles

Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714

Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Join Us for LUNCH Specializing in

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

G

of equal or lesser value.

G

Dine in only. Up to $5.95 Value. Expires 9/13/10

“Best New York Deli

in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

EST 1994

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

Magazine Location

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

PARKWAY

FRENCH

FOR

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

PO’BOYS!

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

(504)

482-3047

2 1 for

WINE by

the GLASS

Tuesday - Friday on select wines

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > AUGUST 10 > 2010

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT

MI

www.cafediblasi.com

1801 Stumpf Blvd. • 361.3106

45


Out2Eat Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C

Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ItaLIaN ANDREA’S

NORTHERN

ITALIAN

SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chefowner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties of the house include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemoncream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd.,

Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi. com — For casual Italian dining, head to Cafe DiBlasi for pan-fried veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco served with rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

46

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JaPaNESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave.,

410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists.

There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LatIN aMERICaN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN

CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 8625252 — Enjoy Latin home cooking in a quaint and festive cafe. Try the namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, as well as a wide selection of tapas dishes and vegan options. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRaNEaN/ MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www. maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade

Ave., 945-9997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine on po-boys and seafood platters, crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee, shrimp Creole and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Cre-

ole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honeybaked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.Fri. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR —

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W.

Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 8380022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZa MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Maga-

zine St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria.com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 4880133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 8180111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd.,

Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SEaFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations

accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOuL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE — 2401

St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE — 3633

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters

St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant. com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanish-accented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette and seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St.,

899-5129; www.moonnola.com — There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Man-

hattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — Choose from Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


Apartment Condo Guide Lakeview fully renovated double,

private entrances, individual off street parking. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, liv rm, din area, w/d hkp - $1200/mo 1bdrm, 1 bth, liv. rm. din. area, w/d - $900/mo

Call usWe have quality rentals.

4604 BANKS ST.

Mid City, 2 or 3 bdrms, 1 1/2 ba, furn kit, w/d, wd flrs, ceil fans 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceils. OS pkng. Pets negotiable. Credit check required.

$1400 + deposit 504-982-0046 after 4 pm

Colleen Mooney, agent 504-236-7765

Vallon Real Estate 504-486-5437 4533 Canal St, NOLA 70119

BOOK NOW FOR THE NEXT

APARTMENT & CONDO GUIDE!

(coming out in the Sept. 14 issue!)

Find Your PERFECT FIT At

Bring this ad to any of the listed communities and receive

2 Weeks FREE rent! Clearwater Creek

1 Bedroom $895 2 Bedroom $1015

Sawmill Creek

1 Bedroom $675 2 Bedroom $850

in

HOTnner Ke West l l i rm 610 Suga rooms $ 75

Lafreniere

1 Bedroom $658 2 Bedroom $760

Chestnut Creek

7 d 1 Be rooms $ d e 2B

1 Bedroom $795 2 Bedroom $950

Hickory Creek

1 Bedroom $805 2 Bedroom $860

Windmill South Expires 8/16/10. Prices subject to change based on availability.

1 Bedroom $595 2 Bedroom $750

Offering over 8,500 apartment homes.

Large storage closets, Direct tv. Wide screen tv! King size master bed bedroom, 2.5 bathrooms. Extra queen sofa bed in living room. All you need is your bag! Completely corporate furnished! Friendly active neighborhood. 3 minute walk to free Algiers Point ferry which takes 8 scenic minutes landing at Canal St. At Harrah's casino/ French Quarter and Central Business District.

FROM $2500/MO! A DEAL FOR 1700 SQ. FT!

Call owner 504-366-7374 or 781-608-6115 cell for best deal! 323 Morgan St., New Orleans, LA 70114

$39,900 - $79,900

CONDOS! TOTAL MONTHLY: $380-$700 NO DOWN PAYMENT! Free Credit Restoration!

ALL UNITS LESS THAN $700 PER MONTH

Ask about the $24 million park!

888-207-1711

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Specials forSUMMER

FURNISHED CORPORATE UPSCALE SPACIOUS 2 & 3 BEDROOM CONDOS. SECURED PARKING, GYM, POOL, INTERNET. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. New Orleans-Algiers Point river front! Convenient to everything. The longer the stay, the better the deal. Multiple rental discounts. Minimum term is one month. W/D, alarm syst, high ceils, exp. brick, balcs & priv rooftop decks.

47


marKeT PLaCe

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

CRISTINA’S

CLEANING SERVICE Let me help you with your

WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

cleaning needs

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

Light/General Housekeeping • Heavy Duty Cleaning Summer Cleaning • Supplies Provided

Residential & Commercial

504-250-0884 • 504-286-5868 Fully Insured & Bonded

Licensed & Bonded

232-5554 or 831-0606 La Lic #2983

Locally owned & serving New Orleans area for 19 years

A Touch

pain management & relaxation needs

massage & body work

Available: Made in Hawaii, scented oils, candles & soaps, also spiritual books, etc.

of

Aloha Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes

• Neuromuscular Therapy • Deep Tissue • Swedish

IntrOduCtOry Offer

1 hr Massage $50

258-3389

Woodland Oaks Center

2209 LaPalco Blvd

Accept All Forms of Payment. • By Appointment Only • gift certificates available

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Susana Palma

including

After Construction Cleaning

48

Residential • Commercial

Photo Restoration • DVD Photo Slideshow with Music Video Tape to DVD Conversion Professional Video Editing • On-Site Presentation Available view samples at:

Maria 504.430.0533

www.slideshowmd.com

your body. your mind. your life.

Group TRX classes 8422 Oak St. NOLA 985-640-2648

www.TransformNOLA.com

Darin 504.722.6005

Antique Game Machines 1930 circ. All accept coin to play. Great condition. $2600 and up. Call (504) 512-8980

SLIDELL LOOKING GLASS SHOW DEPRESSION GLASS, CHINA & POTTERY

AUG 14, 2010 10:00-5:00 AUG 15, 2010 11:00-3:00

Admission $5.00 - Good Both Days ($1.00 Off With This Card)

NORTHSHORE HARbOR CENTER 100 Harbor Center Blvd, Slidell, LA 70461 Exit 261 off I-10 South ½ Mile Glass Grinder Available • Hourly Door Prizes Exhibits/Seminars For InFormAtIon:

Looking Glass Productions Fred & Pam Meyer

972-672-6213 www.meyershows.com

FAST SERVICE • NO JOB TOO SMALL

504 885-8000 EMBROIDERYEMPIRENOLA.COM 7005 MAGNOLIA CT. SUITE H METAIRIE LA 70003

Empowerment from

Rosemary Donnelly's Kitchen Cookbook

www.cougarinstincts.com Photo by Abby Photo, LLC.

Embroidery, Screen Printing, Uniforms, Windows Signs, Vehicle Wrap, Magnetic Signs, Car Signs Banners, Aluminium Signs Se Habla Español


CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR BARISTA/COUNTER PERSON

Needed for gelato shop. Excellent for college students, FT&PT avail. Apply in person @ Brocato, 214 N. Carrollton, NOLA 70119

SEASONAL TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Caprock Dairy, Muleshoe, TX, has 4 positions for silage, hay, grain & livestock. 3 mths exp req w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guarantee from 9/1/10 7/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6128619.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

TX Genetic Induction Division, Perryton, TX, has 40 positions for swine. 3 mths exp req w/references; clean driver’s license; tools, equipment & housing provided free. Trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/ hr; 3/4 work period guarantee from 8/1/10-6/1/11 . Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3064474.

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

Coaches needed for Gymnastic & Tumbling classes. PT schedule is avail & flexible. For more info: 884-0907

Lollipop and Jellybean

5wk old male and female adorable kittens,thrown from car window and rescued.504 462-1968

AUTOMOTIVE

Lollipop and Jellybean

AUTOMOTIVE

5wk old male and female adorable kittens,thrown from car window and rescued.504 462-1968 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, great companion and loves everything,VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Hsbkn /microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

2007 Jeep

VOLUNTEER

CANON

HOSPICE Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Wrangler Sahara 4x4, auto, low miles, black/gray,$5750 details/pics at vsa49@msn.com 225-208-1317

TRUCKS

Winky

‘29 antique model A truck

Winky - Very beautiful and sweet Calico lap cat ,Spayed, shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968

this 1929 modelA pickup truck runs fine. green and black with new tires. own a piece of history. $23,065.00. phone (504) 394-3078

LICENSED MASSAGE Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW, DT or Gen Relaxation. HUGE price reduction $50/hr Safe, priv & quiet location, 8am-9pm. LA#509, 504-231-1774.

NEW

Thai Massage/ Body Work on the Table

Full Body Massage(Swedish/ Deep Tissue). Deluxe Salt Scrub.

For Combo Specials: www.RightTouchNola.com Private Spa Like Studio, Tropical Garden in Fauborg Marigny - FQ. Flexible hours. LA #4553 Male Massage Therapist, Chris

(504) 458-5996

MERCHANDISE FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

Alicia Whittington

Relax Today SPECIAL 60/90/2 hour sessions

1 HOUR

$50

Swedish & Deep Tissue Appts

9am-9pm • M - F

LA Lic# 520

call

601.303.7979

$295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 $95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $115 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122 Queen Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $129. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Free English Bulldog Puppies 2 FREE ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES PLEASE CONTACT ME ASAP morrisphillip200@gmail.com.

KOJAK

Very sweet, large Morris look a like ,neutered rescue 504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer.

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Weekly Tails Cammie is a 9-month-old, spayed, PomChiChi. She’s good around cats, knows how to twirl and is currently in Mind Your Manners class. To meet Cammie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

There is a cure for the Summertime Blues! CAMMIE

CHAR-BROIL PATIO CADDIE 15" DIAMETER ELECTRIC GRILL PERFECT FOR SMALL SPACES OR APARTMENTS WHERE GAS GRILLS AREN'T ALLOWED. EXCELLENT CONDITION. SELLS $160 NEW, A STEAL AT $80. PLEASE CALL 985-809-7777.

NEED HELP?

Kennel #A10386558

PETS

Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

Learn how to dance. MrHappyfeet’s dancing, dance classes, lessons & instruction. Easy to follow, step-by-step method. Ask about our Introductory Lessons for Beginners!

1 yr old sweet and playful Calico,spayed ,shots ,tested microchip rescue 504 462-1968

NEWS FLASH!

Incalls LA #3182. Call Kevin Wu 504-453-4844

INSTRUCTION Salsa Ballrm Swing Country

COONEY

MISC. FOR SALE

Mention “Summertime Blues” and get $10 off your massage!

Licensed Contractor 504.606.0685

PET ADOPTIONS Elijah

Elijah -Gorgeous solid white Angora male cat,very sweet and smart neutered,shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968

DELILAH

Kennel #A10871580

Delilah is 3-year-old, spayed, DSH with a stunning tortie coat. Instructions for new family: pet, brush, love, pet, brush, love—please repeat often. To meet Delilah or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Nice Ridgelake Dr. Location

BUSINESS SERVICES HVAC/Spray Foam Insulation

PETS FOR SALE

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

SERVICES

49


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

931-35 Dauphine $935K 922-24 Dauphine $900K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated 4 unit French Quarter multikit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. family. 3457 sqft total. Great Back unit has 4 studio apts-7 apts Quarter location! Parking. total. $6500/mo rent income.

829 St. Roch Ave. $149K 1 bdrm, 1 ba, furn kit incl dishwasher, w/d, cen a/h, shed, rear yard. Excellent condition. Motivated seller!

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

LAKEVIEW

SLIDELL

UPTOWN

ST. TAMMANY

57345 Oak Ave • $125,000 Reduced, 2085 sq ft 3 bedroom home New Carpet, Refreshed kitchen Large rooms, Exposed wood beams Lisa B Simms-Hayles Broker MaRioN B REaL EStatE iNC www.marionb.com • 985-643-4452

901 Aline Street $199k Beautiful, renov. 2 bedroom, 1 bath condo in buidling w/ just 2 units! Private & spacious. this lower unit lives very comfortably! Parking. Colette Meister • Re/Max Complete 504-220-1762 cell

Unique & secluded. Gated. 1/4 mile winding, private drive to gated entry plus substantial 800 sq ft driveway through property. Bridged sandy creek, abundant wildlife, high, dry, rolling, pond, woods, pasture, fenced. 15 minutes from Covington. Won’t divide. $345,000. 601-215-6241

GENTILLY

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

19 ACRE HIDDEN JEWEL

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Two Story Lakeview Double, Great Location 3000 Sq Ft, TLC needed $185,000 Open HOuSe Sunday Aug 15th, 12 to 2pM 504 231-2445 ProPerTy New orLeaNS

FRENCH QUARTER

METAIRIE $79,900

Whitney Place Condo. Lovely 1 BD condo w/decorater updates. Light & bright. 756’ living space. Visit my website: www.sharrondemarest.com to view pics. SHARRON DEMAREST, cell: 504-250-6497.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

1, 2 & 3 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $500

GENERAL REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $179,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

INCLUDING UTILITIES

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

Call 899-RENT

3108 CLEARY AVE CLEARY BUILDING

MISSISSIPPI PRETTY WAVELAND LOT

GROUND FLOOR RETAIL SPACE

GARDEN DISTRICT

w/utilities. Paved, cleared, fenced w/ shade trees. Private! Close to main str. $9750. 228-363-4595.

Office space, 460 sf 1/2 bath, renov, CCTV, 24 hr access, parking in front, side & rear. $460/mo. 504-250-7676

UPTOWN

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

Call (504) 483-3100

50

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

$750 Call

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

2302 Magazine Street • New Orleans, Louisiana 2302 Magazine Street is a vibrant development located on the retail corridor of Magazine Street. This development includes 3,118 square feet of ground floor retail space providing a mix of high visibility, traffic and open showroom space.

AVAILABLE SPACE: 3118 sf TERMS: $15 p.s.f./NN CONTACT: Matthew M. Brooks Philip Street Real Estate, L.L.C.

Craig M. Ripley, Broker (504) 598-3617 matt.brooks@magazinest.com

1216 Peniston

2/1 "Touro Area"

$1200

541 St. Joseph

1/1 "Arts District Loft"

$1000

1207 Jackson Ave 1/1 “Aquatic Garden”

$750

912 Harding Dr.

$575

1/1 "Bayou Effficiency"

899-RENT

Sterling Financial ServiceS, llc Mortgage Rates are still LOW!!!

3.875%

15 year fixed

4.112% APR

Interest rate quoted assumes a minimum loan amount of $200,000.

Call Michael Schenck

504-889-0737

www.sterlingrates.com Rates effective 8/4/2010 and subject to change without notice.

No Upfront Fees, Pre-Approval in Minutes!


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS HaraHan/river ridge FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

FrenCH Quarter/ FauBOurg Marigny

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/cer flrs, recess lighting, srnd snd, sec sys, grt bkyd. Never flooded. Zone X, roof 4 yrs. $1600/ mo or $194,900 For Sale. Call Sylvia 415-6501

1103 Royal St

RIVER RIDGE NR LEVEE

#B, TH style guest hse. 2b/2b, pat/ bal, CA/H wd/tile fls, water incl, pking, furn/unfurn. $2,000/mo. Appt 504-952-3131

Newly renov 4 plx. 2 br, 1 & 1/2 ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd. No pets. Quiet area suits retired person. $725/mo, refs & dep. 504737-2089.

Kenner NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Private rm w/bath & kit. Utilities paid, $500/mo. & 3 brm/1 bath house, $900. 504-737-2068

Metairie A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $675 & 1 br + study fr $795. Furn corp avail. 780-1706 or 388-9972. www.orrislaneapts.com

FOR RENT OR SALE

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $1,000/mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

LUXURY APTS

2 BR, 1 1/2BA, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $750/mo. 504-443-2280

Old Metairie $300 OFF 1ST MONTH’S RENT - OLD METAIRIE SECRET

Unit A, 1B/1B, cen A/H, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water included. Furnished. $1700/month. Call for appt 504952-3131

1103 Royal St.

927 ST. ANN STREET

1BDRM,1st flr. CH&A. Tilled Bath. 2 Patios. No dogs. $995.00 + Deposit. 504-568-1359

FRENCH QUARTER APTS

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

NEW RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $600 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

1835 BURGUNDY - LWR Studio Studio, wd/cer flrs, Alcove kit, clst, a/c, fans, w/d on premises, no pets, low cost utils, $575+dep+lse. 504908-5210

2205 DAUPHINE ST

2b/2b, full kit, fenc patio/gard. private prking $1050/mo, wtr & garb pd. w/d hkups, Lse/refs. 985-510-0231.

514 MADISON ST/ $1000

1st flr off Decatur. Two 1 br, 1 ba, liv, din area, kit, wd flrs, coin w/d. Eddie 861-4561. Grady Harper Inc

521 ROYAL STREET

Luxurious 2BR, 2.5BA, LR/DR. Elevator. Modern kit & baths. W/D, wd flrs & carpeted bdrms. 2000’, terrace. No pets. $2800/mo. Prestige Properties, 504-884-1925.

725 DUMAINE #F

1 bedroom. Newly renovated. Granite cntrtps, hdwd flrs. 550 sq.ft. $750/ mo. 504-301-4411

824 Charters

Lux fully furn 1 br, 1.5 ba, lr w/queen sleeper, kit, mahogany flrs, 2nd flr balc, w/d. $2000/mo + dep. 504-2365757 or 504-236-7060. fqrental.com.

gentilly INCREDIBLE APT

2 brm,/1 bath in Gentilly. Water pd. Furn kit. Cats Ok. O/S pkng, Call Bobby. $875. Call 944-5076 or 610-4187.

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+utils • 504-283-8450

irisH CHannel IRISH CHANNEL COTTAGE 816 Ninth St. Beautifully Renovated, Irish Channel Camelback Cottage. 4 Bd/2Ba, cen A/H, wood Flrs, ceiling fans, furn. kitchen. $1800/mo. Louis Lederman • Prudential Gardner 504-874-3195

IRISH CHANNEL (504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

3 BR SHOTGUN DBL

C-a/h, wd flrs, furn kit, hkps, shed, nr st car, fncd bkyd, no smkrs/pets. $850+dep. 504-858-5389, 491-4056

3949 Constance

3bd, 1ba, cen AC/H, new floors, appl., $1300/mo. 452-2356

City ParK/BayOu st. JOHn FRESHLY RENOV’T VICTORIAN

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $975/mo. 504/495-6044

930 ORLEANS - 2 bd/ 2 ba $2000 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

1301 N. RAMPART-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $1500 760 MAGAZINE - 1 bd/ 1 ba $1250 4831 COLISEUM - Studio

$300

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

Mid City 121 1/2 N. CLARK ST.

1 BDRM - all appl, w/d hkps, lg clos., wtr pd. Walk to streetcar. 504-343-6383 or 985-226-0340. $650 lse +dep.

2 BDRM BRICK DOUBLE

Lg lr, hdwd frs, equip kit incl range, frig, d/w, w/d, cen a/h, off st pkg, dep & refs.1,000 sq ft. No pets. $890. 835-9099

1629 TOLEDANO #102

1/1, $1100/mo. incl cable, wtr, elec. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504-432-1034 Keller Wiiliams.

1703 S CARROLLTON 2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, balc, off st pkg. No pets. $1050/mo/dep. 504-865-9848 or 504-236-5757, email FQRental.com

1711 Second St

1 blk to St. Charles, Renov’t 3rd fl loft, lots of windows, fur kit, w/d on site $650. 895-4726 or 261-7611.

1726 FOUCHER

1922 General Taylor

Rmmate for 2b/1b shtgun. util incl, w/d,a/h,hrd flrs,inter, no pets. grad st. or profs pref 210-363-6614

248 Cherokee St.

3rd flr corner unit, 1b/1b furn kit, w/d gated comm. $795/m 504-236-7060 or 504-236-5757 fqrental.com

2840 State St.

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail NOW. Paula 952-3131

6237 ANNUNCIATION

Nr Audubon Pk. 3 br, 2 ba, liv rm, furn kit, d/w, w/d, cen a/h, off st pkg, Pets ok. $950/mo. 504-957-1233.

landscaping

lawn care

Stunning Restored Victorian

1700sf 3br/1ba, furn kit & ldry, wd flrs, ca/h, 14’ ceils, o/s prkg. Pets ok 1 yr lse. $1300/mo. Day pg 793-1300, Eve 835-6897

eastern new Orleans Single brick home, 3BR, 2 baths, patio, fenced yard, off st prkg,off Chef Menteur Hwy. $950+dep. 504-433-9394

6126 DELORD

716 DUFOSSAT

Spac 2 BR, 1 BA, frplc, cen a/h, porch, $1000/month w/ sec dep. 4 blks off St Charles. 504-891-7584 lv msg

1BR/1BA. 775 sq feet. Furn kit with w&d, window unit. Pets ok. 1 year lease, $675. Pgr. 793-1300, eves, 835-6897.

4619 BUNDY RD

By Jefferson. Raised cottage, upper. Deluxe 2br, lux bath/jacuzzi. Furn, W&D, hrdwd flrs, 1400sf, $1300/mo includes gas. 899-3668.

1106 BOURDEAUX ST

construction &

5300 FRERET

3 bedrooms, 1.5 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, w/d, 1500 sf, 12’ ceils, $1400/mo. 504-952-5102

1042 SONIAT ST

3b/2b Single Cottage. lr, dr, funr kit. C a/h w/d. hard wood flrs ceil fans $1850. 899-7657.

1201 CHARTRES #16 - 3bd/2.5ba $3000

1026 DUMAINE - 1 bd/ 1 ba $800

CarrOlltOn

laKeFrOnt

Lux 3/2, 3600 sqft, 1/2 blk to St Charles. Walk to Loyola Law/Audubon Park, hi ceil, fans, hd flrs, cen A/H, beau wd wk, W/D, furn kit, pkg, sh yd. $2550. Call Steve w/Latter & Blum 650-6770.

Between State & Palmer Ave. Renov 2 br half dbl, 1 ba, wd flrs, cen a/h, fully equip kit, w/d, rear yd, porch. Avl Aug 1. $1195/mo. S. Talbot, O/A. 975-9763.

inc

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

2340 Dauphine Street

521 1/2 LOWERLINE

call marcio perez

504.330.2708

2 story single hm w/os pkng. 3 BR, 2BA includes stove, fridge, W/D. Small pets ok. $1700/mo + $1700 deposit. 504-669-0976

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1BR, bath, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lutcher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

930 JACKSON, near Mag.

Renov, furnished kitchen, new appls, cen air/heat, w/d. EFFC/$495. 3BDRM/$800 • Call 504-250-9010

RENOV’T - GR. LOCATIONS!

#1 MAGAZINE ACROSS FROM SAKE CAFE 1BR/1BA Gated, lrg pool, laund, OS pkng $750/mo. #2 S. JOHNSON NEAR CLAIBORNE 2BR/1BA, Double, w/d hkkps, $875/ mo. 891-2420

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT wareHOuse distriCt

BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM

Henry Clay Ave, nr Aud Pk, ac/ht, furn kit w/ w/d, hi ceils, hdwd flrs, sm patio. $1400/mo. 504/897-3816, 504/940-4831

CARROLLTON AVENUE

1 br, furn kit, a/c unit, hdwd flrs, fresh paint, sec gate. Sm pet ok w/dep. $675-$695/mo. Call 899-RENT.

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $590/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

Historic Landmark

WAREHOUSE/COTTON MILL

Condo. Lg Studio, 1st flr. Opens to patio/pool w/appl & w/d. Cable & water pd. $1100/mo. Call 504-292-2632.

rentals tO sHare ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, furn kit, w/d onsite, hr flr, marble mantels, brkfst area, balcony $850/mo 895-4726

To Advertise in

VICTORIAN SHOTGUN

REAL ESTATE

502 Washington, 2BR, 1BA, w/d, c-fans, wd flrs, c-a/h, sec, drvwy, pool, FREE Direct TV, $1095. 813-5822

Call 483-3100

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 1204 Chartres #9 1/1.5 911 N Derbigny 1/1 1205 St Charles Studio 830 St Philip “G” 1/1 735 Esplanade “6” 1/1 1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 829 Ursulines #1 1/1 833 Ursulines #5 1/1 1418 Chartres A1 1/1 1438 Chartres Studio 448 Julia Unit #219 1/1 1908 Pauger 2/1 835 St Louis 2/2 739 ½ Gov Nicholls 1/1 315 Chartres LSQ Studio 1704 Napoleon 1/1 814 Orleans 1/1 837 Barracks #3 1/1 1418 Chartres E Studio 712 St. Philip 1/1 727 Conti B Studio 1028 Kelerec #1 1/1 1028 Kelerec #2 1/1 1028 Kelerec #3 1/1

FQ,loft bd,great loc,hi ceil,ctyd $975 newly renov singl shotgun hse $650 St. car Line, Pool, Pkng, Gym $800 Hi Ceils,Lg Balc,Prkng,Exc Loc $1995 Hdwd Flrs, Ctyd, Exc Loc $850 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool $1995 furnished w/FREE RENT AUG 2010 $950 FREE RENT AUG 2010! $1050 furnished,courtyard w/d on site $850 Renov in great $800 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950 recently updated, wtr included $950 Central heat w/d ctyd $1800 Util included, furn., great loc! $950 Great renov studio in location! $1000 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800 new kitch&bath,great location $1500 Adorable2storyaptw/balc&crtyrd$800 Furn. w/ ALL utilities included! $650 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1700 Furnished, fab location $950 nice lay out,great loc,water paid $950 wd flrs, central air, water paid $950 d/w, great loc, water paid $950

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

7120 Willow Street, living room, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $700month+deposit. Call 504/2837569

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 443-4488

1 br, liv area, 1.5 baths, furn kit, 1st flr, utilities & cable included. No pets. POOL. $900/mo. 833-0915.

algiers POint

uPtOwn/garden distriCt 1 BDRM - NEAR TULANE

1730 NAPOLEON AVE

METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1050/mo - 914-882-1212

226 S Scott. Gutted/total renov upr apt. 2 br,1 ba 1.5 blk fr Canal St. Hdwd flrs, cer tile, w/d, blt-in appl, sec sys. $1200/ mo/dep. Avl 8/1. 504-455-5411.

Upstairs, 1 bedroom, liv rm, din rm, kit w/ appls incld, front porch. $750/ month. Call 504-606-1845

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ liv rm sep Din, King Master, no Pets, no Sect 8, $699 & $824 • 504-236-5777

METAIRIE TOWERS

AMAZING RENOVATION

51


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2010 PC LLC

52

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Online Classifieds

now on bestofneworleans.com upgrade your ad to print in front of

112,000 Gambit Weekly readers CALL (504) 483-3100 TODAY.


DESCRIPTION OF CHANGE:

NEW CREATIVE PLEASE BEGIN RUNNING:

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BAMBOO Spa PLEASE DESTROY OLD AD COPY

CLIENT: PUBLICATION: AD SIZE: POSITIONING: AD REP: EMAIL PDF TO: PUBLICATION ISSUE DATE: AD DEADLINE:

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

looking for sexy

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES NEW lISTING

• 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,500,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,679,000 (3 bdrm w/pkg) $429,000 (Comm. w/pkg) $299,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

YOUR CONDO COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

54

1963-65 N. GAlVEz

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

3 YEARS NEW! Architect designed construction completed in 2008. One unit is 95% complete and occupied by owners, second unit needs finishing touches. Great opportunity for owner with rental or investor. Large units, solidly built. Foundation for guest cottage in rear. $150,000

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

4206-08 S. GAlVEz LARGE INVESTMENT DUPLEX. Centrally located in Broadmoor near Naoleon. Large duplex w/ 3 bdrms 2 baths in each unit. 1st floor flooded & gutted. 2nd floor needs work. Excellent opportunity for owner occupied or investment rental. $125,000

MICHAEL ZAROU

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


BULLETIN BOARD TOO CLASSIFIEDS CERTIFIED GRADE “A” TURF We beat all competitors! St Augustine (including Palmetto), Centipede Tifway Bermuda, Zoysia. The contractor’s choice for premium quality grass! Call DELTA SOD 504-733-0471

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STARVING STUDENT CONTEST DESIGN THE LOOK OF GAMBIT'S FALL RESTAURANT GUIDE AND WIN $500 IN LOCAL DINING GIFT CERTIFICATES. [ WINTER2007 ]

[ FALL2008 ]

[ WINTER2008 ]

CONTEST�OPEN�TO�HIGH�SCHOOL�AND�UNIVERSITY�STUDENTS

CONCEPT: DESIGN A COVER THAT VISUALLY REPRESENTS THE NEW ORLEANS DINING SCENE. GAMBIT’S ANNUAL FALL RESTAURANT GUIDE IS A COMPLETE DIRECTORY OF NEW ORLEANS RESTAURANTS LISTED BY NEIGHBORHOOD.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > AUGUST 10 > 2010

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55


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