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13

... NOT JUST HOW YOU BUMP AND GRIND IT

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

02

A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Named “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 7 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers”. www.wildlotusyoga.com 899-0047 DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430 Buying MIGNON FAGET Jewelry Rolex & Diamond Engagement Rings, CHRIS’ Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave, Met. Call 504-833-2556 BELLY DANCING CLASSES FUN, FANTASTIC & ALWAYS SASSY 7 wk sessions start, Wed 10/6. Beg: 6-7pm, Open Level 7:10-8:10pm. Instructor Betty Karam, jdkaram@tulane.edu 897-0432 or meryl@nojcc.org 897-0143. BANKRUPTCIES & WILLS DIVORCE from $350 + costs DWI & TRAFFIC TULANE AVE LAW CENTER Stein, Glaser, Smith and Assoc 2735 Tulane Ave (across fr Criminal Courts) (504) 822-4488 Free Consultation & Parking

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2010

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

7:00p m–8:30p m LITTLE RIVER BAND 9:30p m–11:00p m REO SPEEDWAGON

5:00p m–6:30p m 7:30p m–9:00p m 10p m–11:30p m

3:00p m–4:30p m AMANDA SHAW & THE CUTE GUYS 5:00p m–6:30p m THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND 7:30p m– 9:00p m BLAKE SHELTON

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9 GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

5:00p m–6:30p m 8:00p m–9:30p m

THE VETTES SISTER HAZEL

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ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m 8:15p m–9:15p m

AL LIL FATS JACKSON BAG OF DONUTS LOUIS PRIMA JR.

OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9

THE RADIATORS

THE TEMPTATIONS REVIEW FEAT. DENNIS EDWARDS

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

4:00p m–5:30p m MYNAMEISJOHNMICHAEL 6:00p m–7:30p m DASH RIP ROCK 8:30p m–10:00p m SOUL ASYLUM

3:30p m–5:00p m THE WISEGUYS 6:00p m–7:30p m JOHNNY SKETCH & THE DIRTY NOTES 8:30p m–10:00p m BONERAMA

4:00p m– 5:30p m WAYNE TOUPS & ZYDECAJUN 6:00p m–7:30p m TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE 8:00p m–9:15p m IRMA THOMAS

MARKET STAGE: FIRST NBC & IESI & BOOMTOWN® CASINO

BOBBY LENERO THE YAT PAC

R. SCULLY & ROUGH 7 BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION LOS LOBOS

MARKET STAGE: FIRST NBC & IESI & BOOMTOWN® CASINO

RIVERFRONT STAGE:

RIVERFRONT STAGE:

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m

THE TOPCATS BUCKTOWN ALLSTARS THE FRANKIE FORD SHOW

2:00p m–2:45p m 3:00p m–4:30p m 5:00p m–6:30p m 7:00p m–8:30p m

ABDULLA THE TENT MAKER ALEX McMURRAY BAND PAUL SANCHEZ ROLLIN ROAD SHOW

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m

JUNIOR & SUMPTIN SNEAKY BIG AL CARSON

4:30p m–6:30p m 4:30p m–6:30p m

KIRK JOSEPH’S 504 BRASS BAND

2:30p m–4:00p m 4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

BOBBY LENERO CARLO DITTA THE YAT PAC

ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

KIM CARSON KYLE TURLEY BAND LUTHER KENT

FESTIVAL GROUNDS

5:00p m–7:00p m 5:30p m–7:30p m

ALGIERS BRASS BAND

4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m 8:00p m–9:00p m

BOBBY LENERO THE YAT PAC LOUIE PRIMA JR.

THE WILD MAGNOLIA MARDI GRAS INDIANS

ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

15 Daily Admission $40 Weekend Pass

$

TICKETS ONLINE AT

www.gretnafest.com

ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY

CHUBBY CARRIER & THE BAYOU SWAMP BAND

FIRST STREET STAGE: PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK TOMMY MCCLAIN, WILLIE TEE & THE CYPRESS BAND

FESTIVAL GROUNDS

CREOLE WILD WEST MARDI GRAS INDIANS

ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

October 1, 2 & 3 2010

FREE PEDESTRIAN FERRY SHUTTLE FROM CANAL ST.

Free Parking At 3rd & Derbigny Free Parking & Shuttle: From Oakwood Shopping Center (Westbank Expressway) From Westside Shopping Center (Stumpf Blvd. & Westbank Expressway) Carnival Rides | Arts & Crafts | Over 100 Food items

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

6:00p m–7:30p m 8:00p m–9:30p m

GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

2:30p m–3:30p m 4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

4:00p m–6:00p m JIMMY THIBODEAUX BAND OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: 6:30p m–8:00p m VIEUX CARRE FEAT. RACHEL FLEETWOOD FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY 9:00p m–10:30p m CREOLE STRING BEANS 3:00p m–4:30p m BENNY GRUNCH & THE BUNCH 5:00p m–6:30p m CHICKEN ON THE BONE FIRST STREET STAGE: PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK 7:00p m–8:30p m AARON FORET 4:00p m–5:30p m AUSTIN SICARD & THE MEDICS 9:00p m–10:30p m SHAMARR ALLEN 6:00p m–7:30p m SKEETER THOMASSIE’S SWAMP POP ALLSTARS FIRST STREET STAGE: 8:00p m–9:30p m DANNY ALEXANDER BLUES BAND PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK 3:00p m– 4:30p m CLARK KNIGHTEN & 4X4 CONNECTION BAND FESTIVAL GROUNDS 5:30p m–7:00p m RYAN FORET & THE FORET TRADITION 5:00p m–7:00p m STORYVILLE STOMPERS BRASS BAND 8:00p m–9:30p m LITTLE FREDDIE KING 5:30p m–7:30p m CREOLE WILD WEST MARDI GRAS INDIANS ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9

03


>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A>.M. > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI. PUBLISHER

MARGO DUBOS

8131 Hampson St. • 866-9666 Open til 8pm Thurs • St. Charles Streetcar

#43

a great place to watch the games! 10 TVs, NFL PACKAGE, ½ Price Bud Light Pitchers, $10 Corona Buckets & FREE SAUZA SHOTS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 37

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES

Cover story

17

Heroin: It’s back, it’s more lethal and five dollars’ worth gets you high. A look at the problem among New Orleans teenagers

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

9

Bigfooting the Quarter New Orleans know-it-all

Crude and crustaceans: A day in Morgan City at the annual Shrimp and Petroleum Festival

17

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

C’est What?

9

Scuttlebutt

9

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll

MAKE NACHO MAMA'S YOUR HOME FOR THE BLACK & GOLD + YOUR FAVORITE COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAM!

From their lips to your ears

25

Gambit Picks

25

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

27

Cuisine

47

CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

24

VIEWS Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

13

Clancy DuBos / Politics

15

Tackle football turns Rose into a soccer mom Forward New Orleans and Mitch Landrieu

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT The annual New Orleans Burlesque Festival brings the bump ’n’ grind back to town

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

04

Best bets for your busy week Reviews of some new music

Menu Guide FEATURING: TAKEOUT - DELIVERY & DINE - IN MENUS

11am-10pm Sun - Thurs · 11am-11pm Fri & Sat

Ian McNulty on Mike’s on the Avenue 5 in Five: 5 standout places for crabmeat Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

The Puzzle Page

FILM ART A

SPECIAL

ADVERTISING

62

PULL-

OUT

SECTION

58

GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC

www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com

STAGE

EVENTS

28 34 36 39 42

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

Employment

Stud Rocker Boots

Weekly Tails

Real Estate / Rentals Mind / Body / Spirit

UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5 FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com

A&E News

Spa Reina

GENTILLY: NOW OPEN 6325 Elysian Fields Ave. 286-1805 UPTOWN ELMWOOD 3242 Magazine 1000 S Clearview 899- 0031 736-1188

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR DORA SISON SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ INTERN MARK WAGUESPACK

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERN SARAH SOLOMON

Shoptalk /Shopping News

23

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, CHRIS ROSE, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS NICOLE CARROLL, MORGAN RIVERA

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

52

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MARY LOU NOONAN 483-3122 ········maryloun@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com SARAH BEARDEN 483-3124 ········sarahb@gambitweekly.com

MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN WEBSITE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

53

WEB SITE MANAGER

53

Gambit Communications, Inc.

54 55

MARIA BOUÉ

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in The Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


s Entertainment Serie FLEUR DE TEASE

featuring Trixie Minx Saturday, September 18 9:30pm & 11pm

Boomerssm

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

SEP 15 Mutzie

SEP 22 Jayson Cross

SEP 29 Alysia Wood

OCT 6 The Disgruntled Clown

THURSDAYS KARAOKE • 8:30pm–9:30pm - LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm–1:30am LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

SEP 16 Junior & Sumtin Sneaky SEP 30 Foret Tradition

SEP 23 Chris LeBlanc OCT 7

Swing Dancing with Johnny Angel

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC & TRIBUTE BANDS • 9:30pm–1:30am

SEP 17 The BonJourney’s OCT 1 Video DJ

38 Special SEP 24 (Tickets start at $25) OCT 8 Private Event

SATURDAYS SEP 18

Fleur De Tease featuring Trixie Minx

OCT 2 Video DJ

SEP 25

Cyril Neville & Nevillution

OCT 9 BJ Thomas

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

VARIETY • 9:30pm-1:30 am

05


Blaine Kern PEOPLES HEALTH CHAMPION

This y! da s r u h T

®

“I was 53 years old 30 years ago, and I am having more fun and am more creative than I’ve ever been in my life.”

with Special Guest

– Blaine Kern –

Village People

On October 31, 2008, at age 80, Blaine Kern, Sr. unveiled his campaign to establish New Orleans as America’s premier Halloween destination.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

Blaine saw a new opportunity for the magic and mystery of the Crescent City, already world-renowned for Mardi Gras, jazz, cuisine and more. With its ancient cemeteries, towering oaks and legends of ghosts and voodoo, New Orleans is the perfect setting for the world’s greatest Halloween party. And who better to transform Halloween into a three-day extravaganza than artist and businessman, “Mr. Mardi Gras” himself—Blaine Kern.

06

Blaine is a visionary, a man who sees opportunity everywhere he looks. Now, grounded by a lifetime of experience and success, Blaine’s ever-growing roster of projects has become more grandiose than ever before. His current projects include building a city within a city along the river in his beloved Algiers, putting hydrokinetic generators in the Mississippi River as a source of clean energy, rebuilding his river-spanning gondola introduced at the 1984 World’s Fair and of course, making New Orleans synonymous with Halloween. Blaine’s vision for Halloween will connect many of our city’s seasonal favorites, such as Voodoo Fest, Boo at the Zoo and some of the world’s most elaborate (and scary!) haunted houses. Blaine’s Krewe of Halloween will complete the experience with celebrity vampires and ghouls at a Monster Bash and a “spooktacular” parade rolling through the “Boo Carre” and downtown New Orleans. At age 83, Blaine is a high-powered bundle of energy and ambition with a daily schedule that would exhaust a teenager. Busier and more productive than ever before, Blaine truly shatters the myth that growing older means slowing down. And if you don’t believe us, ask him yourself… that is, if you can get him to slow down enough for you to catch up. Blaine Kern… Peoples Health Champion.

www.peopleshealth.com/champions The Peoples Health Champions program demonstrates the excellence that comes through life experience by recognizing exceptional achievement after age 65.

2010 Peoples Health Champions Selection Committee Joe Cook, WVUE-TV Fox 8 David Francis, The Times-Picayune Ben Hales, New Orleans Saints Angela Hill, WWL-TV Channel 4 Kip Holden, Baton Rouge Government Donna Klein, Peoples Health

David Manship, The Baton Rouge Advocate Karen Carter Peterson, LA State Senate Mark Singletary, New Orleans CityBusiness Carol Solomon, Peoples Health Jim Tucker, LA House of Representatives

SEPTEMBER 16TH

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER Tickets available at the MJT Box Office, ticketmaster.com and all ticketmaster outlets or call 800.745.3000

KCSBONLINE.COM

MAHALIAJACKSONTHEATER.COM

LOBSTER NIGHT

EVERY THURSDAY!

with salad and a side dish, $25 RESERVATIO N S R EC O M M E N D ED

COOLINARY SPECIAL

JOIN THE BOMBAY CLUB THIS SUMMER,

3 COURSES FOR $25!

WED • THUR • SUN 5-10PM FRI • SAT 5-7PM

1ST

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

2ND COURSE CHOOSE ONE

3RD

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

APPLE,BRIE & WALNUT SALAD

ENGLISH STOUT Braised Beef Shepherd’s Pie with Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

SOUP DU JOUR

FRIED CALAMARI

CURRY & CITRUS STEAMED MUSSELS

ENGLISH STYLE FISH & CHIPS

CREOLE CARLBONARA LINGUINE

BAKED STUFFED LOUISIANA SHRIMP

with Fresh Cut Fries & Apple-Jalapeño Tartar Sauce

Chicken, Andouille, Asparagus, Garlic, Cream & Cheese

stuffed with Crabmeat, $30 with Sautéed Spinach and Choron Sauce

PRALINE CRÈME BRULEE

ASSORTED ICE CREAM

BREAD PUDDING

Subject to availability • Not available with any other promotions No substitutions, please

The Bombay Club Restaurant & Martini Bistro 830 Conti Street | New Orleans, LA 70112 | 504.586.0972 1.800.699.7711 | Validated Parking Available (Corner of Iberville & Dauphine)


commentAry

thinking out loud

Bigfooting the Quarter

A

merchants near the square, they were neither consulted about nor informed of the plans until scaffolds began going up. It was up to groups like French Quarter Citizens to cobble together information to share with their neighbors — until the day before the event, when Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s office issued an official “clarification” of street closures and no-parking zones. That was much too late. Ryan Berni, a Landrieu spokesman, admitted there were “hiccups” in the process but noted that tourism is “a perception-driven business” and called the spectacle “a three-hour infomercial for the city.” Shelley Waguespack, president of the French Quarter Business Alliance, echoed Berni’s sentiments: “The NFL has made it very clear they love coming to New Orleans and it’s important [that] all of us — businesses and residents —

skinny

bootcut

jegging

straight

clothes + accessories

maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

7732

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The new Champions Square, outside the Superdome, would have been tailor-made for the NFL’s affair.

reciprocate that feeling that we want them here, too.” Indeed we do want the NFL here, but our welcome doesn’t have to involve bigfooting the French Quarter, a delicate architectural area where we don’t even allow our own Mardi Gras floats to roll. The new Champions Square, outside the Superdome, would have been tailormade for the NFL’s big show. As for communicating with the public, the Landrieu Administration’s first big event, the mayoral inaugural, was a model of how a large public event can and should be staged — behind the scenes as well as on the ground. Clearly this administration knows how to pull it off. The next time the NFL comes to town (Super Bowl 2013 if not, we hope, before) let’s use some of those same skills to show off the city in a way that also respects the locals who keep the French Quarter going all year long.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

long with the Minnesota Vikings, the “Krewe of NFL” came to town last week. That was the informal name for the pre-game TV show/parade on Decatur Street on Sept. 9, which was as Disney-slick as the game itself was bumpy. The National Football League stages an annual production in honor of the reigning Super Bowl champs on the league’s opening night. Last year it was held in Pittsburgh’s Point State Park. In 2008, the venue was New York’s Columbus Circle. Both are appropriate sites for huge crowds and loud bands. While we share everyone’s enthusiasm for the Saints’ winning ways and the tremendous positive publicity the NFL “krewe” brought to New Orleans for last week’s season opener, Decatur Street and Jackson Square were not the best venue for the made-for-TV spectacle. Sadly, both the city and the NFL fumbled the ball preparing French Quarter residents and merchants for the huge event. Beginning a week before, a mammoth stage was constructed at Washington Artillery Park across from Jackson Square, pointing not toward Woldenberg Park but toward St. Louis Cathedral, speakers at the ready to blast the music of Taylor Swift and the Dave Matthews Band into the historic Quarter. Huge banners spanned Decatur Street promoting Verizon, Motorola and other companies (many of the floats were sponsored by soft-drink and candy makers). Tickets to Jackson Square were mostly reserved for dignitaries. Average New Orleanians had to sign up for a ticket lottery on a website, which referred to spectators as a “casted audience.” Because the area was restricted to adults over 18, families were shut out. In sum, this was not really a “New Orleans” event. It was a television “big event” — albeit one that rolled without a hitch, showed off the city to great advantage, and will go a long way toward dispelling the bafflingly pervasive notion that the city is still in ruins. New Orleanians welcome TV and movie professionals and accept the occasional inconvenience, but the scale of last week’s event was just too big for that site. Tens of thousands of people can fit into Columbus Circle. Not so in Jackson Square. Residents and merchants in the Vieux Carre are accustomed to the hurly-burly of street festivals, live music and parades. It comes with the territory. This was something different: a nearly weeklong closure along much of Decatur Street and the area around Jackson Square. Unlike a standard TV production, no one compensated affected merchants for lost business. Though the city met with the French Quarter Business Association, plans didn’t filter down to ground level. According to

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SHIRLEY STILLS

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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DEAR SHIRLEY, It’s true. Gilbert Academy was one of New Orleans’ first church-run boarding schools for African Americans and stood on a 4-acre site on St. Charles Avenue where De La Salle and the Jewish Community Center stand now. The Methodist Church operated the school, which was founded in 1865 as an orphanage for the children of deceased slaves who fought for the Union in the Civil War. It originally was located in the Soule Mansion on Esplanade Avenue, which was confiscated during the war. The orphanage was moved to a plantation on Bayou Teche near Franklin, La., later in 1865, after a court ordered all confiscated Confederate properties to be returned to their owners. In Franklin, the facility was expanded to include a school for the orphans and was named Gilbert Academy in honor of William L. Gilbert, a Connecticut philanthropist who donated $50,000 (and included a $40,000 endowment in his will) to bolster the school’s mission of preparing young African Americans for college and careers. By 1870, the school had expanded into an agricultural and industrial college for recently emancipated slaves, and the name was changed to Gilbert Academy and Agriculture College. In 1919, Gilbert Academy merged with New Orleans University and the two shared the latter’s large, tree-shaded campus on St. Charles Avenue. New Orleans University merged with Straight College in 1930 to become Dillard University, and Gilbert Academy inherited the entire Uptown campus, which included collegegrade facilities, a dormitory building and several other structures.

Gilbert Academy students recane chairs, weave baskets and perform other handcrafts for the National Youth Administration, a work-study program of the Roosevelt Administration in the 1930s and ’40s.

Gilbert Academy was considered the premier private college preparatory school for blacks in the city. It became the first four-year high school for black youth to be accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools (it got an “A” rating), and 16 students in the school’s first graduating class received academic scholarships to colleges. Among its alumni are former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young, poet/ writer Tom Dent, musician Ellis Marsalis, civil rights attorneys Lolis Elie and Robert Collins, and track star Audrey “Mickey” Patterson, the first black woman to win an Olympic medal. The Methodist Church quit funding Gilbert Academy in 1949, and the school closed. The land was sold to the Archdiocese of New Orleans for $312,000 that same year, and Gilbert Academy’s main building and some other structures were demolished to make way for De La Salle High School, a Catholic school for boys. De La Salle is now coed. Dillard University has kept the legacy of Gilbert Academy alive at its William L. Gilbert Academy for Young Emerging Scholars, a six-week summer residential program that each year helps 80 middle and high school students from across the country prepare for college. Correction — Ol’ Blake is starting to show his age, my dear readers. In last week’s column on the legendary Huey Long, I erroneously listed Winnsboro, La., as the Kingfish’s birthplace. It was Winnfield, La., of course. My humble apologies.


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scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I had one guy say to me, ‘Tell Peyton thanks so much for throwing that interception.’ I’ve told a few guys to do some things that are — uh — humanly impossible.” — Archie Manning, on life as a Manning during the offseason.

FROM KENNEL TO CAGE

Crude and Crustaceans MORGAN CITY CELEBRATES ITS 75TH ANNUAL SHRIMP AND PETROLEUM FESTIVAL — WHAT ORGANIZERS CALL ITS BEST YEAR EVER. BY ALE X WOODWARD

T

PHOTO BY ALEX potentially threatening WOODWARD local jobs and revenue. This may have been the festival’s best year yet. Festival organizers estimate about 125,000 people visited Morgan City over the Labor Day weekend. “It’s mind-boggling,” says Lee Darce, assistant festival director and vendor chairwoman. “Add an exclamation point.”

IT’S RAINING ON THE FESTIVAL’S FINAL DAY, MONDAY, Sept. 6, Labor Day. Festival director Lee Delaune sits in his office at the Shrimp and Petroleum Festival building at 715 Second St., waiting for the rain to slacken, and

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Should the city make the proposed charter change to put NORD into the hands of a public-private partnership?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

Catholic Charities and the Home Builders Association

of Greater New Orleans partnered for a fundraiser to benefit Louisiana fishermen and families affected by the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and BP oil disaster. The organizations will raffle white shrimp boots designed and autographed by Saints coach Sean Payton and chefs John Besh and Emeril Lagasse, among others, during the inaugural New Orleans Home + Interior Design Show Sept. 17-19 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

Harold Baquet,

Loyola University’s photographer since 1989, was awarded the school’s highest honor, the President’s Medal, at the university’s fall 2010 President’s Convocation last month. Baquet has documented incoming and outgoing classes at Loyola for 21 years and the campus’ damage and renewal following Hurricane Katrina and the floods of 2005, as well as many other historical views of New Orleans.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu

announced this month a new policy for city employees with take-home cars. It will eliminate 464 automobiles from the city’s fleet. Municipal departments, the City Council and the DA’s office now have 59 cars (down from 179), and public safety lost 344 vehicles. The total city reduction went from 758 cars to 414. In a statement, Landrieu’s office said the cuts will help correct the city’s $79 million budget hole left by Ray Nagin.

Dan Hampton,

NFL Hall of Famer with the Chicago Bears, told the Pro Football Weekly radio show that the Minnesota Vikings, en route to New Orleans for last Thursday’s match against the Saints, should “hit that town like Katrina.” Hampton later apologized, saying it was a “spur-of-the-moment” comment meant to be a metaphor for intensity, and that he was “horrified” anyone would make the connection between his words and the “terror Katrina wrought.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

wo seemingly rival industries — shrimping and oil — co-headline St. Mary Parish’s biggest event of the year, and Morgan City is the host. In light of BP’s Gulf oil disaster — gushing oil from a mile below the sea and strangling fishing industries — the Shrimp and Petroleum Festival is a paradox. But the parish usually thrives because of both industries, and in Morgan City, that marriage is celebrated. There is little to no anger directed toward BP and fellow industries by those who attend the Morgan City festival. (In fact, BP’s name and trademark logo are attached to a sign above a children’s play area.) Instead, anger is directed at President Barack Obama, who authorized a deepwater drilling moratorium during the summer,

BP co-sponsored this year’s Shrimp and Petroleum Festival in Morgan City. Other sponsors for the 75th annual event included Shell and Murphy Oil.

Mike Spears, a Lafayette businessman and political independent who’s running against Republican David Vitter for his U.S. Senate seat, challenged the senator on Sept. 8 to a martial-arts cage wrestling match at the Cajundome “to restore the honor of Louisiana and this nation as well.” Vitter, who easily dispatched his two Republican challengers in the Aug. 28 primary, is the frontrunner in polls and in fundraising. Spears was among his opponents the night before at a forum at Loyola University, at which Spears claimed Vitter “admitted he broke the law” at a press conference after Vitter’s phone number was connected with the records of Deborah Jeane Palfrey, the infamous and nowdeceased “D.C. Madam.” Spears, who owns a website design firm, made waves in Louisiana GOP circles in April when he announced his intention to take on Vitter, running as an independent and “constitutional conservative.” At the time, his announcement was carried in many state newspapers and he was interviewed on several radio programs. He told Gambit at the time, “I am running as an independent, not as a representative of the Tea Party. What I am saying is that my ideals and beliefs are consistent with the Tea Party, and it’s an affiliation I’m proud to say I’m a part of.” Omitted from Spears’ website and resume at the time was

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then he’ll grab his straw hat and something from the Jolly Trolley. It’s Delaune’s fourth year as festival director, and he says this is the best one since he took office, and may be the best one yet. Despite the devastating oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico and its numerous detriments — even after the well was capped — BP and the oil disaster aren’t on anyone’s lips. Instead, it’s petroleum and seafood. Lots of it. Even in the months following the disaster attacking the Gulf Coast, when every politician and business outpaces the next by trying to distance themselves from BP and Big Oil, Morgan City is giving BP and the industry a public, fiveday-long high five in front of thousands of visitors. In fact, the oil disaster didn’t even cause a hiccup in the festival’s arrangements, even as organizers planned for the monumental 75th anniversary. There was no question the event would be held this year. (Billboards on Highway 90 read, “Yes, We Are Having” with a festival logo underneath) The biggest hurdle, Delaune says, was deciding whether to construct a second stage for musicians. (He opted for just one.) BP coincidentally was one of this year’s sponsors, providing the festival with $5,000 and a children’s play area. If anything, organizers are happy the well is capped and shrimpers are able to supply crustaceans to the festival, which pays tribute to St. Mary Parish and offers a distraction from lost jobs and a long, painful summer. The parish has a population of 50,000, and many of its residents work in the headlining industries. Media flocked to the event (“We all know it’s from the spill,” Darce says), which usually draws thousands of visitors with little press outside of the The Daily Review of Morgan City, The TriParish Times in Houma and maybe The Times-Picayune. Darce says the media wanted to know, “How you can celebrate the two (industries),” especially in the wake of the oil disaster? “I think they got it,” she says. “We celebrate the workers — the people who support and participate in both industries. It’s the fabric of our community, our area. It’s just the way we are. And let me tell you, they did pass a good time.” MOrGAn CITY HELD THE InAuGurAL festival in 1936, but it wasn’t much of a fete but rather an impromptu street parade celebrating the arrival of the first shrimp harvest of the season. Dock workers, shrimpers and alligator trappers partied in the streets. The


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Morgan Festival queen Lani City’s Cafe Jo Marie Bergeron Jo’s opened (left) toasts king Al in 2002, but Adams III during a this is its boat parade prefirst year as ceding the blessing a vendor at of the fleet. the festival. “The turnout was incredible, weather was beautiful, I couldn’t have asked for more,” says owner Brian Blanchard. Karen Thompson of Karen and Greg’s Pistolettes from College Station, Texas, was invited to the festival and sells shrimp remoulade-stuffed pistolettes. “Everything was wonderful,” she says after dusting powdered sugar on a honey-stuffed pistolette. Grilled sausage segues to scented homemade candles and cypress rocking chairs, wooden cars, and guns that shoot rubber bands. But at the end of the overpass, Oceaneering displays a remoteoperated vehicle (ROV) used on the sea floor to monitor the oil leak at the site of the Deepwater Horizon rig. “That created a magnitude of interest for everybody,” Delaune says. “They didn’t sell anything, they just gave information. They want to come back. That’ll give the oil industry some more representation. People are interested.” Delaune says he’s not sure how he’ll outdo this year’s festival for the 2011 event. But he’s certain of one thing: “Oh, I’ll get that second band stage. It will happen.” AS HIGHwAy 90 LEADS OUT OF MORGAN City, passing BP headquarters, there are billboards for offshore injury attorney Patrick yancey, International Construction Group and International Marine. They’re hiring, the signs read, with text superimposed above an image of an offshore oil rig.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

tradition continued until 1967, when the oil industry, now an economic behemoth for the region, implanted itself, thus dubbing the event the Shrimp and Petroleum Festival. The state continues to honor the anniversary from the first event, making it the oldest harvest festival in Louisiana. Celebrating its 150th year, the city produced the first offshore oilrig in the ’40s and honors the groundbreaking discovery by displaying it on the neutral ground of Brashear Avenue, a main thoroughfare bordering its historic downtown district. The city has a sense of humor — there’s a Blowout Lounge in its downtown, and the festival’s logo is a hard hat-wearing shrimp climbing an offshore oil rig. The festival’s main event is the blessing of the fleet. On Sunday, Sept. 5, a boat procession paraded Berwick Bay, with Holy Cross Catholic Church’s Rev. Danny Poche performing the 75th annual blessing. This year’s theme was “Honoring Our Hometown Heritage,” the Marine Corps Marching Band performed “The Star Spangled Banner” and the Air Force National Guard flew over the procession. From the bow of the Lil’ Wilson, this year’s Shrimp and Petroleum Queen Lani Marie Bergeron toasted the king, Al Adams III, from the Miss Vickie. The festival stretches just a few blocks, from Lawrence Square Park to the Highway 90 overpass. In the park, the Kiwanis Club sells daiquiris, Mount Zion Baptist Church sells fried fish, and the Louisiana Lottery offers tourist information. Under the overpass, hundreds swarm carnival rides, some breaching the lip of the bridge above them. In the food area, the sounds and smells of sizzling grills and bubbling fryers accompany giant placards for hamburgers, blooming onions, chicken on a stick and shrimp served every way: in cakes, wrapped in bacon and stuffed in po-boys.

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his second career as “The Dog Designer,” in which he created five-figure custom canine couture like “The Little Socialite Collection” for Yorkies and other pocket pooches. When Gambit reported on the side business, Spears said he had put aside the company, Molle Teche, when the recession hit. (The Molle Teche website is now defunct.) In April, he told Gambit, “I have seen a lot of commentary from the strong Vitter supporters, and the feeling is: ‘Finally. Wow. We have a choice.’” But the revelation about his dog-design business may have hurt Spears, whose public profile sputtered quickly after an initial flurry of interest. On his most recent filing with the Federal Election Commission, Spears had received only $9,410 in individual contributions — less than half the money required to buy “The Queen’s Obsession,” his own custom-made, four-poster dog bed with a Swarovski crystal chandelier. — Kevin Allman

Politically Vocal

Singing politicians are nothing new in Louisiana. Gov. Jimmie Davis famously co-wrote the standard “You Are My Sunshine,” which became the official state song in 1977. Kaplan-born country music star Sammy Kershaw, who released his first album in 1991 and was named to the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2008, is running in the Oct. 2 primary for lieutenant governor, and his 11th album, Better Than I Used To Be, will be released at the end of August. Kershaw wrote or co-wrote the two songs at the beginning and end of the album (“That Train” and “Takin’ the Long Way Home”), while the rest are by other songwriters, most notably “The Cover of the Rolling Stone,” which was written by Shel Silverstein and became a hit for Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show in 1972. While Kershaw’s platform hews closely to the pro-gun, pro-life, opposite-sex marriage line of the GOP, much of it is also concerned with attracting entertainment business to the state through tax credits and cultural tourism. “If financial gains could be produced in Louisiana, record labels and producers would set up shop here,” he writes. “Dating back to the days of the Louisiana Hayride, there is no doubt that the music industry is a part of who we are. We need to embrace this industry and allow it to find a home in our state.” If Kershaw wins, perhaps he can get a country music studio here in time for his follow-up album. According to its liner notes, Better Than I Used To Be was recorded entirely in Nashville. — Allman

RefoRm GRouP taRGets school BoaRd elections

The Council for A Better Louisiana (CABL), after passing a major piece of school board reform legislation this year, is taking its fight to the next level by focusing on school board elections across the state this fall. All Louisiana school board members outside Orleans Parish are up for election on Oct. 2, and CABL has added a new section to its website (www.cabl.org) to educate voters about the proper role of school board members, what to look for in a school board member, suggested questions to ask candidates for school board and more. The site also contains information about how each school district is performing compared to other districts in Louisiana. “School boards are incredibly important elected bodies that play a major role in the education our children receive while spending millions of public dollars,” CABL president Barry Erwin says. “Being a school board member is a big job and electing school board members is something voters should take seriously.” During the 2010 legislative session, CABL helped pass Act 720, which was designed to reduce “inappropriate interference” in personnel decisions by school board members. “Our school board elections initiative is an outgrowth of that effort,” Erwin says. “We want voters to be able to make informed decisions on Election Day, knowing important information about the role of an effective school board, their local school district’s performance, and where their school board candidates stand on improving education for all children.” — Clancy DuBos

leaGue VoteR Guide aVailaBle online

The League of Women Voters of New Orleans has released its nonpartisan candidate information guide for the fall elections. The guide, available online at www.lwvno.org, is a free service of the League, which produces a guide for all major elections. This year’s guide contains information about candidates for U.S. Senate, Congress (in Orleans and Jefferson parishes), lieutenant governor, Public Service Commission District 3, and all local races in New Orleans and Jefferson Parish. The information includes unedited biographies of candidates and their answers to questions posed by the League. The League also is placing informational flyers in area public libraries. — DuBos


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I watch the glow of my son’s eyes in the computer screen and slowly, a realization has come over him — has come over me — and it is this: Before this season is over, my kid is going to kick your kid’s ass. will ever need to know. And he laughed so hard he had tears in his eyes and I thought about telling him to have some respect — until I remembered that the first time I ever heard the name Dick Butkus, I nearly peed myself. I watch the glow of my son’s eyes in the computer screen and slowly, ever so slowly, a realization has come over him — has come over me — and it is this: Before this season is over, my kid is going to kick your kid’s ass. Ya hear me? He’s going to knock him down, stomp him into the mud, maybe even kick him in the head — but not on purpose. And then he’ll reach his hand out to help up your son before doing it to him all over again. Because Dick Butkus was a gentleman about things like that.

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t’s difficult to describe exactly what emotions run through a father’s head the first time his son straps on shoulder pads and a helmet, chomps down on a rubber mouthpiece, jogs out onto a football field and subsequently gets the crap knocked out of him by another kid he never saw coming. Truth be told, if I’d acted on my basest animal instincts when this happened at my son’s first football practice last week, I would have run out onto the field, pushed everyone away from my child, poked the other kid in the eyes and then gathered my son — my sweet baby James! — up in my arms, told the coach this has all been a terrible mistake and then filled the back seat and trunk of my car with Happy Meals and Topps football cards on the way home as my atonement for sending him into battle so unprepared. Tackle football is a lot different from flag. I guess I forgot to tell him that part. I don’t reckon that’s what my son would’ve wanted me to do, though. And I don’t suppose that would have been the best response as far as his self-esteem and playground cred would go. James is having the time of his life. He is 7, and his cuts and bruises are marks of distinction and pride, the initial carvings of alpha-maledom into his skin and psyche. To me, they are savage assaults against his beautiful skin. He’s my youngest, my precious, my baby. He is beautiful. And he really doesn’t like it when I say that. I have discovered that most 7-year-old boys in shoulder pads and helmets don’t, in fact, like to be called beautiful. And it just feels like it’s going to be a long, unendurable season, particularly with the painful, mortifying, damn-near-crippling realization of what has become of me: I’m a soccer mom. I hover. I fret. Here, I brought you some fruit. Are you sure you’ve got enough water? I swear to God, if I show up at practice with a folding chair, a latte and the latest issue of Town & Country, somebody, please: Just shoot me. When I was younger, I didn’t really have a great deal of official football instruction. Let’s just say I had issues with authority figures and leave it at that. So I just went with what felt natural. At home, I told him to put on his pads and we went outside and I started throwing a football at him as hard as I could, over and over. It started with the ball bounching off his face mask and off his shoulder pads and after a few sessions like this, he started catching them. All of them. Once we’d accomplished this lesson, I told James to put on his pads and asked his older brother and sister to come outside. Then I sat down on the stoop and

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High Marks for Mitch itch Landrieu’s honeymoon is in full bloom. This week, a reform-minded coalition formed during the run-up to the 2010 citywide elections will give him high marks on several key fronts. A year ago, Forward New Orleans (www.forwardneworleans.com) identified seven major areas in need of reform and pledged to hold the next mayor and City Council accountable for keeping their campaign promises. This week’s report is the first by the group since Landrieu was inaugurated. Forward New Orleans was formed by the Business Council of New Orleans and includes more than 30 civic, neighborhood and business organizations. The seven areas of concern are crime, blight, city finances, economic development, city services and infrastructure, city contracting and public education. In most areas of concern, Landrieu gets “good” or “satisfactory” marks. In one — blight — the group gives him a rating of “pending,” saying the new mayor needs more time to implement a comprehensive citywide blight program. Crime was one of Landrieu’s main focuses as a candidate, and it’s the issue

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that has garnered the most public attention since he took office. It’s also the issue to which Forward New Orleans dedicated the most attention in its report. “We commend the administration for conducting a national search for a police chief that yielded a highly qualified candidate,” the report states. “Superintendent [Ronal] Serpas is aligned in principle with our crime mandates.” The document goes on to commend Landrieu and Serpas for implementing specific strategies against violent crime, adopting performance metrics and public disclosure policies (including opening COMSTAT meetings to the public), and for seeking a lump-sum federal settlement for post-Katrina FEMA claims. In one of its few criticisms, the group notes that arrest, charging and incarceration policies “have improved and are trending in the right direction, but require further improvement. Initial policy changes on arrests are good, with progress in targeting violent and repeat offenders. However, there are still far too many arrests of nonviolent, misdemeanor, petty offenders when tickets and summons should be issued instead of arrests.”

‘We observe integrity in the commitments of our elected officials. We acknowledge the momentum of progress.’ — Forward New Orleans

Apparently the group was talked out of a bad grade during a meeting with Landrieu. “After meeting with the administration, we are persuaded that it is too soon to assess achievement of the blight mandates,” the group writes. “The administration has explained to us that it deemed 120 days a more appropriate time frame for preparing the strategic plan and that an announcement is coming within days.” The group noted Landrieu’s recent town hall meetings, during which he asked citizens to back him up in a forthcoming effort to attack blight — even if it means tearing down homes. “We will closely monitor this issue in the near term and assess progress in our next report, if not sooner,” the report says. In other areas, Forward New Orleans gives Landrieu high marks and concludes that its confidence in local leadership is growing. “We observe integrity in the commitments of our elected officials,” the report says. “We acknowledge the momentum of progress.” It’s been a long time since a business or reform group could say that about a New Orleans mayor.

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In recent weeks, Landrieu has been prepping for a big announcement about blight, but his plan hasn’t materialized yet. Forward New Orleans cuts him some slack on this issue, although it was initially dissatisfied with the administration’s performance. “Our dissatisfaction derived from the fact that we called for a strategic plan to issue within the first 60 days in office, and we have not yet observed the sort of comprehensive action plan that incorporates short and long term goals or objective benchmarks,” the report states.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010


B y M at t D av i s ’ve spent 11 months of the last two years in jail,” says Arun Rahman, who dropped out of one of the area’s most expensive private schools two years ago, in his senior year, to try to kick a heroin addiction. It didn’t work. Rahman, 20, talked to Gambit in late August, just four days out of a seven-month, court-ordered stay at the Narconon rehabilitation center in Baton Rouge. It cost his parents $36,000 to send the former National Merit Scholarship finalist there. Meanwhile, his older sister just graduated from Yale and is on a graduate placement in Paris. Rahman used to feel impatient — that he was missing out on many things because of his addiction. Rehab has helped him accept that he must move at his own pace, he says. Rahman left Benjamin Franklin High School after he was caught selling marijuana in the parking lot. “They (school officials) said they had the right to expel him, but ‘because we know he can

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make a new beginning, we’re not going to put it on his record,’” says Rahman’s mother, Zeenat Rasheed. “It was in the middle of exams, so they let him finish his exams and said, ‘Please just take him away.’” Rahman’s family did just that. He applied and was admitted to a private school, but his family did not tell the school of his drug history. His academic record earned him a scholarship, but the school had no inkling of Rahman’s drug problem. His mother admits they withheld that information from the school, which has a policy of expelling students who use or deal drugs on campus. No doubt that school would not have admitted Rahman had it known of his drug problems. Today, Rahman still looks like most high school kids, except for his three jailhouse tattoos — one, a cross, another naming a former girlfriend with whom he broke up because of his addiction, and page 19

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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the last, the sacred symbol for peace or “Om.” Even today, bright and articulate, dressed in high-top Nike sneakers, a Ralph Lauren polo shirt and toting a brand new iPhone 4, he hardly looks or seems like a heroin addict. Or does he? Rahman, who has overdosed three times, admits he is lucky to be alive. Schools and parents have responded with increased concern and some policy changes, but experts caution that a zero-tolerance message alone may not be enough. Two recent heroin deaths among young New Orleanians send a disturbing message about the renewed availability, popularity and dangers of the drug. High school students can now buy enough heroin to get high for hours for the price of a McDonald’s Happy Meal. Gambit investigated the local heroin problem by interviewing law enforcement officials, rehabilitation experts, school principals, parents and Rahman, a teenage heroin addict himself, to find out what can be done to stop more of the city’s youth from dying. The answer requires parents and schools to set aside their anxieties. Parents need to be bolder about talking to their kids about drugs, and schools need to stop being afraid to discuss their drug policies publicly. Most schools contacted in connection with this story, for example, refused to talk on the record for fear of being seen as “soft” on drugs or as “having a drug problem.” According to many experts, every high school has a “drug problem” at some level. Most simply choose not to confront or acknowledge it.

market. “This very potent Mexican heroin didn’t discriminate between white or black, gay, straight, uptown, downtown, or by age,” he says. A new heroin user in New Orleans can now get high for hours for just $5. A “20-bag,” or $20 worth of heroin, is enough to get a new user high for two days, Rahman says. By comparison, cocaine is more expensive than heroin. Half a gram of coke, chopped into four or five lines, costs about $30. Just one line of cocaine is enough for a new user to get high for an hour or so, for about $6 to $8 — but a half-gram of the drug is typically gone in a few hours. Many teens are turning to heroin for a cheaper, longer-lasting, more intense high. Bernazzani helped lock up the dealers responsible for the January 2008 death of Lusher High School student Maddy Prevost. She was one of seven people between the ages of 16 and 27 who died in New Orleans during a five-week period from using the drug. Supply lines and pricing are not the only aspects of heroin use that have changed in recent years. State lawmakers in 2002 reduced the sentence for heroin possession from life to five years, with the possibility of rehabilitation or probation. That was a stroke of luck for kids like Rahman. State Sen. Danny Martiny, R-Kenner, a conservative who has received awards from anti-crime groups, helped lead the drug-sentencing reform effort while a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives. Martiny says the idea was to provide parity in sentencing for “possession crimes” between heroin and other drugs while reducing the financial burden on the state for lifetime incarceration of addicts who could otherwise be treated. “I guess there are those who would argue that because of the change in the sentencing, we encouraged more people to use it,” says Martiny, who chairs a Senate committee that deals with criminal statutes. “But that wasn’t the intention at all.” Another new twist to contemporary heroin use is that young people are more likely to combine smoking the drug with abuse of prescription medications. “They really like the Adderall for attention deficit disorder,” NOPD’s Capt. Little says. “Pain pills, some opiates, tranquilizers — any time you’re doing pills in combination with heroin, it’s a lethal cocktail.” Statewide, seven people under the age of 18 have died from overdoses of opiates or opiate derivatives since 2005, according to statistics obtained from the Jefferson Parish Coroner’s Office. Those deaths coincide with a spike in adult heroin deaths after Katrina. Adult heroin deaths spiked from 25 in 2005 to 163 in 2006; they fell only slightly over the last three years to 111 in 2009. RAHMAN FIRST TRIED MARIJUANA AT 13. HE STARTed taking Vicodin, codeine and Ecstasy at 14. At 15 he tried cocaine, and by 16 he was selling it to finance a $100-a-day habit. At 17, he tried heroin — and didn’t look back. “I got a lot of people started on cocaine,” he says. “And then a few of my close friends tried heroin. Most of them realized it was stupid and stopped, but others weren’t so lucky. There were always

“I GOT A LOT OF PEOPLE STARTED ON COCAINE. AND THEN A FEW OF MY CLOSE FRIENDS TRIED HEROIN. MOST OF THEM REALIZED IT WAS STUPID AND STOPPED, BUT OTHERS WEREN’T SO LUCKY.” — ARUN RAHMAN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS HAVE BEEN PART OF NEW Orleans’ culture for years, and heroin use has been rife since the drug first arrived here a century ago, with the city initially seeking to regulate it via an ordinance in 1910. New Orleans piano player Champion Jack Dupre memorialized heroin addiction on his 1941 record “Junker Blues,” and William Burroughs’ semi-autobiographical book Junkie was written after the author moved here in the late 1940s because the drug was easier to obtain. More recently, Shannon Hoon of the band Blind Melon overdosed in his tour bus outside Tipitina’s shortly before he was supposed to perform in 1995. Nationwide, hero-

in has undergone a resurgence as a new generation of adolescents comes of age without memory of the celebrity heroin deaths that quelled the drug’s popularity in the mid-1990s. “Over the years, heroin has claimed the lives of many,” says a video in the lobby of the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Target America exhibition at the Old U.S. Mint on Esplanade Avenue. “Billie Holiday, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Sid Vicious, River Phoenix, John Belushi and Kurt Cobain.” Nirvana singer Cobain, the most recent celebrity death on that list (though not the most recent celeb to overdose on heroin), died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound while high on heroin in 1994. Today’s 18-yearolds never knew the shock that his suicide caused, and thus many may be more inclined to experiment with the drug that led to it. “Kids aren’t as afraid of heroin as they once were,” says Robyn Dewhirst, director of assessment and early intervention at the Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse (CADA) for Greater New Orleans. “The impression is that smoking it is no big deal, and the fear of becoming a proverbial junkie is just not there.” Instead of shooting heroin by injecting a cooked solution of the drug with a syringe, today’s teens are more inclined to begin by snorting it — inhaling lines of the powdered drug through their nostrils like cocaine, or smoking it in a variety of ways, says Dewhirst. Ingesting heroin that way reduces somewhat the risk of overdosing — but not the risk of addiction. And if heroin is combined with other drugs such as prescription tranquilizers or painkillers, the risk of overdosing can worsen. In terms of addictiveness, heroin ranks at the top of the list with crack cocaine. Crack is attractive to users wanting a lift in mood, while heroin is attractive to people with anxiety or racing thoughts who want to come down. “Heroin can be addictive from its very first use because it gives the absolute peace that people are seeking,” Dewhirst says. “And after that, people are always seeking that first high. It’s referred to as ‘chasing the dragon,’ or being ‘in the womb’ by addicts. It’s incomparable, when you’re talking to a heroin addict, that first heroin high.” Dewhirst adds that kids today don’t realize snorting heroin is as dangerous as shooting it up. “The thought is, ‘How much worse can it be than smoking pot or something like that?’” If they only knew. Local cops say heroin’s resurgence is worse in New Orleans right now than in other areas of the country. They attribute the drug’s prevalence here to Hurricane Katrina shaking up local drug distribution networks. “Prior to Katrina, there were very few conduits bringing in heroin from Houston,” says Capt. Bruce Little of the New Orleans Police Department’s Specialized Investigations Division. “Post-Katrina, there were a lot more people with a direct pipeline. Now the problem is that the heroin hasn’t been stepped on as much, so the purity is much higher and users have no idea of how potent it is.” Retired FBI Special Agent in Charge James Bernazzani, who led the bureau’s New Orleans office after Katrina, says the market was flooded with cheap, potent heroin as new dealers tried to gain a foothold in the

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

things I said I’d never do. Until eighth grade I said I’d never do weed. Then it was, ‘I’d never do pills.’ Then it was, ‘I’d never smoke crack.’ Then, ‘I’d never do heroin.’ Then, ‘I wouldn’t shoot it up.’” By age 17, says Rahman, he was injecting the drug every day, at school in the bathrooms, in the library when nobody was looking, in the bathroom of the coffee shop where he met with Gambit, and everywhere in between. “The kids I was in high school with who said they never would have done it, some of them are still doing it now. They’re sophomores in college,” Rahman says. “It’s just crazy that they would even have started. They come from good families. They’re rich, they have good friends, they did decently in high school. They all seemed so locked down.” Rahman expresses mixed emotions about how his heroin addiction has affected him and those around him — regret for things he has done as well as detachment from the past, so that he can look forward to being drug-free. Rahman also admits he was responsible for other kids using drugs. But,

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again, he expresses mixed feelings. “I used to think I was the one responsible for them using, but this last time when I went to rehab, I came out and a lot of those kids were way worse off than they were when I went in,” he says. Rahman’s mother says she was shocked to discover her son had a heroin problem. “Arun was the one who looked as though he was fine,” she says. “He always handled everything. His sister was the one who said, ‘I can’t cope, I can’t handle this.’ That’s a practical note to parents — always make sure that all your children are getting as much attention.” The recent heroin overdose of an 18-year-old high school graduate and reports on the heroin overdose of the son of a St. Tammany Parish judge renew concerns that may have been waning since Prevost’s death in 2008. The 18-year-old was expelled from a New Orleans Catholic high school near the end of his junior year, in March 2009, after he failed a drug test for marijuana as part of the school’s drug awareness and prevention program. The student later graduated from a Jefferson Parish

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public high school before overdosing on heroin in mid-July. “I guess he just got involved in the wrong crowd,” says a close friend, who knew him since fifth grade. “I knew he wasn’t on heroin long. Supposedly he wasn’t getting the good stuff, then he got some and it killed him.” The skeletal remains of 28-year-old Richard A. Swartz III, son of state district Judge Richard Swartz Jr., were discovered in Mississippi Aug. 8. A man arrested while driving Swartz’s car told police Swartz died in late July after overdosing on heroin bought in New Orleans. Judge Swartz did not respond to a request for comment. “MY SOPHOMORE YEAR, I SPENT LIKE three hours a day in the bathroom,” Rahman says. “I’d sit there and cut up lines of coke on the little toilet (paper) dispenser. And then before class, so I wouldn’t come down, I’d drink a gram of coke in some water or something.” Rahman says he would take advantage of free periods at school and forge notes from his mother so he could go out and get high or score drugs off

campus. “People just don’t think of heroin as [being] as big a thing as they used to,” he says. “Everyone I thought was cool was all right with it. I don’t want to sound stereotypical and say I did it because I wanted to feel cool, but in some sense it was, because it made me feel cool. I mean, that’s kind of lame, but there it is.” “I don’t think [the school] realized,” Rahman’s mother says of his high school. “They have a wonderful group of people there who talk to the kids about drugs and everything. I can’t blame the high school. I don’t want to look at it in the past. I want to say, ‘Since this is a problem, let’s look at it.’” Professor John Mason of Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine supervised research into the heroin-related deaths of high school and college students after the rash of overdoses in January 2008. He made some significant findings. “First, the problem isn’t only heroin in the schools, it’s that people don’t understand the danger of mixing it with other drugs,” Mason says.

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Heroin overdoses occur when the drug shuts down the respiratory center in a user’s brain, he says. That’s much more likely to happen when heroin is combined with a host of prescription medications, from antihistamines to tranquilizers. “Second, research suggests that the treatment for an overdose of this kind is relatively simple,” Mason says. “An injection of nalaxone, which goes by the brand name Narcan, will save a patient’s life. “Lastly, we need to let high school and college students know that it’s possible to save the life of a friend who may be overdosing,” Mason says. “We need to say, ‘If you’re worried about one of your friends, call this number.’ And we need to make sure they can do that in a way that assures them they won’t be prosecuted.” Which is where Mason’s research runs into a brick wall in New Orleans. “As you try to advise people on particularly risky behavior, you may inadvertently encourage the perception that mere risky behavior is acceptable, or less risky,” he says. And that’s a big no-no. The difficulty for parents and schools is how best to talk about drugs without encourag-

ing the perception that they expect teens to experiment with them. Many parents have grown accustomed to thinking their children were protected from the worst perils of drug addiction by social class or other demographic factors. For them, it boils down to this: Whether to discuss drug use at all, or to simply advocate for a “just don’t do it” blanket policy that leaves adolescents to figure things out for themselves. Most seem to choose the latter option, which Mason argues could be putting lives at risk. “I just think we’re ignoring the problem of drugs as a society and hoping it will go away and not affect us,” says Rahman’s mother. “There are drugs in the jails. These people are under our authority, so why are they there?” WHILE MOST HIGH SCHOOLS ADHERE TO A strict “zero tolerance” policy when it comes to alcohol and illegal drugs on campus or at school activities, many also have learned valuable lessons about drug education from the rash of heroin deaths in 2008. “Do I think we have a heroin problem at Lusher High School?” Principal Kathy

Reidlinger asks. “No. But after the jolt we had with Maddy Prevost, we put many things into place — both positive programs for kids, and pretty strict consequences for anybody who breaks the law.” Reidlinger adds that while Lusher students are unlikely to be exposed to heroin or drugs at the school, she believes all kids of high school age are increasingly being exposed to a wide range of risky behaviors outside school. The key, she says, is to focus on developing self-esteem and resistance to peer pressure. Lusher’s curriculum now includes extensive education about drug abuse, Reidlinger says. The school also has a proactive policy aimed at deterring drug use — and holding students accountable when they violate that policy. Kids at Lusher who are caught talking about drugs or making plans involving drugs are put on academic probation and given a health intervention and a second chance before expulsion. Kids caught using,

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possessing or selling drugs on campus are expelled and referred to the police. No doubt many public, private and parochial high schools in the area take a similar approach, but many are afraid even to discuss their drug policies — for fear they might be seen as having a “drug problem.” Gambit called more than 20 private and Catholic high schools, as well as public school systems in New Orleans, in connection with this story. We asked each the same questions: Are you aware of any heroin use by students? How many drug-related expulsions have you had in the last school year? And what policies are in place concerning drug use by students? Eleven of the schools did not even return our calls, though many private and parochial high schools post their drug abuse policies on their websites. Of the high schools who spoke to Gambit for this story, zero-tolerance policies were claimed by Franklin, Academy of the Sacred Heart, Holy Cross, Jesuit, Brother Martin, Xavier University Preparatory High School, Mount Carmel and Immaculata. Even the term zero-tolerance can be nuanced, however. For example, most if not all schools will expel a student who brings drugs onto campus or to a school event, or who is caught manufacturing or selling drugs anywhere. However, a school’s zero-tolerance policy may also allow a student who has merely experimented with drugs once or twice off campus, or who is overheard talking about drugs, or who turns to school officials for help, to enter a program that combines random drug testing with appropriate levels of CADA-sponsored counseling and intervention. Once in the program, students are subject to random drug tests and can be expelled if they fail subsequent drug tests. Most schools also offer educational programs for parents as well as students. Many just don’t want to talk publicly about their efforts. Jesuit High School President Rev. Tony McGinn gives new Jesuit parents a blunt message about alcohol and drugs at the beginning of every academic year. In his

presentation, McGinn admonishes parents to forbid even casual beer drinking at home by their sons. He goes so far as to tell parents who serve beer at home to their own or other people’s sons to pull their boys out of Jesuit — and he will refund them a full year’s tuition. A copy of the speech is available as an MP3 on the school’s website (www.jesuitnola.org/jesdata/pdf/ Town%20Hall%20Meeting_FrMcGinnAudio.mp3). “They’re afraid of you,” McGinn says in last year’s speech. “They respect you, and we urge you to keep that relationship.” Many high schools post their student handbooks and drug policies online. Holy Cross High School’s website and handbook warn that any student who “manufactures, possesses, furnishes, uses or sells alcohol, narcotics, or any other illegal drugs, drug paraphernalia, or intoxicants at any time shall be subject to severe disciplinary action, including expulsion.” (www.holycrosstigers.com/handbook). The policy statement goes on to note that students’ lockers may be searched, students may be required to undergo drug testing, and students may be required to participate in professional assessment, treatment and testing programs in order to remain enrolled at the school. Brother Martin High School’s website and student handbook contain similar language. None of the Catholic high schools would speak to Gambit on the record for this story, however. Archdiocesan spokesperson Sarah Comiskey McDonald emailed all Catholic high schools in the area two weeks ago, repeating the questions posed by Gambit in its initial phone calls and asking them to respond to her so she could amalgamate their responses. As of Sept. 8, McDonald reported that only about half the schools had replied — despite a request from Archbishop Gregory Aymond that they cooperate with Gambit’s requests for information on school drug policies — and none disclosed expelling any students for drugs. Sources at several Catholic high schools later confirmed to Gambit privately that their institutions had expelled students in the previous academic year for drugs, but all refused to talk on the record. “Most have in place some form of random drug testing for students,” McDonald said of the Catholic schools’ policies. “Most high schools post their handbooks online either on the school website or through a parent portal such as Edline. Parents and students sign off on having read the handbook at the beginning of each school year.” Country Day, a private school in Old Metairie, has a policy of expelling any student caught supplying or using drugs at school, according to Upper School Principal Howard Barton. Students who are caught under the influence of drugs or alcohol are suspended for five days for a first offense, and expelled for a second offense, he says. “Like all schools, we take the welfare of our students very seriously,” Barton wrote in an emailed statement. Like many other schools, Country Day also offers counseling and educational opportunities for students with

chemical dependency issues. Louise S. McGehee, an all-girls private school in the Garden District, brings in outside professionals every year from Freedom from Chemical Dependency, an international nonprofit that has worked with schools for three decades to reduce drug abuse, to talk to students, parents and faculty. “We take seriously our responsibility to support our students in making good, healthy and lawful decisions,” says McGehee headmistress Eileen Powers. “Our substance abuse policy is clearly stated in our handbook, but perhaps more importantly, our policy is supported by a highly effective honor code that defines the culture of the school, close faculty-student relationships and a close line of communication with parents. … Being a small, all-girls school allows us to cultivate this positive school culture.” Among public schools, only Lusher and Franklin discussed details of their proactive drug education or counseling programs with Gambit. Franklin expelled two students last year for marijuana possession, says Principal Dr. Timothy Rusnak, one of the few principals to discuss drug-related expulsions in response to Gambit’s inquiry. Two students withdrew from Lusher last year for marijuana use, Reidlinger says. Meanwhile, the Recovery School District (RSD) reported it had expelled 68 of its 12,000 students last year for drugs, according to spokesman Ken Jones, who noted the RSD likewise has a zero-tolerance policy. Jones did not mention counseling or drug education in response to Gambit’s questions. The Orleans Parish School Board and the Algiers Charter Schools Association did not respond to Gambit’s requests for comment. IN ADDITION TO SCHOOL-BASED EDUCATIONAL AND counseling programs, parents need to watch their kids more carefully, says Tulane University Professor Peter Scharf, a colleague of Mason’s at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. “This is a social networking phenomenon. It’s like Facebook or Twitter,” Scharf says. “We need an early warning system not just for the Nancy Reagan shit about ‘Is your child smoking pot?’ but, ‘Is your child managing depression with a variety of street or prescription drugs?’ “The one rule I learned as a parent is that if they tell you they’re not doing something, they probably are.” Rahman admits as much. “We used to have this thing where we’d tell parents we’d done something less than what we’d done so they’d believe us if we got caught,” Rahman says. “Like we’d say we’d been drinking or smoking weed. So I was shooting heroin with this one girl and her mom caught us, and she said, ‘It’s OK, mom, I was just snorting some heroin.’ And in her state of mind, that made a weird sort of sense.” The girl’s mother hit the roof, of course. Her daughter didn’t mention that Rahman had been giving her CPR just moments earlier — in an effort to revive her from an apparent overdose.

“THE ONE RULE I LEARNED AS A PARENT IS THAT IF THEY TELL YOU THEY’RE NOT DOING SOMETHING, THEY PROBABLY ARE.” — PETER SCHARF, A PROFESSOR AT TULANE UNIVERSITY.


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MARTINI

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sHTo P aLK

BY MARY CROSS

SHOPPING NEWS BY BY MORGAN RIBERA LOVE JOY SPA & SHOP (200 Metairie Road, Metairie, 828-1997; www.lovejoyspa.com) offers 50 percent off manicures with a pedicure booking and 25 percent off facials and massages every Tuesday.

Everybody Loves Reyna ew Orleanians have the balance between work and relaxation down to a science, but venues for blowing off steam needn’t be limited to those with liquor permits. Since opening last December, Spa Reyna (5221 Magazine St., 899-4171; www.spareyna.com) has become an Uptown sanctuary for people looking to kick back and relax with some pampering. Whether customers seek a massage, pedicure, or the nail and skin expertise of owner Reyna Tabora, Spa Reyna provides refuge. After 15 years in the spa industry, Tabora opened her eponymous spa in the heart of Magazine Street, offering premium beauty services within a welcoming Greek Revival house. “You never feel like you’re being rushed or like you’re in a factory when visiting,” Tabora says. “It’s a social place where everyone who comes in knows each other. Everyone’s a friend.” Providing a personal, private experience is the ultimate priority for Spa Reyna’s employees, whose votes landed Spa Reyna among the top three “Best Places To Work Locally” in Gambit’s 2010 Best Of New Orleans poll. “We take our time with clients,” Tabora says. A wide array of massages, including classic deep tissue, Thai and warm stone, helps clients unwind. The almond pedicure nourishes and moisturizes tired feet with vitamin E and an infusion of sweet almond and jojoba oils. The “Immuni Tea” facial, which utilizes green, white and rooibos teas, along with the purifying power of guava and bamboo, staves off signs of aging. While Spa Reyna customizes services for individual clients, it also provides packages to accommodate birthday celebrations and bridal parties. Spa Reyna’s “Princess Party” for girls under 12 includes everything but a pair of glass slippers. While sipping punch and nibbling cookies, little princesses enjoy regal mini-manicures, pedicures and makeup applications. “We like to make everyone happy,” Tabora says.

NOLA FOOD DELIVERY (644-3512; www.nolafooddelivery.com) is now open and providing Uptown customers with deliveries from local restaurants that don’t offer the service. The company is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. It charges a 20 percent surcharge for orders from featured restaurants and 25 percent for orders from non-affiliated restaurants.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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The AL COPELAND FOUNDATION and SAKS FIFTH AVENUE host The Hi-Speed Fashion Show (www.alcopelandfoundation.org/fashion2010), a benefit for cancer research, at 8:30 p.m. on Friday Sept. 17 at the Metropolitan (310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 568-1700). The runway event features entertainment by radio personalities Stevie G and TPot of B97 and food and beverages from local restaurants. Roman Harper and Darren Sharper of the New Orleans Saints will attend the patron party at 6:30 p.m. Spa Reyna provides beauty services and massages in a comfortable, homey setting. PHOTO COURTESY OF SPA REYNA

THE WORKROOM (www.facebook.com/work-

roomnola), a nonprofit art studio, hosts DIY Hard (With a Vengeance) on Saturday, Sept. 18 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Antenna Gallery (316 Burgundy St., www.antennagallery.org). This free event features a crafts market and DIY art workshops, along with music, beer and light refreshments.


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 27 34 36 39 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < S E P ANDERS OSBORNE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

EVENTS

42

CUISINE

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5 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Wednesday Lafayette Square, 500 St. Charles Ave.; www.harvestthemusic,org

15

Guitarist/singer/songwriter Anders Osborne covers a lot of ground, from blistering blues rock to New Orleans jazz funk to softer ballads. He opens the Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans’ concert series running Wednesdays through Nov. 3 in Lafayette Square. There also are food and drink vendors and a craft market. Free admission.

TV BUDDHAS p.m. Thursday 16 10 Saint, 961 St. Mary St., 523-0050; www.thesaintneworleans.com SEP

No relation to TV Torso (who played the Saint in August) or Monotonix (who also hail from Tel Aviv), Israeli-cum-Berliner trio TV Buddhas are Euro road trippers. The band makes its first stateside trip this month, bringing swarthy psych/rock and speak/sing lyrics like Nico eloping with Jonathan Richman. Tickets $5.

HAIRSPRAY p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 2 p.m. 17 8Sun.; through Oct. 10 Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com SEP

Appreciating Assets

BURLESQUE DANCERS BRING BACK THE STRIPTEASE AND STARDOM. BY WILL COVIELLO

T

was filmed for the documentary Burlesque Undressed. Naquan also caught the attention of the field’s best-known celebrity, Dita Von Teese, who invited her to perform in a two-night engagement opening Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans in July. Like many artists or musicians who shed day jobs, she’s made the leap and is focusing solely on her burlesque career. New York dancer and author of The Burlesque Handbook, Jo “Boobs” Weldon credits the Internet for making the revival possible. The movement coalesced in the mid-1990s as disparate performers were able to easily find each other, share information and organize events. Naquan pursues bookings by emailing links to YouTube videos of her performances to talent bookers and producers around the world. Josephine Baker inspires Naquan’s stage name and work. She favors traditionally styled acts, but Baker predates the rise of burlesque. Baker was a chorus line dancer in vaudeville shows in the United States before she moved to France in the 1920s. There her act combined erotic dance and some singing. It wasn’t a striptease, but Naquan has turned Baker’s signature banana skirt act into a burlesque dance. She also has a routine in which she sings Baker’s “Don’t Touch My Tomatoes.” PAGE 26

PHOTO BY A KOCH PHOTOGRAPHY

Le Petit Theatre opens its season of mainstage musicals with Hairspray. Ricky Graham directs the Tony Award-winning adaptation of John Waters’ movie about Tracy Turnblad, a plump high school girl who gets a chance to dance on a local TV show in Baltimore in the early 1960s and sets out to integrate it. Tickets $31-$50.

BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN WITH BIG HISTORY 10 p.m. Saturday Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation. com SEP

18

THE NEW ORLEANS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL

Sept. 17-19 www.neworleansburlesquefest.com

Another offspring of Silent Cinema and Antenna Inn, Big History (pictured) — conceived by guitarists Matt Glynn and Blandon Helgason — sounds more of a piece with fellow pop infant Empress Hotel. Sexpot singer Meg Roussel sighs and moans pleading verses over staccato dance beats and clubby synth hooks. Big Rock Candy Mountain headlines. Tickets $7.

Bring Home the Bacon BY WILL COVIELLO

New Yorker Matt Timms started a series of Takedowns (www. chili-takedown.com) in 2005. The mostly amateur cooking contests have centered on staples of Americana, including battles with grits, mac and cheese, salsa and even trash can smokers. Competitors at the Bacon Takedown (3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 19) at the Howlin’ Wolf (907 S. Peters St., 5295844; www.howlin-wolf.com) vie for a year’s supply of bacon. Attendees can taste the dishes. Tickets $15.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

he burlesque dancing revival is more than a decade old, bringing back pasties, slowly peeled stockings and bump and grind music. While ever more performers take up feathered fans and boas, sometimes in theaters, sometimes in DIY-spirited rock club shows, top performers are again making a career of it and traveling the world. “Burlesque has taken over my life,” says New Orleans’ own Nedra Naquan, who performs as Perle Noir. “I have been able to travel all over — to London, Paris, Toronto. In January, I am going to perform in Australia for a week.” Since getting into the striptease revival five years ago, Naquan has become a star in the new burlesque world. She’s one of many headlining dancers performing at the New Orleans Burlesque Festival (Sept. 17-19), which in just its second year is becoming one of the top festival events, along with the Miss Exotic World Pageant and Striptease Reunion in Las Vegas and the New York Burlesque Festival. Naquan was named best debut dancer at the Miss Exotic World Pageant in 2008 and was the first runner up in the event in 2009. After the debut, she was invited by dancer Immodesty Blaize to perform in a London showcase called The Tease Show, which

Evie Lavell performs a burlesque dance with a live band at the 2009 New Orleans Burlesque Festival.

25


page 25

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“For me, the reason burlesque is something I love is it’s one of the oldest forms of theater,” Naquan says. “It’s dancing, acting and singing. … I would love to have my own show with singers, dancers, comedians and novelty acts.” Naquan debuted with Bustout Burlesque, a monthly New Orleans show created by festival producer — and documentary filmmaker (Ruthie the Duck Girl) — Rick Delaup. Bustout favors the classic New Orleans format for shows, with dancers performing to live jazz bands plus other acts such as comedians, magicians and singers. The festival includes several evening showcases at Harrah’s New Orleans Casino and the House of Blues and a competition in which performers must dance to a live band. There also are workshops for dancers and panel discussions with former burlesque stars, including Kitty West, aka Evangeline the Oyster Girl, the Bourbon Street starlet who graced the pages of Life magazine for a publicity stunt in which she used an ax to smash the glass tank of a dancer performing a water act. Other veteran dancers include San Francisco’s Satan’s Angel and New Orleanians Bambi Brooks and Wild Cherry. Top contemporary burlesque performers include Weldon, Kitten De Ville, former Miss Nude International Katherine D’Lish, Evie Lavelle and Michelle L’amour. A native of Chicago, L’amour was always interested in dancing and being on stage, and she stumbled into burlesque when she was asked to be in a show. She liked the sexy side of burlesque and delved into it. “I always used to pose in front of a mirror, going for sexy looks,” she says. “I had been training for it my entire life, I

Perle Noir performs with Bustout Burlesque. photo by Kaylin idora

just didn’t know it.” L’amour made a name for herself quickly, won the Miss Exotic World title in 2005 and was asked to audition for the TV show America’s Got Talent. She appeared on the program through several rounds of competition, finally doing a strip act with KITT the talking car from Knight Rider. Judge David Hasselhoff approved, but the rest of the panel panned striptease as a talent. Was she surprised at that response after the producers asked her to appear? “They wanted me to be a stupid whore,” she says, laughing. “But I am a smart lady. I wasn’t going to play that.” L’amour earned a degree in finance at the University of Illinois and had always wanted to own her own business. Burlesque has become a platform for her to teach dance and do choreography at her Studio L’amour space. She runs the burlesque troupe Chicago Starlets, and another increasingly popular event, which has expanded to New York and Seattle, Naked Girls Reading. She’s also got a book of nude photography, The Most Naked Woman. She has performed across the United States as well as Europe and Brazil. “The problem is that I want everything,” she says. “I want to expand the studio, have my own venue. The opportunities are endless.” Visit www.neworleansburlesquefest.com for a full list of performers and events.


noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

CD Reviews MAGNETIC EAR

Aliens of Extraordinary Ability (Self-released)

t takes a lot of lip to make this happen,” Martin Krusche says, goatee parted in a grin, eyes twinkling. The tenor saxophonist means it literally. Flanking him on the Blue Nile stage are four brass-kissers — baritone saxman Dan Oestreicher, sousaphonist Jason Jurzak and trombonists Jeff Albert and Charlie Halloran, as well as percussionists Paul Thibodeaux and Michael Skinkus — which makes 10 engaged lips in all, mightily winding their instruments as if charged with inflating the earth. It’s the CD-release party for Aliens of Extraordinary Ability, so the Magnetic Ear bandleader might well have been speaking in metaphor about the ensemble’s boisterous, long-awaited studio debut. A New Orleans contemporary jazz back-talker, the album’s nonoriginal offerings are attitudinal covers of Radiohead (Kid A kickoff “Everything In Its Right Place,” whose creepy synths transpose just fine as creepy saxes) and Nirvana (“In Bloom,” sassily rearranged by Jurzak a la Toussaint on “Here Come the Girls”). Magnetic Ear has performed steadily for five years and released two previous records, After the Rain (2006) and Live at the Saturn Bar (2007). But only Krusche remains from the former, and since the latter, he’s beefed up with a second trombone and turned over his rhythm section more than once (Thibodeaux and Jurzak replaced Justin Peake and Jon Gross, who had replaced Kevin O’Day and Matt Perrine). He also opened the door to contributors, a parade of “aliens” — Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Chris Alford, Evan Christopher, Dwayne “Big D” Williams and Roger Lewis among them — that became an album motif. Lewis’ sax handles bass duties on his own tribute, the scooting Dirty Dozen ringer “Uncle Roger”; on “Farewell Tango,” a covers-separating neutral ground dedicated to Alex Chilton, Christopher’s eulogizing clarinet gets cut with spicy Latin syncopation, a Krusche specialty. Rounding out his compositions is Jurzak, who penned two memorable originals, steamy miniature “Dublike” and monster stomper “Alotalip.” Yes, it is.

I

BILL KIRCHEN (Proper)

s steady and sure a catalog as there is in American music, Bill Kirchen’s solo output has never garnered the national attention of the gigs he’s supported, which include co-piloting the 1970s country swingers Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen and shining as an ace six-stringer for Elvis Costello, Gene Vincent, Nick Lowe and Link Wray. Word to the Wise, Kirchen’s seventh LP, can be read as a favor returned, as a bevy of marquee artists lend guest vocals and instrumentals on this affectionate collection of eight originals and three well-selected covers. Lowe and Paul Carrack (Ace, Squeeze) drench Merle Haggard’s ballad “Shelly’s Winter Love” in pining harmony, and longtime Kirchen collaborator Kevin “Blackie” Farrell puts an amazing Michael McDonald impression in the saddle on Leroy Preston’s cowboy killer “Open Range.” But it’s the new compositions, and the delicious twists Kirchen’s guests give them, that define the platter. Rockabilly opener “Bump Wood” may sound dirty until you get to the hilarious hook (“I know in the morning that it’s gonna be good/ When I stick out my elbows and they don’t bump wood”). George Frayne, aka Commander Cody, holds a boogie-woogie reunion with his old wingman on “I Don’t Work That Cheap,” and harmonica hell-raiser Norton Buffalo, who died in October 2009, blows one of his final solos on accidentally poignant closer “Valley of the Moon,” as Kirchen sings, “We raised up a ruckus till the wee small hours/ Some got lucky, some are pushing up flowers.” The album’s knockout moment, however, comes when Costello, whose relationship with Kirchen dates back to late-’70s session work in London, sneers the opening line to “Man at the Bottom of the Well” over a locomotive riff by the latter — two grandfathers of rock, trading clocks. Kirchen throws a record release party for Word to the Wise at 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 19, at Chickie Wah Wah (2828 Canal St., 304-4714).

A

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

Word to the Wise

27


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CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Notes & Quotes Songwriters Night feat. Marc Belloni, 8:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Mooney, 8

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 6; Na-Naâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Reed Red, Alex Mark, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Hook, 9:30

A SPECIAL EVENING WITH

JOHN MOONEY SOLO

(WWOZ LIVE BROADCAST) 9PM LATIN QUARTERS DANCE PARTY 12AM

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque & Live Music, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tribute to Lionel Ferbos feat. Jason Marsalis, Irvin MayďŹ eld, Shamarr Allen and others, 8

GRAVY 9PM

608 Fulton Street

Attiki

bar & grill experience the mediterranean

FRI

TUE

SEP

WED

15

PARISHIONERS LYNN DRURY

14

TUES

New Orleans â&#x20AC;˘ (504) 212-6476 www.12barnola.com

www.themapleleafbar.com

SEP

CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi & Delta Funk, 7; Glen David Andrews, 9:30

9/16

FRI 9/17

SUN 9/19

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 7; Blues4sale, 9:30

WED

SAT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

28

MON 9/13

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

SUMMER HAPPY

HOUR SPECIALS â&#x20AC;˘ M-W 3-6PM

2 for 1 Specialty Drinks & Hookahs

SIN NIGHT Every Tues & Thurs

230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com 587-3756

Soft Spoken

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Weliky, 7:30

Showcasing Local Music

preview

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marc Stone, 4:30; Rainmakers, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Growden, 8:30; Sazerac the Clownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabinet of Wonders, 10 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bo Dollis & the Wild Magnolias, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

A lot can be concealed behind the garage door of du jour lo-ďŹ production. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost bolder these days to do what Brett Harris does: write and release (under your own nondescript name) spotless chamber pop that both music snobs and their mothers can love. The Durham, N.C., singer derives from a thinning lineage of songwriters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rufus Wainwright, Ben Folds, Ra Ra Riot and Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently deceased Voxtrot â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to whom the classic arrangements and melodic compass of the Brill Building, New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harmony headquarters of yesteryear, still come as naturally as breathing. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than a little Bacharachian sensibility and blue-eyed soul in Man of Few Words, Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; self-released April LP. Hum-strum opener â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Found Outâ&#x20AC;? and handclap-and-keys centerpiece â&#x20AC;&#x153;Perpetual Motionâ&#x20AC;? are ďŹ rst-class, sweet-talking soft rockers, reďŹ ned to the point of slippery smoothness. On countriďŹ ed wooers â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wishâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unspoken,â&#x20AC;? Harris proves he could charm the pants off a French busker or bucolic folkie just as easily. Jackson, Miss., rockers Roosevelt Noise and Dave Feraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reunited Mahayla open. Free admission. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

SEPT

16

Brett Harris with Mahayla and Roosevelt Noise 10 p.m. Thursday Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rainmakers, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Radio Active, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 15

CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stone River Boys, 8

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Chris Scheurich, 10 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tin Men, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

61 BLUES HIGHWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Jam feat. Wardell Williams & the Blues Hwy. Band, 8

DECKBAR & GRILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues & Beyond Jam feat. John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 10

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Sean, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Neo Tribraco, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob Andrews, 9:30

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Diminished Men, Major Bacon, 8

FRAT HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nothing Solid, A New Light, Blackstar Bangas, 10

BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gravity A (upstairs), 11; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 11 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Rue Fiya, 9:30

CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9

HUDDLE SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Band of Brothers, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin MayďŹ eldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 9

LACAVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CrossďŹ re, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6


bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Russell Batiste, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Davy Brooks, 7; Jesse Brooks, 9; Joe Amette, 10

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD POINT BAR — Mike Burkhart, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — Henry Clay People, Giant Cloud, Robert Ellis, 9 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jerry Embree, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 7:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & the Deacons, 5; Late As Usual, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

Thursday 16 12 BAR — Steve Kelly & friends, 9

61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Will Work for Whiskey, 4

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 9 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 8:30

CADILLAC’S ROCK ’N’ COUNTRY SALOON — Fixx, 8:45

CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson’s Musicworks feat. John “Papa” Gros, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Junk Shot, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6; Brett Harris, Mahayla, Roosevelt Noise, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — Freddy Omar, 8

D.B.A. — Paul Sanchez, 7; My Graveyard Jaw feat. Country Fried, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Diverse, 9:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB — Dave Stover Project, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Free Agents Brass Band, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Millers of Metry, 7; Nattie, 8; Frans Schumann, 9; USA 2000, 10 OLD POINT BAR — K.C. Robinson Band, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8 PAGE 31

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

BMC — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; J.P. Carmody & the Micro Brues, 10

29


Come pLaY WiTH US!

30

N UE VE ZZ

JA NEW

O RLE AN S

P

M RE

IE

R

SEpTEmbEr TEmbEr 14 AT 8pm

TrIbUTE bUTE TO

LIONEL FErbOS

JASON mArSALIS

FEATURING & A SpECIAL

TrUmpET TrIbUTE bY

IrVIN mAYFIELD, SHAmArr ALLEN & OTHEr SpECIAL gUESTS JOIN US BEFORE THE SHOW, 6:00 -7:30 pM AT THE WIllIAMS RESEARcH cENTER FOR

A ConversAtion with LioneL Ferbos 410 cHARTRES STREET

braSS baND Jam

EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

2010

SEpTEmbEr

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

TUESDAY,

play HOUr EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Monday 13, 20, 27

BOB FRENCH and the ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND

Tuesday 14, 21, 28 JASON MARSALIS

Wednesday 15, 22, 29

IRVIN MAYFIELD and the NOJO JAM

burlesque ballroom starring

TriXiE miNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

Thursday 16, 23, 30 SHAMARR ALLEN

Friday 17, 24

LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” BROWN

Saturday 18

SHANNON POWELL

Saturday 25

GLENN DAVID ANDREWS

irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 29 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nathan & the Zydeco Cha-Chas, 8:30

SING SING CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stephen Richard Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Barrett, 4; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Penton, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9 VAUGHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit RufďŹ ns & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 17 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cortland Burke, 6; John Mooney, 9

3 RING CIRCUSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; THE BIG TOP GALLERY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Coliseum, Burning Love, War Amps, We Need to Talk, 7 61 BLUES HIGHWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jack Yoder & Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l G Delta Blues, 8 ALLWAYS LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Boom Chick, 11

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Furrows, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott, 5; Leon â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kid Chocolateâ&#x20AC;? Brown, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buddy Francioni & Home Grown, 5; Irish Bayou Band, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Reis, 7; Soul Project, 11 THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Some Like it Hot!, 7:30

THE MAISON (PENTHOUSE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pictureplane, Brice Nice, Musa, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 101 Runners, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Damn Hippies, 7; Gallivan Burwell, 9; Mike True, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Drunkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Drinkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mustard Brothers, 9

ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Help feat. Barbara Menendez, 9:30

RUSTY NAIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 10

SING SING CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi, 9

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

SOUTHPORT HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chee Weez, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Way, 9 STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ivan Nevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dumpstaphunk CD release feat. DJ Soul Sister, 10

BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BonJourneys, 9:30

TOMMYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WINE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tommyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amy Trail, 5

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 1; Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ben Labat & the Happy Devil CD release, Mia Borders, 9

TOOLOULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Arrivals, 9

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

CLUB 7140 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Ward, 8

WHISKEY DIX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Coleman Jernigan Project, 9

CLEVER WINE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Grayson Capps, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gringo do Choro feat. Rick Trolsen, 10 HERMES BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Panorama Jazz Band, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crotchbreaker, Built to Destroy, Ruiniverse, 10

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturate, Poltern Kinder, City Below, Gethsemani, 9

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Mia Borders, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Butch Fields Band, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 18 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gravy, 9

61 BLUES HIGHWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Johnny J & the Hitmen, 6 APPLE BARREL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Orr, 7

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gypsy Swing Club, 8

FLEUR DE LIS PENDANTS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.â&#x20AC;? 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-222-4956

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Legendary Luther Kent, 9:30

CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Rock Candy Mountain, Big History, 9:30

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazzholes, 6; Bruisers, 10

COACHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Black Magnolia, City Below, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Andy Rogers & guest, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Boutte, 8; Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & Russell Batiste, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 FREDERICK J. SIGUR CIVIC CENTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Back to School Power Jam feat. California Swag District, J. Cole, Mystikal and others, 3

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Off The Dome Emcee Competition, 10 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Third Coast Bass BeneďŹ t feat. DJUNYA, Mindelixir, Frequent C and others, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shannon Powell, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Speed the Mule feat. Paul Tobin, 5; Rites of Passage, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; George Porter Jr. & the Runninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pardners, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Ledford, 7; Clint Kaufmann, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Boom Chick, 10 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Settly, Green Demons, 9

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 PAGE 33

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XXX/KVOHTHPMEFOESBHPO3/DPN

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Johnny Angel & the Swinging Demons, 9:30

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Mike Dillon & friends, 10

CLEVER WINE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8

BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monster CrawďŹ sh Band, 8

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Young Fellas Brass Band, 1:30; Sasha Masakowski, 7; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30

BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Voodoo Blues Competition, 7

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Lars Edegran, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ani Difranco, 9; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 11

BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Life Without Elvis, Sticky Wig, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mem Shannon & Brother Tyrone, 9

ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Local Skank, Scorseses, Los Po-Boy-Citos, 9

Fisher & Sons Jewelers

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Indie rock showcase feat. Man At Home, Cosmic Funk and others, 10

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Red & Big Bad, 9:30

BABYLON LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Typical Stereo, Fat Camp, 10

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10

MUSIC

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THE RUGBY PUB — Kenny Claiborne Band, Jane Harvey Brown Traditional Jazz AllStars, John Mooney, Little Freddie King, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Germain Bazzle feat. Larry Sieberth Trio, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Weathered, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke Winslow King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6 THREE MUSES — Washboard Rodeo, 10 TIPITINA’S — Ingram Hill, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Backflow, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Sammy Naquin, 1; Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Late As Usual, 9 TWIST OF LIME — Poltern Kinder, Saturate, 10

WHISKEY DIX — Jason Turner Band, 9

Sunday 19 BMC — Joe Kennedy Project, 5:30; Marlon Jordan, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Bill Kirchen, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Blissed Out, Justin Peake, 10

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Marc Stone, 4; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8 HERMES BAR — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Mockingbirds feat. Heidi Campbell & Mike Rihner, 8:30; Irish Session, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Some Like it Hot!, 5

ONE EYED JACKS — Legendary Shack Shakers, Guitar

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Sasha Masakowski, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late As Usual, 9 WHISKEY DIX — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

Monday 20 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 CIRCLE BAR — Memphis Band with Freilich/Wexler Duo, Ben Jones, Julie Odell Jones, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES — O.A.R., Steel Train, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 8 ONE EYED JACKS — Devil Makes Three, My Graveyard Jaw, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7 THREE MUSES — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; T’Canaille, 9

TOGA

SEPTEMBER 18TH, 10PM

COM E IN YOUR FAVORITE BEDSHEET ( NOT R EQU I R ED TO PA RT Y)

S AT U R D AY

18

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Late As Usual, 11:30

classical/ concerts ABITA SPRINGS TOWN HALL —

22161 Level St., Abita Springs, (985) 892-0711 — Sat: Abita Springs Opry presents Steve Anderson Group, Moss Pickers, Melanie Rainwater & Southern Rain, Chieupique, 7

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

120 S. New Hampshire St., Covington, (985) 892-3177 — Sun: Third Sunday Concerts presents New Leviathan Oriental Fox-Trot Orchestra, 5

DOWNTOWN COVINGTON — Columbia Street, (985) 892-1873 — Fri: Sunset at the Landing presents Cecilia Zabala, Sasha Masakowski & Musical Playground, 6

(LEFT TO RIGHT) ADAM-vocals/guitar; BLAKE-lead guitar; ROB-drums; ANTHONY-bass

BLACK MAGNOLIA

W/ CITY BELOW / SHOW @ 10PM

TOGA DRINK SPECIALS $5 NECTAR OF THE GODS 25¢ SHOTS - APHRODITE’S ELIXIR check out www.myspace.com/coachscornermetairie for future events and band info

2221

TRANSCONTINENTAL DRIVE

888.6685

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — 601 S.

Maestri Place, 581-1039 — Wed: Harvest the Music Concert Series presents Anders Osborne, 5

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — 916 N.

Peters St., 589-4841; www. nps.gov/jazz/index.htm — Wed: Bill Malchow, noon; Fri: Johnette Downing, 11 a.m; Sat: Bruce Brackman, 2

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — 925 Camp

St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Thu: Ogden After Hours presents C.P. Love, 6

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Twilight in the Garden Concert Series presents Banu Gibson, 6

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Wed: Victory Belles, 1 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Trinity Artists Series presents Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Mayes 2, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

TULANE UNIVERSITY DIXON HALL — 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5000 — Sat: Classical Guitar Series presents Ernesto Tamayo, 8

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 7; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

Lightnin’ Lee, 9

POPPY’S TIME OUT — John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 11 a.m.

PARTY

PAGE 31 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Sgt. Pepper’s Beatles Tribute Band, 9:30

MUSIC

SEPT

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

33


The best ‘RESIDENT EVIL’ yet.” Shawn Edwards, FOX-TV

FILM

“AMAZING!

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING THE AMERICAN (R) — George Clooney stars as an assassin who retreats to the Italian countryside, but danger soon follows him. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 AVATAR (PG-13) — In James Cameron’s sci-fi fantasy, a wheelchair-confined former Marine is recruited to mine an extraterrestrial moon for the solution to Earth’s climate crisis. AMC Palace 20

“3D the w ay it SHO

ULD BE D ONE.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

Spider (Micha el Cumm ings), F EARNET

34

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

CAIRO TIME (PG) — A fashion editor meeting her husband in Cairo becomes acquainted with his friend while her husband is delayed. Prytania DESPICABLE ME (PG) — Steve

Carell, Kristen Wiig, Jason Segel and others provide the voices in this animated comedy about orphans who see dad potential in a diabolical supervillan. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Hollywood 9

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) — Julia Roberts stars in the film adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert’s memoir about finding herself through a journey around the world. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14 THE EXPENDABLES (R) — A

SCREEN GEMS DAVIS FILMS/IMPACT PICTURES INC. CONSTANTIN FILM INTERNATIONAL GmbH PRESENT A CONSTANTIN FILM INTERNATIONAL GmbH/DAVIS FILMS/IMPACT PICTURES INC. PRODUCTION A FILM BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON MILLA JOVOVICH ALI LARTER “RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE” KIM COATES SHAWN ROBERTSBASEDSERGIUPON O PERIS-MENCHETAASSOCIATESPENCER LOCKE WITH BORIEXECUTIVE S KODJOE AND WENTWORTH MILLER MUSIC BY TOMANDANDY CAPCOM’S VIDEOGAME “RESIDENT EVIL” PRODUCER HIROYUKI KOBAYASHI PRODUCERS MARTIN MOSZKOWICZ VICTOR HADIDA PRODUCED BY JEREMY BOLT PAUL W.S. ANDERSON ROBERT KULZER DON CARMODY BERND EICHINGER SAMUEL HADIDA WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

4.729" X 10.5" (1/2 PG V) TUE 9/14 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

group of mercenaries is hired to infiltrate a South American country and overthrow its ruthless dictator. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

FLIPPED (PG) — Set in the

1960s, a girl is in love with her easily embarrassed neighbor who keeps her at arm’s length through grade school and junior high. AMC Palace 20

GET LOW (PG-13)— A cranky

old recluse decides to have a funeral for himself while he’s still alive. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies GOING THE DISTANCE (R) —

After a summer fling, two people (Drew Barrymore and Justin Long) attempt a longdistance relationship when

Easy A (PG-13) © 2010 CTMG, INC.

Patricia Clarkson (right) stars as Olive’s (Emma Stone) offbeat mother in Easy A, a comedy in which a high school girl turns the tables on the rumor mill. Opens Friday.

one of them returns home to New York. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9 INCEPTION (PG-13) — A thief (Leonardo DiCaprio) skilled at extracting secrets from deep within the subconscious gets a chance at redemption. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) —

A lesbian couple’s lives are turned upside down when their children successfully find their biological father. Canal Place

THE LAST EXORCISM (PG-13) —

In Eli Roth’s horror film, true evil awaits a reverend on a Louisiana farm where he will conduct and document his final exorcism. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LOTTERY TICKET (PG-13) —

Rapper Bow Wow plays a lottery winner who has to keep quiet about his good fortune in the days before he can cash in his ticket. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

MACHETE (R) — Danny Trejo,

Jessica Alba, Robert De Niro, Michelle Rodriguez and Lindsay Lohan star in the action film about an ex-federale who disguises himself as a day laborer. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS (PG) — The sequel to the

2006 film finds the magical nanny taking on five mischievous charges. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) —

Two mediocre cops (Will

Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg) stumble into a case that gives them a chance to prove their worth. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9 PIRANHA 3-D (R) — A school of prehistoric man-eating fish descends upon a popular Spring Break locale. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) — Milla Jovovich returns

as Alice, a survivor in a world ravaged by a virus infection. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) — Michael Cera stars

in Edgar Wright’s film adaptation of the graphic novel series. Chalmette Movies

THE SWITCH (PG-13) — A single

woman (Jennifer Aniston) conceives via artificial insemination and seven years later, she discovers her neurotic best friend (Jason Bateman) may have switched his sperm with the donor’s at the last minute. AMC Palace 20, Grand

TAKERS (PG-13) — A group of

skilled criminals that consistently pulls off perfect bank robberies meets its match in a determined detective. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9

TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG13) — Bella continues to be

torn between choosing the vampire or the werewolf. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand VAMPIRES SUCK (PG-13) —

Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer’s spoof movie franchise takes on the Twilight movies. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9


OPENING FRIDAY DEVIL (PG-13) — A group of people are trapped in an elevator, and one of them is the devil in M. Night Shyamalan’s horror film. EASY A (PG-13) — In the comedy inspired by The Scarlet Letter, a high school student’s reputation takes a hit when she pretends to lose her virginity to a friend. THE TOWN (R) — Ben Affleck,

Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner and Blake Lively star in Affleck’s drama about a crook who falls for the manager of one of the banks he’s robbed.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (NR) — An eccentric inventor

(Dick Van Dyke) struggling to support himself and his family creates a magical car. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Sept. 22, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (R) — Cameron Crowe’s

MEDITERRANEO (R) — The 1991 Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film is set during World War II and follows a group of Italian soldiers who become stranded on a Greek island. The screening is a part of the library’s Italian Film Festival and features commentary by Paul Cimino. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. Monday, St. Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 8936280; www.sttammany.lib. la.us/covington.html PANIC IN THE STREETS AND LETTER TO ELIA (NR) — The the-

ater hosts a double feature of Elia Kazan’s 1950 film noir and Martin Scorsese’s documentary about the filmmaker. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Sept. 15, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

SPIRITED AWAY (PG) — The 2001 Japanese animated film follows a sullen 10-year-old girl and her adventures in a world of spirits and monsters. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

VIEUX CARRE MATINEES —

The Historic New Orleans Collection screens short films on Louisiana history and culture. Visit www.hnoc.org for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 5222081; www.lepetittheatre.com

FILM FESTIVALS BRAZIL ON TOUR FILM FESTIVAL

— The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University and the Consulate General Brazil present screenings of Historias De Amor Duram Apenas 90 Minutos, Cartola: Musica Para Os Olhos, Se Nada Mais Der Certo and Tamboro. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 with Tulane ID. 7 p.m. Thursday-Sunday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 277-4778; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

review Freedom Fries

Add free- and reduced-price school lunches to the list of things some conservatives opposed because they would inevitably take America down the road to socialism. That historical note is not as laughable as the Reagan administration classifying ketchup as a vegetable serving (not a bowl of ketchup, a small condiment-sized portion) in school lunches, but that’s some of the contentious history of feeding children with tax money. Lunch Line follows Chicago students who entered a challenge to create a healthy school lunch spending only as much as the school program does. It touches on current efforts to balance cost, nutrition and health concerns within governmental policy constraints. The film also includes a history of the federal government’s establishment of the program and its complicated politics and at times unconventional alliances, involving schools, anti-hunger advocates and agricultural policies. The history is dramatized in animation co-opting the Twilight series’ scheme of vampires and werewolves, but it’s a compelling account nonetheless. The screening is part of the release party for Edible New Orleans’ fall issue. Admission $10. — Will Coviello

SEP

16

LUNCH LINE 6:30 p.m. Thursday The Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave.; www.eiffelsociety.com

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS AN OLIVE BRIDGE ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A WILL GLUCK FILM “EASY A” PENN BADGLEY AMANDA BYNES THOMAS HADEN CHURCH PATRICIA CLARKSON CHALKA STANLEY TUCCI CAM GIGANDET LISA KUDROW MALCOLMWRITTEN MCDOWELL ALY MIDIRECTED PRODUCED BY ZANNE DEVINE WILL GLUCK BY BERT V. ROYAL BY WILL GLUCK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 CHECK THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

4.729" X 10.5" (1/2 PG V) TUE 9/14 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

1982 coming-of-age comedy follows a group of teens who enjoy malls, sex and rock ’n’ roll. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

LUNCH LINE (NR) — In conjunction with the release of Edible New Orleans’ fall issue, the venue screens the documentary about the history and politics of school lunch in America. A reception with hors d’oeuvres and drinks follows. Tickets $10. 6:30 p.m. screening, 8 p.m. reception, Thursday, Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., www.eiffelsociety.com

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

35


ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren Laborde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING GOSH MUSEUM. 2065 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-6118 — “Water-

ways to Railways: A Bicentennial Exhibition,” rare photographs and artifacts depicting Slidell’s history, through Jan. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2406; www. newcombartgallery.com — “Voices Inside: The Form and Function of Baskets,” more than 200 baskets from around the world; “Creative Environs: Art of the Newcomb Pottery”; both through Oct. 17. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday. REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool.org —

Multi-layered silkscreen wall installations by Winifred Ross Reilly, through Oct. 14. Opening reception 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

GALLERIES

36

1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — “Vanishing Acts,” mixed media and oil paintings by Dana Beuhler, Caroline Thomas and Alexandra Adduci, through Oct. 9. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com —“The Lines

Are Drawn,” photographs and drawings by Libby Nevinger and John Deal, through Sept. 28. ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

faculty exhibition, through Sept. 28.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “Crime Scene

NOLA,” a group exhibition featuring photography by five artists, through Sept. 26.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET taprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December.

review

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Amy

Archinal, jewelry by Debra Villa and new works by Julie Breaux, all through Sept. 30.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “From

Start to Finish,” works by Maxx Sizeler, through Oct. 2. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lift-

ing Our Souls Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean

Mitchell, ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “Redhead Car,” paint on

recycled political signs by Devin Meyer, through Oct. 6.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Let Them Eat

Crude,” acrylic paintings by Tony Nozero, through September.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com —

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others.

“Quiet Light,” new works on oil by Masahiro Arai, through Sept. 28.

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street; www.aor-

CARROLL GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Art Depart-

Forging Ahead

In the dog days of summer, evening lows bottom out at 80 degrees and the sky’s the limit for the highs. Most people try to stay air-conditioned. Rachel David heads for her blacksmith forge, where metal is heated until it glows red — hotter than Hades — and yields to the persuasion of blunt instruments. A bon vivant and workaholic who has focused more on private commissions, she should become better known with her first solo show at Coup d’Oeil Art Consortium, an agglomeration of delicately poetic heavy metal baroque dadaism with the occasional art nouveau flourish. Although there are some useful objects like tables and picture frames (with collaborative photos and woodwork by Jayme Kalal and Jesse Stotzfus), the metal sculptures are the main course here. The title piece, Mouth Environment, is a wall-mounted bas relief with elaborate filigree and surface effects including scallops like eye sockets, or orifices for unknown biological functions, and the effect is somehow simultaneously medieval, art nouveau and extraterrestrial. Many of the freestanding sculptures such as Tethered (pictured) allude to this city’s pervasively sinewy vines and botanical life. Stylistically, they fall somewhere between belle epoque Paris and Invasion of the Body Snatchers, but in David’s hands the effect is organic, holistic and often elegant. If it’s hard to know exactly what she’s doing, it’s fair to say she does it thoroughly, arduously and with a finely wrought flair. Although he also works in metal, Mitchell Lonas’ Wrench Series is very different. Inspired by swallows’ nests he found in the Smoky Mountains, Lonas developed a technique for delicately incising painted metal with abrasives to achieve a similarly gossamer effect in the creation of a series of nests. Shimmering like fiber optics, they challenge the viewer to provide his or her own answers to what is real and what is illusion, what is nature and what is artifice, what is life and what is art. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU SEPT

25

RACHEL DAVID: Mouth Environment Coup d’Oeil Art Consortium, 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com MITCHELL LONAS: The Wrench Series Gallery Bienvenu, 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com

ment, Tulane University, 314-2228; www.carrollgallery.tulane.edu — “Sources of Inspiration,” works by Tulane Studio Art faculty, through Sept. 24. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — A group

exhibition featuring works by Barbara Brainard, Denyce Celentano and Stephen Strickland, through Sept. 26.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paintings

from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Mouth Environment,”

metalwork by Rachel David, photographs by Jayme Kalal, woodwork by Jesse Stolzfus, through Sept. 25.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Singing Over the Bones,”

ceramics by Beverly Morris, through September.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St.,

818-6032 — “Whimsy,” works by Denise Gallagher, Amy Glisan and Brandon Zeringue, through Oct. 2. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

ESOM GALLERY. 3935 Magazine St., (225) 202-6405 — Works by

Tony Mose, Alex Harvie, Dennis Hargroder and Lou DeAngelo, through Sept. 21.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Self-

portraits by Elizabeth Acevedo; a group photography exhibition by UNO graduates; collage by

Jules Buck Jones; works by Matt Rebholz and Julie Doucet; all through Oct. 3. GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “The Wrench Series,” incised paintings by Mitchell Lonas, through Sept. 25. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Treasures of the Gulf,”

a group exhibition featuring more than 12 artists, through Sept. 26.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037

St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Sailing to Byzantium,” a group exhibition curated by Adrian Price; “New Orleans Mountain Project,” a group exhibition curated by Srdjan Loncar; both through Oct. 3. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — “Young, Talented and Still Affordable,” a group exhibition featuring paintings, drawings and sculpture by new artists, through Oct. 28. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Broken Time,”

new paintings and pastel drawings by Pinkney Herbert, through Saturday.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — Push Pin Show, an

exhibition featuring New Orleans Photo Alliance members, through Oct. 3. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 3616620 — “The Call of the Alluvial

Empire,” new works by Gina Phillips, through September.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080 — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “I Saw in Louisiana a Live Oak

Growing,” a group exhibition, through September.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“2010 No Dead Artists,” a juried exhibition featuring artists from around the country, through Sept. 28.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — New paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 —

New paintings by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Anting,” paintings and

pastels by Jesse Poimboeuf, through Sept. 25.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show

featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www. martinechaissongallery.com —

“Fanciful Fauna,” oil on canvas by Hunt Slonem, through Sept. 25.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www. neworleansglassworks.com — “A

Culinary Extravaganza: The Sweet Sounds of Satchmo and the Sugarfoot Stomp,” works by Chad Gilchrist, Lisa Liggett, Melissa Clark and Cathy DeYoung, through September. NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. 1111 St. Mary St., 610-4899; www.neworleansphotoalliance. blogspot.com — “GULF,” a group

exhibition of photographs exploring the Gulf of Mexico, through Saturday.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Voices Inside: The Form and Function of Baskets,” more than 200 baskets from around the world; “Creative Environs: Art of the Newcomb Pottery”; both through Oct. 17. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Southern Life

After Death,” a group exhibition featuring five artists depicting afterlife in various mediums, through September.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Darrin and Yolanda

Butler, Greg Little, Tress Turner and other New Orleans artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown

glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Tony Hernandez; new ceramic works by Dana Chapman and Evelyn Jordan; all through September. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — “Sid

Fuhrmann 1890-1963: A Breath of St. Tammany,” an exhibit honoring the contributions of the Covington cultural founder, through Oct. 1.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Melting

Lines,” works by Murielle White, through Sept. 27. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., third floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Fever

Dreams,” drawings and paintings by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 22.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Abstraction

Now,” a group exhibition featuring Dawn Dedeaux, Jessica Bizer, Ariya Martin and others, through Oct. 3.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Works by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

CALL FOR ARTISTS

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out of the Blue,” a

group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — New works by David Lapin; works on paper by Harry Paul Ally and Mark Willems; “A Decade ...” works by

504 WHAT STYLE. The group

seeks visual and performing artists to participate in a visual art and multimedia exhibit and event to be held at Juan’s Flying Burrito (4724 S. Carrollton Ave.) in November. Call 957-9690 or visit www.504whatstyle.com for details. Submission deadline is Wednesday.

ART SPILL. The Collective World Art Community invites artists to apply to appear in a juried show of artwork and crafts to be held during the multidisciplinary event in November. Visit www.collectiveworldartcommuntiy.com for details. Submis-

sion deadline is Oct. 5. BATON ROUGE GALLERY. The

gallery invites artists of all mediums to apply for membership. Visit www.batonrougegallery. org for details. Submission deadline Oct. 5.

CLARENCE JOHN LAUGHLIN AWARD. The New Orleans

Photo Alliance awards $5,000 to recognize a fine art photographer who is creating, or has completed, a significant body of work. Visit www.neworleansphotoalliance.org for details. Submission deadline is Wednesday. MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL. The

festival seeks film submissions, as well as Arab, Persian or Middle Eastern musicians, multimedia installations and performance pieces, for the November event. Visit www. nolamideastfilmfest.blogspot. com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 30.

VAMPIRE FILM FESTIVAL. Filmmakers and musicians are encouraged to submit vampire or gothic-themed short films, feature films, music videos and experimental films for the October festival. Visit www. vampirefilmfestival.com for details. Submission deadline is Friday. ZULU SOCIAL AID & PLEASURE CLUB. The group seeks an artist

to design its 2011 poster. Call 610-7072 or visit www.zulusapclub.org for details. Submission deadline is Oct. 8.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Tom

Dent: A Heavy Trip Through the South,” an exhibition highlighting the New Orleans poet, playwright and historian, through September. ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave., 522-4806; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits

of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Freak Parade,” works by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 24. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “Synesthesia: A

Blending of the Senses,” new works by Carl Joe Williams, through Oct. 9.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org — Early

Louisiana furniture from the Magnolia Mound Plantation collection, through Dec. 11.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Deepwater Horizon Response,” a conceptual installation by Mitchell Gaudet about the BP oil disaster, through September. “Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December. LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” handson exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Loyal Forces:

The Animals of World War II,” artifacts focusing on animals

employed and encountered in the war, through Oct. 17. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Sumpt’n to See, Native Son

Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Scents and Sensibil-

ity,” 125 objects covering the history of perfume bottles, through Oct. 24. “Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,” photographs, artifacts and archival research from Tulane University’s George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive, through Oct. 24. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects, ongoing. “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

“One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson, through Jan. 2, 2011. “The Art of Country Music,” items from the Marty Stuart Collection, through October. “Telling Their Stories: The Lingering Legacy of the Katrina Photographs,” photographs depicting Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath: ”The Art of Tennessee,” works from the collection of Gertrude and Ben Caldwell; “Place Meets Time,” photographs by Tom Rankin; “Flight Lab,” a multimedia piece by Jenny K. Hager; “Art Speaks,” a video project by YA/YA; all through Sunday. Works from 1956 exhibited at Tenth Street Galleries in New York and new works by Robert Tannen, ongoing.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “New Orleans con Sabor

Latino,” an exhibit highlighting the legacy of Latin cuisine in New Orleans, through Nov. 15. “Consider the Oyster,” oyster plates from Jim and Diane Gossen’s private collection; “The Don Effect,” an exhibit based on the Goat and the Road theater and dance production of the same name; both though December, and more. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Simultaneous Horizons,” mixed-media and acrylic works by Edith Moseley and Brad Robertson, through Sept. 28.

ART

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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TheaTeR 504. Anthony Bean Community

Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — The hip-hop musical, which first premiered at the theater in 2007, tells the story of young people’s role in New Orleans’ recovery. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 26. 6X6. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Six playwrights get a topic and one week to write a 10-minute-long play. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. ABOUT TIME. Cutting Edge

Theater, Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 6398294; www.cuttingedgetheater.com — An elderly couple spends the day in their kitchen talking about nearly everything, including what it means to share — and arrive at the end of — a life together. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Oct. 2.

ALIENS, IMMIGRANTS AND OTHER EVILDOERS. Ashé Cul-

CURTAINS. Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — After a stage actress is killed during her curtain call, a detective moonlighting as a musical theater fan tries to solve the mystery and save the show. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 seniors and students, $17 children ages 6 to 12. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, then 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 3. A DIFFERENT WOMAN. Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Veronica Russell’s one-woman show is a humorous tale of a liberated Texas woman in the 1900s. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Saturday. A FEW GOOD MEN. Playmak-

ers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — Aaron Sorkin’s play follows the trial of two Marines for complicity in the

THRU SEPT

26

The Madwoman of Chaillot 8 p.m. Fri.-Sun. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 2185778; www.cripplecreekplayers.org Tickets $10

death of a fellow Marine at Guantanamo Bay. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 26. HAIRSPRAY. Le Petit Théâtre du

Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.

com — A plump teen gets her dream of dancing on a popular TV show in 1962 and tries to use her newfound stardom to racially integrate the program. Tickets start at $31. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 10.

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tural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — José Torres-Tama’s “sci-fi Latino noir” depicts the struggles of immigrants by satirizing their status as “aliens.” Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday.

French playwright Jean Giraudoux’s The Madwoman of Chaillot (1942) invokes sinister strains of predatory capitalism — about the lust for oil, in a timely coincidence for this production — but it is ultimately a whimsical comedy about a Parisian socialite attempting to restore order to her corner of the world and peace for her neighbors. Cripple Creek Theater stages the first act cabaret-style in the theater at AllWays Lounge. The audience is seated at the cafe at Chaillot, between the Eiffel Tower and the Seine. Street vendors selling flowers and rags circle among the audience, and a carnivalesque spirit of street life is enhanced by live music by Ratty Scurvics, who takes up a host of instruments throughout the show. Ragpicker (Ross Britz) is a humble street merchant convinced the garbage he picks through for discarded wares isn’t as glorious and pure as it once was, a sign to him of the decline of Parisian life. The Prospector (Andrew Vaught) sits in the cafe, certain he can taste the riches of pure crude in the water served, evidence of vast oil reserves below. He joins an absurdly arrogant and singleminded cluster of venture capitalists who seek profit at any cost, regardless of who they trample along the way. Into the mix comes Countess Aurelia (Jennifer Pagan), a batty and high-spirited woman who has befriended the cafe’s regulars and seeks to aid them in their struggles with debt, the police and romance. Some elements of the play seem unwieldy. The satire of greed appears to have a serious point and there are earnest diatribes about the decline of quality of life, but they yield to Aurelia’s cackling joy and her undaunted optimism that everything will work out for the best. She seems to have the wit, will and means to stand up for the little people. Emilie Whelan directed a large cast and fills in hilariously as Gabrielle, a socialite who raises trifling concerns to epic heights. Vaught is inspired as the petroleum whisperer, who would level Paris in a moment for a drop of oil. Samantha Beaulieu and Donald Lewis are funny as obsessively singleminded bankers, but their villainy is at times too flat. Some subplots get too little attention. The romance between Pierre (Andrew Farrier) and Irma (Andrea Carlin) blossoms more from Aurelia’s pronouncements than its own energy. But the flurry of characters, physical comedy, music and highpitched Aurelia give the work a madcap and warm feel, and it’s entertainingly zany. — Will Coviello

39


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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FINANCING AVAIL ABLE


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com stage IN THE NEXT ROOM (OR THE VIBRATOR PLAY). Southern Rep

Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep. com — A wife longs to connect with her doctor husband who treats women with his mysteriously popular vibrating machine. Tickets $35 FridaySaturday, $29 Thursday and Sunday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 26.

THE LAST READING OF CHARLOTTE CUSHMAN. Le Chat Noir,

715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Karen Shields reenacts actress Charlotte Cushman’s final readings before dying of breast cancer. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Friday.

LET FREEDOM SWING! National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The musical highlights wartime-era big band and swing music. Visit www. stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY. New Orleans Arena, 1501

Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The show written, produced and directed by Tyler Perry follows a middle-aged mother who organizes a family reunion after her cancer diagnosis. Tickets $52-$72. 7:30 p.m. WednesdayFriday. PETITE ROUGE: A CAJUN RED RIDING HOOD. Teatro Wego,

REASONS TO BE PRETTY. Ac-

tor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — A man and his friends confront the value of physical beauty when his offhand comments about his girlfriend’s lackluster looks get back to her. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 25.

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD. University

of New Orleans, Performing Arts Center, Robert E. Nims Theatre, 280-7468; www. uno.edu — Theatre UNO and Theater 13 Productions present Tom Stoppard’s absurdist play about the two courtiers from Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Tickets $12 general admission, $8 seniors and UNO students, faculty and staff. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

ZOMBIE TOWN: A DOCUMEN-

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — The mockumentary follows a San Francisco theater troupe that travels to the site of a zombie attack to interview survivors. Tickets $10. 11 p.m. Saturdays through Sept. 25.

Burle sque & CaBaret BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in a burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

FLEUR DE TEASE. Boomtown

Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans. com — The burlesque troupe performs. 9:30 p.m. Saturday. THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Midnight Friday.

NEW ORLEANS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL. Harrah’s Casino (Har-

rah’s Theatre), 1 Canal St., 5336600; www.harrahsneworleans.com — The festival for burlesque dancers and enthusiasts features performances, parties and workshops. Visit www.neworleansburlesquefest.com. 8 p.m. FridaySunday, workshops start at noon Saturday-Sunday.

DanCe SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE? TOUR. UNO Lakefront

Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — Finalists from the TV show perform routines in a variety of dance styles. Tickets start at $46.40 (includes fees). 7:30 p.m. Sunday.

auDitions BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www. ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 3639001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. LELIA HALLER BALLET CLASSIQUE. Lelia Haller Ballet Clas-

sique, 4916 Canal St., 482-0038; www.lhballet.com — The ballet studio invites dancers, gymnasts and actors to audition for The Nutcracker. Ages 6 to 11 at 2:30 p.m., ages 12 to adult 4 p.m. Saturday.

ComeDy BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The improv show features some guys and a girl. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Kelli Rosher and others. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday.

Eco-friEndly

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, followed by open mic. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit

Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 5711863; www.rubyfruit-jungle. com — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up 7:30 p.m. Show 8 p.m. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Tarantula

Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 14 START WITH ART. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Parents and children 18 months to 5 years old experience music and art in a museum setting. Call 539-9608, or email kbarron@ogdenmuseum.org for details. Tickets $120 general admission, $100 members, $15 drop-in fee. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 16 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LITTLE MASTERS. Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Preregistration is required. Call 488-5488 ext. 410 or email kchulvick@longuevue.com for details. Tickets $15 general admission, $12 members (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 18 DOROTHY’S TREK TO OZ .

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — The Port-A-Puppet Players’ show features audience participation and a meet-and-greet Toto. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 14

601

NEW LOCATION TERRY PKWY · GRETNA

C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222; www.parkerchurch.net —

BE THERE DO THAT

Analysts discuss Jung’s recently published personal journal. Visit www.jungneworleans. org for details. Admission $10, free for members. 7:30 p.m. A CONVERSATION & CONCERT WITH LIONEL FERBOS. Williams

Research Center, Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — Author Jason Berry interviews Ferbos about his life as a jazz musician. A concert at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse (300 Bourbon St.) follows. Pre-registration is recommended. Free admission. Call 523-4662 or email wrc@ hnoc.org for details. 6 p.m. lecture, 8 p.m. concert.

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS MEETING .

Don’s Seafood Hut, 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-1550; www. donsseafoodmetairie.com — Louie Dabdoub, corporate security director of Entergy, discusses workplace violence. Call 391-6112 or 250-5311 for details. Admission $25. 6:30 p.m.

SOCIETY OF FINANCIAL SERVICE PROFESSIONALS KICK-OFF LUNCHEON . Southern Yacht

Club, 105 N. Roadway St., 288-4200; www.southernyachtclub.org — Gambit’s Clancy Dubos is the keynote speaker for the luncheon. Visit www.sfsp.net/neworleans for details. Tickets $30 general admission, $20 SFSP members. 11:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m.

TEA ON TUESDAY: JEWELRY OF THE TABLE . Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Historian, author and lecturer William P. Hood Jr. discusses 19th century flatware. A tea service follows. Pre-registration is required. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. Tickets $30 general admission, $25 members. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

TOBACCO CESSATION CLASSES.

St. Tammany Parish Hospital Outpatient Pavilion, 1202 South Tyler St. — The eightweek program provides the tools necessary to becoming tobacco free. Pre-registration is required. Call (985) 898-4581 or email ccorizzo@stph.org for details. 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Wednesday 15 CHAMBER AFTER 5. Harrah’s Hotel Fulton Salon, 228 Poydras St. — The New Orleans Chamber of Commerce hosts a networking event featuring hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Email rsvp@neworleanschamber.org for details. Tickets $20 general admission, free for members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. COLLECTING 101: SELF-TAUGHT

ART. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The event features a panel discussion with prominent self-taught art collectors, as well as a home tour of one of their collections. Call 539-9614 or email ebowie@ogdenmuseum. org for details. Panel tickets $10 general admission, free for members, collection tour tickets $25 general admission, $15 members. Registration for home tour due Tuesday. Panel 6 p.m. Wednesday, tour 10 a.m. Thursday.

GLOBAL GREEN PANEL SERIES. Global Green Resource Center, 841 Carondelet St., 525-2121; www.globalgreen.org — Global Green, AIA and the New Orleans Chapter of the USGBC host a monthly panel series on issues of sustainability and environmental responsibility. Visit globalgreen.org/ bibg/calendar for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. GRAHAM TECHNIQUE CLASS.

New Orleans Dance Academy, 5956 Magazine St., 899-3780 — Anna Morris hosts a weekly dance class. Call 899-3780 for details. Admission $15 per session, $40 per month. 7:30 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Kellie Boutwell presents “Night Witches: Women Bomber Pilots of the Soviet 588th Night Bomber Regiment in WWII.” Free admission. Noon to 1 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. 12 p.m.

MS. MYERS’ HOUSEWARMING PARTY. Molly’s at the Market,

1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket. net — To celebrate nonprofit homebuilder Build Now’s completion of a new home, the bar hosts a housewarming party for the home’s resident to help buy furniture. Call 324-3964 or visit www. buildnownola.com for details. Admission $10 suggested donation. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m. ONE BOOK ONE NEW ORLEANS COCKTAIL PARTY. Carousel

Piano Bar & Lounge, Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 5233341 — The party celebrates the Youth Leadership Council program, which recently selected Louis Armstrong’s autobiography, Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans, as this year’s book. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. POSITIVE WAYS TO DEAL WITH ANGER & STRESS. St. Tammany

Hospital’s Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St. Suite B, Covington, (985) 898-4435; www.stph.org — The session teaches parents ways to deal with stress in turbulent times. Admission $5. Noon to 1:30 p.m.

QUILTING 101 . St. Tammany

Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The library hosts a sevenweek series of quilting classes tailored for beginners. Call 768-6294 for details. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

ROAD TO SUCCESS. Cars of

Yesteryear, 4625 Fairfield St., Metairie — The networking event for area businesses and professionals benefits Jefferson Dollars for Scholars and Jefferson Performing Arts Society. Email events@ejba. org for details. Admission $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

STAIR TUTOR TRAINING . St.

Charles Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1545 State St. — The children’s literacy program trains tutors for the fall semester. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux,

1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. TRUMPET RELEASE PARTY.

Adams Street Cultural Development Center, 1801 Adams St. — The Neighborhoods Partnership Network celebrates the September release of its magazine. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite

WOMEN & WINE ON WEDNESDAYS. 12 Bar, 608

Fulton St. — The women’s networking and social event features wine specials. Visit www.womenwinewednesday. com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Thursday 16 BENEFIT FOR P&J OYSTER COMPANY. Tujague’s

Restaurant, 823 Decatur St., 525-8676; www.tujagues.com — All funds from Tujague’s dinner benefits the oyster shuckers who have been out of work. Call 5258676 for details. Admission $125 (includes meal, tax and gratuity). 6:30 p.m. cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, 7:15 p.m. dinner.

INN ON BOURBON’S NOLA BREW EXPERIENCE . The Inn on

Bourbon Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon.com — The beer tasting features brews from NOLA Brewery and food from the hotel’s Cafe de l’Opera. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE ROLE OF NEW ORLEANS IN LATIN AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE . Louisiana

State Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www. lsm.crt.state.la.us — Robert Gary Freeland explores the historical importance New Orleans has had in Latin American history. The event also features live music. 6 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 17 THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL: A BILLION POUND DOSSIER . Loyola University

College of Law, 7214 St. Charles Ave., 861-5668; www. law.loyno.edu — The symposium is a legal and environmental examination of the BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Call 861-5642 or email mgpuder@loyno.edu for details. 1:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

FIESTA HISPANA . Fair Grounds

Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.

fairgroundsracecourse.com — The festival celebrates Latin heritage with live music, authentic cuisine and libations. Admission is free prior to the day’s last race at 5 p.m., $10 general admission. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. HI-SPEED FASHION SHOW. Generations Hall/

Metropolitan, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www. generationshall.com — The Al Copeland Foundation’s fundraiser for cancer research features a runway show, food and drink, a silent auction and appearances by Saints players and local personalities. Visit www.alcopelandfoundation. org for details. Admission starts at $25. 6:30 p.m. patron party, 8:30 p.m. general admission. MARTINI MADNESS. Pavilion of the Two Sisters, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — The Friends of City Park’s event features 23 speciality martini bars, dishes from local restaurants, a photo booth and music from Mod Dance Party DJs Matty and Kristen. Call 483-9376 or visit www.friendsofcitypark.com for details. Tickets $40 general admission, $35 members. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. NEW ORLEANS HOME + INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — The inaugural show includes seminars, demonstrations, vendor displays and more featuring the latest trends and innovations in design. Visit www.neworleanshomeshows.com/homeanddesignshow for details. Tickets $9 general admission, $5 military, free for children 12 and under. Noon to 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Saturday 18 30TH ANNIVERSARY BIRTHDAY BASH . Whole Foods Market

Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — The store celebrates its birthday with tastings throughout the store, carnival-style games, prizes, raffles, giveaways, live music by Some Like it Hot!, face painting, complimentary massages, and a Greasethemed costume contest. Free admission. Noon to 4 p.m.

ABSINTHE VISIONS: DISCUSSION WITH DAMIAN HEVIA . Southern Food &

Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — The artist discusses the inspiration and technical details of his museum exhibit Absinthe Visions. Free with museum admission. 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

BLACK & BROWN ALLIANCE PANEL . Ashé Cultural Arts

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ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON . Begue’s Restaurant at the Royal Sonesta, 300 Bourbon St., 533-2278; www.beguesrestaurant.com — The monthly luncheon features a number of speakers. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano.com for details. Admission is $38. Noon.

4, 525-6500; www.marriott. com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

43


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — In conjunction with José Torres-Tama’s production Aliens, Immigrants and Other Evildoers, the center hosts a panel discussing issues facing the Latino and African-American communities. 11 a.m to 2 p.m. BOOT CAMP FOR NEW DADS. St. Tammany Parish Hospital, 1202 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 898-4000; www.stph. org — The cost of the session includes a T-shirt. Admission $10. 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. BYWATER NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION MEETING .

Holy Angels Convent, 3500 St. Claude Ave. — Representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers are guests at the meeting. 7 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. HOMEBUYER TRAINING CLASSES. Lower 9th Ward

NENA, 1120 Lamanche St., 3736483; www.9thwardnena. org — The weekly class provides assistance to New Orleans-area residents interested in purchasing a home. Pre-registration required. Call 373-6483 or email info@9thwardnena.org for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

LIVING HISTORY CORPS. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum’s re-enactors share their knowledge about the dayto-day lives of military men and women and the broader lessons of World War II. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. MADISONVILLE ART MARKET. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River Front at Water St., Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www.artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features fine art from local artists including painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS CON SABOR: CHEF ADOLFO GARCIA .

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St.,

NEW ORLEANS SECULAR HUMANIST ASSOCIATION PROGRAM . Audubon Zoo,

Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Peter C. Stone presents “Bertrand Russell’s Ethical Philosophy.” Call 2825459 for details. 2 p.m. SURVIVOR SERIES. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The session discusses helpful tips for survival situations, including foraging for food, starting a fire, shelter construction and mental fortitude. 11 a.m. TRADITIONAL OKTOBERFEST KICK-OFF. Whole Foods

Market, 3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8888225 — The store observes the customary beginning of Oktoberfest with beer tastings, live music, traditional German dishes and historical story telling with German guide Dorette Davis. Free admission. Noon to 2 p.m.

WEEKEND WARGAME .

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — To commemorate the anniversary of Operation Market Garden, the museum hosts a wargame simulating the fights for the bridge at Son, Holland. Free admission. 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. WONDERS OF WETLANDS. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Participants learn about erosion and what is being done to preserve Lake Pontchartrain’s shoreline, then use scoop nets to collect aquatic wildlife. 1 p.m.

Sunday 19 ABITA ARTISTS. Berkeley

Gallery, 72066 Maple St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

CALEDONIAN SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS POT-LUCK DINNER .

Christ Anglican Catholic Church, 4316 N. Woodlawn Ave., 456-7170 — The Scottish heritage organization’s dinner also includes officer inductions and discussion of the upcoming year. 4 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar,

1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. LAKEVIEW FEST. St. Dominic School, 6361 Memphis St., 486-2824 — The Saintsthemed event features live music, children’s games, raffles, craft booths, a second line and more. Visit www. lakeviewcivic.org for details. Noon to 9 p.m.

! DEMAND R A L U P PO r 10 BACK BYgins Septembe Show Be

All the songs, sass and swing of the 1940s starring eight terrific singers and dancers, Weekends, September 10 – November 21. Friday & Saturday Evenings @ 8:00pm Sunday Matinee@ 1:00pm Dinner & Show: $60 Brunch & Show: $55 Dinner Seating 6:00pm – 6:30pm SHOW ONLY: $30

Brunch Seating 11:00am – 11:30pm Balcony Brunch & Show: $50

NEW ORLEANS BACON TAKEDOWN . Howlin’ Wolf,

907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com — Competitors use 15 pounds of bacon to create dishes, and attendees can vote for their favorite bacon creations. Visit www.chilitakedown.com for details. 3 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 20 CBT GROUP. Counseling

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Take a nostalgic journey with our charming vocal trio and their spirited renditions of 1940s musical classics. Plus a delightful lunch by Chef John Besh and the American Sector restaurant! Every Wednesday beginning Sept. 15 Luncheon: 12 Noon; Performance: 1:00pm $34 per person, including tax and gratuity

ReseRvations on-line at www.stagedoorcanteen.org or call 504.528.1943 Sponsored in part by LA Office of Entertainment Development and IMLS Magazine Street at Poeyfarre H 504-528-1943 H www.stagedoorcanteen.org

Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details. DEEPWATER HORIZON BLOWOUT LECTURE SERIES.

Tulane Law School, Weinmann Hall, Room 110, TLS Moot Court Room, 6329 Freret St. — The law school’s lecture series about the technical, scientific and policy issues related to the BP oil disaster is open to students and the general public. Email fwootten@tulane.edu for details. 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. PHILOSOPHY CAFE . The Inn on Bourbon Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon.com — The New Orleans Lyceum’s monthly event presents philosophical discussion in a casual environment. Call 473-7194 or email neworleanslyceum@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (excepting holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Nonprofit Central, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofitcentral.org — Nonprofit

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Toni Kiser, co-curator of the museum exhibit Loyal Forces: The Animals of WWII presents “The Berlin Zoo: In the Crossfire.” Noon to 1 p.m.

Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — Garcia demonstrates and prepares a Latino dish. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

45


Taste Real New Orleans! THE ORIGINAL

EVENTS

Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

RESTAURANT AND BAR

Home of the

Frenchuletta®

STEAK NIGHT WED,THURS & SAT NIGHTS

12oz Ribeye w/side dish $13.95 5pm-till

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Ita l ia n • Gum bo Home-Made

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP GRANTS. The New Orleans

Soups

PoBoys • Seafood

Jazz & Heritage Foundation awards grants to nonprofit organizations that hire local performers for cultural events. Call 558-6100 or visit www. jazzandheritage.org for details. Application deadline is Monday.



S a l ads • L u nc h & Dinner Specials

3636 BIENVILLE · MID CITY · NOLA

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 8:00 - 11:00 PM

AUDUBON AQUARIUM OF THE AMERICAS

Tickets begin at $35 Join us for an unforgettable evening as we celebrate the

Aquarium’s 20th Birthday!

Wine and beer samples from more than 20 bars Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

New Orleans cuisine from more than 25 local restaurants

46

LISTINGS

Silent Auction

All food & drinks are included in ticket price. Proceeds benefit Audubon’s Louisiana Marine and Sea Turtle Rescue Program

AudubonInstitute.org/scalesandales or (504) 861-5107 The Kids are back in school

BREAK OUT THE GOOD STUFF!

5707 Magazine St. · 504.269.5707 www.kyotonola.com • closed sundays

to amateurs and professionals, the competition is judged by music industry stars and awards more than $150,000 in cash and prizes. Visit www. songwritingcompetition.com for details. Submission deadline is Oct. 6.

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST. The

contest winner receives a two-day writing session with songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www.nosongfest.com/ song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15. NEW ORLEANS WRITING INSTITUTE . The Arts Council

of New Orleans hosts a fiction- and creative nonfictionwriting workshop taught by James Nolan, starting Wednesday. Call 522-5934 or email jnolan77@bellsouth.net for details.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

Live Entertainment

4920 prytania st • 891-3644

INTERNATIONAL SONGWRITING CONTEST. Open

www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

NOW SERVING ICY HOT CHOCOLATE

Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. BILL LOEHFELM . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Bloodroot. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

BUD FAUST. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs Great Moments in New Orleans History, Volume 2. 1 p.m. Saturday.

Books Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DAVID LUMMIS. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and reads from The Coffee Shop Chronicles of New Orleans. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

INTERNATIONAL FICTION BOOK CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS.

Blue Cypress Books, 8126 Oak St., 352-0096 — The group discusses Tony Eprile’s Persistence of Memory. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MARK MUSTIAN . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author signs and reads from The Gendarme. 6 p.m. Wednesday. MID-CITY WRITERS GROUP.

Prose writers meet to read and critique original work. Email midcity.writers@gmail. com for details. Tuesday.

MONA SIMPSON . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses My Hollywood. 3 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS HAIKU SOCIETY MEETING . Latter Library

Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — The NOHS holds a monthly gathering. The meeting features readings, writing and discussion. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Monday. OCTAVIA BOOKS BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Tim Gautraux’s The Missing. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

CHESLEY HINES. Garden

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cook

OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Sixty-Four Degrees. 12:30 p.m. Saturday.

France St., 944-0441; www. yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www. ladivinagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday. OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.rubyfruit-jungle.com — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. SOCRATES CAFE . St. Tammany Parish Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 796-9728 — The philosophical group holds a monthly discussion. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. SOLA-RWA WRITERS GROUP.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Nevada McPherson presents the program “Writing and Directing the Short Film.” 10 a.m. Saturday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St., 343-2406 — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. UPTOWN FREE READERS BOOK CLUB. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <TOWERING AMBITIONS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The Eiffel Society (2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2952; www.eiffelsociety.com) opened recently on St. Charles Avenue in < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <a structure that once was part of the Paris landmark. Chef Ian Schnoebelen of the French Quarter restaurant Iris is in charge of the eclectic menu, so look for dishes ranging from WHAT octopus tostadas to Filipino-style eggrolls to hanger steak. Iris Mike’s on the Avenue bartender Alan Walter created the restaurant’s cocktail list. The Eiffel Society also is a showcase for contemporary art and WHERE a music venue. Wednesday is salsa and meringue night, with 628 St. Charles Ave., music beginning at 6 p.m. 523-7600; www. mikesontheavenue.com ON THE MOVE

am

B

WHEN

Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. RESERVATIONS

Accepted

HOW MUCH

Expensive

WHAT WORKS

Lunch, focused Asian dishes, the beautiful room. WHAT DOESN'T

Quizzical concepts poorly executed.

CHECK, PLEASE

A bumpy second act for a symbol of 1990s New Orleans fine dining.

Restaurante Telamar (3911 Washington Ave., 866-9711) was a tiny place that earned a big following for its authentic Honduran comfort food. In the face of extensive construction along Earhart Boulevard, owners Elisabeth and Daisy Olviedo moved to a new location in Broadmoor. It’s hard to spot from the street, but you’ll find the same menu with highlights like chicken tajadas, breakfast baleadas and stewed tongue.

five 5 IN

FIVE PLACES FOR COOL CRAB GALATOIRE’S RESTAURANT 209 BOURBON ST., 525-2021 www.galatoires.com

Crabmeat maison defined: jumbo lump meat, mayo, capers and Creole mustard

LÜKE

333 ST. CHARLES AVE., 378-2840 www.lukeneworleans.com

Crabmeat maison here is a neat stack of crabmeat with herbs and greens.

Lost in Translation A RESURRECTED 1990S FUSION RESTAURANT SHOWS THE CONCEPT’S AGE.

Mike’s on the Avenue reprises Southwesternand Asian-fusion dishes. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

O

poor execution of the basics. The tuna Napoleon appetizer arrived as four wonton chips each carrying a slice of tartare tuna quilted over by cayenne and further obscured by guacamole. The crab and crawfish cakes were masked by a confusion of sauces, including remoulade, salsa and guacamole. “Mike’s Crispy Duck” might have worked if its wobbly skin was actually crisp and if its flour tortillas were at least warmed. Still there are enough strong points to assemble a unique and pleasing meal. Smear redfish pate on sesame crackers, wrap crawfish spring rolls in lettuce or order the tender shrimp and spinach dumplings and you’ll be off to a good start. I like the smoked tomato sauce on the paneed pork chop, and the seared tuna is another solid entree. Desserts have been good, like genuinely spicy carrot cake and passionfruit cheesecake. Lunch is stronger than dinner, and this is when Mike’s on the Avenue is busiest. Paella with orzo replacing the rice made a satisfying lunch with an interesting twist. But then there are lunch dishes like a burrito of fried oysters slathered in bland tomatillo salsa, a combination that achieves maximum sliminess inside a tortilla. I suspect the original Mike’s on the Avenue made the strong impression it did thanks in part to the contrast it offered to the New Orleans norm and the possibilities it revealed. But times change, and thus far, this reincarnation proves the premise of “you had to be there” isn’t a strong enough restaurant concept.

900 CITY PARK AVE., 488-1000 www.ralphsonthepark.com

The crabmeat Napoleon features layers of couscous, tomatoes, cucumbers and salsa.

SAMMY’S FOOD SERVICE & DELI 3000 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE., 947-0675 www.sammysfood.com

The stuffed tomato bursts with crab at this Creole deli.

HERBSAINT

701 ST. CHARLES AVE., 524-4114 www.herbsaint.com

Jumbo lump crabmeat plumps up watermelon gazpacho.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2006 Paso Creek Cabernet Sauvignon

PASO ROBLES, CALIFORNIA / $12-$16 RETAIL This bold, robust wine was aged 15 months in a combination of new French and American oak. Intense aromas of dark berries, cocoa, oak, earthy notes and a hint of mint are followed on the palate by flavors of black cherry, currant, blackberry, more toasty notes and a touch of cranberry. It has firm tannins, balanced acidity and a lingering finish. Pair it with steak, grilled meats, ribs, roasts and other hardy dishes. Buy it at: Rouses, Breaux Mart, Langenstein’s in Metairie and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Mona Lisa and Deanie’s Seafood. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

pening a new restaurant is never easy. But as the recent resurrection of Mike’s on the Avenue shows, opening an old one can be daunting as well. Restaurateur Vicky Bayley and chef Mike Fennelly originally opened Mike’s on the Avenue inside the Lafayette Hotel in 1991, and right away, the chef’s fusion cuisine made a splash. Gene Bourg, then restaurant critic for The Times-Picayune, gave Mike’s the paper’s highest rating in 1992. The following year, Food & Wine magazine named Fennelly to its annual list of the nation’s top 10 chefs. The two partners closed the place in 1999, by which point both were involved with other restaurant ventures. I never dined at this original Mike’s on the Avenue, though I heard plenty about its legacy when I started exploring the restaurant scene here. News that Bayley and Fennelly opened a new restaurant early this year in the same address as their old place naturally raised expectations that the old Mike’s was coming back. This new venture, however, was intended as something different. Initially called Mike’s East West, its menu mixed a few popular dishes from the old Mike’s with many new ones — and it featured a sushi bar with inventive rolls and exotic sashimi. But the restaurant switched courses within months of opening. The owners revived the old name, mothballed the sushi bar and introduced a menu anchored by Fennelly’s hits from the 1990s. A string of novel though mostly disappointing meals here has shown the perils of this path. Many dishes are overly complicated, and food that could shine is often blunted by

RALPH’S ON THE PARK

47


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., < < < < < < <287-0877 < — Located in Place St. Terrazu serves coffee > > > > > > > >Charles, > drinks and a menu of soups, sal<<< ads and sandwiches. The Terrazu >> salad is topped with boiled shrimp, of palm and avocado. No <hearts < reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <VINE < & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., www.vine-dine.com — > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > 361-1402; >> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 883-5905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memo-

rial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetiz-

48

ers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601

Gallier St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe. com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139 N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www.therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese. com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; wwww.chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups,

salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND — 1823 Metairie Road, Metairie, 6661823 — Enjoy something cold and sweet from this 50-year-old business, which offers an assortment of flavored sno-balls, soft-serve ice cream, malts, banana splits or ice cream cones dipped in chocolate. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams Blvd.,

Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-0301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 7389678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI

& GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli

FRENCH azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curPAGE 50


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ries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD

RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef-owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with crabmeat in a lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd., Gret-

na, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi.com — The pan-fried veal is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce, and veal shank osso buco has a rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepperseared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.

milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park

Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph and turtle soup. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

fajita platters, quesdillas and enchiladas. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-

1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Maga-

zine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www.juansflyingburrito. com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-ahalf-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reserva-

— Stuffed crabs are made scrumptious with jumbo lump crabmeat and come with spaghetti bordelaise. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915

Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s specialties include battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644

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— Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT — 901

Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www. cafeatchafalaya.com — Shrimp and grits features head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

50

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR — 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www.liuzzas. com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253;

namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, as well as a wide selection of tapas dishes and vegan options. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffetstyle gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe. com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepperhoney-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAK-

LATIN AMERICAN

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

NEIGHBORHOOD

HOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 4109997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-5252 — Try the

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

www.rocknsake.com — There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

CATERING available

and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W. Espla-

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200 Magazine

St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling

Taj Mahal (923 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859) serves an array of popular Indian dishes. PHOTO BY susan snee tions. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 9480077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade Ave., 9459997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice

nade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napo-

leon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www. rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Es-


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Magazine St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria.com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys,

SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial

Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www. sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WALL STREET DISCOUNT MEAT MARKET — 445 Wall Blvd., 393-

1800 — The deli section at this meat market includes a variety of sandwiches and po-boys with fillings of seafood, cold cuts or hot sausage, plus hot wings, fried chicken platters and seafood platters. There are egg sandwiches or platters for breakfast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

STEAKHOUSE N’TINI’S — 2891 Hwy. 190, Suite D, Mandeville, (985) 626-5566; www. ntinis.com — Enjoy steaks, seafood, daily specials and martinis in a relaxed ambience. Entree choices include filets, rib-eyes, baby back ribs, tuna steaks, fried

seafood platters and more. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

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MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

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VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $



EST 1994

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

Magazine Location

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Check Out Nightly The Gambit’s MUSIC SCHEDULE – Top 50 Bars –

on Facebook & MySpace 2008, 2009 & 2010

BAR:

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

HOURS

planade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY

OP & D EN L A E T kfast e AVAIL LIVERYE a e r B y AB n n O A d y n u LE! 2 B et the day-

51


marKeT PLaCe

Baby Belly Casting

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Professionally reproduce an exact replica of your pregnant form, quickly and easily. For appt.'s call or e-mail 504-909-9089 romey_410@hotmail.com

including

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

KITCHEN CABINET

52

Expecting moms, create a lasting memory of your pregnancy with a 3-D belly casting.

Embroidery, Screen Printing, Uniforms, Windows Signs, Vehicle Wrap, Magnetic Signs, Car Signs Banners, Aluminium Signs

Learning to dance is Fun & EASY with MrHappyfeet's Step By Step Proven Method! For Weddings, Parties & many other Special Occasions... • Ballroom • Salsa • Line Dancing • Jamaica • Swing • Weddings

Two Introductory Dance Lessons - Just $25 8308 Lafitte Ct. Chalmette Call Now (504) 432-5429 MrHappyfeetsDanceSteps.com

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE Residential • Commercial

Susana Palma

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

Light/General Housekeeping • Heavy Duty Cleaning Summer Cleaning • Supplies Provided

Se Habla Español

504-250-0884 • 504-286-5868 Fully Insured & Bonded

Vehicle V Vehic le e Wraps Wrrraps W aps Our Speciality!

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ON ING SO

COM

Why Choose Tony-Louis School Of Dance?

COOKING WITH A

Cougar

Allow me to cook & entertain in your home this season Wine Tasting & Book Signing

Sept. 24th, 5:00-8:00pm The Creole Grill 5241 Veterans Blvd.

SHOW A R T S E H & ORC U D I T O R I U M

BMACTA L L I S T EERR 2A5TH - 4 - 6sePeMa spectacular combination of O R C A E S Y CHINNEE U N I V E R8 S- I1T0 PM/ SEPChTinEeMseBVariety Art she.ow. Come $30 STUDENTS ional theatr T U L A BER 24TH ing a tradith traditional chinese EPTEM e perform S it b obats will blended w Chinese AcrStrength and Grace ic Images Representative of Actual Performers Gymnast For More Information: (504) 613-4727

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Real Estate For Rent &

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT CLERICAL

Employment

LOOKING FOR EXTRA INCOME???

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

AGENTS & SALES

Special Rates

BUY

FREE

Asst. Store Manager

Full Time Position Available. Bridal Experience Necessary. Send resume to stephanie@primadonnasclosest.com

Applies to line ad only.

CLERICAL

Receptionist

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Wed. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Thurs. 8:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. /Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

Advertise in

market PLACE

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

We are seeking dynamic receptionist oriented individuals with great communications and Typing skills needed to work on behalf of company. This service representative will earn up to $2000 monthly any job experience needed.

Email us at resume_j.holdings@w.cn if interested.

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

SOUS CHEF

Qualifications: 2-yrs exp. as Sous in highvolume kitchen; Work well under pressure; Broad product knowledge; Culinary Arts Degree a plus. Competitive salary, bonus, insurance, 401-K, dining discount, gym, & more Apply in person Mon – Fri • 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm 115 Bourbon Street or hr@neworleans-food.com Drug Free Workplace

oreo

Kennel #A11230519

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS

Outback & Local Runs. Free health Ins. & Benefits. CDl-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp. Requird. 888-380-5516.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR MEDICAL Full Time Exper. Med. Asst

ollie

Kennel #A11214606

Ollie is a 1-year-old, neutered, Holland Lop. He enjoys cuddling and snuggling and especially likes to have his ears rubbed. To meet Ollie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Busy Metaire Obgyn practice. Competitive Salary/Benefits. Email resume to lwscmgr@bellsouth.net.

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience Barback Positions

Apply in person Mon-Fri, 1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

SEASONAL TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Belcan Service Group, El Campo, TX, has 16 positions for rice. 3 mths experience req w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 10/12/10 - 12/31/10. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6034848

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place ad in The Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Oreo is a 6-month-old, neutered, Jack Russell/Chihuahua who is definitely a lap pup who likes to give kisses. He walks nicely on a leash and enjoys playing fetch. To meet Oreo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Chef Brian Katz now hiring

Coaches needed for Gymnastic & Tumbling classes. PT schedule is avail & flexible. For more info: 884-0907

Chef Chip Flanagan seeks

PRIVATE PARTY CHEF & SOUS CHEF

Each candidate must have: 4-yrs experience including 1-yr mgmt in fine dining; Culinary Arts Degree a +. Private Party Chef must have banquet or highend hotel experience. Competitive salary, bonus, insurance, 401-K, dining discount, gym, & more Apply in person Mon – Fri • 2pm – 4:00 pm 900 City Park Ave or hr@neworleans-food.com

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT

VOLUNTEER

CANON

HOSPICE Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

FIND IT HERE…

Weekly Tails

Call 504-717-5986

Call (504) 483-3100

53


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K 922-24 Dauphine $900K Great views of City Park & 4 unit French Quarter multiperfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking. br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

829 St. Roch Ave. $149K 1 bdrm, 1 ba, furn kit incl dishwasher, w/d, cen a/h, shed, rear yard. Excellent condition. Motivated seller!

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

faubourg st. john

GENTILLY

FRENCH QUARTER

2612 Esplanade Avenue $349k 3/2 with 2,300 sf renov; huge loftlike rooms w/ high ceils & all the New Orleans charm you’d expect. Bonus garage w/ remote entry! Colette Meister Re/Max Complete 504-220-1762 cell

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

4811 Constance

2/1 “Uptown Apartment”

$1100

1726 St. Charles

1/1 "Avenue Living"

$800

1303 Ursulines

1/1 "Near French Quarter"

$650

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

METAIRIE $79,900

Whitney Place Condo. Lovely 1 BD condo w/decorater updates. Light & bright. 756’ living space. Visit my website: www.sharrondemarest.com to view pics. SHARRON DEMAREST, cell: 504-250-6497.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $179,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

GENERAL REAL ESTATE

Southern Spirit REALTY, LLC

would like to welcome

Kimic Clay

Real Estate Professional

Serving the entire

New Orleans metropolitan area

`COMMERCIAL RENTALS

3108 CLEARY AVE CLEARY BUILDING

Office space, 460 sf 1/2 bath, renov, CCTV, 24 hr access, parking in front, side & rear. $460/mo. 504-250-7676

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 130 O.K. Ave

Great Fam Home 4 br, 2 ba, liv rm, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, Pets ok. garage. $1500/mo. 504-430-9903.

216 West

2bd/1ba apt in Harahan, 1000 sqft, prking, laundry, water paid $725 Call Terrence w/ Latter & Blum 450-9003 Nice area. 3br/1bat. Brick. All appls, New carpet, granite. Fenced yd. Yd maintained. $1200/mo + dep. No section 8. No smoking. 504-874-0599

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

METAIRIE

54

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

For rent Lakeview 1Bed/1BA. $900/Mo 1201 Canal St. 1 Bed/1BA. $1500/Mo For Sale 550 Aris Ave. 3 Bed/2 BA, New Price! $227,500 3701 Tulane Ave. 3 parcels. Call for info. 3615-21 Banks St. 3 parcels. Call for info.

Colleen Mooney, agent 504-236-7765 Vallon Real Estate 504-486-5437

1317 St. Phillip

2.5 blks frm qrt. across prk. hrdwd flr, ceil fans, eat-in-kitch, Bd,Liv, Ba, wtr pd, w/d hkp 504-482-6004.

C-a/h, wd flrs, furn kit, hkps, shed, nr st car, fncd bkyd, no smkrs/pets. $850+dep. 504-858-5389, 491-4056

DOWNTOWN 1 Bedroom Furnished Condo

Fully furnished 1 bed/1 bath condo in Warehouse District. Top floor unit with views of pool, courtyard, and city skyline. Loft with desk. Rent includes electric, cable, Internet, pool, gym, w/d. Secure building close to French Quarter, street car, parade route. $1500/mo. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988.

9804 JOEL AVE

504-352-1558 slidellkim@yahoo.com

CARROLLTON 3 BR SHOTGUN DBL

2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

EASTERN NEW ORLEANS 4619 BUNDY RD

Single brick home, 3BR, 2 baths, patio, fenced yard, off st prkg,off Chef Menteur Hwy. $950+dep. 504-433-9394

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 Royal St

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

Unit A, 1B/1B, cen A/H, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water included. Furnished. $1700/month. Call for appt 504952-3131

A HIDDEN GEM

1835 BURGUNDY - LWR Studio

FOR RENT OR SALE

2800 N. Rampart

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $660 & 1 br + study fr $795. Furn corporate avail. 780-1706 www.orrislaneapts.com 2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $950/mo. Sale $145,000. Call 427-1087

LUXURY APTS

2 BR, 1 1/2BA, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $750/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1050/mo - 914-882-1212

Studio, wd/cer flrs, Alcove kit, clst, a/c, fans, w/d on premises, no pets, low cost utils, $575+dep+lse. 504908-5210

Brand New Triplex. 2 BDRM/ 1 BA Each Unit. Corner Lot. $850-$1100/ month. Email realtorbev7045@gmail. com.

427 ESPLANADE APT/OFFICE Very bright 1br/1ba apt, LR, new kit w/ice maker & front balcony. First flr consists of 2 lrg rms & bath suitable for office or gallery. W/d, working fireplace $1200/mo, 504-529-3222

521 ROYAL STREET

Luxurious 2BR, 2.5BA, LR/DR. Elevator. Modern kit & baths. W/D, wd flrs & carpeted bdrms. 2000’, terrace. No pets. $2800/mo. Prestige Properties, 504-884-1925.

526 Dumaine

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

fully furn 1 br/1.5 ba, sec fl balc, hrd fls, w/w onsite, no pets $1500/mo/ dep. 504-236-5757. fqrental.com.

630 ST. PHILIP

Efficiency, $650. No pets. 269-9629 or cell # 458-6509.

FRENCH QUARTER LOFT

1226 Chartres. 1 bdrm apt, Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $900/mo Mike, 919-4583.


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE NEW RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $600 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

IRISH CHANNEL

2840 State St.

1/2 BlOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRs w hdwd/crpt flrs. $175/wk to 900/mo +depst. 504-202-0381,504738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

504.949.5400

BOATHOUSE

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@ fqr.com

Nice loft w/cathedral ceil, full kit, view of marina & lake. 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700/mo.Jennifer,504-250-9930 / HGI Realty 504-207-7575

RENTALS 1438 Chartres studio $750 1108 dauphine #6 1/1 $850

4810 St Charles Ave, 2 BR/2BA-Upper, 2000 sf, furn kit, wd flrs, w/d, no pets/smkrs. $2000/mo. 504-8994259

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail NOW. Paula 952-3131

MID CITY AMAZING RENOVATION

226 S Scott. Gutted/total renov upr apt. 2 br,1 ba 1.5 blk fr Canal St. Hdwd flrs, cer tile, w/d, blt-in appl, sec sys. $1200/mo/dep. Avl 8/1. 504-4555411.

Large Studio w/Balcony

Lovely 600 sq ft, wd flr, lots of windows full kit, w/d No pets. water incl $675 504-835-9099 avl aug 31

2 bdrms, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, A/H, w/d hkps, small bk yard. Wtr pd. $800/mo+dep • 897-9885, 256-3644

3915 Annunciation St.

Betw Gen Taylor & Austerlitz Sts. Newly remodeled 1 BR, wtr pd, cen a/h, appls incld. $650/mo. 504-508-1436

4419 St. Charles Ave.

2 BR, 2 BA lux condo, huge balcony, water paid, $2950/mo. 504-236-6896 see website @ www.balconycondo.com

6015 1/2 Annunciation

632 Gallier 2/1 $950

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

829 ursulines #1 1/1 $950 829 ursulines #5 1/1 $995 519 iberville #6 2/2 $1600 712 st philip 1/1 $1700

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

Furn effy. 1 br, sep lr/dr comb, a/h unit, ceil fans, wd/tile flrs, w/d onsite, lot of light. $550. 895-0016

1629 TOLEDANO #102

1/1, $900/mo. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504432-1034 Keller Wiiliams.

1711 Second St

1 blk to St. Charles, Renov’t 3rd fl loft, lots of windows, fur kit, w/d on site $650. 895-4726 or 261-7611.

1726 FOUCHER

GENTILLY LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

2BR w/Balcony

3526 CONSTANCE ST

www. frenchquarterrealty.com

French Quarter realty’S 2009 toP ProDucer

3b/2b Single Cottage. lr, dr, funr kit. C a/h w/d. hard wood flrs ceil fans $1850. 899-7657.

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

Upstairs, 1 bedroom, liv rm, din rm, kit w/ appls incld, front porch. $750/ month. Call 504-606-1845

1730 NAPOLEON AVE

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 443-4488

close to audubon park 1-2b/1ba lower apt, furn kit, w/d, yard, pets ok, $600/m 504-957-1233

6126 DELORD

Between State & Palmer Ave. Renov 2 br half dbl, 1 ba, wd flrs, cen a/h, fully equip kit, w/d, rear yd, porch. Avl Aug 1. $1195/mo. S. Talbot, O/A. 975-9763.

504-949-5400 1/1 newly renov singl shotgun hse $525

830 St Philip “G”

1/1 Hi Ceils, Lg Balc, Prkng, Exc Loc

1125 N Rampart “3”

1/1 Lots Nat Light, walk-in closet, Exc Loc $700

1104 Music “A”

1/1 Freshly painted,Lots Nat Light,Hi Ceils $585

1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool

$1995

$1995

829 Ursulines #1

1/1 furnished w/wifi, tile floors

833 Ursulines #5

1/1 Lotsofwindows,newcarpet,crtyrd $1050

1438 Chartres

Studio Renov in great location

$950 $750

448 Julia Unit #219

1/1 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950

552 Metairie lawn

3/2 Corner lot WD/DW Parking Pets OK $1400

835 St Louis

2/2 Central heat w/d ctyd

739 ½ Gov Nicholls

1/1 Util included, furn., great loc!

$950

315 Chartres USQ

1/1 2 balconies,great renovation

$1800

1704 Napoleon

1/1 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800

632 Gallier

2/1 all the amenities! w/d&crtyrd.

712 St. Philip

1/1 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1700

$1600

1b loft fully furn, pool, w/d onsite, shared balc, no pets $1250/m/dep 504-236-5757, FQRental.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

1/2 dbl, 2 rms & furn kit, w/d avail, c-a/h, crtyd. Camp & Toledano Sts. No Dogs please. $650/mo. 319-0531. One person studio. Near TU Univ. $580/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

1/1 furnished condo w/ PARKING!

1108 Dauphine #6

1/1 wd flr, 10ft ceil, window units, crtyrd $850

232 Decatur #3A

1/1 Furnished, balc w/ grt views! $1950

$1850

of

Aloha

504-258-3389

Woodland Oaks Center

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB

LICENSED MASSAGE Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown) Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452. Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

Alicia Whittington

RENOV’T - GR. LOCATIONS!

#1 NAPOLEON 1 BR/1BA, laund. $650/mo. #2 S. JOHNSON NEAR CLAIBORNE 2BR/1BA, Double, w/d hkkps, $875/ mo. 891-2420

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

ART/POSTERS ART COLLECTION

SPECIAL

CHIHUAHUAS

JIM LEISURE PAINTING

YORKIES AND MALTESE

Original 3 x 5’ painting by Jim Leisure of St. Germain. Absolutely gorgeous! Paid $6000, asking $5000. Call 985290-2230.

$50

Swedish & Deep Tissue

Nice Ridgelake Dr. Location LA Lic# 520

call

601.303.7979 Appts M - F

• 9am-9pm

BODY HEAVEN Stressed Out? Tense? A Thai massage increases your flexibility & relaxes you. Also Cert. in Deep Tissue & Swedish & Hot Stone Reflexology Incalls LA #3182. Call Kevin

504-453-4844

AKC 1 M, 2 F, chocolate, 1st shots, vet checked, $400. 504-459-5307 AKC. pups and young adults. show/ pet. all sizes teacup and regular 504737-1234

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

PETS

STIFFNESS?

Try my Streching Techniques 60/90/2 hour sessions

5mo male fully train blk/brindle/wh fixed cuddly top family pet 504-5597654

Vintage Photography, Tribal Art, Glass & Ceramics. Call Michael, (504) 913-2872

Relax Today 1 HOUR

PETS FOR SALE Boston Terrior AKC

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Neuromuscular Therapy • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

2 ba, upr, furn kit, d/w, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, c-fans, sec, hkps, prchs, nr univs/ st car, wtr pd, no smkrs, $1900 • 897-3539, 723-2726 cell.

Compl renov duplex, just steps to mag. 2 Bd/1.5 Ba, den, kitchen, refrig. w/ ice maker, stove w. micro hd, d/w, w/d, cA/H. ceiling fans, hrdwd flrs, exposed brick, 24/ hr sec. Sorry no smkrs/pets. $1875. 891-8977

MERCHANDISE

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ON AUDUBON PARK / 2 BR

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4d xe Sport model. fully load 40k miles $200 down take over payments $88/m w/warranty 504-836-9801 24hrs

PET ADOPTIONS Kit Kit

KIT KAT, Muted Gray Tabby, appx. 7 mos old, Vet, Ck/Vacs/Spay/ Rescue/Litter Trained Super Sweet Lap Cat, Rescue (504) 460-0136

KITTENS

2 months old, very sweet. Vet Checked, vacs, rescue, litter trained. Will be spay/neutered when old enough. (504) 512-0306

Lollipop and Jellybean

16wk old sweet playful kittens with personality plus, spayed/neutered ,shots, microchip. rescue 504 462-1968

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

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small terrier mix very sweet female, 7 yrs old ,loves cats and dogs, rescue 504 462-1968 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, great companion and loves everything,VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Hsbkn /microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136. NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, great companion and loves everything,VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Hsbkn /microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

05 Ford focus

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Maxine

AUTOMOTIVE

7535 JEANNETTE ST

941 Royal

French Quarter Realty

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55


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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56

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now on bestofneworleans.com upgrade your ad to print in front of

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

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57


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS CONDO IN OLD JEFFERSON NEW LISTING

1802 AUDUBON TRACE PRISTINE CONDITION! 2 story condo features hardwood floors on first level, wood burning fireplace. Adorable courtyard. Large master bedroom & lots of natural light. Exquisite community w/2lrg inground pools. Conveniently locate. $195,000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

(504) 895-4663

58

FALL FIX-UP Advertise your home & garden services.

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CLASSIFIEDS Explore HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS

BULLETIN BOARD TOO

www.HauntedHistoryTours.com 504-861-2727

$95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122

URBANSUBURBANSOLARSALES.COM

$295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403

888-316-7029

PHYSICIANS, NURSES, and PATIENTS To be better served in the area!!!

CAFÉ/store front FOR LEASE At

2633 NAPOLEON MEDICAL BUILDING Busy Medical District Telephone (504) 891-8011 facilitymanager@mainlandcompanies.net

AVANCEZ TA L E N T S T U D I O

• Want to be in the Movies? • Want to be walking on a runway? • Want a career in Movies? Modeling? Dancing?

Arts & Rhythm

BALLROOM DANCING STUDIO

Call Avancez today for an appt.

504-231-4313

We are auditioning now for potential talent to work in the local market.

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Banu Gibson Swinging Jazz

SEPTEMBER 16

Walk In & Dance Out

If you're sitting at home & you would like to get out there, meet interesting people & have fun...

Arts & Rhythm

BALLROOM DANCING STUDIO

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL

5 Lessons For $25

3 Private • 1 Class • 1 Party

Learn all the latest steps to all the latest dances! • Foxtrot • Waltz • Cha-Cha

Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

• Hustle • Swing • Country & Western

4413 - 4415 I-10 Service Rd • Metairie Office: (504) 883-5061 • Cell: (504) 231-4313

“Professional training in mixology and casino dealing”

Dealingschool.com • 1-800-Bartend

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 14 > 2010

Call Us Today & Come Dance!

Adults = $8 / Children 5-12 = $4 Children 4 & Under = FREE

59


TICKET ON SAL S NOW! E

FRIDAY, SEPT. 24 NEW ORLEANS ARENA TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT TICKETMASTER.COM, ALL TICKETMASTER LLOCATIONS AND THE BOX OFFICE. CHARGE BY PHONE 800-745-3000. Produced by RED MOUNTAIN ENTERTAINMENT and BLUE DEUCE ENTERTAINMENT


Gambit - September 14, 2010