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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: A PRISON RODEO ON FILM PAGE 39 | DINNER AT ANTOINE’S PAGE 59

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DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430

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Camp Swan 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ November 19, 20, 21 â&#x20AC;˘

Camp Swan is a three-day, two-night camp for children age 7-12 who have lost a parent, sibling, or other significant person in their life. The camp combines art, music, individual and group therapies so that so that the need of each child can be addressed. Through these therapeutic experiences the children learn how to have a proper outlet for their feelings of sadness. The Camp takes place at beautiful Bayou Segnette and will take place November 19th, 20th, 21st, 2010. The Camp is sponsored by Canon Hospice and the Akula Foundation. The Camp is free of charge. We are currently accepting applications for volunteers and for children to participate in the camp.

For information, contact Sue may at 504-818-2723 x 3012.

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VOLUNTEERS WANTED

Working with the patient and their families, assisting bereavement dept & volunteer with our nursing staff. Good opportunity to earn school service hours.

504-818-2723 ext. 3016 Ask for Volunteer Coordinator

"Studio Courtyard," an oil painting by the noted New Orleans painter Clarence Millet, ANA, (d.1959), will be included in the "Louisiana Purchase" auction by Neal Auction Company, 4038 Magazine St., on Nov. 20 or 21. One of very few Louisiana artists to be included in the National Academy of Art.

See www.nealauction.com for more information.


To date, with your help, Abita SOS has raised $225,000 to help Save Our Shore. “Since we haven’t been able to fish, we’ve had a hard time paying our mortgage. The help we received from the Abita Brewing Company helped us make ends meet.” –Brian P., St. Bernard Parish Fisherman

“Since I haven’t been able to fish, I’ve been so worried. I’m very happy to receive this money from Abita.” –Steven T., Lafitte, translated from Vietnamese We will continue brewing our charitable pilsner and making a 75¢ donation from every bottle sold for a full year. The Abita Brewing Company is committed to the preservation and restoration of our wetlands and our way of life.

Visit SOS.abita.com to make a donation, create your own SOS message or purchase SOS merchandise.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

“I’m grateful to the Abita SOS Charitable Fund for their help. I have felt desperate lately because there was no way I could pay my bills and I haven’t been able to go back to work as a deckhand. This money will give me a chance to catch up.” –Female Fisherman from Plaquemines Parish

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NOVEMBER 02, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 44

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES Cover Story 17 POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS Gambit’s annual 40 Under 40

Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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News

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Budgeting for animal control services New Orleans know-it-all

Trying to get to know Charlie Melancon and David Vitter a bit better — it’s not easy This week’s heroes and zeroes

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Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

MAKE NACHO MAMA'S YOUR HOME FOR THE BLACK & GOLD + YOUR FAVORITE COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAM!

A night(mare) at the museum: a new exhibit about Katrina opens at the Old U.S. Mint

Shop Talk Pho Hoa

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VIEWS Clancy DuBos / Politics

A bipartisan political summit at Tulane Nov. 9

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Chris Rose is recovering from surgery.

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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39 A documentarian takes on a prison rodeo and some musical New Orleans families

Gambit Picks

39

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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Best bets for your busy week

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COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON COVER PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER, GARY LOVERDE AND ROMAGUERA PHOTOGRAPHY

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, CHRIS ROSE, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS NICOLE CARROLL, MORGAN RIBERA, JAMIE CARROLL

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR DORA SISON SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ INTERN MARK WAGUESPACK DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERNS SARAH SOLOMON, ALLISON WOLFE CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE SARAH BEARDEN 483-3124 ········sarahb@gambitweekly.com SALES CONSULTANT MARY LOU NOONAN 985-809-9933 ··········maryloun@bellsouth.net MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN WEBSITE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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MARIA BOUÉ

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


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Jewish Community Center - Uptown 5342 St. Charles Ave. New Orleans, LA 70115 504.897.0143

Goldring-Woldenberg JCC - Metairie 3747 W. Esplanade Ave. Metairie, LA 70002 504.887.5158

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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Pres Forum Fall 2010 Ads_44-910 Pres Forum Gambit Climate Change Ad 10/25/10 1:41 PM Page 1

TURBULENT TIMES: 100 Years of Environmental Change

Open House for Grades 6-12 Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010 5:30 p.m.

For more information or to schedule a personal tour call (504) 736-9917

2010 PRESIDENT’S FORUM SERIES

Join us for a lecture by environmental historian John McNeill, Ph.D. What have we done to provoke events in the most environmentally turbulent century in human history?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

McNeill will discuss environmental change around the world in the past century, with in an effort to explain why the global climate has been in turmoil.

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225 Green Acres Road Metairie, LA 70003-2484 (504) 733-0353 www.stmsaints.com St. Martin’s Episcopal School, a coed, prekindergarten through grade 12 independent school, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, religion, national or ethnic origin.

The school that will change his life.

Thursday, November 11 7:30 p.m. Nunemaker Auditorium Monroe Hall Free and open to the public

Prospective students and their families are invited to experience Jesuit’s…

Open House Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Tours begin at 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, & 7:00 PM Contact Jesuit Admissions Office: admissions@jesuitnola.org; (504) 483-3936

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Jesuit High School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its admissions, educational, or athletic policies.


commentAry

thinking out loud

Budgetary Dog Days s municipalities across the country grapple with shortfalls, animal control budgets have been getting the ax. New Orleans faces a double whammy: a deficit and the maladroit budgeting of former Mayor Ray Nagin’s administration, which failed to account for complete funding of the Louisiana SPCA, the nonprofit which has traditionally provided animal control for the city by contract. This year, the money ran out at the beginning of October, meaning after-hours animal control services are now handled by the New Orleans Police Department’s K-9 unit. Stray animals are not being captured or trapped, and private veterinarians will be called upon to quarantine animals that bite people. It’s an unsustainable, patchwork approach, and coming up with a permanent alternative should be a priority for the New Orleans City Council over the next two weeks as the council works on the 2011 budget. The 2010 allotment for animal control was $2.1 million, which SPCA director Ana Zorrilla says covers only nine months of the year. Animal control in New Orleans, she says, costs $3 million annually, of which the SPCA raises $500,000. Meanwhile, Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin told the council on the first day of budget hearings that the Landrieu Administration is prepared to spend only $1.5 million on animal control in

A

2011, halving what the SPCA says it needs. “We are looking at all options — bringing it in house or contracting it out to somebody else,” Kopplin says. In our view, it’s hard to imagine an organization that could do the job better or more cost effectively than the Louisiana SPCA. The group has handled animal control for the city since it was founded in 1888 — a 122year public-private partnership. When its Japonica Street headquarters was wiped out in the floodwaters following Hurricane Katrina, the SPCA built a new s t ate - o f-the -ar t facility in Algiers in record time, and its former director, Laura Maloney, was just named chief of staff of the United States Humane Society. We’d like to know who, locally, the Landrieu Administration thinks has a better track record than that. The mayor has a tough job, but any delay in finding a permanent solution will make things exponentially worse. As stray animals breed, this problem will just get bigger and more expensive. (Remember the population explosion among strays in the year after Hurricane Katrina?) With so many rebuilding tasks ahead, it makes little sense for the administration to create a new city agency to manage animal control. It makes even less sense to sever ties with a well-run nonprofit that has been serving New Orleans so well for more than a century.

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CITY LIGHTS. YOGA NIGHTS.

Vote this tuesday uesday, Nov. 2, is Election Day across Louisiana and across America. In last week’s issue, we made our recommendations in various important state and local elections. While we spend considerable time studying the issues and the candidates before making our endorsements, and while we hope our readers take our recommendations to heart, we want more than anything else for our readers to participate in the democratic process by voting. We therefore present our recommendations again below — and we urge everyone, whether you agree with us or not, to vote on Tuesday. U.S. Senate — Charlie Melancon. In our view, Louisiana needs a new senator. The incumbent has distinguished himself in the wrong ways, whereas Melancon offers a chance for our state to put its best foot forward. He is a conservative Democrat who has demonstrated his

t

commitment to put Louisiana’s interests ahead of party affiliation. Congress, 2nd District — Cedric Richmond. As a state lawmaker, Richmond has a good record for getting things done and for reaching across the aisle to work with members of the other party. Lt. Governor — Jay Dardenne. Dardenne has a proven track record of prudent management in the Secretary of State’s office, and after nearly two decades in public office he is ready for this next step. State Constitutional Amendments: Amendment 1 — FOR Amendment 2 — FOR Amendment 3 — FOR Amendment 4 — AGAINST Amendment 5 — FOR Amendment 6 — FOR Amendment 7 — FOR Amendment 8 — FOR Amendment 9 — FOR Amendment 10 — AGAINST

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

The New Orleans Athletic Club offers nighttime, rooftop yoga classes.* Relax your mind and invigorate your body with classes in Jivamukti, Vinyasa Flow, Restorative, Sivananda high above the hustle and bustle of the city below.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com *Outdoor yoga classes are weather permitting. At times, classes may be held in the rooftop studio

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step in for our fa bulous

blake

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Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, HOW DID THE TERMS “DIXIE” AND “DIXIELAND” COME INTO BEING? WHAT DO THEY REALLY MEAN?

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Join us for our Open House TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 • 6 PM

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NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

FOLLOW US ON

DEAR PATRICIA, The Citizens Bank and Trust of New Orleans, which was established in 1833, became known across the United States for printing $10 notes with the word “DIX,” the French word for 10, on the back. From these notes came the nicknames “Dixie” and “Dixieland.” Citizens Bank was one of the strongest banks in the South throughout the 1800s and into the 1900s. In 1924, it merged with the Canal Bank and Trust Company, which also had been around since the 1830s, and the new bank thrived until the Great Depression. In 1933, the federal government shut down all commercial banks nationwide in response to the Depression, and the Canal Bank was not given a license to reopen. On May 20, 1933, however, the National Bank of Commerce (NBC) opened; as part of a reorganization plan, many customers of Canal Bank became depositors of NBC. Over the next four years, the bank increased its assets from $3 million to $50 million and in 1971 became the First National Bank of Commerce. That bank was later acquired by Bank One, which in turn was bought by J.P. Morgan Chase. The First National Bank of Commerce that operates in New Orleans today is unrelated to the original FNBC. It is locally owned and received its charter from the Louisiana Office of Financial Institutions in May 2006 with an initial capitalization of more than $60 million. HEY BLAKE, WHEN I WAS IN ITALY SOME YEARS AGO, I SPOTTED A SQUASH ON A FRUIT AND VEGETABLE STAND AND TOLD A FRIEND IT WAS A “GUGUTZA.” SHE ACCUSED ME OF MAKING UP THE NAME. IS THERE SUCH A THING AS A GUGUTZA, AND DOES IT HAVE ANOTHER, BETTER KNOWN NAME? MABEL

DEAR MABEL, You didn’t make up the name, but you did spell it wrong. The proper spelling is cucuzza — although many in south Louisiana use a variant of the phonetic spelling you employed. Cucuzza is a

Sicilian word for a long squash, which can be prepared similar to zucchini and summer squash. Cucuzza is pale green in color and the flesh inside is white. Technically, it’s not a squash but a gourd, and if dried can be used as a drinking vessel, giving it an alternate name of “bottle gourd.” You should peel cucuzza before preparing it, but both the flesh and seeds are edible.

A copy of the Citizens Bank and Trust of New Orleans’ $10 bill that inspired the terms Dixie and Dixieland. HEY BLAKE, WHEN THE OLD 1ST DISTRICT POLICE STATION WAS BUILT ON NORTH RAMPART STREET, WASN’T IT USED AS THE CITY HALL, AND WASN’T THERE SOME CONTROVERSY OVER AN ARTWORK THAT WAS TO ADORN THE FRONT OF THE BUILDING? HARRY HART

DEAR HARRY, Your memory is partially correct. The structure, which was constructed in 1951 and has since been replaced by a new 1st District station at 501 N. Rampart St., originally was the Municipal Courts Building and police station. The city hired artist Enrique Alferez to create a sculpture for the front of the building. He produced The Family, which depicted the anatomically correct nude bodies of a man, woman and child holding hands. The piece was cast in concrete and sheathed in aluminum. The frontal nudity offended the congregation at the nearby Our Lady of Guadalupe church and other members of the public, and was condemned as obscene. The statue was taken down and sold at an auction for $2,400 to A.E. Truxillo, who placed it in the cocktail lounge of the St. Francis Hotel, which he owned. After Truxillo died, the artwork was passed down to his descendants.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 15 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“I don’t feel comfortable standing next to the man. That’s the truth.” — State Rep. Ernest Wooton of Belle Chasse, a thirdparty Senatorial candidate, as he stood next to U.S. Sen. David Vitter at the Oct. 27 debate hosted by WDSU-TV. When Vitter protested, Wooton delivered the finishing blow: “You’re not standing next to a hypocrite. I am.” “Louisiana is in the midst of the most serious budget crisis in our history, and our governor is absent without leave. I shouldn’t be surprised. … As our colleges and universities face crippling budget cuts and the future of our health care system is in doubt, Jindal himself is not minding the store. Who can keep track of where he is these days? I don’t know if he’s campaigning for another politician in California, Wisconsin or New Hampshire, or raising money for himself in Texas or Maryland.” — Rep. John Bel Edwards, D-Amite, in a letter to the editor of the Baton Rouge Advocate, Oct. 26. That day, Gov. Bobby Jindal was in New Mexico at a fundraiser.

DEBATE CLUB

The Men Behind the Ads

PAGE 13

c'est what?

BY JEREMY ALFORD

hat has become of modern politics? Petty spying has replaced issues-based campaigns, videos of half-truths are standing in for public debates, and candidates have become brands, rather than human beings — especially in Louisiana’s U.S. Senate race. In today’s politics, anybody can drop a dime and become an influencer, even if he or she is peddling fiction from the shadows. We rarely see anything personal about the candidates — unless it’s embarrassing. If a staffer were to interrupt President

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Barack Obama or Gov. Bobby Jindal during a press conference to replace their batteries, many of us might not even blink. So we asked the challenger, Rep. Charlie Melancon, and incumbent Sen. David Vitter to get real, just for a few moments, to talk about their childhoods, college days, families, interests and disinterests. The end results (or lack thereof) say more about the candidates than all their ads put together. THE MEL ANCON CAMPAIGN AGREED TO LET THE

WHOM DO YOU SUPPORT IN THE NOV. 2 U.S. SENATE RACE?

65%

Charlie Melancon

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Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

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THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

have formed the CP3 Afterschool Zone, a partnership to team up with local schools to offer sports, art, music and homework help for local children, including free transportation. Paul and Chase each donated $500,000 to get the program underway, and the Afterschool Zone was kicked off at a press conference Oct. 28 at KIPP Central City Primary School.

The Quincy Jones Musiq Consortium

donated a new piano to the Mahalia Jackson Center, the Central City facility that offers Head Start programs, health screenings and other services with the goal of preparing babies and toddlers to enter school ready to succeed. The piano will be dedicated in an event Nov. 2 featuring a performance by pianist Carmen White.

Liberation Through Education and the Youth Rescue Initiative

gave away more than 1,000 books to local kids Oct. 30 to commemorate Family Literacy Day. At the book fair, held at Borders on St. Charles Avenue, adult storytellers read from their favorite children’s stories, and children in attendance were given vouchers and allowed to select their own books.

Tim Profitt,

a county coordinator for Rand Paul’s Kentucky Senate campaign, was caught on video stepping on the head of Lauren Valle, an anti-Paul protestor outside a debate Oct. 25, giving her a concussion and spraining her shoulder and arm. After Profitt was fired, he was unrepentant and unapologetic, suggesting Valle should apologize to him instead. It was a low point even in a gutter-level election season.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

FORCED TO SHED THEIR GAME FACES, DAVID VITTER AND CHARLIE MELANCON FINALLY OPEN UP … A LITTLE.

Rep. Charlie Melancon (left) hopes to defeat incumbent David Vitter in the Nov. 2 race for Vitter’s U.S. Senate seat.

At the Oct. 27 U.S. Senate candidates debate hosted by WDSU-TV, incumbent Sen. David Vitter and Democratic challenger Rep. Charlie Melancon were joined by four thirdparty candidates: Randall Todd Hayes (Libertarian), William McShan (Reform Party), Mike Spears (Independent) and state Rep. Ernest Wooton (Independent). Melancon and Vitter, predictably, took plenty of swipes at each other, but Wooton — like Glenn Close in the movie Basic Instinct — would not be ignored. “I know you don’t recognize this, David,” he told Vitter, “but we’re your opponents, too.” In response to moderator Norman Robinson’s first question

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really funny,â&#x20AC;? he says, referring to last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zach Galifianakis romp. Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Animal House, the 1978 fraternity spoof that lifted John Belushi to new levels of stardom as frat slob Bluto Blutarsky. Melancon says with a chuckle that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reason he relates to the movie â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as the ending credits roll, the future of each character is revealed. Bluto becomes U.S. Sen. Blutarsky. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art mimics life,â&#x20AC;? Melancon says. Did Melancon party that much during his college days (he was Kappa Sigma) at what is now the University of Louisiana at Lafayette? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was the original party animal,â&#x20AC;? he says, laughing. He also admits to being called into the assistant deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office once for a minor prank. Musically, Melancon can name all the local radio stations in Acadiana that play Cajun music and almost immediately called out Dr. John, who is related to Peachy and is scheduled to play a fundraiser for Melancon in the Crescent City home of Democratic consultant James Carville. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You should see his texts,â&#x20AC;? Peachy says of Dr. John, who once described Hurricane Katrina as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sippiana Hericaneâ&#x20AC;? in a 2005 album. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re indecipherable.â&#x20AC;? Peachy has become a staple on the campaign trail. She has an opinion on everything and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shy about sharing it with folks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or the congressman. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also not beyond her to interrupt one of her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speeches. (At the Abita Brew Pub, she joined in the discussion, but showed more interest in her beer and the LSU-Auburn football game.) Aside from his congressional salary, her income from a storage rental facility is the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only outside income, though Peachy is technically retired. The Melancons clearly enjoy each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company. They have two grown children â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charles Joseph, known as Seph, and Claire â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a grandchild, Jack. The congressman chuckled slightly when remembering how he originally made the moves on his future wife. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met her in an elevator in 1971,â&#x20AC;? he says, in New Orleans while both were working on Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; historic run for governor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would go on walks and then just started doing more and more until we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t getting home until after midnight. I think we were only engaged for two or three months.â&#x20AC;? Melancon, the grandson and greatgrandson of sugar cane farmers, was born and has spent most of his life in Napoleonville. He grew up on a deadend street called Hog-Pen Alley, not far from where he lives now, but Melancon did not want for anything as a child. His page 12

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candidate field a few questions over beer at the Abita Brew Pub in Abita Springs. Melancon, a Cajun Democrat, declined the free beer and ordered iced tea. His D.C. press secretary, Robin Winchell, and Peachy, his wife of 38 years, each had Abitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall Fest, an Oktoberfest variety. The rest of the staff sat at the bar. With a guarantee that nothing would be off limits, Melanconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interview veered into strange corners: â&#x20AC;˘ Cockfighting: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a Louisiana trade that died hard. It was important not only in the rural areas, but all over the state. It was a bit macabre, though. It was time for it to end.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Baggy pants laws: Melancon says the government shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in the business of telling anyone what to wear, but added heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personally against baggy pants. He recounted a story from an evening in New Orleans where a young man was shot in a dispute because his pants kept sliding off. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run,â&#x20AC;? Melancon says, shaking his head. â&#x20AC;˘ Personal health: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hypoglycemic,â&#x20AC;? he says, referring to the medical condition of low levels of blood glucose. â&#x20AC;˘ Interracial marriage and gay and lesbian relationships: â&#x20AC;&#x153;People marry who they love. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their business.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ UFOs: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess a full moon comes out every so often. But if they exist, I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen one.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Political folklore: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard [former governor] Edwin Edwards had a bit of tennis elbow from shaking so many hands.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Non-biodegradable cheeseburgers: â&#x20AC;&#x153;For some reason, ever since this oil spill, I feel like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve eaten more fast food than I ever cared to.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Marijuana: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe in medicinal marijuana. â&#x20AC;Ś But smoking marijuana can lead to harder substitutes. Alcohol, the same thing. At the same time, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just filling all of our jails with people who smoke marijuana,â&#x20AC;? Melancon says before adding â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only a matter of timeâ&#x20AC;? before the issues of medicinal applications and decriminalization need to be examined more closely. Melancon, who turned 63 in October, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much of a reader, just perusing hunting and fishing periodicals mostly. He couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t name the last book he read or his favorite novel. He says he recently tried to get through the new Edwards biography by Baton Rouge writer Leo Honeycutt, but quit after a few chapters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get about 15 minutes into a book and my eyes shut,â&#x20AC;? he confesses. He does have a fondness for comedic films. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought The Hangover was

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father, Joseph U. Melancon, was mayor of Napoleonville and his mother, Niceé “Brownie” Talbot Melancon, was a civic activist. The congressman admits his father’s public service took away some quality father time, but it did not make him rebellious. “I knew if I did anything, I mean anything, they would find out,” Melancon recalls. “But it was an experience that served me well.” As expecTed, lANdINg AN INTervIew with david vitter — even a nonpolitical one — proved to be difficult; the senator agrees to few interviews. A phone message left for his flack seeking a personal encounter turned into requesting others associated with the campaign to carry a message seeking an interview and then, finally, into a flurry of emails asking for responses in any fashion. The end product was an email response directly from vitter. vitter, a 49-year-old Metairie republican, was asked all of the same questions as Melancon, but the senator cherry-picked the topics he wanted to discuss — which did not include UFOs, medical marijuana or interracial and gay and lesbian marriages. • Interests: “My best friend, claude, and I have a weekly tennis match, which we get to every other month.” • Architecture: “I did the initial design of our house that we built.” • Favorite book that was turned into a movie: To Kill a Mockingbird (also alltime favorite movie, with Casablanca running a close second). • Favorite musicals: The Sound of Music and The One and Only Genuine Original Family Band. • Favorite books: The Last Gentleman, A Confederacy of Dunces and And Then There Were None. • Television: The Dick Van Dyke Show, Everybody Loves Raymond, Monk (“The big bonus is my kids watch it with me”) and Fawlty Towers (“A great British situation comedy starring Monty python’s John cleese”). • Food: “I love ice cream.” vitter was born and reared in New Orleans, arguably the most liberal region of louisiana, but later settled in Metairie, one of the most conservative parts of the state. state House district 81, which vitter represented in the early 1990s, has one of the highest concentrations of white voters in louisiana. It sent former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard david duke to the legislature, and its current representative, John laBruzzo, has grabbed headlines for wanting to drug test welfare recipients. vitter’s roots actually run much deeper in New Orleans than in Jefferson parish. He graduated from de la salle

High school in 1979. He played first clarinet in the high school band to wynton Marsalis’ second trumpet. “Our musical paths diverge slightly after that,” vitter says, “meaning he went to Juilliard and lincoln center and I did not.” vitter says he also digs Harry connick Jr., but that might just be an opportunity to mention that his wife, wendy, was chief of trials for former New Orleans district Attorney Harry connick sr. vitter also is a huge New Orleans saints fan and once sent a black-andgold themed family christmas card. Then there’s this: “My best job growing up was working for Blaine Kern studios, the Mardi gras float builders. However, I was only allowed to paint floats the white primer coat.” He was the youngest of six children, as was wendy, and together they have their own brood — three daughters, sophie, lise, and Airey; and a son, Jack. “All of my waking time falls into two categories,” he says, “working on behalf of my fellow citizens of louisiana, which I love, and doing things with my family, which I love even more. wendy and I both tutor our 13-year-old [twin] latin scholars, attend their volleyball games, follow 8-year-old Jack’s soccer career and try to get penciled into 17-year-old sophie’s busy social calendar whenever possible.” His parents, Audrey Malvina st. raymond and Albert leopold vitter, were both New Orleans natives as well. “They were dedicated christians and great personal examples,” vitter says. “My dad was a petroleum engineer and mom a homemaker with a social work degree. Neither of them were very politically minded, but both were super supportive of me.” politics weren’t even on the radar back then for vitter. “growing up, at various times, I wanted to be an astronaut, a singer/actor and a diplomat,” he recalls. Today, he’s a U.s. senator, which makes the future version of Bluto in Animal House a better fit for vitter than Melancon. Few voters see him in that light, however, thanks to the tightly controlled images and messages put forth by both campaigns. politics will probably always be that way — candidates will hold back enough to seem wholesome and normal … unless we all begin asking more pointed questions about medicinal marijuana, UFOs and ice cream. Jeremy Alford is a freelance journalist based in Baton Rouge. You can reach him through his Web site at www.jeremyalford.com.


scuttlebutt

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on family values, Vitter trotted out his “serious sins” line and then changed the subject, but Wooton would have none of it. In acid tones, he hammered Vitter for continuing to employ aide Brent Furer despite Furer’s arrest for drunk driving and conviction on domestic-violence charges. Even Wooton’s closing statement was a jeremiad: “I am a very serious candidate for senator,” he said. “David Vitter is a hypocrite.” The following night, at WWL-TV’s debate, it was Melancon who came out swinging. “Mr. Vitter has a problem with truth,” he said, referring repeatedly to Vitter’s prostitute scandal as “illicit activities” and calling him “a pathological liar.” In a moment reminiscent of Lloyd Bentsen’s takedown of Dan Quayle in the 1988 vice-presidential debate, Melancon said quietly, “David, you’ve never had family values.” It was Vitter’s first live-television appearance in which he was called to account for his serious sin, though he declined to say just what that was when asked. “I have received forgiveness from my wife, from my family and from my God,” he said. Asked repeatedly by the moderators if he broke the law, Vitter continued to dodge the question. “I think the voters of Louisiana heard me and understood me,” he said. “I’m looking forward, not backward.” Shortly after, he expressed support for repealing the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which was adopted in 1868 during Reconstruction. — Kevin Allman The WWL-TV poll by Clarus Research Group of Washington, D.C., contained a lot more information than the sta-

entergy’S 20-year Plan

Entergy New Orleans (ENO) unveiled its preliminary blueprint last week for a plan to provide reasonable-cost electricity through the year 2028. The plan is called the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) and will create an energy portfolio based on three criteria: reliability, lowest cost to the customer and economic risk. Tony Walz, Entergy’s director of planning analysis, says the utility is “constantly reevaluating resource alternatives and costs” and keeping tabs on emerging technologies such as wind, solar and hydroelectric. At this time, he says, renewable resources are “too costly.” “Certainly, in the future, we expect costs to go down,” Walz added, noting also that nuclear power won’t be economical in the next decade. Instead, the

company looks to fill its portfolio with combined-cycle gas turbine power, which he called “the most attractive option.” The IRP process began in 2008. Last year, as part of preliminary planning, ENO assumed it would need to find more alternative resources because two of Entergy’s six subsidiaries — in Mississippi and Arkansas — are breaking away from the Entergy system to form independent utilities. Renewable resources, in the short term, are off the table, Walz says. He cited difficulty transporting energy from wind and solar facilities to the grid, and he worries that because those resources don’t produce “on demand,” ENO would have to keep other plants running, thus increasing costs. In addition, some alternative sources of energy are expensive in and of themselves. Walz said one 500 megawatt gas-fired plant produces as much electricity as 400 wind turbines — but the gas-fired plant is a $600 million investment, whereas that many wind turbines would cost $2 billion. A long-term plan shows renewable resources potentially in the energy portfolio by the 2020s. Meanwhile, ENO hopes consumer-driven efficiency measures will help reduce the company’s environmental impact and keep costs down. Melonie Hall, ENO customer service director, announced a SmartView pilot program beginning in June 2011. The program will give 7,400 low-income customers monitors to gauge their energy use in real time. The program was developed via a $5 million federal stimulus grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Entergy is accepting public comments on the IRP on its website, www.entergy-neworleans.com/IRP. — Alex Woodward

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Night(mare) at the Museum By Jamie Carroll

n Oct. 26, the Louisiana State Museum opened “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina & Beyond” in the Presbytere on Jackson Square. Mayor Mitch Landrieu, city officials and donors attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the $7.5 million exhibit. “We lost a lot, but we gained a tremendous amount as well,” Landrieu said at the ceremony. “This is a tale of redemption and resurrection.” The exhibit chronicles the effects of the storm, levee failures and the recovery efforts of Louisiana residents. Louisiana State Museum director Sam Rykels conceived the exhibit days after Hurricane Katrina. “From the moment we entered Kenner, we knew that this

O

was going to shape the culture of New Orleans,” Rykels said. The installation presents a timeline pinpointing hurricanes and zeroing in on Katrina and the subsequent floods. Storm events are detailed through video footage and newscasts from the days before landfall. The exhibit also chronicles rescue efforts at area hospitals and the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Displayed artifacts tell individual stories. There’s Elton Mabry’s diary, taken from a wall at the B.W. Cooper housing project before it was demolished. Flanking the entrance to the Presbytere is Ken Ballau’s boat, which he and the National Guard used to rescue 400 people.

“At first I had a hard time looking at it,” Ballau says. “The whole experience was overwhelmingly sad.” The exhibit addresses how future tragedies can be avoided. “It is inevitable that there will be another hurricane disaster,” says Bill Read, director of the National Hurricane Center. “This exhibit helps to prepare and be proactive.” The final section, “Recovery,” focuses on rebuilding. Rykels plans to adapt the gallery as rebuilding continues. “It will show them why we live here, why we can live here, and why we should live here,” says Rykels. “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina & Beyond” is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Mary Still PollS Well

tion had time to put on the air. Among the nuggets we dug up is an anomaly between the Democrats’ overall bad fortunes this year and U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu’s approval rating, which remains more positive than negative. Although most voters interviewed for the survey rated Congressional Democrats poorly (39 percent approval versus 48 percent disapproval), Landrieu’s numbers were almost the opposite: 52 percent approved of the job she’s doing compared to 40 percent disapproving. At a time when many are saying Louisiana is finally falling into line with the rest of the country in terms of political trends, those numbers offer evidence that, at least as far as Sen. Landrieu is concerned, the state retains its counter-cyclical identity. Landrieu won re-election two years ago with slightly less than 53 percent of the vote. — Clancy DuBos

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What Now? he classic campaign movie, The Candidate, starring a very young Robert Redford, ends with one of the most poignant lines in political theater. Having triumphed against all odds, Redford’s character pulls his campaign manager into a private room just after winning a U.S. Senate seat and asks, “What do we do now?” It’s a question quite a few new and returning members of Congress may be asking themselves after Tuesday if, as expected, Republicans take the reins of power in the House. To be sure, they’ll have an agenda, but they might not have the Senate — and they certainly won’t have the presidency. So what do they do now, after both political parties have waged scorched-earth campaigns against one another for almost a year — and after decades of increasing rancor and partisanship that voters of all stripes find irresponsible? “Is there even one Republican who is going to go to Washington who ran on the platform of ‘We are coming to Washington to work with President Obama?’” asks Democratic strategist James Carville.

T

The answer, of course, is no, but Carville remains hopeful that bipartisanship can prevail … eventually. “It’s going to be necessary,” Carville says, predicting that the GOP will capture the House but not the Senate. If that happens, he says, “It’s going to produce the necessity to work together. They’re not going to have any other choice. The Republicans are not going to have the option of just saying no to everything. Some things have to happen, like passing budgets. Also, there are going to be things that they want that they cannot get without the president.” Carville speaks from experience. He was one of then-President Bill Clinton’s political strategists after the GOP captured the House in 1994. Initially, then-Speaker Newt Gingrich led a movement that shut down government — a move that backfired on the GOP. “It gave Clinton the upper hand after that,” Carville recalls. “Hopefully, they’ve learned from that.” As much as Carville wants to see Democrats prevail on Tuesday, he knows the partisan atmosphere inside the Beltway has poisoned American politics. That’s why he and his Republican strategist wife, Mary

Matalin, are co-chairing the Bipartisan Policy Center’s (BPC) annual summit next Tuesday (Nov. 9) at Tulane University. The BPC (www.bipartisanpolicy.org) was founded in 2007 by former Senate Majority Leaders Howard Baker, Tom Daschle, Bob Dole and George Mitchell to demonstrate that consensus can be achieved on difficult policy issues. Currently, the BPC leads efforts on health care, energy, national and homeland security, economic policy and transporta-

The partisan atmosphere inside the Beltway has poisoned American politics.

tion. The summit will include strategists from both parties. The public is invited; admission is free. “These are some of the most powerful people on both sides coming down here,” Carville says. “They have a lot of influence. The people at this summit are going to be in the back rooms advising the decisionmakers on both sides next year.” The theme of this year’s summit is “Beyond the Ballot: Making Washington Work.” In addition to remarks by Carville and Matalin, the summit will feature panels that include, among others, Whit Ayres, Dan Bartlett, Paul Begala, Tony Blankley, Lanny Davis, Matthew Dowd, Ed Gillespie, Stan Greenberg, Karen Hughes, Walter Isaacson, Kathleen Koch, Joe Lockhart, Mark McKinnon, Kiki McLean, Steve McMahon, Hilary Rosen and Steve Schmidt. The summit will begin at 10:15 a.m. on Nov. 9 in the Kendall Cram Room of Tulane’s Lavin-Bernick Center. For more information and to register, visit www.bipartisanpolicy.org/nola-2010-agenda. Who knows, maybe they’ll figure out what to do now. Of course, the bigger trick will be getting Congress to listen.

Please protect me and my friends.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

• Providing animal control services to the community is the responsibility of the City of New Orleans.

15 10/27/10 11:56 AM


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010


ERICA ADAMS, 34 AMY HENRY CENTOLA, 30 Founders and Co-owners, Two Sprouts PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

's

Sweetly hand-drawn streetcars, pelicans, shotgun houses and Rex floats (among other New Orleans images ranging from iconic to arcane) populate the borders of Two Sprouts stationery. “We do a lot for New Orleans people who live away,” says Amy Henry Centola, who co-founded Two Sprouts with Erica Adams in October 2005. “We did (a birthday card with) a little king cake with a candle in it for a family in Texas. All of our stuff is subtle.” “Sometimes we get overly conceptual,” Adams adds. The concept behind Two Sprouts — New Orleans-centric note cards printed and sourced locally — resonates with customers. The business has expanded to include a children’s apparel line and custom invitations. Two Sprouts’ products can be found in 20 stores throughout the city, and the women have plans to expand. “We keep everything local,” Adams says. “We’re excited about all the donations we’ve been able to make.” Centola and Adams, both New Orleans natives, recently donated $7,500 generated from the sales of a special T-shirt to the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation. Proceeds from another card benefitted Friends of City Park. “I remember feeding ducks at the park with my parents, and now I bring my daughters,” Centola says. “We want to give back to the city that did so much for us.” — Wilkinson

MULLADY VOELKER ALFORD, 29 Founder, Gifted Nurses Home Care PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

PROFILES BY KEVIN

ALLMAN, JAMIE CARROLL, WILL COVIELLO, KANDACE POWER GRAVES, LAUREN LABORDE, MARTHA PITTS, MORGAN RIBERA, MISSY WILKINSON AND ALEX WOODWARD

NEAL BODENHEIMER, 33 MATTHEW KOHNKE, 34 Co-owners, Cure PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE

As any doctor knows, the difference between a cure and a poison is the dose. Matthew Kohnke and Neal Bodenheimer, co-owners of Cure, originally planned to name the craft cocktail lounge Apothecary, a nod to the original palliative purpose of cocktails and their intent to revitalize a faded city corridor. “It was a tough neighborhood,” Bodenheimer says. “We endured two break-ins (during the renovation process) where tools were stolen. We wondered if it was teetering on the verge of improvement or returning to its old form.” The decision to renovate a dilapidated 1903 fire station was born of equal parts practicality (“It was a shoestring budget,” Bodenheimer says) and passion. Friends since their pre-school days at the Jewish Community Center, the duo wanted to be part of the rebuilding efforts and made the risky decision to open a sleek, upscale bar in a neighborhood that, at the time, had “nothing at night other than Friar Tuck’s,” Bodenheimer says.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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hether it’s in the arts or business, technology or community development, young adults are making the Crescent City a better place to live and work. Every year (with the exception of an interruption following Hurricane Katrina in 2005), Gambit solicits nominations from the public, then honors 40 people under the age of 40 for their accomplishments — and the contributions they have made to New Orleans. Welcome to our 13th annual 40 Under 40.

New Orleans native Mullady Voelker Alford has found a way to combine her two passions — business and helping people — with a company she believes is on the cutting edge of health care. After graduating from Vanderbilt University, Alford worked for a local investment firm before Hurricane Katrina prompted her to change her focus from helping businesses improve their bottom lines to helping children traumatized by the storm. She earned a master’s degree in social work from Tulane and counseled kids who had experienced deaths of loved ones, violence or other losses. “I loved that, but I found I really missed the business side of working,” she says. Alford joined Gifted Nurses, which provides supplementary nurse staffing for hospitals, but she missed helping people. Four months ago, Alford combined the best of both worlds by founding a Gifted Nurses home-care division, which provides in-home care for the elderly and families juggling the responsibilities of full-time jobs and caring for children and aging parents. “People have more options in private care,” Alford says. “They get to dictate the options they want. We know the elderly population is growing and … people want to stay in their homes as long as possible. We want to help them do that.” — Graves

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New Autohaus. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans has moved in to their new contemporary Autohaus showroom. This new facility is unlike any other Mercedes-Benz dealership in our State. Over 20 Mercedes-Benz vehicles are displayed on our new showroom alone, which has more than tripled in size.

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We invite you to stop by and see what makes Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans the leader in the luxury vehicle market and how we are changing the future of luxury automotive sales and service in New Orleans.

Tom Benson Owner

mbofno.com 3727 Veterans Boulevard Metairie, LA â&#x20AC;˘ 504-456-3727 Service open on Saturdays

Jamie Moll V.P. / Gen. Manager


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    “We  were  curing  a  building  and  the  neighborhood,”  Bodenheimer says. “We were trying to do something more ambitious than opening a bar.”     Cure’s  custom  cocktails,  kaleidoscopically  complex  intersections of local, seasonal ingredients and made-from-scratch tinctures and bitters, garnered glowing mentions in GQ, Food & Wine,  the  Los Angeles Times  and  The Washington Post,  among  other  publications.  In  addition  to  serving  as  a  cornerstone  in  Freret  Street’s redevelopment, the bar also is socially active, holding a  coat drive last January, donating proceeds from cocktail sales to  the  Red  Cross  last  March  and  hosting  the  “It  Gets  Better”  antibullying project last month.     “Gathering places can be either constructive or destructive to  people’s  lives,  and  we  wanted  to  do  a  very  constructive  space,”  Kohnke says. “We know it’s a bar, but we still want to do better.”  — Wilkinson

VANESSA BROWN, 39 JEFF LOUVIERE, 38 Visual Artists, Louviere + Vanessa Photo by Cheryl Gerber

Co-owners, Satsuma Cafe Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Though  some  chefs  take  a  conceptual  approach  to their menus, Cassi and Peter Dymond, co-owners  of Satsuma Cafe, craft their menu from the ground  up — literally.     “Peter will say, ‘I have some mizuna coming,’ and  so we’ll develop menu items around it,” Cassi says.  “Our  mission  is  to  source  as  much  locally  grown  produce as possible, even down to things like honey  and lettuce and all the vegetables.”     By  relying  on  seasonal,  locally  grown  produce  at  their  Bywater  cafe  and  coffee  shop,  the  Dymonds  support Louisiana farmers and community gardening  programs  like  the  one  at  Our  School  at  Blair  Grocery  in  the  Lower  9th  Ward.  The  ever-shifting  menu (current offerings include ciabatta sandwiches,  quinoa  salad,  tomato  basil  soup  and  pumpkin  pancakes),  fresh-squeezed  juices  and  made-from-scratch pesto, mayonnaise and dressings reflects a culinary ethos as much as  the agricultural terrain of Louisiana.     “If  you  buy  locally,  you  are  supporting  (Louisiana)  farmers.  It  might  be  a  dollar  more  a  pound, but that dollar is going directly to where you live,” Cassi says.     The Dymonds, both of whom came from fine-dining backgrounds, sought to fill a hole in  the New Orleans dining scene: “We felt New Orleans had been longing for somewhere to  get good, fresh local produce at affordable prices,” Peter says.      Garnering shout-outs from R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe and mentions in The New York Times,  Satsuma has expanded its staff from three to 15 since opening in August 2009, although the  food is still prepared in a tiny, 150-square-foot kitchen.      “We  have  no  stove  or  anything.  It’s  all  plug-in  appliances,”  says  Peter,  who  wants  to  expand  the  cafe  to  several  locations  and  create  a  service  connecting  farmers  with  chefs  who  want  to  serve  their  produce.  “I  would  hope  we  would  be  a  start  of  a  movement.”   — Wilkinson

KRISTEN EVANS, 37 Executive Director, New Orleans Fringe Festival Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Kristen  Evans  has  always  been  attracted  to  building  things  from  the  ground  up  —  whether  it’s a graphic design company in Atlanta, sustainable forests in Bolivia or a local theater festival in  New Orleans.       “I  think  it’s  because  I’m  unemployable,”  Evans  says. “No one would hire me, so I hired myself.”     Evans’ realization was the catalyst behind founding  Blink  Interactive  in  Atlanta  in  1996,  and  her  entrepreneurial sprit has remained strong.      “Once  you  do  that  sort  of  project,  it  gets  under  your skin,” she says. “You learn so many things … that  it’s hard to imagine a job that’s even a little more circumscribed in what you do. Once the entrepreneur  bug bites you, you’re kind of unemployable.”       After  working  with  indigenous  communities  in  Bolivia with the Peace Corps, Evans decided to move to New Orleans. (“Everything I owned  fit into a shoe box, so I was at a point in my life where I could pick anywhere to live,” she  says.)  Tapping  into  her  longtime  interest  in  theater,  Evans  helped  create  the  Backyard  Ballroom performance space and, eventually, the New Orleans Fringe Festival. It has become  an  annual  event  featuring  more  than  100  shows  at  alternative  and  traditional  venues  around the city.      As this year’s Fringe Festival approaches, Evans, who is working on a master’s degree in  sustainable  tropical  forest  management  at  Tulane’s  Roger  Thayer  Stone  Center  for  Latin  American Studies, can be proud of what she’s cultivated.     “People outside of New Orleans who are performing see this city as an exciting place to  do theater,” she says. — LaBorde PaGe 21

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

    Photographer  Vanessa  Brown came home one day  to see her negatives lying in  the  sink  with  some  Comet  and  steel  wool,  which  husband Jeff Louviere had used  to  distress  and  alter  them,  much the way he scratched  copper plates to make intaglio prints. She wasn’t happy  at first.     “I  almost  freaked  out,”  she says.     Though that might not seem like the most harmonious juncture  in  an  artistic  partnership  or  marriage,  it  was  a  pivotal  moment  for  the  duo,  opening  up  a  world  of  experimentation  with  processes  and  materials,  and  forged  a  rare  collaborative  approach  to  making  photography-based  art.  Previously,  their  arrangement  had  Louviere  acting  as  art  director,  setting  up  scenes  to  shoot,  and  Brown  taking  still  shots.  Now  they  combine  old  and  new  processes  and  equipment,  from  cheap  Holga  cameras  to  Photoshop  manipulations  to  printing  using  arcane  processes and rare papers.     “We’re both very passionate about what we do,” Brown says.  “We  both  have  ideas.  We’re  not  the  same.  There  would  be  no  point in collaborating if we were.”     Shows  like  their  2005  Slumberland  series  featured  images  of  mythical  and  horrific  human  and  animal  figures  that  seemed  both  ancient  and  modern  primitive  in  ethereal  black-and-white  images  that  simultaneously  appear  antique  and  timeless.  In  a  more recent project, they created the first film made entirely with  still images from Holgas.     A  native  of  Ithaca,  N.Y.,  Brown  studied  photography  at  the  Rochester Institute of Technology and in 1995 moved to Georgia,  where she met Louviere, a New Orleans native who was pursuing  a master’s  degree in  graphic  design  at the  Savannah  College  of  Art  and  Design.  They  settled  in  New  Orleans  in  1998  and  have  made  the  transition  to  full-time  collaborating  artists.  They  are  represented locally by A Gallery For Fine Photography and have  work  in  the  George  Eastman  House,  the  Odgen  Museum  of  Southern Art, New Orleans Museum of Art and other museums  and  private  collections  nationally.  Their  work  also  appears  in  international exhibitions and film festivals. — Coviello

CASSI DYMOND, 32 PETER DYMOND, 32

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

N’Awlins. The Big Easy. The Crescent City. No matter what you call it, there’s no place in the world quite like New Orleans and no better place to live, work, and play.

20

November 9, 2010 | Harrah’s Theater 8 Canal Street 6pm - 8pm FREE ADMISSION Big Sam’s Funky Nation plus FREE food(while&supplies drinks last) for more info: proudtocallithome.org

facebook.com/ProudToCallNOLAHome @ProudNOLA Download Barcode scanner app on your smartphone to access our site instantly.

*Must be 21 years of age or older to attend.


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TONY FELIX, 15 Entertainer Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    When  he  was  7  years  old,  Tony  Felix  and  his  mother  were  just  looking  for  a  summer  camp  activity  when  they  considered  a  program  at  the  Anthony  Bean  Community  Theater.  Felix  chose  to  rap for the audition. Now, at 15, he’s looking for a  way to juggle both singing and acting as a professional entertainer.     “At  the  theater,  all  I  was  doing  was  rapping,”  Felix  says.  “So  they  worked  on  getting  my  stage  presence out.”     Many years later, Felix starred in the musical 504,  which Anthony Bean took to Shreveport, Lafayette, Biloxi, Miss., and other cities,  and it helped Felix gain exposure.     Felix spent last summer in Atlanta recording three songs, which are getting  airtime on regional radio. The track “It’s Eazy” has climbed regional charts, and  songs from the summer recording sessions can be heard on New Orleans stations 102.9 FM and Q93.     Besides  numerous  stage  credits  at  the  Anthony  Bean  theater,  Felix  performed  with  Wendell  Pierce  in  the  Classical  Theatre  of  Harlem’s  post-Katrina  production of Waiting for Godot. He’s landed roles in FOX’s K-Ville and in films  shot in New Orleans, including Labou and Hungry Rabbit Jumps.     Felix is currently a sophomore at St. Augustine High School, and sometimes  he  telecommutes  to  class  while  he  is  performing  in  Atlanta,  Houston,  Dallas  and elsewhere. — Coviello

MICKEY HANNING, 38 Founder, San Fermin in Nueva Orleans Photo by Cheryl Gerber

KYLE JOHNSTON, 31

Celebrating over 100 years of Serving New Orleans the Best!

Homemade Gelato Pastries · Cannoli · Spumoni

Attorney, Globalstar Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    As  a  corporate  associate  at  Fenwick  &  West  in  Silicon Valley, Calif., Louisiana native Kyle Johnston  had  the  rare  opportunity  to  represent  such  companies  as  Facebook  and  Silver  Spring  Networks.  Yet,  when  he  saw  a  tweet  regarding  the  decision  by  Globalstar,  a  publicly-traded  satellite  communications company, to relocate from Silicon Valley  to  Covington,  Johnston  contacted  the  company  and  within  a  week  accepted  an  offer  to  serve  as  assistant general counsel (the No. 2 legal position  PaGe 23

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

    After  attending  the  Running  of  the  Bulls  in  Pamplona,  Spain,  Mickey  Hanning  became  fascinated with Ernest Hemingway and Spanish culture.  He  and  his  friends  planned  San Fermin in Neuva Orleans  for  2007,  hoping  a  few  mutual  friends  might join.     The  event  has  grown  into  a  three-day  festival  with more than 8,000 runners. The run, which features horn- and bat-brandishing Big Easy Rollergirls  instead  of  live  bulls,  occurs  in  July.  As  Facebook  groups  and  word  of  mouth  spread,  the  need  for  larger venues and more events grew.      People  who  came  into  town  just  for  the  event  wanted  more,  so  Hanning  and  his  team  created  a  tapas  party  Friday  night,  a  concert  on  Saturday  and  a  Hemingway-inspired contest on Sunday.      “Any  reason  in  New  Orleans  for  people  to  get  dressed  up,  get  up  early  and  drink and have a good time is what New Orleans is all about,” Hanning says.  He  and his fellow Los Pastores plan the events at night, after their day jobs. Hanning  is  an  account  manager  for  Wines  Unlimited,  whose  Spanish  wine  was  the  event’s first sponsor. Any funds left after event expenses are paid are donated  to charities including Animal Rescue New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain Basin  Foundation’s Save Our Coast initiative. — Carroll

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J

R SE TE U 2PM IN O -1 S W N H10AMPUSE E 2 • CAM OPAN. 2 BOTH

The African American Resource Center PResenTs The

2010 Tom Dent Literary Festival november 4-6, 2010 Main Library, 219 Loyola Avenue

(504) 596-2597 Free & Open to the Public

Thursday, Nov. 4

6:30 P.M.

Poetry Night featuring local poets Asia Rainey, Chris “One Eye” Williams, Will “Deuce” Powell, Sunni Patterson, and Asali DeVan.

friday, Nov. 5

10:00 A.M.

Children’s Storytelling with Tayari kwa Salaam, Ph.D.

friday, Nov. 5

6:30 P.M.

Author’s Showcase with co-authors Harold Battiste and Karen Celestan and the Neighborhood Story Project’s, Rachel Breunlin, Daron Crawford, Pernell Russell, and Susan Stephanie Henry.

saTurday, Nov. 6

1:00 P.M.

Literary Forum Chakula cha Jua Theater Company will present Tom Dent’s play, Ritual Murder. Commentary will be provided by Kalamu ya Salaam. This program is made possible through a grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, with support from the Friends of the New Orleans Public Library, and the New Orleans Public Library Foundation. The New Orleans Public Library will make every effort to provide interpretation of library programs for the hearingimpaired. To request this service please call (504) 596-2605.

Wednesday Tours The French School of New Orleans November 3 November 10 November 17

December 1 December 8 December 15

Call today to schedule your tour! 821 General Pershing St. 4yrs-6th grade 8:30 am

5818 Perrier St. 2 yrs-3 yrs 9:30 am

APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED JANUARY 3, 2011 8:30AM 504.896.4500

www.ebnola.com

EB does not discriminate against any person because of race, creed, ethnicity, disability, age or sex in violation of state and federal laws and regulations

Renaissance Festivaƒ

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

The Fifth Annual

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Friday, November 19, 2010 7 p.m. Renaissance Arts Hotel 700 Tchoupitoulas Street New Orleans

Experience an evening of fine food, drink, entertainment, artwork and incredible auction packages featuring local artists, vacation getaways, fine jewelry, dinners and more!

Sponsored by

2010 Co-Chairs Jane Heidingsfelder, Mark Preston & Erica Reiss Music by the Bucktown All-Stars

Purchase tickets at www.MSRenaissanceFestival.org or call 1-504-322-3785. LA_RenFest_Ad_Gambit_BW.indd 1

10/25/2010 9:42:49 AM


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in the company). “[Globalstar] still feels like a scrappy startup, and I’m viewed more as an entrepreneur who knows about the law rather than as just another lawyer,” he says. Returning home has provided him with more opportunities for community involvement, something he started as a student at Tulane. As a law student, he participated in a public forum in Algiers sponsored by Deloitte & Touche, where he observed anger and outrage over the lack of local opportunities for the younger members of the community. Johnston, who spent part of his childhood in Algiers, made it his mission to work with several students at Algiers Technology Academy (ATA). He raised enough money to send 12 students to Silicon Valley to meet with companies such as Facebook, Google and DreamWorks. Johnston also was instrumental in helping ATA receive a state-ofthe-art computer lab. Most people do not think of New Orleans as “Little Silicon Valley,” but to Johnston the comparison is apt. “It’s becoming a little technology hub here. There’s a cultural shift. People are starting to build their startups here instead of fleeing the state.” — Pitts

DR. TARUN JOLLY, 35

JEROME JUPITER, 39 Director of Education Services, Youth Empowerment Project PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

After a chaotic morning spent preparing his five sons and daughters for their school day, Jerome Jupiter arrives at the Tulane Tower Learning Center to help prepare more young adults for a successful future in the workforce. As director of education services for the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP), he heads New Orleans Providing Literacy to All Youth (NOPLAY), a nonprofit program that helps local youth 16 to 24 years old gain literary proficiency, develop career skills and earn their GEDs. The program serves young people who were unsuccessful in the classroom because of challenges such as unstable homes or incarceration.

JULIUS EARL KIMBROUGH JR., 39 Vice President, Liberty Bank and Trust PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

When Julius Earl Kimbrough Jr. joined Liberty Bank and Trust as its vice president, he turned the bank — and himself — into vital community linchpins. “We began thinking of ourselves as a community development organization,” he says. For seven years, Kimbrough has helped find funding sources for “otherwise not credit-worthy recipients” and spearheaded a home improvement loan program to help Gentilly residents rebuild following the 2005 levee failures. He also was instrumental in Goodwill reopening its New Orleans location at Tulane Avenue and Jefferson Davis Parkway, as well as a daycare center near the former Desire housing projects. “It’s a challenge, but it’s a great opportunity to touch a lot of lives,” Kimbrough says. He also serves on the boards of the New Orleans Institute of Mental Hygiene, where he helps find grants to build childcare centers and fund mental health and wellness programs; and the New Orleans Neighborhood Development Collaborative, where he helped develop affordable housing and community resources near the former C.J. Peete housing projects. Kimbrough graduated from Hampton University, where he studied history, economics and political science. He dabbled in investment banking before returning home to New Orleans. “There’s not always a straightforward (plan) for everyone to do what they want to do where they live, especially in New Orleans,” he says, but Kimbrough counts himself lucky to do so. — Woodward

CORETTA GRANT LAGARDE, 29 Community Services Coordinator, New Orleans Council on Aging PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

People always tell Coretta Grant LaGarde she is an old soul. As community services coordinator for the New Orleans Council on Aging, she has a knack for communicating with older adults. “I lived with my grandmother growing up, and it allowed me to see I can get a lot of wisdom from older adults,” she says. LaGarde writes grants, raises funds, plans events and represents the council, but her favorite activities bring her directly to the people she is working to help. During Older Americans Month in May, LaGarde hosts Senior Fest to showcase talents and honor older adults. “I love seeing them come out and sharing with one another,” she says. LaGarde also participates in local organizations. She does fundraising for Meals on Wheels, which provides food to homebound older adults; coordinates programs and raises funds for the New Orleans Regional AIDS Planning Council, representing older adults with HIV; and is a board member of Family Services of Greater New Orleans, which provides services to children, teens and adults. While LaGarde sometimes wants to rush home to be with her 4-month-old daughter, she understands the importance of her position. “The saying I live by is ‘Be your best self,’” she says. “It has allowed me to be successful in my career, volunteerism and personal life.” — Carroll

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Founder and CEO, Southern Pain Relief Pain management specialist Dr. Tarun Jolly hit the ground running after graduating from LSU’s School of Medicine and completing an internship at Tulane Hospital and a post-doctoral pain management fellowship at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Shortly after joining Ochsner Hospital in 2006, he became one of the youngest directors in the hospital’s history and founded Ochsner’s first surgery center for pain management. In February he left Ochsner to start a private practice, Southern Pain Relief. He already has opened two locations and plans to further expand his business. Jolly’s specialty is treating patients who have undergone surgeries that failed to alleviate their chronic pain. “I use a combination of medications and interventions, including minimally invasive therapies,” he says. “There are over 200 interventions I can do. The focus is to mask enough of the pain so they can enjoy their life.” He also educates other doctors about innovative pain therapies, delivering lectures around the country, and has been featured on the ABC network’s website for pain management. One of his goals is to dispel the stigma surrounding pain patients as well as the doctors who treat them. “For me, it’s always been about education,” he says. “Not every pain doctor is a drug dealer, and not every pain patient is looking for drugs. Some of these patients expect a cure. A patient who comes into my office is just looking for hope.” — Graves

“For many of these students, survival is their top priority,” Jupiter says. “It is difficult for them to prioritize education when they do not know when their next meal is going to come. It became my vocation to help these vulnerable kids succeed.” Under his leadership, NOPLAY has doubled the number of people it serves from 300 to 600 and has cultivated more than 20 new community partnerships, expanding the program’s supportive services to new levels. “It is definitely a labor of love,” Jupiter says. “We’re like family. It’s fulfilling to actually be a part of helping individuals overcome their barriers.” — Ribera

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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forty under

LORETTA LAMBERT, 36 Director of Veterinary Services, Louisiana/SPCA Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    When Loretta Lambert returned home to New Orleans in 2003, she was looking for  a  volunteer  opportunity  and  landed  at  the  Louisiana/SPCA,  but  “that  role  changed  over  time,”  she  says.  Jumping  from  animal  cruelty  investigator  to  a  heroic  first  responder following Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, Lambert now heads the  organization’s veterinary services programs and helped relaunch its low-cost community veterinary clinic this year.      “It’s a big step in the health and wellness of the animals  in the community,” she  says. The clinic covers Orleans, Jefferson and St. Bernard parishes and offers preventative  health  care,  spaying  and  neutering,  vaccinations and  education about  how  pet  owners should care for their companions.      Her work with the SPCA’s emergency response helped pass the national PETS Act,  which ensures local and state disaster response addresses households with pets. This  year,  Lambert  and  the  SPCA  also  assisted  the  Gulf  Coast  Companion  Animal  Relief  Program,  which  raises  funds  for  pet  owners  affected  by  the  Gulf  oil  disaster.  It  has  helped more than 300 families with spaying/neutering, vaccinations and other needs  for their pets. “Animals are part of the community,” she says.      Lambert attributes her success to the SPCA’s supportive and talented staff of veterinarians and vet techs. “My nomination is a reflection of their success,” she says. — Woodward

AUSTIN LAVIN, 26 Marketing Manager, Federated Sample Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Because  of  the  recession,  many  New  Orleanians  are  familiar  with  Austin  Lavin’s  work. He moved to the Crescent City from Pennsylvania in 2009 to help run the online  job board WorkNOLA, a daily stop for many job hunters. The concept of an online job  board  isn’t  new,  but  Lavin  says  the  support  and  word-of-mouth  fuel  have  made  it  thrive.      “It’s  only  successful  because  so  many  members  of  the  community  have  bought  into it, letting them seek ownership of the job board,” he says “Our technology is not  particularly innovative, but what’s really great is we found a community of people in  New Orleans who need this kind of resource.”     Lavin also is very involved with helping people new to the city adjust. Besides his  work with WorkNOLA, he sits on the newcomers committee of the Jewish Federation  of Greater New Orleans and is co-chairman of the Jewish Community Center’s Young  Jews of the Crescent City program. In both roles, Lavin points new residents and young  people toward social and professional resources.     Most recently, Lavin started working with Federated Sample, a start-up company  that creates online data collection technologies. He also hosted a local “It Gets Better” event, where attendees filmed videos for the anti-bullying project started by columnist Dan Savage.     “It’s a great community,” Lavin says of the city. “People always say the people here are welcoming, but it’s really true.  Having lived in other places, you really appreciate how much people appreciate you being here.” — LaBorde

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    Sasha Masakowski grew up in a musical family that includes her father, guitar virtuoso Steve, and mother Ulrike, a pianist — so singing has always been an “instinct,”  she says. “One of my dreams as a little girl was to be a backup singer for Antonio Carlos  Jobim,” she says. “That was my dream job — either [Jobim] or Pavarotti.”     Masakowski has immersed herself in an acclaimed, dynamic range of Brazilian and  traditional jazz, lending her airy, soulful vocals to jazz ensembles Musical Playground  and  Sidewalk  Strutters  and  progressive  pop  outfit  Bionica.  A  graduate  of  both  the  New  Orleans  Center  for  Creative  Arts  and  University  of  New  Orleans,  Masakowski  also  studied  at  the  Netherlands’  prestigious  Rotterdam  Conservatory  of  Music.  But  singing  struck  a  chord  while  the  musician  was  growing  up  in  choirs  and  the  New  Orleans Children’s Chorus. “Since then I’ve been fascinated by the voice and voice as  instrument,” she says.     She anticipates a spring release for an album with Musical Playground and hopes to  hit the studio with Bionica in the coming months. “The key to my musical happiness  and to keep myself going is just surrounding myself with really incredible musicians,”  she says. “If you constantly put yourself in a position working with people who are on a high level intellectually and musically, you’re constantly being inspired.” — Woodward


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MIKE MILLER, 31 SHAMUS ROHN, 29 Founders, UNITY of Greater New Orleans’ Abandoned Building Outreach Team PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE

Mike Miller and Shamus Rohn spend nights searching through dark, abandoned buildings that often are crumbling or mold-infested. They look for what they call “signs of life,” but what — or who — they find is often barely living. They discover homeless people with debilitating mental and physical diseases, anything from tuberculosis to syphilis so advanced it has attacked their brain, and “an entire range of physical things that you would expect that once you’ve been diagnosed with it, the hospital finds a place for you to go and takes care of you,” Rohn says. “But they’re turning up in buildings.” Miller and Rohn head UNITY of Greater New Orleans’ Abandoned Building Outreach team, which they started in 2008. They search the city’s estimated 55,000 abandoned buildings for homeless inhabitants, and then attempt to connect them with health and housing services. The people they encounter are often the “sickest of the sick,” but Miller and Rohn work to get them into stable housing. Miller is from Chicago, and Rohn is from Michigan; both moved to New Orleans for different reasons and ended up staying. Miller has a master’s degree in social work and Rohn has master’s in political science. Although the men work “weird hours,” as Miller says, often canvassing a neighborhood until 2 a.m., they make time for activities such as playing in a kickball league, hotly debating Gambit’s Top 50 Bars list and enjoying everything else New Orleans offers. “It’s New Orleans, man,” Miller says. “You can’t have just one hobby in New Orleans.” — LaBorde

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LAVONZELL NICHOLSON, 34 Founder/President, PlayNOLA PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

After working for area nonprofits Each One Save One and Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations, Lavonzell Nicholson got an opportunity to start a business of her own. She entered the 2009 Idea Village Entrepreneur Challenge, a national business plan competition, with her proposal for PlayNOLA, a sports and social club in New Orleans. “Having been to a couple of different places and having been an athlete, I noticed that it can be difficult for people to meet each other in the city,” she says. “Sports are a neutralizing factor.” Now, there are 1,000 participants in PlayNOLA events, from kickball leagues to rooftop parties to boot camps. Nicholson started out doing everything for PlayNOLA, but she now has a staff of two league coordinators and 10 referees. “People look at our website or look at us and think we are some major thing that has been around,” she says. “The three of us make it all go.” Nicholson returned to New Orleans from Maryland after Hurricane Katrina to be part of rebuilding the city. She noticed an increase in the popularity of recreational activities in the city and hopes PlayNOLA leads people to new ways to meet others and stay healthy. — Carroll

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Real estate developer Neal Morris uses his expertise to fight blight in New Orleans, turning dilapidated and adjudicated properties into affordable housing for mostly lowto moderate-income and elderly residents. Since founding Redmellon Restoration and Development in 2000, he has renovated or built more than 400 affordable housing units, mostly single- and double-family houses. He believes one way to revive New Orleans is by supplying housing and repopulating the city’s neighborhoods. “I’m an urbanist,” Morris says. “I think density is the key to sustainability. Those who live in the most dense places actually consume the least fossil fuels. The key for us in New Orleans is to fill in the historic density we already have.” Morris moved to New Orleans from Augusta, Ga., in 1991 to attend Tulane University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in history, a master of business administration and a law degree. In 2006, the Louisiana Housing Finance Agency awarded Redmellon the Innovation in Housing Award, and in 2009, Morris was one of only 10 professionals to be named a Loeb Fellow at Harvard, where he taught classes and studied design, public policy and law relating to the low-income housing industry. He currently is renovating 47 housing units and is developing a 50-unit pilot home ownership project in which Redmellon will renovate doubles and place a tenant in one side before selling the buildings to first-time homeowners. Morris says he doesn’t develop only lower-priced housing, but shifted his focus to single- and two-family houses because “I think that’s what is needed in New Orleans now. I like being part of the rehabilitation of the city.” — Graves

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G. TRAVIS NORVELL, 36

CHET POURCIAU, 38

Pastor, St. Charles Avenue Baptist Church

Owner, Chet Pourciau Design

Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    It  isn’t  uncommon  for  Pastor  G.  Travis  Norvell  to  quote  The Simpsons  and  The New Yorker  in  the  same  sermon  at  St.  Charles  Avenue Baptist Church.      “I  love  Johnny  Cash  and  jazz  music,  so  I’m  trying  to  fuse  those  two in [future] sermons,” he says.      Norvell  and  his  family  moved  to  Louisiana  from  Providence,  R.I.,  finally living out a decades-long fascination  with  New  Orleans  after  a  discussion  with  a  theology  professor  at  the  New  Orleans  Baptist  seminary  filled  him  stories  about  the  magic and mystique of the city. “I would always tell my wife, ‘We’ve got  to get down there,’” he says.      Originally from West Virginia, Norvell has served various churches in  his home state, New York and Rhode Island. He describes his approach  as based in a historic Baptist thought, a stance he took when he wrote  an  editorial  in  The Times-Picayune  discussing  the  controversy  over  building a mosque near Ground Zero in New York City in the context of  freedom of expression. Norvell says that is the essence of New Orleans:  “the idea that you can be yourself and nobody cares.”     In addition to engaging his congregation with his popular sermons,  Norvell  started  a  weekly  series  discussing  the  creative  spirit  in  New  Orleans, and a Jewish-Christian group studying the parables of Jesus.  Norvell is planning a jazz vespers program — free jazz concerts with a  central spiritual component.      He says he would love for locals to recommend St. Charles Avenue  Baptist  to  visitors  asking  what  church  they  can  visit  that  reflects  the  culture of New Orleans. — Pitts

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

PERRYN OLSON, 30

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Senior Graphic Designer and Marketer, Design the Planet Animal Handler and Educator, Audubon Zoo Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Graphic  designer  Perryn  Olson  can  be  found  every  Saturday  handling alligators, owls and rats at the  Audubon Zoo, where he volunteers  as an animal handler and educator.  But  when  he’s  not  mingling  with  animals  and  visitors,  he’s  leading  an award-winning brand marketing  and design firm.     A graduate of Loyola University’s  visual  arts  and  graphic  design  program, Olson joined Design the Planet as an intern almost 10 years ago  and  has  worked  there  since,  now  as  its  senior  graphic  designer.  The  firm’s  creative  team  designs  logos,  brochures  and  websites,  handles  advertising  and  brand  marketing,  and  has  earned  numerous  acco-  lades for its cutting-edge work. “Every day is something new,” he says.  “You learn a lot about different industries and see sights you normally  wouldn’t  see.  It’s  cool  to  see  a  company  that  started  out  in  a  house  that now has an office, or you hear a radio commercial or see a billboard for one of your clients.”     Olson also is active with Boy Scouts, and he created the co-ed scouting group Venturing while in college. That love of the outdoors led him  to the Audubon Zoo, where his experience as a scout leader made him  a natural animal educator to visitors.     Olson also helped launch the New Orleans chapter of the referral business Corporate Connections, where he is vice president. — Woodward

Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    It’s easy to imagine Chet Pourciau — dapper, friendly, down-toearth — as the host of a design show on cable TV. A self-described  “Cajun  boy”  who  grew  up  in  New  Iberia  and  majored  in  communications at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Pourciau  moved to New Orleans in 1995 to study interior design at Delgado  Community  College.  Today  he  owns  his  own  company,  Chet  Pourciau Design  on Magazine  Street,  and has a  weekly  segment  on the Fox 8 Morning News as a rebuilding expert. He’ll soon debut  his  own  TV  show  on  WLAE-TV,  where  he’ll  dispense  advice  and  answer viewer questions.     In his spare time, Pourciau sits on the board of the New Orleans  Recreation  Department  and  is  a  member  of  the  NO/AIDS  Task  Force. He’s also active with the Forum for Equality and HIV/AIDS hospices.      “I’m  trying  to  go  national  and  take  my  career  to  the  next  level,  but  New  Orleans  is  always  going to be my home. I’m all about giving back, and I don’t want to seem unapproachable,” says  Pourciau, adding that he’s inspired by the dual acting/designing career of fellow Magazine Street  business owner Bryan Batt. “I make sure people know good things come out of New Orleans.”  — Allman

JOSHUA RUBENSTEIN, 38 Attorney; President, Jewish Family Services Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Joshua  Rubenstein  realized  it  was  time  for  a  career  change  when  his  plane  landed  at  the  Atlanta  airport  and  he  knew  by  heart all the restaurants and fast food places in Concourse B.      “I  was  spending  too  much  time  away  from  New  Orleans,”  he says.      As  an  attorney  for  a  multi-state  law  firm,  the  New  Orleans  native took on a lot of casework and depositions, which required  him to travel over all the country. As he observed the momentum  and  energy  in  his  post-Katrina  hometown,  he  was  inspired  to  become more engaged with the community.      Rubenstein left his job representing companies with asbestos  liability  to  join  Scheuermann  &  Jones,  where  he  now  performs  work  for  plaintiffs.  He  also  became  involved  with  the  Jewish  Family  Services,  a  social  service  agency he didn’t know much about despite growing up in the city’s active Jewish community.  Always on the forefront of Rubenstein’s agenda is closing the gap in services being provided to  the city’s diverse population.      “New Orleans needs to find a way to include everybody,” he says.     Rubenstein  is  working  to  create  a  bank  dedicated  to  the  needs  of  the  city’s  growing  Latino  population, and a concierge service for the elderly who prefer an independent life but are not as  mobile as they’d like to be.      Rubenstein also is on the board of J-Grad, an organization dedicated to keeping students in  the New Orleans area after they graduate and attracting more Jewish professionals to the city.  “The Jewish community is very much a part of the fabric of New Orleans,” he says. — Pitts

SALVADOR SCACCIA, 31 Pharmacist, Founder of Total Life Care Pharmacy Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Many  people  depend  on  a  pharmacist  to  count  out  the  right  number  of  pills  and  facilitate  insurance  payments  for  medications  prescribed  by  physicians.  Salvador  Scaccia,  however,  wanted to do more for patients, so in May 2008, he founded Total Life  Care Pharmacy, integrating the services of an old-time apothecary  with the innovations of modern-day medicine.     It  is  a  winning  concept,  and  in  two  years  he  has  increased  his staff from two to 22 employees and serves Louisiana and 12  other states.     “The ideals and morals we operate on are based on how things  used to be,” he says. “We have no automated phone system; we  have live people to answer the phone and are able to help you.  [My  employees]  are  knowledgeable  about  the  medications  a  patient  is  on  and  the  conditions  they are dealing with — not just general information.”     The pharmacy serves customers with simple needs but specializes in patients with complex,  PaGe 29


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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chronic medical problems such as cancer, HIV, hepatitis and those who have undergone organ transplants. “Ours are the patients most people shy away from,” Scaccia says. “They require more attention and someone who follows them every month … and if new therapies arise, we can help them [access those].” The pharmacy, which serves 150 to 200 patients a month, helps patients navigate changes in Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance and advocates for patients when insurance carriers balk at prescribed treatments. “I think it’s the direction that pharmacy should go in,” he says. “What we do here is not just dispense medication and charge insurance. You get a higher level of service.” Scaccia has been president of the Greater New Orleans Pharmacy Association for seven years, is on the board of the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum, works with Cancer Crusaders to raise research funding for Louisiana State University and Tulane, and is active in the youth ministry of the Archidocese of New Orleans. — Graves

NEEL SUS, 33 CEO of Susco Solutions and Touch Studios Photo by Cheryl Gerber

With a touch of a finger or two, potential high school football recruits can have unprecedented access to the purple and gold, thanks to the Miles Method, a free iPad application created by CEO of Touch Studios Neel Sus and Jameson Quave. Sus and Quave created Miles Method after LSU football coach Les Miles approached Sus about technological ways to connect with prospective student-athletes. Released on Sept. 16, the Miles Method is the first of its kind, providing highlight videos, Twitter and Facebook posts from Miles and guided tours of LSU. Realizing a budding entrepreneurial spirit, Sus left his engineering job at Northrop Grumman in 2005 to start Susco Solutions, a custom software development company that has grown from a one-man operation to employing multiple programmers. Grateful for the entrepreneurial community that has believed in him, Sus has channeled his energy to help other entrepreneurs through his participation in many local organizations including Louisiana Technology Council and the city’s chapter of the Entrepreneurs’ Organization Accelerator Program. He is a founding member of Net2NO (Net Squared New Orleans). “I cannot imagine who I would be as a person if I was not doing this,” he says. “I’ve never been so happy as I am now.” — Pitts

CHARLOTTE SYNIGAL, 38 Detective, Kenner Police Department Photo by Cheryl Gerber

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NIKKI DEMETRIA THANOS, 32 Fellow at the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice

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Nikki Demetria Thanos recently completed an intense three years at Loyola University School of Law, but she’s not taking a break. “Now the real work begins,” she says. “There are ideas that have been gestating inside me and some of my colleagues, and now is the time we can put them in full throttle.” Long before she was sworn in to the Louisiana State Bar Association on Oct. 21, Thanos was hard at work with social justice organizations on and off Loyola’s campus, around the country and internationally. She moved to New Orleans in 1996 to study environmental policy at Tulane University, which led to human rights work in Latin America. While at Loyola law school, she worked with and founded organizations focusing on issues ranging from fair housing to immigration, and also authored A Handbook for Social Justice Activists Thinking About Law School, a guide for law students interested in public interest work. “Law is a funny field,” she says. “It traditionally has become sort of a niche profession. In the kind of lawyering I do, I have accountability to one person — the client — but also to a much broader group of people.” In her spare time, Thanos contributes to building sustainable food systems in the city by running a community garden in MidCity. She says New Orleans is a perfect fit for her. “The importance of what I call ‘front-porch organizing’ is much more a part of the way things happen here,” she says. “I can’t PaGe 31

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

When Det. Charlotte Synigal quit nursing school in 1994 to join the Kenner Police Department, she encountered resistance from her mother, pastor and coworkers. “I did it as a dare,” she says. “I really did it because [my coworker] said, ‘You better not.’” The Kenner native was elected Officer of the Year by the Louisiana Association of Chiefs of Police after her meticulous work as lead detective on a homicide investigation uncovered a loosely knit gang of 16 men dealing in stolen weapons and narcotics. “We ended up with five narcotics arrests. Some are doing time now,” Synigal says. “It was really a team effort, everybody going through everything tooth and nail.” The detective recently completed a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and plans to earn a master’s degree in education. “At some point, I would love to try my hand at teaching,” she says. Synigal credits her compassion and faith for her ability to stay grounded in a job that exposes the worst — and best — of human nature. “So many different things can lead a person to make a decision that may not be the best thing for them,” she says. “It is not my job to judge them. It is just my job to make sure that I catch them.” — Wilkinson

PET CARE

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

30

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0

forty under

PaGe 29

do my work well unless I’m out in the community and talking to folks and sharing life.” — LaBorde

STEPHEN TREMAINE, 25 Director, Bard Early College Photo by Cheryl Gerber

DR. RYAN THIBODAUX, 36 Dentist, Trumpeter with Bucktown All-Stars Photo by Cheryl Gerber

Dr. Ryan Thibodaux splits his time between blowing the horn, riding bikes and pulling teeth. One of the original members of the Bucktown All-Stars, Thibodaux integrates his passion for playing the trumpet and bike riding into his dental practice. His business’ logo features a second line with a tooth-decorated drum and his office is musically themed. He disregarded the advice of his professors to keep everything professional. “We are in New Orleans. People want to connect with you

as more than a dentist,” he says. Thibodaux always balanced school with music, playing gigs in New Orleans before rushing back to Louisiana State University for band practice. “I kept saying one day I would let the music go, but it became a second career,” he says. Just as he started dental school, the Bucktown All-Stars picked up momentum and now is a popular rhythm and blues cover band. Between gigs, his trumpet does not stay locked up. Thibodaux plays the national anthem and rides at LIVESTRONG events around the country. For his next race in Austin, Texas, Thibodaux already raised more than $10,000. “I really believe in the power and ability to create the life you want,” Thibodaux explains. “You have to deeply think about what makes you happy.” — Carroll

Owner, Fleurty Girl Photo by Cheryl Gerber

When the NFL tried to shut down the Who Dat Nation, Lauren Thom took a stand. Owner of Fleurty Girl, a T-shirt line inspired by New Orleans, Thom received a notice to stop selling her “Who Dat” shirts — but she didn’t. “I felt like the voice of the people,” explains Thom, who says the controversy actually helped her business. “It made the phrase and local products more desirable.” Last summer, Thom used an income tax refund to start Fleurty Girl. Instead of paying the mortgage or taking a vacation with her three children, the single mom created simple T-shirts geared toward women. Her hobby became a full-fledged business after she sold out of the shirts she had made in just one month. Now, Thom owns two Fleurty Girl stores: the original location at 8611 Oak St. and a new store at 3117 Magazine St. Thom designed a “Rescue Me” shirt after the oil spill to raise money for the Audubon Institute’s Louisiana Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue Program and a “NOLA > Hurricanes” shirt to raise money for Evacuteer.org. “We don’t pay a royalty on New Orleans culture, so we might as well find a way to give back,” she says. — Carroll

MERRITT GRACE VAN METER, 18 Pole Vaulter Photo by romaGuera PhotoGraPhy

Merritt Grace Van Meter has learned to manage her time well because she doesn’t have much of it. For five years, she hopped from school to school and house to house while coping with the death of her father. “It was a really hectic and rough time,” says Van Meter, a freshman at the University of North Carolina. “I just took it out on the track.” This dedication paid off during her senior year at Metairie Park Country Day; she received the nation’s best high school pole vault at 13 feet, 8.25 inches. After trying other track events, Van Meter’s coach suggested pole vaulting. She instantly loved the combination of gymnastics, speed, physics and athleticism, and soon dominated the sport, winning the National Pole Vault Summit, Allstate Sugar Bowl Classic and Class 1A girls state meet. Off the track, Van Meter was on the honor roll, mentored younger students at Country Day, volunteered at an animal shelter and worked at the stable where she practiced rodeo. In college she is studying psychology and sports medicine while competing for the Tar Heels. “I don’t feel like I’m defined by my vaulting career, but more my outlook,” she says. “It’s about perseverance, not giving up, and not being distracted by negative things going on.” — Carroll PaGe 33

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

LAUREN THOM, 29

If Stephen Tremaine has his way, more students in the city will study The Decameron, a classic 14th-century text by Italian writer Giovanni Boccaccio. Tremaine directs the Bard Early College program in New Orleans, where local juniors and seniors read classical texts and take writing-intensive courses as part of traditional liberal arts curriculum. Classes are held on high school campuses and taught by local college professors and people with advanced degrees. Students can earn college credits from Bard and/or transfer credits to other schools in addition to satisfying high school course requirements. The program enrolls 150 students a semester in 10 schools across the city including George Washington Carver, John McDonough and Sojourner Truth Academy high schools. “We don’t make any compromise in academic quality even though the circumstances are dramatically different,” he says. Tremaine, a 2007 graduate of Bard in New York state’s Hudson Valley and an alumnus of New Orleans Center for Creative Arts and Bonnabel High School, realized the Crescent City was the perfect setting for extending Bard’s distinguished education. Bard has a strong history of “reaching out to new students in new settings,” he says, citing the Bard Prison initiative, which provides a Bard liberal arts degree to prisoners in New York State. “I had access to this incredible education,” he says. “I was aware that this wasn’t as accessible as it needed to be.” According to Tremaine, 98 percent of New Orleans high school seniors who have completed a Bard Early College course have been accepted to college. “Every day, I get to work with students who are incredibly intellectually curious, motivated, eager to be critically involved in course material,” he says. “Hearing them rave about Socratic dialogue is a rare pleasure.” — Pitts

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

You don’t have to be Jewish to be REJEWVENATED!

32

THE NEW SHLOMO MUSICAL!

The story of Shlomo Carlebach featuring 30 hit songs and the Broadway cast. Score by the composer/arranger of Fame, The Who’s Tommy and Elton John’s Aida.

“FIVE STARS *****” New York Times Audience Reviews

PRE-BROADWAY TOUR November 9 & 11

Mahalia Jackson Theater www.ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000

“A MUST SEE” Wall Street Journal

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forty under

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JENNIFER WALKER, 34 Founder, New Orleans Baby Fest; Owner, Jackaroos Boutique Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Growing  up  in  Labadieville,  La.,  Jennifer  Walker  learned  to  sew  at  summer  camp.  Off  and  on  for  the  next 15 years, she made  little things for herself, her family and close  friends. But it wasn’t until she got married,  had  her  first  child  Jack  and  quit  her  job  as  director of syndication for a home-improvement show to become a stay-at-home mom  that she took sewing seriously.     “Lots  of  my  friends  were  having  babies,  and then I had my own son, so I made stuff,”  she says.     Walker’s interest in children’s items grew  when she took classes at a children’s boutique in Mobile, Ala., where she lived  at the time. Friends urged her to open her own boutique. She created Jackaroos  Boutique,  an  online  custom  clothing  store  for  children,  after  the  birth  of  her  second  son  and  a  move  to  Orlando,  Fla.  It  was  then  that  Walker  realized  the  marketability of baby products. “People do and buy anything for their babies,”  she says.     She and her husband began talking about an expo to showcase baby products  and services people didn’t know about — all in one place. After they returned to  New Orleans in August, their plans became more concrete.      Using  her  background  in  marketing  and  sales,  Walker  contacted  potential  sponsors,  created  media  kits  and  searched  for  venues,  often  with  her  second  son Beckett on her hip. After several months of hard work, Baby Fest premiered  at  the  Pontchartrain  Center  on  Oct.  2.  Walker  says  she  knew  she  was  on  to  something  when  the  doors  opened  and  she  saw  a  line  of  people  wrapped  around the building. More than 3,000 parents and their children attended the  six-hour event. — Pitts

WENDY WAREN, 33

have to do it all.”      Waren is involved in her Irish Channel neighborhood, participating in youth  outreach and restoration projects. — Pitts

KYLE WEDBERG, 37 President/CEO, New Orleans Center for Creative Arts Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    When  Kyle  Wedberg  first  visited  New  Orleans to start City Year in 2005, he knew  there was just something about the city.     “I spent a year not being able to shake it,”  he says. “My mind was here.”     Wedberg  took  a  position  with  the  Recovery  School  District,  which  introduced  him to the New Orleans Center for Creative  Arts  (NOCCA).  “The  building  was  built  for  the  purpose  of  generating  leaders  in  the  cultural economy — a unique idea not only  in New Orleans, but nationally,” he says.      NOCCA  is  an  arts  training  center  with  part-time  programs  that  are  free  to  any  Louisiana  high  school  student  who  passes an audition. As president and CEO of NOCCA, Wedberg strives to keep  the  faculty  of  working  artists,  despite  state-mandated  cuts.  “It  demystifies  being an artist,” he says. “It’s really healthy for a 17-year-old to see what it is  really like.”      This year, NOCCA graduates received $12 million in scholarships to some of  the nation’s top arts schools.      Wedberg  also  serves  on  a  number  of  city  boards,  using  his  administrative  background to strengthen New Orleans. “I like being involved in the city, and  I’ll do whatever, as a citizen, I can do to help.” — Carroll

SHARONDA WILLIAMS, 38 Partner, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert LLC

Photo by Cheryl Gerber

Photo by Cheryl Gerber

    Three  days  after  the  Gulf  oil  disaster,  Wendy  Waren’s  phone  was  ringing  off  the  hook.  As  vice  president  of  communications  for  the  Louisiana  Restaurant  Association  (LRA),  Waren  fielded  calls  from  concerned  restaurant  owners  asking  about  the  crabs  and oysters they depend on, as well as international  media  inquiring  about  how  the  oil  would  affect  one  of  New  Orleans’  most  famous industries.     Waren,  who  grew  up  in  LaPlace,  is  adept  at  handling  tough  situations.  She  recalls  heart-wrenching moments when, as the sole  staffer  of  Dillard  University’s  communications  department,  she  led  reporters  on tours of the damaged campus in the  months following  Hurricane  Katrina.  Before  that,  Waren  oversaw  various  publications  at  the  school,  her  first  job  after graduating from Tulane’s School of Continuing Studies with a media arts��� degree. That degree shaped her experience as she saw her role shift from publications to public relations to crisis communication. Not everyone understands  what her job entails.     “The biggest misconception people have [of my job] is that I’m a restaurant  critic. I am not a food writer,” she says, adding that the public also believes she  receives perks from restaurants. “People think I eat out every day. They don’t  feed me for free.”     Waren has developed a deep understanding of the restaurant owners and managers  she  represents.  Her  job  requires  her  to  be  knowledgeable  about  political,  cultural and financial trends that affect her constituents.      “Eighty percent of our restaurants are small businesses,” and owners often  juggle several roles, from cook to human resources to manager, she says. “You 

    At  the  end  of  her  fourth  year  at  the  University  of  North  Carolina  School  of  Medicine at Chapel Hill, Sharonda Williams  had to make decisions about her residency  when  she  had  an  epiphany:  She  was  not  passionate  about  a  career  as  an  physician.  Her  then-husband  was  an  attorney,  and  she  thought  his  job  didn’t  seem  too  difficult. Within three weeks, Williams took the  LSAT, applied to Loyola Law in New Orleans  and  was  offered  a  scholarship,  which  she  could not turn down. Such is the go-getter  attitude of Williams, a New Orleans native 

and Xavier University alumna.      After making the Law Review at Loyola and graduating summa cum laude,  Williams worked at top intellectual property firm Kilpatrick Stockton in Atlanta,  where she was active in a network of black female attorneys. When she moved  back to New Orleans, Williams joined Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert  law firm, practicing complex commercial litigation. Last year, she became the  first African American to become a partner at the firm.      In  addition  to  serving  as  past  president  of  GNO  Louis  A.  Martinet  Legal  Society and working on several pro bono cases, Williams was instrumental in  bringing the 85th Annual National Bar Convention to New Orleans.      She  also  co-founded  the  Louisiana  Association  of  Black  Women  Attorneys.  Only a couple of months old, the organization already has a mentorship program for underprivileged young women in local high schools. Though proud of  her accomplishments related to her legal career, Williams says it’s her involvement in the community that is more meaningful “because it touches a wider  span of people.” — Pitts

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Vice President of Communications, Louisiana Restaurant Association

33


BYWATER NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION presents the 21 st annual

ra Celeb ting

St. Augustine High School Conducted by the Josephite Fathers and Brothers

JOIN US FOR OPEN HOUSE Sunday November 7th, 6pm to 8pm

SATURDAY

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Featuring Bywater’s own

KERMIT RUFFINS

11 AM - 7 PM

Mickey Markey Park

Royal + Piety Streets

Also starring the various talents of

R SCULLY’S ROUGH 7

101 RUNNERS

Admission $5 General

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The MIRLITONES

HAPPY TALK BAND HURRAY for the RIFF RAFF N.O. JAZZ VIPERS GAL HOLIDAY and the HONKY TONK REVUE

Neighborhood EATERIES s CHILDREN’S Activities s ART Market s Bywater Merchandise * $3–BNA Members Children Free www.bywatermirlitonfestival.com s s

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Friday, November 5th

34

Saturday, November 6 Jeff Greensberg 6pm Tim Laughlin & Trio 9:30pm

Amanda Walker 6pm Banu Gibson & Trio 9:30pm

Best Martini in Town Dinner Served Nightly • 7 Days A Week 830 Conti Street

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sHTo P aLK

BY NICOLE CARROLL

SHOPPING NEWS BY NICOLE CARROLL

All in the Pho-mily or the Vo family, reopening Pho Hoa (1308 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 302-2094) last April at its new location was the realization of a decades-old dream. “My parents’ dream was always to own their own building, instead of leasing,” says owner Anthony Vo. When their lease expired at the previous location, the family had saved enough money to purchase a lot and build from scratch. “That’s always been our dream — to build something from the ground up and see it prosper,” Vo says. Opened more than 25 years ago by Anthony’s parents, Pho Hoa specializes in authentic Vietnamese cuisine, including vermicelli noodles with char-broiled shrimp, marinated pork with lemongrass, stir-fried beef, beef stew and of course, pho, a soup of rice noodles served with your choice of meat. While there are similarities between Vietnamese food and other Asian cuisines, Vo points out that Vietnamese food is distinct. “My feeling is that Vietnamese cuisine gets lost between the spectrum of Chinese and Japanese … and not a lot of people outside of our culture have experienced, or (have) even been open-minded to try Vietnamese food,” Vo says. For those who’d rather stick with something familiar, Pho Hoa also offers banh mi, the Pauline, Anthony, Tim and Vietnamese version of a po-boy, topped with pate, pickled carrots and daikon, ham, pork and Kathy Vo (left to right) dish up hogshead cheese. This month, Pho Hoa will participate in the New Orleans Po-Boy PreservaVietnamese fare. tion Festival for the first time. Although Pho Hoa has a loyal customer base on the West Bank, Vo hopes New Orleans diners will venture across the river to visit his Harvey restaurant. Pho Hoa is busiest during lunch hours and on Sundays, when families come in to eat and hang out. “The TV’s on,” Vo says. “If you want to watch football all day long, you’re more than welcome to stay here. Whoever walks through the door is like an extension of our family.”

POYDRAS HOME (5354 Magazine St., 897-0535; www.poydrashome.com) holds its 16th annual Poydras Home Art Show & Sale on Saturday, Nov. 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 7, from noon to 4 p.m. The show features more than 2,500 original works from local and regional artists. The JUNIOR LEAGUE OF NEW ORLEANS is selling shopping cards for $35. Purchase the shopping card and receive a 20 percent discount from Friday, Nov. 5, until Sunday, Nov. 14, at more than 100 local stores and restaurants. Call 891-5845 or visit the Junior League website (www.jlno.org) to purchase the shopping card. On Saturday, Nov. 6, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Magazine Street merchants entertain shoppers with the sixth annual MAGAZINE STREET RETAIL RELIEF event. The entire street features special promotions from area businesses, food and music. The Last Straws jazz band performs in Magazine Street’s 5500 block. The 500 block of Frenchmen Street hosts the ninth annual NEW ORLEANS BOOK FAIR, featuring live music, readings and refreshments, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

fo 6 0 cr r th d On ed e ay ly it fed s l pr e ef og ral t ra ta m x

F

MID-CITY STUDIOS (4436 Toulouse St., 822-5581; www.midcitystudios.org) hosts an artist open house and sale on Saturday, Nov. 6 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring paintings, ceramics, photography and sculpture from more than 20 artists.

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s Entertainment Serie

s ay d s ne P M d e W 5:00

PRESENTS

La f S q ay e ua tte re

BOOT HILL November 6 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm

F r e e Fa l l c o n c e r t s e r i e s 2010 lineup

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

NOV 3 NOV 17

Darryl Rhoades featuring Pokey Simmons

NOV 10 Jen Kober

Jim Holder featuring Dennis Fowler

NOV 24

Caroline Picard featuring Carolyn Agnew

THURSDAYS LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

NOV 4 Junior & Sumtin Sneaky NOV 18 Chee Weez

NOV 11 Brandon Foret NOV 25 Foret Tradition

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

NOV 5 Chicken on the Bone NOV 19 Burgundy

NOV 12 Junior & Sumtin Sneaky NOV 26 Al “Lil Fats” Jackson

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

SATURDAYS

36

LIVE MUSIC

NOV 6

Boot Hill 9:30pm

David St. Romain NOV 20 9:30pm

Texas NOV 13 Little 7:30pm-9:30pm

harvestthemusic.org

Anderson NOV 27 John 7:30pm & 9:30pm

sponsors 2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP


Film: SweetheartS of the PriSon rodeo Page 39

Oh Bee-hive! Southern Culture on the SkidS hitS town Page 39

music: mannO man Page 40 cuisine: a creOle classic strives FOr rejuvenatiOn Page 59


Property: Harrah's New Orleans Project: Redesign: Entertainment Job#: 46467.6 8:43 AM Vendor: Gambit dMax: 225 Show: 10/27/10 Ship: 10/27/10 Insert: 11/2/10 Trim: 4.729" x 5.333" Live: 4.479" x 5.083" VO: - x Bleed: none Final Mats: PDF X1a Artist: Lori Rev: 31 Desc.: Gambit 4.729" x 5.333" Ad

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

SCHEDULE IN SOME FUN. Coming to Harrah’s Theatre

Spyro Gyra

The all-singing, all-dancing, all-American musical delight!

Nov. 5

ONLY THREE WEEKS LEFT!

Tickets on sale NOW! Purchase tickets online at HarrahsNewOrleans.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

Friday & Saturday Evenings

Dinner Seating 6:00pm – 6:30pm Showtime 8:00pm Dinner & Show: $60 SHOW ONLY: $30

off for friday & saturday shows!

Sunday Brunch Matinee

Brunch Seating 11:00am – 11:30pm Showtime 1:00pm Brunch & Show: $55

Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org today! Entertainment schedule subject to change without prior notice. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2010, Harrah’s License Company, LLC.

Sponsored in part by LA Office of Entertainment Development and IMLS Magazine Street at Poeyfarre H 504-528-1943 H www.stagedoorcanteen.org

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10/28/10 10:31 AM


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 40 45 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < Southern >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Skids

BRADLEY BEESLEY AND SWEET— HEARTS OF THE PRISON RODEO 6 P.M.-9 P.M. FRIDAY, NOV. 5 OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART, 925 CAMP ST., 539-9600; WWW.ODGENMUSEUM.ORG

ART

48

STAGE

52

EVENTS

54

Culture on the

PHOTO COURTESY OF CINEMA PURGATORIO

Jailbirds

BRADLEY BEESLEY SCREENS HIS WORK AT THE OGDEN MUSEUM. veryone likes a good tale of personal redemption. That’s one reason why the prison rodeos of Oklahoma and Louisiana, in which inmates work all year for the chance to compete for a few moments of glory, have long been mythologized in songs and Hollywood movies. Documentary filmmaker Bradley Beesley, who grew up in the suburbs of Norman, Okla., and whose work shines a light on the little-seen subcultures of the American South, was as susceptible as anyone else to the lure of the prison rodeo. “It always had this over-romanticized place in my life,” Beesley says. “When I became a documentary filmmaker there were 30 different subjects I wanted to do, and that was always on the list.” But something significant happened in 2006. The Oklahoma State Penitentiary announced it would allow female inmates to participate in the prison rodeo for the first time since the event debuted in 1940. “I thought, well, this is a sign I have to cross that one off the list,” Beesley says. Beesley’s powerful Sweethearts of the Prison Rodeo, which will be screened at the Ogden Museum’s Art of Southern Film series, goes beyond the rodeo’s surface appeal to explore the lives of female inmates in the state with the nation’s highest per capita rate of female incarceration. Women also remain behind bars longer than men in Oklahoma, even though most are in for drug-related crimes and 80 percent have

E

children. But Beesley claims no overt political message with the film, instead seeking to “humanize” his subjects as people, not just as inmates. “Initially we thought we’ve got to find the bad guy, that surely someone within the prison system is causing all this to happen,” Beesley says. “But it’s really more about the culture in Oklahoma and the lack of opportunity that drives women to hang out with losers who cook and sell methamphetamine. That’s not going to change overnight.” Beesley has been spending a lot of time in New Orleans recently, working on one film about the city’s music schools and another, Fam Jam, that explores the world of family bands and which Beesley hopes will become an “episodic documentary” for television. Understandably, he found himself working with Glen David Andrews, whose extended family includes local legends James Andrews and Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews. “Glen doesn’t have a family band, per se,” Beesley says. “But if you’ve got a camera, he’ll put one together for you at the drop of a hat. He’s very accommodating.” Excerpts from Fam Jam and several other Beesley films, including a rarely seen documentary about bluesman R. L. Burnside and Christmas on Mars, one of three films Beesley has done in collaboration with Oklahoman indie rockers Flaming Lips, will precede the Ogden screening. An audience discussion with the filmmaker follows.

NOV

03

NOV

04

Nick Jaina is a Portlander who whispers folk heroics about the anesthetizing properties of cocaine, recorded an album on Elliott Smith’s upright piano (2008’s Wool) and launched his current tour from inside Umatilla, Ore.’s Two Rivers Correctional Institute. His current project is The Beanstalks That Have Brought Us Here Are Gone, 10 tracks written for guest female vocalists (Jolie Holland, Laura Gibson). Luke Allen opens. Admission $5. 10 p.m. Thursday. Mudlark Public Theatre, 1200 Port St.

Monk + Bat

NOV

4-5

An all-star lineup celebrates the music of Thelonious Monk and Harold Battiste. The Friday concert (8 p.m., Dixon Hall) features Harold Battiste, Nicholas Payton (pictured), Herlin Riley, Wessell Anderson, Jesse McBride, Delfeayo Marsalis and Robin D.G. Kelley, a pianist and professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Kelley lectures on modern jazz Thursday (6:30 p.m., Freeman Auditorium). Free admission to both events. www. tulane.edu.

Lil’ Doogie From viral videos of “Jaywalking”-style Mardi Gras interviews to headlining the House of Blues: Lil’ Doogie — shybe-talking Marreroan, Bert’s nefarious MiniMe and the logorrheic puppet id to West Bank superegos Ballzack and Odoms — has jumped the shark. Or the remora, as it were. Billed “Doogie’s Magic Extravaganza,” the gig is a release party for the debut full-length YeahBrahCaDaBrah, a potty-mouthed verbal spar that puts the ounce in bounce. Tickets $12. 10 p.m. Friday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999. www.hob.com.

NOV

05

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

BY KEN KORMAN

59

A son of the New South, Rick Miller grew up in small town North Carolina, where his father worked at a mobile home factory, moved to the big city, Chapel Hill, hooked up with bassist Mary Huff, and the two perfected Southern Culture’s surfabilly. The latest album, The Kudzu Ranch, is heavy on psychobillia and is named for Miller’s recording studio located in a converted cinderblock garage. Scott H. Biram opens. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Wednesday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361. www.oneeyedjacks.com.

Nick Jaina with Luke Allen Women wait to compete in the Oklahoma State Prison Rodeo.

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Haitian Connection UNSUNG LEGEND MANNO CHARLEMAGNE IS A HAITIAN FOLK HERO. t this time last year, Bernard Pearce, like many Americans, had never heard of Manno Charlemagne. Listening to an NPR report by Miami correspondent Kenny Malone in January, Pearce, a Lafayette-based musician who records under the handle One Man Machine, fell in love with the Haitian singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound: captivating, acoustic guitar-voiced Caribbean cantatas. But it was Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrible stories, cloaked in misleadingly romantic French â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreyol,â&#x20AC;? that spurred Pearce into action. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The music is incredible,â&#x20AC;? Pearce says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His voice, the guitar work, that alone is pretty impressive. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never heard guitar work like that. The lyrics, when you read the translations, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty brutal.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to get lost in the rolling undulations of Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s careful tenor and mistake them for Serge Gainsbourg seductions. They are not. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The dominant class is very clever,â&#x20AC;? he excoriates on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oganizasyon Mondyalâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;International Organizationsâ&#x20AC;?). â&#x20AC;&#x153;In principle, they know they are the minority/ They know how to play it/ Their class position is what counts/ Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do the impossible, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll rampage / To eliminate the child in the womb.â&#x20AC;? Learning Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible history through song and story â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a folk hero in Haiti on par with Bob Marley, a political exile and one-time mayor of Port-au-Prince â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pearce reached out to Malone, who put him in touch with Joann Biondi, a Miami-based journalist and Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime friend. This week, a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of work culminates in the Haitian visiting Louisiana for the first time, playing concerts in Lafayette and New Orleans, finishing with the Congo Square Rhythms Festival on Nov. 14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people in Haiti really connect with him,â&#x20AC;? Pearce says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about a man whose songs actually inspired a revolution. His life has been threatened; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been beaten and tortured because of his music.â&#x20AC;? But Pearceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tone turns light when relaying Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first impression of Crescent City music: â&#x20AC;&#x153;One time he got in trouble for listening to this record outside somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He heard this music, so he just sat down outside the window and listened ... He thought maybe Louis Armstrong was inside the house. That was one of the first artists he really connected to.â&#x20AC;? Speaking by phone from Miami, Charlemagne confirms the anecdote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was

A

NOV

06

a kid, 5 years old,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard that voice, and when I am older, I realize it was Louis Armstrong. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pleasure for me to be there, to walk Bourbon Street, to go to

Congo Square.â&#x20AC;? Charlemagne was Manno living in Miami in Charlemagne January, performing comes to Louisiana for a regular gig at the the first time. Haitian cultural outpost Tap Tap, when the 7.2 magnitude earthquake destroyed much of his homeland, killing friends and cutting off communication with his two sons (both survived). If not for happenstance, Charlemagne says, he too might have died: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was supposed to be in Haiti Jan. 11, and I fell Jan. 9. in my hotel, closing a vent. ... If I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that accident, I would have died in Haiti.â&#x20AC;? For Pearce, Charlemagneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plight mirrored his own after Hurricane Katrina. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I wanted to reach out to Manno and see what I could do to try and hook him up with a record label, maybe some management,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever worked with a label, never really had any sort of representation. And heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never really sought it out either. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully we can bring him back in the spring, and do some more work in Louisiana,â&#x20AC;? Pearce adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been talking to people in France about bringing him out there. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just hoping someone locally will see him and fall in love, and try to support him and his music.â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, I would do that,â&#x20AC;? Charlemagne says to the offers.) Asked about the connection forged from shared tragedy, the singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answer mirrors his music: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have some issues like we do. In Haiti, it was the earthquake; you, Katrina. Oh man, that was tough. I applaud you. To go from Katrina to Super Bowl champs, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something special.â&#x20AC;?

Manno Charlemagne with Helen Gillet MIDNIGHT SATURDAY PRESERVATION HALL, 726 ST. PETER ST., 522-2841; WWW.PRESERVATIONHALL.COM TICKETS $12


Listings

stick this iN yOur ear

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

preview Halcyon Days

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 2 Bacchanal — Mark Weliky, 7:30

Banks sTreeT Bar — Cha Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 10 Bayou Park Bar — Parishioners, 9

BMc — Abita Blues, 7; Kile Cripps feat. Grunge Jazz, 9:30

carrollTon sTaTion — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Night feat. Marc Belloni, 8:30 check PoinT charlie — Nervous Duane, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11 chickie Wah Wah — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8

circle Bar — Tom Paines, 6; Northern Neon, Hannah Kreiger-Benson, By & By String Band, 10

Dos Jefes uPToWn cigar Bar — Tom Hook, 9:30 hosTel neW orleans — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 house of Blues — Wiz Khalifa, Yelawolf, 9

MaPle leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 neuTral grounD coffeehouse — Heavy Mitchell, 9; Zeina & Sebastien, 10

olD oPera house — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

Perino’s Bar — Musician’s Jam Night feat. 1 on 1 Band, 7 rock ’n’ BoWl — Clarence “Tadpole” Henry, 8:30

snug harBor Jazz BisTro — Jeff Albert Quintet, 8 & 10 sPoTTeD caT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 yuki izakaya — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

zeiTgeisT MulTi-DisciPlinary arTs cenTer — Simon Berz, Kaspar Koenig, Dave Easley, 8

Wednesday 3 12 Bar — Ruby Moon, 7; BrassA-Holics, 10

61 Blues highWay — Blues Jam feat. Wardell Williams & the Blues Hwy. Band, 8

Deerhunter’s third album, 2008’s Microcastle/Weird Era Cont., laid out all the band’s cards: the double-album references its post-punk and krautrock influences and sneaks in ambitions toward a perfect pop band. It followed with last year’s Rainwater Cassette Exchange, a five-song EP shuffling psych-pop and propulsive garage rock, all draped in a drowsy, post-summer haze. Its latest, September’s Halcyon Digest (4AD), channels the same seasonal spell and gets much closer to its pop ambitions by expanding the band’s repertoire — acoustic guitars, subdued Motown rhythms and saxophone add to a densely packed, headphone-tripping dream world. “We just wanted to try to do something completely different, but not something foreign or alien — something that makes sense,” says founding member and drummer Moses Archuleta. The band worked within the recording studio’s close quarters and lassoed producer Ben Allen, who turned Animal Collective’s 2009 hit Merriweather Post Pavilion into a bright, bass-heavy pop album, something of a crossover success for the longtime experimental outfit. “Ben has a certain polish and a certain ear for things, and that was outside of our comfort zone,” Archuleta says. “(Engineer) David Barbe was more familiar with the stuff from where we were coming from, and the two of them got to marry things that made sense on record.” That marriage didn’t hurt the band’s career-long dynamic of psychedelic punk rock and earworm melodies. “There are divergent and convergent tastes and personalities in the band,” he says. “That’s how we arrived at the finished product, and hopefully it gets a lot more interesting on the way there.” Tickets $13.50 in advance; $16.50 at the door. — Alex Woodward

NOV

08

Deerhunter with Deakin and Casino vs. Japan 9 p.m. Monday House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com

Bacchanal — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

Building Such a Big Ship?, 10

Banks sTreeT Bar — Major Bacon & guests, 9

D.B.a. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Beach house — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

fraT house — Young Pinstripe Brass Band feat. Gumby, 9

Bayou Park Bar — Hooch Riders, 9

Big al’s saloon — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BMc — Lynn Drury, 7; Blues4Sale, 9:30

canDlelighT lounge — Treme Brass Band, 9

check PoinT charlie — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11

chickie Wah Wah — Iguanas, 8:30 circle Bar — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Faun Fables, Why Are We

Dos Jefes uPToWn cigar Bar — Bob Andrews, 9:30

hoWlin’ Wolf — Combichrist, Aesthetic Perfection, iVardenshphere, DJ Tarnish, 10 huDDle sPorTs Bar — Band of Brothers, 9 irvin MayfielD’s Jazz Playhouse — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

Happy

Late night

entertainment

Hour

GREAT FOR BIRTHDAYS, BACHELORETTE PARTIES, RETIREMENTS , ANNIVERSARIES, OR ANY REASON TO HAVE A GOOD TIME!!

f ro m 4 - 6 p m where all drinks are

2 for 1

MON. • NOV. 1ST • 6-9PM

THE BEAGLES TRIO TUES. • NOV. 2ND • 7PM

DJ TRIVIA WED. • NOV. 3RD • 7-10PM

BRANDON FORET THURS. • NOV. 4TH • 7-10PM

HARVEY JESUS & FIRE FRI. • NOV. 5TH

THE BTU’S 7PM COMEDIAN MARVIN LEE 10PM [TICKETED] NO COVER

SAT. • NOV. 6TH • 8-11PM

AL “LIL FATS” JACKSON SUN. • NOV. 7TH • 11AM-2PM

JAZZ BRUNCH FOUR UNPLUGGED [AFTER GAME] MON. • NOV. 8TH • 7PM OPEN MIC TUES. • NOV. 9TH • 7PM DJ TRIVIA

krazy korner — Death by Orgasm, 8:30

158 S. Military Road Slidell, LA 985-646-1728

liTTle TroPical isle — Frank

Mon 11am-9pm Tue-Thur 11am-12am (midnight) Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

lacava’s sPorTs Bar — Crossfire, 9

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

irvin MayfielD’s Jazz Playhouse — Jason Marsalis, 8

musiC

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MusiC

Listings

Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

Maple leaf Bar — Belleville Outfit, 10

Mojo Station — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 one eyed jackS — Southern Culture on the Skids, Scott H. Biram, 9

rock ’n’ Bowl — Johnny J feat. Derek Huston, 8:30

Snug HarBor jazz BiStro — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 Speckled t’S — Brandon Foret, 7 Spotted cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 tipitina’S — Aggrolites, Maddie Ruthless & the Secret Affair, 9 yuki izakaya — By and By, 8

thursday 4 12 Bar — Pinettes Brass Band, 9:30 61 BlueS HigHway — Will Work for Whiskey, 4 BankS Street Bar — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 Bayou park Bar — Ron Hotstream, 9

tHe BeacH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 Big al’S Saloon — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BMc — Ladyfest feat. Zena Moses, Wendy Darling, Meschiya Lake and others, 6

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

BooMtown caSino — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9:30 carrollton Station — Jimmy Robinson’s Music Works feat. Bill Davis, 9 cHickie waH waH — Uncle Daddy, 9

circle Bar — Sam and Boone, 6; Captain No. 1, Seamonster, Hawn, 10 clever wine Bar — Johnny Sansone’s Mid-City Concert Series, 7

d.B.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Coot, 10

doS jefeS uptown cigar Bar — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

Hi-Ho lounge — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HoStel new orleanS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11

HouSe of BlueS — Gwar, Casualties, Infernaeon, Mobile Death Camp, 7:30 krazy korner — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

little tropical iSle — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 Maple leaf Bar — The Trio, 10 Mr. wafer’S place — Mamasita, 7:30 & 9:30

neutral ground coffeeHouSe — Star in a Fable, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Brett Randell, 10

old opera HouSe — Bonoffs,

42

4; Vibe, 8:30

old point Bar — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Andre Bouvier & the Royal Bohemians, 9

preview

preServation Hall — Survivors Brass Band, 8 rock ’n’ Bowl — Chris Ardoin & Zydeco NuStep, 8:30 Snug HarBor jazz BiStro — John Ellis & Double Wide, 8 & 10 tipitina’S — D. Strong, Danny Burns & the Defectors, Spit Flames, Good Hurt, 9

yuki izakaya — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

zaddie’S tavern — Blues Mob, 8

friday 5 12 Bar — Hot 8 Brass Band, 7; Grunge Jazz Trio, 10

61 BlueS HigHway — Jack Yoder & Li’l G Delta Blues, 8 allwayS lounge — Carl Ludwig-Huebsch, Wolter Wierbos & Matthias Schubert feat. Helen Gillet & Tim Green, 9:30

BankS Street Bar — Derrick Freeman & Smokers’ World, 10 Big al’S Saloon — Jay B. Elston Band, 8 BMc — Abita Blues, 3:30; Caroline Fourmy & Jazz Band, 7; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, 1 a.m.

cHeck point cHarlie — Pirate Girl Radio, 7; Mission vs. Madness, 11

cHickie waH waH — Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Stephanie Nilles Songwriter’s Extravaganza, 9 cluB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8 coconut cluB — Acoustic Swiftness, 10

coluMnS Hotel — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 d.B.a. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Papa Mail & Friends, 10

HarraH’S caSino (HarraH’S tHeatre) — Spyro Gyra, 7 & 10 HouSe of BlueS — Lil Doogie CD release, 10 Howlin’ wolf (tHe den) — Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9

irvin Mayfield’S jazz playHouSe — Tom Worrell, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight le Bon teMpS roule — C.R. Cruver, 7; J .Monque’D, 11

Maple leaf Bar — Piney Woods Playboys feat. Oary Hudson, 10 neutral ground coffeeHouSe — Lovers, 7; Agent 86, 8; Michael Millet, 9; Mia & Jona, 10; Greg Hayden, 11

peacHeS recordS — Kermit Ruffins CD release, 11 a.m.

Code Pink Ironists, ethnomusicologists and mere stoners with impeccable taste, clear your calendars for Monday. The cyclical and cannibalistic nature of pop culture is apotheosized in this Golden Gate of generation-gap bridges: outre Brazilian outlaws Os Mutantes, 1960s Tropicalismo psych/rock originators, open for Beverly Hills High alum Ariel Pink (nee Rosenberg), aught-decade aggregator of 40 years of errant radio waves, a pirate of AM pyrite. The first-born cub of Animal Collective’s Paw Tracks imprint in 2004, Pink, recording solo under the band-aid guise Haunted Graffiti, hasn’t just swallowed his own tail — he seems to have swallowed the tail end of the 20th century, regurgitating the paisley ’60s, bell-bottomed ’70s, pastel ’80s and scruffy ’90s onto a blotter-paper canvas in his own solipsistic, headphone-imprisoned image. A dial-spinning daydream of tinsel-haired vocal caricature, roller-rink synths and funky, flatulent bass, June release Before Today (4AD) does precisely what the six preceding Haunted Graffiti LPs did: plumb new depths of Pink’s 500-plus cassette track catalog, turning up ear clogs that change on each rotation from gnarly to nostalgic, trashy to terrific. Tickets $20. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

NOV

08

BooMtown caSino — Chicken on the Bone, 9:30 carrollton Station — Susan Cowsill Band, 9:30

Freeman, Alex McMurray & J the Savage, 9

Ariel Pink's Haunted graffiti with Os Mutantes 10 p.m. Monday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

one eyed jackS — Crocodiles, Golden Triangle, Dirty Beaches, 9

peggy Sue’S lounge — Eudora & the Deep Souls, 8 repuBlic new orleanS — Mumford & Sons, 9 rock ’n’ Bowl — Kermit Ruffins CD release, 9:30

Snug HarBor jazz BiStro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

Sweet lorraine’S jazz cluB — Ladyfest feat. Kat Walker, Amy Trail, Miss Sophie Lee and others, 6 tipitina’S — Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Stooges Brass Band, DJ Soul Sister, 10 yellow Moon Bar — Micheal James & His Lonesome, 9 zeitgeiSt Multi-diSciplinary artS center — Simon Berz, Kaspar Koenig, Justin Peake, 10:30

Saturday 6 12 Bar — Jake Labotz, 7; Brian Stolz, 10

3 ring circuS’ tHe Big top gallery — Melters, Dives, Threshold, Astral Boycott, 6 BaccHanal — Gypsy Swing Club, 8

BankS Street Bar — Ponykiller, Rabbit, Smoking Spore, 10

BMc — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Soulsect, 9:30; Ashton & Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BooMtown caSino — Boot Hill, 9:30 carrollton Station — Tanglers, 9:30

cHeck point cHarlie — Tawdry Hepburns, 7; Remedy Krewe, 11 clever wine Bar — Michelle Lewis, 8 d.B.a. — John Boutte, 8; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

dragon’S den — Truth Universal presents Grassroots (downstairs), 10:30 irvin Mayfield’S jazz playHouSe — Shannon Powell, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

krazy korner — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 le Bon teMpS roule — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 11 Maple leaf Bar — Johnny V’s Saturday Night Special, 10

neutral ground coffeeHouSe — Igor, 7; Destiny, 8; Alex Bosworth, 9; Big Empty Box, 10; Prosevere, 11

old point Bar — Mission 3, 9:30 one eyed jackS — 86 Caprice feat. Jimbo Mathus, Derrick

preServation Hall — Joe Lastie & the New Orleans Little Jazz Men feat. Joe Lastie, 8

rock ’n’ Bowl — Eric Lindell, 9:30 Snug HarBor jazz BiStro — Wess Anderson Sextet, 8 & 10 Speckled t’S — Al “Lil Fats” Jackson, 8

Spotted cat — Luke Winslow King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 10 tipitina’S — OK Go, Those Darlins, Samuel, 9

toMMy’S wine Bar — Julio & Caesar, 10 tooloulaS — Riptide, 10

zeitgeiSt Multi-diSciplinary artS center — Carl-Ludwig Hubsch, Mathias Schubert, Wolter Wierbos, 8

Sunday 7 BankS Street Bar — Funkplayers, 9

BMc — Nola Music Series, 1; Joe Kennedy Project, 5:30; Dr. Bone & the Hepcats, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight

cafe negril — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

cHaMpionS SportS puB & grill — Sam Cammarata, 8 circle Bar — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Triggers, Leo DeJesus, 10

donna’S Bar & grill — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

Howlin’ wolf — Gorilla Productions Battle of the Bands, 5

Howlin’ wolf (tHe den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 Maple leaf Bar — Mean Willie Green, 10 tHe precinct — Funk Express, 7:30

preServation Hall — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8

Saturn Bar — Corrie Beth Hogg, 9; Tom Paines, 10; Girls in Trouble, 11:30

Spotted cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & friends, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

Hi-Ho lounge — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

HouSe of BlueS — Deerhunter, Deakin, Casino vs. Japan, 9 one eyed jackS — Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Os Mutantes, 9

classical/ concerts aSHe cultural artS center —

1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Sat: Gospel & Arts Festival, 9 a.m; Sun: Ladyfest feat. Nattie, Margie Perez, Zion Trinity and others, 1 covington trailHead — 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — Thu: Rockin’ the Rails Concert Series presents Kermit Ruffins, 5 firSt BaptiSt cHurcH of new orleanS — 5290 Canal Blvd.,

482-5775; www.fbcno.org — Thu: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 7:30

lafayette Square — 601 S.

Maestri Place, 581-1039 — Wed: Harvest the Music Concert Series presents Allen Toussaint, Nicholas Payton & the Joe Krown Trio feat. Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste Jr., Little Freddie King, 6

MaHalia jackSon tHeater for tHe perforMing artS — 1419 Basin St., 525-1052;

www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles, 8 Wed.-Thu., 5 & 9 Fri., 2 & 8 Sat., 2 & 7:30 Sun. Markey park — 700 block of Piety Street, between Royal and Dauphine streets, 944-7900; www.bywaterartmarket.com — Sat: Mirliton Festival feat. Kermit Ruffins, R. Scully’s Rough 7, Hurray for the Riff Raff and others, 11 a.m. norwegian SeaMen’S cHurcH — 1772 Prytania St., 525-5570 — Fri: Scandinavian Festival, 10 a.m.; Sat: Paul Longstreth and others, 11 a.m; Sun: Paul Longstreth, 11 a.m. St. anna’S epiScopal cHurcH — 1313 Esplanade Ave., 9472121 — Wed: Ladyfest feat. Danielle Wilson & the Truth, N*Harmone, 7:30

Bj’S lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10

trinity epiScopal cHurcH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Trinity Artists Series presents Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: The Art of Aikido, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

cHickie waH waH — Ed Voelker’s Jolly House, 8

xavier univerSity — 1 Drexel

Monday 8

BMc — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

circle Bar — Inspectah Deck, Masta Killa, 10 donna’S Bar & grill — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

tulane univerSity dixon Hall — 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5000 — Fri: Monk + Bank: A Tribute to Thelonious Monk and Harold Battiste, 8

Drive, 486-7411; www.xula.edu — Sat. & Mon: Xavier University Opera Workshop, 7

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


NOVEMBER2010

SUNDAY

MONDAY

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3

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

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Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG)—

Two wolves with conflicting personalities get stuck together on a journey to find their way home. Hollywood 14 CASE 39 (R) — A well-meaning social worker (Renee Zellweger) encounters dark forces while trying to rescue a girl from her seemingly cruel parents. Grand CIGARETTES & NYLONS (NR) —

In the locally produced French film, three young women navigate the United States as foreigners after marrying American soldiers during World War II. Chalmette Movies CONVICTION (R) — Based on

a true story, a woman (Hilary Swank) puts herself through law school to represent her brother, who was arrested for murder and sentenced to life in prison.AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

DEVIL (PG-13) — A group of people are trapped in an elevator, and one of them is the devil. AMC Palace 10

THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) — Lisbeth

Salander fights for her life in more ways than one in the final installment of Stieg Larsson’s Millenium trilogy. Canal Place

HEREAFTER (PG-13) — Clint

Eastwood directs Matt Damon in the drama about three people affected by death in different ways. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14, Prytania I AM LOVE (R) — The film follows a bourgeoisie family in Milan whose lives are changing due to forces of passion and love. Prytania IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) — A 16-year-old finds

himself stuck in a mental health hospital, where he meets a mentor (Zach Galifianakis) and a love interest (Emma Roberts). AMC Palace 20 JACKASS 3-D (R) — The MTV

buffoons add another dimension to their hijinks in their third film. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC

THE 2009 ZURICH FILM FESTIVAL

hell and Back Straight to Hell (1987) was a bizarre tour south of the border that left film critics divided over whether the flashy/ schlocky project was intended as a parody or celebration of spaghetti Westerns. Director Alex Cox (Sid and Nancy, Repo Man, Walker) wanted to organize a concert featuring a slate of punk bands in Nicaragua, but during the late 1980s’ demonization of the Sandinistas by President Ronald Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, it was easier for him to get a star-studded lineup of musicians in a film shot in Spain. The title, obviously, is taken from the Clash song, and the picture stars the Clash’s Joe Strummer, whose album Sandinista! (1980) weighed in against Thatcher’s anti-Communist stance. The film also features Dennis Hopper, Sy Richardson, Elvis Costello, Shane MacGowan and Spider Stacy of The Pogues, members of the Circle Jerks, Grace Jones, Jim Jarmusch (director of Down By Law) and a young Courtney Love. It’s a quirky and violent film about a trio of hitmen who mess up a job, rob a bank instead and head to a Mexican desert town to hide. A sequel, Back to Hell, was rumored though never made, but with the advent of digital technology, Cox went back and re-edited the film, adding more violence to create this version. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

THRU NOV

09

Straight to hell Returns 9 p.m. Wed.-Fri., Nov. 3-5 & Sun.-Thu., Nov. 7-11 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) — Based on the book series,

a young barn owl and his friends escape the orphanage where captives are brainwashed into becoming soldiers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Hollywood 14, Grand

LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) —

Two adults (Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel) with a dissonant relationship unexpectedly become the caregivers of their godchild when the baby’s parents die in an accident. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 MY SOUL TO TAKE (R) — In Wes Craven’s thriller, a serial killer is on the hunt for the seven children born the day he supposedly died. AMC Palace 20 N-SECURE (PG-13) — The

drama follows the complicated lives of a group of affluent professionals. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) — The sequel to the low-

budget box office hit features a new slate of night-vision terrors. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

RED (PG-13) — Bruce Willis,

Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren star in the action-adventure based on the D.C. Comics graphic novel. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

SAW 3-D (R) — Survivors of Jigsaw’s lethal traps form a support group in the supposed conclusion of the successful horror franchise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

Follow the lives of three New Orleans musicians during the years following Hurricane Katrina. Featuring singer Liliane Boutte, trumpeter/photographer Armand “Sheik” Richardson, & musician /Xavier professor Dr. Michael White.

Wednesday, November 3, 2010 • 7:00pm Xavier University Qatar Pavilion, Room 112

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

EASY A (PG-13) — A high school student takes advantage of untrue rumors circulating about her. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

PRESENTS

BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Now ShowiNg

THE KELLER CHAIR IN THE HUMANITIES

45


46

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010


SECRETARIAT (PG) — The film chronicles the life of Penny Chenery, owner of the Triple Crown-winning racehorse Secretariat. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) — Aaron Sorkin and

David Fincher’s film follows the complicated ascent of Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9 TAKERS (PG-13) — Skilled crimi-

nals who consistently pull off perfect bank robberies meet their match in a determined detective. Grand

THE TOWN (R) — Ben Affleck,

Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner and Blake Lively star in Affleck’s drama about a crook who falls for the manager of one of the banks he’s robbed. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

WAITING FOR SUPERMAN (PG) — Davis Guggenheim’s docu-

mentary takes a look at the country’s failing public school system. Canal Place

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) — Michael

Douglass is back as stock trader Gordon Gekko, who is out of prison and looking for a fresh start. Grand

opening Friday BURIED (R) — A man who

wakes up 6 feet underground and doesn’t know who put him there begins a desperate struggle for survival.

DUE DATE (R) — Trying to

make it to his child’s birth in time, a first-time father (Robert Downey Jr.) hitches a ride with an aspiring actor (Zach Galifianakis) for a road trip gone comically awry.

FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) —

Tyler Perry adapts Ntozake Shange’s Tony-nominated stage drama with a starstudded cast. HATCHET II (NR) — A woman returns to the Louisiana swamps to seek revenge against a maniacal killer. Chalmette Movies MEGAMIND (PG) — Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill and Ben Stiller provide the voices in the animated comedy about a supervillain whose life feels meaningless after defeating his nemesis.

ANNIE (PG) — Based on the

stage musical, the film follows a young orphan looking for a family amid the Great Depression. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saurday-Sunday and Nov. 10, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

GHOST BIRD (NR) — The film

documents the elusive Ivorybilled woodpecker, which was declared extinct but then said to be found in Eastern Arkansas. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and Sunday through Nov. 11, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE (PG) — In Hayao Miyazaki’s

animated fantasy, a young woman cursed with an old woman’s body seeks the help of a wizard living in a walking house. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

LAST TRAIN HOME (NR) — Lixin Fan’s documentary follows a couple who is part of China’s annual exodus of migrant workers on the trek to their home villages for the New Year’s holiday. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and Sunday through Nov. 11, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net NOTORIOUS (NR) — In Alfred Hitchcock’s 1946 thriller, Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains’ characters become entwined during a spying mission. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC (NR) — Organist Paul Goussot

provides an improvised score to Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 silent film. Free admission. 6 p.m. Sunday, St. Louis Cathedral, Jackson Square

SENSORY FRIENDLY SCREENINGS: MEGAMIND.

AMC Palace 20 (1299 Elmwood Park Blvd., Harahan) and AMC Palace 10 (5737 W. Park Ave., Houma) screen the film in a safe and accepting environment for autistic children and their families. 10 a.m. Saturday. THE SOUND AFTER THE STORM (NR) — The documentary

follows Lillian Boutté, Dr. Michael White, Armand “Sheik” Richardson and the Next Generation Brass Band through three years after Hurricane Katrina. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday, Xavier

University, 1 Drexel Drive, 4867411; www.xula.edu SWEETHEARTS OF THE PRISON RODEO (NR) — Bradley

Beesley’s documentary follows the female participants of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary’s prison rodeo. A discussion with Beesley and a screening of excerpts from his other projects precede and follow the screening. Tickets $10 general admission, $5 members. 6 p.m. Friday, Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org

TOP SECRET ROSIES: THE FEMALE COMPUTERS OF WORLD WAR II (R) — The film

tells the little-known story of the female mathematicians who did secret research for the U.S. Army during WWII. A Q&A with the filmmaker follows. Call 528-1944 ext. 331 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. Thursday, National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944

Showcasing Local Music MON 11/1

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 11/2

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 11/3

Belleville Outfit

THU 11/4

The Trio

FRI 11/5

Piney Woods Playboys feat. Cary Hudson

SAT 11/6

Johnny V’s Saturday Night Special

feat. Johnny V, George Porter Jr. & Mark Mullins

Joe Krown Trio

SUN feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 11/7 Wolfman Washington

+ Jerry Joseph

VIEUX CARRE MATINEES —

The Historic New Orleans Collections screens short films on Louisiana history and culture. Visit www.hnoc.org for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre. com

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

THE WACKY WORLD OF DR. MORGUS (NR) — The theater

hosts the first big-screen presentation of the iconic New Orleans show in more than two decades, thanks to an HD transfer obtained from the Library of Congress. 3:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m, TuesdayThursday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 West Judge Perez Dr., 504-304-9992

WAY OUT WEST/BLOCK-HEADS (NR) — The two farces are

considered to be comic duo Laurel and Hardy’s greatest masterpieces. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria. com

RANDY JACKSON OF ZEBRA COMING SAT. NOV. 20TH WEEKDAY HAPPY HOUR 2 FOR 1 DRINKS 4-7PM

The Hallelujah Girls

WED. & FRI. 7-9PM

Directed by Jerry Lee Leighton

$10

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

BOTTOMLESS GLASS OF WINE

WED RUBY MOON 7PM 11/3

BRASSAHOLICS 10PM

THU THE PINETTES 9:30PM 11/4

ALL GIRL BRASS BAND

FRI HOT 8 BRASS BAND 7PM

11/5

GRUNGE JAZZ TRIO 10PM

SAT

JAKE LABOTZ 7PM

11/6

AN EVENING W/

BRIAN STOLZ 10PM

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

STARRING

Gennifer Flowers also starring:

Sandy Bravender Karen Hebert Claire Conti Bob Scully Opens Nov. 5 thru Nov. 20 Friday & Saturday Doors Open 6:30pm Large Buffet 7:00pm Show 8:15pm

Reservations 362-4451 Timberlane Country Club 480 Timberlane Dr., Gretna

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

YOU AGAIN (PG) — In the comedy starring Kristen Bell, Sigourney Weaver, Jamie Lee Curtis and Betty White, a wedding causes a host of high school rivalries to reemerge. Grand

special screenings

Film

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

47


ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “The Upward

Spiral,” a group exhibition featuring 13 artists, through Nov. 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

Miniature Exhibition, through Dec. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

BLACKETT-PECK GALLERY. 509 Royal St., 304-6493; www.blackettpeckgallery.com — Works by

Robin Daning, Michelle Levine and Bill Young. Artists’ reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery. com — Works in oil by Robert Malone, through November. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “New

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Landscapes,” oil paintings by Bill Iles; “The Luxury of Exercise,” digital prints, drawings and sculpture by Claudia DeMonte; both through Nov. 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

48

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “The

Adventures of ... ,” paintings by James Taylor Bonds, through Nov. 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “The Fragile If,” porcelain objects by Nikki Jackson, through Dec. 2. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “River Culture,” sculpture and photographs by Elizabeth Shannon; “Surface Tensions,” porcelain wall sculpture and drawings by Beth Dary; both through November. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Plein Air in the Parish,” oil

paintings by Steve Bourgeois, through November. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Metaphor Boxes

and Drawings,” by Beverly Erdreich; works by Sam Still

Birds of a Feather

The Front is the result of a fateful series of collaborations in 2007 between local artists and New York activist Paul Chan, the artist/activist responsible for the 2007 production of Waiting for Godot performed outdoors in the Lower 9th Ward. The project is everything co-op galleries are supposed to be: freewheeling places where art and ideas are bandied about with little regard for the art market. While most St. Claude area galleries also fit that description, The Front may be more miscellaneous than most. So it’s no surprise that Korean artist Yoonmi Nam’s Book of Rocks, Flowers, and Birds is not really a book but a series of ink drawings inspired by a 17th century Chinese painting manual, or that the drawings reflect her “transitional existence” between Eastern and Western cultures. Even so, it’s hard to know what to make of these deftly circumspect studies, except to say her Chrysanthemums ink drawing on mulberry paper is sublime. The dislocations escalate in Jeremy Drummond and Hoang Pham’s Counter Cartographies series, where continents and nations are sliced, diced and reconfigured into alternative topographies that resemble maps of the world as seen through a kaleidoscope or spun through a food processor. Ethnicities and nations can seem fixed in our minds, yet these whimsically conceptual geographies remind us of the fluidity of continents and DNA over time. All lands and peoples have undergone migration; they are where they are because they moved there from elsewhere. More miscellaneous is the Precious Horshes expo curated by Dave Greber. These emerging artists’ works emit occasional sparks, but the standout is Jacob Edwards, whose gut-wrenching ink drawings (pictured) are demented in the grand expressionistic manner of Ralph Steadman and Ronald Searle at their darkest. In a very different vein is the five-panel multi-channel video by David Webber, a kind of electronic ballet of everyday things reduced to abstract swirls of vertiginously rotating colors. It’s all oddly painterly and hypnotic, effects lyrically reinforced by an electronic music soundtrack Webber concocted on his homemade synthesizer. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU NOV

07

Book of Rocks, Flowers, and Birds; Counter Carto— graphies; Precious Hor— shes: Mixed Media Group Exhibition plus Video by David Webber Through Nov. 7 The Front, 4100 St. Claude Ave., 9203980; www.nolafront.org


bestofneworleans.com ART curated by Dan Cameron; both through Nov. 27. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m Saturday. LOUISIANA ARTWORKS. 818 Howard Ave., Suite 300, 571-7373; www.louisianaartworks. org — “Editions at Dawn,” an exhibition

of local contemporary artist printmakers, through Dec. 4. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt. state.la.us — “LSU: Building an American Renaissance,” a traveling exhibit about the university’s architectural history, through Jan. 1. Opening reception 6 p.m. Thursday. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Sculptural works in metal by Jonathan Taube; participatory sidewalk art by Tish Douzart; glass rock sculpture by Curtiss Brock; all through Jan. 8. Opening Saturday.

Find Yourself.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Fashioning Kimono: Art Deco and Modernism in Japan,” through Jan. 9. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SWAMP FEST

NOVEMBER 6-7 • AUDUBON ZOO

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Aquazoa: Micro Dramas in Peril,” acrylic and sumi ink on canvas and wood by Betsy Stewart, through Dec. 1. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

FEATURING ROSIE LEDET & THE ZYDECO PLAYBOYS, TERRANCE SIMIEN & THE ZYDECO EXPERIENCE AND OTHER GREAT ENTERTAINERS

PK GALLERY. 938 Royal St — Paintings by Rex

Presley. Benefit opening 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

JOIN US FOR THESE OTHER FUN-FILLED EVENTS

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com —

December 11 Jingle Bugs

“My New Orleans: A City in Transition,” a curated exhibition featuring 22 artists, through Dec. 3. Opening reception 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — Collages by Billy Renkel; altered

Audubon Dinosaur Adventure AUDUBON ZOO

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Sebastião Salgado, through Jan. 1. ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “Parallel Universes,” works by

Dichotomies,” an installation by Daniel Lauricella, Duane Pitre and Jeanette Bonds, through Sunday. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com —

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BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave.,

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“Hell Hell Hell/Heaven Heaven Heaven: Encountering Sister Gertrude Morgan & Revelation,” works by Lesley Dill, through Nov. 20. “Rebel Scum,” wood block prints by Sean Starwars, through Saturday.

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For Swamp Fest, portable chairs and blankets welcome. No outside food or beverage. Skip the lines, buy tickets at AudubonInstitute.org

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SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Found Light,” black-and-white photographs by Stephanie Hierholzer, through November. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

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49


ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 49

www.byrdiesgallery.com — “David Sinclair Nixon: A Retrospective of One Artist’s Life and Work”, through Nov. 9. CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Global

Log,” paintings on kitenges by Horton Humble, through November. Meet the artist event 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

DEITY ARTS OF THE EXTREME ORIENT. 2001 Magazine St., 529-3171; www.deitynola.com — “Parlance?” contemporary American artists working with the style and subjects of Asian art, through Sunday. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Dream-

ing in Clay,” stoneware figural works by Mark Chatterley, through Thursday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Harvest,” glazed stonewear sculpture,

acrylic on canvas and oil canvas by Sue Bowers, Jason DuMouchel and Anne McLeod, through Saturday. “Ethnographic Terminalia,” a juried exhibition in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association Meeting, through Dec. 4.

FORT ISABEL GALLERY. 502 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1841 — “Fall for Art,” a group exhibition featuring 10 gallery artists, through Saturday. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Sumi ink drawings by Yoonmi

Nam, Jeremy Drummond and Hoang Pham; installation works by emerging artists curated by Dave Greber; multi-channel video installation by Dave Webber; all through Sunday. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Sculpture by Pablo Atchugarry, through Nov. 20. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Celebrate New Orleans,”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

a group exhibition featuring local artists, through Sunday.

50

HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — “Smile,” oil paintings by Brian Poirier,

through Nov. 22.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. —

Gumbo Art Group show featuring works by Bruce Davenport Jr. and others, through Nov. 9. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “The Bento Box,” a group exhibition featuring NOCCA visual arts faculty, through Thursday. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www.jazzandheritage.org — “Haiti Before and After the Earthquake,” photographs by students from the SUNO Master of Arts in Museum Studies program, through Sunday. LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Paintings by Tucker Fitz Hugh Jr. and Vera Deville Judycki; painted ostrich eggs by Tucker Fitz Hugh Jr., through Nov. 27.

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MYERS & WHITE GALLERY. 2036 Magazine St., 529-8945 — Group exhibition featuring

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paintings by Jack Fontana, M.K. Hargrove and Matilde Alberny; photographs by Katherine Slingluff; glass sculpture by Gerry White; jewelry by Myers & White and Becky Burt. Works by Andrew Jacques. All through November.

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MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www.martinechaissongallery. com — “Niagara,” paintings by Jack Niven, through Nov. 27.

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POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Carnival of Saints and Souls,” a group

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pets and photographs, through November. SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out of the Blue,” a

group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell — “So You

Think You Can Paint?” works by elected officials and community leaders, through Nov. 12. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “The Edge of

Spirit,” drawings and mixedmedia sculptures by Donald Locke, through Nov. 27.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Robot

Invasion,” a group exhibition featuring wearable and sculptural robots, through Nov. 14. “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Do What I

Mean, Not What I Say,” a group exhibition featuring seven artists, through Sunday.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing.

Project seeks entries for its furniture design competition and auction. Email cwhite@ thegreenproject.org or visit www.thegreenproject.org/ salvations.php for details. Submission deadline is Dec. 1.

STUDIO 525 ART MARKET. The

studio seeks artists for its art market held on the second Saturday of the month starting Nov. 13. Call (985) 373-2212 or email studio_525@hotmail. com for details.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Perma-

nent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Through A Crowd, Bravely:

The 50th Anniversary of Public School Desegregation in New Orleans,” an exhibition about the 1960 integration of William Frantz and McDonogh 19 elementary schools, through Dec. 22.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts.

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It:

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — “Be Cool;

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

Do Good. Piece by Peace,” discarded materials repurposed for art by Traci Claussen, through Monday.

CALL FOR ARTISTS JAZZ FEST CRAFT VENDORS. The

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival seeks craft vendors for the 2011 festival. Email craftsadmin@nojazzfest.com or visit www.nojazzfest.com for details. Submission deadline is Dec. 3. MIXED MEDIA JURIED EXHIBITION. The City of Slidell seeks

works for the Slidell Cultural Center’s Mixed Media juried exhibition to be held in January. Visit www.slidell.la.us for details. Submission deadline is Dec. 3.

Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GOSH MUSEUM. 2065 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-6118 —

“Waterways to Railways: A Bicentennial Exhibition,” rare photographs and artifacts depicting Slidell’s history, through Jan. 7. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org — Early

Louisiana furniture from the Magnolia Mound Plantation collection, through Dec. 11. “Mignon Faget: A Life in Art and Design,” textiles, jewelry, prints, linoleum blocks, drawings and glassware by the jewelry designer, through Jan. 2.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road,

488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hur-

ricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, ongoing.

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MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,” pho-

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NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Sumpt’n

w ww . t e r r azu. ne t

to See, Native Son Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Deja Vu All Over Again:

Generic Art Solutions;” “Selections from Project 35” videos selected by Independent Curators International; both through Feb. 13, and more. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-cen-

tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “The Big Spill,” a

Center for Southern Craft and Design spotlight exhibition, through Dec. 5. “Art of the Cup: Functional Comfort,” a juried invitational exhibition; “One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson, and more.

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SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “New Orleans con Sabor

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Beans and Blues

Latino,” an exhibit highlighting the legacy of Latin cuisine in New Orleans, through Nov. 15. “Consider the Oyster,” oyster plates from Jim and Diane Gossen’s private collection, and more.

TEKREMA CENTER FOR ART AND CULTURE. 5640 Burgundy St. —

Collection of intuitive art from Papa New Guinea, through Nov. 15. For more information, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — “French Towns and Countrysides,” an exhibition featuring 19th- and 20th-century French painters, through Dec. 31.

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51


STAGE

LISTINGS

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

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THEATER AFTERLIFE: A GHOST STORY.

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Southern Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www. southernrep.com — A couple preparing their beachfront home for a storm is confronted with a great wave, carrying a haunting world that threatens to swallow them. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday-Saturday. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. BAT BOY: THE MUSICAL.

Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 616-6066; www.dcc.edu — The campy horror-comedy is based on the Weekly World News report about the supposed “bat boy” found living in a cave. Tickets $14. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and Nov. 10-13, 7 p.m. Sunday and 2 p.m. Nov. 14. A CRUDE TRILOGY. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — Cripple Creek Theatre presents a trio of plays by Andrew Vaught about man-made disaster. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Nov. 13.

FORBIDDEN BROADWAY. Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www. lepetittheatre.com — Gerard Alessandrini’s satire is a rapidfire revue of contemporary Broadway musicals. Tickets $32-$50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, then 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 21.

MODEL TRAIN SHOW! OPERATING TRAIN LAYOUTS s+)$3#/.4%343s-/$%, TRAIN DEALERS AND MORE

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Ponchatoula Lions Club 750 E. Pine St., Pontchatoula $5 per person, 12 and under free

Bring old eyeglasses for free ticket to all day toy train raffles!

Sponsored by the Louisiana Chapter of The Train Collectors Association www.traincollectors.org

LET FREEDOM SWING!. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The musical highlights wartime-era big band and swing music. Visit www. stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. LOVE CHILD. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Bob Edes Jr. and Brian Peterson play all the characters in the off-Broadway play-withina-play by Daniel Jenkins and Robert Stanton. Tickets $31 Friday-Saturday (includes $5 drink credit), $20 Thursday and Sunday. Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. Thursday (call 671-7410 for tickets for that show only; tickets $25). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 21. MARDI GRAS MURDER IN THE BAYOU. Le Cafe De Bon Temps,

GET IN ON THE ACT

review Unnatural Causes

There’s a hurricane, but it’s not Katrina. Steve Yockey’s Afterlife: A Ghost Story — currently receiving a premiere production at Southern Rep — is more imaginative and weird than any art I’ve seen inspired by our own brush with disaster. The first act is played out between a young married couple, Connor (Michael Aaron Santos) and Danielle (Lucy Faust). They’ve just returned to their beachfront cottage to secure it against a looming storm. But there’s an underlying tension between them, and they can barely tolerate each other’s presence. Some horrible, tormenting secret lurks, symbolized by the number of dead fish strewn on the beach or the ungainly black birds that have descended to feed on them. It turns out the vast, turbulent ocean has swallowed the couple’s 3-year-old son. Danielle hates the “hungry beast of an ocean” for taking her boy, and she curses it. Connor claims he has come to terms with the loss by writing a letter to the boy and throwing it into the ocean. Danielle is enraged that he claims to have accepted the loss. Certain she’s heard her son’s voice, she swims out into the surf to find him, but Connor rescues her. Act 1 draws to a close as an exceptionally welldone two-character drama — part realism, part expressionism. The second act is entirely different. It revisits the first act’s themes in a symbolic manner — part Beckett and part Lewis Carroll (if he’d written for psychopaths instead of children). The stage is split into three abstract locations. In one, a young man (Andrew Farrier) abandoned on an island writes letters to his parents, apologizing for not coming home. A postman (John Neisler) arrives and takes the young man’s letters. On a second platform, we see Connor and a visiting black bird (John Neisler again). The third platform is a kind of teahouse hosted by a proprietress (Troi Bechet) with a seamstress (Lisa Picone) at her side. Danielle arrives, and the proprietress welcomes her and makes some tea, but that may be all the comfort Danielle will find. Afterlife is a dark postmodern puzzle. Director Aimee Hayes assembled an excellent cast and brought the play vibrantly to life. It’s well worth a visit. — Dalt Wonk

THRU NOV

07

Afterlife: A Ghost Story 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; 3 p.m. Sun. Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com Tickets $29-$35

40261 Hwy. 190 East, Slidell — A murder causes life at a bayou plantation to never be the same in the comedic murder-mystery. Tickets $50 (includes dinner). 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14 and Dec. 5. TWO TIMES TWO. Teatro Wego,

177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 8852000; www.jpas.org — Two married couples who are hav-

ing affairs with each other’s spouses end up having dinner together. Tickets $20-$30. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 21. VANITIES. Cutting Edge Theater

at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 639-8294 — The comedy follows the growth of a friendship among three small-town women


bestofneworleans.com STAGE coming of age in the 1960s and ’70s. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Nov. 20.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s

Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight by the

Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www. starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

THE QUEEN B’S. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Lyla Hay Owen explores the lives, careers and songs of Betty Grable, Bette Davis, Lauren “Betty” Bacall and Betty Hutton. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Monday and Nov. 22.

COMEDY BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The long-form improv comedy show features John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. Zeitgeist Multi-

Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge,

2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY.

Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts a standup comedy show with professional comedians. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

STAND-UP NOLA PRESENTS DARRYL RHOADES & POKEY SIMMONS. Boomtown

Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

53


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Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through ageappropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 4 LITTLE MASTERS. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Preregistration is required. Call 488-5488 ext. 410 or email kchulvick@longuevue.com for details. Tickets $15 general admission, $12 members (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 6 ACTION STORYTIME: MAKE YOUR OWN PIZZA . East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Children ages 7 to 9 learn how to make pizza dough and cook their own pizzas. Free admission. Noon.

CHILDREN’S CASTLE TURNS 15. Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Irwin Royes, the World’s Smallest Magician, and the Port-a-Puppet Players perform at the celebration featuring cake, door prizes and more. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m. DAISY SCOUTS WORKSHOPS: OUR FLOWER GARDEN . Longue

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Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The event provides an opportunity for Daisy Scouts to continue in the Flower Garden Journey program. Advanced registration is required. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@ longuevue.com for details. Admission $8 Scouts, $4 adults. 8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. MASTER GARDENERS.

Hollygrove Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www.

The Mirliton Festival fills the Bywater’s favorite canine-friendly hangout, Markey Park, with live music, food, an art market, children’s activities and more. The 21st annual neighborhood bash features Kermit Ruffins (pictured), R Scully’s Rough 7, 101 Runners, Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue, Happy Talk Band, Hurray for the Riff Raff and, of course, The Mirlitones. General admission $5, Bywater Neighborhood Association members $3, children free. — Will Coviello

NOV

06

mirliton festival 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday Markey Park, Royal Street at Piety Street; www.mirlitonfestival.com

hollygrovemarket.com — Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans teaches young gardeners to plant, paint, identify good and bad bugs and feed the chickens. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

events Tuesday 2 BRIDGE HOUSE CELEBRITY WAITERS IV. Sheraton New

Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — Former NFL players are the waiters at this fundraiser benefiting Bridge House’s substance abuse treatment programs. Call 821-7135 or email wayne@ bridgehouse.org for details. Admission $100. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — Analyst Marilyn Marshall presents “Active Imagination: Engaging the Other.” Visit www.jungneworleans.com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, free for members. 7:30 p.m.

ESSENCE OF STYLE DESIGN SYMPOSIUM . Longue Vue

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The two-day event features a reception, discussions, a luncheon, silent auction and a presentation and book signing by designer Carleton Varney. Email jgick@longuevue.com for details. Admission starts at $100. Reception 7 p.m. to

9 p.m. Tuesday at a private residence; luncheon, silent auction and book signing 10 a.m. Wednesday at the RitzCarlton New Orleans Grand Ballroom (921 Canal St.).

Wednesday 3 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. ILADYFEST. The spoken word, film and arts festival features female artists and benefits organizations that support women. Times and locations vary. Visit www.ladyfestneworleans.org for details. Wednesday-Sunday. LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. 12 p.m.

MEET THE ARTIST: VITRICE MCMURRY. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The program features the New Orleans-based jewelry designer. Free admission. 6 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS MEDIA PANEL DISCUSSION SERIES. Louisiana

Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 5234352; www.leh.org — The third installment of the series discusses “The Economics of


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Newspapers.” Free admission. 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING . Whitney Bank Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www. whitneybank.com — The group holds its monthly meeting. Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m. TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Thursday 4

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DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur St. — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m.

SPEAKERS’ FORUM SERIES. American-Italian Museum & Research Library, 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Honorary Consul of Italy Arnaldo Partesotti discusses the benefits of obtaining Italian citizenship. 6 p.m. WARGAMES. National World War II

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Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming on the first Thursday of every month. Pre-registration required. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday 5 EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 5427113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. EXHIBITION WALK-THROUGH: SELECTIONS FROM PROJECT 35. New Orleans Museum

of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Modern and Contemporary Art curator Miranda Lash leads a walk-through of the museum

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

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ROBIN D.G. KELLEY. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www.tulane.edu — The professor and historian lectures about the role of community and neighborhood in shaping the work and lives of jazz musicians. 6:30 p.m.

SELECT DEBIT

J. MICHAEL DESMON. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — The LSU College of Art and Design professor discusses the university’s architectural history. The lecture is in conjunction with the Cabildo’s LSU: Building an American Renaissance exhibit. 6 p.m.

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FEDERALISM AT WORK . Loyola University College of Law, 7214 St. Charles Ave., 861-5668; www. law.loyno.edu — The symposium examines the role state criminal law has in the context of immigration, immigration-related activities and unauthorized or undocumented migration. Call 861-5558 or email aralessa@loyno.edu for details. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION WINE DINNER. St. Tammany Art

Association, 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www. sttammanyart.org — The dinner and fundraiser commemorating the New Orleans Museum of Art’s “Contemporary Women Artists in Louisiana” exhibit features a five-course meal and live music by Don Vappie. Call (985) 892-8650 for details. Admission $65 (includes meal). 6:30 p.m.

Saturday 6 ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park,

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

IN THE F RENCH QUA RTER

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BINGO. St. Stephen School, Cafeteria, 1027 Napoleon Ave. — The school hosts a bingo game to benefit St. Stephen Church. Call 899-1378 for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF.

Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 8999119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EXHIBIT DISCUSSION & COOKING DEMONSTRATION: NEW ORLEANS CON SABOR LATINO. Southern Food

& Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Zella Llerena and Edgar Sierra lead a cooking demonstration and presentation. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m.

Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GOSPEL & ARTS FESTIVAL . Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The block party features live music, local vendors selling art, fashion, jewelry, home decor and other wares; children’s activities, face painting and more. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

HOWLING SUCCESS: A TRIBUTE TO THE 1940S. Mardi Gras World’s

event includes art shows, displays from arts organizations, live music, dining specials at area restaurants and an after-party. Call (985) 6464375 for details. Free admission. 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. general admission, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. after-party.

its annual awards for outstanding achievement in and contributions to the humanities. Email sartisky@ leh.org or visit www.leh.org for details. Deadline is Nov. 9.

STEP-OUT WALK TO FIGHT DIABETES.

words

Audubon Park, 6500 Magazine St. — The American Diabetes Association’s event features a second line through the park, a fitness festival and a children’s area. Visit www.diabetes.org/step-out for details. 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. general admission.

UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ZUMBA TO STOP HUNGER . Premier

River City Ballroom, 1380 Port of New Orleans Place, 361-7821 — The LA/SPCA’s annual event features music by Anais St. John, Swingaroux and Victory Belles, as well as food from local restaurants, special drinks and more. Visit www. la-spca.org/howlingsuccess for details. Admission $125 general admission, $250 patron party. 7 p.m patron party, 8 p.m general admission.

Fitness, 1909 Airline Drive, Metairie, 304-4200; www.bepremierfit.com — Gym instructors host a day of the Latin-influenced dance workout to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans and Acadiana. Admission is three or more cans of food or a donation to Second Harvest. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

LECTURE: SELECTIONS FROM PROJECT 35. New Orleans Museum

Sunday 7

of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The lecture discusses the museum exhibit. Free with museum admission. Noon.

MIRLITON FESTIVAL . Markey Park,

700 block of Piety Street, between Royal and Dauphine streets, 9447900; www.bywaterartmarket. com — The festival features food, art and live music. Visit www. bywatermirlitonfestival.com for details. Tickets $5 general admission, free for children 12 and under. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS COFFEE FESTIVAL .

Freret Market, corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 638-2589; www.freretmarket. org — The festival features a coffee tasting flight with more than 35 varieties, educational sessions and live music. Visit www.neworleanscoffeefestival.com for details. Noon to 5 p.m.

O.C.H. ART MARKET. Zeitgeist

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The free indoor and outdoor market features locally made arts and crafts, live music and food. Email ochartmarket@gmail.com for details. 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

ner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 638-2589; www.freretmarket.org — The market offers food, arts, live music and crafts from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m.

OPEN STUDIO DAY. NOCCA|Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The center opens its doors to prospective students and their parents and provides information about programs and upcoming auditions. 10 a.m. to noon.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET.

SLIDELL ARTS EVENING . Olde Towne

FRERET MARKET. Freret Market, cor-

Ormond Plantation, 13786 River

56

Be there do that

Slidell, www.slidell.la.us — The

DANCE FOR LIFE . NOCCA|Riverfront,

2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The nonprofit Nfungutah presents a day of free African-inspired dance, music and yoga classes from renowned teachers, musicians and advanced students. Call (646) 504-4325 or visit www.nfungotah.com for details. 8 a.m to 5:30 p.m.

MOUNT CARMEL ACADEMY FALL FESTIVAL . Mount Carmel Academy,

7027 Milne Blvd., 288-7630; www. mtcarmelcubs.org — The event features food, activities and live entertainment. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Monday 8 POETRY PROCESS WORKSHOPS.

St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121 — Delia Tomino Nakayama leads the fiveweek writing workshop series. Pre-registration is required. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@ gmail.com for details. Free admission. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS. Nonprofit Central,

1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central. org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Call for appliCations LOUISIANA HUMANIST OF THE YEAR .

The Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities seeks nominations for

A.J. MEEK . Historic New Orleans

Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — The photographer signs Sacred Light: Holy Places in Louisiana. 2 p.m. Saturday.

BOB CARR . Chris Owens Club, 500 Bourbon St., 523-6400; www. chrisowensclub.com — The author appears at the event for Raising Our Children on Bourbon: A French Quarter Love Affair. 7 p.m. Wednesday. BRIAN W. SMITH. Afro-American

Book Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 2432436 — The author signs and reads from Deadbeat. 3 p.m.

KIM DUDEK . Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Dogs and the Women Who Love Them: Extraordinary True Stories of Loyalty, Healing, and Inspiration. 6 p.m. Thursday.

LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. NANCY PARKER . Maple Street Book

Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs The Adventures of Yat and Dat: What’s Cookin’?. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

RICHARD CAMPANELLA . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Lincoln in New Orleans: The 18281831 Flatboat Voyages and Their Place in History. 6 p.m. Saturday. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. SUSAN CHEEVER . Maple Street Book

Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs Louisa May Alcott: A Personal Biography. 6 p.m. Friday.

SUSAN SCHADT & LISA BUSER .

Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The authors discuss and sign Wild Abundance: Ritual, Revelry & Recipes of the South’s Finest Hunting Clubs. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

TARA MASIH . Xavier University, 1

Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www.xula. edu — The author reads from Where the Dog Star Never Glows. 7 p.m. Thursday.

TONY FENNELLY. Faubourg Marigny Art & Books, 600 Frenchmen St., 947-3700 — The author signs and reads from The Bitch’s Guide to Handling Men and Home Dead for Christmas. 11 a.m. Saturday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FIRST YOU MAKE A RUE <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Chef Ray Gruezke, the former sous chef at Le Foret, has opened > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >his own restaurant, Rue 127 (127 N. Carrollton Ave., 483-1571; PUTTING EVERYTHING ON THE TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <www.rue127.com), in a Mid-City shotgun previously occupied by Arabesque. The average entree price at Rue 127 is a little more than $20 and dishes include panko-crusted salmon with WHAT couscous, duck with fennel and citrus, and poached bass with Antoine’s Restaurant house-made fettuccine. Rue 127 serves dinner Tuesday through Saturday and brunch on Sunday.

am

B

WHERE

713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com WHEN

Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. HOW MUCH

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

A new bar, a new attitude, the same incomparable atmosphere WHAT DOESN'T

Some dishes still need a lot of work. CHECK, PLEASE

Noble efforts are seeking to right the listing ship.

Grande Dame

GETTING THE MOST FROM AN IRREPLACEABLE BUT EXASPERATING CLASSIC.

In the Rex Room, Sterling Constant (left), chef Mike Regua and Rudy Green present some of Antoine’s classics, including oysters Rockefeller (center). PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

O

lunch specials, monthly wine tastings and even a Facebook page. Antoine’s famously arcane menu also was culled after Katrina. This effort may have boosted efficiency in the kitchen, but unfortunately, Antoine’s remains frustratingly inconsistent on the plate. Oysters Rockefeller and Bienville are usually good, as are escargot and shrimp remoulade. But for entrees, even my old standbys of trout or pompano under enormous lumps of crabmeat have proven unreliable. The pompano Pontchartrain was sublime simplicity one night, though another day, the fish was so dry not even the buttered crabmeat could help. Steak is relatively safe, but at $40, a filet mignon should be more than just a haven from flabby sauces and overcooked chicken. With more satisfying cuisine so readily available around town, including in the old-line Creole style, I can’t recommend Antoine’s on its cooking alone. Under some circumstances that might rule out a restaurant altogether. Yet there still is something authentically alluring here. While conventional wisdom has long emphasized the need to “know how to order” at Antoine’s, I think I’ve found my own way to get the most from a visit, culinary consistency notwithstanding. First, dress up, even though you may now see grown men wearing shorts here. Second, take a tour around this indoor campus of a restaurant, examining the museum-quality displays throughout its chambers and passages, even if you’ve done it all before. Most of all, plan a visit as a cultural outing, and if the outing ends with dancing at the Hermes Bar, all the better. There will never be another Antoine’s, though now it seems we have new ways to experience it.

To mark its 10th anniversary, the nonprofit Cafe Reconcile (1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157) will co-host a neighborhood party on the 1600 and 1700 blocks of Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard on Saturday, Nov. 6, in conjunction with the Make a Joyful Noise Gospel Festival. Cafe Reconcile is a hands-on instrucitonal program for at-risk youth. For a schedule of events, see www.reconcileneworleans.org.

five 5 IN

FIVE OFFBEAT BEIGNETS

KATIE’S RESTAURANT & BAR 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582 www.katiesinmidcity.com

At brunch, order sausage beignets topped with jalapeno aioli.

BOULIGNY TAVERN

3641 Magazine St., 891-1810 www.boulignytavern.com

Gouda beignets are an instant hit on this upscale bar menu.

MONDO

900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633

www.mondoneworleans.com

Cinnamon beignets are light as air and disappear quickly.

DOMENICA

123 Baronne St., 648-6020

www.domenicarestaurant.com

An Italian relative, frittole di zucca are filled with pumpkin and ricotta.

RED FISH GRILL

115 Bourbon St., 598-1200 www.redfishgrill.com

Darkly fried shrimp beignets are served with sweet pepper jelly.

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2005 Chateau Gonin BORDEAUX, FRANCE / $13-$15 RETAIL

Since 1510, a noted winemaking family has produced exceptional wines in the Saint-Sulpicede-Pommiers commune. Its winery, located 20 miles southeast of the city of Bordeaux, harvested the estate-grown grapes (an even blend of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon) for this bottling in 2005, an excellent vintage. Vinification took place in stainless steel tanks with an extended maceration process. The medium-bodied wine offers aromas of red and black berry fruit, truffles, leather and cocoa leading into black cherry, currant and blackberry flavors with soft, velvety tannins and a long finish. Decant an hour before serving. Enjoy it with steak, veal chops and other grilled meats. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle, The Wine Seller, Dorignac’s and Martin Wine Cellar. Drink it at: Clever Wine Bar. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

ysters Rockefeller still begins many meals at Antoine’s, where the dish was invented, and dessert still calls for baked Alaska and flaming cafe brulot. These days, however, dinner at Antoine’s may well end at the relatively new Hermes Bar on a night when singer/songwriter Paul Sanchez reprises old Cowboy Mouth numbers or trombonist Glen David Andrews leads the well-dressed crowd on impromptu parades out the front door. Antoine’s is the oldest of the old-line French Creole restaurants — establishments renowned for their protective embrace of this city’s indigenous grand cuisine and for their stiff resistance to change. Yet few other New Orleans restaurants have seen more change lately. Antoine’s remains essentially Antoine’s, an iconic, irreplaceable if often exasperating restaurant that is simultaneously a tourist attraction and a clubhouse for the intensely local ranks of Carnival royalty. But Rick Blount, Antoine’s CEO and the great-great-grandson of Antoine Alciatore, the Frenchman who founded the place in 1840, is striving to make it more relevant and accessible to a broader customer base. The first foray was the addition of Sunday brunch in 2006, and more changes have followed. Last year, the restaurant converted a dining room into the Hermes Bar, a handsome, upscale saloon with bands scheduled on weekend nights and a menu including such surprisingly delicious creations as a fried shrimp Reuben. In March came Antoine’s Annex, a counter service cafe for sandwiches, coffee and Angelo Brocato’s gelato. In the main restaurant, the wine list has been rebuilt since Hurricane Katrina with less age but greater variety. There are three-course

JOYFUL RECONCILIATION

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China < < < < < < <Rose < offers many Chinese seafood The Lomi Lomi com> > > > > > > >specialties. > bines jumbo shrimp, pineapple <<< and water chestnuts wrapped in >> bacon, fries them golden brown <and < serves them on a bed of sau-

téed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Credit < cards. $

> > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > FIVE > > HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAMELLIA CAFE — 69455 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 809-6313; www.thecamelliacafe.com — A family-friendly atmosphere and local flavors are calling cards of Camellia Cafe. The Riverbend platter is a feast of catfish, shrimp, oysters, crab fingers, soft shell crab and hushpuppies. The Monterey chicken is grilled and topped with onions, peppers, mushrooms and cheese. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

60

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke

dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

CAFE THE BREAKROOM CAFÉ — 3431

Houma Blvd., Metairie, 941-7607 — Breakfasts of eggs, waffles or burritos are served any time at the Breakroom. The breakfast platter rounds up two eggs, bacon and a hashbrown patty. At lunch, the signature Breakroom sandwich is piled high with corned beef, pastrami, purple onion, lettuce and tomato. There’s also a selection of salads and a coffee bar. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www.eliza-

beths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania

St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese. com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian

dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www. mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CELLERS OF RIVER RIDGE — 1801

Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellersrr.com — 1801 Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellarsrr.com — The deli at this wine shop serves up hearty dishes and creative sandwiches like the “spicy bird” with smoked turkey, applewood-smoked bacon, pepper Jack cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo on a croissant. The shrimp remoulade salad is served over romaine with cucumbers and tomatoes. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714

Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER AMERICAN PIE DINER — 2244 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 468-2187 — American Pie serves breakfast around the clock and a menu of burgers and Americana

classics. The Reuben has melted Swiss over pastrami and sauerkraut and is served with fries or chips. Chicken quesadillas with provolone and sauteed onions and peppers are one of the changing daily specials. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $ STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

61


Out2Eat

CELEBRATE

s

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JaPaNESE

A N N I V ER SA RY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH 5:30-7:30 PM

The Davenport Lounge at the Ritz CO M E TASTE

5 FINLANDIA GAMBIT-TINI

$

( F R EE SA M P L E S O F T H E W I N N I N G R ECI P E )

Win GREAT DOOR PRIZES COURTESY OF GAMBIT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

TASTE LOUISIANA DEER SAUSAGE

62

BY CLANCY DUBOS AND CHEF MAT MURPHY OF M BISTRO ENTERTAINMENT

JEREMY DAVENPORT COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING WITH A PURCHASE. Bar menu with prices starting at $8 Dinner reservations now available at M Bistro via www.opentable.com

NEW ORLEANS

KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 8913644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters

Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDItERRaNEaN/ MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honey-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, anchohoney coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT & BAR —

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4633030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree plat-


MI

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

ING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www. sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with

PO-BOYS

&

CATER-

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

Full service restaurant

with night time

entertainment from Tue-Sat. Magazine Location

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

Sandwich Specials! monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

158 S. Military Road, Slidell, LA 985-646-1728 Mon 11am-9pm • Tue-Thur 11am-12am Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

PARKWAY FOR

PO’BOYS!

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

SOUL

STEAKHOUSE

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

EST 1994

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

2244 Veterans Memorial Blvd. Suite A Kenner • 468-2187

starting from $5.50

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

hourS

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113

Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

(504)

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

482-3047 525 Hwy 190 • W Slidell • 985-649-6211 Monday-Thursday 7am-9pm, Fri & Sat 7am-10pm, Sun 8am-4pm

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 11/14/10

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT • DR. MITCHELL PIERCE DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

69455 Hwy 59 • Abita Springs • 985-809-6313 Monday-Thursday 8am-9pm, Fri & Sat 8am-10pm, Sun 8am-8pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAMMY’S

4

K• 2 ee

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

Totally retro 50’s diner complete with a full soda fountain menu & all your classic diner favorites.

Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

yS A w dA

PIZZA

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N.

dAy • 7

fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

A

ters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

63


NOLA MARKETPLACE CRISTINA’S

3 TON 410 FREON REPLACEMENT SYSTEM

CLEANING SERVICE Let me help you with your

WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

cleaning needs

After Construction Cleaning

$3690

INSTALLED 10 year compressor

12 months same as cash

Residential & Commercial

Superior Aire, Inc.

Licensed & Bonded

465-0688

232-5554 or 831-0606 3 TON A/C

Trainer To Go LLC

condenser & installed

1499

$

In Home Personal Training

"Where we bring the gym to you"

5 YEAR WARRANTY Exp 10/31/10

Service Calls $ 50

49

GULF STATES AIR

464-1267

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

13 Seer

until Nov. 30th

including

64

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS • AND MORE

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE Residential • Commercial

Susana Palma

Our trainers will travel to you 24/7 at your convenience We will help you achieve your weight loss and fitness results We will custom design a work out program tailored to your specific needs

Light/General Housekeeping • Heavy Duty Cleaning Summer Cleaning • Supplies Provided

Owner: Jessie Campora • 504-994-3822 TrainerToGo@hotmail.com

Locally owned & serving New Orleans area for 19 years

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

504-250-0884 • 504-286-5868 Fully Insured & Bonded

Allow me to cook & entertain in your home this season

www.cougarinstincts.com Photo by Abby Photo, LLC.

Mind • Body • Spirit

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 483.3100

SAVE A PIGGY’S

LIFE

WITH

 GAMBIT COUPONS  TURN TO THE INSIDE BACK COVER OF GAMBIT FOR SPECIAL DISCOUNTS ON GOODS & SERVICES OR VISIT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM


CLASSIFIEDS

 

NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place ad in The

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

DOMESTIC AUTOS CHRYSLER PT CRUISER ‘05. Fully loaded, 40K miles. mint cond. $200 dpwn, take over pmts $75/mo w/ warranty. Call 504-836-9801, 24 hours. FORD TAURUS ‘05. Fully loaded, all power, a/c. Exc cond, one owner. $200 down, take over pmts of $95/ mo w/warranty. Call 504-836-9801 24 hours.

PETS

PET ADOPTIONS

COONEY

1yr old sweet and playful Calico kitty,shots spayed microchiped ,rescue 504 462-1968

AUTOS UNDER $1000 2004 NISSAN SENTRA SPEC V

Runs but does needs work! NO Drivers side airbag. It has a few dents & dings,l but overall body in good shape. Current on inspection & tags. Would be great for parts or project car! Must sell $600. Call (504) 676-8943

Elijah BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

WANTED TO PURCHASE Cash for Cars

Rescued Cats & Kittens

Don’t trade or donate your unneeded car or truck. We pay cash on the spot for drivable cars and trucks. 304-6702

Need forever homes, cute, friendly,& playful. Fixed, UTD on shots, vet checked, FIV/Feluk neg. Seniors adopt for free w/ vet reference 461-0760 info@petadoptionservices.org

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Sweetpotato

XL black and white very sweet male kitty, neutered ,vacs, rescue 504 462-1968

MIND-BODY-FITNESS

Special Rates

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Advertise in

market PLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS Adopting your baby is a gift we’ll cherish, endless love awaits. Christine & Tom 888-316-5136 exp. pd. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

DATING SERVICE. Long-term/ShortTerm Relationships, FREE-2-TRY! 1-877-722-0087 Exchange/Browse Personal Mesaages 1-866-362-1311. Live adult casual conversations 1-877599-8753. Meet pn chat-lines. Local Singles 1-888-869-0491 (18+) New!! Talk Live!! 1-866-362-1311

A Touch of

Aloha

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Neuromuscular Therapy • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

504-258-3389

Woodland Oaks Center

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

Sacred Ground

Massage Therapy Swedish, Deep Tissue, Reflexology

Kris

La Lic #1121-01

Tranquil CBD location 12 years Experience

(504)729-7011

SERVICES ART/MUSIC Art Classes

Learn Portraiture, color mixing, landscape plein aire, and Impressionist theory. Teacher is New Orleans Artist Bob Graham. www.bobgrahamart.com bigbobgraham@aol.com

Weekly Tails

MERCHANDISE ART/POSTERS ART COLLECTION

Hilda is a 2-year-old, spayed, Wire Hair Fox Terrier. She’s NON-STOP energy and would make a great jogging partner or agility dog!! To meet Hilda or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Vintage Photography, Tribal Art, Glass & Ceramics. Call Michael, (504) 913-2872

Clarence Millet Painting

“Studio Courtyard,” an oil painting measuring approximately 3’ x 2’, by the New Orleans artist Clarence Millet ANA (d. 1959) of a French Quarter courtyard, not unlikely where he and others of the Arts and Crafts Guild in the 1930’s worked, with a magnificently luminous banana tree seen from a balcony. This painting has been in a private collection for the past 50 years, but it will be included in the upcoming Louisiana Purchase Auction at Neal Auction Company on Magazine St., on either November 20 or 21. See their website, www.nealauction.com for more information.

hilda

Kennel #A11566817

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES 1- Wicker Settee wheat color with white cushion “fair condition” $95.00. Call 889-8474 or 220-7059 $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

sassy

Kennel #A11039887

Sassy is an 8-month-old, spayed, brown Tabby DSH. She’s been at the shelter since July and is hoping to have a new home for the holidays. To meet Sassy or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Employment

5 months old sweet playful kittens with personality plus, spayed/neutered ,shots, microchip. rescue 504 462-1968 solid white 5yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

La Lic #2983

For Rent &

Lollipop and Jellybean

Princess Leila

massage & body work

Real Estate

4 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Nice Italian Guy Seeking honest female 25-40. for companionship. Don't be shy. Call Alfonse 756-1456.

65


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GENTILLY

NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. post-Katrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multi-family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

FRENCH QUARTER

WAGGAMAN

UPTOWN

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine ONLY 4 LEFT! STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $140,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

8218 BURTHE ST. • 2 BR/ 1.5 Ba Hidden gem in the Riverbend w/ heated salt water pool/spa + guest cottage in need of TLC. $280,000 Maria a. Zuñiga-Lott 504.377.7547 Prudential Gardner Realtors

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

3124 Chippewa 2br/1ba Irish Channel Gem $1100 96 Fontainebleau #D 2br/1ba Light Shines In $1000 3701 Tchoupitoulas Office/Warehouse $900

66

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE GETAWAY EVERYDAY!

Nice loft bths w/view of lake/marina. 40ft cov slip, granite kit. $279K. Jennifer 504-250-9930 lanasa.com HGI Realty 504-207-7575

Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

7710-12 S. Claiborne ave Built-to-plan duplex. Great curb appeal! Each side has 3bd/1.5ba + sunroom. 1,634 sf. Wd flrs. Cent. AC&H. Excellent Condition! $389,900

Shaun Talbot

504-975-9763 • 504-525-9763 sktalbot@talbot-realty.com www.talbot-realty.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $695 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

UPTOWN

LOTS/ACREAGE Charm - Old Mandeville

2 blks from lake. Lot approx 65x255’ w/utilities access. $81,500. 985-951-8950, by owner.

Rental on Ursulines

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

1 BR, 1 BA, w/ofc. Parking. 1300 sq ft. quiet street. 1 yr lease, $1100/mo. Dep. 504-344-2116

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

$795 CALL

899-RENT

Representing

Faubourg Saint Charles Condos

Cassandra Sharpe Commercial & Residential Broker

Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 • Cell: 460-7829 sharperealestate@me.com

GENERAL REAL ESTATE 1317 St. Phillip

2.5 blks frm qrt. across prk. hrdwd flr, ceil fans, eat-in-kitch, Bd,Liv, Ba, wtr pd, w/d hkp 504-482-6004. ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9804 JOEL AVE

Nice area. 3br/1bat. Brick. All appls, New carpet, granite. Fenced yd. Yd maintained. $1200/mo + dep. No section 8. No smoking. 504-874-0599

METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

BEVERLY GARDEN NR LAKE

Sm fam home in great Met n’hood. 1 stry brk, 3 br, 2 ba, lr/dr, furn kit/den, cen ah, w/d hkp, gar, fnc yd. $1550. 858-2744.

HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. ALL NEW 1 bdrm $660. Laundry, wtr. pd, pkg-1 car. 780-1706 www. orrislaneapts.com

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $900/mo. 504-443-2280


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE Old Metairie Charming Lower Duplex

Furnished 2BR/1BA. W/D, fncd yd, o/s pkng. Excellent & safe n’bhood, close to shopping. No pets. $1200/mo + dep. 504-616-3040

2800 N. Rampart

Brand New Triplex. 2 BDRM/ 1 BA Each Unit. Corner Lot. $850-$1100/ month. Email realtorbev7045@gmail. com.

427 ESPLANADE APT/OFFICE

MUST SEE! 2BD/1BA. Stv, Refrig. Fenced yard. PETS CONSIDERED. W/D 237 Papworth $1000. 504-837-3827.

Very bright 1br/1ba apt, LR, new kit w/ice maker & front balcony. First flr consists of 2 lrg rms & bath suitable for office or gallery. W/d, working fireplace $1200/mo, 504-529-3222

METAIRIE TOWERS

927 ST. ANN STREET

COZY SINGLE HOUSE

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. All new kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

1BDR ,1st flr. CA&H.Tiled Bath. 2 Patios. No dogs. Wtr/Cbl inc. $995.00 + Deposit. 504-568-1359.

METAIRIE TOWERS

BrOadMOOr CLOSE TO UNIVERSITIES

Lg 1 br, furn kit, new cer tile/refin wd flrs, lots of windows, ceil fans, w/d, off st pkg. $800/mo. Louis, 874-3195

City Park/BayOu st. JOhn LARGE STUDIO

20x25’ , bath & sep kit. Priv balcony. Gated community. Near Fairgrounds. No pets, no smoking. $650/mo. Call 504-615-1716.

HISTORIC COTTAGE ON BOURBON

FrenCh Quarter/ FauBOurg Marigny 1103 ROYAL ST

Unit A, 1br, 1ba, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished. $1700/mo. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

1804 N. RAMPART

1 room efficiency , furn kit. Prking, 2 blks to Qtr. Only $600/mo. with water paid + 1 mo dep. 504-9451381 or 504-908-1564.

uPtOwn/garden distriCt

2340 Dauphine Street

Furn effy w/lr, a/h unit, ceil fans, wd/ tile flrs, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avl Nov. $550. 895-0016.

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

Private Patio! 1 br, furn kit, off st prkg, secure, paid water, cen a/h w/d. $1000/mo. Call 504/237-4902.

(504) 944-3605

524 DAUPHINE-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2850 1301 N. RAMPART-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2000 1205 ST. CHARLES-1 bd/ 1ba $1800 822 CHARTRES- Comm.

$1800

4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

5224 SANDHURST DR. - 3bd/2.5ba$1300 1304 ROSE GARDEN - 3 bd/ 2 ba $1200

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

1 ST CHARLES AVE APT

1006 Washington

Furnished Large 1/bd, cen a/h, w/d gated parking pool. no pets lease $750/m 269-9629 or 458-6509

1030 Robert St.

2 br, 1 bath, 1000 sf, central a/c, w/d, d/w, pool. Good neighborhood. $1500/mo+utilities. Call 250-5791.

1113 Cadiz Street

Large 1 bedroom, Central A/H, Dishwasher, Washer & Dryer , Water Paid. $950/month. Call 899-4494.

1205 ST CHARLES AVE

Furn lux 1 br condo in conv location. Fully equip kit, gated pkg, fitness ctr. Call Mike for price, 281-798-5318.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

furn’d Studios/effey/sec bldg/gtd pkg/ pool/gym/wifi/ laundry. 985-8714324, 504-442-0573. Avail Nov 2nd.

1629 TOLEDANO #102

irish Channel 1/2 BlOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRs w hdwd/crpt flrs. $175/wk to 900/mo +depst. 504-202-0381,504738-2492.

1/1, $900/mo. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504432-1034 Latter and Blum.

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

3111 Napoleon Ave

lakeview/lakeshOre Beautiful Lakeview Apt

Gorgeous Renov. 2BD/1.5BA. Lrg. Fenced Yd. New Appl. Lrg Closets. Pets Pos. $1350. Call Al 504- 237-2929.

1/BR Studio,Furnished, Util. Pd. W/D, Alrm. OFS pking. $1250 + Dep.Crdt Chck. No Pets/smkers.504- 442-5709.

3915 Annunciation St.

To Advertise in

4419 St. Charles Ave.

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Betw Gen Taylor & Austerlitz Sts. Newly remodeled 1 BR, wtr pd, cen a/h, appls incld. $650/mo. 504-508-1436

6311 TCHOUPITOULAS

Steps to Aud Pk. TH, 2/2, pkg, balc’s, deck. Overlooks tennis cts. Nice! $2200. RE/MAX N.O. Prop. 494-2208.

821 JOSEPH @ CAMP

1/2 blk to WHOLE FOODS, 2 sm bdrms, A/C, fans, wd flrs, full kit, w/d. $975 + dep +lse. No pets. 899-9291

Dublin Near St. Car

3/1.5 upper Nr Univ, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs,ceil fans, scrn porch. $1150+deposit. Owner/ Agent,442-2813

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $580/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

PETS WELCOME!!!

4828 CHESTNUT. 1 bdrm, newly painted, furn kit, cen a/h, wood floors, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, pvt bkyd. $825/mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

eMPlOyMent $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately!

Marine TANKERMAN

Ingram Barge Company has an opening in their Harahan, La location. Candidates must possess a current Tankerman’s license and a solid safety record., Also must possess a valid Driver’s license and a High School diploma/GED. This position will be responsible for loading and discharging of diesel fuel and other liquids. Work schedule will be on a rotating schedule (i.e. 14/7). Generous daily wage and excellent benefit package. Interested candidates must apply online at www. ingrambarge.com. EOE, M/F/V

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT warehOuse distriCt BAKERY CONDO $895

Gated 1 br, granite counters, hdwd flrs, All applian. W/D, pool, workout area. No pets. 455-6245.

PrOFessiOnal Community Revitalization Program Officer

Job Announcement The Community Revitalization (CR) Program Officer will work closely with the Senior VP and others she might assign to support the Foundation’s grantmaking and non-grantmaking work. While most of this non-grantmaking work will originate from and/or be housed in the Foundation’s Program Department, the CR Program Officer might also be asked to support special projects and initiatives in other Foundation departments. Specific responsibilities will very from project to project. For a detailed job description please go to: http://www.gnof.org/about/ employment-opportunities/

rentals tO share ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

NEED HELP? Advertise in

CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

drivers/delivery DRIVERS: LOCAL

Home Everyday! Free Health Ins. & Benefits. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1yr TT Exp. Required 888-380-5516

entertainMent MOVIE EXTRAS. Earn up to $150 Per Day. To stand in backgrounds of major films. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-4621

seasOnal TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Robert & Uvonne Morgan Farms, Plains, TX, has 2 positions for cotton, milo, peanuts & grain. 3 mths experience req w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 11/28/10 - 9/28/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6784137.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Rocking H Orchards, Farwell, TX , has 2 positions for grain & oilseed crops. 3 mths experience required w/ references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/1/10 - 10/111. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8125189.

vOlunteer

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

2 BR, 2 BA lux condo, huge balcony, water paid, $2800/mo. 504-236-6896 see website @ www.balconycondo.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Luxury and Historic Home Specialist CommerCial • investment • appraisal

Office: (504) 895-1493 Other: (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com

JAZZ PLAYHOUSE HOST, COCKTAIL SERVERS AND BARBACKS

We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply in person at 700 Conti Street Mon - Fri 9am to 4pm Email: employment@royalsonestano.com Fax: 553.2337 EOE/Drug Free Workplace

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

Remodeled 2br/2bath 1400’historic cottage on Bourbon. Loggia,courtyard,cypress floors/ mantels,new baths;all new kitch apps;cntrl air.$2800.Heather 504388-2880

Upper duplex, 2 brm, 1 bath, os pkng. $1150/mo. 251-2188 or 813-7782

1 BR EFFTY CLOSE UNIV

gentilly dOwntOwn

university area 7941 NELSON

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450.

algiers POint High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

Above Wit’s Inn, 1BDR/1BA, Kitch-Efficiency. $525/mo. A/C. Stve, Ref, Wi-fi, Wtr Pd, No Pets/Smkrs 486-1600.

1 BEDROOM APT

Rent “$950/mo “ or Lease to Buy “130k”, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

Mid City 141 N CARROLLTON AVE

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

67


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

69


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BROaDMOOR

DOWNTOWN

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• 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,500,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,679,000 (new kitchen) $1,300,000 (3 bdrm w/pkg) $429,000 (Comm. w/pkg) $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $239,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

70

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

4206-08 S. Galvez LARGE INVESTMENT DUPLEX Centrally located in Broadmoor near Napoleon. First floor gutted. Excellent potential for rental income or resale. $75,000

504.895.4663

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(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


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BULLETIN BOARD TOO

“Professional training in mixology and casino dealing”

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&

PRESENT

Pet Adopt-A-Thon

HELP REDUCE THE HOMELESS POPULATION

Make the Holidays “Dog”gone“Purr”fect for local animals

As part of its ongoing efforts to find suitable, permanent homes for foster animals, Gambit and Zeus’ Place, along with the help of the Louisiana SPCA, Spaymart, and the Humane Society Of Louisiana is sponsoring it’s 8th Pet Adopt- A -Thon

To Sponsor an Animal for Adoption From a Local Shelter Send $25 per animal: ($5 of this will be donated to a shelter) Attn: Pet Adopt-A-Thon Gambit®Weekly 3923 Bienville Street New Orleans, LA 70119

Please help us spread the word and get other members of the community involved. You may specify a shelter.

Example Ad:

Issue Date: December 7th • Deadline: November 24th Dollar Amount: ($25 will sponsor one animal) Send Check Payable to Gambit Weekly or Call 483-3138 w/ a Credit Card: Name(s) of Sponsor(s):

Optional Message:

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > NOVEMBER 02 > 2010

4601 Freret St. • New Orleans, LA (504) 304.4718 • www.zeusplace.com

71


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