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Publisher  |  Margo DuBos administrative Director  |  MarK KarCHEr  editorial Editor  |  KEVIN aLLMaN Managing Editor  |  KaNDaCE PoWEr graVEs Political Editor  |  CLaNCY DuBos arts & Entertainment Editor  |  WILL CoVIELLo special sections Editor  |  MIssY WILKINsoN staff Writers  |  aLEX WooDWarD,   CHarLEs MaLDoNaDo

Editorial assistant  |  LaurEN LaBorDE Contributing Writers   

January 1, 2013    +    Volume 34     +    Number 1

14

33

on tHe cover

Gus Kattengell .................................................13 Looking forward to the 2013 saints H+W .......................................................................25 resolutions and workouts

40

JErEMY aLforD, D. ErIC BooKHarDT,   rED CoTToN,  aLEJaNDro DE Los rIos,   sTEPHaNIE graCE, gus KaTTENgELL, KEN KorMaN,   BrENDa MaITLaND, IaN MCNuLTY,   NoaH BoNaParTE PaIs, DaLT WoNK Contributing Photographer  |  CHErYL gErBEr

production Production Director  |  Dora sIsoN Events graphic Designer  |  sHErIE DELaCroIX-aLfaro Web & Classifieds Designer  |  MarIa Boué graphic Designers  |  LINDsaY WEIss, LYN BraNTLEY,  

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Pre-Press Coordinator  |  KaTHrYN BraDY display advertising fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com advertising Director  |  saNDY sTEIN BroNDuM  483-3150  [sandys@gambitweekly.com] advertising administrator  |  MICHELE sLoNsKI  483-3140  [micheles@gambitweekly.com] advertising Coordinator  |  CHrIsTIN JoHNsoN  483-3138  [christinj@gambitweekly.com] sales & Marketing Coordinator  |  BraNDIN DuBos  483-3152  [brandind@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  JILL gIEgEr  483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] account Executives    JEffrEY PIZZo  483-3145  [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDa LaCHIN  483-3142  [lindal@gambitweekly.com] aMY WENDEL  483-3146  [amyw@gambitweekly.com] sTaCY gauTrEau  483-3143  [stacyg@gambitweekly.com ] sHaNNoN HINToN KErN  483-3144  [shannonk@gambitweekly.com] KrIsTIN HarTENsTEIN  483-3141  [kristinh@gambitweekly.com] MELIssa JurIsICH  483-3139  [melissaj@gambitweekly.com] marketing Marketing Director  |  JEaNNE EXNICIos fosTEr   classifieds 483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified advertising Director  |  sHErrY sNYDEr  483-3122 [sherrys@gambitweekly.com] sales administrator  |  rENETTa PErrY  483-3124 [renettap@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  CarrIE MICKEY LaCY  483-3121 [carriem@gambitweekly.com] business Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller  |  garY DIgIoVaNNI assistant Controller  |  MaurEEN TrEgrE Credit officer  |  MJ aVILEs operations & events operations & Events Director  |  Laura CarroLL operations & Events assistant  |  raCHEL BarrIos

New Orleanians of the Year .....................14 James Carville and Mary Matalin

7 in seven

Seven Things to Do This Week .................5 sugar Bowl, Leon russell, Thou and more

news + views

News .........................................................................7 stephanie grace on a new documentary  about Joseph Cao Bouquets + Brickbats .....................................7 Heroes and zeroes C’est What? ..........................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll 2012 Updates .......................................................9 updates on some stories we brought you  in 2012 Commentary .....................................................10 our annual resolutions  Blake Pontchartrain ...................................... 11 The New orleans know-it-all

sHopping + style

What’s In Store................................................31 BC Kitchen and Bath

eat + drink

Review ..................................................................33 Manning’s Fork + Center ....................................................33 all the news that’s fit to eat 5 in Five  ..............................................................34 five spots for black-eyed peas 3-Course Interview  ......................................34 Chris Montero of Cafe B

arts + entertainment

A + E News .........................................................40 Patti LuPone comes to NoCCa ........................ Music .....................................................................43

Hillegas

Mind + Body + Spirit  ...................................56 Pets  ......................................................................56 Legal Notices....................................................56 Services...............................................................57 Employment + Job Guru .............................58 Real Estate ........................................................59 Market Place .....................................................63

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Guster | Boston popsmith Guster is after more than a feeling. With nary a whiff of processing or reverb, Easy Wonderful, the band’s sixth release in an impressively understated 17-year career, sounds like an ear-whispered secret. Yellowbirds opens at House of Blues. PAGE 43.

Allstate Sugar Bowl and Fan Fest Tue.-Wed. Jan. 1-2 | Before the University of Louisville Cardinals face the University of Florida Gators in the Sugar Bowl Wednesday, there’s entertainment at the Allstate Fan Fest. The band fun. headlines activities Tuesday at the festival grounds in the parking lot adjacent to Jax Brewery. PAGE 52.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch Fri.-Sun. Jan. 4-Jan. 21 | The world’s most overlooked transsexual pop diva, Hedwig, is back in Skin Horse Theater’s reprise of the raucous rock musical. The produc-

tion’s live band, Whom Do You Work For?, also returns and performs a set before the show at AllWays Lounge and Theatre. PAGE 51. Leon Russell Sat. Jan. 5 | There’s a parallel universe in which Joe Cocker is Leon Russell’s first-call session man and Bernie Taupin is his acceptance speechwriter. The piano and guitar wizard was reluctantly nudged to center stage by 2010’s The Union, a collaboration with Elton John. At House of Blues. PAGE 43. Dirty Dozen Brass Band Sat. Jan. 5 | The Dirty Dozen kicks off a month of shows celebrating the 35th anniversary of Tipitina’s. The Soul Rebels also perform. PAGE 43. Patti LuPone Mon. Jan. 7 | Patti LuPone starred as Evita in the original Broadway production and as Fantine in the London opening of Les Miserables. She also appeared in Driving Miss Daisy, Glee, 30 Rock, Frasier and Will & Grace. She kicks off the Broadway at NOCCA concert series. PAGE 51.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

JAN

The Body Tue. Jan. 1 | Portland, Ore.’s punishing two-man hell-bringing wall of sound reached a sludgy zenith with 2010’s All the Waters of the Earth Turn to Blood. Its colleagues in Baton Rouge/New Orleans band Thou continue to climb Mount Doom — its brutal output has been nonstop since 2007, though band matters may make this show its last gasp, right at its peak. Small Bones and Ghostlimb also perform. At United Bakery. PAGE 43.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

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Y E A R- E N D u P DAT E S 9 C O M M E N TA R Y 10 B L A k E P O N TC H A R T R A I N 11 G u S k AT T E N G E L L 13

knowledge is power

Agent of Change

heroes + zeroes The Roots of Music

are scheduled to march in this year’s Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, Calif., on New Year’s Day. Founder Derrick Tabb’s student band program, now four years old, has been praised nationally for its success in giving children something to do after school. The Roots of Music will send 140 kids to the annual New Year’s parade to represent New Orleans.

Malcolm Jenkins

held his second annual “Big Easy Holiday Dinner” just before Christmas. Volunteers from the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office and church and community groups prepared holiday meals for 25 families and distributed them at the Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church near Bayou St. John. The New Orleans Saints safety had help from a former teammate, Ricky Jackson.

A new documentary about Anh ‘Joseph’ Cao, the eastern New Orleans politician who served briefly in Congress, looks at the man who replaced ‘Dollar Bill’ Jefferson. By Stephanie Grace

Ken Foster,

D

In 2009, then-Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao met with  President Barack Obama in the State Dining  Room following a Congressional discussion about  immigration reform. Cao, a Republican, touted his  friendship with Obama, but was later hurt when  the president backed Cao’s opponent in the next  election. For his part, Cao took pains to separate  himself from Obama when he considered running  for statewide office. COuRTESY WHITE HOuSE/PETE SOuzA

shocked national Asian-American groups as much as it stunned many local voters. While Chiang takes his audience inside eastern New Orleans’ Vietnamese-American enclave (his earlier film, A Village Called Versailles, chronicled the community’s comeback after Hurricane katrina), and while the film has been widely featured on the Asian-American festival circuit, it’s not really about page 8

c’est

Bywater resident and founder of the Sula Foundation, had his recent book I’m a Good Dog named as one of Vanity Fair’s “Best Books of the Year.” The Sula Foundation is a pit bull advocacy group named for Foster’s dog Sula, who was featured in his 2006 book The Dogs Who Found Me, and is dedicated to free spay/neuter programs, education and adoptions.

Louisiana

scored 6 out of 10 in the annual report “Ready or Not? Protecting the Public from Diseases, Disasters, and Bioterrorism” from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report says the state isn’t adequately prepared for outbreaks of highly infectious diseases, bioterrorism or other health emergencies. Thirty-four other states and Washington, D.C. also scored a 6 or lower. Mississippi, however, ranked as one of the most prepared, scoring 8 out of 10.

?

Will the departure of  Jim Letten affect the  disposition of past  convictions and ongoing  investigations within the  U.S. Attorney’s office?

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

39% A lot 32% No 29% A little

THis weeK’s question:

Mayor Mitch Landrieu has promised the major street repairs and construction around the city will be done in time for the Super Bowl. Are you confident of that?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

uring his brief but groundbreaking stint representing Louisiana’s majority African-American and Democratic 2nd Congressional District, Anh “Joseph” Cao was described as an “accidental” congressman so often that the word might as well have been part of his title. Although California filmmaker Leo S. Chiang doesn’t clue viewers in to his protagonist’s fate until the waning frames of his new documentary Mr. Cao Goes to Washington, Cao’s former constituents know just how his story ends: Cao, the unknown Vietnamese-American Republican and political newcomer who had finished off now-convicted African-American Democrat William Jefferson in 2008, lost the seat two years later to another black Democrat, Cedric Richmond. For many of us who watched in real time, the election itself didn’t carry much suspense either. Although Cao embraced a president who was beloved by his constituents but demonized by his fellow Republicans — and although he sometimes, but not always, broke party ranks to back Barack Obama’s agenda — the outcome of his re-election effort felt predetermined. The names on the ballot may have been Cao and Richmond, but the practical choice was between Obama and the Tea Party-driven GOP, between gratitude for and virulent opposition to initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare.” In this district and with this electorate, Richmond held all the cards. None of which makes Cao’s rise and fall any less fascinating. And it doesn’t make Chiang’s documentary any less thoughtprovoking. The film won the 2012 New Orleans Film Festival’s Audience Award for documentary feature after an October screening at the Prytania Theater, and it makes its national broadcast debut at 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, on WYES-TV. While there’s an election at stake in the film, the real tension in this narrative is the deeper question of whether someone like Cao can exist in today’s Washington at all.   Chiang’s story is a classic fish-out-of-water tale. That’s not because Cao arrived in Washington with no political experience. Nor is it that he was the first Vietnamese-American politician to win a seat in Congress, an accomplishment that

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Cao’s ethnic identity at all. what sets Cao apart is the fact that he could stand in for pretty much anyone who doesn’t fit the narrow mold — and doesn’t want to. An earnest one-time seminarian who skipped the priesthood for politics because he thought he could do more to bring about change, he became a Republican mainly because the GOP recruited him first. Like the idealistic Mr. smith, the iconic Jimmy stewart character in the 1939 movie Mr. Smith Goes to Washington who inspired the documentary’s title, Cao was an outsider to washington’s ways, in this case to the culture of professional, hyper-partisan politics. Cao’s attempts to do things his way often led to deep frustration. exhibit A was his very public struggle with perhaps the most divisive issue of Obama’s first term: the battle to enact health care reform. Cao liked much of the bill’s intent to expand access to coverage, and he knew that it would benefit many of his constituents. But he also faced pressure from the Republican caucus to be part of a united front. During an initial vote, he broke ranks, made headlines and earned Obama’s gratitude by casting the only GOP vote for the measure. During the final and decisive vote, though, he flipped and voted “no” because, he said, he feared the senate-passed version didn’t do enough to prevent federal money from paying for abortion. in the end, he didn’t make anyone happy. Not the voters, to whom he mass-mailed a copy of the explanation he’d written to the president, in the hopes they’d understand. Not Republican supporters, many of whom had expected him to vote like one of them. Not Democrats, who gave him no credit for his willingness to at least consider crossing lines. And not Obama, who cut a television commercial for Richmond, knowing the Democrat would be a reliable vote for both his agenda and for Nancy Pelosi as House speaker. Cao, whose two daughters are shown sharing some warm moments with both Obama and his wife Michelle, seems genuinely shocked and crushed that the president he liked so much would back his opponent — a reaction that highlights, as much as anything, his innocence. winnie Brown, his fundraising consultant, all but rolls her eyes at the notion that Obama would do anything else under the circumstances. Cao really did embody the whole Mr. smith idea, she says, and “that’s a blessing and a curse at the same time.” Larger themes aside, the film also serves as an entertaining slice of New Orleans political life. The city looks great, as does the ex-congressman’s proud, charming family. Cao himself is endearing and thoughtful, if often befuddled or visibly uncomfortable with what’s going on around him. The film captures his wonder as well as his impatience. it also shares his sense of gallows humor at the less lofty aspects of his new life. interviewed as he was preparing to learn his fate, Cao likens the experience to “waiting to see the dentist before you get your teeth pulled out.” Chiang gets the dynamics of the re-election contest, and places them in near-perfect context. He may not quite fully explain just how much of a fluke his subject’s initial victory was. Cao didn’t just beat Jefferson; he won in a low-turnout December election that, after the Democratic primary, many voters considered a formality — but that’s an insider quibble. The filmmaker also captures Cao’s supporters’ palpable affection for their candidate. One of those diehards is Brown, who comes off as something of a political life coach, taking Cao under her wing and guiding him through the unpleasant task of dialing for dollars

Then-Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao (second from right) joined other local politicians on the Judge Seeber Bridge at a ceremony in the 9th Ward on the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the levee collapses. With him are former City Councilwoman Cynthia Willard-Lewis (left), Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. (second from left) and former City Councilman Jon Johnson (center).

PHOTO BY MeLiNA MARA/THe wAsHiNGTON POsT viA GeTTY iMAGes

(Brown is one of several Cao supporters who also openly wishes for rain on election day in order to minimize turnout). Another is former New Orleans City Councilman Bryan wagner, as physically imposing and seasoned as Cao is slight and green. wagner signed Cao up as a Republican and helped launch his Congressional bid; on election night 2010, he’s shown offering a sweet pep talk while delivering the bad news. in the opposite corner, of course, is the congressman-inwaiting, a longtime state representative who Cao says he found too tainted to serve. Keying in on police records of a bar fight, the temporary suspension of Richmond’s law license after he claimed two different domiciles in election qualifying papers — and unconfirmed rumors of worse — Cao describes his opponent as a “bad person” with a “very questionable character.” He also insists that voters should consider such things as much or more than party identification. ironically, Cao’s harsh judgment of his opponent probably hurt Cao as well. By Louisiana standards, the allegations against Richmond were “penny ante” stuff, former TimesPicayune reporter Jonathan Tilove says, while Cao’s negative attacks tarnished his own “good guy image.” while it’s outside the scope of the film, the same could be said of a surprising interview Cao gave Tilove after his election loss, when he briefly considered running for statewide office as a Republican. After the fact, Cao all but renounced some of the seemingly sincere votes he cast in Congress, including one for the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, which he dismissed as simply voting his district. The interview came off as a clunky and cynical attempt to reposition himself to appeal to a more conservative electorate, and it raised an intriguing question: Clearly Cao didn’t change washington, as he’d set out to do. But in the end, did washington change him? — Mr. Cao Goes to washington airs nationally on PBS Jan. 3. In New Orleans, it can be seen at 8 p.m. on WYES-TV. For more information, visit www.mrcaofilm.com.


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Year-end Updates The latest news about some of the stories Gambit covered in 2012. The long-awaited federal consent decree to overhaul the New Orleans Police Department was issued in 2012, but as Charles Maldonado reports, the process is just beginning.

U

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During the municipal 2013 budget talks, District D City Councilwoman Cynthia Hedge-Morrell called the city’s $7 million consent decree allocation a “ripoff.” PHOTO by CHeryl Gerber

consent decree negotiations, which the city denied. On Aug. 31, Morgan denied all four intervener requests, though in her ruling she left an opening for future interventions from FOP and PANO. “if changes are proposed to any NOPD policies that may conflict with the Civil service rules and procedures, FOP and/ or PANO may move to intervene for the limited purpose of asserting their Civil service property rights,” it read. Community United for Change and the FOP both have appealed that ruling to the U.s. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which has not, as of this writing, scheduled a hearing on those appeals. Morgan also allowed the four wouldbe interveners to testify during a daylong evidentiary hearing on the consent decree in september. The cost of the consent decree briefly became a budget issue during 2013 city budget talks. District D Councilwoman Cynthia Hedge-Morrell said the city’s $7 million consent decree allocation for 2013, including $2 million for the monitor, was a “ripoff.” Nevertheless, the consent decree budget ultimately passed intact. As of press time, the city and DOJ have not yet identified a contractor for the federal monitor job, and Morgan has yet to put her signature on the agreement.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

.s. Attorney General eric Holder swept into town last July, announcing that after two years of investigation and negotiations, the city of New Orleans and the Department of Justice (DOJ) had finally drafted a consent decree for the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD). The consent decree, at 124 pages, was the “most wide-ranging” agreement of its kind in DOJ’s history, Holder said at the time. The 491-point agreement covered almost every aspect of policing, from officer shooting investigations and suspect interrogations to officer promotion procedures and off-duty details (now called police secondary employment). it banned the use of pepper spray, recommending tasers in its place, and demanded that citizens be allowed to photograph and videotape officers on duty. it was to last four to five years and would be overseen by a contracted monitor, who in turn would report to U.s. District Court Judge susie Morgan. The expected cost would be $55 million, according to city estimates. Five months later, the consent decree still hasn’t been finalized with Morgan’s signature. in early August, the city’s two largest officer associations — the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) and the Police Association of New Orleans (PANO) — along with New Orleans independent Police Monitor (iPM) susan Hutson and citizens’ group Community United for Change filed requests to intervene as named parties to the consent decree. FOP and PANO objected to provisions they felt undermined city civil service rules governing promotions, evaluations and hiring and firing procedures. They also called for increased recruitment and more opportunities for officer promotion to be part of the final consent decree. Hutson and Community United for Change objected to a lack of citizen input in consent decree implementation. All four groups claimed the city repeatedly ignored their input before and during

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resolutions for 2013 nce again we approach the New Year with equal measures of optimism and trepidation. We are hopeful that south Louisiana’s recovery will continue — we see many indications that it will — but we are fearful that our leaders will continue to repeat the mistakes of the past. Herewith our suggested resolutions for prominent New Orleanians, public figures and public servants in 2013: Mayor Mitch Landrieu — This year will be the run-up to his 2014 re-election campaign. This will also be the year that we see if his “NOLA For Life” anti-violence initiative gains traction. We’ve never seen a mayor better at multitasking, and we encourage Hizzoner to continue in that vein, but he should focus on crime and the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) like never before. Between NOLA for Life and the federal consent decree with NOPD, the elements are in place to make lasting reforms in our city’s troubled Police Department while simultaneously

New Orleans. We meant Orleans Parish. Once more, with feeling. We predicted then that he would not be vice president this year. We’ll predict now that he won’t be nominated for president in 2016. But, if he insists on playing on the national stage, he must recognize that his platform is Louisiana. All the things he prescribes for the GOP nationally must be put in place here at home. That means repealing the so-called Louisiana Science Education Act (allowing the teaching of creationism in public schools), putting real accountability into his voucher program, supporting anti-bullying policies that protect ALL students in public schools, and losing his tax virginity by reinstating the Stelly Plan. Interim U.S. Attorney Dana Boente — Take no prisoners. Ditto for special counsel John Horn, who is here to conduct a real investigation into the online posting and “leaks” scandal. President Barack Obama and Congressional Republicans — Stop the bickering and the blaming, and quit

The elements are in place to make lasting reforms in our city’s troubled police department. beginning to change the city’s culture of violence. Both are long-term goals. In the short term, the mayor must learn to play nicer in the City Hall political sandbox, especially with New Orleans City Council President Stacy Head. It definitely means not being so “controlling” on every issue. In the longer term, we’d like to see him kick off his re-election campaign next fall by offering a vision of New Orleans celebrating its tercentennial (in 2018, the last year of his second term) with more than just a big party. It should include a reinvigorated downtown, a modernized Louis Armstrong International Airport, and more. NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas — See above re: NOLA for Life and the consent decree. He should do whatever it takes to get buy-in on both by the rank-and-file. This is his chance to leave a legacy like no other police chief. Jefferson Parish President John Young — He has burnished his reputation as a reformer, but he has a lot to learn when it comes to working with other elected leaders — particularly the parish council. He could start by communicating with them more openly and more frequently. Hint: Before announcing new initiatives, give them a heads-up and get some early support. Gov. Bobby Jindal — This time last year we asked him to spend more time in

kicking the can down the road. Make the grand bargain — on the economy as well as gun control. The latter should include planks dealing with video games and help for the mentally ill. The New Orleans Hornets — Rebrand and rebuild. The New Orleans Arena has never looked better, and we still have faith in coach Monty Williams and general manager Dell Demps. The pieces are in place for a top-notch basketball team. In last year’s resolutions, we told the Hornets we’re still in — and we continue to believe. The New Orleans Saints — The on- and off-field drama made 2012 a year to forget for the Black and Gold faithful. Much was out of the team’s control last year, but the 2013 season needs to be a reboot. The prime imperative: Come to a new agreement with coach Sean Payton, and do it soon so the team (and the fans) can move on from a season we need to put behind us as quickly as possible. Hubig’s Pies — Reopen! Team Gleason — Continue to embrace life to its fullest and inspire New Orleanians with your bravado, grace and courage, showing us what “No White Flags” truly means. And to all our readers in print and online: Happy New Year!


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included the Washington Hotel, bathhouses and taverns. Riding the train proved to be a great adventure. Occasionally a cow that meandered onto the track was sacrificed to progress, but during the time it was in service, no passengers suffered injuries on the train. There were other problems, however. The tracks were strips of iron bars spiked to crossties of wood. Occasionally they worked loose and sprang upward, piercing the floors of the cars and sometimes throwing the train off the track. Once in a while an engine would conk out, leaving passengers stranded. The crew had a clever solution for that; they hauled out sails, which they used to capture wind and propel the train. With the advent of automobiles and highways, Smoky Mary became little more than a city landmark. While plans were being made to turn Elysian Fields into a hard-surfaced road for its entire length, the Pontchartrain railroad line was discontinued. There was great excitement on March 15, 1932, when Smoky Mary made its last run. It seemed that everyone wanted to be a part of the event and crowds jammed the coaches of the old train. Engineer John A. Galivan was the last man to drive the train. He had made the round trip seven times every day for 32 years, except for his two days off each month. Nothing remains of Smoky Mary today. All the cars and engines were scrapped.

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DEAR DARLENE, The first reference to the train — officially the Pontchartrain Railroad — was spelled Smoky Mary. But since then it has been spelled both ways, so you can take your pick. Either way, this little railroad played a big part in New Orleans history for about 101 years. The Pontchartrain Railroad — the second railroad established in the United States — was chartered on Jan. 20, 1830, when workmen began to fill in the swamps that bordered the city on several sides. On April 23, 1931, a line of wooden cars was drawn along the rails by horses on a track that ran almost five miles from the Mississippi River along Elysian Fields Avenue and ended in Milneburg (a town on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain that later became part of New Orleans). In September 1832, a train engine arrived from Liverpool, England, but folks were skeptical as to whether it would be powerful enough to pull 12 cars loaded with 300 people. A great crowd gathered on the big day. The engine coughed and sputtered, then took off at what one newspaper called the “mad speed” of 15 mph. It left behind a plume of black smoke a mile long, and someone shouted, “Smoky Mary!” — a name that stuck, even though the first engine was quickly junked. The railroad initially was a great success because it carried passengers and freight, the latter of which previously had to make a long, slow trip via Bayou St. John. The railroad company purchased the Milneburg area at Lake Pontchartrain from philanthropist Alexander Milne and transformed it into a popular resort that

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t’s over. The most tumultuous New Orleans Saints season in recent memory concluded with Sunday’s game against the Carolina Panthers. It was fraught with bounty allegations, penalties and suspensions that led to a lost season. “Were there distractions? Yeah,” Saints quarterback Drew Brees said. “Were there circumstances swirling around us that were just crazy and we had no idea what to expect? Challenges? Yes, most definitely. But ... we will not allow our team — to use that as a crutch or an excuse. Others might say, ‘It doesn’t matter. It affected you guys.’ That’s fine, but we’re not going to go there.” Brees may not want to go there, but Who Dats and media have been forced to as they watched the Saints deal with unprecedented challenges. No other team in NFL history had had to take the field with the loss of not only a head coach (Sean Payton), but the assistant head coach (Joe Vitt) and general manager (Mickey Loomis) — all important elements in the day-to-day operations of the team. Vitt returned after a six-week suspension and Loomis after eight weeks, but Payton was barred from the team for the entire 2012 season. The lack of leadership and Payton’s game-calling input was clearly evident in the

Black and Gold’s four-game losing streak at the start the season. The Saints were missing that something that had made them one of the top teams in the NFL. What’s done is done. It’s time to look forward to next season. Now come the questions: How do we make sure this doesn’t happen again? Will the team recover for the new season? I believe they will — with the return of Sean Payton. Yes, I am assuming Payton will return. But even if he doesn’t, the leadership in place will be better organized than the jigsaw puzzle we saw this year. Will the Saints be a contender next season? They should be because of the team’s nucleus of players, but it will be a challenging offseason for the front office. A recent report projected the Saints to be about $16 million above the salary cap heading into the 2013 offseason, and two cap casualties could be defensive end Will Smith and linebacker Jonathan Vilma. Smith is set to make $10.15 million in salary and bonuses, while Vilma would cost the Saints $6 million in salary and bonuses. Releasing them would cost the Saints $9.4 million, since bonuses are guaranteed. Left tackle Jermon Bushrod is the team’s top unrestricted free agent. Wide receiver

The New Orleans Saints after defeating the Dallas Cowboys 34-31 Dec. 23. PHOTO BY MICHAEL C. HEBERT/NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

Devery Henderson and linebacker Jonathan Casillas are others whose contracts are expiring. Saints management will have to get below the cap so it can spend money to improve the team. Brees’ cap figure reportedly more than doubles for next season, going from $7 million this year to $17 million to $18 million next season. The good news is the Saints don’t need a massive overhaul, and the improvement we saw in the defense late in the season gives us hope. Young players like defensive end Cam Jordan, defensive tackle Akiem Hicks, and safeties Isa Abdul-Quddus and Rafael Bush matured as the season progressed. Offensively, receiver Joe Morgan

and a healthy Nick Toon could rejuvenate a solid passing game. Late in the season, running back Mark Ingram showed the type of play the team hoped for when it drafted him in the first round. The Saints ended 2012 playing hard and winning games, which has many wondering what might have been if the Black and Gold had played that way all season. “I’d rather have a different title than Best Team Not in the Playoffs,” Brees said. “You never want to hear ‘not in the playoffs.’ ... We want to finish strong, and we want to really have something we can build on moving forward.” Moving forward can’t come fast enough after this season. Bring on 2013.

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very year since 2006, Gambit has selected as New Orleanians of the Year people who helped lead our area’s rebound after Hurricane Katrina. They have included first responders, nonprofit volunteers, activists, civic and business leaders, the New Orleans Saints and federal prosecutors. Now, seven years later, we feel New Orleans has turned the corner — and the world has taken notice, thanks in large part to the efforts of this year’s New Orleanians of the Year: James Carville and Mary Matalin. Political combatants by profession, happily married couple by choice, Matalin and Carville officially made New Orleans their home in 2008 — but they each fell in love with the city long before that. “It was love at first sight, even before I knew who James Carville was,” Matalin says, recalling her first visit to New Orleans in the 1980s. “I have the same feeling today as the first time I came to New Orleans — it takes my breath away. The sounds, the smells, the sights — it’s a place apart.” Carville couldn’t agree more. “We don’t live in a place, we live in a culture,” he says. “And wherever we are today as a city, after Katrina, we’re further than where most people thought we’d be seven years ago. You’re never where you need to be or want to be, but we’re much improved.” Matalin and Carville do much more than tout the city’s progress, however. They actively help make it happen by opening their home, their hearts and their Rolodexes to dozens of local nonprofits. They also co-chair this year’s Super Bowl. In ways large and small, public and not so public, they generously and passionately embody the simple criterion that Gambit has used to select New Orleanians of the Year since 1983: They make a positive difference for New Orleans.

James Carville

Mary Matalin

THE RAGIN’ CAJUN SAYS HE HAS ‘A REAL CONNECTION TO THIS CIT Y.’

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ames Carville’s office on the second floor of his Uptown home is pretty much what you’d imagine his mind would look like, if you could transpose yourself into his brain and lay it out in 3-D. Ordered but eclectic, the space reflects Carville’s passions for family and place. “We got married here on Thanksgiving Day 1993,” he says, settling into an easy chair. “Mary was the one who insisted on that. She loves this place. It was all she could talk about after the 1988 Republican Convention here.” Over the next hour, as he talks about his adopted hometown, Carville steadily sinks lower and lower into the chair, until he’s almost horizontal. His body language screams “relaxed,” yet his mind races from subject to subject with the intensity and agility of a punt returner weaving through opponents in the open field. “We moved here in 2008,” he says. “It was an easy decision for us after the storm. We didn’t agonize over it one bit. And then all the connections started happening. Mary converted to Catholicism. We got married as Catholics in St. Stephen’s Church in April 2010. Three days later my sister called me and said that our grandparents had gotten married in that same church exactly a century earlier, in April 1910.” page 15

n the summer of 1988, the Republican National Convention was the event of the year in New Orleans. Mary Matalin, then a rising star as a GOP strategist, recalls staying up till dawn one evening — “I was not married then” — and seeing the dew rise up as mist from the street on her walk back to her hotel. “It was just so sublime,” she says. “I remember saying to myself, ‘This is my heaven.’” Over the next 20 years, the Illinois-born Matalin made many trips to New Orleans. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, she and husband James Carville decided to make the city their home. “When Katrina happened, people from both parties (Republican and Democrat) were calling us and asking what they could do,” she says. “What struck me most, however, was the resolve, the purpose, the focus of the people here — and their love for the city. Every time I had any interaction with New Orleanians it was never an ordinary experience ��� it was always magical. It was always special, even romantic. … “And then the turning point came when my father died, right before Christmas 2007. I said to James, ‘We can’t stay here. Let’s go to your sister’s — but I want to stay in page 15


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He beams and points to a framed copy of his and Matalin’s Catholic marriage certificate on his wall. Immediately below it is his grandparents’ certificate, also showing St. Stephen’s as the venue. “I guess I’ve always had a real connection to this city.” That connection shows not only in how Carville and Matalin talk about New Orleans, but also in their actions. Among their most visible contributions are the many fundraisers held at their home, which they open to dozens of charitable and civic causes every year. “We do very little entertaining of our own,” Carville says, easing still lower in his chair. “We like doing purpose-driven entertainment. We moved here for a purpose.” The causes he and Matalin have embraced include The Idea Village,

New Orleans.’ I already had a lot of association with the city, and it’s just such a compelling place.” But moving to a new place and putting down roots is not the same as visiting it and passing a good time, as Matalin soon learned. “It was terrifying,” she says of her first days here. “Fortunately, Anne Milling lives just a block away, and she became like a big sister to me. She was my introduction to the soul of the city. Anne took me everywhere, starting with Women of the Storm. That organization is such an incredible cross-section of the city, and it was so incentivizing. Nobody in that room had time to be doing what they were doing, but they gave it their all.” Milling, who is Carville’s distant cousin, is one of three people that Matalin credits with helping her

PAGE 17

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

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Teach For America, Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Businesses initiative in New Orleans, Boys Hope/Girls Hope, Women of the Storm, the Loyola Institute of Politics — to name just a few. Recently a bartender who has worked many of those gatherings told Carville, “Whenever I see this address pop up, I always know we’re gonna be doing some good.” Mark Romig, president and CEO of the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation and a member of this year’s Super Bowl Host Committee, says Carville and Matalin “define servant leadership” in New Orleans. “Their proactive messaging about New Orleans’ uniqueness and authenticity is heard across the nation each and every day,” Romig says. “Their leadership work as co-chairs of the Host Committee for the Super Bowl has raised the bar for such events in the future. And they keep a sense of humor along the way.” Carville gives the credit to the Host Committee, which he says “has done a great job” preparing the city for the big game. “People remember the 2002 Super Bowl here,” he says. “This is not even the same kind of event. It’s so much bigger. … I think it’s going to be a real chance for us to shine.” In addition to high-profile efforts such as their work on the Super Bowl, Carville and Matalin also contribute in quiet ways. A recent example: On Nov. 8, just two days after a grueling presidential campaign, they kicked off the investiture celebration of the University of New Orleans’ (UNO) first president, Dr. Peter Fos, by headlining the Homer L. Hitt Lecture Series on UNO’s campus. What few knew until that night was that they also donated back their speakers’ fees to UNO’s new EdVets program, a scholarship endowment that will assist military veterans who seek to continue their education at UNO. Their donation was the

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largest to date for the new program, Fos says. Carville, a proud LSU alum, is also a member of Tulane’s faculty. He teaches a senior-level course in national politics every spring, and he brings the nation’s top political and economic minds to address the class. He gets several hundred applications each year for a class of several dozen students. “I always learn more than the students,” he says. Looking beyond 2013, Carville sees a bright future for New Orleans. The city’s tercentennial in 2018 “gives us a deadline for getting a lot of important things done.” But he acknowledges that “nothing here is easy.” “New Orleans the way we know and love it is never a given,” he says. “It’s never given that this city’s going to be like we want it 50 years from now, with an intact culture and prospering. It’s always going to be a struggle. You can never rest. And I like that about this city. Every struggle here matters.” ‘We have our own By now Carville is horizontal in the easy food, our own music, chair, but he continues our own funerals, with his favorite rant — one that he shares our own social with his students, with audiences, with the world: structure, our “New Orleans has more culture than most own architecture, countries. People in our own body of other cities are obsessed with their quality of literature... Our life — their sunshine, restaurants here their libraries, their universities, their income are noisy — and it’s levels. We’re obsessed with our way of life. In because people New Orleans, our way of life is our quality of here are having fun life. If we don’t have while they eat.’ our way of life, we don’t have a quality of life. We have our own food, our own music, our own funerals, our own social structure, our own architecture, our own body of literature. Nobody ever went to an Ohio restaurant to listen to Oregon music. … “Our restaurants here are noisy — and it’s because people here are having fun while they eat. Plus, people here really know how to fry food. That’s my guilty pleasure — fried shrimp and fried oysters. Everywhere else in the country, people scoff at fried food, but that’s because it’s greasy everywhere else. Here, properly fried shrimp and oysters are never greasy. They’re just good.” He pauses and then finally sits up in the chair. “Damn, I’m getting hungry just talking about this!” He laughs, then turns serious again. “I hope when my daughters reach my age, if they say, ‘I want to go home,’ they can come home — and find that the culture here is intact,” he says. “I don’t know if it will be, but I hope they can say that their daddy gave it his best to make it that way.”


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MARY MATALIN NEW ORLEANIAN

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OF THE YEAR 2012

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connect with New Orleans. The others are the Rev. Msgr. Christopher Nalty, pastor of St. Stephen’s Church, and Tulane University President Scott Cowen. While Milling connected Matalin with the city’s soul, Nalty became a spiritual guide during her conversion to Catholicism. Cowen, meanwhile, helped shape the local commitment to public education reform, a movement embraced by Matalin and Carville. Matalin also helped bring the Bipartisan Policy Center’s annual political summit to Tulane’s campus — an event she co-hosts with Carville. That event brings the nation’s top pollsters, political consultants and senior statesmen to New Orleans every November to hash out the prospects for ending the partisan rancor that has stifled meaningful progress in Washington. And while they’re here, they get a dose of Matalin’s love for the city. Matalin connects with New Orleans on many levels. She is active in the local Catholic Charities organization, and with her husband she supports dozens of local nonprofits by hosting fundraisers at their Uptown home. She freely admits that she never set out to do anything specific when she and her family moved here. “I’m not a joiner,” she says. “I didn’t do anything like that in D.C. In fact, I’m still trying to raise my kids. But we love hosting parties for causes we believe in — just tell me the parties are fun. If people are having fun at a party, they’ll be incentivized to do things and get involved. In Washington, I’d pay money not to be invited places. Here, people so care about what they’re doing. “It’s organic,” she adds. “You just open your heart and the city floods in.” Although Matalin downplays the impact of her move page 22


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to New Orleans and her role in helping the city’s post-Katrina recovery, others are quick to offer praise. “James and Mary are wonderful ambassadors and great friends for the city,” Mayor Mitch Landrieu says. “It ‘I remember meant a lot when they moved here. I know the first time I how much they have worked to keep the smelled night spotlight on the good things happening jasmine, It was so in New Orleans. And their work in intoxicating. Then the community, from leading the effort to the streetcar plan the Super Bowl next year to raising started clacking funds for education causes, will have a and church bells meaningful impact on New Orleans for years were ringing. I to come.” Landrieu’s press could not believe secretary Ryan Berni worked for Matalin there was a place and Carville for five years before joining like this on earth.’ the mayor’s staff. He echoes Landrieu’s praise from an up-close-and-personal perspective. “When they moved here in 2008, people in D.C. thought they were nuts,” Berni recalls. “It wasn’t at all clear the city was going to recover, but their heart

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was always in New Orleans, and they committed to do what they could to help bring the city back. They genuinely love every part of being New Orleanians — food, family, faith and football. I think they could even muster up nice words about the potholes.” Berni is not far off with that last comment, for Matalin gushes that she sees beauty everywhere in New Orleans. “I remember the first time I smelled night jasmine,” she says. “It was so intoxicating. Then the streetcar started clacking and church bells were ringing. I could not believe there was a place like this on earth. It’s why I’m humbled that anybody else thinks I’ve contributed to this city, because this is paradise to me.” Matalin’s connection to the city is deeply spiritual as well as romantic. “People who don’t live here don’t appreciate what it means to live in a place of faith,” she says. “To be in a place where everybody believes in something beyond themselves — and lives those values, and wants to do right, and lives by that code — you cannot underestimate the power and beauty of that. It’s like living in a good society as envisioned by Socrates. “This is unique in all the county,” she continues. “And the preservation of the value system in this city — if you look at other cities that have been subjected to tragedy as we have, what happens to them? Tell me one other city that’s been able to do what we’ve done here. It has to be divine providence. I really feel special about seeing the hand of God here.” That value system, she says, is “the greatest gift” she and Carville can give to their daughters. “You can’t teach somebody that,” she says. “You have to live that. Is there any greater gift than giving your kids those values? And a desire to want to come back? This is their home. There is no greater gift.”

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Stop Letting Joint Pain Dictate Your Life Do you have pain in your knees or hips that limits your quality of life? Have you changed travel plans or put things off because the pain is simply debilitating? It doesn’t have to be that way. Dr. William Sherman is a leading edge orthopedist who is changing the way many view hip or knee replacement surgery. His anterior hip replacement procedure, performed on the specially designed HANA® Table, gives patients faster recovery times and the very best in outcomes. Under Dr. Sherman’s guidance, hip and knee replacement

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

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Keeping Your New Year’s

RESOLUTIONS

REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS, A PLAN OF ACTION AND FLEXIBILITY ARE KEYS TO STAYING ON TRACK SET REALISTIC GOALS

“New Year’s resolutions are often problematic because they have a way of setting one up to fail,” says Dr. Robin Benton-Crutcher, a licensed clinical social worker in private practice. People often set lofty, unrealistic goals and overlook the need for a practical plan of action — lacking a plan, a resolution is little more than a wish or dream. She suggests clients explore why they want the change, how it would affect their lives, whether they have a course of action, and what the pitfalls have been in the past — if it’s a resolution they’ve made before. “One of the best things we can ever do is learn from our mistakes,” she says.

BE SPECIFIC

GET STARTED

The first step often is the hardest. Putting a plan into motion is crucial and that may mean looking at things in a new way. “Procrastination almost always equals perfectionism,” Benton-Crutcher says. “It’s not that you’re lazy, it’s that you probably think you have to do it a certain way.” PAGE 27

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

By Lee Cutrone

“One of the problems people have is that they’re too vague or general,” says Molly Kimball, a registered dietitian and nutrition program manager at Ochsner’s Elmwood Fitness Center. “You also have to figure out how you are going to do something.” Kimball says cutting out mindless snacking after dinner, for instance, or commiting to weekly boot camps or spinning classes are concrete ways to reach the goal of losing weight. If your resolution is to save money, create a specific plan of action. Randy Waesche, president and CEO of business and wealth advisory firm Resource Management Inc., suggests a foolproof method of sidestepping the temptation to spend: have the maximum allowable amount taken out of your paycheck and put into your IRA. That way, money automatically goes into savings.

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    Benton-Crutcher advises letting go of the  notion that there’s only one way to accomplish  your goal. “Making a decision, any decision, is  better than not making one at all,” she says.         Procrastination also may be a sign of not  really wanting to do what’s necessary for  change, such as cutting back the amount you  spend on clothes in order to increase savings.      “You’ve got to put your needs before your  wants,” Waesche says.

Take Things One sTep aT a Time

“I tell people to dream big and keep their goals  small,” says Dr. Cindy Ashkins, a licensed  clinical social worker, certified life coach and  relationship therapist.         Instead of vowing to work out every  single day in the new year, Ashkins says  committing to 30 minutes a day, five times a  week for the next month is a healthier way to  approach change — and one that’s likely to  have more longevity. To assist with each step,  she recommends creating a “vision board” by  placing motivational words and images on a  corkboard. “You get to look at it every day, and  when you’ve met a goal, take it off and replace  it with a new one,” she says.

DOn’T geT siDelineD By seTBacks

It takes time for new habits to set in and become familiar. Slip-ups happen, and the important thing is not to use a setback as an opportunity to give up altogether.      “One poor choice or decision is not going to  determine your success,” Kimball says. “It’s the  repetition of those that will add up. Get past it.”  To take the pressure off, Ashkins suggests having  a designated day off, like a Sunday, where you  can cheat a bit. “If you get off track, don’t say  ‘Oh well, I’m just not going to do it,’” she says.  “Get up the next morning and start again.”

RewaRD yOuR successes

How we reward our successes varies from person to person. One person may go shopping;  another may opt for a massage. But giving  ourselves a reward for a goal achieved does not  have to involve spending money. Kimball advises  tapping into what makes you happy.      “You have to tune into what those things are,”  she says. “It could be a pedicure or it could be  spending time with family and friends.” Waesche advocates taking advantage of the many  free activities available in the community. His  suggestions include fishing in City Park and  riding bikes along the Tammany Trace from  Mandeville to Slidell.

TOp

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ituated at the intersection of psychology and physiology, the effect of music on exercise is widely studied but not so well understood. What we do know  is that music tempo affects the cadence of moderate  exercise: A 2010 study by the Research Institute for Sport  and Exercise Sciences revealed that subjects increased or  decreased their paces on stationary bikes when listening  to faster or slower music, respectively. If you’ve ever found  yourself unconsciously walking to the beat of a song,  you’ve probably experienced the phenomenon firsthand.     RunHundred.com, a workout music blog, capitalizes  on that tendency by compiling monthly lists of the most  popular workout songs, determined by more than 40,000  readers’ votes, and grouping them by beats per minute  (BPM). “Present (in the December 2012 list) is the latest of  the Usher/Ludacris hits that began with 2004’s ‘Yeah!’”  creator and DJ Chris Lawhorn writes on the site. “Also  collaborating this month are Irish rockers The Script and  Will.I.Am from Black Eyed Peas. Further mixing things up  are Taylor Swift’s flirtation with dubstep and two different takes on the same song by Flo Rida and Bingo Players.”     Here’s the rest of the list, with BPMs that can take you  from warmup to cooldown. — Missy Wilkinson

Taylor Swift, “I Knew You Were Trouble” — 77 BPM Avicii, “Silhouettes” —129 BPM The Script & Will.I.Am, “Hall of Fame” — 87 BPM

Be accOunTaBle

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

One Direction, “Kiss You” — 90 BPM

“When a goal is costing you more time and  mental energy than it would if you had  somebody guiding you, it may be time to seek  professional support,” Kimball says.      A professional — such as a nutritionist, personal trainer, therapist, life coach or  financial adviser — can do many things, from  helping you to set realistic, achievable goals  to devising a plan to providing accountability,  empowerment and ideas you may not think of  on your own.  At the end of the day, however,  making a change is up to the individual.      “The important thing,” Waesche says, “is  the discipline to follow through.”  

Calvin Harris & Florence Welch,   “Sweet Nothing” — 127 BPM Ludacris, Usher & David Guetta,   “Rest of My Life” —129 BPM Flo Rida, “I Cry” — 126 BPM Fun., “Some Nights” — 110 BPM Bingo Players, “Cry (Just a Little)” — 128 BPM PSY & MC Hammer,   “Gangnam Style / 2 Legit 2 Quit” — 131 BPM

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

“For most of us, it often works out better  if we find a friend who has a similar goal,”  Benton-Crutcher says. Working out with a  buddy, for example, helps with accountability  and meets another of our needs by supplying  social interaction.      Other ways to be accountable include sharing goals with the people around you, keeping  a log, journal or spreadsheet for daily spending and taking advantage of the many smartphone applications available for things like  weight loss. “Tracking your behavior can help  you see whether there is something you’re  forgetting,” Kimball says. 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

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When is Your exercise routine

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A

strength and speed, your body’s natural ability to adapt can run counter to your health goals. To see improvement, the body must be challenged, but where is the line between exercising effectively and overdoing it? “If you’re lifting weights and trying to improve muscle strength and muscle growth, then you should only be able to do a set of 12 repetitions,” Muralles says. “If you can do 15 to 20 repetitions, then you are not challenging your muscles

“The best thing about the human body is that it adapts, and the worst thing about the human body is that it adapts.” enough to promote muscle growth or strength. If you are trying to improve your cardiovascular health, you should be working at 70 to 80 percent of your predicted max heart rate. Keeping in mind that exercise heart rate is dependent on age, level of fitness and medical history.” You know you’ve reached a plateau in your exercise regimen when you begin to see a decline in benefits. For example, if you are weight training and you no longer experience muscle fatigue (the point at which you cannot complete any more of a particular exercise) during your routine, then it’s probably time to increase the weight or try exercising the muscle

in a different way. From a weight management standpoint, you’ve reached a plateau when your weight loss stalls or slows down despite continuing to exercise at the same level and consume the same number of calories. To counter plateauing, build your intensity by increasing resistance, distance, duration or volume. “When it comes to exercise, we use what’s called the F.I.T.T. principle: frequency (how often), intensity (how hard), time (how long), type (choice of exercise),” Muralles says. “What you are going to change depends on what your goals are. If you want to improve your strength, then you would change the frequency and intensity. If you are looking to improve your distance in running, then you would increase your duration, etc.” To keep boredom at bay and maintain motivation, it may help to vary the way you exercise. Instead of jogging a couple of miles on the treadmill every day, go for a jog outside or take spinning or an aerobics class. Add yoga or Pilates to your strength-training program; exercise doesn’t have to be grueling to be effective. If you want to give yourself a good shot at staying on track, keep it fun and switch it up. Muralles suggests modifying your regimen every three to four weeks to prevent adaptation and boredom. “From a psychological standpoint, changing your routine will keep things fresh,” he says. “From a physiological standpoint, changing your routine causes you to use muscles in a different way and forces your body to adapt to the change. In turn, you continue to receive the benefits from your regimen.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

n exercise routine should be part of your day, just like brushing your teeth and taking a shower. But when an exercise routine gets to be too routine, it can actually become another obstacle between you and your fitness goals. Repeating the same routine day in and day out is a recipe for failure. When the workout that once got you out of bed starts to feel mundane, it becomes as much a task of mental endurance as it is strength and fitness. It’s just plain boring. Boredom is the fastest way to unhinge your commitment, and from there it’s a slippery slope to sofa city. Your body essentially gets bored, too. It adjusts, and when it adjusts, you no longer get the same physical payoff. “The best thing about the human body is that it adapts, and the worst thing about the human body is that it adapts,” says East Jefferson General Hospital’s corporate wellness facilitator Leonel Muralles. “As you exercise, it is important to change your routine to continue to receive the physiological and psychological benefits.” The body responds to the stress of exercise by building muscle, burning fat and improving cardiovascular function. If the amount of intensity remains consistent, then the body becomes accustomed to it and will only improve enough to maintain that level of activity. This is where the plateau occurs. In most aspects of life, this is an invaluable function of the body. Just imagine if every time you ran a mile, mowed the lawn or picked up a toddler, it felt as difficult as the first time you’d done it. When you are trying to lose weight or gain

29


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WHAT’S

in store

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By Eileen Loh

CULTURE Owner Bin Hang says the showroom at BC Kitchen and Bath gives her customers creative remodeling ideas. PHOTO By CHEryL GErBEr

constantly — granite, quartz, marble, in both 2 and 3 centimeters,” Hang says. Hang carries product lines to fit every budget, and the most popular is the instore brand, BC Cabinetry. “Our brand is medium-priced but very high quality,” she says. “It wouldn’t carry our name if the quality wasn’t there.” Because the store has so many styles, BC Kitchen doesn’t have a “typical” client. “We have a lot of clients in downtown New Orleans who want the more modern, Shaker style that looks good with high ceilings and contemporary interiors,” Hang says. “Then we have customers in Kenner and Metairie who want more classic styles.” The store provides special rates to customers in LaPlace who are rebuilding due to Hurricane Isaac. Though contractors are a major part of her client base, Hang spends much of her time making sure individual customers are happy. That includes quick installations — an average of two days, no matter the project size — to curb the inconvenience of lengthy home renovations. “We take our projects very seriously; I treat customers like family,” she says. “This is a huge investment for them, and we want them to feel good and satisfied with their investment. After the installation we keep in touch, and we won’t leave the customers until they are completely satisfied with everything.”

Reservations only. Make them online or call now! open as usual for dinner 5-9:30pm

SHopping NEWS WEiNSTEiNS (4011 Magazine St., 504895-6278; www.weinsteinsinc.com) hosts a trunk show of Ginja Moseley’s alligator tooth jewelry and home accessories through Wednesday, Jan. 2. The pieces include earrings, letter openers, cocktail serving pieces and more.

Bakery and coffee shop MaNHaTTaNjaCK (4930 Prytania St., 732-768-6561;

www.manhattanjack.com) celebrates its grand opening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, when there will be free pastry samples, cocktails and Champagne.

HiKE fOR KaTREENa (www.hikeforka-

treena.org) holds its Big TrEEsy Giveaway from 9 a.m. until noon Saturday,

by Missy Wilkinson

Jan. 5 at jOE BROWN PaRK (10900 Lake Forest Blvd.). One thousand trees will be given to New Orleans residents, and there will be a seminar on tree planting and care by the City of New Orleans Department of Parks and Parkways. This is the fourth of five tree giveaways, which are funded by a grant from the Apache Foundation. faSHiON WEEK NEW ORLEaNS

(www.fashionweeknola.com) holds a model casting call for women 5-foot-7 and taller and men 5-foot-11 and taller for its March 2013 runway shows from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6 at EiffEL SOCiETy (2040 St. Charles Ave., 504525-2951; www.eiffelsociety.com). Wear black fitted clothing and heels.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

alking around the showroom of BC Kitchen and Bath (3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-338-6227; www.bckitchenbath.com), it’s tough to resist the urge to gut your entire kitchen and start from scratch. With displays varying from classic to contemporary to creative, the shop has a range of real-world examples that fit every taste. Owner Bin Hang says the thoughtfully planned showroom — styled by her business partner, designer Meng Sun — is one of the store’s main selling points. “People come in here even when they’re not remodeling, because they want to gather ideas,” she says. “Even if customers don’t purchase from us, we work with them and make recommendations.” Displays feature stone countertops with solid wood cabinetry and sink fixtures, as well as stylish touches like cabinet lighting and tile backsplashes. A wine bar display featuring a wine chiller, mahogany bottle racks and a built-in stemware hanger over a bar sink is a tempting option for oenophiles. For large-scale projects that can’t fit into the showroom, there is a photo album featuring completed installations including outdoor kitchens. A native of Shanghai, Hang moved to the U.S. 11 years ago and attended the University of New Orleans. In 2007, she opened an American extension of the cabinetmaking business her family owns in China. “I grew up in the business, so I took that knowledge and built on it,” she says. Hang enlisted Sun to provide interior design services free to all customers. She uses her family’s business connections to procure quality imports at low prices. “We have new styles imported from China

31


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EAT drink

+

FOrk + center By IAN MCNuLTy Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net

putting everything on the table

Third Course and Long

Manning’s attracts the football nation’s many fans.

O

ver the last few years, more New Orleans restaurateurs have been forced to concede that a nice meal can’t always compete with this town’s football obsession. Consequently, flat-screen TVs have been turning up in some dining rooms, a hi-def appeal for business during big games. Manning’s, however, is a restaurant custombuilt around the TV — about 30 of them, including a stadium-sized monster facing an end zone of recliners. Not only is the big game on, every game is on — everywhere you look. Fans from many tribes of the football nation have found their way here, and as a dozen college bowl games roll this week, someone under Manning’s roof surely will be cheering for each of them. Harrah’s opened Manning’s last winter in partnership with the New Orleans Saints’ legendary quarterback Archie Manning. It’s a man cave completed with a casino’s budget and enough memorabilia from the first family of football to stock a museum. Seasoned local chef Jared Tees is at the helm of the kitchen, but Manning’s is much less about chefdriven food and much more about the name over the door, atmosphere and entertainment. It feels like a homegrown version of Buffalo Wild Wings, and it compares better with sports-themed taverns of that ilk than it does with serious New Orleans restaurants. The redfish courtbouillon is the best choice if you’re determined to dial in local flavor. It’s built with quality seafood in a tomato stew brimming

with the Creole trinity. A nontraditional nicoise salad was a pleasant surprise too, with layers of butter lettuce holding portions of its properly oily, Dijon-slicked components. Crab claws also are a good bet, especially with a fresh squeeze from a charred lemon half over them for some smoky citrus flavors. But what should be easy points for an upscale sports bar were too often lifeless duds — the dry, insipid burger tops that list and the consistently limp fries are only worth eating when completely covered with pork, cheese and gravy. There’s also an appetizer-laden “game day menu,” served during big games, but like the regular menu it’s patchy. I like the alligator sausage sliders for their tang, but jambalaya boules prove that red, gummy jambalaya is not improved by wadding it into balls for the fryer. Sightlines to TVs are superb, and the long bar opens onto table seating in a courtyard/parking lot. But Manning’s has some unusual omissions for a sports bar. It has a gift shop but no draft beer. Service is what you’d expect stepping into an airport bar to check game scores between flights: friendly and efficient enough, but just that. The staff is on to something, of course. This isn’t the type of place to cultivate loyal regulars, but rather a place that draws new people all the time who are mostly loyal to a team and want to cheer in a glittering temple of sports glory. The food doesn’t bring much passion, but the patrons do.

Barcadia (601 Tchoupitoulas St., 504-335-1740; www.barcadiabars.com), a concept that mixes vintage arcade games, craft beers and burgers, will open soon in the Warehouse District. Frogger, Ms. Pac-Man, Mortal Kombat and other coinop classics will line the space, and the bar will feature roughly 40 beers on tap (and more in bottles) and the kitchen will stay open late. Barcadia is taking shape in the ground floor of a parking garage off Poydras Street, where the developers also are building an upscale cocktail bar called Ohm Lounge. Barcadia is expected to open in early January, with Ohm Lounge following later in the month. Barcadia is an expansion of a concept that has two locations in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area, but the New Orleans edition is coming in with local partners as well. Stan Ripp, who runs the Warehouse District event space Generations Hall, is developing Barcadia here in partnership with the concept’s founder, Billy Blatty, who has operated several bars in New Orleans — and, incidentally, whose father, William Peter Blatty, wrote the novel and screenplay for The Exorcist). page 34

Chef Jared Tees and Archie Manning at the former New Orleans Saints quarterback’s namesake restaurant.

PHOTO By CHEryL GErBEr

WinE OF THE week By BrENDA MAITLAND Email Brenda Maitland at winediva1@earthlink.net

what

Manning’s

where

519 Fulton St., (504) 593-8118; www.manningsneworleans.com

when

lunch and dinner daily

how much moderate

reservations accepted

what works

the room is sports fanatic heaven, local flavors stand out

what doesn’t

comfort food standards flop, no draft beer

check, please

a sports tavern where even if the food isn’t always on, the game is

2007 Brandborg Bench Lands Pinot Noir UmpqUa Valley, OregOn $20 retail

The Bench Lands, located 25 miles from the Pacific Ocean on mountains rising to 1,000 feet, feature Dijon and Pommard clones planted in well-drained sedimentary sandstone and clay loam soils. The marine influence provides fog, warm days and cool evenings to encourage slow ripening in the vineyards to develop the grapes’ flavor. The wine offers aromas of cherry, pomegranate, baking spice and subtle smoke. On the palate, taste sweet berry, earth notes, toasty vanilla and herbal and mineral components. Drink it solo or with nicoise salad, foie gras or country pate with tart cherry compote, duck confit, grilled vegetables, herb-crusted lamb, roast chicken, pork and veal dishes and mild cheeses. Buy it at: Keife & Co.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

By Ian McNulty

Games, beer and burgers

33


page 33

interview     “We thought it was perfect for New  Orleans and for this space,” Ripp says.  “It’s all about beer, games, rock and roll  and burgers.”      For those burgers, they’ve brought in  Nick Hufft, a New Orleans native who  has gained a following in Baton Rouge  for a food truck called Curbside, which  serves burgers around a circuit of lunch  and late-night locations. His menu at  Barcadia will include appetizers (such  as fried pickles), salads, eight or nine  burgers (one with over-easy duck eggs)  and sandwiches (deli-style hot pastrami,  bratwurst). Hufft says he’ll continue to run  Curbside in Baton Rouge.      In addition to a main room and open-air  patio, there will be a second room, used  on busy nights and available for private  parties, with its own bar, patio and a game  room stocked with air hockey and more  contemporary games.     Ohm Lounge will open next door, with  a drinks list handled by Ricky Gomez, a  former Cure bartender and current brand  ambassador for the international beverage  company Diageo. 

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Restaurants reemerging

34

    A small restaurant row in Gentilly that  was wiped out after Hurricane Katrina is  becoming busy again. The 5300 block of  Franklin Avenue is anchored by Fleury of Wings (5325 Franklin Ave., 504-3029675), the name of which indicates a main  specialty but doesn’t tell the full tale, and  Willie’s Kitchen (5321 Franklin Ave.,  504-283-3200; www.willieskitchenneworleans.com), a newer addition with  a hybrid buffet/family-style approach to  comfort food during lunch. A new restaurant called Cafe Gentilly is in the works  between those two, and directly across  the street is the site where Dunbar’s, a  pre-Katrina bastion of Creole soul food, is  expected to relocate this spring.       Fleury of Wings is the new incarnation  of Merlin’s Place, which was located  a few doors down. Owners LeKesiah  and Merlin Fleury moved it to the former  home of The Munch Factory (6325  Elysian Fields Ave., 504-324-5372), a  neighborhood standout that moved last  fall to a spot closer to the University of  New Orleans. There are wings with 35  sauce flavors, but the exceptional roast  beef po-boy and hot tamales, both holdovers from the first Merlin’s, are still my  go-to items.      Walk into Willie’s Kitchen and you find  long communal���tables set up as if for a  banquet, and a steam table with a dozen  or more items. Pick a main item (such as  meat loaf, fried chicken or smothered pork  chops) and you have the run of the many  sides (red beans, green bean casserole,  fried okra, mustard greens and others)  and second helpings of those sides are  encouraged. Lunch costs $10 with tax  and a drink included, and there’s also an a  la carte menu available until 8 p.m. Willie Cave, a Houston native, opened the place 

chRIs MOntERO

FIVE in FIVE spOts FOR bLack-EyEd pEas

E x Ec u T i v E c h Ef a n d gEn ER a l m a n agER aT c a fE B

n

ew Orleans native Chris Montero got his start at Louis XVI during that former  French Quarter restaurant’s heyday and later worked with chef Susan Spicer  and the late New Orleans food legend Warren LeRuth. Montero joined the  Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group in 1999 and served as Bacco’s chef until it closed  in 2011. He opened the company’s latest venture, Cafe B (2700 Metairie Road,  Metairie, 504-934-4700; www.cafeb.com), later that year. Creole cream cheese features prominently on your menu at Cafe B. Why is that? Montero: I’m related to the Centanni family, who had Gold Seal Creamery in  Mid-City, and they were famous for decades and decades for their Creole cream  cheese. I wanted to make it really authentic so I used the old family recipe. My  cousins come in and they all get a kick out of it. But then we completely flipped  it by making it into a savory dip with crabmeat, which has been our top appetizer  from day one.   How has Cafe B changed since opening last year? M: When we opened, it was more of a gastropub, new-American concept.  But the customers were asking for more traditional, but elevated, New Orleans  dishes. Pan-sauteed speckled trout with crabmeat and a satsuma butter sauce,  that’s my No. 1 dish now. It’s like trout meuniere, which everyone knows, as  opposed to trufffle fries, a gastropub dish we also have. So we’re bridging the  two concepts.   You served President George W. Bush and the first lady at Bacco shortly after Hurricane Katrina. What was that like? M: It was amazing, and we did it under the most unbelievable circumstances.  We’d been back open for maybe two weeks, and we did that [with] 24 hours’  notice. I was one of three people who knew. It was really interesting to see the  protocol. They had a Secret Service guy with me the whole time. They had a guy  watching me cook the whole time, a guy who had a briefcase with the plates the  president and the first lady ate off of. It was actually fun though, not as stressful  as I thought it’d be once we got going.  — IAN MCNULTY

Bennachin 1212 Royal St., (504) 522-1230 www.bennachinrestaurant.com Gambian akara fritters are mashed  and fried black-eyed peas. 

Cochon 930 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 588-2123 www.cochonrestaurant.com A unique gumbo features blackeyed peas and roasted pork.

Crescent Pie & Sausage Company 4400 Banks St., (504) 482-2426 www.crescentpieandsausage.com “Black jambalaya” includes braised  pork, sausage, chicken and blackeyed peas.

Liberty’s Kitchen 422 1/2 S. Broad St., (504) 822-4011 www.libertyskitchen.org “Cowboy caviar” features blackeyed peas in a salad.

Squeal Bar-B-Q 8400 Oak St., (504) 302-7370 www.squeal-nola.com Bacon, andouille and black-eyed  peas fill egg rolls.

OFF this fall, recognizing the one-time restaurant cluster was overdue for a rebound.      “It’s close to the lake, close to the universities here — there’s no reason why we  can’t come back like other parts of town,”  Cave says.      Diners who remember the red beans,  fried chicken and gumbo from Dunbar’s  should be excited about owner Celestine Dunbar’s plans to reopen here. She  plans to convert the former address of  Vazquez Restaurant, now empty, into a  place called Dunbar’s Soul Food. She’ll  serve her familiar comfort food menu at  lunch, and dinner will feature more complex Creole dishes, with an emphasis on  grilled seafood and roasted meats.      Plans for Cafe Gentilly have not  been announced.

Local absinthe goes red

    Absinthe has a long, romanticized and  generally misunderstood history, one  linked to literary giants, false accusations  of psychoactive properties and the lore of  drinking cultures in France, London and 

New Orleans. Banned in many countries  until recently, the herb-based liqueur has  made a comeback, and now there’s a locally made version on the market.      The upstart New Orleans distillery  Atelier Vie recently released Toulouse Red, an absinthe distilled with hibiscus  flowers to give it a candy-apple red color  in the bottle. The classic preparation  calls for it to be diluted with water, which  produces a pale pink beverage – a significant departure from the traditional green  color that lent the drink its fin de siecle  nickname “the green fairy.”       It retails for $60 a bottle and is available locally at restaurants, bars and retail  shops (see the “where to buy” page at  www.ateliervie.com).      Earlier this year, the distillery released a  strong vodka called Buck 25, a reference  to its 125 proof (or 62.5 percent alcohol).  The overproof spirit is aimed at craft cocktail makers, allowing them to add more ingredients to the glass with less vodka while  maintaining the same alcohol content.      Atelier Vie is based in the Art Egg Studios, a repurposed industrial space  in Mid-City. 

the

menu

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food.

“[W]e try to predict what humans will  find flavorful, based on some basic ideas  from chemistry and psychology. ... The  basic idea is that two ingredients that  share a lot of flavor compounds will go  together well in Western cuisine.” — IBM computer scientist Lav Varshney  explaining to National Public Radio how  an artificial intelligence project is creating  new recipe ideas by analyzing databases  of successful recipes and generating  ingredient and flavor combinations likely  to please human palates. 


to

EAT

COMPleTe lIsTIngs aT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN Indulge Island grIll — 845 Carondelet St., (504) 609-2240; www.indulgeislandgrill.com — This Caribbean- and pirate-themed restaurant offers everything from seafood and salads to burgers, sandwiches and ribs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ O’HenrY’s FOOd & sPIrITs — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, (504) 4619840; www.ohenrys.com — The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Treasure Island BuFFeT — 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 443-8000; www. treasurechestcasino.com — The all-you-can-eat buffet includes New Orleans favorites and other cuisines. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BaYOu Beer garden — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., (504) 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame seed bun. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ dMaC’s Bar & grIll — 542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., (504) 304-5757; www.dmacsbarandgrill.com — Stop in for daily lunch specials or regular items such as gumbo, po-boys or salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ dOWn THe HaTCH — 1921 Sophie Wright Place, (504) 5220909; www.downthehatchnola. com — The Texan burger features an Angus beef patty topped with grilled onions, smoked bacon,

rendOn Inn’s dugOuT sPOrTs Bar — 4501 Eve St., (504) 826-5605; www.therendoninn.com — Fresh cut fries are served with Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of truffle oil. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ THe rIVersHaCK TaVern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ sHaMrOCK Bar & grIll — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 301-0938 — Shamrock serves an Angus rib-eye steak, burgers, po-boys and more. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., (504) 202-4741; www. bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ sauCY’s — 4200 Magazine St., (504) 301-2755; www.saucysnola.com — The cochon blue is a sandwich of pulled pork, blue cheese and melted mozzerella on a bun. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS CHeeseBurger eddIe’s — 4517 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 455-5511; www. mredsno.com — This eatery serves burgers, Mr. Ed’s fried chicken, tacos, wings, shakes and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE anTOIne’s anneX — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www. antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

St., (504) 861-7890; www. cafefreret.com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ CaFe nOMa — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www.cafenoma. com — Roasted Gulf shrimp comes with a salad dressed with Parmesan-white balsamic vinaigrette. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Fri. Credit cards. $ laKeVIeW BreW COFFee CaFe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts as well as specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINESE FIVe HaPPIness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to seafood combinations. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Jung’s gOlden dragOn — 3009 Magazine St., (504) 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COFFEE/DESSERT PInKBerrY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., (504) 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices, as well as fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY BaYOna — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 525-4455; www.bayona. com — Try an appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Breads On OaK — 8640 Oak St., Suite A, (504) 324-8271; www.breadsonoak.com — The bakery offers a range of breads, muffins, pastries and sweets. No reservations. Breakfast Thu.-Sun., lunch Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OaK — 8118 Oak St., (504) 302-1485; www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CaFe FrereT — 7329 Freret

One resTauranT &

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

sOMeTHIn’ else CaFe — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www. somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somthin’ Else offers shrimp baskets, boudin balls, alligator corn dogs, burgers, po-boys and sandwichest. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

cheddar and a fried egg. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

35


ouT to Eat

JOHN J. HAINKEL, JR.

HOME AND REHABILITATION CENTER AFFILIATED WITH OCHSNER HEALTH SYSTEM

612 HENRY CLAY AVENUE • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118 PHONE: 504-896-5900 FAX: 504-896-5984

LOUNGE  — 8132 Hampson St., (504) 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Seared scallops are served with roasted garlic, shiitake polenta cakes and cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www.antoines. com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., (504) 524-4747 — The menu includes Creole favorites like crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., (504) 309-3570; www.redemption-nola.com — Roasted duck breast is served with red onion and yam hash, andouille, sauteed spinach and grilled fig jus. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Services Offered

36

• Respiratory Therapy and Tracheotomy Care • IV Therapy • Skilled Nursing Services • Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapies Available 7 Days a Week • Extensive Restorative Program • On-site Laboratory, X-Ray, Pharmaceutical, and Medical Services • Post Surgical Recovery • Rehab Transition to Home • Adult Day Care Services “They have an exemplary quality assurance program.” “I suspect the Hainkel Home is one of the best nursing homes in the state of Louisiana.” “This is a home that the city of New Orleans needs, desperately needs.”

• Veterans Administration • We currently service Long Term and Respite Care VA residents • Hospice Care • Medicaid & Medicare Certified • Medicaid Pending Accepted • Private Pay Accepted • Managed Care • People's Health and Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance Accepted • Free Beauty and Barber Shop • Dentist Visits Weekly • Beautiful Gardens for Active Living Dr. Brobson Lutz Vice Chairman of the Board of Commissioners for the Orleans Parish Communications District, graduated form Tulane University Medical School Hospital and served as Orleans Parish Medical director for eight years.

PLEASE CONTACT TENAJ MELENDRERAS FOR REFERRAL REQUEST PHONE: 504-896-5901 FAX: 504-896-5984

NEW MAXIMO’S IS NOW OPEN AT

11AM 117 DECATUR ST FRENCH QUARTER 504.586.8883 sun-tues 6-11pm wed-sat 11am-11pm www.maximosgrill.com

FOR

LUNCH WEDNESDAYSATURDAY

3

COURSES FOR $25 MON + TUES NIGHT

ESTATE TREASURES

SAINTS & SINNERS — 627 Bourbon St., (504) 528-9307; www.saintsandsinnersnola. com — The restaurant serves Creole and Cajun dishes, seafood, steaks, po-boys, burgers and more. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$$ STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Toulouse Street Wharf, (504) 569-1401; www.steamboatnatchez.com — The Natchez serves Creole cuisine while cruising the Mississippi River. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

DELI JIMS — 3000 Royal St., (504) 304-8224 — The Reuben is rye bread layered with corned beef, pastrami, provolone and Swiss cheeses, German sauerkraut and Thousand Island dressing. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI &  GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ MARDI GRAS ZONE — 2706 Royal St., (504) 947-8787; www.mardigraszone.com — The 24-hour grocery store has a deli and wood-burning pizza oven. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , (504) 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ QUARTER MASTER DELI — 1100 Bourbon St., (504) 529-1416; www.quartermasterdeli.com — Slow-cooked pork ribs are coated in house barbecue sauce and served with two sides. No reservations. 24 hours daily. Cash only. $

FRENCH

After Holiday Sale 20% off! 2014 MAGAZINE ST 504.679.6600

FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., (504) 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., (504) 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — Try Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$


ouT to EAT

Open for Breakfast & Lunch on New Year’s Eve! Serving our regular Brunch Menu on New Year’s Day from 9am-2pm. Serving traditional Black Eyed Peas & Cabbage! Reservations Accepted.

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • WEEKEND BRUNCH D I N N E R T H U R S D AY S & F R I D AY S

125 CAMP ST. • 504 - 561- 8844 R E D G R AV Y C A F E . C O M

GOURMET TO GO

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., (504) 944-6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — The restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., (504) 561-8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items, Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE CHIBA — 8312 Oak St., (504) 826-9119; www.chiba-nola. com — The satsuma strawberry roll bundles scallop, yellowtail, strawberry, mango, jalapeno, wasabi tobiko and tempura flakes and is topped with spicy sauce and satsuma ponzu. Reserva-

PhoTo By CheRyL GeRBeR

wiShing you all a happy and proSperouS new year!

tions recommended. Lunch Thu.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ KAKKOII JAPANESE BISTREAUX — 7537 Maple St., (504) 570-6440; www. kakkoii-nola.com — Kakkoii offers traditional sushi, sashimi and Japanese cuisine and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., (504) 891-3644 — “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Watch for our big changes coming mid-January!

3138 magazine St (Enter on 9th Street) 504.309.7557 • open daily 7am-3pm • artzbagelz.com

Get ready for the

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit

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CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., (504) 529-2154; www. cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

Cafe Degas (3127 Esplanade Ave., 504-945-5635; www. cafedegas.com) is grounded in traditional French cuisine.

Ne igh borho

t od Restauran

CELEBRATE

NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH US!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, (504) 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, (504) 737-8146; www. breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

OPEN MON-SAT 11AM-9PM · HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 3PM-5PM

3001 MAGAZINE ST. · 891-0997 · www.joeyksrestaurant.com

37


ouT to EAT

New place for

Breakfast/Brunch

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ORIGAMI — 5130 Freret St., (504) 899-6532 — Nabeyaki udon is a soup brimming with thick noodles, chicken and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., Diners will find authentic, healthy (504) 581-7253; www.rocknsake. and fresh Mediterranean cuisine. com — There’s a wide selection of No reservations. Lunch and dinsushi, sashimi and rolls or gyoza ner daily. Credit cards. $$ soup, soba noodles and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner MEXICAN & Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

(previous location of the Joint BBQ) 801 Poland Avenue, 304-5411, delivery

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

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YUKI IZAKAYA — 525 Frenchmen St., (504) 943-1122; www. facebook.com/yukiizakaya — This Japanese tavern combines a selection of small plates, sake, shochu, live music and Japanese kitsch. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY HERITAGE GRILL — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 934-4900; www. heritagegrillmetairie.com — Dishes include duck and wild mushroom spring rolls with mirin-soy dipping sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$ MANNING’S — 519 Fulton St., (504) 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — A cast iron skilletfried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Join Us for LUNCH

G

St., (504) 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and a meat choice. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

WAIST WATCHER 4920 PRYTANIA ST. • 891-3644 KYOTONOLA.COM • CLOSED SUNDAYS

RESTAURANT R’EvOLUTION — 777 Bienville St., (504) 5532277; www.revolutionnola.com — Creole dishes are the rule, but there restaurant also offers caviar tastings, house-made salumi, pasta dishes and more. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 527-0942 — The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Light dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ZACHARY’S RESTAURANT — 902 Coffee St., Mandeville, (985) 626-7008 — Chef Zachary Watters prepares dishes like redfish Zachary, crabmeat au gratin and Gulf seafood. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple

SOUTHWESTERN

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., (504) 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — Mardi Gras Indian tacos are stuffed with roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled summer squash, Jack cheese and spicy slaw. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 5238995; www.lucysretiredsurders. com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., (504) 948-0077 — Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg,d served with smoked paprika aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., (504) 586-0972; www. thebombayclub.com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepperseared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE COLUMNS — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — The menu offers Creole favorites like gumbo and crab cakes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood, sandwiches and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855; www. siberianola.com — Potato and

cheese pierogies are served with fried onions and sour cream. No reservations. Dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $.

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., (504) 309-7557; www. artzbagelz.com — Bagel options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin, salt and more. Salads are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ CAFE B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 9344700; www.cafeb.com — Grilled redfish is served with confit of wild mushrooms, spaghetti squash, charred Vidalia onion and aged balsamic vinegar. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity. com — The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA DON FORTUNATO’S PIZZERIA — 3517 20th St., Metairie, (504) 302-2674 — The chicken portobello calzone is filled with grilled chicken breast, tomato sauce, mozzarella, ricotta, portobello mushrooms and sun-dried tomato mayo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 8328032; www.marktwainspizza. com — Salads, po-boys and and a range of pizza flavors are available. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., (504) 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www. theospizza.com — Build your own pizza from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., (504) 571-7561 — Burgers and sandwiches can be dressed with topping including everything from sprouts to peanut butter. Reservations accepted for large


OUT to EAT parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUGHEAD’S CHEESESTEAKS — 801 Poland Ave., (504) 304-5411; www.jugheadsneworleans.com — Jughead’s specializes in cheese steaks on toasted Dong Phuong bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ KILLER POBOYS — 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — At the back of Erin Rose, Killer Poboys offers a short and constantly changing menu of po-boys. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun. Cash only. $ MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., (504) 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 885-3416; www. parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme poboy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., (504) 322-2446; www.thestoreneworleans.com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD ACME OYSTER HOUSE — 724 Iberville St., (504) 522-5973; 1202 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155; 3000 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 309-4056; www. acmeoyster.com — The original Acme Oyster House in the French Quarter has served raw oysters for more than a century. The full menu includes chargrilled oysters, many cooked seafood dishes and New Orleans

GALLEY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-0955 — Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GRAND ISLE — 575 Convention Center Blvd., (504) 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — The baked Gulf fish is topped with compound chili butter and served with local seasonal vegetables and herbroasted potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MR. ED’S SEAFOOD & ITALIAN RESTAURANT. — 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, (504) 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, (504) 838-0022; www.mredsno.com — The menu includes seafood, Italian dishes, fried chicken, po-boys, salads and daily specials. Eggplant casserole is stuffed with shrimp and crabmeat and served with potatoes and salad. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ NEW ORLEANS HAMBURGER & SEAFOOD CO. — citywide; www.nohsc.com — Menus vary by location but generally include burgers, salads, po-boys, fried seafood and New Orleans favorites. The thin fried catfish platter comes with wedge-cut garlic-herb fries, hush puppies and Mardi Gras coleslaw. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., (504) 241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Momma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE AUSTIN’S SEAFOOD AND STEAKHOUSE — 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-5533; www.austinsno.

com — Austin’s serves prime steaks, chops and seafood. Reservations recommended. Veal Austin features paneed veal topped wwith Swiss chard, bacon, mushrooms, asparagus, crabmeat and brabant potatoes on the side. Reservations recommended. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

WE NOW HAVE

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Magazine St., (504) 522-7902; www. chophousenola.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

HOT BOILED

TAPAS/SPANISH

CRAWFISH

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., (504) 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER & LATE-NIGHT

SUN - WED 7AM-10PM | THURS - SAT 7AM-LATE

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe. com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

620 CONTI ST. FRENCH QUARTER

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VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., (504) 899-5129; www. moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ CAFE MINH — 4139 Canal St., (504) 482-6266; www. cafeminh.com— The watermelon crabmeat martini is made with diced watermelon, Louisiana jumbo lump crabmeat, avocado, jalapenos and cilantro and comes with crispy shrimp chips. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ DOSON NOODLE HOUSE —135 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 309-7283 — Traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlight the menu. The vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, (504) 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

SLICE — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., (504) 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com — Slice is known for pizza on thin crusts made from 100 percent wheat flour. Other options include the barbecue shrimp po-boy made with Abita Amber and the shrimp Portofino, a pasta dish with white garlic cream sauce, shrimp and broccoli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

staples. The Peace Maker po-boy combines fried shrimp and oysters and is dressed with Tabasco-infused mayo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

thurs-sat 8am-3pm • sunday 8am-noon

39


MuSIC 43 FILM 46

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AE +

ART 48

what to know before you go

Star Turns Patti LuPone opens a concert series at NOCCA. By Lauren LaBorde

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

T

40

ony Award winner Patti LuPone is a venerable Broadway diva, known for the title role in the opening production of Evita and Fantine in the original London production of Les Miserables and for her star turns in Broadway revivals of Gypsy and Sweeney Todd. This week, she kicks off the Broadway at NOCCA series with two shows. “Seth [Rudetsky] asked me to do (the NOCCA series), and I’ve known him for years,” LuPone says. “When we did it in Provincetown (Mass.), and it was just so much fun. So here we go again. Hopefully it’ll be as much fun for the audience as it is for us.” LuPone recently starred in David Mamet’s Broadway flop, The Anarchist (which marked her eighth time working with the playwright), and was in town not long ago filming the thriller Parker. She appeared in the Provincetown series this summer, and in her show (available to download at www.sethtv.com) she revisited songs from Evita that she hadn’t performed in years. At Rudetsky’s goading, she also discussed the infamous incident in which she halted a production of Gypsy to chastise an audience member who was taking photos. The NOCCA shows are a new iteration of the Provincetown Broadway at the Art House series produced by Mark Cortale and hosted by Rudetsky, a musician, writer and radio host. The New Yorkbased Cortale is producing the series and was instrumental in bringing it to New Orleans, which he describes as his second home (he’s the manager of homegrown drag performer Jeffrey Roberson, aka Varla Jean Merman). Each show consists of songs interspersed with banter and interviews guided by Rudetsky, creating a casual and, at times, dishy retrospective of each singer’s career. “What I love doing is showing people the beauty and art in Broadway, and that’s what this sort of is. It’s kind of like my radio show (SiriusXM Radio’s On Broadway), but it’s live,” Rudetsky says. “I love chitter-chattering about Broadway and giving people a look under the curtain. Not in a kind of boring way I feel a lot of interviews do, but in a ‘we’re having brunch together’ way.” For her NOCCA show, LuPone’s set list likely will stick to songs heard in New York’s Theatre District. “I think it’ll all be Broadway songs because that’s kind of what Seth is obsessed with,” she says. “Some of the stars, I have to tell them in advance

what the (song) order is — but with Patti, I said, ‘You’re going to sing what you’re going to sing, so deal with it,’” he says. Later this year, the series will bring Broadway heavyweights Sutton Foster, Megan Mullally, Audra McDonald and Betty Buckley to the performing arts school for master classes and shows that are a fusion of Inside the Actors Studio and semi-improvised cabaret. Rudetsky, who once performed for an enthusiastic audience at Le Chat Noir, says while it’s often difficult to get performers to travel for shows, the women in the NOCCA series were game to perform in the South. “The women said yes because they’re so obsessed with New Orleans,” he says. Rudestky’s slate of performers is a dream team of Broadway divas: LuPone; Foster, who originated the title role in the revival of Thoroughly Modern Millie; Mullally, known for her role as Karen Walker in NBC’s Will & Grace and Broadway roles including Elizabeth in Young Frankenstein; McDonald, who recently won the Best Actress Tony for her role in the revival of Porgy and Bess; and Buckley, the Broadway legend known for starring in Cats. “I’m always like ‘What would I enjoy as an audience member?’ That’s how I gauge it,” Rudestky says. “It’s never about ‘What’s going to sell tickets?’ I’m such a big fan, so I try to think what would a super fan like me love? I try to create the show out of

my own obsession.” With the exception of Foster, Patti LuPone has each will present two perforstarred in numerous hit mances per night, and Rudestky Broadway musicals. says each of the two shows has different surprises in store. “Not only is (the show) a unique Patti LuPone jAn experience, but you can see both 6:30 p.m. & 8:30 performances and it’ll be totally p.m. Monday different,” he says. “It’s not like a cabaret act with set patterns and NOCCA, Lupin set songs. If you got tickets to both Hall, 2800 Charperformances with the same arttres St., (800) ists, you see two different shows. 838-3006; www.It’s kind of the epitome of theater in broadwaynola.com that you never know what’s going to happen.” Tickets $50-$100, During their visit, Rudetsky and plus fees the performers in the series will teach master classes to NOCCA students. Rudestky’s class will cover audition technique, and the others will focus on performing songs. The classes will include question-and-answer sessions for students. LuPone is unable to teach a master class during her visit, but she has advice for young performers. “Train as much as possible for the profession,” she says. “It isn’t easy and it’s a craft — both the singing of it and the acting — and one needs to train for it. One needs to hone their craft and then go out there and do it.”

7


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

41


Irvin Mayfield

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Midnight Burlesque Ballroom featuring Trixie Minx & Join Our Mailing List

s on: For schedule updates follow us

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Grand Prize!

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TUeSdAYS 8pm 1/1, 8, & 29 Jason Marsalis 1/15 The Andrew Baham Band 1/22 The Stephen Gordon Group WedNeSdAYS 5pm Kipori Woods 8pm Grammy Award-winning Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam performing the music of Joe Henderson $15 cover THURSdAYS 5pm Roman Skakun 8pm 1/3, 10, 24, & 31 James Rivers Movement 1/17 Don Vappie FRIdAYS 5pm The Professor Piano Series featuring 1/4 Joe Krown 1/11 Josh Paxton 1/18 Tom McDermott 1/25 Tom Worrell 8pm Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown

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MUSIC listings

Vaso — Kyndra Joi & soul theory, 6; ashton & the big easy brawlers, 9; mario abney Quintet, 11

THURSDAY 3

GNA

Banks Street Bar — i’m fine, fuzzlebutts, 9

LA S

Bistreaux — aaron lopezbarrantes, 7 Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

all show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Cafe Negril — sam Cammarata & Dominick grillo, 7:30; another Day in paradise, 9:30

TUeSDAY 1

Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — stephanie Jordan Jazz band, 10:30

Banks Street Bar — the art of funk, 10 Bombay Club — monty banks, 6 Buffa’s Lounge — some like it Hot!, 11 a.m.; David roe, 3; natasha sanchez, 4; Catherine demer, 5; gardenia moon, 6; Chris watts, 7; ben de la Cour, 8; Cody blaine, 9 Circle Bar — netherfriends, 10 Columns Hotel — John rankin, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — treme brass band, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — tom Hook & wendell brunious, 9:30

Howlin’ Wolf Den — robert fortune band, nobody panic, riptide, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — rebirth brass band, 11 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — mumbles, 11:30 a.m.; some like it Hot!, 4; Viper mad, 7:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — michael liuzza, 8; michael bordelon, 9; John renshaw, 10 Preservation Hall — preservation Hall stars feat. shannon powell, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Davell Crawford, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — andy J. forest, noon; andy J. forest & the woodcutters, 3; panorama Jazz band, 6; smoking time Jazz Club, 10

WeDneSDAY 2 Banks Street Bar — major bacon, 10 Bistreaux — aaron lopezbarrantes, 7

Circle Bar — Jim o. & the no shows, 6 Columns Hotel — andy rogers, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — washboard Chaz blues trio, 7; walter “wolfman” washington & the roadmasters, 10 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 House of Blues — Domenic, 7 House of Blues (Parish) — Curren$y’s Jet lounge, 11 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori woods, 5; irvin mayfield’s noJo Jam, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — Honey island swamp band, 10 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — leah rucker, 6; Chris polacek & the Hubcap Kings, 9:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — bob north, 10 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — lars edegran, topsy Chapman & palm Court Jazz band, 7 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Creole string beans, 8:30 Siberia — toxic flood waters, sarah mcCoy & the oopsie Dosies, sweet street symphony, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo marsalis & the Uptown Jazz orchestra, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Carolyn broussard & the scotch Hounds, 2; the orleans six, 6; st. louis slim & the frenchmen street Jug band, 10 Three Muses — Kris tokarski, 4:30; Hot Club of new orleans, 7

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Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — paul longstreth, 5; george french Jazz Quartet, 8:30 Chickie Wah Wah — spencer bohren & the whippersnappers, 8 Circle Bar — Country fried, 10 Columns Hotel — Kristina morales, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Colin lake, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — tony green & gypsy Jazz, 9:30 Four Points by Sheraton — Desantis Duo, 6 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30

Chickie Wah Wah — meschiya lake & tom mcDermott, 7; Johnny sansone, John fohl & seth walker, 9

Bombay Club — tony seville trio, 7

HOURS

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

A

43


MUSiC LISTINGS PrEViEW

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Netherfriends

44

JaN

01

Netherfriends 10 p.m. Tuesday Circle Bar 1032 St. Charles Ave., (504) 588-2616

Musicians can play at the Circle Bar only so many times before the bar gives them their own night. Shawn Rosenblatt, aka Chicago’s Netherfriends, gigs in New Orleans more frequently than some local bands, so he picked up a pied-a-terre: On Tuesday nights in January, his restless solo road trip puts down roots on Lee Circle. The one man in Netherfriends’ one-man band has spent much of the last two years couch-surfing his way across the USA, writing, recording and performing a song in every state — a “selfish personal project,” he told the Chicago Tribune in May, but one that has gleaned a tiny piece of inspiration from every corner of the country, forming a more perfect union than any of its lonely parts. Middle America, his 2012 psych/pop mosaic, embarks from St. Louis, Mo., flips sides in Chicago and runs out of gas in Lawrence, Kan. In between, the impressionable journey gathers new friends for a good time in music-rich “Bloomington, IN” and questions an itinerant existence in “Omaha, NE”; metropolises yield intimate moments (“Minneapolis, MN”) and nowheresvilles tower like skyscrapers (“Kalamazoo, MI”). At these shows, Rosenblatt enlisted audiences and guest musicians to populate his loopy head voices and flighty world jams. The guy made a funk album out of Harry Nilsson samples. Give him Louisiana and see what he can do. Admission $5. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

Jammers, 8:30

Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow King, 7:30 Vaso — Emily Estrella & the Faux Barrio Billionaires, 6; Zena Moses & the Rue Fiya All-Stars, 9:30 Vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 4 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9 Andrea’s Capri Blu Lounge — “Uncle” Wayne Daigrepont, 7 Banks Street Bar — Revealers, 10 Bistreaux — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 7

Trio, 5; Prima Jazz Band, 9; Lena Prima & Band, 10

Checkpoint Charlie — Neslort, 11 Circle Bar — Norbert Slama, 6; Act Rights, Lord Buffalo, Todd Waits, Luxley, 10 Columns Hotel — Ross McIntire, 6 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 The Cypress — Bermuda, A Past Unknown, Deserters, Those Who Fear, Wishful Thinking, Atlas Shrugged, Ozona, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Iguanas, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10

Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 6; Lillian Boutte, 9:30

Four Points by Sheraton — DeSantis Duo, 6

Buffa’s Lounge — Bad Penny Pleasure Makers, 8; Aurora Nealand & Tom McDermott, 8

Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — Robin Barnes Jazz

Green Room — Todd Lemoine, Patrick Johnson, Nick Butitta, 9

House of Blues — Christian Serpas & Ghost Town, 5; Guster, Yellowbirds, 8 House of Blues (Parish) — Blue Mountain, Marah, 9 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — Lil Red & Big Bad, 10 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen, 4; Nancy Staggs, 7; Javier Olondo & AsheSon, 10:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Agent 86, 8; Mario Ortiz, 9; Samuel Barkerr, 10 Oak — Jenn Howard, 9 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Upstarts, 9:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Mark Braud & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Will Smith, 8 Rivershack Tavern — Coldshot, 10


MuSic LISTINGS Rock ’N’ Bowl — Boogie Men, 9:30

Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

Tipitina’s — Bruce Daigrepont & David Doucet, 5:30

The Saint — Scarecrow Sonic Boombox, High, Secret Society & Smaller Lies, 9

Preservation Hall — New Orleans Nightingales feat. Ingrid Lucia, 8

Siberia — Dr. Sick, 6; Meta the Man, Ivory Sons, I, Octopus, 9

Rivershack Tavern — Joe Krown Trio, 10

Vaso — Ed Willis & Blues 4 Sale, 7; Trumpet Black, 9; Froggies, 10; Mario Abney’s Super Jazz Cyper, 1 a.m.

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Jason Marsalis, 8 & 10

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. & the Zydeco Twisters, 9:30

Three Muses — Kristin Diable, 4; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9 Vaso — Eric Gordon’s Lazy Boys, 6; Original Pinettes Brass Band, 10; Young Fellaz Brass Band, midnight Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Shannon Powell Trio, 5

Saturday 5 Banks Street Bar — Riccardo Crespo, 8; Isla NOLA, 10 Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7 Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 6 Buffa’s Lounge — Royal Rounders, 8 Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 Chickie Wah Wah — Creole String Beans, 9

Clever Wine Bar — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 d.b.a. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 7; Little Freddie King, 11; Debauche, 2 a.m. Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 Four Points by Sheraton — DeSantis Duo, 6 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 House of Blues — Big Soul, 6; Leon Russell, 9 Howlin’ Wolf — Tankman, Lank, Kuthulu Prime, Nu Guise, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — 101 Runners, 10 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Mumbles, 12:30; Emily Estrella & the Faux Barrio Billionaires, 4; Megan Blue & the Bllue Trees, 7 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Igor, 7; Kerry Cox, 9; Beth Trepagnier, 10; Terrina & Jon, 11 Oak — Billy Iuso, 9 Old Point Bar — Gal Holiday, 9:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe —

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Dr. Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Casual Baby, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10 Tipitina’s — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Soul Rebels, 10 Tommy’s Wine Bar — Julio & Caesar, 10 Vaso — Some Like it Hot!, 6; 21st Century Brass Band, midnight

SuNday 6 Banks Street Bar — Ron Hotstream & Tony Italiano, 9 Bombay Club — Tony Seville Trio, 7 Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like it Hot!, 11 a.m. Circle Bar — Micah McKee & Little Maker, 6 d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; King James & the Special Men, 10 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 8 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Kevin Clark & Tom McDermott, 11:30 a.m.; Riccardo Crespo, 3:30; La Tran-K Band, 8 Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh feat. Romy Kaye, 9:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 Preservation Hall — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran & Big Al Carson, 8 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 4:30 Siberia — Jimmy Bradshaw, 6 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Jimmy Robinson, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sounds, 10 Three Muses — Raphael Bas & Norbert Slama, 5:30; Linnzi Zaorski, 8

Banks Street Bar — The Art of Funk, 10 BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 6 Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 6 Chickie Wah Wah — Jon Cleary, 8 Circle Bar — Missy Meatlocker, 6 d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9:30 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Larry Foyen Big Band, 6; Alex Marti, 9:30

TBA

TUE 1/1

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Honey Island Swamp Band

THU The Trio feat. Johnny V. 1/3 & Special Guests FRI 1/4

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Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Jay P. Dufour, 9 Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Living Legends feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 10 Vaso — James Williams & the Swamp Donkies, 6; Young Fellaz Brass Band, 10

claSSical/ coNcertS Loyola University New Orleans — Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www. montage.loyno.edu — Metropolitan Opera audition concerts, 10 a.m. Sat., 1:30 Sun. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts — 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Tue-Wed: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents “One Vision: The Music of Queen,” 8 Trinity Episcopal Church — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Sun: High Ground Drifters, 5

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Circle Bar — Daria & the Hip Drops, Minutehead, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 10

Siberia — The Tix, Voluptuals, Texas Funeral, High In One Eye, DJ Benny Divine, 9

Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8

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Spotted Cat — Andy J. Forest, 4; Jayna Morgan Band, 6; Cottonmouth Kings, 10

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Showcasing Local Music

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

More than just great food...

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DJANGO UNCHAINED (R) — Quentin Tarantino’s Louisiana-shot spaghetti Western follows a freed slave (Jamie Foxx) and dentist-turned-bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) who set out to free the slave’s wife (Kerry Washington). AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 FLIGHT (R) — Denzel Washington, Don Cheadle, Melissa Leo and others star in the drama about a troubling discovery surrounding a pilot’s emergency landing. AMC Palace 16

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Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LES MISERABLES (PG-13) — Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway and Amanda Seyfried lead an ensemble cast in the film adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LIFE OF PI (PG) — Ang Lee directs the adaptation of Yann Martel’s 2001 adventure novel. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 LINCOLN (PG-13) — Steven Spielberg’s biopic stars Daniel Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln and Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 14 MONSTERS, INC. 3-D (PG-13) — The 2001 pixar comedy gets a 3-D re-release. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Hollywood 14 PARENTAL GUIDANCE (PG-13) — A grandfather (Billy Crystal) is tasked with caring for his grandchildren when his daughter leaves town for work. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE POLAR EXPRESS 3-D (PG-13) — The adaptation of the Chris Van Allsburg children’s classic voiced by Tom Hanks returns in 3-D. Entergy IMAX SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R) — After a stint in a mental institution, a former teacher (Bradley Cooper) moves in with his parents and attempts to reconcile with his wife — but a mysterious woman (Jennifer Lawrence) complicates

reVIew

Les Miserables

There are no mysteries left as regards Les Miserables. The most successful musical in history by any reasonable measure, the show has been seen by more than 60 million people in 43 countries and translated into 21 different languages. The Broadway production ran continuously for 16 years, and the original English-language production in London’s West End is still Les Miserables (pg-13) running after 27 years. That means pretty Directed by Tom Hooper much anyone who loves musicals has Starring Anne Hathaway, seen it, and many fans are all too happy to prove the point by bursting into one of the Hugh Jackman and score’s unspeakably catchy songs. How Russell Crowe could a cinematic translation possibly add wide release anything significant to the unstoppable Les Mis juggernaut? To the credit of original producer Cameron Mackintosh — who still controls the property — Les Miserables the movie doesn’t attempt to recreate the experience of attending a theatrical production. The film is a wholehearted attempt to reinvent the original work for an entirely different medium. It’s still a huge story of personal struggles set against the backdrop of the revolutionary period in early 19th century France. But much of the grand historical sweep that elevated the play above less substantial musicals has been intentionally sacrificed to deliver what a theatrical production cannot: intimate performances. For the most part, Les Mis serves up 160 minutes worth of (mostly) talented singers performing much-loved songs in full close-up. That’s not going to win over new fans, but it’s pretty much guaranteed to please the old ones. At the very least, no one’s going to accuse Oscar-winning director Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech) of disrespecting his source material. Hooper made one crucial choice that makes his film’s modest success possible: Unlike familiar Hollywood musicals of previous eras, Les Mis offers not a single moment of lip-synching. All the actors performed the songs live on-set with help from a live pianist, whose playing was transmitted to the singers via invisible earpieces. This technique lends all the performances an immediacy and authenticity not normally found in movie musicals. The difference is striking, and it’s especially valuable to this musical because the story is told almost exclusively through lyrics — Les Mis has only a handful of spoken lines. The wispy orchestral music placed behind the vocal performances is nothing much to listen to, but it’s intended to gently support both the needed exposition and the singers’ emotionally charged performances. Those performances are strong. The biggest surprise is Anne Hathaway, whose moving turn as Fantine, the tragically fallen factory worker, embodies the inequities at the root of social unrest in the country. The movie never fully recovers from her character’s early exit. Hugh Jackman manages an appealing performance as former convict Jean Valjean, but Russell Crowe’s Inspector Javert sticks out like a sore thumb — Crowe simply lacks the singing ability to keep up with the rest of the cast. The film also suffers as the story turns to its younger generation of budding revolutionaries, led by Amanda Seyfried as Cosette and Eddie Redmayne as Marius, who just don’t possess the depth of feeling displayed by the ensemble cast in the movie’s first half. They can sing, but their screen time seems designed mainly to attract younger filmgoers. Score it as a victory for the older set, both on screen and in the audience. — KEN KORMAN things. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place SKYFALL (PG-13) — Daniel Craig returns as James Bond in the spy thriller. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 THIS IS 40 (R) — The spin-

off of Knocked Up finds characters from that film (Leslie Mann and paul Rudd) struggling with middle age and parenting. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SpecIaL ScreeNINgS ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO (NR) — The 1940 drama stars Bette Davis as a governess who incurs the wrath of the duchess for whom she works. 10 a.m. Sunday and Jan. 9, Prytania

© 2012 Universal stUdios

SAL AD M A NIA


FILM LISTINGS REVIEW

© 2012 Universal stUdios

Immigrants

The recent presidential primaries and election campaign reduced discussion of immigration to a nearly exclusive focus on Latinos and the construction of fences on the border with Mexico —as well as draconian Arizona laws requiring documented immigrants (“resident aliens”) to carry proof of identity. The possibility of seriously addressing the estimated 12 Immigrants million undocumented immigrants living jan 5 p.m. Saturday in the country is encumbered by this distortion and other political complicaContemporary Arts tions. The film Immigrants, by University Center, 900 Camp of New Orleans film and theater professor St., (504) 528-3000; Laszlo Fulop and Tulane University history www.cacno.org professor Marline Otte, is a welcome breath of fresh air in the discussion of immigration and global connections. It is, however, similarly narrow in focus. The hourlong film features interviews with “creative class” immigrants — all are professionals or academics. They come from countries including Spain, India, Bolivia, Brazil, South Korean, Japan, Ghana, Ireland and Australia, among others. The various subjects talk about their lives as immigrants in America, but many of the most interesting observations come in comparisons of living in America versus other cultures — for example Irish Catholicism versus American Catholicism. The film is anecdotal. There is no narrator, no statistics, no analysis. Instead, the interviewees talk directly to the camera about everything from their names and accents to religious and gender role differences between countries. The short interview segments don’t always follow a particular line of thought, and at times they are interspersed with superfluous scenes of a modern dance performance. The film obviously suggests these and many other individuals are not accurately described by the labels thrown around in politically loaded discussions of immigration. This group isn’t representative of the immigration issue anyway, but given the diversity of individuals’ nations of origin, it offers a broad view of an increasingly interrelated world of nations, and some of the subjects have migrated to different countries several times. The film screens in conjunction with excerpts from the same filmmakers in an exhibit called Home and Away in the Contemporary Arts Center’s video gallery. There is a question-and-answer session with the filmmakers following the screening. Admission is free to Louisiana residents. — WILL COvIeLLO

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BONES BRIGADE: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY (NR) — The documentary traces the story of the popular skateboarding team of the ’70s and ’80s that includes Tony Hawk, Rodney Mullen, Steve Caballero and others. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students and seniors, $6 members. 5:30 p.m and 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net IMMIGRANTS (NR) — Laszlo Fulop and Marline Otte’s documentary explores what gets lost when an individual leaves his or her country of origin. Free admission. 5 p.m Saturday, Contemporary Arts

Center, 900 Camp St., 5283800; www.cacno.org MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (PG) — The classic British comedy spoofs King Arthur’s quest to find the Holy Grail. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com TAI CHI ZERO (PG-13) — In Stephen Feng’s steampunk kung-fu adventure, a young man travels to a village renowned for its Tai Chi style but is greeted with resistance from residents. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students and seniors, $6 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

CaLL FOR FILMMaKERS LOUISIANA FILM FESTIVAL The inaugural film and mentorship program to be held April 18-21 accepts entries. visit www.lifilmfest. org for details. Submission deadline is Monday. AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania. com

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art

listings GaLLErIES ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — works by michelle gagliano, through Jan. 10. ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www. antieaugallery.com — “a good Defense,” works by beth bojarski, through January.

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “lumen tetrachotomy,” works by rachel David, elizabeth eckman, rachel speck and sarah rose, through feb. 23. opening reception 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. saturday. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — paintings by susan landry, sculpture by arlyn Jiminez, jewelry by Chigusa nishimoto and works by Jack pollack, through January. opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. saturday.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JANUARY 1 > 2013

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www. arthurrogergallery.com — “natural wonders,” mixed media on canvas by allison stewart; “build Your Cities,” paintings by nicole Charbonnet; both through feb. 16. opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. saturday. CALLAN CONTEMPORARY. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www. callancontemporary.com — “Dawn walker,” works by michael Kessler, through Jan. 30. opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. saturday. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936; www.docsgallery. com — “other plans,” paintings by brad Dupuy, through January. opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. saturday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “better Dead than red,” sculpture by David buckingham, through January. opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. saturday. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “aurora,” sculpture by sean o’meallie, through feb. 23. opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. saturday. MARDI GRAS WORLD. 1380 Port of New Orleans Place, 361-7821 — “bead town,” mosaics made out of mardi gras beads by stephan wanger, through feb. 13. opening thursday. NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www.neworleansglassworks.com — “team Chihuly,” works by James mongrain and Joey DeCamp; luminous sculpture by tish Douzart; both through January. opening reception saturday.

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JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “new orleans at table,” paintings of new orleans restaurants by linda lesperance, through January. opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. saturday.

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BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 5252767; www.barristersgallery. com — “archaeologies of the extraordinary everyday,” dolls and mixed media on canvas by anne marie grgich; “the filthy fs,” paintings by VonHoffacker; both through saturday. BENEITO’S ART. 3618 Magazine St., 891-9170; www. bernardbeneito.com — oil paintings by bernard beneito, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “new orleans loves to second line all the time,” works by nilo and mina lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, noel rockmore and others; all ongoing. BIG BUNNY FINE ART. 332 Exchange Alley, 309-2444; www.bigbunnyfineart.com — “old enough for ghosts,” works by greg gieguez, steve lohman, sarah nelson and Hanneke relyea, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422 A St. Claude Ave., www. byrdiesgallery.com — “earth never leaves Your Hands,” photographs by lindsay Carter pritchard in conjunction with photonola, through Jan. 8. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery.com — works by Joachim Casell, phillip sage, rene ragi, Jack miller and others, ongoing. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoe-

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ilartconsortium.com — “loss,” photographs by souzan alavi in conjunction with photonola, through saturday.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing.com — Hand-carved works in wood by Daniel garcia, ongoing. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936; www.docsgallery. com — “the wildflower series,” oil paintings by busch, through thursday. THE FOUNDATION GALLERY. 608 Julia St., 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola. com — works by paul santoleri, through Jan. 12. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — works by Carl Joe williams; works by Kyle Hossli; “angry american artist,” works by rajko radovanovic; works by mike Drake; all through sunday. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “a Visual feast: new orleans restaurants,” a group exhibition of paintings, through Jan. 20. GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “5 rooms/5 photographers,” photographs by Heidi lender, Jane fulton alt, Jennifer shaw, aline smithson and ayumi tanaka in conjunction with photonola, through Jan. 26. HOMESPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave., (917) 584-9867 — “V,” a five-year anniversary show featuring more 40 artists, through sunday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Contemporary antiques,” a group photography show curated by franke relle in conjunction with photonola, through saturday.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., second floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — works by nellrea simpson, Chip tipton, tamra Carboni and Caren nowak, ongoing. RODRIGUE GALLERY. Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 525-2500; www. sheratonneworleans.com — photographs by Jack robinson curated by sarah wilkerson freeman, through march. SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “facade,” photographic collage by J. stirling barrett, through feb. 2. SECOND STORY GALLERY. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 7104506; www.thesecondstorygallery.com — “sexual expression,” female portraits by Veronica ali, through saturday. SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “memes and mirrors of mind and memory,” three-dimensional structures by Jimmy block, through Jan. 9. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — “wax on,” encaustic works by louisiana artists curated by Jessica Danby, through Jan. 12. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www. postmedium.org/staplegoods — “painters’ Choice,” photographs by lake newton in conjunction with photonola, through sunday. STUDIO 831. 532 Royal St., 304-4392; www.studio831royal.com — “in a mind’s eye,” sculpture by Jason robert griego, ongoing.

SParE SPaCES HEY! CAFE. 4332 Magazine

St., 891-8682; www.heycafe.biz — “reconsidering nature,” photographs by Janell o’Halloran in conjunction with photonola, through monday. paintings by mario ortiz, ongoing.

LA DIVINA GELATERIA. 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www. ladivinagelateria.com — photographs by rita posselt, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY, ROSA KELLER BRANCH. 4300 S. Broad St., 596-2675; www.nutrias. org — “random Daze,” works by Dwayne Conrad, natasha sanchez, pat Jolly, amanda leigh and brian Cunningham, through monday.

CaLL fOr artIStS BRIDGE HOUSE/GRACE HOUSE RECYCLED FASHION SHOW. the charity seeks designers for its benefit fashion show featuring items from the bridge House thrift store that have been reimagined into fashionable outfits. the event is march 1. email jpitman@bridgehouse.org for details. CONGO SQUARE NEW WORLD RHYTHMS FESTIVAL. the Jazz and Heritage foundation seeks artists and craft-makers for the festival, held march 23-24. Visit www. jazzandheritage.org for details. application deadline is feb. 1. GEORGE RODRIGUE FOUNDATION OF THE ARTS CONTEST. High school-aged contestants create art around the theme “louisiana’s Culinary Heritage” for a chance to have the work appear in a cookbook and to win college scholarships and cash prizes. Visit www. rodriguefoundation.org/artcontest for details. submissions deadline is feb. 20. RAU FOR ART FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION. m.s. rau antique’s foundation, which provides

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musEums CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “Color Fall Down,” photographs by Priya Kambli in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 20. “Where Do We Migrate To?” a group show; “Rooted,” a mixed-media installation by Ben Diller; “Revolve,” sculpture by Rontherin Ratliff; “Home and Away,” multi-screen installation by Laszlo Fulop and Marline Otte, through Jan. 20. Murals by MILAGROS, through April 6. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum. com — “Faces of Treme,” photographs by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 26. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Perique,” photographs by Charles Martin in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Feb. 2. “Something Old, Something New: Collecting in the 21st Century,” an exhibition of the collection’s significant acquisitions since 2000, through Feb. 8. LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “a year and one day,” sculpture by Andy Behrle, through Dec. 20. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “New Orleans Bound 1812: The Steamboat That Changed America,” through January. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; “Living with Hurricanes:

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MADAME JOHN’S LEGACY. 632 Dumaine St., 568-6968; www.crt. state.la.us — “The Palm, the Pine and the Cypress: Newcomb College Pottery of New Orleans,” ongoing. M.S. RAU ANTIQUES. 630 Royal St., 523-5660; www.rauantiques. com — “Impressionism: Influences and Impact,” paintings by Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Vincent van Gogh and Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, through Friday. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “19th Century Louisiana Landscapes,” paintings by Richard Clague, Marshall Smith Jr. and William Buck, through Sunday. “Lifelike,” works based on commonplace objects and situations by Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, James Casebere and others, through Jan. 27. “Ida Kohlmeyer: 100th Anniversary Highlights,” through Feb. 10. “Make Yourself at Home,” paintings by Jim Richard, through Feb. 24. “Forever,” mural by Odili Donald Odita, through Oct. 7. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “CURRENTS,” a showcase of photography by New Orleans Photo Alliance members, through Sunday. “50 Photographs: An Iconography of Chance,” works by Tav Falco; “Something Whispered, Something Sung,” photographs by Louviere+Vanessa; “Salt & Truth,” photographs by Shelby Lee Adams; all through Monday. OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6993; www.crt.state.la.us/ museum/properties/usmint — Winners of Pictures of the Year International’s Visions of Excellence awards in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through February. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Tanqueray Olive” and “Guinness Pint,” prints by Tom Gianfagna, through Jan. 21. “Lena Richard: Pioneer in Food TV,” an exhibit curated by Ashley Young; “Then and Now: The Story of Coffee”; both ongoing.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

In art, there is a point where romanticism and magic realism intersect. In photography, that point, or place, is southern Louisiana and adjoining regions. It’s a legacy that was epitomized by legendary New Orleans photographer Clarence John Laughlin, a self-proclaimed “extreme romantic” who became America’s first surrealist photographer in the 1930s. He died in 1985, but his legacy lives on today in an array of Louisiana photographers including Josephine Sacabo, and extends slightly west to Beaumont, Texas, where Keith Carter has long pursued his dreamily localized form of magic realism. Both employ a hybrid of digital techniques and archaic processes and both are featured in shows at A Gallery for Fine Photography. Sacabo’s photogravure expo, like her recent book, is titled Nocturnes, but there also are some exciting new images where her baroque feminine Natural Histories: mysticism takes a taut new turn. Inspired by THRU Photographs by Keith Carter the late Brazilian author Clarice Lispector, arguably the Latin American writer most JAN Nocturnes: Photographs by attuned to psychological issues, works like Josephine Sacabo Geometry of Discord, Beyond Thought A Gallery For Fine Photography, (pictured) convey something of the confluence of circumstance and emotion that can lead to intui241 Chartres St., (504) 568tive flashes of epiphany. There is a near construc1313; www.agallery.com tivist formalism about these dynamic new works, a nod perhaps to Lispector’s Ukrainian birth before emigrating with her parents to Brazil as a child in the 1920s. Keith Carter’s Natural Histories series lives up to its name in images made using archaic lenses that take us through a looking glass into a parallel universe where feral humans and decorous animals all occupy a whimsically Darwinian wonderland. They may originate in east Texas, but Carter’s images delve into the rich recesses of mythology and the human psyche to explore the common threads of human and animal attraction in forms ranging from the luminous blue wings of the Morpho moth to the mating games of formally attired humans in archaic bals masques. All appear as artifacts, reminders that we are products of the same earth with all of the beauty and animal urges that implies. — D. ERIC BOOKHARDT

scholarships to high school artists in Orleans, Jefferson and St. Bernard parishes, has an art competition that awards scholarships and an opportunity to study in Italy. Visit www.rauforart. com for details. Application deadline is Friday.

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STAGE listings

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

ThEATER HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — skin Horse theater revives its production of the musical about an east german rock star who suffered a botched sex-change operation. email skinhorsetheater@ gmail.com or visit www. skinhorsetheater.org for reservations. tickets $15. whom Do You work for? opens at 7 p.m. 8 p.m. friday-saturday and monday through Jan. 14 and Jan. 17-18 and 21.

SHUT UP, SWEET CHARLOTTE!. Mid-City Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460; www. midcitytheatre.com — ricky graham and Varla Jean merman star in the parody of the 1948 bette Davis film Hush ... Hush, Sweet Charlotte. tickets $30 general admission, $35 Vip seating. 8 p.m. thursday-saturday and 6 p.m. sunday through Jan. 19.

BURLESQUE, CABARET & VARIETY BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — trixie minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of leon “Kid Chocolate” brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. friday.

RIVERTOWN THEATERS SEASON ANNOUNCEMENT. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 461-9475; www.rivertowntheaters.com — the theater announces its 2013-14 season at the event with food, an open bar, performances from upcoming shows and a silent auction. admission $40. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. fri., Jan. 4.

AUdITIoNS ANTHONY BEAN COMMUNITY THEATER. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www. anthonybeantheater.com — the theater seeks africanamerican actors ages 1665 for its upcoming season of shows. auditions are by appointment only. 2 p.m. saturday. BATTLE OF ANGELS. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Director glenn meche seeks actors for his march production of the tennessee williams play. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. saturday-sunday. RIVER REGION BALLET. the theater holds auditions for its productions of Thumbelina and Ballet in Black & White. email riverregionballet@cox.net or visit www. rrpa.org/riverregionballet/ rrbperformanceseason.html for details. sunday.

ComEdY ALLSTAR COMEDY REVUE. House of Blues Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St. — leon blanda hosts the stand-up comedy show with special guests and a band. free admission. 8 p.m. thursday. BLOCK PARTY. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater.com — performers get 4-6 minutes to present

on The Tonight Show, Johnny Carson had a three-decade run, most of it without serious competition, but now late night is full of talk shows — hosted by Jay leno, David letterman, Craig ferguson, Jimmy Kimmel, Conan o’brien and many others. new orleans has a talk show, albeit monthly, available only to the live audience at Cafe istanbul. Host John Calhoun has posted a few monologues, comedy sketches and guest appearances on Youtube. Calhoun’s The Goodnight Show apes the most familiar late-night tropes, opening with a comedic monologue and progressing to chats with guests on a couch beside his desk. there is an announcer, onstage band and performances by comic and musical guests. the string of guests and loose atmosphere make the show fun, although the segment changes start to drag after the first hour. the December show featured Dwight Henry, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and owner of the buttermilk Drop bakery and Cafe. He shared a story about the persistence it took director benh Zeitlin and a team of producers to convince him to take time from his bakery to make the film. meschiya lake performed a couple of ballads, and then recounted how, at 9 years old, she sang a patsy Cline song to beat adult competition in a south Dakota steakhouse’s talent show. for a comic bit, Calhoun pulled offbeat new Year’s resolutions out of a Christmas stocking. but the unpolished, bare-bones skits that serve as live commercials for sponsors were more entertaining, if only for their upbeat hucksterism. a bit promoting satsuma Cafe featured an overworked but funny joke about an employee learning to make blts as if he was one of the hapless recruits learning to use his rifle in Full Metal Jacket’s boot camp scenes. Calhoun has a big smile; he’s cheerful and comfortable in the role of host. Ultimately, what makes the variety show work is the guests and quick stream of short segments. the talk show-style set and shtick is funny the first time, but will constantly calling attention to it wear well? the desk and couch arrangement led to Calhoun and his guests sitting close together, almost facing one another — a couple of guests awkwardly tried to balance switching back and forth to face the audience and Calhoun. the few rows of seats are shallow but wide, leaving many watching from extreme angles. there’s no real point to setting the stage like a tV set if it makes it harder for the audience to see the show. the gimmickry is not as entertaining as the unscripted moments and conversation that make live events compelling. the next installment is Jan. 23 at Cafe istanbul. — will CoViello

whatever they want. tickets $5. sign-up at 11:30 p.m., show at midnight. friday. COMEDY BEAST. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — the new movement presents a stand-up comedy showcase. tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. tuesday. COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open-mic portion. 8 p.m. thursday. COMEDY SPORTZ. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — the theater hosts an all-ages improv comedy show. tickets $10. 7

p.m. saturday. FEAR & LOATHING WITH GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — the double bill includes fear and loathing, the sketch comedy show, and god’s been Drinking, the improv comedy troupe. tickets $10, $5 with drink purchase. 8:30 p.m. friday. GIVE ’EM THE LIGHT OPEN-MIC COMEDY SHOW. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com — leon blanda hosts the showcase. sign-up 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. tuesday. ICE COLD COMEDY. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855 — the comedy show features stand-up, an open mic and free ice cream.

free admission. 9 p.m. mon., Jan. 7 and monday. LIGHTS UP. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater. com — the theater showcases new improv troupes. tickets $5. 9 p.m. thursday. THE LITERARY CANNON. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www. newmovementtheater.com — improvisers create scenes inspired by book passages, poems, articles, Yelp reviews and more. tickets $5. 7:30 p.m. sunday. SATURDAY NIGHT LAUGH TRACK. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 2317011; www.nolacomedy.com — the theater hosts a stand-up comedy showcase. tickets $5. 11 p.m. saturday.

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

PATTI LUPONE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca. com — the two-time tony award winning broadway actress who has stared in Evita, Gypsy and others presents a concert. Visit www.broadwaynola.com for reservations. tickets $52.74-$104.49 (includes fees). 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. monday.

EVENTS

REVIEW

The Goodnight Show with John Calhoun

51


eveNt LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

FAMILY SUNDAY 6 SUNDAY YOUTH MUSIC WORKSHOP. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com — Children of all ages can play with and learn from musicians at the free workshop. This week’s workshop features Wendell Brunius, Chris Severin and Johnny Vidacovich. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.

eveNtS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

tUeSDAY 1

52

CELEBRATION IN THE OAKS. City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888; www.neworleanscitypark.com — The event showcases light displays in the park and also features live music and holiday activities. Visit www.celebrationintheoaks.com for details. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday-Thursday and 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. FridaySaturday. COMMITMENT DAY RACE. Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888; www.neworleanscitypark.com — The 5K race promotes healthy lifestyle changes in the New Year. Visit www.commitmentday. com/content/new-orleans for details. Admission $20-$39. 10 a.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. Visit www.crescentcityfarmersmarket.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WeDNeSDAY 2 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 —

The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

tHURSDAY 3 BAL DES ARTISTES. Casino building, second floor, City Park — The benefit for the Creative Alliance of New Orleans is a masked ball and fashion show with live music, auctions, a pop-up boutique, food and more. Visit www.cano-la.org for details. Tickets $75 general admission, $35 artists. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. CAMELLIA PRESENTATION. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Marie Mizell, president of the New Orleans Camellia Club, leads the presentation. 7 p.m.

FRIDAY 4 LEAH CHASE 90TH BIRTHDAY GALA WEEKEND. The weekend celebrates the legendary Creole chef’s birthday and inaugurates the Edgar “Dooky” Jr. & Leah Chase Family Foundation. “In Celebration of Leah Chase’s 90th Birthday: A Conversation With Leah and Dooky” is Friday at Dooky Chase Restaurant (2301 Orleans Ave.) with seatings at 11 a.m.,

2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Admission $40. On Saturday there’s a gala at Hyatt Regency New Orleans (601 Loyola Ave.) with live music, food and a special presentation. Admission $250. 6 p.m. Visit http://www. dookyandleahchasefoundation.org for details. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N. Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. NORTH AMERICAN ANARCHIST STUDIES NETWORK CONFERENCE. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The annual conference includes lectures, presentations, parties, live music, “radical history tours,” the Anarchist Bookfair and Expo and more. Visit www.naasn12. org for details. Admission $15-$25. Friday-Sunday. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, lectures, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

SAtURDAY 5 13TH NIGHT MARDI GRAS KICK OFF PARTY. Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www.generationshall.net — The Krewe of Orpheus hosts the party with live music by Mixed Nuts, food from local restaurants, an open bar and a live auction benefiting the George Rodrigue Foundation of the Arts. Visit www.kreweoforpheus. com/13thnight for details. Admission $60 in advance, $70 at the door. 8 p.m. to midnight. 70117 VACCINATIONS & MORE. Firehouse No. 27, 2118 Elysian Fields Ave. — The LA/SPCA provides free microchips, vaccinations, rabies tags and collars to owned dogs of residents of the 70117 zip code (proof of residency required). Residents of Orleans Parish from other zip codes may receive services for a $20 fee. Call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org/70117 for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CHILDREN’S WRITERS WORKSHOP. Education building, room 305 G, University of New Orleans, 280-6000; www.uno.edu — The Louisiana chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators hosts the workshop led by author Donna Jo Napoli.

Admission $35 SCBWI members, $40 nonmembers. Visit www.scbwi-louisiana.org for details. 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. COVINGTON ART MARKET. Covington Trailhead, 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — The market features a variety of work from local and regional artists, including jewelry, crafts, photography, paintings and more. Visit www.sttammanyartassociation.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. FRERET MARKET. Freret Market, corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 6382589; www.freretmarket.org — More than 90 local vendors sell food, art, jewelry, gifts and collectibles. There also are pet adoptions and live music. Noon to 5 p.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly paint drop-off event. Visit www. greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. RIVERTOWN FARMERS MARKET. Rivertown Heritage Park, 2020 Fourth St., Kenner, 468-7211; www.kenner.la.us — The twice-monthly market features local fruit, vegetables and dairy, homemade jams and jellies, cooking demonstrations and more. 8 a.m. to noon. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, ARISE Academy, 3819 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishers. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

SUNDAY 6 FASHION WEEK NEW ORLEANS MODEL CASTING CALL. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www. eiffelsociety.com — Female and male models are needed for the fashion event March 2123. Visit www.fashionweeknola.com/model-casting1 for details. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

MoNDAY 7 ABIGAIL GULLO TAKES MANHATTAN. SoBou, 310 Chartres St., (504) 552-4095; www.sobounola.com/ — The SoBou bar chef leads a seminar discussing the history and techniques of the Manhattan cocktail. Visit www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org for details. Admission $35 in advance, $40 at the door. 5:30 p.m.

SPoRtS HORNETS. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., (504) 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The Hornets play the Atlanta Hawks. 7 p.m. Tuesday and the San Antonio Spurs 7 p.m. Monday. Visit www.hornets.com for details. SUGAR BOWL. MercedesBenz Superdome, 1500 Poydras St., (504) 587-3663; www.superdome.com — The Louisville Cardinals play the Florida Gators in the annual matchup. Visit www.allstatesugarbowl.org for details. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FoR voLUNteeRS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY. American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient-service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free

training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION. Bayou Rebirth seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information. CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marketumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shoppers’ questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION. The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER. The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS. The group that provides free energy-efficient lightbulbs seeks volunteers to help install the bulbs in homes. Email peter.schamp@ greenlightneworleans.org or visit www.greenlightneworleans.org/volunteerapply.html for details. page 54


MadaM Mondays starting January 7

• Get a Madam Name Tag good for $3 cocktails (all day)

s.I.n.- ful Tuesdays • H ang with your Service Industry peers and get $6 burgers (all day) • 2 for 1 beers and cocktails starting at 9 pm

New yeAr’S dAy SPeciAl:

$3 Bloody Marys (From open – 6 pm) Relax after your late night with our homemade hangover helpers!

WIne Lover’s Wednesdays • 1⁄2 off aLL bottles of wine (all day)

• 2 for 1 cocktails for the ladies • All Night Party with DJ

red LIghT FrIdays

• All Night Party with DJ starting at 10 pm

SuNuP ’til SuNdowN SAturdAyS • $3 Bloody Marys (From open – 6 pm)

• All Night Party with DJ starting at 10 pm

SPorto SuNdAyS

• $ 10 Beer Buckets (5 bottles per bucket): Crispen, Miller Lite, Coors Light, PBR (From open through the last play of the day) • 50¢ wings (1⁄2 or full orders only, side of sauce $0.50 ea.)

11 am until (limited menu selection after 11 pm) • 21 and up after 9 pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

LadIes’ nIghT Thursdays

53


t

Classes Start January 7th

- getta bo ut HO i P

Medical Assistant, EKG Phlebotomy Technician, Pharmacy Technician Preparedness & more!

504-526-1478 6660 RIVERSIDE DR.

SUITE 101, METAIRIE www.unitechtrainingacademy.com

A branch of Unitech Training Academy - Lafayette Campus

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053

(504) 368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

EVENT LISTINGS page 52

HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up for service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 304-2275, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo. com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL. The charter school that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details. LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS. The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

Why Cook?

$1 domestic draft $3 IMPORT draft 2-5PM • mon-fri only

3535 severn @ west esplanade

(behind CVS) • metairie

2035 METAIRIE ROAD

www.marktwainspizza.com 54

20%

off lunch

504.888.5858

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LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum accepts

applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details. NOLA WISE. The program by Global Green in partnership with the City of New Orleans and the Department of Energy that helps homeowners make their homes more energy efficient seeks volunteers. All volunteers must attend a 30-minute orientation. Email mrowand@ globalgreen.org for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www. operationreach.org. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEER. New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www. nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details. START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@ scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION. The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

WORDS BARNES & NOBLE JR. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. CHRISTY HEMENWAY. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses The Thinking Beekeeper. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket. net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday. EMILY EPSTEIN LANDAU. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Spectacular Madness: Sex, Race, and Memory in Storyville, New Orleans. 6 p.m. Thursday. FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE. Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday. PASS IT ON. George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. ROSALIE G. RIEGLE. The Catholic Book Store, 3003 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-7504 — The author signs and discusses Doing Time for Peace: Resistance, Family and Community. 11 a.m. Saturday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group for writers of all levels meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 655-5489 or email fleurdeholly@gmail. com for details.


N ED O D I N T A U P IB EX T R IS D

COVERING THE EXCITEMENT AND EVENTS IN NEW ORLEANS SURROUNDING SUPER BOWL 2013.

THE OFFICIAL SUPER BOWL HOST COMMITTEE FAN GUIDE JOIN THE EXCITEMENT! ADVERTISE IN GAMBIT’S SUPERBOWL ISSUE! GAMBIT’S ISSUE DATE

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PETS

WANTED TO PURCHASE

PET ADOPTIONS

CASH FOR CARS

DIXON - SWEET BABY KITTEN

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

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• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

NUBS

AUTOMOTIVE

HEALING ARTS Relieve Stress - Fear - Anxiety NATURALLY with Conscious Connected Breathing. Call Jack at 504-453-9161. www.jackfontana.com

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

Dixon is a 11-week-old gray tabby boy. This biscuit making, purring machine is fully vetted and ready for a family to love. Call or email: 504-454-8200 or spaymartadopt@gmail.com

FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED

For cats & dogs. www.arfl.petfinder. com or call (504) 975-5971

Monkey (brown tabby)

URGENT- snuggling cat, great for family home Monkey (brown tabby) is a shy boy but not skittish just shy personality. He wants to lay w you in bed and cuddle. Monkey loves other cats and would be a great fit for family living. Traci 504975-5971 tbkestler@cox.net

PRECIOUS

Declawed Himalayan. Gorgeous Himalayan seal point kitty. Precious is an affectionate older cat who would make a great companion. 504-454-8200; spaymartadopt@gmail.com

Princess- sweet CHIHUAHUA

Princess is a mild mannered but playful dog. Would love a friend to hang out with. She is a good family pet & really appreciates human attention & love. Sleeping in the bed is a favorite thing to do along with daily treat intake! Traci 504-975-5971 tbkestler@cox.net Applications for adoption for this pet can be filled out at www.arfl.petfinder.com

SARGE - JACK RUSSEL

Great with other dogs & kids.Sarge is a few yrs old & is good w/ other dogs and kids. He is a Jack Russell Terrier and has a lot of energy. Best if he has a yard to run in or someone who will take him running. Would also be nice if he can have a playmate to keep him active. His favorite toy is a tennis ball. www.arfl.petfinder.com

CAT CHAT Gentle Lovebug!

DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE

David is a wonderfully good natured older kitty who never meets a stranger. He is healthy, handsome and ever so gentle. David must be adopted with his best friend Snowball, who shares the same relaxed personality. These two boys would make a wonderful addition to any family.

BY ERNESTO (Masters in Deep Tissue) New Studio in Kenner By appt only. No sensual massage. Lic # LA0445. Call 504-275-5935

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

URGENT-Sweet black and white young CAT needs a home. Nubs (black & white) Sweet boy w/a nub tail. Nubs has an outgoing personality & would love a companion. He is approx 6 mos & has a heart of gold. Traci 504-9755971 tbkestler@cox.net Applications for adoption for this pet can be filled out at www.arfl.petfinder.com

Call or email: 504-454-8200, spaymartadopt@gmail.com

MERCHANDISE MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

www.spaymart.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

VW SEDAN 1996 JACK

56

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Louis is a 10-year-old, neutered, Terrier mix who LOVES treats and knows how to “sit” and “shake.” His owners were moving and couldn’t take him with them, which makes him very sad after 10 years with the same family. Louis appears to be housetrained and is a spunky, friendly, guy. To meet Louis or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

30” white electric wall oven $500 cash & 30” gas cooktop, $300 cash. Both never used. Call (504) 864-9015

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122

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Authentic Handmade Indian Rug 100% Wool • Made in India • Size - 7’-11’’ x 10’-2” Purchased at Hurwitz Mintz in 2007 • Original Price $2,700.00 Selling for $1,700 Please call (504) 458-7904 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $225. Can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $250. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122

LOUIS Kennel #A17894055

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HARLEY Kennel #A18692682

Harley is a 12-year-old, neutered,

DSH with black & white tuxedo markings and pale yellow eyes. Harley weighs 20 lbs., so needs to go on a serious diet, so he can remain healthy during his senior years. Harley enjoys lazing around and will require a vet consult at the shelter to discuss his weight management plan. To meet Harley or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

SHULA

Precious gray tabby kitten. Shula is the definition of kitten: curious & playful; sweet & affectionate. This wide eyed kitten was a bottle baby & is absolutely precious. Call or email: 504-4548200 or spaymartadopt@gmail. com

SNOWBALL COMPLETE LOVE BUG

Older snow white kitty with large gold eyes; super gentle and relaxed. Wonderful addition to any family. 504454-8200; spaymartadopt@gmai.com

SYBIL - GREEN EYED BEAUTY

Sybil’s family surrendered her because of their unruly toddler. Although safe with Spay Mart, Sybil doesn’t understand why she was given up. She is about 7-years-old and just adorable! 504-454-8200; spaymartadopt@ gmail.com

UGLY BETTY

Hurricane Isaac rescue from flooded La Place, LA. 4 months old black/ white kitten needs a safe indoor loving home. Has been vaccinated and spayed, small adoption fee, app and vet references req. (504 ) 462-1968

URGENT

Sweet black and white young CAT needs a home Nubs (black & white) Sweet boy w/a nub tail. Outgoing personality & would love a companion. Approx 6 mos & has a heart of gold. Traci 504-975-5971 tbkestler@cox.net ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS I SAW AEROSMITH N.O ARENA 12/6 JAMMED!

Had 2nd best seats in house: Floor A, Row 2, Seat 7 (next to Catwalk.) Beautiful woman in front of me had best seat in house, Floor A, Row 1, Seat 7 (next to Catwalk) I could not keep my eyes off you - I was speechless. There was a definite connection. Looking for you! We can do it again! We can colonize the moon & the stars! Email me: Matthew-285@yahoo.com

LEGAL NOTICES Anyone knowing the whereabouts of DEBORAH THOMAS ROBEY or KELVIN ROBEY please contact Faun Fenderson, Attorney at (504) 528-9500 or faun@faunfenderson.com Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Kennetra Chrisean Gray, please contact attorney Ramona Washington at (504) 723-5884. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Layshawn Mayes call attorney Lekiesha McKarry 225-290-5605. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Martha Butler Scott or any of the heirs of Martha Butler Scott, please contact attorney Ramona Washington at (504) 723-5884. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Nicole Williams Dukes, please contact Ebony T. Woodruff, Attorney, 1554 N. Broad St., New Orleans, LA 70119, 504-943-7026. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Rocco Donald Cardillo, Jr., please contact Keith A. Doley, atty, 1554 N. Broad St., New Orleans, LA 70119, 504-943-7071. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Sontierrl L. Bacchus or Sontierll L. Bacchus , please contact attorney Ramona Washington at (504) 723-5884. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of THE HEIRS OF DENITRA RUFFIN LEE please contact Faun Fenderson, Attorney at 504-528-9500 or faun@ faunfenderson.com


CLASSIFIEDS CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 09-1580 SEC.13 DIV”J”

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 715629 DIVISION F DOCKET V

SUCCESSION OF ALVIN GENERAL WILLIAMS, SR.

SUCCESSION OF FRANCES T TRAINA

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

NOTICE Notice is given that the executor of this succession has petitioned this Court for the private sale of the immovable property hereinafter described, to wit:

NOTICE IS GIVEN that KATIE M. WILLIAMS, duly qualified executrix of the Succession ALVIN GENERAL WILLIAMS, SR. has filed a Petition for authority to sell, at private sale, the immovable property described as follows: A CERTAIN PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes and advantages thereunto belonging, situated in the Sixth District of New Orleans, in Square 688, bounded by Robert, Upperline, Cucullus and Claiborne Streets, commencing at a point 30 feet from the corner of Robert and Cucullus Streets, and measuring 40 feet front on Robert Street, by a depth of 120 feet between equal and parallel lines. Another portion of ground, adjoining the above described property, commencing at a point 70 feet from the corner of Robert and Cucullus Streets, and measures 3 feet front on Robert Street, by a depth of 80 feet between equal and parallel lines.

Improvements bear the Municipal No. 2805 Robert Street Being the same property acquired by Reverend and Mrs. Alvin General Williams, Sr. in that Act of Exchange from Irving Lawrence Dupre and Mrs. Audrey Mae Helen Richard Riggs, dated February 10, 1984, before Notary Public Gene Friedman, recorded in the Orleans Parish Conveyance records at Book 791, Folio 288, and stamped 535937. under the terms and conditions as provided in the agreement to purchase filed in these proceedings. Notice is now given to all parties to whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of decedent, and of this estate, that they be ordered to make any opposition which they may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating that application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven days, from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. KYLE S. SCLAFANI (LA. 28219) 4130 Canal St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Telephone (504) 875-4079 Attorney for Katie M. Williams Exeuctrix of Succession of Alvin General Williams, SR. Publication: Gambit 12/11/12 & 1/1/13

For the price and sum of $130,000.00 cash, on the terms and conditions set forth in the petition of record herein. Any heir or creditor who opposes the proposed sale must file his opposition within seven (7) days from the day on which the last publication of this notice appears. Jon A. Gegenheimer, Clerk of Court Joann Gasper, Deputy Clerk Attorney: Francis T Moore, Jr. 1201 Massachusetts Avenue Kenner, La 70062 (504)468-8561 Publication: Gambit 1/1/13 & 1/21/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO. 2007-3238 DIV “M” IN RE: SUCCESSION OF ADELE NOBLES NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE Whereas the Administrator of the above estate has made application to the Court for the sale at private sale of the immovable herein described to-wit: 607 BELLEVILLE STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA; Algiers Point 3, Lot 2, Sq 116 UPON THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS, TO WIT: ONE HUNDRED NINETY SIX THOUSAND DOLLARS and no cents ($196,000.00) less the usual and customary expenses of the sale, all as per the agreement to purchase and sell. Notice is hereby given to all parties whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of the decedents herein, and of this estate, be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application

BY ORDER OF THIS COURT ATTORNEY: Elaine Appleberry 405 Gretna Blvd., Ste. 107 Gretna, Louisiana 70053 (504) 362-7800 Publication: Gambit 12/11/2012 & 1/1/13

Civil District Court For The Parish of Orleans State of Louisiana

Docket NO. 2011-1545, Division “B” Succession of David Adolph Smith and of Annie Burton Smith Notice of Filing and of Hearing Date on Motion for Partition by Licitation and Rule to Show Cause Why Property Should not be Placed for Public Sale Notice is given to all interested persons having cause or concern relating to the Succession that a Motion for Partition by Licitation and Rule to Show Cause why Property should not be Placed for Public Sale has been filed this 5th day of October 2012 and is set for hearing this 25th day of January 2012 before the Honorable Tiffany Chase in the Civil District Court for the Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana. Said Motion moves to Partition and sell the following property: A CERTAIN LOT OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all rights of way, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances, and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the SIXTH DISTRICT of the City of New Orleans, in SQUARE NO. 135-A bounded by South Telemachaus, South Genois, Erato, and Clio streets, designated as Lot “F” on a survey by Adole Orr, Jr. and associates, C.E. date 3/14/63, a copy of which is annexed to act passed before Edward P. Ecuyer, N.P. on 4/2/63 according to which said lot begins at a distance of 116 feet 3 inches 6 lines from the corner of Erato and South Telemachus Streets and measures thence 35 feet 5 inches front on South Telemachus Street, 35 feet in width in the rear, by a depth on the side line neared Erato Street of 75 feet 6 inches 2 lines and a depth on the opposite side line of 86 feet 7 inches 2 lines between parallel lines. Said lot is also designated by the letter “F” on survey of Gilbert, Kelly, & Courturie, Inc., S. & E., dated 9/11/72, a blue print copy of which is annexed to an act passed before Robert J. Oster, N.P., dated 9/28/72, and according thereto, said lot is situated in the same municipal district and square and has the same location and dimensions as shown above. The improvements thereon bear the municipal address: 1224 S. Telemachus Street. Atty: Cate L. Bartholomew, 303 South Broad Street, New Orleans, LA 70119. 504-210-4990. Publication: Gambit 1/1 & 1/8/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Booker T. Collor, please contact Keith A. Doley, atty, 1554 N. Broad St., New Orleans, LA 70119, 504-943-7071. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of DARRYL JOSEPH THOMAS, SR., INDIVIDUALLY AND AS NATURAL TUTOR FOR DARRYL JOESPH THOMAS, JR. AND MATTHEW JORDAN THOMAS , please contact Bobby Hawkins Atty, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Titus Brown, Jr. and Adrianne Brown Lombard, please contact Keith A. Doley, atty, 1554 N. Broad St., New Orleans, LA 70119, 504-943-7071.

STATE OF LOUISIANA 24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

NO. 527-014 DIVISION C

SUCCESSION OF JUAN NICOLAS RIVERA NOTICE OF SMALL SUCCESSION NOTICE IS GIVEN that Violeta Sosa Rivera, Testamentary Executrix of the Succession of Juan Nicolas Rivera, is applying for authority to sell at private sale, on terms of FIFTY THOUSAND AND 00/100 ($50,000.00) DOLLARS cash, that which is owned by the Succession of Juan Nicolas Rivera, with said property being described as follows, to-wit: AN UNDIVIDED ONE-HALF (1/2) INTEREST IN AND TO THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO-WIT: ONE CERTAIN LOT OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights,ways, privileges, servitudes and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Third District of this City, in Square No. 11 of Francis Subdivision, said square being bounded by Francis Drive, Warfield and Ranson Streets, and the Western Boundary of the Subdivision. According to a plan of Carlos J. Christina subdividing Square No. 11, approved by the City Planning Commission on July 18, 1963, under its Docket No. 86/63, registered in COB 641, folio 165, said lot is designated by the letter “B”, adjoins Lot “A”, and measures 61 feet front on Francis Drive, same width in the rear, by a depth of 85.94 feet between equal and parallel lines. According to a survey made by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Surveyors, dated August 28,1963, copy of which is annexed to an act before Edmund T. Wegner, Notary Public, on September 17,1963, said lot is designated by the Letter “B”, has the same location and dimensions, and is shown to commence at a distance of 62 feet from the corner of Francis Drive and Warfield Street.

The improvements thereon bear the municipal number 4410-12 Francis Drive, New Orleans, Louisiana An order authorizing Executrix to do so may be issued after ten (10) days from the date of the first and only publication of this notice. An opposition to the application may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of such an order. BRENT J. LALIBERTE, LBN 22275 1820 Belle Chasse Highway, Suite 205 Gretna, Louisiana 70056 (504)393-0315 Publication: Gambit 1/1/13

STATE OF LOUISIANA CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS No. 08-2986 Divison B Succession of Richard S. McBride Jr NOTICE TO HOMOLOGATE FIRST AND FINAL ACCOUNTING AND TABLEAU OF DISTRIBUTION WHEREAS, the Executrix of the Succession of Richard S. McBride, has made application to the Court for Authority to Homologate the First and Final Accounting of the Succession of Richard S. McBride, Jr and the Tableau of Distribution. Notice is hereby given to all parties whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of the decedent herein, and of this estate, to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time. prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating such application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of ten (10) days from the date of service, all in accordance with the law. Attorney: Deborah L. Wilson Attorney for Succession of Richard S. McBride 808 Moss Street New Orleans, LA 70119 Telephone: (504) 488-4493 Facsimile: (504) 488-4497 Publication: Gambit 1/1/13

SALE BY CONSTABLE JUDICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THAT PORTION OF GROUND, BEARING MUNICIPAL NO.

2817 Spain Street, this city, IN THE MATTER ENTITLED NEW ORLEANS DEMOLITION SERVICES, LLC VS DANIELLE COSEY First City Court for The City of New Orleans 2008-53369 Case No: By virtue of a writ of Fieri Facias to me directed by the Honorable The First City Court for the City of New Orleans, in the above entitled cause, I will proceed to sell by public auction, on the ground floor of the Civil District Court Building, 421 Loyola Avenue, in the First District of the City on January 8, 2013, at 12:00 o’clock noon, the following described property to wit: Municipal No. 2817 Spain Street, Lot F-4, Square No. 1709, Third District, City of New Orleans Aqcuired: CIN 171850 WRIT AMOUNT: $3,055.00 Seized in the above suit, TERMS-CASH. The purchaser at the moment of adjudication to make a deposit of ten percent of the purchase price, and the balance within thirty days thereafter. Note: All deposits must be Cash, Cashier’s Check, Certified Check or Money Order; No Personal Checks. Atty: Mark Landry 504837-9040 Lambert C. Boissiere, Jr Constable, Parish of Orleans Publication: Gambit 12/4/12 & 1/1/13 L.A. Weekly : 12/4/12 & 1/1/13 LOST PROMISSORY NOTE: Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having possession of one (1) certain promissory note executed by Ynez Gabriella Silas, Peter F. Favre, and Elvira F. Farve, dated June 24, 1988 in the principal sum of $49,400.00 please contact Tony Fazzio at P.O. Box 80459 Baton Rouge, LA 70898 or at 225216-1099. Gambit: 1/1/13, 1/8/13 & 1/15/13.

SERVICES HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

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CARRIER 3 Ton System 13 Seer $3990 Installed 10 yrs compressor & parts Expires 1/31/13 504-465-0688 Air Conditioning - Heating

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GROUT WORKS, LLC Tile Grout Cleaning Color Sealing & Repair Shower Restoration Natural Stone Care Tile Replacement, Recaulking Commercial & Residential Free Estimates. 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

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Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

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Try our locally made compost today! Get a 25lb bag for $12.99. Your plants will love you for it! Call (504) 206-9298 & order today! Many Varieties of Plants & Vegetables For Sale. 3101 TULANE AVENUE WWW.THECOMPOSTINGNETWORK.COM

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Steering You In the Right Direction for over 40 Yrs! We match any color! We rent Pressure Washers, Spray Guns & Wall Paper Removers (Steamers). Free Delivery. M-F, 7a-6p, Sat, 8a-5p. Locations on Earhart, Canal, Magazine & Veterans

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Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. Kenner-Jefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-652-0084. Northshore 985-6265045. Slidell 985-641-3525. www. RooterManCan.com MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

And according to survey made by F.G. Stewart, Surveyor, dated October 24, 1961, copy of which survey is annexed to act passed before Scledel M. Hebert, Notary Public, dated the 18th day of December 1961, said piece or portion of ground is situated in the Sixth Distrct of the City of New Orleans, in Square 688, Avart., bounded by Robert, Cucullus, Upperline Streets, and S. Caliborne Avenue, and is designated by the Letter “V” and commencing at a distance of 30 feet from the corner of Robert and Cucullus Streets, measures thence 43 feet front on Robert Street, same width in the rear, by a depth between equal and parallel lines of 80 feet.

That portion of ground, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the First District of the City of New Orleans, State of Louisiana, in Square No. 660, bounded by South Lopez, Banks, South Rendon and Palmyra Streets, designated as Lot 4-A on a survey by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Inc., dated May 10,1968, resubdivision approved by City Planning Commission May 22,1968 and plan filed in COB 685, folio 295 on June 27,1968, according to which Lot 4-A forms the corner of Palmyra and South Lopez Streets and measures 42 feet front on Palmyra Street, same width in the rear, by a depth and front on South Lopez Street of 114 feet 2 inches 4 lines, between equal and parallel lines and is composed of part of original Lots 3 and 4. Improvements bear the No. 301 South Lopez Street, New Orleans. Louisiana.

and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days, from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law.

57


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Garrett Flying Service, Danbury, TX, has 5 positions for grain; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.00/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/1/13 – 12/1/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number TX6222867.

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FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Carl Loewer Farming, Wynne AR, has 2 positions for rice & soybeans; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/ hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/4/13 – 11/14/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number 497810.

AIRLINE CAREERS

Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

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TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Pacco Irrigation, Turrell, AR has 11 positions for cotton & soybean; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/ hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/15/13 – 12/15/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number 503217.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Reece Farms, Daisetta, TX, has 12 positions for bees & honey; 3 mo. experience required with references for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; no bee or honey related allergies; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57/ hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/15/13 – 7/15/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number TX6870158.

JOB GURU

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Dear New Orleans Job Guru, “I’m 16 and in high school. I just got my driver’s license and I have the use of a family car, so I’d like to find a part-time job in my area. I put in applications at some stores, but so far no luck. I’ll take anything respectable. I guess I should make a resume, but I don’t think I really have anything to put on it, because I’ve never worked, unless you count babysitting and things like that.” — Marianne W., Slidell, LA

58

Dear Marianne, A résumé would definitely help you, and more and more jobs these days, including entry-level positions, are requiring one. For someone of your age and inexperience, a very brief, one-page résumé will be just fine. There are a number of strategies I can suggest in terms of attracting employers for what will basically be a “beginner” résumé. You can go online and find excellent examples of résumé formatting. First, Grant Cooper be sure to neatly, at the top, include all of your contact information. First name, middle initial, last name, and directly underneath, put your parent’s street address, your cell phone number, and your email address. Louisiana requires a work permit, but it is generally a requirement for the employer to ensure that you get it. All 14 to 17-year-olds must obtain an “Intent to Employ” form that is available online at the web address below: http://bit.ly/W5hXrW At a recent national résumé conference, one of the speakers told the story of a 16-year-old who wished to get a job at the local supermarket. The boy had applied at the store several times, but with no success. He found out the name of the store manager and asked a clerk if he could speak to him. He started to tell the store manager that he had applied to work at the store when the manager interrupted to say that there were no openings. The boy then interjected that he had memorized the location of all items in the store and showed the manager a map of all the aisles that he had created. The manager hired him on the spot.

The form includes some information that your employer must fill out, including the nature of the job, and requires a parent’s signature. After that, you turn the form in to your school or school board office along with your birth certificate or another document which proves your age to receive your employment certificate. Next, list your high school, your grade-level (10th, 11th or 12th), and your grade point average (GPA), if it is at or above average. I would suggest that you also list school activities, clubs, sports, and any other honors or extracurricular pursuits. You can even include a list of any course titles that could prove useful in the workplace (English, Math, Computer Skills, Foreign Language, etc.), the titles of research papers, list field trips, and the title of any special projects or assignments. Even though you apparently haven’t had any “real” jobs, there are many items that you can list, such as the babysitting or child care you’ve provided. List the ages of the children, your duties, and any compliments you’ve received from the parents. Also, you can include assisting with yard work, pet care, helping a sick relative or neighbor, or volunteering in your community, church, or school. New Orleans Job Guru is New Orleans native Grant Cooper. President of Strategic Résumés®, Grant ranks within the top LinkedIn Résumé Writing Experts nationwide and has assisted the U.S. Air Force, Kinko’s, the Louisiana Dept. of Labor, the City of New Orleans, NFL/NBA players & coaches, as well as universities, regional banks, celebrities, and major corporations.

Send your questions to New Orleans Job Guru at: grant@resupro.com or 504-891-7222

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Daren Fowler Farms, Wheatley, AR, has 4 positions for soybeans & rice; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/hr; threefourths work period guaranteed from 1/27/13 – 11/20/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-3422917 with Job Order number 498913.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Nelson & Diana Bulanek Farms, Danbury, TX, has 3 positions for rice & crawfish; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.00/ hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/1/13 – 12/1/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number TX2678425.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Storey Farms, Marvell, AR has 8 positions for grain; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/15/13 – 12/15/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917 with Job Order number 503225.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

D&G Farms, Doddsville, MS, has 2 positions for oilseed crops; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean driver’s license within 30 days of employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/hr; threefourths work period guaranteed from 2/1/13 – 12/1/13. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-3422917 with Job Order number MS65474.

MEDICAL Psychiatry Clinic:

Therapist/Psychologist Professional and personable psychologist/therapist for an opportunity at Acadian Care, a child & adolescent psychiatric clinic. PhD, LPC, LMFT, or LCSW; Full-time, days + some evenings required. Slidell and Mandeville locations. Background check and drug screen reqd. Please email resume and cover letter to: jaime@acadiancare. com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

VOLUNTEER

LOWER GARDEN DIST. BAR

Seeking friendly, flexible and EXPERIENCED Bar Tender. Call (504) 331-0030 or (504) 909-9814 After 5:00 P.M.

THEO’S PIZZA NOW HIRING

Experienced Waiterstaff and Kitchen staff . Apply between 2 - 4pm at 1212 South Clearview Pkwy. No phone calls.

POSITIONS WANTED I’m Waiting On Your Call

I take care of elderly, handicapped, etc. Light meals. Certified CNA+ Ref. $10 & $12/hourly. (504) 427-1445, leave msg if no answer.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY REACH 5 MILLION

Hip, forward thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the lcoal scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies. com/ads.

C & D Production Specialist Co., Inc.

Now Hiring

HS&E Systems Support Associate New Orleans, LA

An office position that requires Data Entry and Analysis, as well as correspondence with field and office personnel.

Seeking Safety Oriented Individuals With The Following Credentials: • MS Office and Outlook Proficient • High School Diploma • 3-5 Years Experience in Oil And Gas Industry • Knowledge in HSE Programs • Good Interpersonal Skills • Able to Work in Multiple Priority Environment • Able to Work with Little or No Supervision • 5 & 2 Work Schedule

Paid Holidays, Vacation & Benefits Please Email Resumes To: David Gary dgary@cdprod.net


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

GENERAL REAL ESTATE Lakeview Appraisal Service

Taking care of all your appraisal needs. Real Estate, Divorce, Bail Bonds Bankruptcy, Estate Property Tax Assessment Appeal Kevin T. LaGraize New Orleans R.E. Appraisal Services www.lakeview-appraisal.com kevin@lakeview-appraisal.com 504-284-3445

38 Muirfield Dr., LaPlace

2818 CADIZ, 5 PLEX

$329,000 Great 4,5 or 6 plex Uptown close to Ochsner and Thriving Freret St. $4,250 mo income, coin op laundry, Good location, Good Investment! Gardner Realtors, LOUIS 874-3195

A MUST SEE DREAM HOME on Belle Terre #6 green. 4BR/4BA. Lg master suite down w/2 wlk-in closets. Jacuzzi, spa shwr, steam sauna, exercise rm overlks pool. $335K. Kembra Lee, 504-382-0226. klee@gardnerrealtors. com Gardner Realtors, 985-652-3304.

COVINGTON / MANDEVILLE

814 Amelia St. 385,000

SENSATIONAL NEW CONSTRUCTION. 10’ ceilings w/8’ frosted doors. Gorgeous 3BR/2BA home Stainless steel appl, Carrera Marble backsplash wall mounted pot filler. Master w/ en-suite marble bathroom featuring double sinks. Joshua Walther, Gardner Realtors, 504.717.5612 cell; 504.891.6400 ofc.

509 Beau Chen Drive

Mandeville. On Magnolia #5 Fairway. Stunning renov. 4137 living. 4BR, 3.5 BA. 2 Story. Master down. Australian cypress floors, game/play rm plus study, formal dining & living. A must see. $569K. Shelly Marchetta, 504577-7900. sgmarchetta@gmail.com. Southern Realty, 985-643-0123

OLD MANDEVILLE

Charming raised Acadiana with wrap around porch. Approx 1800 sq. ft. 3br/2.5ba, 2blks from lake $355,000. Call (504) 920-2581.

KENNER

OUT OF TOWN 20 ACRES FREE

BEST UPTOWN VALUE!

3296 Castle Dr.

923 Nashville. Spacious 4,000’ 4 or 5 bdrm hm walking distance to Whole Foods & Magazine boutiques. Home has everything! $999,000. Call Sylvia Roy, (504) 957-9444 for appt. Gardner Realtors, Corporate Headquarters, 3332 N. Woodlawn Ave., Metairie, LA

RIVER PARISHES

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL RENTALS 9 GLEN ABBEY WAY, English Turn, 4 BR, 3.5 BA, $3500 /mo or sell $547K. 610 BURGUNDY - Fab French Qtr cottage, beautifully furn, 2 BR, 3.5 BA, courtyd, parking, $4900/mo. 656 MELODY DR. METAIRIE - 2 BR, 1 BA. $1500/mo. Eileen Wallen - 504-250-5656. Gardner Realtors 504-861-7575

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

2148 Augusta Dr., LaPlace

1027 Nashville Ave.

Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/ month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com

PICAYUNE, MS EX 6

HOME OFF I-59, PICAYUNE, MS EX 6 2,419 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 2 baths, open kit., frplc., fenced yard, custom blt in cabinets everywhere, on .75 acre. $155,000, 601-749-0498. MUST SEE! (Cat not included!)

CORPORATE RENTALS

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

Motivated Sellers. Grand living up, tall ceil, big master ste w/walk-in closet. 3BR/2.5BA. Great kit opens to deck. Office, media, lndry rm & 2nd & 3nto 1; can easily be changed to 4 br. $699K. Claudette Blanchard, (504) 810-7950 mobile. Thomas K. Winingder, R. E. Inc., (504) 586-8305.

CARROLLTON ROAD HOME RENTAL

LOVE THE OUTDOORS! 4BR/4BA, lg patio w/brick flrs, wood ceil w/3 outdr fans, ceil lights, fshpnd. Lg mstr w/ fireplce, custm clset, spa & ba. Liv area w/fireplace, blt-in shlves, HD wiring, surrnd snd, patio view. Granite in Kit.More! $335K. Kembra Lee, 504382-0226, klee@gardnerrealtors.com Gardner Realtors, 985-652-3304.

2219 W Canterbury, LaPlace No flood in lovely 3BR/3BA Victorian home w/master down. Cath ceil in den, w/wood burn fp. Kit updated w/granite & tile. Ingrnd pool. Inside lndry. Storage rm. Monitored alarm. $210,500. Kembra Lee, 504-3820226. klee@gardnerrealtors.com Gardner Realtors, 985-652-3304

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, fully equipped kit. WiFi, Cbl. Parking & Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras. From $2000/mth. Avail Dec 1. One mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

Modern 1 BR apt, $700/mo. 2 BR Apt $800. Unfurnished. Wifi, internet & assigned parking included. 504-491-1591

8716 Palmetto St. 3BR/1ba. $604/m. 50% med income req. Subj to app fee/BG ck. Sec.8 Ok. 504-723-9253 after 6p.m.

OLD METAIRIE

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

SPARKLING POOL Bike Path & Sunset Deck

Renovated, 1 BR apts with 12 x 24’ liv room. furn kit, laundry on premises, offst pkg. NO PETS. Avail now. Owner/ agent $699 & $749. 504-236-5776.

ALGIERS POINT CORPORATE RENTAL

Historic Algiers Point Victorian Hm. Shared N.O. style courtyard. Ferry - 2 blks. 3/2 CA&H, 12’ ceilings, wood/ ceramic flrs. Fully furnished. Move In ready. Info (228) 348-1754

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR NEAR TULANE UNIV.

3137 CALHOUN ST.- BROADMOOR 1200 Sq. Ft. $1400/ Mo. High Traffic Area. Call Donna, 504-208-7696 To Advertise in

NEAR CITY PARK

3218 Desaix Blvd. Single home, 2 BR/1BA, LR/DR, furn kit, office, W&D hkkps. CA&H. Fenced yard. $1100 per month + deposit. Call 504-952-5102

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY OFF STREET PARKING

1713 BURGUNDY, 1 bd/1 ba, furn kit, all elec, ac, carpet, wtr pd. 1 yr lse. No pets. $750 + dep. 949-5518

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $875/mo. 504-4956044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY 141 N. CARROLLTON

Above Wit’s Inn, 1BDR/1BA, Kitchen $600/mo. A/C. Stove, refrigerator, Wi-fi, Water Pd, No Pets/Smokers 486-1600.

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

1466 Magazine St., $539,900

1005-07 Fouth St., $279,900

5 suites currently used as a Bed and Breakfast with large yard and off street Parking. Real Estate Only $539,900. Owner/Broker

3 units located just off Magazine Street in one of the best blocks of the Irish Channel, Off street parking and nice rear yard.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Lovely 3 BR/2 BA w/kit update. New cabinets, sink & wtr htr. Granite counters. Energy effic dble insul storm wndws. Real wd flrs in DR, LR & foyer. Kitchen w/ bay wndow. Firepl. Warranty. Theresa Ploom, 504-919-1444. tploom@cox.net. www.theresaploom. com ReMax Partners, 504-888-9900. Each office independently owned & operated.

METAIRIE 15 MINUTES TO DOWNTOWN N.O.

MISSISSIPPI

59


REAL ESTATE UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

COVINGTON / MANDEVILLE

3219A PRYTANIA

Perfect for prof’, Renov Vict hse, 2br/,1 full + 1/2 ba with walk in closet, LR, DR, kit, wd flrs, hi ceils, w/i balc., appls, ca&h, sec, police surveillance & gated. Pool privileges. $1475/mo. 813-8186 274-8075.

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo 1BR, $695/ mo. Also: Rms by week, private bath, all util incl . $175/wk. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM, ONE BATH

1 BR/1BA Furnished Condo in the Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor. Rent includes pool, gym, cable, internet. Apt has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Central to French Quarter, West Bank, Uptown, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. $1800, negotiable. $1800/mo. Call Bonnie 504-220-1022 at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988, soniatrealty.com.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

350 EMERALD FOREST BLVD. BEAUTIFUL NEW 2 BR / 2 BA CONDO $1100

Conveniently located nr businesses/ shopping. Resort-style pool/spa, fitness cntr, library, clubhse w/kit. Lush landscaping. Gated community. 9ft. ceil, crown mldg, cherry panel cabinets, SS appliances. Jacuzzi, Wlkin shower, smoke alarms, outside storage, 13 seer A/C unit & more. Flood Zone C. No Pets/Smokers. One year lse req’d. Call 504-812-2704.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

Reach over 117,500 readers in Gambit & thousands more at bestofneworleans.com

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Find A Super Tenant is a special package designed especially for rental properties.

BUY 4 WEEKS, GET 4 WEEKS FREE! You’ll get: • A 5 line ad (bold headline + 4 lines of text) for up to 8 weeks for only $80. Additional lines $8 each • The ad also runs on bestofneworleans.com.

To Find A Super Tenant

call your account rep or Gambit Classifieds at 504.483.3100 today.


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

HAPPY NEW YEAR! IRISH CHANNEL

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR!

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

14 Fairway Oaks 1225 Chartres 3638 Magazine 1215 Napoleon 1224 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 4941 St. Charles 2 Beresford 2721 St. Charles 3222 Coliseum 5528 Hurst

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 1 > 2013

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 58

62

(4BR/2.5BA) ..... NEW PRICE! .... $429,000 (2BR/1BA) ...... NEW PRICE! ...... $279,000 Commercial/Residential .......... $649,000 (4BR/3.5BA) ............................. $899,000 (Only 1 Left!) .....TOO LATE! ..... $169,000 #227 (3BR/2BA) ...TOO LATE! ... $399,000 Commercial TOO LATE! ............ $349,000 TOO LATE! ............................. $1,900,000 TOO LATE! ............................. $1,079,000 #1-C ...TOO LATE! ..................... $169,000 TOO LATE! ............................. $2,495,000 TOO LATE!.............................. $1,300,000

2828 CHIPPEWA CLASSIC IRISH CHANNEL SHOTGUN. Move right in! Newly renovated. Original heart of pine floors throughout. Spacious living area with open floor plan, which allows for you personal touches. 12 ft ceilings, new central A/C & heat. Separate laundry room with hook-ups, ceiling fans, large bath with claw foot tub. Front porch, pretty backyard. $184,800

NEWLY RENOVATED

3131 & 33 NORTH VILLERE HISTORIC BYWATER DISTRICT DOUBLE. 4/2 Newly renovated, central A/C, heat, new wood siding, bamboo flooring, new windows, new wiring, plumbing, kitchens, baths. Huge Backyard with 16 ft deck and privacy fence! Must see! PRICE REDUCED! $150,000

ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRS

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.


NOLA

MARKETPLACE

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS • ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MORE

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CLEANING SERVICE

Locally Owned & Serving the New Orleans Area for 21 Years

Susana Palma

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING LIGHT/GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING • HEAVY DUTY CLEANING SUMMER CLEANING • HOLIDAY CLEANING

504-250-0884 • 504-913-6615

Fully Insured & Bonded fax: 866-514-0884 • lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com

• HURRICANE CLEANUP SPECIALIST •

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“SUPERSTARS” PUBLISHES

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Gambit Readers are Active Homebuyers. Let them know about you! Reach 135,000 readers & thousands more online!

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A GUIDE TO REAL ESTATE’S

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Gambit New Orleans: Jan. 1, 2013