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CREATIONISM VS. EVOLUTION PAGE 11

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BULLETIN BOARD

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LENT & FESTIVALS Don’t Wait! Look Great!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

BELLY DANCING CLASSES

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SHIMMY, SHAKE & UNDULATE. 8 wk session starts Wed Mar 23. Open Level Class: 6:30-7;30PM. Instructor Betty Karam. jdkaram@tulane.edu 897-0432 or meryl@ nojcc.org 897-0143. Buying MIGNON FAGET Jewelry

Rolex & Diamond Rings, Gold & Broken Jewelry CHRIS’ Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave, Met. Call 504-833-2556 DWI - Traffic Tickets?

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Starts March 7

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > NEWS > > > > > > > >& > > VIEW > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < Commentary < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <7< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Market > > > > >forces > > > >and > >the > > city > > >of>New > > >Orleans > > > > > > > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES Blake Pontchartrain 8 POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS New Orleans know-it-all ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO

News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

11

Scuttlebutt

11

A 17-year-old is leading the fight against the teaching of creationism in Louisiana This week’s heroes and zeroes

Gambit’s Web poll

19

From their lips to your ears

15 Introducing the newest way to get your Gambit

Politics / Clancy DuBos

Green Bean Insulation FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

33

Gambit Picks

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Girl on Film

35

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

36

Cuisine

65

The Puzzle Page

78

Best bets for your busy week

35

Gambit hosts a sneak peek benefit screening of Varla Jean Merman’s locally shot film Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads

Jana Nabay at the Foburg Festival

Ian McNulty on Perino’s Boiling Pot 5 in Five: Five great slices of pecan pie Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 watkinsfootcenter.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ

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ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERN MARIA CASTELLON MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

44

CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

REVIEW: My Dog Tulip REVIEW: Archangel REVIEW: Awake, My Soul

45 46 48

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com SALES CONSULTANT MARY LOU NOONAN 985-809-9933 ··········maryloun@bellsouth.net

ART

65

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ

PREVIEW: Foburg Festival PREVIEW: Mardi Gras Indian Festival

FILM

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com

A&E News

Carlo Alban’s Intringulis

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5

04

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GIFTS & SHOPPING Shoptalk

UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Gambit on the iPad

Jefferson Parish investigations

SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, MEG FARRIS BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS CARRIE MARKS, MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON

REVIEW: Harold Baquet and Colin Miller

STAGE

REVIEW: Norman, is That You?

EVENTS

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BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN

Gambit Communications, Inc.

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

011 01 201 2 20

APRILL 28TH -MAY 8TH

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with KIRKJOSEPH'S 504 BRASS BAND Thursday, April 28th - Riverboat Creole Queen Doors 7:30PM • Boat Departs 8:30PM

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504 BRASS BAND Friday, April 29th Riverboat Creole Queen

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GALACTIC AND THE FUNKY METERS Friday, May 6th - Mahalia Jackson Theatre Doors 7PM • Show 8:00PM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT

SUPERFLYPRESENTS.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Friday, May 6th - Riverboat Creole Queen

MISSISSIPPI S ALLSTAR with KIRK JOSEPH'S

05

OUI Teach French!

JESUIT

Alliance Française de La Nouvelle-Orléans

SUMMER CAMPS SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR BOYS AGES 5-12

Full Six-Week Day Camp

Three-Week Day Camp

May 30–July 8

May 30–June 17/June 20–July 8

FIELD TRIPS • PICNICS • TOURS • MOVIES • SWIMMING WATERPLAY • INDOOR/OUTDOOR GAMES For information about Summer Day Camp only, contact Mr. Troy Baglio at Jesuit: (504) 483-3918, or email: baglio@jesuitnola.org

JESUIT ALSO OFFERS SPORTS AND ACADEMIC CAMPS: BASEBALL: July 11-14; July 18-21 BASKETBALL: June 6-10; June 13-17; June 20-24 FOOTBALL: July 25-28 LACROSSE: July 11-15

SOCCER: WRESTLING:

July 25-29 May 31-June 3; August 1-4

Fees and registration forms for all camps are on Jesuit’s web site: www.jesuitnola.org Jesuit High School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its admissions, educational, or athletic policies.

18-1210 IOP Renwick Lecture Gambit Ad_16-1209 IOP Renwick Lecture Gambit Ad 1/31/11 3:54 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

06

10 am to 12 pm Come discover our

SPRING 1 SESSION: March 14 - April 30

Individual & Group classes from beginner to expert!

Specialized classes

French for Travelers, Yoga in French, French Cooking Class, French Grammar

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from Wednesday 20th to Wednesday 27th of April

SCIENCE: July 11-14 STUDY SKILLS: July 11-14

JesuitSummerCampAd-Gambit.indd 1

March 12

2/24/11 5:05 PM

The Institute of Politics invites you to the second annual lecture of the

ED RENWICK LECTURE SERIES FROM THE BAYOU TO THE BELTWAY: Tales from Capitol Hill Please join us for an evening with former U.S. Senator John Breaux, former U.S. Congressman Bob Livingston and former U.S. Congressman Billy Tauzin, moderated by FOX 8 journalist Lee Zurik.

Monday, March 14, 2011, 7 p.m. Loyola University New Orleans, Roussel Hall Free and open to the public For more information, contact Institute of Politics Director Tommy Screen (504) 865-3548 or tscreen@loyno.edu

(504) 568-0770 0770

afno@af-neworleans.org neworleans.org

1519 Jackson Ave

www.af www.af-neworleans.org

coMMenTary

thinking out loud

Market Values

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release defending the city’s position. (“As we increase field agents in the Bureau of Revenue, we will continue to communicate with residents and business owners about the types of permits needed for these types of events.”) By midweek, however, his tone had changed. “These vendors are the heart and soul of New Orleans,” he said at a press conference March 2. When Gambit asked him about the $940 fee quoted to Paige, Landrieu said, “That’s not accurate.” Informed that those were the numbers from the Bureau of Finance, Landrieu said, “You may have asked them the wrong question.” That’s another problem. If city officials can’t agree on the fees, it’s no surprise artists and vendors don’t know what to do. To that end, Scott Hutcheson, the mayor’s point man on cultural affairs, has put

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If city officials can’t agree on the fees, it’s no surprise artists and vendors don’t know what to do.

KEEP ON together new materials that set forth the rules on what event promoters must do to comply with the law. He also put himself forward as a liaison for those who sell handmade goods. From now on, the first step in planning a bazaar or sale should be calling Hutcheson at 658-4258, or emailing him at cshutcheson@cityofno.com. Let him be your guide through the sometimesconfusing rules of the City of New Orleans and its Bureau of Revenue. At the March 2 meeting, Deputy Mayor and CAO Andy Kopplin said the city wants everyone to have a fair chance to succeed. That’s a laudable goal. The best way to achieve it is for the city to communicate clearly with artists and vendors — and to make sure city fees don’t outstrip people’s ability to pay.

TRACK

and get fit post Mardi Gras. Don’t let Carnival season derail your New Year’s Resolution. With its beautiful natural light overlooking our basketball court, the NOAC’s indoor track is a great jogging venue. So come join the NOAC, and do a couple extra laps to keep on track.

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

here was swift and angry reaction this week to the Feb. 27 city shutdown of an annual Mardi Gras flea market at the Blue Nile bar in the Faubourg Marigny — a market now in its 20th year of selling unique, handmade items at affordable prices. Field agents from the New Orleans Department of Revenue arrived, ticketed organizer Cree McCree, Blue Nile owner Jesse Paige and a bartender, and shut down the sale for not having a retail permit. Technically, the agents were correct; McCree and Paige had no permit. But when Paige reported to the Bureau of Revenue the next day, he was quoted a laundry list of permits he would need to stage the event next year, including an occupational license ($200), a “mayoralty permit” ($500) and an approved revenue form from the city’s Department of Safety & Permits. The grand total: $940.25 for a once-a-year market selling handmade masks and hats. Compounding the problem is the city’s special-event permit literature, which lumps in extravaganzas like circuses and trade shows with modest events like the Mardi Gras market. The outrageous fee structure may be the law but, as Dickens famously noted, sometimes the law is an ass. The city says it will enforce such laws across the board in response to public demand. That sounds fair, but cracking down on a once-a-year bazaar when the city has potentially millions of dollars outstanding in uncollected sales taxes only reinforces the impression, even if it’s incorrect, that this was yet another case of Big Government picking on the little artist. It’s a perception with a long and unfortunate history in New Orleans — as any Mardi Gras Indian or brass band member will tell you. Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration and Police Chief Ronal Serpas stumbled last year when the NOPD cracked down on brass band musicians on Bourbon and Frenchmen streets, using an antiquated ordinance that would have required musicians to be off the streets by 8 p.m. That law applied across the board, whether the musicians were in an entertainment district or a residential neighborhood. At the time, band members noted correctly, they were no louder than Quarter clubs that prop speakers in their doorways and blast canned pop music into the street all night. The city’s hardline position in that case made it look like a pack of intractable bureaucrats, and it wisely backed off. Fortunately, the administration seems to have learned from the mistake. Landrieu, who has spent years establishing himself as the lead spokesman for the cultural economy, at first issued a dry press

07

blake

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, WHAT IN THE WORLD IS HAPPENING TO ARMSTRONG PARK? THE ENTRANCE HAS BEEN TORN UP FOR MONTHS, FORCING FRENCH QUARTERITES TO GO AROUND THE PARK IN ORDER TO ENTER MAHALIA JACKSON AUDITORIUM. THE CHAIN FENCE IS UNSIGHTLY AND IS SOMETHING OF AN INSULT TO THE GREAT MAN FOR WHOM THE PARK IS NAMED. WHAT GIVES?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

GLORIA K. FIERO

08

Come to Camp at the Louisiana Children’s Museum And Spend your Summer Smiling! Week-long themed camps for ages 5-8 May 31 through August 8 Before & After Care available $140 to $175 Museum members / $160 to $200 non-members Call 504-586-0725 ext. 222 or www.lcm.org to register

Learn puppetry, journey to outer space, cook up kitchen chemistry, turn trash to treasure and much more!

www.lcm.org · (504) 586-0725 ext. 222 · 420 Julia Street, N.O., LA · 70130

DEAR GLORIA, You got that right. Armstrong Park is indeed a mess. And it began in the waning days of former Mayor Ray Nagin’s administration. Near the end of his term, the former mayor decided the park needed a facelift. Before he left office, Nagin unveiled the park’s new Roots of Music Sculpture Garden — but a series of construction blunders caused damage to the statue of Louis Armstrong, and the park had to be closed. Last July, crews employed by the original contractor, AME Disaster Recovery Services, cracked part of the Louis Armstrong statue, separating the left shoe from the statue’s base. After he took office, Mayor Mitch Landrieu ordered the contractor hired by Nagin to stop work, and the park was closed for the rest of the summer. The original contractor created more problems when crews poured concrete pathways incorrectly. These had to be ripped out and repoured — twice. Workers who were careless with tractors also managed to damage curbing and other sculptures in the park. A light pole was knocked down as well as a 50-foot palm tree. Water pipes were broken and buried power and phone lines were cut. Needless to say, a new contractor was hired and work resumed as quickly as possible. Everyone is eager for the park beautification project to be completed, especially since the reopening of the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts. HEY BLAKE, WHO WAS SOPHIE WRIGHT? SHE HAS A SCHOOL NAMED FOR HER ON NAPOLEON AVENUE. MARY

DEAR MARY, There is also a statue of this outstanding educator. Designed by artist Enrique Alferez, it is located in Sophie Wright Park on Magazine Street at the corner of Sophie B. Wright Place.

And she deserves all the recognition she has gotten. Wright was born into a poor New Orleans family in 1866. As a toddler, she suffered a fall that caused her to spend her life in a steel brace, walking with crutches. At only 15 years old, Wright opened her own school, the Day School for Girls. By 1885, she added boarding facilities and renamed the school the Home Institute, which acquired a reputation as one of the best private schools in New Orleans.

A statue of Sophie B. Wright stands at the corner of a New Orleans street named in her honor. About the same time, Wright was asked if she could teach poor men and boys. She soon opened a free night school for men and boys employed during the day but still too poor to pay for school. Wright also was active in other areas, serving on the Prison Reform Association and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. She also worked to help poor children and women by establishing public playgrounds and baths. In 1903, The Daily Picayune awarded Sophie Wright its prestigious prize, the Loving Cup, for outstanding social activism and philanthropy; she was the first woman to receive this honor. Wright became so well known and respected that The Monitor, a newspaper in Boston, had a story in 1909 about her achievements. In it she was called the “best citizen of New Orleans.” When Wright died on June 6, 1912, she was buried in Metairie Cemetery, and The Daily Picayune praised her as a “saint of the commonweal.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“It is a completely nonpolitical, nonpartisan organization created by the first lady, who as an engineer and the mother of three children, has a passion for helping our young people learn science and math. Anything other than this reality has plainly been dreamed up by partisan hacks living in a fantasy land.” — Kyle Plotkin, Gov. Bobby Jindal’s press secretary, responding to a March 3 New York Times article, which enumerated major corporate donors to the Supriya Jindal Foundation for Louisiana’s Children. According to the Times, “The foundation has collected nearly $1 million in previously unreported pledges from major oil companies, insurers and other corporations in Louisiana with high-stakes regulatory issues” — including Marathon Oil and AT&T, both of which donated $250,000 to the first lady’s charity.

Weird Science ZACK KOPPLIN WON THE FIGHT TO KEEP “ALTERNATIVES TO EVOLUTION” OUT OF LOUISIANA BIOLOGY TEXTBOOKS. HIS NEXT GOAL: REPEALING THE ACT ALLOWING CREATIONISM TO BE TAUGHT IN LOUISIANA PUBLIC SCHOOLS. BY KEVIN ALLMAN

W

High school senior Zack Kopplin is leading the fight to repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act of 2008. The next month, the BESE board at large agreed, and the Baton Rouge Advocate wrote an editorial calling the high school senior “the newest giantkiller in state education policy.” But Kopplin doesn’t intend to stop there. His next target: overturning the Louisiana Science Information Act. HIGH SCHOOL BIOLOGY ITSELF MAY BE AN ENDANgered species, according to a survey analyzed in January by Michael Berkman and Eric Plutzer, political science professors at Pennsylvania State University. Examining data from the National Survey of High School Biology Teachers, they found 28 percent taught evolution, while 13 percent “explicitly advocated creationism or intelligent design.” The remainder (“the cautious 60 percent”) fell somewhere in the middle. The professors concluded, “Our data show these teachers understandably want to avoid controversy.”

“The party’s on probation. Voters are willing to give you a chance. If you don’t follow through it’s a pretty short probationary period.” — Gov. Bobby Jindal, speaking about the GOP election victories of November 2010. Jindal gave The Washington Post his thoughts on what the Republican field of presidential candidates should be doing, while once again denying he had any eye on the Oval Office. Asked if he was interested in a vice-presidential run in 2012, Jindal said it was “obnoxious to speculate.”

STORMY OUTLOOK

The Rev. Grant Storms, who made national headlines in the last decade when he attempted to shut down the annual Southern Decadence festival in the French Quarter, was arrested in Jefferson Parish on an obscenity charge Feb. 25. Storms, PAGE 16

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BoUQuets

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

The New Orleans Ballet Association (NOBA)

received national recognition and a grant from the MetLife Foundation Creative Aging Program for its community senior citizen dance program, which provides classes for more than 100 local senior citizens. It’s the third year NOBA has achieved this recognition, and 20 members of the dance program will perform at the Greater New Orleans Senior Olympics at Clearview Mall in Metairie March 12.

Justin Magrath,

a sophomore at Fontainebleau High School in Mandeville, is one of four Louisiana finalists for the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, given annually to students in grades 7-12 who make a positive difference in their communities. In 2008, Magrath created an environmental program called “Green Mandeville” and since then has built birdhouses, cleaned up litter and planted trees. National honorees for the award will be announced in May.

Rudolph Matas Elementary School students

collected more than a ton of Mardi Gras beads to be used in an art project that will be part of an international exhibit. The Metairie school’s students will create a dozen 16-square-foot bead artworks depicting staples of Louisiana cuisine, including red beans and rice, king cake and other delicacies. The children will work with Tama Distler, the school’s arts facilitator, and local artist Stephan Wanger, who specializes in using recycled items in his artworks.

Ruth Leslie Goodman

was sentenced Feb. 23 by U.S. District Judge Ginger Berrigan to more than three years in federal prison after pleading guilty to mail fraud, theft and other charges. Goodman ran several Hurricane Katrina-related scams to defraud the Road Home Program and FEMA of more than $476,000. Goodman, a New Orleans resident, wrote romance novels as “Meagan McKinney,” with bodice-ripping titles that included No Choice But Surrender and My Wicked Enchantress.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

hen the Louisiana legislature approved the Louisiana Science Education Act (LSEA) by an overwhelming margin in 2008, supporters of “intelligent design” creationism rejoiced; the LSEA would allow public school educators to introduce “supplemental textbooks and other instructional materials” in the classroom, paving the way for — among other things — biology textbooks that cast doubt on evolution and discussed creationism. Several powerful state interests supported the move, from Gov. Bobby Jindal (who signed the LSEA into law) to the influential Louisiana Family Forum (LFF). But when Zack Kopplin, a student at Baton Rouge Magnet School, heard the decision, his reaction was “disbelief.” In November, Kopplin appeared before the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE), where the Textbook Advisory Council was deciding whether to purchase new biology texts. Since the council only meets every seven years, the information in the books chosen would have long-lasting impact in a state with the fourthworst graduation rate in the country. The Rev. Gene Mills, president of the LFF, told the panel the new textbooks under consideration were “biased” toward evolution. Kopplin — wearing an orange hoodie and blue jeans — disagreed. “All the Louisiana Science Education Act does is create an unconstitutional loophole to sneak the teaching of creationism or intelligent design in public school science classes,” Kopplin testified, saying it would “embarrass our state” and hinder the success of Louisiana graduates. “Please stand tall and endorse life science textbooks that teach real science rather than undermine it,” he concluded. What happened next made news in science circles around the country: The council sided with Kopplin in an 8-4 vote.

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KOPPLIn  DOESn’T  LOOK  MUCh  LIKE  A  giant-killer;  he’s  a  particularly  younglooking  17-year-old  with  the  slight  build  of  a  soccer  player  and  swimmer  (his  other  hobbies).  But  when  he  talks,  he’s  as  articulate  as  any  politician,  despite  having a limited political portfolio. “I volunteered for [President Barack] Obama’s  campaign  and  I  volunteered  for  my  dad’s  campaign,  but  that’s  it,”  he  says.  (Kopplin’s father, Andy Kopplin, was the  former chief of staff to Govs. Mike Foster  and  Kathleen  Blanco,  and  ran  an  unsuccessful  2008  campaign  for  Congress.  Today he’s deputy mayor and CAO of the  city of new Orleans. In an email, he calls  his son “relentless.”)

WhEn  KOPPLIn  DECIDED  hE  WAnTED  to  overturn  the  LSEA,  he  contacted  Dr.  Barbara  Forrest,  a  professor  of  philosophy at Southeastern Louisiana University  and  co-author  of  Creationism’s Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design.  Forrest  is  also  the  founder  of  the  Louisiana  Coalition  for  Science,  a  proscience, anti-creationist group.     “[Kopplin] emailed me last summer and  said he’d decided he wanted to tackle this  as his senior project,” Forrest says. She had  fought the LSEA’s passage and similar laws  in  other  states,  including  the  2005  landmark case in Delaware, Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District, in which she was an 

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What is the Lsea? he  Louisiana  Science  Education  Act  (LSEA)  was  passed  in  the  Louisiana  legislature  in  2008  and  signed  into  law by Gov. Bobby Jindal that summer. Its controversial section — language  supported  by  creationists  and  opposed  by  evolutionists  —  states that “a teacher shall teach the  material  presented  in  the  standard  textbook  supplied  by  the  school  system  and  thereafter  may  use  supplemental  textbooks  and  other  instructional  materials  to  help  students  understand,  analyze,  critique  and review scientific theories.”

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expert witness. That case resulted in a U.S.  District Court ruling that intelligent design  “cannot uncouple itself from its creationist,  and  thus  religious,  antecedents,”  and  teaching  intelligent  design  in  public  schools  violated  the  First  Amendment  of  the U.S. Constitution — a decision that did  little  to  deter  school  boards  interested  in  “teaching the controversy.”     After  the  LSEA  was  passed,  the  school  board  of  Livingston  Parish  commissioned  a  panel  to  study  the  possibility  of  teaching creationism in its science classes. The  American  Civil  Liberties  Union  quickly  howled, and the board backed off, though  it  didn’t  table  the  notion  completely.  Livingston  Parish  School  Board  member  David Tate, who introduced the idea, told  the  Baton  Rouge  Advocate,  “We  don’t  want litigation, but why not take a stand  for Jesus and risk litigation?” KOPPLIn IS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT hIS ChAnces  for  getting  LSEA  overturned  in  the  upcoming  legislative  session,  but  the  numbers are against him. LSEA was passed  unanimously  in  the  state  Senate  in  April 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

    Teachers  may  have  good  reason  to  be  wary. A December 2010 Gallup poll found  four  in  10  Americans  are  creationists,  agreeing  with  the  statement  “God  created  human  beings  pretty  much  in  their  present  form  at  one  time  within  the  last  10,000 years or so.”      Creationism  —  the  belief  that  all  life  on  Earth  came  from  a  divine  hand,  as  described  in  the  Book  of  Genesis  —  is  a  single  concept  with  many  subsects.  Creationists  divide  roughly  into  two  camps:  “old  earth”  and  “new  earth.”  Old  earth creationists believe, as do scientists,  that the earth is millions of years old but,  unlike scientists, they hold that it was created by God, while young earth creationists believe — based on their readings of  Genesis — the world was created by God  between  6,000  and  10,000  years  ago.  The  Creation  Museum  in  Petersburg,  Ky.,  which  opened  in  2007  at  a  cost  of  $27  million, teaches young earth creationism,  with  dioramas  featuring  men  and  dinosaurs living side by side, and a baby triceratops for children to ride, Flintstones-style.     Introducing  the  possibility  of  creationism  into  biology  classes  is  referred  to  by  supporters as “teaching the controversy.”  (Louisiana  State  University  evolutionary  biologist  Bryan  Carstens,  who  testified  at  the  BESE  hearing,  disputes  that:  “The  theory  of  evolution  is  not  controversial  among practicing biologists.”) At the final  textbook vote in December, Dr. John Oller,  a professor of linguistics at the University  of  Louisiana  at  Lafayette,  said  the  texts  were  decades  out  of  date.  Oller,  who  also sits on the board of the Texas-based  Institute for Creation Research, has a website on which he posts his theories about  creationism  and  the  textbook  controversy,  such  as,  “There  is  no  mention  of  4-D  moving  pictures  of  unborn  babies  that  explode  many  myths  coming  from  19thcentury Darwinism.”     When the BESE committee ruled in favor  of  the  teenager’s  argument  rather  than  the  professor’s,  Oller  told  The Acadiana Gazette  afterward,  “Darwin’s  too-dull  tools can’t refute the existence of an intelligent God. It’s entirely presumptuous.”

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2008 and got through the House on a 94-3 vote. But Kopplin has the promise of a heavy hitter to introduce the overturn: state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson. Peterson was one of the three “no” votes on the original bill when she was a member of the House. Asked to comment, Peterson wrote in an email, “Legislation like the LSEA puts Louisiana’s children at a disadvantage when it comes to their potential opportunities in growing fields such as biotechnology and health sciences. Initiatives such as the biodistrict here in New Orleans will offer higher-paying jobs and better futures for our children. Our children will be ill-prepared for those exciting potential careers without a modern education system that respects and celebrates science.” Regarding Kopplin, she wrote, “He really is an inspiration to young folks everywhere, because he’s been able to leverage his own determination into a real campaign that is garnering considerable attention. It shows one person can really make a difference.” But will Kopplin’s zeal make a difference when the legislature convenes? “The support I’m getting is accelerating,” Kopplin says, though he admits,“ I don’t have any specific legislators. We haven’t started lobbying yet.” Kopplin also has support from the science world. “I’ve heard back from a lot of scientists, international scientists,” he says. “including John Pierce, the past president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.” (That group pulled its planned 2011 convention out of New Orleans as a protest against the passage of LSEA.) “After he heard about the [textbook] victory,” Kopplin says, “he asked me, ‘Is Louisiana OK to come back to now?’” Kopplin’s activism has not gone unnoticed in atheist circles, either. Richard Dawkins, a biologist, bestselling author (The God Delusion) and perhaps the world’s most famous atheist, featured Kopplin on his website, calling him “splendid” and saying his testimony was a “rare and extraordinary moment … when logic and reason won out against typical Louisiana politics.” Which brings up the question: Is Kopplin an atheist? He declines to discuss his personal religious views. “It’s not about my religion. And it shouldn’t be about theirs, either,” he says. “That’s why you go to church, to learn about creationism. In science class, you learn about science. “It’s wrong to take science away from students who will need it to succeed in today’s economy. If I applied to Harvard tomorrow, they would be very skeptical of my science education — because I’m from Louisiana.”

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Gambit on your iPad Pad owners can now read Gambit and the Blog of New Orleans in an app specially designed for the iPad format. All the familiar Gambit content is there, ready to be controlled with the swipe of a finger: Clancy DuBos’ and Blake Pontchartrain’s columns, News & Views, Arts & Entertainment, our award-winning food coverage, listings, contests and social media links. For those who like the traditional paper, we’ll also upload a “flip” version of Gambit every week, identical to the paper edition, with layouts, advertisements and coupons intact. With this addition, Gambit is now the only media source in New Orleans with specialized viewing on four different platforms: a newspaper, a website, a mobile-phone edition and an iPad version. The Gambit iPad app is now on the Apple Store as a free download; just search the apps for “Gambit New Orleans.” Please give it a try — and be sure to let us know what you think. — Kevin Allman, editor

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who famously denounced the largely gay Labor Day celebration as “perversion,” was taken into custody for allegedly masturbating near a Lafreniere Park playspot where children were present. According to the arrest report, Storms told the attending officer he wasn’t masturbating, but had simply opted to urinate in a bottle in his van rather than find a park restroom. Storms, who was being held on bond, was released by the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office (JPSO) Feb. 27 due to jail overcrowding. Storms held a press conference March 1 at which he admitted the alibi was a lie, but did not admit to masturbating. “I’m confessing to having my hand in my pants,” Storms said. “That’s all I’m going to say.” Despite the arrest report in Jefferson Parish in which he seemed to implicate himself for public masturbation, Storms said he no longer agreed to the charges (“It’s contradictory to what happened”). He added that the conduct of sheriff’s deputies was like a “stab in the back,” calling the sheriffs’ interview procedures “coercive and insulting.” “It’s not true I confessed,” Storms said. “I’m losing faith in law enforcement.” Speaking in the parking lot of a service-road motel in Metairie, where he had been staying since his arrest, Storms struggled for composure, at times breaking down in tears as he described the effect his arrest had on his wife and four children, the youngest of whom are 9 and 6 years old. “I’ll have to tell them, ‘Daddy has a problem,’” he said, weeping. Storms wanted to clear the record on one issue in particular, denying he had parked in the vicinity of the Lafreniere playspot to watch children. “I am not a pedophile,” he said. “I am not a child molester.” In 2003, Storms and his followers marched on Southern Decadence with bullhorns and told ABC News’ Primetime Live he wanted the annual Labor Day weekend gay pride festival shut down “utterly and totally. We want them out of town.” He told the press at the time, “Having oral sex in the middle of the street or masturbating is illegal and immoral,” and said he worried that NOPD officers patrolling the festival might be tempted to cut “some kind of backroom deal to have an orgy in the street.” The following year, a group of French Quarter business owners, led by the Bourbon Street Alliance, obtained a restraining order against Storms and his protestors, and the New Orleans City Council voted to bar the use of bullhorns during Decadence. Storms disappeared from the public eye shortly thereafter, but a lawsuit he filed against a Wisconsin gay group backfired on the pastor in 2006 when a judge found his suit lacked merit and ordered him to pay $87,000 to the group he was suing. Today, Storms says, he is not employed as a pastor and makes a living with a lawn care service he operates out of the van in which he was arrested. He characterized his protests as “hateful,” and asked for the forgiveness of those he had hurt with his anti-gay rhetoric. “I was very proudful, arrogant,” Storms said. “I have been vicious at times in my condemnation of others.” Would he return to Southern Decadence to denounce the crowds? “No, no,” he said. Immediately before going to the park, Storms said, he had been looking at online porn and admitted, “I have a problem with pornography. Pornography is destructive.” Asked if the pornographic material was heterosexual, homosexual or child-centered, he said, “Heterosexual.”

Asked if he would characterize his behavior as a manifestation of sex addiction, he said, “I’m familiar with sex addiction, being a pastor ... I’ll just say: Do I have a problem? Yes.” Despite that problem, he said, this arrest was the first of its kind for him. “I have deeply hurt my family,” Storms said, weeping, “and I pray they can find it within their hearts to forgive me.” The tears, the piety, the nature of the alleged crime and even the setting were all familiar. In 1988, the Rev. Jimmy Swaggart confessed to having sex with a prostitute in a different Metairie motel in his “I have sinned” speech. In 2007, Sen. David Vitter, in an appearance at yet another Metairie hotel, confessed to unspecified “sins” in his own past after he was linked with D.C. Madam Deborah Jeane Palfrey. Like Storms, both men had been crusaders for so-called traditional family values. Storms said he didn’t have a lawyer but planned to fight the charge in court. He left the motel parking lot on foot with a man he said was his pastor. If convicted of obscenity, he would be liable for several thousand dollars in fines and a jail term of between six months and three years. — Kevin Allman

Buddy for President?

Former Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer made it official last week: he’s considering a run for the Republican nomination for president. Roemer, 67, is considered a long shot in the race, but so far there is no official frontrunner. A Harvard-educated son of north Louisiana, Roemer served four terms in Congress and one as governor, from 1988-92. He was the only man ever to defeat Edwin Edwards at the polls. Four years after his come-from-behind victory in the 1987 governor’s race, Roemer finished a disappointing third in his bid for re-election — behind EWE and former KKK leader and Nazi sympathizer David Duke. Roemer attempted a comeback in the 1995 governor’s race but failed to make the runoff, finishing fourth. While many Louisiana politicos scoff at the notion of Roemer trying to win the GOP nomination, friends say he has been studying up on energy issues, economics, tax policy, and other key issues in anticipation of his run for the White House. He is said to be getting advice from GOP consultant Mark McKinnon, who met Roemer during his gubernatorial days. As a sign of how serious he is about the race, Roemer stepped down last week as CEO of Business First Bank in Baton Rouge, which he founded five years ago. For now, Roemer will continue to serve as president of the bank. First up on Roemer’s campaign: a stop this week at the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition, an event for social conservatives just outside Des Moines. He will join former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, businessman and radio host Herman Cain and other GOP hopefuls. Roemer started his political career as a Democrat and switched to the GOP while serving as governor. He never won the hearts of Louisiana Republicans, however, perhaps because he vetoed a no-exceptions anti-abortion bill while still a Democrat. That veto became the first in memory to be overridden by state lawmakers, but it was later struck down by the federal courts as unconstitutional. At some point in the campaign, perhaps as early as this week,

Rev. Grant Storms held a press conference Mar. 1 in the parking lot of the Metairie motel where he’d been staying since being released from the Jefferson Parish jail due to overcrowding. Roemer will have to explain — if not defend — that veto to the GOP’s growing ranks of social conservatives. — Clancy DuBos

toxic city

Forbes.com named Baton Rouge one of the most toxic cities in America last week, clocking in at No. 5. (At No. 1: Philadelphia.) The website used information gathered by the Environmental Working Group, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Sperling’s Best Places Health Index, which compiles health and quality-of-living indices for U.S. cities. Forbes ranked the cities by air and water quality and Superfund sites (areas impacted by hazardous waste). The report also gathered the number of days a city’s Air Quality Index exceeded 100 (the EPA deems indices 0 to 25 “good” air days), and the Toxics Release Inventory, which gathers power plant and manufacturing reports of chemical releases. The report found Baton Rouge contributed 33.6 million pounds of on-site toxic releases in 2009 (the latest year available for the data). Anne Rolfes, director of environmental watchdog Louisiana Bucket Brigade (LABB), says the data illustrates “the tremendous burden of environmental pollution” Baton Rouge residents live with. The country’s second-largest refinery — the 100-year-old ExxonMobil refinery — sits in the Baton Rouge area. Since 2005, that refinery has contributed more than 4 million pounds of pollution to the air and has spilled more than 36,000 gallons of pollutants, according to LABB and EPA data. In 2010, however, the numbers fell sharply — the refinery released only 1,755 pounds of pollution, compared to a 2009 release of more then 700,000 pounds. Rolfes hopes the report triggers a more “robust response from the state” to decrease industrial pollution. — Alex Woodward

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Cat and Mouse he federal indictment of former state Wildlife and Fisheries commissioner Henry Mouton signals a new chapter in the investigation into alleged corruption in Jefferson Parish. It also shows the feds’ latest move in a lawyerly game of cat and mouse between the government and the principals of River Birch landfill. Several years ago, River Birch landed a controversial $160 million landfill contract with Jefferson Parish — at the behest of former Parish President Aaron Broussard, who himself is a target of federal investigators. That contract remains in limbo pending the investigation. FBI agents raided River Birch’s office in September, carting off boxes of records, data and digital hardware relating to River Birch. They also seized records of other companies owned by River Birch principals Fred Heebe and his stepfather, Jim Ward. The companies all share office space. Heebe and Ward sued the feds, claiming federal agents exceeded the scope of the search warrant by seizing records unrelated to River Birch. U.S. District Judge Ginger Berrigan agreed and ordered the feds to return records from the other companies.

T

Heebe and Ward claim the feds are holding back some disputed records. So where does Mouton, of Lafayette, fit in? After Hurricane Katrina, state and federal disaster response officials reopened the Old Gentilly Landfill in eastern New Orleans on an emergency basis. The Gentilly landfill was controversial because it allegedly did not meet environmental standards. Mouton, whose credentials as a conservationist are well established, launched what appeared to be a one-man campaign against the Gentilly landfill — and praising River Birch. He wrote letters to state and federal regulators at every level, often on official state Wildlife and Fisheries Commission stationery. Among the recipients of his complaints, coincidentally, were the FBI and the U.S. Attorney. Now the feds say Mouton was on somebody’s payroll (read: Heebe’s companies) all the while — to the tune of more than $460,000, which they claim was bribe money disguised by Mouton and an unnamed co-conspirator. Apparently the records showing scores of allegedly illicit payments to Mouton are among those Berrigan has determined were improper-

ly seized by the feds during the raid on River Birch. All of which makes the timing of the Mouton indictment very interesting. If some of those disputed records form the basis of Mouton’s indictment, the feds could run into a “fruit of the poisonous tree” problem — which would bar them from using anything in those records and anything they

The indictment says a lot about the direction of the feds’ investigation into Jefferson Parish corruption.

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found as a result of getting those records against Mouton, Heebe or anyone else. On the other hand, Mouton himself may have provided the “independent source” needed by the feds to get around the “poisonous fruit” argument when he wrote to the FBI complaining about the Gentilly landfill in the first place. Another independent source could emerge from a civil suit filed last week against River Birch by a competitor, Concrete Busters of Louisiana. Concrete Busters claims in its suit that River Birch colluded with Jefferson Parish officials to get the contract. Look for Heebe to settle that lawsuit quickly — before the discovery process forces him to turn over the very records that Heebe doesn’t want the feds to get their hands on. Meanwhile, the Mouton indictment contains other allegations that don’t necessarily flow from the disputed records (read: leverage). At a minimum, the indictment says a lot about the direction of the feds’ investigation into Jefferson Parish corruption. This is a complex, high-stakes game of cat and mouse. The legal maneuvers and details may cause non-lawyers’ eyes to glaze over, but there’s no denying who’s the cat … and who’s the mouse.

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ONE IN 100 OIL SPILLS RESULT IN FINES ... SO WHAT REASON DOES THE INDUSTRY HAVE TO

to 1992 under Gov. Buddy Roemer. “You let the little things go, and you set yourself up for something big to happen.”

LOUISIANA DOESN’T HAVE a spill-enforcement crisis, according to Jindal and officials of the DEQ, the state’s main pollution enforcement agency. The number of DEQ fines is influenced by cooperation with other authorities, Jindal said in a statement. “It’s important to note AARON KURILOFF that in many cases, if anR. BABCOCK other agency like the Coast Guard, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or state police has issued a penalty, then DEQ will not issue a penalty,” Jindal said. The DEQ has an agreement with the EPA and won’t seek fines if federal regulators are conducting a criminal probe, he said. “Per square mile, we produce more oil than any other state,” says Chris Piehler, administrator of the DEQ’s inspection division. Most of the spills are small and “aren’t intentional.” Even small oil spills have lethal consequences, said William J. Sydeman, a marine biologist and president of the Farallon Institute, a Petaluma, Calif.-based nonprofit marine research center. “When you spill any amount of oil in a marine system, organisms die,” Sydeman said. The effects of chronic low-level spills like those

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

n the months since the April 20, 2010 blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana regulators moved to fine BP Plc and two of its contractors as much as $1 million for each of the 86 days the runaway well gushed oil. The state attorney general also hired outside counsel to help pursue legal claims that may reach hundreds of millions of dollars. The goal is to restore the oil-stained coast “to what it was pre-spill,” said Gov. Bobby Jindal. In hundreds of smaller, BY KEN WELLS, less noteworthy cases, Lou& CHARLES isiana gave oil spillers a pass, a review of five years of regulatory data shows. Since 2007, the U.S. Coast Guard has reported fielding more complaints of oil and chemical spills from the thousands of wells and thousands of miles of pipelines in Louisiana than in any other state, exceeding 4,000 a year. In 2009, Louisiana punished oil companies for fewer than one in 100 spills, data show. Fines are measured in thousands of dollars, not millions. They take years to collect and are seldom levied against even repeat spillers. A small gas station operator was penalized for faulty paperwork while the state’s biggest oil producer paid no fines in more than a dozen spills since 2002, according to state records. “Lax enforcement leads to lax behavior,” says Paul Templet, who led the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) from 1988

CLEAN UP ITS ACT?

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

in Louisiana are “a huge problem and far more damaging than most people suspect.” In the past 10 years, In June 2005, a discharge estimated at 12 Louisiana has been secbarrels (500 gallons, 1,900 liters) killed at least ond only to Texas in the number of “significant” 460 brown pelicans, Amerada Hess Corp. said at the time. The leak was from a platform pipeline spills. about 60 miles (100 kilometers) southwest of New Orleans. Now, more than five years later, a damage assessment is “near completion” and state and federal agencies are “exploring restoration alternatives,” said Louisiana State Police Lieutenant Doug Cain, a spokesman for the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator’s Office (Losco). Losco works with oil companies to mitigate spill damages. “We continue to work with the state of Louisiana on this issue,” Maripat Sexton, a spokeswoman for Hess, said in an emailed statement. Another company avoided paying a penalty for 18 years, then settled at half the original amount.

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ON ANy DAy IN LOuISIANA, THere IS LIkeLy TO be MOre THAN one spill, the data show. In 2009, the state endured about 1,600 discharges of crude oil or a crude oil equivalent called condensate, including incidents in federal waters off the coast, state records show. About 540 leaks occurred onshore or in state waters, releasing almost 3,000 barrels of oil, the DeQ says. Since the beginning of 2006, the agency opened or completed 46 spill enforcement actions against oil companies, about nine cases a year, according to state data. Those actions resulted in 28 penalties, a total that includes six settlements of incidents that occurred as early as 1990. The average of the 28 penalties was $10,496. by comparison, federal regulators reported levying civil penalties in 29 cases against corporate oil spillers in Louisiana during the same years. The average federal fine was $148,335. The u.S., which shares spill jurisdiction in the state, also undertook two criminal prosecutions, one resulting in a $13 million fine. The DeQ, which has jurisdiction that extends three miles out from Louisiana’s marshy coast and the shores of any state-claimed barrier islands, initiated none. The DeQ says one reason for its lack of prosecutions is that few companies willfully spill crude oil. “Oil is a valuable product,” said rodney Mallett, DeQ press secretary. “rarely will someone knowingly or deliberately discharge oil.” Spills can also include oilfield wastes and “produced water,” ancient seawater that comes to the surface with oil and gas as a toxic, concentrated brine carrying heavy metals and traces of

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“OUR RECORD OF REGULATING OIL AND GAS IS DISMAL. DOWN HERE,

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ANYBODY.” radioactive material. Dumping it is illegal. In the largest federal criminal case, Citgo Petroleum Corp. was fined $13 million after pleading guilty in September 2008 to a misdemeanor violation of the federal Clean Water Act. Storm water tanks at the company’s refinery in Sulphur overflowed during a rainstorm in June 2006, spilling about 53,000 barrels of oil into two rivers, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release. The state joined the federal government in 2008 in an ongoing suit seeking civil penalties against the company over the same spill. Fernando Garay, a spokesman for Citgo, declined to comment.

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IN LOUISIANA, MOST DISCHARG es occur in the coastal zone, which serves as a globally important migratory bird stopover and provides the spawning grounds that sustain a $2.4 billion-a-year commercial fishing industry. The state has lost more than 1,800 square miles of these marshes to erosion since the 1930s, a third of the original total. On an annual basis, Louisiana accounts for 80 percent of the nation’s coastal wetlands losses, according to a task force of state and federal agencies that includes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the EPA. Over the past decade, Louisiana ranked second behind Texas with 223 “significant” pipeline spills — those that damaged property or the environment or killed wildlife or people — according to a 2010 study by the Arlington, Va.-based National Wildlife Federation. The report, published after the BP explosion, listed Louisiana among the nation’s “sacrifice zones” that have suffered heavy pollution as a

21

Louisiana’s oil and gas pipeline system transports almost 40 percent of America’s energy supplies.

tradeoff for energy development. The blowout that led the state to pursue millions of dollars in fines and damages against BP, Transocean Ltd. and Triton Asset Leasing killed 11 workers and resulted in the dumping of 4.9 million barrels of oil. The spill soiled 337 miles of Louisiana coastline, shutting down commercial fishing in places. It dwarfed the estimated 190,000 barrels discharged in 2005 as a result of Hurricane Katrina and the 260,000 spilled in the 1989 wreck of the Exxon Valdez tanker in Alaska. Daren Beaudo, a spokesman for BP America in Houston, declined to comment. Lou Colasu-onno, a New York-based spokesman for Triton and Transocean, also declined to comment. POLICING SPILLS FROM THE STATE’S OIL PROduction and pipeline system, which transports almost 40 percent of America’s energy supplies, is only part of the DEQ’s mission. The agency,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

page 22

24

Gov. Bobby Jindal dips a fishing net into oil-stained water in Louisiana marshlands after the BP oil disaster. courtesy Louisiana governor’s office

which spent $153 million in 2010, brings hundreds of cases a year against leaky underground storage tanks. It also shuts illegal waste dumps and fines air polluters, including oil and gas refineries. Losco, which works on spill mitigation, has no authority to assess penalties. It prefers a “cooperative approach,” said David Gisclair, director of the agency’s technical assistance program. The agency said it has completed 10 of 23 cases it has undertaken since 1991. “Big fines don’t work,” Gisclair said. “The oil companies just fight them

in court and tie you up for years.” Thirteen spills were reported since 2002 at various facilities of Hilcorp Energy Co., Louisiana’s largest oil producer in 2009. Eleven of them came from small pipes known as flowlines, according to DEQ data. The data show the state agency hasn’t imposed a spill fine that stuck against the Houston-based independent oil company. The largest incident, in December 2002, totaled 1,000 barrels. It created what state enforcement documents called a “dead zone” in 7 acres of cypress forest in the Atchafalaya Basin about 130 miles west of New Orleans. While Hilcorp faced a penalty of as much as $32,500, it wasn’t fined, the records show. The company spent $2 million cleaning up the spill, reimbursed Louisiana $75,000 for the cost of assessing the environmental damage and last year agreed to restore a nearby section of swamp, according to Losco. Hilcorp also promised “a new aggressive flowline management program to prevent future flowline leaks,” according to a 2003 company letter to state regulators. The 12 other spills included three in an 11-day stretch in March 2006. Two of them involved less than a barrel and none exceeded 50 barrels. The DEQ moved to fine the company $1,000 for a September 2003 spill and $1,000 for another in September 2004, both of them for “unauthorized discharge of oilfield wastes,” DEQ documents say. The state rescinded both penalties in 2010. In the 2003 case, the DEQ ruled that a Hilcorp contractor had caused the spill. In the 2004 incident, the Louisiana State Police had also fined Hilcorp $1,000 for failing to promptly report a spill of hazardous material. “It’s our policy not to fine companies twice,” said Celena Cage, the DEQ’s

administrator for enforcement. Hilcorp didn’t respond to more than a half-dozen phone messages left at the office of Michael Schoch, whom the company identified as its regulatory, environmental and safety manager in a 2006 letter to the state. In 2009, state data show the company produced 7.9 million barrels of oil in Louisiana worth $490 million at the year’s average crude price of $61.99 a barrel. OIL AND GAS COMPANIES’ POLITICAL influence undermines regulatory efforts, said Foster Campbell, a former Democratic state senator who tried unsuccessfully to pass an oil transfer tax to replace the state’s 1920s-era severance tax. The industry employs 50,000 people. The state general fund’s receipts from oil and gas severance taxes, royalties and fees totaled $1.3 billion last year, about 15 percent of revenue. That’s down from a peak of $1.6 billion in 1982, when oil and gas receipts accounted for 42 percent of the state’s revenue. “Our record of regulating oil and gas is dismal,” says Campbell, now a member of the Louisiana Public Service Commission. “Down here, nobody wants to punish anybody.” From 1982 to 1997, Kerry St. Pe recommended fines in “hundreds and hundreds of cases” as a DEQ inspector in southeastern Louisiana, he says. “But in terms of actual penalties that were levied based on my investigations, I can count them on one hand,” said St. Pe, 60, a marine biologist who now heads the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program in southeastern Louisiana. He said the main reason was “political pressure to the contrary,” which he described as a sense that vigorous enforcement in the field was being discouraged in Baton Rouge. “When oil companies see it’s cheaper to pollute than to prevent spills, it creates a culture of noncompliance,” St. Pe said. The DEQ won’t respond to St. Pe’s comments, said Tim Beckstrom, a spokesman for the agency. The regulator’s field agents today have no more effect in imposing fines than St. Pe did, according to a person with long, direct knowledge of the current DEQ inspection system who declined to be identified because his employer didn’t authorize the comments. The person said spill cases sent to DEQ headquarters can languish for years without action. State field agents, frustrated by inaction from their supervisors, sometimes tip off federal regulators about incidents, the person said.

“CORPORATIONS

resolve, based on state data. In 1991, the DEQ proposed a $110,000 penalty for Opal Oil Inc. Among other things, the agency cited oil spills on land and into nearby streams in 1990 at facilities in the Ora Oil Field near Monroe. In one case, a broken pipeline spilled into a creek and the company “failed to report the release,” state records show. An administrative law judge reduced the penalty to $103,100 in 1992. Still, Opal Oil paid nothing until 18 years after the first proposed penalty, when the company agreed to pay $55,000 in 18 monthly installments, DEQ records show. Louisiana is “probably one of the strictest states” with regard to regulating oil drillers, said Bob Walker, a partner in Opal Oil. He said the initial fine was “unrealistic and unfair” and more than the company, which has four employees and operates only in Northern Louisiana, made at the time. High-impact spills that kill wildlife or soil public beaches or marshes are handled by Losco, the separate agency, under a federally authorized process called a natural resources damage assessment, or NRDA. The DEQ doesn’t seek penalties in these cases, which can take years to complete. In September, the state announced a $1.8 million damage and restoration assessment with Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co., a unit of Tulsa-based Williams Partners LP. The NRDA resolved a 2001 spill of as much as 3,000 barrels of natural gas condensate in Mosquito Bay in Terrebonne Parish. Williams Partners didn’t respond to a request for comment made through the company’s press office. NRDAs take so long because they involve complicated negotiations among the spiller and as many as a half-dozen state and federal agencies, Losco’s Gisclair says.

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GETTING FIRM NUMBERS FOR LOUISIANA’S spills and the penalties assessed for them is complicated by flaws in the DEQ’s own database. The agency supplied it with an unsigned note saying, “The more current the document the more accurate the information.” Fines are levied, then rescinded years later, the records show. Some spills are missing entirely from the online quarterly enforcement reports the DEQ publishes because the federal government took the lead in an investigation while the state played a supporting role. In addition, the online database doesn’t permit simple computer searches — say, for “oil spills” — aimed at finding information on origins, size, responsible parties or causes. Spill data from January 2006 through the third quarter of 2010 — the most recent time-

frame available — was examined. The tally focuses on actual spill-related enforcement. The DEQ also fined eight companies an average of $825 during the period for failing to have spill containment reports on file. These weren’t tied to specific spills. State regulators’ largest penalty was $153,177, levied against Murphy Oil USA Inc., a unit of Murphy Oil Corp., which is based in El Dorado, Ark. That 2010 settlement covered a series of mostly chemical spills and recordkeeping violations beginning in 2001. Another penalty, $55,000, resulted from the 2009 settlement of a case that began in 1991. Leaving those cases aside, the average penalty for oil spillers since 2006 was $3,297. By contrast, in June, regulators fined Dam Nguyen, the owner of the West Gate Quick Shop gasoline and food mart in Opelousas $8,885.29 for underground storage tank violations. Even though his three tanks weren’t leaking, Nguyen persistently failed to monitor them for possible leaks, the agency found. Nguyen appealed the fine, characterizing himself as an overworked small business owner and saying that the employee who kept the monitoring records quit and took them with her. Based on that appeal, the state in November reduced the fine to $550, which Nguyen says he paid. He has enrolled in a DEQ class to help prevent future run-ins with the agency, he said. In all, the agency cited 74 underground storage tank violations in the first nine months of last year, at an average fine of $1,202, state data show. One form of DEQ enforcement actions, administrative settlements, can take years to

THE LAG TIME BETWEEN SPILLS AND STATE decisions to levy fines or seek restitution can be years, a review of DEQ records found. An “expedited penalty agreement” in February 2010 with Texas Petroleum Investment Co., an independent Houston-based oil company, was for spills in May and June of 2006 and December 2007, according to DEQ data. The spills totaled 24 barrels of crude and at least four barrels of produced water at the company’s Delta Farms Field near Larose. The DEQ collected $3,000 and a pledge from the company to “conduct more frequent

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Decisions about fines are governed by a DEQ “matrix” that takes into account size and impact of the spill, the company’s culpability, how quickly the discharge was cleaned up and how cooperative the company was in addressing issues, the DEQ’s Cage says. The agency declined to discuss how this system applied to Hilcorp, the company with 13 spills and no fines. In a letter resisting penalties for four of the spills in 2006, the company reminded the DEQ of its 2002 pledge to manage its flowlines to prevent leaks. The company also noted its more than 60 oil and gas sites in Louisiana. “It’s imperative that Hilcorp and all regulatory agencies continue to have a strong working relationship,” the company said in the letter.

25

BIG FINES

and fishing the wetlands of Plaquemines Parish, the narrow neck of delta that ushers the Mississippi River on the final leg of its journey to the Gulf. It’s prime oil and gas country. In 1980, St. Pe was investigating a tip that there were “acres and acres of dead swamp” near an oil and gas tank installation about 20 miles southwest of New Orleans, he says. “I knew immediately they were discharging produced water in a freshwater area,” he says. That’s illegal; drillers are required to pump the toxic brine back underground after separating it from the oil and gas. As he began gathering samples, an employee of the oil company pulled up in a boat.

DON’T

WORK. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

THE OIL COMPANIES JUST FIGHT THEM IN COURT AND TIE YOU UP FOR YEARS.”

26

visual inspections of transfer lines to prevent a reoccurrence,” according to state documents. The agency’s reports on the December 2007 incident cited pump malfunctions. William Crawford, a co-owner of the company, declined to comment. Closely held Texas Petroleum was Louisiana’s eighth largest oil producer in 2009, pumping 1.7 million barrels of oil with a spot market value of $105 million. The EPA can investigate spills independently and take the lead in federal waters within state boundaries or on spills that cross state boundaries, according to Stacy Kika, an EPA spokeswoman. The agency sometimes shares fines it collects with the states. The EPA announced in August that Plains All American Pipeline LP, a publicly traded, Houstonbased company, had agreed to pay a $3.25 million penalty for a series of discharges from 2004 to 2007. A total of 6,510 barrels of oil spilled into navigable waters of four states. Pat Diamond, a spokesman for the company, declined to comment. In 2006, the agency fined Stone Energy Corp., a Lafayette company, $150,722 and $28,875 for two flowline spills. Stone Energy paid its fines, which were for onshore spills, said Flo Ziegler, a company spokeswoman. St. Pe says he learned early in his DEQ career that it’s hard to alter a culture of noncompliance. A selfdescribed “man of the marsh,” he grew up hunting

“Excuse me, sir, can you tell me what you’re doing here?” St. Pe says he asked the man. “He looked at me and actually grinned. He said, ‘Well, I guess you can tell what we’re doing — we’re getting rid of our produced water.’” The man then explained the company would flout environmental laws because he knew the state wasn’t going to do anything meaningful to punish it. “’OK, you’ll write me up and you’re going to request penalties,’” St. Pe says the man told him. “’And let’s just say they’ll actually fine us — what? $5,000 or $10,000? Do you know what it would cost to inject this produced water down a well? Millions of dollars.’” Other oilfield workers over the years have blown the whistle when their employers broke pollution laws, St. Pe said. He says he doesn’t blame the companies. “Corporations are like children,” he says. “If you allow your kids to have all the candy they want, you’ll get them fat and all keyed up on sugar. And when you then try to discipline them, you wonder why they won’t listen. It’s the same with these corporations. “In Louisiana, they virtually get everything they ask for, so why should they behave?” Used with permission of Bloomberg.com Permissions. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.

Garret Graves, Gov. Bobby Jindal’s senior coastal advisor, examines oiled marsh during a trip to the Pass a Loutre marshes in June 2010, six weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico. COURTESY LOUISIANA GOVERNOR’S OFFICE

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Softball Camp June 20-24 9:00 AM until 3:00 PM $150 + $25 registration

Baseball Camp June 27-July 1 9:00 AM until 3:00 PM $150 + $25 registration

BECAUSE THE WORLD IS CO-ED

(504) 895-5717 | www.delasallenola.com

john curtis christian school BASKETBALL CAMP

May 30-June 3 Ages 6-13 9:00–3:00 Cost $ 150

June 20-24 Ages 6-13 Boys and Girls 9:00–3:00 Cost $ 150

SOFTBALL CAMP May 30-31 12:00-3:00 June 1-3 9:00-3:00 Ages 6-14 Cost $150

SPECIALTY BASEBALL CAMP June 6–10 Ages 6-13 9:00 12:00 Cost $ 100

VOLLEYBALL

summer school

BASEBALL CAMP

JUNE 4-24 Grades 6-8 1 Course $325 2nd Course $325 Grades 9-12 1/2 Unit $225 1 Unit $450

July 5–8 Boys and Girls Ages 6-13 9:00–3:00 Cost $ 120

FOR INFORMATION

FOOTBALL CAMP

ON THE CAMPS AND SUMMER SCHOOL, CALL

July 18–22 Ages 6 -13 9:00–3:00 Cost $ 150

504.737.4621 OR VISIT JOHNCURTIS.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

athletic summer camps

2011 Patriots Summer Activities

27

HOLY CROSS SCHOOL For Boys & Girls Ages 4-12

Our camp offers girls and boys an opportunity to enjoy activities of their choice while benefiting from technique and skill development.

Art • Music • Karate • Sports • Computer Cheerleading • Swimming • Field Trips Session I: June 6 – 24 Session II: June 27 – July 15

Register online at www.holycrosstigers.com/summercamp HOLY CROSS SCHOOL

5500 Paris Avenue, New Orleans

(504) 942-3100

www.holycrosstigers.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 08 > 2011

Holy Cross School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its policies.

28

Dance • s t f a r C & s t Ar lay • Yoga eatre P r te a W • c si Mu al Th More c si u M • s t r o p Cooking • SSpecial Events and Much A Summer aces • Day Camp Relay R CHECK OUT offered by

St. George’s Episcopal School 923 Napoleon Ave.

For more information: Patrick Summerour Castletree Director 504-891-5509 ext. 151 www.castletree.net

DRAGON

CAMP

THE NEW THEATER CAMP:

Tree House Players!

www.castletree.net for more info Registration Opens: February 21 Session 1: June 6 - June 24

Session 2: July 5 - July 22

A summer camp for three year olds providing a rich summer program filled with music, art, water play & activities. Space is limited. Please contact Barbara Dickson @ 891-5509 x532 or dicksonb@stgeorgesepiscopal.com

Saturday dance campS—For 3 to 16 year olds • June and July

new OrleanS dance academy

5956 Magazine St. • New Orleans, LA 70115 • 504.899.3780 • nodanceacademy@aol.com

Elmwood Park

Summer Camp

NEXT TO SHOE-NAMI

Built in Pool and Giant Water Slide (Swim Everyday) Starts June 6th-through August 5th

3112 MAGAZINE ST. | 504.301.9864

• Large Game Room • • • •

(includes Wii, Play Station, Nintendo)

Arts and Crafts Athletic Activities Field Trips every week Free Time and so much more

Call for Camp Also off ered: registration Tuto or for a com- Summer riSng, c Swimm hool; prehensive ing L e s sons brochure for the 2011-2012 school year.

3319 SEVERN AVE. | 504.885.0805

1517 Carol Sue Ave.

Terrytown, LA 70056 • 504-392-0217

Summer Camps @

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART 9 2 5

c a m p

s t . ,

n e w

o r l e a n s ,

l a .

Summer Art and Drama Camp

Fashion Week at the O!

Children will learn basic art and performance skills to create a multi-act play, which is performed on the last day of camp.

Have a passion for fashion? Learn what it takes to pull together a fashion show—from concept and illustration to cutting, sewing and modeling, with a final runway presentation.

with actor/director Mikko and artist Gina Phillips

session 1:

June 6 – 17

session 2:

June 20 - July 1 9 am-12 noon

For children entering 2nd to 5th grades

July 18 - 22 For ages 13-16

For information about these camps, call Ellen Balkin at 504.539.9608 or email: ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

3102 MAGAZINE ST. | 504.895.1717

29

sHTo P aLK

BY MARGUERITE LUCAS

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Foam On The Range

ummer’s scorching temperatures are just around the corner, which means GreenBean Insulation (9140591; www.greenbeaninsulation.com) owner Kurt Buchert soon will field phone calls from customers who want to decrease the costs of their energy bills. “If you insulate your house with spray foam, it’s like making it a big ice chest. It stops all air infiltration. … Other infiltration products don’t do that,” says Buchert, who provides spray foam, cellulose and radiant barrier insulation. The New Orleans native became a spray foam fan after using the product on his own renovation project. In 2006, Buchert started GreenBean as the first spray foam insulation company based in New Orleans “If you live in an old house, you know you have poor insulation,” Buchert says. “(Spray foam) helps in the summer and winter.” The foam sprays on as a liquid, expanding and forming foam as soon as it hits the surface. Although Buchert says spray foam does cost a little bit more than regular insulation, the savings are markedly greater. “If you spray foam an entire house, you’re looking at (a savings of ) 60 to 70 percent (on utility costs),” Buchert says. “It lasts forever; you never have to replace it (and) it doesn’t shrink.”

THE GREEN PROJECT (2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org) hosts a relief woodcarving workshop with instruction by Daniel Garcia from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 12. Participants will learn to create original wood art carvings from old cabinet doors. The workshop is free for members of The Green Project and $5 for non-members. Contact Kaylie at kbirdsall@thegreenproject.org by Friday, March 11, to register.

S

Even insulating just part of GreenBean owner Kurt a house, which many people Buchert says spray choose to do, trims utility foam insulation can costs, he says, adding that save homeowners 60 spray foam is both wallet- and percent to 70 percent on their utility bills. eco-friendly in the long run. GreenBean Insulation’s name is derived from the company’s use of certified green products, Buchert says. “Foam contains 15 percent renewable resources,” he says. “It has a sugarcane base replac(ing) a lot of petroleum in the product.” Besides reduced energy bills, one of spray foam’s best attributes is the short time required to complete its installation, with most taking only a day. Buchert says his employees’ experience is a major advantage. “We’ve done 2,500 houses, and my foreman has 19 years of experience,” Buchert says. “We’ve done more houses than anyone.”

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT recently opened a coffee cafe, FAIR FOLKS & A ROAST (2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com), which offers patrons a subscription plan. For a monthly fee of $20 (or $200 annually), subscribers receive a free cup of tea or coffee with each visit, along with access to the cafe, garden and lounge, discounts on selected merchandise and invitations to subscriber-only events. An art show featuring lithography, prints, silkscreens and etchings by THE NOLA COMMUNITY PRINTSHOP is open from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 12, at LOST LOVE LOUNGE (2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com). From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. there will be live silkscreening onto T-shirts and silkscreened temporary tattoos. Proceeds will benefit a new space for the NOLA Community Printshop.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Mount Carmel Academy

9 am-12 noon ULY J 6-J 6 6E N U J 1 pm-4 pm 2011 for 5th to 9th grade girls Summer Camp offerings: academics • Self-improvement arts • Dance • Cheer • Sports • Theatre NEw N NE w

JUNior J JUN UNior UN ior Camp

1

for 2nd to 5th grade girls

Junior Camp offerings: arts • Dance • Cheer Sports • Theatre

30 MCA SC Gambit_2011.indd 1

3/2/11 10:18 AM

THEATER: CARLO ALBAN AT SOUTHERN REP PAGE 33 MUSIC: FOBURG FESTIVAL PAGE 36 CUISINE: A CRAWFISH FIND IN HARVEY PAGE 65

GIRL ON FILM VARLA JEAN MERMAN’S NEW MOVIE GETS A FIRST PEEK AT THE PRYTANIA THEATER

35 PAGE

Trim: 9.625" x 5.333" Live: 9.375" x 5.083" VO: - x Final Mats: PDF X1a Desc.: Gambit 9.625" x 5.333” Ad

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Offer valid for a limited time and while supplies last. Must play 30 minutes or earn 25 Base Reward Credits ® on the gaming date of sign-up. Must be a new Total Rewards ® member at time of offer. Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend these promotions at any time. Additional restrictions may apply. Valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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2/24/11 3:24 PM

32

Doors open Nightly- 5pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

FASHION. CONNECT. IMPRESS.

March 15-18, 2011

THE SUGAR MILL 1021 Convention Center Blvd, New Orleans

Over 25 Spectacular Runway Shows, a Top Designer Competition, and Silent Auctions benefiting NO/Aids Task Force, Dress for Success, FINO, and the New Orleans Firefighters Foundation.

For ticket information visit www.fashionweeknola.com

Finish Studio

a full service hair salon

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO <<<<<<<<<< << 36 45 51 58 60 65 >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > MAR <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> D.L. Hughley, Sommore and Bruce Bruce headline the Royal Comedy Tour. A spin on CNN may have helped Hughley (pictured) refocus on comedy, but Bruce Bruce’s star has been on the rise on Comedy Central and cable TV. They are joined by Don DC Curry, Damon WilINTRINGULIS liams, Tony Rock (yes, 8 P.M. FRI.-SAT.; 3 brother of Chris), TuRae P.M. SUN.; THROUGH and Mario Tory. Tickets MARCH 23 $48.20-$58.50. (including SOUTHERN REP, THE fees). 8 p.m. Friday. UNO SHOPS AT CANAL Lakefront Arena, 6801 PLACE, 333 CANAL Franklin Ave., 280-7171; ST., THIRD FLOOR, www.arena.uno.edu

Royal Comedy Tour

11

522-6545; WWW.SOUTHERNREP.COM

TICKETS $20 PREVIEW (FRIDAY), $50 OPENING NIGHT (SATURDAY), $29 WED., THU. AND SUN., $35 FRI.-SAT.

Law & Border CARLO ALBAN TELLS HIS IMMIGRATION STORY. BY WILL COVIELLO

A

“I can remember it perfectly,” he says. “I was hunched over getting ready to sing ‘Food, Glorious Food.’ My heart was pounding waiting for the curtain to come up. And the next thing I remember the curtain came down, it was all over, and we were all screaming and jumping around. I fell in love.” One of the show’s producers encouraged him to start auditioning in New York City, and Alban was both interested and cautious. Any investigation of their fake Social Security numbers or green cards could expose them. But two years later, he joined the cast of Sesame Street as Carlo. “There’s something very special about that show,” he says. “I joined on the 25th anniversary season. It’s really a big family; it’s a very grounded place. I was scared, but I felt lucky to be there.” He’s spent much of the past five years developing Intringulis at LABrynth Theater Company in New York. Alban plays himself and other people he has encountered, and he sings some Latin protest songs. It’s the only time he’s played guitar on stage. “The catalyst (for the show) came in 2004, when my mom heard me playing guitar,” he says. His mother responded by playing a tape for him of Joan Baez singing a Mexican folk song. Alban started listing to folk and protest songs more carefully, and he heard similar messages about civil rights and human rights from both North and South America. Music helps ground the show, he says, partially because it had a strong presence at home. “My mom was afraid we wouldn’t speak Spanish,” he says. “But there was always music around our house.”

MAR

1114

Varla Jean Merman brings a cabaret of saucy new songs to Le Chat Noir, with accompaniment by Tom Judson, aka Gus Mattox. Thursday’s performance is sponsored by the Mystic Krewe of Satyricon. Call 525-4498 for tickets to that show only. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Fri.Sat., 6 p.m. Sun. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

Class Actress with Millionyoung and Nicos Gun

MAR

14

A defrosted and womanized answer to Junior Boys’ icy, androgynous electropop, Brooklyn’s Class Actress made a striking entrance with 2010’s Journal of Ardency (Terrible), its six songs trading teases between plush ’80s synthesizers and singer Elizabeth Harper’s silky pillow talk. Millionyoung and Nicos Gun open. Tickets $10. 9:30 p.m. Monday. Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

Sharon Van Etten with Great Lake Swimmers and Ava Luna

MAR

14

On her 2009 debut Because I Was in Love, New York City songstress Sharon Van Etten let her gossamer voice drift miles above her minimalist piano and guitar arrangements. September follow-up Epic (Ba Da Bing) brings her back down to earth, adding well-placed country accents like lap steel and harmonium to sophisticated songs. Ava Luna opens; Great Lake Swimmers headlines. Tickets $8. 10 p.m. Monday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

mong the challenges of trying to enforce strict anti-immigration laws is the fact that undocumented immigrants are everywhere. Even on Sesame Street. “I was hiding in plain sight,” says Carlo Alban, who appeared as “Carlo” on the children’s program for four years. “I was scared of getting caught, afraid of getting fired and humiliated.” As bizarre as it sounds, Alban became a successful child actor while his family concealed its undocumented status, having entered the country on a tourist visa and stayed. Alban eventually graduated to an acting career in stage and film. He’s appeared on Law & Order, Oz, Strangers With Candy and in many other TV programs and films. Since 2004, he’s been working on the one-man show Intringulis, which opens at Southern Rep this week. The show recounts his life as an undocumented immigrant, from entering the United States at age 7 to becoming a citizen in his mid-20s (in 2006). “I’ve always wanted to tell this story,” he says. “I grew up in fear. There’s always that impulse. I feel like I have the right to tell this story.” Alban’s family is from Ecuador. They visited his mother’s sister, a legal immigrant, in California in the late 1980s and never left. After four years, the family moved to New Jersey, where his father had been offered a job. Shortly afterward, he went to his first audition, somewhat by accident. Alban and his brother were visiting cousins who were auditioning for roles in the musical Oliver!, and they went along to watch. Both brothers were encouraged to audition, and Carlo was cast as Oliver.

Carlo Alban sings in his oneman show Intringulis.

The Loose Chanteuse

33

BRING

GREAT TASTE TO THE BOIL MAN UP. CHOOSE ON TASTE.™

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

©2011 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI

34

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LEAKY WINDOWS? COLD FLOORS?

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WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

FEATURE

Misleading Lady VARLA JEAN MERMAN SCREENS HER NEW FILM. BY LAUREN LABORDE

A

MAR

14

TUE 3/8

DJ JIVE & DJ SPIN 9PM

THU CRESCENT CITY 3/10 HARMONICA 9PM FRI SOCIAL SERVICES PRESENTS MACHINEDRUNM 9PM

3/11

SAT JENN HOWARD 3/12

& FRIENDS 9PM

SUN DEFIBULATORS 9PM 3/13 Varla says). She lies, cheats and swindles a desperate infertile couple and a Broadway writer (Seth Rudetsky as himself) in pursuit of her TV show. It’s no Barney: characters include Sharon Needles and Tickle-Me Pickle, and there’s a segment that encourages viewers to mail their parents’ prescription drugs to Varla. Roberson says the next step is to get it in film festivals such as Outfest and the Toronto International Film Festival. In the meantime he is still tweaking the film, using the screenings as barometers for the movie’s success. “Screenings are good for knowing what works,” he says, adding that he will likely be taking notes during the screening at Prytania. Roberson recently returned from Los Angeles, where he was filming the sequel to the drag-cult comedy Girls Will Be Girls, and he is preparing for a role in the off-Broadway play Lucky Guy. In New Orleans, he will perform his solo cabaret show The Loose Chanteuse at Le Chat Noir. Varla shows are typically video-heavy, but Roberson is happy to get back to traditional cabaret after completing a feature-length film. “I was starteing to use so many videos in shows, I joked I would name my next show ‘Phoning it In’ and just play videos the whole time, and keep calling during the show to say ‘I’m on my way,’” he says. “I’ve done plenty of video work.”

Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads Benefit Screening 7:30 P.M. MONDAY THE PRYTANIA THEATER, 5339 PRYTANIA ST., 483-3129; WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM TICKETS $40

HAPPY MARDI GRAS!!!

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Showcasing Local Music TUE 3/8 WED 3/9

Rebirth Brass Band Khris Royal & Dark Matter

monday • 3/7 • 9 pm Red Moped “lundi graS” tuesday • 3/8 • 9 pm f R e e

s h o w

barrel of monkeyS

THU 3/10

The Trio

FRI 3/11

Big Sam’s Funky Nation

SAT 3/12

Closed for Filming

air HoCkey

SUN 3/13

Joe Krown Trio

PunCHing bag

MON 3/14

Papa Grows Funk

raCe Car

feat. Johnny V., June Yamagishi & Keiko

feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

mong the lessons for a firsttime filmmaker is that a film screening for strangers can be less nerve-racking than one for friends. “I learned the worst thing to do is to have a couple of friends over to watch the movie, because they know you want to see their reaction, so they act funny,” says Jeffery Roberson, the man behind the drag persona Varla Jean Merman, recounting a viewing of his film Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads at a friend’s house. “Throughout the film they were silent — it was awkward. I was so depressed.” “But when you show it for an audience, they’re just there to see it and have a good time, and it’s like, ‘Thank God,’” he says. Production for Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads, the locally shot and produced movie based on Roberson’s Schoolhouse Rock-style stage comedy, wrapped early this year and is approaching its official release. Screenings in New York and Provincetown, Mass. were wellreceived (“There were so many laughs, you couldn’t hear the next line,” he says), and local audiences get a chance to see it at a screening to benefit Gambit’s Big Easy Foundation on March 14. Roberson says he’s excited to show the film in New Orleans, where it is set — including sunny shots of the Marigny and Bywater and scenes at spots like Le Chat Noir and JohnPaul’s Bar. Brian Peterson, Ricky Graham, Becky Allen and other local theater personalities also appear prominently in the film. “I can’t wait for the actors to see it,” Roberson says. “It was long hours and hard work, so I want them to hear the audience’s laughter … and have that be their payment.” Loosely based on the stage production of the same name, Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads is a mockumentary in which students from the fictitious Crescent City Community College film Varla as she tries to create a children’s television show. In the film, Varla yearns for a child but cannot conceive or adopt one due to an uncommon gynecological problem and legal troubles, respectively. Realizing that her audience is not getting any younger, she decides to rework her cabaret show to target children (“Like they did for Camel cigarettes and Sudafed,”

35

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JANKA NABAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUBU KING hmed Janka Nabay calls it â&#x20AC;&#x153;the bubu national anthem,â&#x20AC;? and as he hums the opening bars, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter much that bubu isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a nation or that the song isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really an anthem. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infectious. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come on everybody, dance to the bubu,â&#x20AC;? Nabay sings in giddy, kidlike tones, commingling English with his native Temne tongue. By the finish, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giggling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How about that?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basically every single person that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve met in Sierra Leone, even if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know Jankaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, if he sings even a little bit of that song, they know it,â&#x20AC;? says Wills Glasspiegel, a National Public Radio producer who discovered Nabay a decade ago and now represents him as a manager. Glasspiegel says he came upon the music the same way Nabay did: by happenstance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The story Janka often tells is, he was in a musical contest in the beginnings of the Sierra Leonean civil war, and they had some judges there from the U.N. Everybody was trying to play Western music or reggae. They said to Janka, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you have something from here, from the local style?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when he, essentially on the spot, came up with his first original bubu song: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dance to the Bubu.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? That was 1994. Years later, Glasspiegel recalls, he was assembling a piece on the war for Afropop Worldwide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through that show we got access to this trove of music that the BBC had brought back from Sierra Leone, a bunch of stuff that you could never find outside of the country,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As I was soundtracking this show â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which was more political in nature than about the music â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I heard Jankaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music, and I said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Holy shit. What is this music?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never heard anything like it. It struck a chord with me because I thought it sounded very modern and resonant with the direction of music here in Brooklyn, and the direction of modern independent music.â&#x20AC;? Bubu dates back hundreds of years in Sierra Leone, but its circuitous, chiming tones â&#x20AC;&#x201D; blown through bamboo chutes for treble and, more recently, carburetor pipes for bass â&#x20AC;&#x201D; had been reserved for spiritual processions during the Muslim observance of Ramadan. Nabay estimates he was 3 when he first heard it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my

A

MAR

13

first music ever that I had in this world,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This music is forever with me.â&#x20AC;? Nabayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bubu, which helped influence the 1999 Lome Peace Accord that ended Sierra Leoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s civil war, today can be heard in all corners of the country. Nabay loads that tradition into a slingshot and fires it into the 21st century, a digitized dancehall marriage of the original template with rapid Afrobeat tempos, played on synthesizers, drum machines and guitars. With Glasspiegelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help, a septet was culled from progressive NYC bands like the Skeletons and Gang Gang Dance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we were first starting to build the band, No. 1 it was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to find Sierra Leoneans who want to play this music,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Glasspiegel says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find anybody.â&#x20AC;? At this Janka laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first person who really wants to play the music is a white person,â&#x20AC;? he says of polyrhythmic percussionist Jon Leland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bandleader.â&#x20AC;? His only album, Bubu King, captures four songs from 2000 recorded on his final nights in Freetown before fleeing to America. The EP was reissued in 2010 by the Matador Records subsidiary True Panther Sounds. For 2011, Glasspiegel plans on a summertime EP to introduce the band and a full-length debut in the fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Essentially the first bubu recording thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been made and released in the U.S.,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first thing weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do when we get to New Orleans is go to Congo Square and make a guerilla field recording â&#x20AC;&#x201D; bring the bubu music to Congo Square, a place where it probably never has been, and document that. Janka has said it very well before. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I took this one music, from a single tribe in Sierra Leone, and made it for all the 12 tribes of Sierra Leone. The U.S. is the next tribe.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

Janka Nabay with Empress Hotel, Monogold, Tiny Victories and DJ Yrs Truly 9 P.M. SUNDAY ONE EYED JACKS, 615 TOULOUSE ST., 569-8361; WWW.ONEEYEDJACKS.NET TICKETS $10 (FREE WITH FOBURG PASS)

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

THE SALOON — Chicken on the Bone, 8

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

SPOTTED CAT — John Royan Trio, 10 a.m; New Orleans Moonshiners, 2; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

SHAMROCK BAR — Shadow Myself, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

Tuesday 8

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Mojo Trio, 9

BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

Wednesday 9

BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Candy RiedlLowe, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Lil Will & Dem, 6

BMC — Royal Rounders, 7; ChaWa Mardi Gras Indians, 7; Joe Lawler & Friends, 10 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Charley & the Soulabillyswampboogie, 12; Suplecs, 5; De Los Muertos, 11 CIRCLE BAR — Tom Paines, 6

COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. — Nolaphonic All-stars, 3 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown, 9:30

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

BMC — H.G. Breland Band, 8:30; Blues4Sale, 11

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Geb Rault Band, 6; T-Bone Stone, 7; Megan Jean & the Killer F’n Bassists, 11

GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Kristina Morales, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

HI-HO LOUNGE — Mardi Gras Indian Orchestra, 3

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Khris Royal, 6 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Chad Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Kim Carson Band, 7:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jay B Elston, 9

THE MAISON — Meta Space Funk Menagerie, 3; Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, 6; Earphunk, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Megan Jean & the Killer F’n Bassists, 9; Clyde Albert, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FRAT HOUSE — Shy Green, Jeff Guitar Nelson, Rivers Delta, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — John & Tanya, 7; Beth Trepagnier, 8; Terrina & Jon, 9; James Hurley, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Miami University Gospel Singers, 3

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

OAK — Honey Island Swamp Trio, 8

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Robin Clabby, Erik Golson & Keiko Komaki Trio, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Beth Patterson, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & Deacons, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 10 12 BAR — Crescent City Harmonica, 9

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Rambling Letters, 6; Peter Novelli, 8:30; Low-Stress Quintet, 11

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

Advance word of the first Foburg carried so many “SXSW” stamps that the inaugural 2010 music festival had the air of an industry-insider South By Southwest showcase. Doubtless this was by design. Staged by the New Orleans Indie Rock Collective, Foburg proved a successful and self-affirming panorama of the city’s emerging pop and rock practitioners. In the end it was more akin to the group’s twice-yearly NOIR festivals than the monster magnet that draws half the music world to central Texas every March. This sophomore effort emphasizes depth over breadth with a slight increase in venues (up from 10 to 15) hosting a similar number of bands (more than 100 confirmed) over the same three-day stretch. Begin to plot a weekend itinerary, however, and it becomes evident how the event has grown. Each night rests on a pylon: On Friday, it’s One Eyed Jacks’ triple bill of cello-rockers Ra Ra Riot (pictured), undiscovered Quebecan gem The Luyas and new Glassnote signees Givers. Saturday pairs seriously funny Brooklyn rappers Das Racist with bounce Amazon Katey Red at the Maison. And Sunday has two load-bearing beams, the first New Orleans visit by Sierra Leone hero and bubu king Janka Nabay (at One Eyed Jacks with Monogold, Tiny Victories and Empress Hotel) and a whole hive of buzz bands at the Saturn Bar (Toro y Moi, Small Black, Cults, Cloud Nothings, Sun Airway). Of course, catching those means missing out on the Hood Internet, Christoph Andersson, Big History, Jeff the Brotherhood, Brass Bed, Futurebirds, the Spinto Band and Big Freedia. Austin, we have your problem. Visit www.foburgneworleans.com for a complete schedule and ticket information. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

MAR

11-13

Foburg 9 p.m. Friday-Sunday Various venues; www.foburgneworleans.com

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Innerpartysystem, Swiss Chriss, 10

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6

D.B.A. — Lynn Drury CD release, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Brandon Foret, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Eryn Shewell, 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30

THE MAISON — Natalie Mae, 7; Deja Vu Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Meghan Swartz, 12

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

Messing with Texas

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Ukulele Jake, 10

HI-HO LOUNGE — Michael James & His Lonesome, Luke Allen, Big Country, Helen Gillet, Samuel Doors, Riley Downing, Kaioko & Squash, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Yes, 8

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

preview

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 3

KERRY IRISH PUB — Kelcy Mae Band, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 8 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Leroy Jones & Katja Toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

RAY FRANSEN’S DRUM CENTER — Chris Adler, 7:30 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brent & George, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Li’l Nathan & the Zydeco Big Tymers, 8:30 SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Khari Lee & the New Creative Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TELLO’S BISTRO — Jerry Nuccio, 5 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late as Usual, 9 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 11 12 BAR — Machinedrum, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Foburg Fest feat. Other Planets, Caddywhompus, Fights, 9

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8 AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BABYLON LOUNGE — Rivers Delta & guests, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Soul Project, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip PAGE 43

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

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3/15: VICtOR atKINs PREsENts tHE MUsIC OF

ELLIs MaRsaLIs

3/22: ED PEtERsEN PREsENts tHE MUsIC OF

HaROLD BattIstE

3/29: stEVE MasaKOwsKI PREsENts tHE MUsIC OF

Burlesque Ballroom

EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Monday 7, 14, 21, 28

MARCH

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

NE

42

R

starring

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

wednesdays IRVIN MaYFIELD’s NOJO JaM presents the music of: 3/16: DONaLD BYRD 3/23: CHICK COREa 3/26: CHaRLIE PaRKER

saturdays 3/12: DON VaPPIE 3/19: BILL sUMMERs 3/26: KHRIs ROYaL

thursday 10, 17, 24, 31

tYLER’s REVIsItED FEatURING

sHaMaRR aLLEN

sunday 13, 20, 27

GERMaINE BazzLE & PaUL LONGstREtH

Friday 11, 18, 25

LEON “KID CHOCOLatE” BROwN

JaMEs BLaCK

irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 37 Melancon, 8

BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Foburg Fest feat. Flow Tribe, Blue Party, Mississippi Rail Company, 9; Foburg Fest feat. Debauche, Lisps, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Luke Winslow-King (upstairs), 9

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Leslie Smith & Trio, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Topcats, 9:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Andrew Duhon & the Lonesome Crows, Kristin Diable, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Motherload, 7; 28 North, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — NOLA County, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Good Enough for Good Times, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Foburg Fest feat. G-Eazy, D.P., DJ G-Cue (upstairs), 9; Foburg Fest feat. I, Octopus, Zorch, High in One Eye, 9

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Foburg Fest feat. Vox & the Hound, Modern Skirts, Beams, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Crizmatik, Evolution, DJ Ion, 2 Face, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Lagniappe Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Colin Lake Band, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Kristina Morales, 7; Foburg Fest feat. Sun Hotel, The Yes Way, Native America, Booty Trove, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 10 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — John Eubanks, 7; Fredy Omar, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Smiley Rides the Short Bus, 7; Suits & Sombreros, 8; Bloomin’ Onions, 9; John Parker, 10 OAK — Jeffrey James, 6

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Kim Carson, 9:30 OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6 ONE EYED JACKS — Foburg Fest feat. Ra Ra Riot, Givers, Luyas, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — 8 Bit Anatomy, Billsberry Flowboy, 10 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Coldshot, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bonerama, 9:30

SATURN BAR — Foburg Fest feat. White Bitch, R. Scully’s Rough 7, Green Demons, 9

SIBERIA — Foburg Fest feat. Megafauna, Luke Starkiller, General Bye Bye, Enharmonic Souls, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

Feets, 5; Late as Usual, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 12 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Foburg Fest feat. Simon Lott’s Very Cherry, Telegraph Canyon, Birds & Batteries, 9; Foburg Fest feat. Remedy Krewe, Syllable 7, Ugly Elephant, Jason Frilot, 9 ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BABYLON LOUNGE — Green Mantles, Chris Rico, First Time, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — J. Monque’d, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — MoonShyn, 10

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — Foburg Fest feat. T Bird & the Breaks, Headless Horseman, 9; Foburg Fest feat. Revivalists, New Grass Country Club, Moon Taxi, Jon Hugo, 9; Foburg Fest feat. Coyotes, O’Brother, Death on Two Wheels (upstairs), 9; Foburg Fest feat. Brass Bed, Vagabond Swing, Hart (upstairs), 9

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Mainline, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Tim Laughlin & Trio, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Burgundy, 9:30

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. CAFE ROSE NICAUD — Troy Sawyer, 8

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — The Good God Damn Show, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Slewfoot, 7; Damn Frontier, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Hotels and Highways, 9

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mojo Trio, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; John Mooney & Bluesiana, Chickasaw Mudd Puppies, 11

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Big

COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

ON-SI TE VE TERINA RI AN AVA IL ABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK HIGHES T QUALI TY MEDIC AL CAR E STATE OF THE ART SURGIC AL FACILI TY

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Veterin ary Hospital, Pet Resort & Spa r eC e nte r In c.com 2 2 1 2 D av i d D r . · M e ta i r i e · 8 8 7- 2 9 9 9 · w w w. P e tC a

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

Louviere, 5; Rites Of Passage, 9

MUSIC

43

MUSIC

LISTINGS

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Brienn Perry, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — Foburg Fest feat. Spinto Band, Jermaine Quiz Entourage, Oceans of the Addict, Nissi Lee, Bear Cannon, 9; Foburg Fest feat. ImagineIAM, Sorry No Ferrari, Smiley with a Knife, 9; Foburg Fest feat. Aquaforce, Team Robot, Lyriqs, Jim E-Stack (upstairs), 9 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Sasha Masakowski & Steve Masakowski, 7

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FREDERICK J. SIGUR CIVIC CENTER — St. Bernard Parish Coastal Restoration Benefit Concert feat. Air Supply, Bonerama, Iguanas, Cyril Neville, 4:30 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Leroy Jones Quartet, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Foburg Fest fest. Big Rock Candy Mountain, Glasgow, Venice is Sinking, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Soundclash Beat Battle, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Don Vappie, 8; Brass-a-holics, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

KERRY IRISH PUB — Bloomin Onions, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9

44

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Truman Holland feat. Back Porch Review, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — John Sinclair, 2; Kipori Woods, 3; My Graveyard Jaw, 4

THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 5; Metaspace Funk Menagerie, 7; Foburg Fest feat. Das Racist, Katey Red, Shanook + 8188, PYMP, 9; Foburg Fest feat. The Hood Internet, Big History, Christoph Andersson (upstairs), 9; Foburg Fest feat. Big Freedia, Lil Dee, Plane Jane, KLC (upstairs), 9; Kings of the Fauborg, 1 a.m. MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark, 10

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; Iain Micah Weigert, 9; Yugo Sato!, 10;

Mark Saucier, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Some Like it Hot!, 2 OAK — Brad Webb Trio, 9

Barbarin, Leon Brown & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

preview

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

Hi Ho-lidays

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Joint Chiefs of Jazz feat. Frank Oxley, 8

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2

ONE EYED JACKS — Foburg Fest feat. Jean-Eric, Royal Teeth, RYAT, Botanist, 9

SATURN BAR — Foburg Fest feat. Toro y Moi, Small Black, Cult, Sun Airway, Cloud Nothings, 8

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. Lucien Barbarin, 8

SIBERIA — Foburg Fest feat. Jeff the Brotherhood, King Tuff, Dead Gaze, X-Ray Eyeballs, Holly’s Tamales Variety Show, 9

RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dash Rip Rock, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Eric Lindell, 9:30

SATURN BAR — Foburg Fest feat. Los Po-boy-citos, Backwords, Little Maker, Sam Doores & the Tumbleweeds, Loren Murrell, 9 SIBERIA — Foburg Fest feat. Local Skank, Unnaturals, Modoc, Groovocrats, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Astral Project, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Tuba Skinny, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 13 12 BAR — Defibulators, 9

ARNAUD’S FRENCH 75 BAR — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes Open Mic, 9

BIG AL’S SALOON — Cypress, 4:30 BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Alex Bosworth, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9; Kid Red, midnight

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Pallbearers, Before I Hang, Dummy Dumpster and others, 4

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee &

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Matt Haimovitz & Uccello, 8 & 10

The Mardi Gras Indian Orchestra convenes at the Hi-ho Lounge in the afternoon on Fat Tuesday. The lineup includes Mardi Gras Indians Juan Pardo (Golden Commanches), David Montana (pictured, Yellow Pocahontas) and Yeti Boudreaux (Black Eagles). Also performing are Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes, Camile Baudoin (Radiators) and Sam Hotchkiss (Juice) on guitars, Reggie Scanlon (Radiators) on bass, Helen Gillet on cello, Tim Green on sax, Kevin O’Day on drums, Harry Hardin on violin and others. Tickets $20 — Will Coviello

MAR

08

Mardi Gras Indian Orchestra 3:30 p.m. Tuesday Hi Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446

Loren Murrell, 7

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Jack Eckert Band, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara Trio, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Foburg Fest feat. Futurebirds, Lee Bains & the Gloryfires, 9 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; Mint Condition, 8

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Brass Sunday, 9 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9 THE MAISON — Frank Oxley’s Joint Chiefs of Jazz, 4; Tuba Skinny, 7; Foburg Fest feat. Viva City, Zen Lunatic, Zing! Zing!, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — SOJA, Mambo Sauce, Chris Boomer, Seedless, 8

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark & Tom McDermott, 11 a.m; Javier Olondo, 7

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Crescent City Jazz Festival Showcase, 12

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Rascal Flatts, Luke Bryan, 7:30

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Chad Reeves, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

KERRY IRISH PUB — Mike Ryan, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Foburg Fest feat. Janka Nabay, Empress Hotel, Monogold, Tiny Victories, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien

& All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin Party, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Young the Giant, 8:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Caspian, Moving Mountains, Native, Into It. Over It, Chiaroscuro, Aiua, Marathon, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Kim Carson, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

THE MAISON — James Copeland Band, 5; Jayna Morgan, 7 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & Friends, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Uke Joint, 7; Jennings, 10

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Great Lake Swimmers, Sharon Van Etten, Ava Luna, 9

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

Monday 14 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Josh Garrett, 9

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BLUE NILE — Birds of Avalon; Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. William Smith, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Class Actress, Millionyoung, Nicos Gun, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

classical/ concerts MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — 675

Lafitte St., Mandeville, (985) 624-3147; www.mandevilletrailhead.com — Fri: Mandeville Live! presents Swing-a-Roux, 6:30

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Ashley Renee, Tyrone Chambers & Jana Ernst, 7; Sun: Festival of Choirs feat. Bradley University Chorale & Alabama School Choir, 4; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) — A politician poised

to win a Senate seat falls for a beautiful ballet dancer, but mysterious men want to keep the two apart. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania BARNEY’S VERSION (R) — The

film spans three decades and three continents to tell the story of one man’s extraordinary life. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place BEASTLY (PG-13) — The

modern-day Beauty and the Beast follows a New York teen transformed into a monster to find true love. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — Martin

BLACK SWAN (R) — Darren Aronofsky directs Natalie Portman as a veteran ballerina whose psyche begins to crumble after nabbing the lead role in Swan Lake. AMC Palace 16, Canal Place DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) —

David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome DRIVE ANGRY 3-D (R) — A

hardened felon is hellbent on stopping the cult that murdered his daughter. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Long before there was a dog whisperer, the British writer J.R. Ackerley (1896-1967) penned a memoir about the 15 years he shared with Tulip, a willful but loyal Alsatian (German shepherd). The animated film My Dog Tulip may be most appreciated by dog lovers, because it is an earnest and insightful reflection on what it’s like to have a dog as a best friend. It also subtly reflects on many aspects of human friendship, but in the placid tones of an elderly British gentleman reflecting on his years. Ackerley was never particularly interested in having a dog, but he rescued Tulip from abusive owners. As he grew attached to Tulip, he became an ever more keen observer of dogs, and he made Tulip his constant companion. The dog’s behavior didn’t damage his friendships so much as cost him social invitations once the two became inseparable. There were many places where Tulip was not welcome to return, whether the issue concerned cats, house training or attracting suitors. Christopher Plummer narrates Ackerley’s tale, and other voices are contributed by the late Lynn Redgrave and Isabella Rossellini. The narrative proceeds at a measured pace and is formal in tone, even as Ackerley candidly relates details about Tulip’s excretory and reproductive impulses. But Ackerley learns much about himself and even his own shortcomings as he tries to understand and care for Tulip. Though the film looks like an endless series of evolving watercolors, animators Paul and Sandra Fierlinger did all work digitally for their first feature film. — Will Coviello

FRI MAR

11

My Dog Tulip Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

THE GRACE CARD (PG-13) — A man loses his faith in God after dealing with personal tragedy. AMC Palace 20 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HALL PASS (R) — Two women

sensing their husbands’ restlessness decide to grant them one week of freedom to do whatever they want. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy

who seeks to destroy him. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) —

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic surgeon who enlists the help of his assistant and her kids to woo a much younger schoolteacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) — The documen-

tary on the 16-year-old pop sensation features concert footage and screaming teenagers. AMC Palace 10, AMC

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA AN ORIGINAL FILM PRODUCTION “BATTLE: LOS ANGELES” AARON ECKHART MICHELLE RODRI GUEZ RAMON RODRIGUEZ BRIDGET MOYNAHAN MUSIC EXECUTIVE NE-YO AND MICHAEL PEÑA BY BRIAN TYLER PRODUCERS JEFFREY CHERNOV DAVID GREENBLATT WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY CHRIS BERTOLINI BY NEAL H. MORITZ ORI MARMUR BY JONATHAN LI EBESMAN STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 11 CHeCk loCAl lISTIngS FoR THeATeRS AnD SHowTIMeS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Lawrence reprises his role as FBI agent Malcolm Turner who disguises himself as an old woman. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Pet Projects

45

FILM

LISTINGS Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin

review

Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne, in the Oscar Best Picture winner. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 RANGO (PG) — Johnny Depp is the voice of a chameleon who finds himself in a Western town plauged by bandits. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

We’ve got plenty of time to have a drink.

THE ROOMMATE (PG-13) — A

college freshman is assigned a dorm room with a crazy person who becomes obsessed with her. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

TAKE ME HOME TONIGHT (R) —

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UNKNOWN (PG-13) — A man

(Liam Niason) awakens after a car accident and discovers another man has assumed his identity. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) — After Earth is attacked by

unknown forces, Los Angeles becomes the last stand for mankind as the world’s cities crumble.

RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) —

Amanda Seyfried stars in the reboot of the fairy tale.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 12 ANGRY MEN (NR) — The 1957 drama follows a jury of 12 men as they deliberate the guilt or innocence of a defendant. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com AFRICAN QUEEN (NR) —

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn star in the 1951 film set in Africa during World War I. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and March 15, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

ARCHANGEL (NR) — In Guy

Maddin’s 1990 comedy-drama, an assorted group comes together in the Russian Arctic near the end of World War I. Tickets $7 general admis-

Wing Man

In his short feature films, Guy Maddin has honed a signature style mimicking the period of transition between silent and talking films, featuring jittery black-and-white cinematography, very sparse and crudely dubbed dialogue, silent-film overacting, cryptic chapter titles and other entertaining effects. His stories often ape the over-the-top melodrama of operatic works like Metropolis, and he loves to cloak lurid primal urges and aberrant psychology in the shadows of restrained dialogue and surreal steampunk inventions. Archangel (1990) is Maddin’s second feature film and it won the Winnipeg filmmaker critical acclaim. It’s a bizarre tale set against the ravages of World War I, and as if referencing the horrors of trench warfare isn’t enough to set the backdrop, Maddin pushes the despair further by locating the tale in the Russian arctic after the war has ended — but no one has informed the people in Archangel that they can stop fighting. Plus there’s the problem of the October Revolution; no one knows if the Bolsheviks have prevailed. Soldiers walk around in a daze, suffering from trauma and amnesia. Maddin is so insistent on illustrating the bleakness of it all, one can’t help but marvel at the epic and sick humor. There’s no personal exchange between characters that he won’t make more hopeless by the sudden arrival of marauding Huns or some other wartime atrocity. Boles (Kyle McCulloch), a one-legged Canadian soldier, is distraught over the loss of his wife Iris, and he’s perpetually deluded that Veronkha (Kathy Marykuca) is in fact Iris. Veronkha’s husband Philbin (Ari Cohen), a Belgian aviator, has forgotten they are married. Both men and women seem to continue campaigns of love that have been resolved, but as with the war, they are hopelessly unaware of the outcomes. It’s Maddin at his early best, but the pleasure is in his inspired homage to a genre of filmmaking and his indulgence in an insanely melodramatic story. Devoted Maddin fans will appreciate the crazed eccentricity of Archangel. Newcomers might find it easier to wade into films like Brand Upon the Brain (2006) or The Saddest Music in the World (2003), which are cryptic as well, but don’t trivialize a global war to create metaphors about the futility of finding love. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

Archangel 7 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 12-13 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgesitinc.net

MAR

PAGE 48

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

PHOTO BY HEDI SLIMANE

47 V2_50191.1_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

2/25/11 12:06 PM

FILM

LISTINGS PAGE 46

sion, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net AWAKE MY SOUL (NR) — The documentary is about Sacred Harp singing, a style of singing that has been around for more than 200 years. Director Matt Hinton appears at the screening, which is part of the New Orleans Afrikan Film and Arts Festival Project. Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday, Cafe Rose Nicaud, 632 Frenchmen St., 949-3300 BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

COLEEN FITZGIBBON: PUBLIC RECORDS (NR)— This program

revisits some early 16mm films from the experimental film artist. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 8 p.m. Wednesday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

GARBAGE DREAMS (NR) — The

documentary follows three

teenage boys living in the world’s largest garbage village on the outskirts of Cairo, where residents recycle 80 percent of the garbage they collect. The screening is part of the Green Project and Charitable Film Network’s Green Screen series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, Green Project, 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www. thegreenproject.org THE LINE KING: THE AL HIRSCHFELD STORY (NR) — The Academy Award-

nominated documentary spans Hirschfeld’s many years of work as an illustrator for the New York Times, and it includes appearances by Lauren Bacall, Carol Channing, Joan Collins and others. Free admission. 2 p.m. Sunday, Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org

SANDRA GIBSON & LUIS RECODER SCREENING AND DISCUSSION — The duo pres-

ents collaborative film installations and performances. Tickets $8-$10. 7 p.m. Friday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net SHAFT (R) — DJ Soul Sister presents the screenings of the 1971 blaxploitation film about a pri-

vate detective hired by a crime lord to find his kidnapped daughter. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

review Off the Scales

YOJIMBO (NR) — Akira Kurosawa’s drama tells the story of samurais in 19th century Japan. The screening is part of the museum’s Where Y’Art Program and is in conjunction with its exhibit of Japanese painting and calligraphy. Tickets free for NOMA members, $5 New Orleans Film Society members, $10 general admission. 6:30 p.m. Friday, New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org

One of the unsung traditions of American religious music is that of the “sacred harp” or harmonic a cappella singing. The music is still popular in the South, from Georgia to Texas, but its roots stretch back to the late 1700s and northeastern colonies, where some of the first composers in the colonies wrote sacred harp music. It is also referred to as “shape note” music because its relatively accessible notation can be written with simple shapes ascending the octaves. It offers a very easy way for minimally trained singers to produce rousing choral music. Director Matt Hinton’s film visits congregations who find shape singing to be an ecstatic experience, and through a few of its fans and songwriters, he traces its history in the United States and to religious traditions in Europe. It’s clear that experiencing the group singing is a strong component of its allure, and that may help explain how its tradition has remained vibrant in small rural churches, below the radar of media exposure and the outside world. Hinton will attend the screening. Free admission. — Will Coviello

MAR

11

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

Awake, My Soul 6 p.m. Friday Fair Grounds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon St.; www.neworleansafrikanfilmfest.com

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811 GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www.francoalessandrini.net — Photographs by Riccardo Lorenzi. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

starting at $5.45 Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Works by Elsie

Semmes, Abe Geasland, Kiki Huston and Phillip Spence, through March. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Read

My Lips,” paintings by Terrence Sanders, through April 4. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Emit,” works

by William DePauw, Sean Friloux and Cory Knott, through April 3. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org —

Works by Lee Deigaard, Alex Podesta, Tippy Tippens and Dave Greber, through April 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “A Toast to Louisiana Sea-

food,” a group exhibition of oil and acrylic works, through March. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “The Theatre of Cultural

Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Archeology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jusrisich, through May 2; “Wrapped,” sculpture by Sidonie Villere, through April 9; opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Confluence,”

works by Kathryn Hunter, through April 16. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

LOST LOVE LOUNGE. 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — New

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In the Blink of an Eye: A Photography Retrospective by Harold Baquet

Loyola University, Collins Diboll Gallery, 6363 St. Charles Ave.; www.loyno.edu/dibollgallery Newsworthy: Recent Photographs by Colin Miller

The Darkroom, 1927 Sophie Wright Place, 522-3211; www.neworleansdarkroom.com

Orleans Community Printshop exhibition, through March. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — Photographs by Robert

Dutruch, through April 9. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “The Glass Menagerie,” a group exhibition of glass works, through May 30. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Dual Tense,”

works by Robyn Denny; “Functional for your Purpose,” works by Jason Derouin, through April 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. PAGE 53

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JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www.jazzandheritage.org — “Femme Fest,” an exhibition of female artists curated by the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana, through April 15. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday

Ah, the news — blood, gore, libel and larceny — who could live without it? On a global scale such things are called “history,” but locally they strike a more personal chord, as we see in Harold Baquet’s photographs. For more than 30 years, Baquet has recorded it all, but he excels at a kind of portraiture of juxtaposition, so we see former Mayor Ernest “Dutch” Morial feeding cake to Fats Domino on his birthday, a somber Miles Davis handing a trumpet to a young Wynton Marsalis, and Earl Turbinton with a literally smoking soprano sax. There also are contextual portraits of Allen Toussaint at his piano and Big Chief “Tootie” Montana in full Mardi Gras Indian regalia, but of special interest are the barbershops, the nerve centers of neighborhood life where philosophical exchanges occur in a contemplative setting. Such small, telling moments share space with epochal events like Morial’s funeral, a portrait of collective grief etched into the expressions of a Creole family. All of this is familiar with the sweetness and poignancy of a family album, but this is an album of America’s Creole city, and Baquet was there to record it for posterity. Much of the news today is more a matter of spin and posturing as mercenary cartels and noisy infotainment nonentities try to persuade a weary public to appreciate them. In this context, Lafayette photographer Colin Miller finds many targets of opportunity in his rogues’ gallery of mass mediated dysfunctions, in images of himself as a snarky talking head looking glib as the Twin Towers collapse behind him, and the like. In Hearing (pictured) he locks eyes with a pelican on the witness stand as dour politicos dredge through the painful oversights that allowed global corporations to despoil our waters while holding us hostage to their money, in a wry new take on a sad old story. — D. Eric Bookhardt

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 51

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by

Tim Trapolin, through April 18.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Mwwwahahahhhaaa!”

mixed media by Ryan Ballard, through March 30.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Michael

Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through April 30.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through March 26. AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — Paint-

ings by Steve Taylor, through March 15.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists

work on site in all media; watercolors and limitededition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

BERTA���S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com —

“Beauty, Power & Circumstance,” female nudes in color pencil and acrylic by Richard Johnson, through Saturday. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paint-

ings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the

Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through March 24.

ongoing. GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through March 28. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www.georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by

George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — “The Good Stuff

2,” works by Bruce Davenport Jr., Nicole Fernandez, Taneeka Jackson and John Walton, through Saturday.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — Visual Communications/

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixed-me-

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works

dia sculpture by Allen Wynn, through March.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

Graphic Design Student Exhibit, through March 17.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal

WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “Permanence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through April 3.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Show,” small-scale collage work by Christopher Stone, through Wednesday .

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

Paintings by Fredrick Guess,

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Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

PAGE 55

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by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “A Little Picture

FREE DELIVERY

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Intimate

Topographies,” sculpture by Paulina Sierra; “Slowness,” paintings by Emily Farranto; both through March 19.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

ART

53

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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and William Murphy, ongoing. KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki,

paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com —

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “The Saints Go Green,” works by Chad Ridgeway, Teri Walker, Carol Rivers, Tish Douzart and Pamela Conway Caruso, through March 30.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “An

Earthly Paradise,” works by Stefan Szczesny, through March 26.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by

Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

ings by Will Smith, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

works by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

work, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 — “The Talent Within:

Creative Works from the Commission on the Arts,” through March 18.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My

Religion, Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www. stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 —

Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Suffer

Little Children,” paintings and collages by Dona Lief; “Assignations,” paintings by Ann Hornback; “What Bugs Me,” sculpture by Andrew Bascle; all through March 15.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 —

Works by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero,

Put a Little

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7.

Rodrigue, ongoing.

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WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — PaintA WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Analog

Frontiers,” a collection of steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through March.

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by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

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BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

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CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 8918500; www.dosjefescigarbar. com — Works by Mario Ortiz,

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FUEL. 4807 Magazine St., 8955757; www.fuelcoffeehouse. net — Watercolors laminated

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HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www. mpcds.com — “The Unconven-

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NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24.

com — Kathleen Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

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ART

PAGE 57

ongoing. MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oil landscapes

of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY, MARTIN LUTHER KING BRANCH. 1611 Caffin Ave., 529-READ; www.nutrias.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The

Lafitte,â&#x20AC;? works by Bruce Davenport Jr., through Saturday.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mixed-media

paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Portraits by Zack

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;As We See It:

Youth Vision Quilt,â&#x20AC;? studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 5867432; www.themckennamuseum.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tambourine and

Fan,â&#x20AC;? works by Jamar Pierre and Gregoryuan Mghee-Hunter, through Saturday. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The museum

Smith, ongoing.

features fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drawn to

ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@gmail. com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery,

4921 Freret St., 818-6032 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March 31. art from Delgado Community College students and alumni to be included in a calendar. Call 258-5011 or email xdesot92940@dcc.edu for details. Submission deadline is March 15.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Perma-

nent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;All That Glitters,â&#x20AC;? an

exhibition of Carnival jewelry, through April 12.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www. louisianafilmmuseum.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

The museum features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before During After,â&#x20AC;?

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through Aug. 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,â&#x20AC;? an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carnival Time in Louisiana,â&#x20AC;? Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hidden from History:

Unknown New Orleanians,â&#x20AC;? photographs of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St.,

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NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ours To Fight For:

American Jews in the Second World War,â&#x20AC;? an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Most Beautiful

Day of My Youth,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Bernard Faucon, through Sunday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Residents and Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,â&#x20AC;? a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sound of One Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,â&#x20AC;? through April 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,â&#x20AC;? through April 24. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,â&#x20AC;? through May 15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,â&#x20AC;? permanent collection of Faberge objects; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Six Shooters,â&#x20AC;? photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

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CUBAN & MEXICAN FOOD

Forced Migration to Commercialization,â&#x20AC;? a multimedia exhibit; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laissez Faire â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Savoir Fare,â&#x20AC;? the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eating in the White House â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foodâ&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tout de Sweet,â&#x20AC;? an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; all ongoing.

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OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big-Hearted Pots,â&#x20AC;?

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treme: People and Places,â&#x20AC;? maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through Nov. 30.

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tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Acadian to Cajun:

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NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Exhibits on 19th-cen-

ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Carolina Craft Now,â&#x20AC;? an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Life in Glass,â&#x20AC;? glass vessels by Richard Ritter; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Selections from â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Partial to Home,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15.

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DELGADO STUDENT ART ASSOCIATION. The group seeks

Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,â&#x20AC;? drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,â&#x20AC;? through April 20.

Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absinthe Visions,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

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57

S:2.281”

STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

GET IN ON THE ACT

review New York Closet Apartment

THEATER DON’T DRINK THE WATER.

Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — Woody Allen’s farce follows a family of tourists seeking refuge inside an American Embassy behind the Iron Curtain. Tickets $14 general admission, $7 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through March 20.

58

nothing like juicy gossip over a filet with the girls.

temporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

INTRINGULIS. Southern Rep S:10.833”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Con-

Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep. com — Actor Carlo Alban chronicles his experiences as an undocumented Ecuadorian immigrant who became a cast member on Sesame Street and in several feature films. Tickets $20 preview performance (Friday), $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday-Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, through March 23.

MARRERO ACTION. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — Hal Clark’s play follows a man whose father’s stroke prompts him to return to New Orleans for the first time in 12 years. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, through March 27.

BURLE SQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE LOOSE CHANTEUSE. Le Chat

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi ruthschris.com

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Varla Jean Merman’s cabaret show returns with new songs and videos. Call 525-4498 for tickets for Mystic Krewe of Satyricon perfor-

Norman, Is That You?, recently on the boards at Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, is the title of the 1970s comedy and also is the funniest line in the show. When the lights come up, somebody (or -bodies) are lying in bed in a New York apartment. The doorbell sounds and 26-year-old Norman (Kyle Woods) gets up to answer the buzzer. To his shock and horror, it’s his dad Ben (Rene J.F. Piazza). The ill-tempered Ben, who runs a successful dry cleaning business in Ohio, is dropping in for a surprise visit. Norman rouses the other sleeper — his lover Garson Hobart (Brian Slayton). Garson is long out of the closet, but Norman has not told his parents about his sexual orientation. He buzzes in his dad and hurries Garson out of the apartment in an attempt to put off the inevitable explosion. Most of the play, however, is taken up with Ben’s fury. He disapproves of homosexuals. He rants. He raves. All, of course, to no avail. He even brings in an attractive, gum-chewing prostitute named Mary (Greta Trosclair) in the hopes of “curing” Norman of his gayness. Ben came to see his son for consolation because his wife Beatrice (Viki Lovelace) ran off with his brother. They took Ben’s car and are holed up in a cheap motel in Montreal. Suddenly, Beatrice also shows up at Norman’s apartment. She says the fling with Ben’s brother was a bust. Perhaps partly for revenge, Ben tells Beatrice their son is gay. Just then, Mary, wearing a swank satin robe, sashays out of the bedroom. “Norman,” Beatrice gasps, “is that you?” Up to that point, the knockabout comedy and wisecracks are at times funny, and sometimes a bit too predictable and repetitious. But Beatrice’s reaction catches us off guard. Norman, Is That You? is dated. But actor/director Piazza relished the nonsense and got lively performances from his cast. His Ben was a torrent of overbearing, loud truculence that kept the dilemmas moving. The other characters had plenty to deal with just coping with Ben. The show was flawed, but more enjoyable than it had a right to be. — Dalt Wonk mance only (8 p.m. Friday, tickets $30). Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday. THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly femaleimpersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

OPERA OPERA RETURNS TO BOURBON STREET. The Inn on Bourbon

Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon.com — Bon Operatit! performs. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

AUDITIONS LOUISIANA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL. Louisiana Renais-

sance Festival, 46468 River Road, Hammond, www.LARF. org — The festival seeks actors to portray historically based characters during the November-December festival. Email cast.director@larf.org for details. 9 a.m. Saturday.

bestofneworleans.com STAGE NEW ORLEANS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL. Burlesque dancers (men and women), singers, comics, magicians, contortionists, duos, troupes, novelty and other variety acts are sought for the September festival. Email neworleansburlesque@yahoo.com or visit www.neworleansburlesquefest.com for details. There is a $15 application fee. Application deadline is April 25. RENT. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmak-

ers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — The theater holds auditions for its July production of Jonathan Larson’s rock musical. Auditions are by appointment only. Call (985) 867-8889 or email lynn@perkinsvideo.com for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

A celebration with a lot of soul. Music • Food • Crafts • Wellness

COMEDY BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

March 12-13 11am-5pm

BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. City Bar, 3515

Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola. com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

entertainment by:

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays.

Presented by: ®

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday.

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THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Soul Fest is free with Zoo admission or membership. No outside food or beverage. Portable chairs and blankets welcome.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www. arena.uno.edu — The show features standup comedians Sommore, D.L. Hughley, George Wilborn, Tony Rock and Damon Williams. Tickets $48.20 and $58.50 (includes fees). 8 p.m. Friday.

and many more

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GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

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FR

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 8 Between 1778 and 1783, the king of Spain sent Canary Islanders, known as Isleños, to colonize Louisiana.

SATURDAY Noon -12:00pm

MARCH 19

OPENING CEREMONY

SUNDAY Noon - 12:00pm

MARCH 20

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SENIOR HERITAGE PROGRAMS 1:00 - 3:00pm

FREDY OMAR CON SU BANDA

3:00 - 4:00pm

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4:00 - 8:00pm

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Delicious authentic Spanish food, folklife exhibits, crafts, living history and activities for the children Call 504-277-4681 or 504-676-3098 or 504-554-8412 or visit www.losislenos.org for Info

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

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TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 10 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday 11 JOHNETTE DOWNING . New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — The author and musician performs Louisiana-themed music geared toward children in pre-K through 3rd grade. 11 a.m.

Saturday 12 CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — Artists lead the workshop about making mixed-media paper chain dolls. Pre-registration is recommended. Email artboxrhino@gmail.com for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. GLEN GHIRARDI . Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — The magician performs. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m. INTRODUCTION TO FLY TYING .

Fairview-Riverside State Park, 119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — Members of the Pontchartrain Basin Fly Fishing Club conduct a beginner fly tying class for children ages 12 to 15. Pre-registration is required. Call (985) 845-3318 or (985) 792-4652 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. MUSIC FOR ALL AGES. New

Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — Children

BE THERE DO THAT

can bring their own instruments and learn traditional brass band songs. 11 a.m. to noon. WE CAN DO IT! HANDSON WORKSHOP. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Children ages 8-12 create World War II-inspired crafts including model airplanes, Silly Putty, victory pins and propaganda posters. Preregistration is required. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 or email lauren.handley@nationalww2museum.org for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Wednesday 9 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter. org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE .

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www.

globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 5253377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott. com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 10 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library,

913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www.fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 957-5226 for information. 6:30 p.m. CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. LE CLUB DE LECTURE POUR

bestofneworleans.com EVENTS TOUS. St. Tammany Parish Library,

Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/covington.html — The group for those who speak and read French provides a language immersion experience through reading and discussing books. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

PARENTS OF TROUBLED ADULTS MEETING . Jewish Family Service, 3330 West Esplanade, Suite 600, Metairie, 831-8475; www.jfsneworleans.org — The bi-monthly meeting offers support to parents whose adult children suffer from depression, mental illness, addiction disorders and other difficulties. Call 831-8475 or 828-6334 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. STRENUOUS OR SOCIAL?: THE NEW ORLEANS ATHLETIC CLUB. Louisiana State Museum

Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www. lsm.crt.state.la.us — The presentation discusses the iconic fitness club, which is one of the oldest in the United States. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

VOTES FOR WOMEN: A CELEBRATION OF THE FIRST 90 YEARS. Tammany Trace Trailhead,

21400 Koop Road, Mandeville, (985) 8716971 — The St. Tammany Parish League of Women Voters presents the event featuring a “suffragist march” lead by the Girl Scouts, ceremonies, entertainment, refreshments and more. Call (985) 8759388 or (985) 898-0162 or visit www.lwvst. info for details. 1:30 p.m.

Friday 11 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/ DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of

Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 12 ALLIGATOR LIFE . Fontainebleau State Park,

67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — The program discusses one of Louisiana’s most well known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m.

ANIMAL RESCUE NEW ORLEANS CAT ADOPTION EVENT. Double M Feed Garden

& Pet Supply, 8400 Jefferson Hwy., 738-5007; www.doublemfeed.com — Volunteers from the animal rescue organization facilitate cat adoptions and answer questions regarding volunteer opportunities. Visit www.animalrescueneworleans. org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. BIRD HIKE . Fairview-Riverside State Park,

119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — The hike covers birds commonly found in the park and topics such as basic identification PAGE 63

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 9139073; www.fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m. Fridays.

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Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré with Jay, Andree, Bailey, Kelly Batt, Bryan Batt and Tom Cianfichi

&

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

present

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Oscar nominee and two-time Emmy Winner

Two-time Screen Actors Guild Award Winner

PATRICIA CLARKSON in BRYAN BATT LOVE LETTERS by A. R. Gurney

Two of the brightest stars in Hollywood and on Broadway star in a special benefit for Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré for TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY!

Friday, March 18 at 8 p.m. Sunday, March 20 at 3 p.m. 616 St. Peter Street on Jackson Square Tickets: $100 A limited number of PRIORITY SEATS are available for $300 (two for $500) and include a meet-and-greet soiree with the cast after the show. Call (504) 522-2081 or visit www.lepetittheatre.com for tickets. This production of LOVE LETTERS is dedicated in loving memory of Gayle Batt.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 61

methods, eating and nesting habits, and influence on the ecosystem. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www.broadcommunityconnections.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CAN I EAT THAT?

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The site ranger leads a a hike focusing on edible plants that can be found along the nature trail. 10:30 a.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DOUGLAS REDD CULTURAL SUMMIT. Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The summit includes a health fair with massages, health screenings, consultations and more, as well as panels discussing the financial, creative and physical health of New Orleans’ arts and cultural community. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

GROW MO’ BETTA SUSTAINABLE GARDENING SERIES. Hollygrove Market &

Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www.hollygrovemarket.com — The program discusses sustainable pest and disease management. Call 864-2009 or email ariel@noffn.org for details. Admission $5. 3 p.m.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

OCH ART MARKET. Zeitgeist

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The indoor and outdoor market features locally made arts and crafts, live music and food. Visit www.ochartmarket.com for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SCHOOLS EXPO. University of

New Orleans (Lindy C. Boggs International Conference Center), 2045 Lakeshore Drive — Guests can meet with school leaders and community resource providers, as well as apply to schools on site. The event also features food, activities, entertainment and giveaways. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. SIGNS OF LIFE . Bogue Chitto

Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger discusses the wildlife of the park and signs that indicate where they have been. 2 p.m. TRAIL HIKE . Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger leads a casual walk through one of Bogue Chitto State Park’s trails and discusses the wildlife and habitat of the area. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www. utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

WRITING YOUR PERSONAL COOKBOOK . Southern Food &

Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — Natalie Root and Liz Williams lead the workshop and discussion about creating cookbooks. Admission $25 members, $30 non-members. 2 p.m.

with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM . Audubon Zoo,

Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — The program features a slideshow of wildlife photographs taken during a trip to Costa Rica. Call 7808889 or visit www.louisiana. sierraclub.org/neworleans for details. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. WATER TREATMENT. Bogue

Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 6777312 — The program discusses the natural filtering of water in the environment. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Monday 14 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

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NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM . Audubon Zoo,

Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — The program features a slideshow of wildlife photographs taken during a trip to Costa Rica. Call 7808889 or visit www.louisiana. sierraclub.org/neworleans for details. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. WATER TREATMENT. Bogue

Sunday 13

Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 6777312 — The program discusses the natural filtering of water in the environment. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

SPORTS

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior

GRAPHIC DESIGN

NEW ORLEANS HORNETS.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The PAGE 64

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

CAMERAS & EQUIPMENT

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

PAGE 63

Hornets play the Dallas Mavericks, (Wednesday), the Sacramento Kings (Saturday) and Denver Nuggets (Monday). Visit www. nba.com/hornets for details. 7 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST. The

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Leah Chase Jazz-laden love songs to the up-tempo

MARCH 10

museum seeks essays on the topic “Why should we remember Pearl Harbor?” for the contest that awards a cash prize. The entry divisions are middle school (grades 5-8) and high school (grades 9-12). Essays are accepted online only. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/essaycontests for details. Submission deadline is March 31.

OCHSNER STAR PROGRAM . The

hospital accepts applications for a free high school science program featuring hands-on research in a laboratory with medical scientists. Call 842-5321, visit www.ochsner.org/star or email asharai@ochsner.org for details. Application deadline is Monday.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The faith-

based nonprofit seeks Hurricane Katrina-damaged homes (50 percent or more) to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE

64

Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer. org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The orga-

nization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 5221962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@ casaneworleans.org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The

nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVAL.

Volunteers are sought for the festival (April 7-10). Visit www.fqfi. org for details. FRIENDS OF LAFITTE CORRIDOR.

The group seeks ambassadors for its annual Hike the Lafitte Corridor event on April 16. There is a training session on April 2. Visit www.folc-nola.org or email lafittegreenway@gmail.com with the subject line “ambassador” for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER . The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign-up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 4837041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@ handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks

volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@ yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL .

The charter school that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca. org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other

daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION . The

Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES.

Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www.touro. com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 897-8107 for information.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold Mine

Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 5680745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet John Sinclair presents a reading of his works. Jimmy Ross hosts an open mic following the reading. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. ARDEN BUCKLIN-SPORER . Maple

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses How to Grow a School Garden: A Complete Guide for Parents and Teachers. 6 p.m. Saturday. BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. CHRISTIE INDEST. St. Tammany Parish Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 796-9728 — The author signs and discusses Aletheia Irene. 1 p.m. Friday. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 5255169; www.mollysatthemarket. net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

EMILIE GRIFFIN . The Catholic Book Store, 3003 S. Carrolton Ave., 8617504 — The author signs and discusses Small Surrenders: A Lenten Journey. 11 a.m. Saturday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES.

Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 8669359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. 9 p.m. Saturdays. PATRICIA BRADY. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and reads from A Being So Gentle: The Frontier Love Story of Rachel and Andrew Jackson. 6 p.m. Thursday. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. R. STEPHANIE BRUNO. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The author signs New Orleans Streets: A Walking Guide to Neighborhood Architecture. 1 p.m. Saturday. SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Naolo Hopkinson’s Midnight Robber. 10:30 a.m Saturday. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural

Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday.

CALL FOR WRITERS FINN MCCOOL’S SHORT STORY CONTEST. The bar seeks pieces

between 500 to 1,000 words in any literary genre that contain the words believe, relic, buzz, Shakeweight, barrel, Jameson, Kilwilkie, balls, bult and banks. The winner receives a keg of Guinness. Call 251-6620 for details. Submission deadline is March 11. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> CATERING TO THE ENVIRONMENT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Audubon Catering (6500 Magazine St., 212-5301; www.> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >auduboninstitute.org), the food and beverage outfit at the < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Audubon Nature Institute, recently became Louisiana’s first certified “green” caterer through the Green Restaurant Association. Audubon Catering services events at the Audubon Zoo and the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, and it earned the certification after an evaluation of areas including its foods, WHAT energy use, waste and pollution control programs. Perino’s Boiling Pot

am

B

WHERE:

3754 Westbank Expy., Harvey, 340-5560 WHEN

Lunch and dinner daily HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

STEAKHOUSE HAPPY HOUR

Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse (716 Iberville St., 522-2467; www.dickiebrennanssteakhouse.com) has a new happy hour menu of small plates served daily from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Available at the bar only, this “$5 after 5 p.m.” menu includes dishes like tempura shrimp, crabmeat beggars’ purses, grilled beef skewers and croquettes of manchego, jalapeno and bacon for $5 each, plus $5 cocktail specials.

five 5 IN

Five Great Slices of Pecan Pie

WHAT WORKS

Reliably big, abundant crawfish

WHAT DOESN'T

Though well cooked, the fried seafood lacks excitement

CHECK, PLEASE

A boiled seafood specialist with a family connection

Room in the Pot

A WEST BANK FAMILY KEEPS THE CRAWFISH COMING. BY IAN MCNULTY

I

3625 PRYTANIA ST., 304-4265

Look for grab-and-go pecan pie squares by the register.

CAMELLIA GRILL

626 S. CARROLLTON AVE., 309-2679; 540 CHARTRES ST., 522-1800 www.camelliagrill.net

Slices warmed on the griddle get a little extra flavor.

MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT 937 LEONIDAS ST., 861-9600 www.matandnaddies.com

Try a spicy hybrid of pecan and sweet potato pies.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Perino’s menu is short and straightforward, offering the usual seafood joint options. The seafood gumbo is first rate, and an artichoke arrived so overstuffed with garlicky, herb-laced, Parmesan-dusted dressing it took substantial digging just to find the ’choke itself. Crawfish boudin oozes from its casing with whole tails and plenty of spice but mushy rice. It’s best spread on crackers. When the main act here isn’t boiled it’s fried. The batter is uniform, forming a light, mildly seasoned shell-on shrimp, catfish and alligator alike. Sweet, fry-crusted crab claws are worth a try, and at least two dozen of them are generously piled over a tangle of curly fries. No one seems to eat at Perino’s alone, and the restaurant is designed to serve large groups quickly with long tables, stackable seafood trays and reusable picnic-style plastic plates that might bear the knife marks of earlier meals. Appropriately, the Boiling Pot takes more care with its beer service. Frozen plastic batons are stuck in oversized glass pitchers like icy drink stirrers and they keep the brew cold until it’s poured into frozen mugs. The jukebox cranks a mix of swamp pop, Led Zeppelin tunes and New Orleans Saints anthems, and there’s such a robust collection of hunting trophies mounted on the walls, posts and in nooks that the brightly lit dining room could double as a gallery of taxidermy. The lunging black bear propped over the bar seems to promise that even if you come as hungry as a beast, you’ll leave stuffed.

RUE 127

127 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 483-1571 www.rue127.com

A scoop of bourbon ice cream makes it a la mode.

UPPERLINE

1413 UPPERLINE ST., 891-9822 www.upperline.com

A classic rendition in sync with the Creole cuisine.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2007 Mas Martinet Menut Tinto PRIORAT, SPAIN / $20-$21 RETAIL

This full-bodied wine from the Priorat region of Spain exemplifies the high quality and affordability of the region’s offerings. A blend of 50 percent Garnacha, 15 percent each Syrah and Carignan, and 10 percent each Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, it was aged 18 months. It offers aromas of black currants, toast and rusticity. On the palate, the wine yields dark fruit, coffee, herbal notes, taut tannins and a bracing acidity. Drink it with roasted meats, grilled chops, casseroles, stews, wild game and fowl. Buy it at: Swirl Wine Market, Cork & Bottle and Bacchanal. Drink it at: Barcelona Tapas Cafe and Sukhothai. —Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

’ve grown accustomed to traveling a bit to satisfy a strong crawfish craving. After all, when pickings are slim in New Orleans, even a short trip to restaurants in surrounding parishes usually pays off. The closer you get to the source, it seems, the bigger, better and more reliable the crawfish become. Lately, though, I’ve been getting my fix closer to home, just across the Harvey Canal in fact, thanks to the network of seafood specialists strung along the Westbank Expressway. Sam Perino is the man behind two of them — Perino’s Seafood & Deli, a market and take-out joint he’s run for more than 30 years in Marrero, and Perino’s Boiling Pot, a full-service restaurant in Harvey that his family opened in 2000. Volume is a big factor in the crawfish game, and a restaurant that shares DNA with a busy seafood market seems to have a hereditary advantage. Sam’s daughter Vicky Perino says the family restaurant gets the cream of the crop from the market supply, and they’ve certainly looked and tasted that way, even early in a season hamstrung by a dry autumn and a cold winter, which always inhibit crawfish growth. Picking through a platter here a few weeks before Mardi Gras turned up a good mix of mid-sized and outright large specimens, all run through with a moderately spicy, lemony boil mix. A few links of boiled sausage, brick-red and seething with spice, and a few ears of corn ignited the whole feast, while bland boiled potatoes functioned primarily as a sop to the heat from the other items.

Sam Perino and Jenny Brignac serve trays of boiled crawfish at Perino’s.

COULIS

65

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > FOR >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <CALL <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

PARKWAY

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

PO'BOYS! IN NOLA

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards, charcuterie plates, sandwiches, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

<(504) < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > com — Sizzling black pepper beef or

482-3047

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

11AM TO 10PM CLOSED TUESDAYS

chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations and lo mein dishes. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Weekly Specials Now Serving

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Alcohol!

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WEEKLY

WINE SPECIALS

WE DELIVER

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

614 South Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-866-9301 • www.jazminecafe.com Tuesday-Sunday 11am-9pm

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Grand Isle Restaurant serves an array of seafood dishes including raw oysters (575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com).

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 08 > 2011



66

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Ha-

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

m

on Roo Restaurant & Plantati

2 ENTREES FOR THE PRICE OF 1

CHOOSE YOUR ENTREES FROM OUR SPECIAL DINNER MENU, TUES-FRI 4-9PM One coupon per table-Second Entree of equal or greater value May not be used with any other offer or Gift Certificate

5725 JEFFERSON HWY | HARAHAN, LA (CORNER OF EDWARDS) | 504-733-3000

rahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this

Northshore smokehouse. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s

Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606

Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees, pastries and desserts, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — The cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and more. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Crabcakes Benedict is two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Memo-

rial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — The lobster mac and cheese combines lobster meat, PAGE 68

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 08 > 2011

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OUT2EAT

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St.,

525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers signature dishes including oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St.,

68

525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 5615171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

DELI

1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations

PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

page 66 elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

Elizabeth’s is a comfortable neighborhood cafe in Bywater (601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com). recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full

range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, page 70

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OUT2EAT

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Contest

turtle

Send your favorite pet photos to vip@gambitweekly.com for the chance to have yourpet published in the March 22nd pet issue.

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Email all digital photos of your pet to vip@gambitweekly.com by Monday, March 14 or drop off a print at 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA (photos will not be returned), Attention: Pet Photo Contest. Digital photos should be high-resolution, 300 dpi, but should not exceed 5MB. By sending your photo, you agree to have it posted on bestofneworleans.com and Gambit Communications reserves the right to reuse photo in future issues or for marketing purposes.Photos may be adjusted to accommodate print and color availability.

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page 68 muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the

Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried softshell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner

Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

72

Real Estate For Rent &

Employment Special Rates

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Advertise in

market PLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

CAREER PREPARATION EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

ENGINEERING INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER

(Sugar Mill) Will estimate wear & tear on grinding components; adjust mill settings for appropriate grinding & design turn plates & roller scrapers; suggest modifications to existing equipment; maintain inventory or engineering equipment; coordinate general maintenance; supervise machining & welding procedures; supervise efficient operation of mill & implement changes to increase productivity; periodically inspect mechanical equipment; supervise safe operation of steam equipment; adjust components for efficiency, inspect, repair, & adjust all lubrication systems as well as coordinating scheduled stops. Bachelor’s in industrial or mechanical engineering; five years progressively more responsible experience in all phases of operation of sugar mill; on call 24 hours a day during grinding season. Send resume to: Lafourche Sugars, LLC, P.O. Box 5531, Thibodaux, LA 70302. Job location: Thibodaux, LA. Must reefernce Job#10463 to be considered,

Richmond Gin, Poplar Grove, AR, has 32 positions for cotton & grain. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.10hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/9/11 - 2/9/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 219649.

MODELING/ACTING

MISCELLANEOUS

PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME. BEST PAY OUTS, BUSY SYSTEM, BILINGUAL/SP A+. Weekends a must! Land Line / Good Voice 1-800-4037772. LIPSERVICE.NET

WALK THRU MARDI GRAS

Experience Mardi Gras first hand. Help lead horses through the excitement of the Mardi Gras parades. Salary plus tips. Lots of fun! Call 891-2246.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Schilling Brothers, Farwell, TX has 2 positions for grain & oilseed crops. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/1/11 12/15/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8135455.

POSITIONS WANTED PRIVATE SITTER SEEKING WORK

MEDICAL

I am a Certified CNA+. Sit w/elderly, sick & children. Menus, tube feedings & sitz baths. If I may be of service please call Joni @ 427-1445.

Case Finder/ Outreach Coordinator Identify newly HIV-infected individuals; provide community education about program services; conduct case-finding activities that link into HIV primary care. Required: B.S. or higher in Health Ed. or MD; 2yrs exp. working w/ high risk women, children, networking w/ AIDS organizations & health facilities on HIV prevention; knowledge of multidisciplinary management of HIV. Must have driver’s license & reliable vehicle w/insurance. Daily travel in New Orleans & surrounding parishes. Apply at www.chnola.org.

VOLUNTEER

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS INSTRUCTIONAL COORDINATOR:

Science Cluster. Mail res. to Pelican Educational Foundation, 5552 Read Blvd., New Orleans, LA 70127, Attn: Mr. Eski, Ref. to Ad#KY. Develop instr. content & coordin. educ. content w/ science teachers at 2 campuses in charter sch. syst. Conduct training programs for science teachers. Master’s degr. + 3 yrs. exp., or Bach. degr. + 5 yrs. exp. Job in New Orleans.

FARM LABOR

Weekly Tails

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Rhett Burns Farms, Benoit, MS, has 3 positions for grain & cotton. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.10hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/1/11 - 12/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 29233.

Simon is a 3-year-old, neutered, Retriever/Chow mix who is a shelter favorite. He walks nicely on a leash, enjoys tasty treats, brushing and will require TLC during his heartworm treatment. To meet Simon or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Excellence is our passion. Is it yours? WE ARE CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR: • LAUNDRY MANAGER • PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE TEAM (2 positions): PMT Houseperson Preventative Maintenance Tech We offer an excellent benefits package, including: Competitive Salaries, Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, 401 (K), Paid Holidays, and much more! Applications accepted Monday - Friday, 9am –4pm 401 Natchez Alley, New Orleans, LA, 70130 Fax resume: (504) 596-4722 • Job line: (504) 596-4657 Phone: (504) 962-4925 • www.windsorcourthotel.com EOE, M/F/D/V

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

SIMON

Kennel #A12156000

JOHNELL Kennel #A12212269

Johnell is a 1-year-old, neutered, orange & white tabby cat. He’s very friendly, but a bit shy, so not too many people get to see his beautiful face and dazzling yellow eyes. To meet Johnell or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe WAGGAMAN

RIVER RIDGE

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

9012 Rosecrest Lane 1,420 sqft, lot 62x120 Newly renov 2 bdrm, 2 bth, original hw floors, appl. inclu. Covered carport and additional shed in bkyd. Great River Ridge nbrhd. $189K. Call (504) 915-3220

GENTILLY

FRENCH QUARTER

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

CARROLLTON 8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

ONLY 4 UNITS LEFT. STARTING AT 93,500

Jennifer Shelnutt French Quarter Realty 388-9383

MUST MOVE/HEALTH PROBLEMS

Diamondhead. ALL amen! I-10 - blks. 3-3-2+ Lx Stucco, Split fpln cnr lot, deck & iron fencing. Many unique feat, Arched ent, Copper awnings, hi ceils, cer flrs/crpt skylts. $289,900. Hate 2 part w/it - but nature calls! 228-348-1754.

3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

GENTILLY Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

LOTS/ACREAGE

Great 1 Bdrm Condo for Rent in Metairie! Gated Community, ground floor unit, reserved parking outside your door! Fitness Ctr & Pool! Granite & SS appliances. Washer/Dryer. Conv. to Hosp, I10, Shopping! $950/mo. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates O: 504-838-7649 or C: 504-669-4677

BROADMOOR 4211 S. BROAD

Totally renov sgl 2 br house, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d hkps, fully furn kit. $1350/mo + dep. Call Joe, 400-7273. 2-3 BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrplc. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/ mo. 874-3195

FRENCH QUARTER

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

817 AMELIA STREET $249,000

NEW RENTAL 556 N. Rochblave

Walking distance to Ffairgrounds. Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $650 mo/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

IRISH CHANNEL

Not a shotgun! 2 small cottages joined in the middle creating one unique single home, Granite counters, central air and heat, nice wood floors, and recycled wooden paneling lend a rustic charm. Small yard makes this a great condo alternative.

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT

2B$, 1 1/2 BA, 1250 sq. ft. Balcony overlooking pool. $1000/mo. Call 504-289-4411

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

227 CODIFER BLVD

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

METAIRIE

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

METAIRIE

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

ALGIERS POINT

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

METAIRIE TOWERS ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS, $99/ mo., $0-down, $0-interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www. sunsiteslandrush.com OWN 20 ACRES, Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www. sunsetranches.com

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Big Beautiful Bargain

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

938 Royal St. A $237K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

REAL ESTATE

OLD METAIRIE MISSISSIPPI

931-35 Dauphine $769K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated kit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. Back unit has 4 studio apts -7 apts total. $6600/mo rent income.

605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $210,000, 504-832-1901.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

NEW ORLEANS

73

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS BYWATER REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

LAKEFRONT LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504756-7347

4219 Burgundy

JOIN US FOR THE NEXT MFC MEETING

Multifamily Report by Schedler & Associates with Madderra & Cazalot Thursday, April 7, 2011 @ Vincent’s Restaurant 4411 Chastant St., Metairie $30 members • $35 non-members HBA- 2424 N Arnoult Rd • Metairie, LA 70001

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES Tammy Schindler 504- 373-5581 804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS 304-HOUSE (4687) www.BrunoInc.com PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services 137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

(504) 486-5846

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

5403 POWELL STREET

74

New Orleans, LA 70123-2306 (504) 731-8777

5035 BLOOMFIELD STREET Jefferson, LA 70121 (504) 733-8381

FONTENELLE & GOODREAU INSURANCE, LLC 4508 CLEARVIEW PKWY SUITE 200 METAIRIE, LA 70006 PHONE (504) 454-8939 • FAX (504)454-8979

INTERESTED IN JOINING THE COUNCIL? CONTACT: KATHY D. BARTHELEMY, COUNCIL DIRECTOR (504) 837-2700 OR KATHY@HOME-BUILDERS.ORG WWW.MFCNO.COM Affiliated with

H O M E B U I L D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F G R E AT E R N E W O R L E A N S

Half dble shotgun 2br/1ba liv, kit, screened in porch, yard w/shed, Cen air, hrd floors 504-945-8630

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE BOATHOUSE

Nice loft, full kit w/great view, 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700/mo. Jennifer 504250-9930. HGI Realty 504-207-7575.

MID CITY 217 N. SCOTT ST.

800 sq/ft., wd flrs, 2 firepl mantels, ceil fans, LR, DR, kit, bath w/clawfoot, hall closet, BR w/closet. Cent a/h, DW, fridge w/ice & wtr, Stackable W&D, small front yd, EZ on st pkg. Walk to Rouses, bars & restaurants. Pets OK w/fee. Avail April 1. $780/lse. (504) 908-5210 for appt.

4208 DUMAINE STREET

1 blk City Park betw Carrollton/Cty Pk Ave, 3 lg rms cent a/h w/d hdwd flrs, ceil fans, thruout. Avail immed. $900/ mo. 504-234-0877

COMPLETELY REMODELED

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

TREME 1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450.

CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900.

DOMESTIC AUTOS Only $3995 Call 504-365-1655

‘05 KIA RIO

4 door, perfect condition, fully loaded. Only 40K miles. For sale, leaving town. $5800 obo. Call 504-836-9801 24/7

‘06 ACURA TL $16,995 504-368-5640

‘06 INFINITY G35 COUPE $16,995 504-368-5640

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

‘08 HONDA ACCORD LXP

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May!

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo. com

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

2 BR NEAR MAGAZINE

930 Jackson, 2BR + office, furn kitchen, cent a/h, washer/dryer on site. No pets. $850/mo. 504-250-9010.

Lrge 3 bdrms, 2 ba, liv rm, din rm. furn kit, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, wsher/ dryer. $2000/mo. 899-7657.

815 PINE ST

1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt. Near univ, 1 br, furn kit, wd flrs, cen a/h, new ba, w/d on site. $900 furn, $850 unfurn, 1 yr lse. 504-415-1030 MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/ mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs,ceil fans, scrn porch. $1150 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

‘09 HONDA CIVIC DX, 4 door $11,995 504-368-5640

ROOMS FOR RENT CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" 7522 Benjamin 1br/1ba "Cool Pool Condo" 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency"

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

Approx 8’ H x 8’L x 3’D (from front to back of cabinet section. Features 6 doors w/ 2 inside adjustable shelves & top section holds 6 adjustable shelves. Solid cypress by Boesch Cabinetmakers, finished by Littleton & Pruit. $700. E-mail bcieditor@cox.net NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

RESTAURANT/BAR EQUIP CASH REGISTER SYSTEM

Tech 200. 3 terminals, 6 printers, 4 cash drawers, 5 keyboards. $2500. Call Dennis, 486-1600 9am - 12 noon.

$11,995 504-368-5640

TRUCKS ‘08 FORD 150 XL Crew Cab $18,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘07 HONDA PILOT LX Low miles $17,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT MIND-BODY-FITNESS NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

HEALTH/FITNESS

Lori's

La# 1681

11 yrs Experience Convenient Metairie Studio Near Lakeside Mall Same Day & Weekend Appts Available

MERCHANDISE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUE FRENCH DAYBED, ETC.

18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-7172577. www.amazinghands.us

Artist works throughout the world. Museum, Private & Corporate Collection. Appt. only, 775-354-4464

SERVICES DECK/PATIO M & M PATIO PATIO COVERS

Aluminum Patio Covers, Screen Enclosures, Hurricane Panels. Wood Fencing, Glass Rooms Windows, Gutters, Siding. Lic & Ins. Over 32 yrs exp. 504-443-4675

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE GROUT WORKS, LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning, Color Sealing, Grout repair, Shower Restoration, Natural Stone Care, Tile Replacement, Recaulking. Commercial & Residential. Free Estimates. Jay Broadwell, 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 4 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

ALL ABOUT CLEAN

Pressure Washing & Cleaning Specialist in Sanitizing The Following: Driveways, Sidewalks, Gutters, Brick, Dumpster Areas, Stucco, Vinyl, Patios and Decks. Melinda Tanet, Owner - 800-291-5021 Raymond Tanet, Mgr - 504-481-5509

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru March Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

Princess Leila

BYWATER BODYWORKS

LICENSED MASSAGE

Elijah

KOJAK

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

TRAINER TO GO

PET ADOPTIONS

Therapeutic Massage

Numerous pieces for sale, including: antique Neo-classical style French daybed, small antique Davenport Desk, Baker reproduction Highboy, various pieces of cut crystal, large Asian charger on stand, some shabby chic pieces and more. Bergere chair has beautiful legs and stretchers, accompanied by a skirted ottoman in matching upholstery. Not all pieces pictured. All in fabulous condition that can be moved directly into your home. Serious inquiries only for photos, dimensions and prices. 504.615.8775

In Home Personal Training “Where we bring the gym to you” GET IN SHAPE FOR SPRING BREAK Individuals, Groups, Couples & Kids 504-994-3822 trainertogonola.com

PETS

Massage Therapy

504-231-7433

PORTRAITS

HOUSE WASHING

‘09 NISSAN CUBE

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

$1050 $1200 $700 $600

LARGE HUTCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558

APPLIANCES Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

BOOKS Care Givers- Financial Guide to Recovering from a Stroke. $20 Call 504-340-3429

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS Garage Sale: Sat. March 12th 9 am - 2 pm

6416 Boutall St. Metairie/ nr Lafreniere Pk: Table n 4 Chairs, Handmade Quilt, Handmade Barrettes and Bracelets; Girl Scout Cookies; Clothes n Shoes mostly Girl, Teen, and Ladies, Girl’s Bike; Small Appls; Luggage, Printers, Misc. Household; Parade Throws, Beads, Stuffed Animals, ETC.Lots of Goodies/Everything Must Go/ LET’S MAKE A DEAL!!!

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

MISC. HOME SERVICES CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL Self Contained & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15, 20, 30, 40 Cu. Yds.) Fully Insured. Construction, Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Service, No Delivery Fee. <B>>RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

BUSINESS SERVICES Gypsy Upholstery

Commercial/residential furniture boat/ auto interiors tops/covers. 504-3055020

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. $1156/mo. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

V6, LOW LOW MILES $21,900 504-368-5640

GRT LOCATIONS!

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

‘09 ACCORD COUPE EXL

8217 PLUM ST

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426.

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

33K Miles, $14,995 504-368-5640

7821 JEANETTE

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

$11,995 504-368-5640

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

05 FORD TAURUS

IMPORTED AUTOS

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

White Wedding Dress Size 1-2 $75. Call 504-340-3429

‘03 MERCEDES BENZ E320

ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

1 Blk to St. Charles

CLOTHING

AUTOMOTIVE

75

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN UPTOWN & OCHSNER

UPTOWN HOME

NEW LISTING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Wonderful renov $2,700,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 TOO LATE! $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 08 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 74

78

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

131 BROOKLYN AVE. CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $114,131

3506 ANNUNCIATION CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

MICHAEL ZAROU abr, gri, srs

(504) 895-4663

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


Gambit- March 8, 2011