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We love our hospice volunteers and are always looking for new additions to our wonderful team! Our hospice volunteers are special people who can make a difference in the lives of those affected by terminal illness. We would like to announce a new exciting track for those interested in a future medical career. Many physicians and nurses received their first taste of the medical field at Canon. If you would like to be become a hospice volunteer and work with our patients and families, please call today!

To Volunteer Call Paige

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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THIS WEEK IN CLASSIFIEDS: Employment •••••••

Picture Perfect Properties •••••••

Real Estate •••••••

Home & Garden •••••••

Holiday Helpers and much more!

starting on page 85


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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CONTENTS

STAFF Publisher | MARGO DUBOS Associate Publisher | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER

December 17, 2013

EDITORIAL Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | MISSY WILKINSON Staff Writer | ALEX WOODWARD Editorial Assistant | MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY Feature Writer | JEANIE RIESS Contributing Writers

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Volume 34

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Number 51

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JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, SCOTT GOLD, GUS KATTENGELL, KEN KORMAN, BRENDA MAITLAND, NORA MCGUNNIGLE, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

Editorial Intern | LAUREN HARTMAN

PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Senior Graphic Designer | LYN VICKNAIR Graphic Designers | PAIGE HINRICHS, JULIET MEEKS, DAVID KROLL, JASON WHITTAKER Pre-Press Coordinator | KATHRYN BRADY

DISPLAY ADVERTISING fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 [sandys@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140 [micheles@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Coordinator | CHRISTIN GREEN 483-3138 [christing@gambitweekly.com] Events Coordinator | BRANDIN DUBOS 483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | JILL GIEGER 483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] Account Executives JEFFREY PIZZO

483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDA LACHIN

483-3142 [lindal@gambitweekly.com] SHANNON HINTON KERN

483-3144 [shannonk@gambitweekly.com] KRISTIN HARTENSTEIN

483-3141 [kristinh@gambitweekly.com] KELLIE LANDECHE

483-3143 [kelliel@gambitweekly.com]

MARKETING

Marketing & Digital Assistant | ANNIE BIRNEY Marketing Interns | RYAN MCGUIRE, CAITLIN MILLER

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

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483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified Advertising Director | RENETTA PERRY 483-3122 [renettap@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | CARRIE MICKEY LACY 483-3121 [carriel@gambitweekly.com]

BUSINESS Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller | GARY DIGIOVANNI Assistant Controller | MAUREEN TREGRE Credit Officer | MJ AVILES

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57

ON THE COVER

SHOPPING + STYLE

It Was a Very Odd Year .........................................19 The strangest and funniest stories you were talking about in 2013

Holiday Gift Guide.................................................33 We already shopped for you What’s In Store ......................................................39 Discoveries Furniture & Finds

7 IN SEVEN Seven Things to Do This Week........................... 5 Under Milk Wood, Terry McDermott, Ike Stubblefield and more

NEWS + VIEWS News.............................................................................7 The man who repairs the brass instruments in New Orleans public schools Bouquets & Brickbats ...........................................7 This week’s heroes and zeroes C’est What? ................................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll Scuttlebutt................................................................11 News briefs from all over Commentary............................................................14 A ballot of familiar faces Politics/Clancy DuBos ......................................... 17 Handicapping the mayor’s race

EAT + DRINK Review .......................................................................41 Cleo’s Mediterranean Cuisine & Grocery Fork + Center ............................................................41 All the news that’s fit to eat 3-Course Interview .............................................43 Mike Kantor of Second Harvest Food Bank Drinks ........................................................................45 Beer Buzz and Wine of the Week Last Bites ................................................................. 47 Foodie calendar, 5 in Five, Off the Menu

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT A&E News ................................................................. 57 Walter “Wolfman” Washington turns 70 Music .........................................................................58 PREVIEW: Harry Shearer and Judith Owens’ Holiday Sing-A-Long

Film.............................................................................63 REVIEW: American Hustle Art ...............................................................................69 REVIEW: Artist Spaces: Close to Home and The Art of Empathy Stage..........................................................................73 REVIEW: Long Day’s Journey Into Night REVIEW: A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant Events .......................................................................78 PREVIEW: Home for the Holidays Crossword + Sudoku ...........................................94

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place ...........................................................85 Legal Notices..........................................................86 Employment ...........................................................87 Home + Garden ...................................................... 88 Picture Perfect Properties................................89 Mind + Body + Spirit...............................................58 Real Estate .............................................................90 Pet Emporium ........................................................92 Holiday Helpers .....................................................95

OPERATIONS & EVENTS Operations & Events Director | LAURA CARROLL Operations Assistant | KELLAN DUNIGAN

GAMBIT COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Chairman | CLANCY DUBOS + President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS

COVER DESIGN BY Dora Sison

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2013 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


seven things to do in seven days

DEC

Eddie Roberts and the New Mastersounds with Ike Stubblefield

Wed. Dec. 18 | British guitarist Eddie Roberts is in the middle of a series of shows at the Maple Leaf Bar. He’s joined by soul and R&B Hammond B3 master Ike Stubblefield. Show at 10 p.m.

Walter “Wolfman” Washington | Funk,

blues and psychedelic guitar master Walter “Wolfman” Washington celebrates his 70th birthday with special guests Anders Osborne, Ivan Neville, Cyril Neville and Stanton Moore. The Soul Project opens at 10 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar. PAGE 57.

Spencer Bohren

Thu. Dec. 19 | Folk troubadour Spencer Bohren’s annual holiday hootenanny features guest appearances by Saint Cecilia’s Asylum Chorus, Swedish blues-rocker Nikke Strom, string aficionado Seva Venet, pianist Bill Malchow and many others. At 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. at Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro.

Terry McDermott and the Bonfires with Rotary Downs and the Morning Life

Thu. Dec. 19 | Nearly tabbed The Voice (he finished as runner-up on season three), new New Orleanian Terry McDermott showcases his current band the Bonfires, featuring members of the Afghan Whigs, Rotary Downs and World Leader Pretend. Rotary Downs and the Morning Life open at 8 p.m. at House of Blues.

Caddywhompus with Designer and High in One Eye

Fri. Dec. 20 | Community Records’ favorite St. Bernard Avenue Caddy-shack is an ideal venue for these three amplifier fryers, each of which is varying degrees of crust, rising and baked to perfection. Boston’s Designer joins locals High in One Eye and Caddywhompus at 8 p.m. at United Bakery.

The Nutcracker

Sat.-Sun. Dec. 21-22 | Ballet Hysell performs its version of the holiday classic, featuring Kimberly Matulich-Beck, Eric Michaels (Broadway’s Movin’ Out) and the Jefferson Performing Arts Society Symphony Orchestra. At 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Jefferson Performing Arts Center.

Under Milk Wood: In the Walking Haze

Fri.-Sat. Dec. 20-21 | On the 60th anniversary of Dylan Thomas’ radio play about a Welsh fishing village, Cripple Creek Theater, singer/guitarist Alex McMurray and the Valparaiso Men’s Chorus present an immersive show featuring scenes, sea shanties, dinner and drinks. At 7 p.m. at Saturn Bar.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

P H OTO BY C H ERY L G ERB ER

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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NEWS +

VIEWS

BOUQUETS + brickbats ™ heroes + zeroes

S C U T T L EB U T T 11 C O M M EN TA RY 1 4 CL ANCY DUBOS 17

knowledge is power

Instrumentor

Local horn player gives worn-out school musical instruments a new life — and kids a chance to play.

was named Chef of the Year by the New Orleans chapter of the American Culinary Federation. Fredricks is a professor at the University of New Orleans’ Lester E. Kabacoff School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration. The award recognizes chefs who work with programs benefiting the city’s culinary arts.

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Tipitina’s Foundation after Hurricane Katrina when Musician Stafford Agee pays it BAC Horn Doctor forward by repairing horns for New founder Mike CorOrleans high school marching bands. rigan came to New P H OTO BY C H ER Y L G ER B ER Orleans to repair instruments for local musicians. Corrigan says the images of devastation he saw on television following Katrina and the levee failures motivated him to do something to help. Knowing how important music is to the city, he decided to take his mobile repair van to New Orleans. He repaired so many instruments on his first trip that he decided to make it a yearly ritual. “Everyone down there would wait a year for me to come back to have anything fixed,” he says. “A combo of not having enough money or the ability to get to a repair shop meant I was their only choice.” One of those musicians was Agee, who stood out to Corrigan because he expressed interest in learning instrument repair, not just getting his horn fixed. Agee’s experience as a welder made him an apt pupil, and Corrigan was able to teach him quickly how to do basic horn repair. In the past four years, Agee’s talent for instrument repair has given him a second career. “If there’s a point where he gets older and doesn’t want to be flying all over the world and drive everywhere, he’ll have this,” Corrigan says.

announced Dec. 2 that it will award 127 instruments, valued at nearly $200,000, to eight New Orleans area schools: Cohen College Prep High School, Eleanor McMain Secondary School, Lake Area New Tech Early College High School, Martin Behrman Charter School, McDonogh 35 High School, Mildred Osborne Charter School, Sophie B. Wright Charter School and West Jefferson High School. The donation is part of the foundation’s ongoing Instruments A Comin’ program.

Cassandra Johnson,

the former head of the Orleans Parish Criminal Court’s community service office, pleaded guilty Nov. 25 to taking $600 in bribes to alter the record of a criminal defendant. Johnson offered to “fix” the court records for an acquaintance to show he had performed community service for a crack cocaine conviction. Johnson received a two-year suspended sentence and an $800 fine.

PAGE 9

c’est Gov. Bobby Jindal turned down the Medicaid expansion option under the Affordable Care Act. What do you think?

? Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

82%

Bad move; the state could use federal funds

18%

Good move; too expensive for Louisiana

THIS WEEK’S Question: Sen. David Vitter is considering running for Louisiana Governor in 2015. Should he do it?

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Agee has his hands full. Walking into the third-floor suite at Fountainbleau Storage that houses his repair shop, the first thing you see is instrument cases piled almost to the ceiling. They’re filled with broken horns. The space has a repair shop, a bathroom and an office with a leather couch, where Agee sometimes spends the night if he has a difficult repair job. He estimates that he repaired more than 200 instruments this year. Seemingly the only time he isn’t repairing horns is when he’s playing one with Rebirth, which is his primary source of income. Agee, a licensed welder, has only been repairing instruments for a few years. But he’s been working with his hands his whole life. One of his earliest memories is receiving a boombox for Christmas when he was 5 and taking it apart to see how it worked. His curious nature and professional experience came in handy

Allen Toussaint, Terence Blanchard, the Hot 8 Brass Band, Andrew Duhon, Bishop Paul S. Morton and PJ Morton were nominated for 2014 Grammy Awards Dec. 6. Toussaint received two nominations — Best Americana Album for Songbook and Best American Roots Song for “Shrimp PoBoy, Dressed.” The 2014 Grammy Awards broadcast is 7 p.m. Jan. 26 on CBS.

Ricardo Fredricks

By Alejandro de los Rios tafford Agee vividly remembers receiving his first horn. He was 12 years old and playing with the Bucketmen Brass Band and learning traditional New Orleans music from Milton Batiste. Agee didn’t own an instrument, and the one he borrowed broke during a gig. So Batiste sent Agee to see Alan Jaffe, the late founder of Preservation Hall. That was in 1985, and Agee still plays the trombone Jaffe gave him that day. “I can get a brand new instrument and it plays good for a bit, but after a while, I gotta get back on my baby. I gotta get back on my old horn,” Agee says.   That trombone was the first instrument Agee ever owned, and since then, he’s been lead trombone at John F. Kennedy High School, toured the world with the Rebirth Brass Band, acted as a music consultant for the HBO series Treme and won a Grammy in 2012 with Rebirth for best regional roots music album, Rebirth of New Orleans. Besides making it possible to pursue a career as a professional musician, receiving an instrument from an older musician he admired instilled in Agee a sense of responsibility to give back to the community that fostered his talents as a young boy. “I do feel the responsibility of paying it forward,” he says. “If there’s a working horn, then a kid has a chance at playing.” That sense of responsibility led Agee to start Rebirth Instrument Repair in partnership with the Tipitina’s Foundation and Best American Craftsmen (BAC) Horn Doctor, an instrument fabrication and repair shop in Olathe, Kan., that specializes in brass instruments. Working out of a space at the Tipitina’s Foundation headquarters on Tulane Avenue, Agee will take calls for any local school that needs instrument repair, which is pretty much every school with a marching band.

Louisiana music stars

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


NEWS VIEWS PAGE 7

There’s certainly a market in New Orleans for people like Agee and Corrigan. Agee has personal experience dealing with schools’ needs for instruments, going back to his time at John F. Kennedy High School. (“I remember sometimes us having to borrow some instruments from schools we were playing against,” he says.) In addition, his band mate and close friend, Wilbert Rawlins Jr., is the band director at L.B. Landry-O. Perry Walker College and Career Preparatory High School. Rawlins, who studied music education at Southern University and has spent the last 20 years directing marching bands, says a scarcity of instruments among school bands hasn’t changed much since the days Agee played for Kennedy. Rawlins’ job has opened his eyes to New Orleans schools’ dire need for instrument repairs. “I would say that anywhere between 40 and 50 percent of a school’s instruments are broken (and stored) in a back room,” he says. Keith Thomas, band director at Lake Area High School, says the number of broken instruments makes it hard to equip all of the 200 students in his band. He says another problem is that the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) doesn’t provide the funds necessary to keep the bands operating. “There isn’t a line item for us in the budget,” Thomas says. “I believe they put it in the general fund and we have to ask our principals to try and make something happen.”

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

OPSB Superintendent Stan Smith said the board is hamstrung when it comes to funding broad initiatives like marching band programs. Since Katrina, the OPSB has seen a drastic reduction in the number of schools it governs, overseeing just 20 schools as opposed to 130 before the storm. Of those 20 schools, the OPSB only runs six directly; the other 14 are charters schools with their own boards. The OPSB runs two schools that have marching band programs, Eleanor McMain Secondary School and McDonogh 35 College Preparatory High School. The Recovery School District (RSD) governs 68 New Orleans schools — five direct-run and 63 charter schools. Smith says the RSD, like the OPSB, does little in deciding what schools do with the money they’re given. “Those are decisions that are made on a school-by-school basis,” he says. Many of the budgetary decisions are made by the Louisiana Legislature, which requires schools to meet certain mandates regarding curriculum and teacher’s wages. For example, the OPSB saw an increase in state funding this year for the first time in four years, but the state required that half of those funds go to teacher salaries and wages. At McMain and McDonogh, the OPSB pays to have band directors on staff, but leaves it up to the directors or individual schools to hold fundraisers for uniforms, instruments and travel expenses. As part of the OPSB restructuring post-Katrina, the director of music position was eliminated. Vondel Smith-Sloan, the last person to hold that position before the storm, says instrument repair has always been an issue among New Orleans schools. “Band directors have to make an extra effort so the instruments are up and ready,” she says. “It was always amazing to me what they were able to accomplish. Some of them had to do fundraisers constantly.” Rawlins and Thomas also look to local businesses and charities for funding. Bethany Paulsen, a member of Tipitina’s Foundation’s board of directors, said the foundation’s Instruments A Comin’ program donated $200,000 in instruments to eight area schools this year alone, but high school band directors continually talk about the need to repair instruments they already have. Agee now gives the Tipitina’s Foundation more options in how to donate. “Knowing that we have a system in place that’s a certified repair process will allow us to reach more students and make better use of donations,” Paulsen said. Paulsen says the foundation primarily works directly with band directors to place instruments. Agee uses his connections among the tight-knit community to assess the needs of individual schools, sometimes repairing instruments for free or at reduced rates if funds aren’t available. “The bands are raising their own money and if it’s not enough, I can make it enough,” Agee says. His work is a labor of love; there’s not a lot of money to be made in repairing instruments for cash-strapped high school bands. But Agee says he wants to expand his shop and, when he retires from touring with a band, initiate an apprenticeship to teach young people how to repair instruments as a career. For now, though, Agee is focusing on getting kids involved in music the best way he knows how: by putting an instrument in their hands, one repaired horn at a time.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


SCUTTLEBUTT Quote of the week

Whistling Dixie edition

“Democrats are fighting against history in most of the South. … You can still elect a Democrat to a statewide office in the South if you have the right candidate, with the right biography, in the right cycle. And then hopefully you get some help from the Republicans nominating a bad candidate. But that’s a lot of ifs.” — Thomas F. Schaller, author of Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South, as quoted in The New York Times. In the article, reporters Campbell Robertson and Jeremy W. Peters assessed the campaign against Sen. Mary Landrieu and two other Democratic Senators: Kay Hagan of North Carolina and Mark Pryor of Arkansas.

N.O. Council to regain black majority The last time was 2007.

judgeship to jump into the mayoral free-for-all. Bagneris qualified on Dec. 13 — and so did Manny “Chevrolet” Bruno, who will make his fourth run for mayor. (Bruno made unsuccessful, though entertaining, bids in 2002, 2006 and 2010.) • Council District A: Incumbent Susan Guidry will face Drew Ward, who is the only Republican in any of the council races (the rest are Democrats), David A. Capasso, Jason Coleman (of Coleman Cab Co.), Stephen Gordon, and Reid Stone, founder of marketing firm HERO|Farm. • Council District B: Incumbent LaToya Cantrell is seeking re-election. • Council District C: Council President Jackie Clarkson, term-limited out of an at-large position, will be attempting to win the District C seat a third time. Clarkson got her political start as the District C councilmember in 1990; she won the seat again in 2002. She got into the race at the urging of Landrieu and others when incumbent Kristin Gisleson Palmer opted not to seek a second term. Former Civil Court Judge Nadine Ramsey, who ran for mayor in 2010, had announced earlier and qualified on Dec. 11, as did Clarkson. Also running are Carlos Williams and Eloise A. Williams. All four live in Algiers. Lourdes F. Moran, who was narrowly defeated in the race for the 4th District seat on the Orleans Parish School Board last year, qualified Dec. 13. • Council District D: Incumbent Cynthia Hedge-Morrell is term-limited out of this seat. State Rep. Jared Brossett, who got his political start as a council aide to Hedge-Morrell, announced early and has drawn the support of Landrieu. Also running are Joseph Bouie, the former chancellor of Southern University New Orleans, and Dalton R. Savwoir Jr., who has run several times (unsuccessfully) for the state Legislature. • Council District E: Incumbent James Gray II is seeking his first full term on the council after winning a special election a year ago. His major challenger is Cynthia Willard-Lewis, a former District E representative and former state legislator who endorsed Gray for the job last year. WillardLewis now opposes Gray but will not have the support of her longtime ally Landrieu, who told Gambit last week he is endorsing Gray. Andre Kelly, a staffer with former councilman Jon Johnson, qualified Dec. 13. • Council At-Large Division 1: Incumbent Stacy Head will face Eugene Green, who worked in former Mayor Marc Morial’s administration. • Council At-Large Division 2: Hedge-Morrell is running for Clarkson’s old seat against defense attorney

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

While the races are yet to be run in New Orleans’ municipal elections, one thing is clear: the City Council will have an African-American majority for the first time since 2007. The seven-member council has had a white majority in recent years, but starting next May, at least four council members will be black — possibly five. Based on voter registration and the candidates who qualified last week, the council seats from Districts B, D and E will be held by AfricanAmericans, as will the at-large seat for Division 2. It’s also possible that District C, which has a black majority voter registration, will be represented by an African-American. Qualifying for the elections ended Dec. 13, with many familiar politicos filing to run — and a few surprises. The open primary is Feb. 1, 2014, with a runoff if necessary March 15. Here’s a closer look at who qualified for the major seats up for grabs: • Mayor: Incumbent Mitch Landrieu qualified Dec. 11, as did Danatus King, president of the New Orleans branch of the NAACP. King sent out a press release the day before, saying, “Contrary to recent media reports, Danatus N. King does have $750.00 to pay the fee to qualify to be a candidate for mayor of the City of New Orleans.” King denounced what he termed “the Tea Party voter suppression tactics that have been used this early in the race.” King seemed to be referring to a Times-Picayune report that noted that his campaign filings didn’t indicate he’d raised $750. The race really heated up when Civil District Court Judge Michael Bagneris announced he was retiring from his

NEWS VIEWS

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NEWS VIEWS

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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Jason Williams and former interim District E Councilman Ernest “Freddie” Charbonnet. Williams is the son-in-law of former Mayor Sidney Barthelemy; he ran for district attorney in 2008, finishing third. • Sheriff: Incumbent Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman will face off against former Sheriff Charles Foti, who served four years as state attorney general; Ira Thomas, president of the Orleans Parish School Board; and Quentin Brown, who ran for Council District B in 2006. Thomas ran for sheriff in 2004, when Foti vacated the office after nearly 30 years; Gusman won that special election. • Assessor: Erroll Williams, who became New Orleans’ first citywide assessor when he took office in 2011, is seeking re-election. • Coroner: Incumbent Frank Minyard will once again face perennial candidate Dwight McKenna. The two men faced off in 2010, and McKenna produced one of the all-time memorable New Orleans TV political ads, portraying Minyard as a Dr. Frankenstein (complete with political consultant Bill Schultz as Igor) whom, the ad stated, sold body parts out of the coroner’s office. Also qualifying: Vincent A. Culotta Jr. and Chief Deputy Coroner Jeffrey Rouse. • Clerk of Criminal District Court: Current Clerk Arthur Morrell seeks re-election. The New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation’s Robbie Keen qualified Dec. 13. • Clerk of Civil District Court: Incumbent Dale Atkins is seeking re-election.— KEVIN ALLMAN, ALEX WOODWARD & CLANCY DuBOS

www.stcharlesvision.com

Since the mid-2000s, Louisianabased chicken finger empire Raising Cane’s has used (and trademarked) the slogan “One Love.” But “One Love” also is one of the most popular reggae songs of all time, appearing on reggae icon Bob Marley’s multi-platinum albums Exodus and Legend, among others. It was first recorded as early as 1965, and the most prominent version (from 1977’s Exodus) was also re-released as a single in the 1980s following Marley’s death. On Dec. 6, Marley’s family filed a lawsuit in Massachusetts U.S. District Court against Raising Cane’s, alleging trademark infringement and other charges related to the company’s use of the slogan. 56 Hope Road, the company run by


NEWS VIEWS Marley’s family, has used “One Love” on its merchandise, too — including T-shirts, hats and bumper stickers. In a statement to Gambit, Raising Cane’s founder Todd Graves said the company “denies the Marleys’ allegations and will continue to defend our rights as we have done with the Marleys in related proceedings concerning the One Love mark before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board since 2010.” Graves said he has met with Bob and Rita Marley’s daughter Cedella “in a good faith attempt to reach a resolution regarding the Marleys’ desire to enter the restaurant space,” though he said settlement offers were turned down. Graves is referencing 56 Hope Road’s licensing of Marley’s work to Universal Studios for its Bob Marley: A Tribute to Freedom in 1999, as well as its one-time plans to open an Alabama restaurant called Bob Marley’s One Love Cafe. Graves added, “Raising Cane’s looks forward to proving our position in court, putting this matter behind us and continuing to pursue our one love — serving our communities our quality chicken finger meals.” — ALEX WOODWARD

Crimestoppers goes ‘holistic’

Group unveils new image and slogan

Scuttlebits

All the news that doesn’t fit

• State Sen. Elbert Guillory, ROpelousas, who got plenty of ink earlier this year when he switched his party affiliation from Democrat to Republican, told Lafayette radio station KPEL-FM he intends to run for lieutenant governor in 2015. Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser already has announced his own run, while Baton Rouge Mayor Kip Holden also has expressed interest. Meanwhile, Sen. David Vitter told Shreveport station KEEL-AM he was still weighing a Louisiana gubernatorial bid, but Rep. John Fleming, R-Minden, seems to think Vitter’s mind is already made up. He told KEEL, “Vitter is very, very close to announcing he is going to run” … • Allen Eskew, one of New Orleans’ most famed architects who had a hand in everything from the 1984 World’s Fair to the redevelopment of the riverfront near Canal Street, died Dec. 10 at the age of 65. Among his many other projects: Woldenberg Park, the renovation of the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina, Champions Square, and the planned “Reinventing the Crescent” project along the river in the Faubourg Marigny and Bywater. Two days after his death, his firm, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, received the Firm of the Year Award from the American Institute of Architects, the group’s highest honor … • WWL-TV personality Frank Davis died Dec. 9 after a long illness. The gregarious Davis, a New Orleans native, was known for decades for his “Fishin’ Game” reports, his authentic accent, on-air cooking and “Naturally N’awlins” features about local people. Davis was 71 … • Two weeks after the national gay-rights lobbying organization Human Rights Campaign (HRC) issued its second annual “Municipal Equality Index,” ranking U.S. cities based on their LGBT policies, Shreveport adopted an ordinance protecting gays and lesbians against discrimination based on sexual orientation. The HRC had given Shreveport 16 out of a possible 100 points when it came to LGBT issues — not great, but well ahead of Baton Rouge, which scored a 7 (and has no such protection in place). The Shreveport City Council voted 6-1 to pass what it called the Fairness Act, which prohibits workplace discrimination. Penalties for violating the act begin at $500. — KEVIN ALLMAN

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Crimestoppers — the hotline-driven organization that feeds crime tips to a variety of criminal justice agencies — has unveiled its new “look” and slogan: “Keeping neighborhoods safe.” Crimestoppers Executive Director Darlene Cusanza said the organization no longer is “strictly a place to call in” with crime tips but aims to show its “much more proactive and holistic side of fighting crime.” On Dec. 9, representatives from area crime groups (including the New Orleans Police Department, Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office and U.S. Marshals) showed the more “friendly” Crimestoppers look, with a Jefferson Transit bus wrapped in a Crimestoppers ad with colorful cartoons. It’s one of two buses with the ad in Jefferson Parish — one is on the West Bank, the other is on the East Bank. The website (www.crimestoppersgno.org) — which includes active lists of missing persons, open cases and most wanted suspects — now includes a blog to interact with Cusanza and others, as well as a segment for teenagers. A “positive” 30-second advertisement, featuring children playing in parks and in schools, highlights the organization’s Teen Ambassadors Against Crime program, which pulls from 16 schools in the New Orleans metro area.

Crimestoppers’ anonymous tip hotline is (504) 822-1111. People also can submit tips anonymously on the group’s website. “We’re real, and we’re here to serve you,” Cusanza said. — ALEX WOODWARD

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COMMENTARY

MMENTARY

thinking out loud

Start over, sell hospitals he Jefferson Parish Council has been deadlocked for months over the biggest fiscal and policy question to confront the parish in at least a generation: the proposed lease of Jefferson’s two publicly owned hospitals to a private operator. At the outset, officials at East Jefferson General Hospital (EJGH) and West Jefferson Medical Center (WJMC) wanted to put their respective institutions on a path that would guarantee longterm financial and medical viability. Their intentions were good and their reasoning well-founded, but the process has been fraught with problems from the get-go. Closed-door meetings, claims of conflicts of interest, ambiguous evaluation criteria and political maneuvering have delayed the council’s decision and added to the angst of medical staff, patients and voters. As things stand now, a final decision appears to be at least six months away, possibly longer, while the council tries to hire yet another independent consultant. According to the nonpartisan Bureau of Governmental Research (BGR), the

son Parish will be getting out of the health care business, and it’s highly unlikely ever to get back into that business. • Despite the council’s best efforts to get independent outside advice, the lease process has been imbued with politics, intrigue and devilish complexity. What was supposed to be an objective process has degenerated into an emotional contest of wills between the two hospital boards and their political patrons. Given all that, and given that the parish has already decided that it no longer will control what goes on inside its publicly owned hospitals, why hold on to those facilities at all? Leasing them to a third-party operator will generate revenue, but not nearly as much as an outright sale. Moreover, a sale would be a far “cleaner” — and simpler — transaction, one far less likely to trigger litigation that will only further delay third-party operation of the hospitals and further diminish public confidence. In addition to all those reasons, a sale has far greater potential to take politics out of the equation because it

The lease process has been imbued with politics, intrigue and devilish complexity. GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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Byzantine process used by the council underscores all that’s wrong with Jefferson’s historically politicized, council-centric procurement policy. “It’s just another example of why there’s such a pressing need there for reform,” said BGR president Janet Howard, who added that the selection process has been “shrouded in secrecy” and “overly subjective.” We agree, and we would add that things have now reached a point that citizens have little basis for confidence in the council’s ultimate decision. For those reasons and more, we suggest that parish leaders scrap the entire selection process, cease throwing good money after bad (on more consultants’ fees) and start over — but this time, the end result should be a sale of the hospitals, not a lease. This may strike some as an outside-thebox suggestion, but in truth it is no more extraordinary than leasing the hospitals. Consider the undeniable facts that brought both institutions to this point: • Health care is getting more complicated and more expensive by the day — to the point that community hospitals all over the country are scrambling to partner with, or be acquired by, large private health care providers. • By all objective accounts, the coming decades will bring even more financial pressures on community hospitals. • Under either a sale or a lease, Jeffer-

can be accomplished under the public bid law — provided the council adopts a straightforward set of bid specifications. This is paramount, and eminently doable. Bidders should be required to pay the entire sale price at the closing and pay off the hospitals’ debts. The highest bidder would get the hospitals, with no council action (read: interference) required. Moreover, all of the proceeds of a sale could be placed into a trust fund, with interest dedicated to infrastructure improvements and public safety. Opponents of a sale no doubt will argue that it’s too late to turn back now, but that’s nonsense. The many delays already encountered are a big red flag warning of more trouble ahead. Others may suggest that a sale would take away the parish’s ability to guarantee patient-centered care. That, too, is nonsense. Even under a lease, the private operator would determine hospital policy — and the market will dictate levels of patient care far more efficiently than the parish council. As for timing, the council’s latest tack has delayed a final decision at least until next summer, and litigation could further delay implementation. A sale would require legislative action and a referendum, but those steps would bring finality and clarity — and give voters a voice in charting the institutions’ future, even if it means selling them off.


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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


CLANCY DUBOS

POLITICS

Follow Clancy on Twitter: @clancygambit

‘A formidable challenger’ o paraphrase Mark Twain, reports of a deathly quiet mayoral election were greatly exaggerated. The eleventh-hour candidacy of former Judge Michael Bagneris makes it a real race, but his late entry raises a lot of questions. For starters, many are wondering whether — and where — Bagneris can raise the money to take on Mitch Landrieu. Then there’s the question of timing: Why would he wait until the last day of qualifying to get into the race against a popular mayor who has more than $2 million in the bank? Speaking of timing, the calendar is one factor that remains immutable. No amount of money can change the fact that Christmas is next week, followed by New Year’s Day, the Sugar Bowl and the New Orleans Saints playoff schedule.

real one. The answer he will give is that he could not campaign while serving as a judge. While that’s true, it’s also true that he could have retired months ago and started running sooner, but didn’t. The real reason, I suspect, is because the offer of sufficient money didn’t come through until recently — and it’s coming, according to several sources, from an unlikely source for a black Democrat: the GOP. My sources tell me Bagneris will benefit from a massive anti-Landrieu fundraising effort directed by Republican mullahs who are hell-bent on tarnishing the Landrieu brand in advance of U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu’s re-election campaign next year. If that means financing a Bagneris campaign for mayor (or mounting a third-party ad campaign to help him), so be it.

Landrieu starts out as the favorite, but he cannot afford to appear overconfident. But that’s all inside baseball. Publicly, Bagneris will have to introduce himself to New Orleans voters all over again. He won his first judicial race 20 years ago and has been unopposed ever since, which means an entire generation of voters never heard of him. Many older voters remember him as the bright young executive counsel to then-Mayor Dutch Morial in the 1980s. He ran (unsuccessfully) for an at-large seat on the City Council in 1986 before winning his judgeship in 1993. As a judge, Bagneris earned high marks from the legal community, and he recently served as chief judge at Civil District Court. In that capacity, he locked horns with the mayor over construction of a new courthouse. Landrieu wants the new courthouse located in Big Charity; the judges want their own stand-alone courthouse. Rumors of Bagneris’ candidacy began when the courthouse fight heated up. Landrieu starts out as the favorite, but he cannot afford to appear overconfident. “We have overcome great odds,” he told me last week, “and we will press on. I consider every candidate to be a serious candidate and a formidable challenger.” If the rumors are true and Bagneris benefits from a full-scale GOP assault against Landrieu, the mayor’s words could prove to be prophetic.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Sound familiar? That’s the same scenario that accompanied Landrieu’s first successful race for mayor in 2010. Landrieu, who had more name recognition than any two of his opponents in that race, coasted to victory as voters were too distracted to pay much attention to the other hopefuls. They voted overwhelmingly for the guy they knew. No two elections are alike, but the template for this mayoral contest looks familiar. Bagneris has a small window of time to raise money, organize a campaign, formulate a message and get that message out to voters. As the challenger, Bagneris must articulate a compelling reason to toss out the incumbent — something Landrieu failed to do in 2006 when he challenged then-Mayor Ray Nagin (and lost). This time, Landrieu says, he will “run a fullblown campaign.” Effectively, the race will occur in two stages, the first between now and Dec. 20. Between Dec. 21 and Jan. 3, 2014, voters will be celebrating the holidays and generally not paying attention to politics. Then there is a four-week sprint to the Feb. 1 primary. That’s not a lot of time for a challenger who probably starts out with less than 10 percent name recognition and whose opponent has 65 percent voter approval. So why did Bagneris jump in so late? There are two answers to that question: the one Bagneris will give and the

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


TOURIST OF THE YEAR The Dalai Lama

Forget Super Bowl quarterbacks — the year’s most high-profile visitor to New Orleans was the Dalai Lama, whose May trip to the city saw colorful Tibetan prayer flags fluttering from balconies all over town.

These may not have been the biggest stories of 2013 in the city — but they were the strangest, most interesting … and in some cases, most alarming. Here’s what you were talking about this year, New Orleans. BY KE V IN ALLMAN & ALEX WOODWARD

Pierre the Pelican

When the newly rebranded New Orleans Pelicans unveiled their new mascot, Pierre the Pelican, at a game in late October, reviews were not good: “The Pelicans unveiled ‘Pierre’ to fans on Wednesday, and he is completely and utterly terrifying. Seriously. Don’t try to stare into his eyes for more than a few seconds.” — Sean Highkin, USA Today “The thing is nightmare-inducing, and if I didn’t know better, I’d say it was simply a cruel Halloween costume  meant to scare small children at New Orleans Arena.” — Sam Gardner, Fox Sports “From a distance, it’s cute and cuddly enough to make you think you shouldn’t be afraid, but then you get up close and catch a glimpse of that gaping, ‘smiling’ maw, which is the portal for your soul’s devourment.” — Deadspin Meanwhile, busy fans set to work Photoshopping Pierre into a number of disturbing images: as the creature from both Alien and The Ring movies, as the twins from The Shining and even into both Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper and the Beatles’ first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. The hapless pelican was even the butt of jokes on Comedy Central’s late-night series @ Midnight. Pity poor Pierre — he just wants to be loved, and to shoot you with a T-shirt cannon.

DANCE OF THE YEAR Twerking

If you grew up in New Orleans, you likely called it “p-poppin’” when you first saw it (though DJ Jubilee was using the word “twerk” as early as 1993). As the bounce scene became popular elsewhere, Americans got their first look at New Orleans-style twerking. But it was an instantly infamous performance by Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke at the August MTV Video Music Awards that

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

ODD Year It was a very

SCARIEST NEW LOCAL OF THE YEAR

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C OV E R S T O R Y

Have you ever asked someone to do something — then realized you should City Park/Ty Park fiasco have been more specific? In October, New Orleans City Park officials hired a contractor to do some trim work, only to have him cut down two of the letters in the iconic topiary CITY PARK sign. By the time horrified neighbors intervened, the damage was done, and CITY PARK was now TY PARK. New boxwoods were planted within the week.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

TRIM OF THE YEAR

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brought “twerk” to the mainstream and launched a national debate about New Orleans’ booty popping. Big Freedia told the press that Cyrus “didn’t really twerk properly” (“Just get me and Miley together so I could give her ass some lessons”). The Queen Diva then asserted her own dominance in the genre by attempting to set a Guinness World Record for twerking in New York’s Herald Square in October. Just last week, Cyrus tried to twerk up trouble again by grinding on Santa Claus at a holiday concert in Los Angeles. Are you shocked yet? Neither are we.

ALTERCATION OF THE YEAR Jim Letten vs. James O’Keefe

In July, muckraker James O’Keefe of the website Project Veritas was removed from the campus of Tulane University after he and a camera crew attempted to interview former U.S. Attorney Jim Letten. In 2010, Letten recused himself from a federal case that followed an incident in which O’Keefe and his crew posed as telephone repairmen and gained access to Sen. Mary Landrieu’s New Orleans office. (The recusal, presumably, was due to the fact that one of O’Keefe’s crew was the son of William Flanagan, acting U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Louisiana — Letten’s then-counterpart in the western half of the state.) Later that year, O’Keefe and his partners pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor in that case and received probation, community service and minor

fines. But when O’Keefe attempted to give Letten a copy of his book Breakthrough, Letten gave O’Keefe a piece of his mind in return, calling him a “hobbit,” “spud,” “scum” and “asshole.” The video of their encounter was posted promptly on Project Veritas’ website.

ENDLESS DEBATE OF THE YEAR

Hipsters and gentrifiers Forget “the N word” — this year we were suffused with “the G word” (gentrification) and the dreaded “H word” (hipster). If you open a business, are you a gentrifier? What if it’s in a formerly blighted building? If you like to ride your bike to the Hi-Ho or Euclid Records, are you automatically a hipster? What if you moved to Bywater from Portland, Ore. in 2012? (OK, then probably you are a hipster.) There’s no concrete definition of either of these terms, but it didn’t stop New Orleans from passionately arguing about it all year — after all, someone or something must be making the rents rise so quickly, and it can’t be us, so it must be them ... whoever they are.

UNFORTUNATE AD PLACEMENT OF THE YEAR The Talk

French Quarter residents who were already unhappy over CBS Sports


C OV E R S T O R Y turning much of the Upper Quarter into a TV backlot during Super Bowl XLVII finally hit the roof when officials promoting the CBS daytime yap show The Talk hung a promotional sign on the statue of former President Andrew Jackson in Jackson Square. After a day of social media outrage, the sign was taken down and CBS issued a terse apology: “The sign, which was placed due to a light reflection issue, has been removed.”

SECURITY MEASURE OF THE YEAR

Clear purses at Saints games The NFL ticked off lots of Saints fans when it mandated new rules for bags carried into football arenas. Anything larger than a clutch bag had to be transparent — the NFL website actually recommended Who Dats carry their possessions in Ziploc bags, or (ahem) purchase one of the league’s nifty new clear tote bags for $10. Fans who hadn’t gotten the word were turned away at the gates, and there were plenty of anecdotes about Who Dats who missed most of the first quarter trudging back

to their cars. Local comics Colleen Allerton and Lauren LaBorde (a former Gambit staffer) made a funny video (“My Purse, My Choice”) about the brouhaha, which went viral and even got a writeup in The New York Times. The NBA followed the NFL’s lead on bag restrictions, but its rules were less onerous — they could be larger, and they didn’t have to be transparent, protecting Pelicans fans’ privacy.

NAME CHANGE OF THE YEAR Hor … uh, Pelicans

Even though the name “Pelicans” was first proposed more than a year ago, we’re still not used to saying it.

RETIREMENT OF THE YEAR Angela Hill

In April, when Angela Hill stepped down from the WWL-TV anchor desk, she had been reporting news in New Orleans for 38 years. The station promised she’d be back to do special reports (it hasn’t happened yet), but in September, she

Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre reOPENING OF THE YEAR Leopened in July and the Civic Theatre followed suit in September, but it was the

The Saenger Theatre

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

return of the Saenger Theatre — closed since Hurricane Katrina — that heralded the return of a complete downtown theater district. A $52 million renovation brought back everything from the twinkling stars in the ceiling to the lighted blade marquee outside, along with an entirely new stage area that will allow modern mega-musical productions (like the Broadway Across America opener The Book of Mormon) to once again play on Canal Street.

PHOTO BY JEANIE RIESS

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C OV E R S T O R Y

REALITY TV NEWCOMER, CHAMPION & FLOP OF THE YEAR

We don’t mean to be rude, but this was Big Freedia’s year on reality Big Freedia, (11-three photos/) TV. The Queen Big Freedia the Robertson family and Diva’s Fuse TV show spread P H O T O BY C H ER Y L Trina Scott Edwards G ER B ER her fame even (Duck Dynasty) further, while the Robertson family of north LouisiP H O T O C O U R T E S Y A & Eana saw their Duck Dynasty become one of the most (The Governor’s Wife) popular reality shows of all time, sometimes outrating network shows. Several of the Robertsons used their popularity to champion evangelical issues and politics, most notably in Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District race, where Duck patriarch Phil Robertson endorsed novice politician Vance McAllister — who went on to thump the presumed favorite, State Sen. Neil Riser. Not so lucky was Trina Scott (Mrs. Edwin) Edwards, whose A&E show The Governor’s Wife was delayed nearly a year. When the dull, contrived show finally aired in the fall, it had the only thing worse than bad reviews: near-complete disinterest. After three weeks of disappointing ratings, A&E abruptly burned off the rest of the series on an early Sunday morning and filled The Governor’s Wife’s timeslot with reruns of Duck Dynasty.

P H O TO BY C HERY L G ERBER

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

re-emerged as a host on WWL radio in the afternoons.

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RESTAURANT OPENING, CLOSING & RESURRECTION OF THE YEAR Peche Seafood Grill, Brennan’s, Tujague’s

Donald Link’s Peche Seafood Grill was an immediate smash hit when it opened in April. The Warehouse District restaurant specializes in tip-to-tail seafood — think whole fish, coated in flavorful herbs and oils, cooked over an open wood fire. Bon Appetit named it one of

America’s top new eateries, and when Dana Cowin, editor of Food & Wine, gushed over Link’s new restaurant in an editor’s letter, tables became harder and harder to get at Peche. Meanwhile, Brennan’s — the pink doyenne of Royal Street where $35 breakfasts and a heavy tourist trade were the norm — was sold at auction in May, beginning a restaurant soap opera to rival Dynasty, or maybe Falcon Crest. The company that bought it was run by rival restaurateur Ralph Brennan, who announced plans to open his own eatery on the spot. Meanwhile, former Brennan’s employees claimed the company was stiffing them for their last paychecks and tips. Earlier this month, Brennan’s Inc., the company that had run Brennan’s for decades, filed for bankruptcy, and on Dec.

12, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals put the company in the hands of Ted Brennan, shifting long-time control from his brother Pip. The family hopes to reopen, possibly at another location. Currently the familiar gold script letters that spell “Brennan’s” have been taken off the facade, leaving an ugly scar. And it was Gambit that broke the news last March: After the death of longtime owner/restaurateur Steven Latter, Tujague’s — the second-oldest restaurant in New Orleans, founded in 1856 — was rumored to be in danger of closing. Hot rumor around the French Quarter had it that the brisketand-horseradish emporium might be turned into yet another tourist T-shirt shop. By the end of May, however, Latter’s son Mark announced he had

A B O V E P H O TO S C O U R T E S Y A &E

signed a new lease on the building and urged New Orleanians to come eat there if they wanted to support the restaurant’s continued existence. Local chefs and culinarians came to Tujague’s support, and food doyenne Poppy Tooker announced she would collaborate with the restaurant to produce its first cookbook.

INFRASTRUCTURE FAILURE OF THE YEAR Superdome blackout

Oh, New Orleans. We’ve become accustomed to all-too-frequent boil-water orders, and having our electrical powPAGE 24


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C OV E R S T O R Y PAGE 22

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So what if Baton Rouge got a Trader Joe’s first? It probably means ours is right behind. Despite New Orleanians’ stated preference for local shops and products, they rushed to embrace chains both large (Costco) and smaller (Pei Wei, Five Guys Burgers & Fries and the other shops in the Mid-City Marketplace). The year-end opening of Tiffany and Co. — New Orleans’ first — in The Shops at Canal Place drew attention, but if you wanted crowds, the one outside H&M on N. Peters Street drew people who stood in a four-block-long P H O TO BY C HERY L G ERBER line to be the first through the doors. Next year will bring the reopening of Riverwalk Marketplace, transformed into The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, which will feature Neiman Marcus, Kenneth Cole, Forever 21 … and New Orleans’ first-ever Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar and Grill. Um … yay?

er knocked out for hours if it so much as drizzles outside. So it shouldn’t have been too much of a surprise when the one glitch in an otherwise-smooth Super Bowl XLVII week came during the game itself. At 7:38 p.m. on Feb. 3, as the Baltimore Ravens were spanking the San Francisco 49ers 28-6, most of the lights in the Superdome went dark — and stayed that way for half an hour, embarrassing city officials and leaving New Orleanians shaking their heads. During the pause, Baltimore lost a lot of momentum, but still went on to win 34-31. Still, it didn’t stop the Ravens’ Terrell Suggs and Ray Lewis from suggesting that the blackout had been purposely orchestrated by none other than Who Dat Public Enemy No. 1: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. We can live with that.

INFRASTRUCTURE FAILURE OF THE YEAR, RUNNER-UP Elevator failure at City Hall

City Council President Jackie Clarkson was an hour late for an October council meeting about the budget — because she’d gotten trapped on one of City Hall’s elevators. (It would have made a hell of a Halloween costume.) It couldn’t have shaken up the councilwoman too

much, though, because two months later she reversed course on her planned retirement and is now running for her old council seat in District C.

SAINTSOPHRENIA OF THE YEAR

Falcons triumph and Seahawks defeat The height of satisfaction: Beating the Falcons 17-13 at the Georgia Dome Nov. 21. And the depths of despair: Getting beaten by the Seahawks two weeks later in Seattle, 34-7.

AGGRAVATION OF THE YEAR Endless street repair/streetcar repair

The never-ending reconstruction of Napoleon Avenue continued all year — and orange cones and webbing seemed to spread all over the city like an invasive plant. Esplanade Avenue was a mess right up until Jazz Fest, and the end of the year saw street tear-ups from Orleans Avenue and Bienville Street to Jefferson Davis Parkway. Some day you will be able to tell your children about the crape myrtles on Napoleon. PAGE 27


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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C OV E R S T O R Y PAGE 24

MOGUL OF THE YEAR

The nascent newspaper wars in New Orleans got more interesting in May when John Georges local businessman John Georges bought the Baton Rouge-based The Advocate and announced he was making a play for the New Orleans newspaper market, which was still in turmoil after The Times-Picayune’s 2012 “digital transition” to publication three days a week. Georges beefed up the New Orleans bureau substantially and branded the paper with a new slogan: “Seven Days, Louisiana Owned, Home Delivered.” Meanwhile, the T-P continued to innovate by publishing a tabloid edition, TP Street, on three of the days it had stopped printing a daily paper, and by year’s end its newsboxes were once again advertising “The Times-Picayune: 7 Days a Week.” It seems print’s not dead in New Orleans — as evidenced by the December announcement that the NOLA Defender website (www. noladefender. com) plans to launch a quarterly print edition in 2014.

UNWANTED PUBLICITY OF THE YEAR

“The Intoxicating, Tradition-Steeped Charm of New Orleans” The juggernaut of national (and international) publicity for New Orleans continued all year — most of it fulsome praise, a good deal of it questionable. But was there anything worse than Sara Ruffin Costello’s paean to the city in The New York Times’ glossy T Magazine? Costello, a recent transplant from New York, said she “had spent my adult life trying to shed my Southern roots,” before rhapsodizing about all the things she’d discovered in New Orleans —most of which can be found as easily in Brooklyn as they can now in Bywater. Costello managed to name-drop another recent transplant, the singer Solange Knowles (the two shared a plate of empanadas at Booty’s Street Food) while managing to insult a place she was trying to praise: the Erin Rose bar in the French Quarter. Costello called it “a classic joint in a century-old building with a crusty patina and mixed PAGE 29

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C OV E R S T O R Y J o in u s fo r o ur HOLIDAY PE R SO NAL

PAGE 27

P H O TO BY C HERY L G ERBER

This summer, days before the New Orleans Daiquiri Festival, Facebook and Twitter lit up with pleas to save go -ups. From what? Gentrifying business Tie: Go-cup a go-go/Live owners looking to kick plastic cups music permits and zoning from their bars, city officials planning legislation to repeal open-container laws, or neighborhood groups forcing new businesses to stop serving them? None of these things happened — however, fears persisted. St. Roch Tavern, after repeated infractions, had its go-cup privileges revoked by the city in June. Alcohol Beverage Control Board and City Planning Commission (CPC) meetings were closely watched as go-cups became subject to approval — though no businesses were told to stop serving them. City officials noted repeatedly there is no plan to ban go-cups; existing businesses may be prohibited from serving them if they fail to meet ABO license requirements. Arts and culture overlays, like on St. Claude Avenue, allow new businesses to have go-cups as long as they have the bar’s logo on them. Meanwhile, zoning and music permit issues have cropped up again as they did in 2012, this time on Frenchmen Street, where New Orleans Police Department officers recently patrolled — enforcing rarely enforced regulations on the lively street. Watch for this story to become a biggie in 2014.

CONTROVERSY OF THE YEAR

RETURN OF THE YEAR Sean Payton

• 2011 Saints season with Payton: 13-3, 1st place in NFC South • 2012 Saints season sans Payton: 7-9, 3rd place in NFC South • 2013 Saints season with Payton: 10-3, 1st place in NFC South (so far) ’Nuff said.

DELAY OF THE YEAR Ray Nagin trial

Former Mayor Ray Nagin was indicted on more than 20 counts of bribery and other corruption charges back in January, but his trial has been delayed longer than The Governor’s Wife. In

October, U.S. District Judge Ginger Berrigan granted another delay, scheduling Nagin’s trial for January 2014 — a third postponement. (For those who need reminding: Nagin was charged with six counts of bribery, one count of conspiracy, one count of money laundering, nine counts of wire fraud and four counts of filing false tax returns.) The question now is whether a plea deal will be reached.

TEMPEST IN A TIP JAR OF THE YEAR

Drew Brees tip scandal Anything Saints quarterback Drew Brees does makes news. So when he tipped $3 on a $74 bill at a San Diego restaurant in July, a photo of the receipt went viral on social media. What a cheapskate, right? Well, not so fast — Brees pointed out that it was a takeout order and tweeted, “Had we sat down it would have been 20%+.” That subsequently ignited a discussion on PAGE 30

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

clientele — some with teeth.” More than 100 people commented on the story on the NYT website, and most were not complimentary about Costello’s condescension. In fact, you could say they showed her their teeth.

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C OV E R S T O R Y PAGE 29

Words of the Year 2013 COMPILED BY ALEX WOODWARD

Gentrification

noun: a socio-economic shift in an urban community welcoming wealthier residents at the expense of poor residents who can’t afford rising property values raised by outside investors; usually used incorrectly to describe a restaurant’s small plates menu

Hobbit

noun: James O’Keefe; see also: scum, snail, horse’s ass “All of you, you’re hobbits. You are less than I can ever tell you.” — former U.S. Attorney Jim Letten to provocateur James O’Keefe, who attempted to deliver a copy of his book Breakthrough: Our Guerrilla War to Expose Fraud and Save Democracy, on Tulane University’s campus and to Letten’s home

Iconic Structure GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

noun: A carousel? Or is it a “sky wheel”? Whatever ends up at the World Trade Center site. That thing

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Le Diner en Blanc

noun: a dinner party in which attendees pay to bring their own food and drink, as well as their own tables and chairs, while dressed in all white at an undisclosed location, presumably to avoid the loud groans of passersby

“Le Diner en Blanc recalls the elegance and glamour of court society, and diners engage one another knowing they are taking part in a truly magical event.” — Le Diner en Blanc New Orleans website

Rise Up

verb: a failed campaign by the Atlanta Falcons “Rise up? Falcons bow down” — Fox Sports headline following the New Orleans Saints 17-13 victory Nov. 21.

Twerk

verb: to dance with one’s buttocks displayed prominently in an up-anddown manner; popularized in New Orleans bounce music and Southern rap in the early ’90s; gained wider usage (and exposure) by Miley Cyrus in 2013, also setting off discussions of cultural appropriation see also: bounce, p-pop, twurk, wobble


C OV E R S T O R Y

Buku Music + Art Project’s NEW FEST OF THE YEAR March’s sophomore effort proved a bigger, louder and more ambitious version of its 2012

Buku, take 2

predecessor. Multiple stages (including a psychedelic, cavernous bass-heavy lair in the float den) at Mardi Gras World hosted names like Public Enemy and Kendrick Lamar, with rising stars Calvin Harris, Kid Cudi, Passion Pit, Icona Pop and alt-J winning over thousands of sunglass-wearing teenagers wearing furry leggings and all-over neon. Neighbors didn’t rush to celebrate its success: the festival, camped along the Mississippi River, was apparently so loud it shook windows downtown and in other neighborhoods. The high volume was a trend repeated at the Voodoo Experience, which moved its stages to City Park’s new festival grounds” — close enough so Mid-City residents could watch Nine Inch Nails and The Cure from their porch or lawn chairs along Bayou St. John. Or if you wanted to stay home in Lakeview or Old Metairie, you could hear it clearly.

tipping for takeout orders (should you or shouldn’t you; if so, how much) and Brees told the media that if Tipgate was the biggest controversy he’d have to face all season, he’d be happy.

DANGEROUS SINGLE-CELLED ORGANISM OF THE YEAR Naegleria fowleri

A brain-eating amoeba that once again showed up in the Chalmette water supply resulted in a flushing of the water system and the addition of chlorine to starve the amoeba.

RENTAL OF THE YEAR

$1600/month efficiency apartment In a year that saw rents and home prices go through the roof in metro New Orleans, a November ad on Craigslist may have taken the cake. A 700-square-

foot basement apartment in the Carrollton neighborhood with sink and toilet just off the living room was listed for $1,595 per month. Did the owner get the money? Who knows. The good news? Utilities were included.

OVERHYPED NON-EVENT OF THE YEAR Hurricane Karen

Would it be a Category 1? A nasty tropical storm? In October, New Orleans steeled itself for Hurricane/Tropical Storm Karen, which formed off the coast of Cuba and made rapid progress toward the Gulf Coast. As it turned out, Karen was a most welcome visitor — her “landfall” brought on one of the most pleasant weekends of the year and resurrected an old photo meme: a plastic lawn chair tipped delicately on its side, as if by the tiniest puff of breeze, with the legend: HURRICANE KAREN: NEVER FORGET.

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P H O T O C O U R T E S Y B U K U M U S I C+ A R T P R OJ EC T

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p a r w s ’ t e L

it up!

A handcrafted, twosided ornament by Heather Elizabeth Designs (www.hedesigns.com) adds a double touch of local charm, $24 available at Little Miss Muffin (766 Harrison Ave., 504-482-8200).

BY MARY CROS S

Written by 14 historians and prominent figures, including Gambit political editor Clancy DuBos, this lavishly illustrated 336-page tome is an homage to the beloved local products that make New Orleans great. Making New Orleans, $49.95 at Phillip Collier Designs (www.phillipcollierdesigns.com).

This fierce structured leopard print bag makes a glamorous gift for the fashionista in your family, $99 at Maiya (3000 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504-324-8745).

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It would be no surprise to find Santa kicking back in this recliner by Colt. The manual leather version is $499 and the powered leather edition starts at $669 at Halpern’s Furnishing Store (1532 St. Charles Ave., 504-304-0039; 1600 Prytania St., 504-566-1707; www.halpernsfurniture.com).

It’s one week till Santa’s arrival. Do you know where your presents are?

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Ranging from comedies to murder mystery productions, the 2014 season for the Jefferson Performing Arts Society (1118 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie, 504-885-2000; www.jpas.org). includes shows to thrill everyone on your list. Regular tickets are $30, and gift certificates, ticket packages and discounted group rates are available.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Available in a variety of richly hued patterns, hand-sewn Robert Talbott silk ties ensure he’ll look dapper under the mistletoe, $90 each at M. Goldberg Clothier (502 Leontine St., 504-891-1119; www.mgoldbergclothier.com).

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A double orchid is an elegant and unexpected alternative to poinsettias. Orchid, $24.95 and flowerpot, $9 at Harold’s Indoor Outdoor Plants (1135 Press St., 504-947-7554; www.haroldsplants.com).


The kitchen cupboard by Aries is a great gift for the friend who loves to stay organized. Two drawers and multiple shelves provide stylish storage space, and the piece can be customized with more than 100 finishes, $895 at Christian Street Furniture (3029 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-841-3332; www.christianstreetfurniture.com).

A vividly hued flask is a clever way to keep eggnog close at hand, $15.50 at Buffalo Exchange (3312 Magazine St., 504-891-7443; www.buffaloexchange.com).

Jazz up your gift giving with a sterling silver Music Lover pendant designed by Jose Balli, $80 at Jose Balli Jewelry (621 Chartres St., 504-522-1770; 70360 Hwy. 21, Covington, 985-892-8990; 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-832-8990; www.joseballi.com). PAGE 37

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LINGERIE STORES: 831 CHARTRES ST. 2044 MAGAZINE ST.

ORE INFORMAT ION RM FO

504.522.5686

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FOLLOW US

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Searching for a playful accessory for your holiday cocktail dress? Try this feathered fascinator. From Carnival season to LSU tailgating time, the versatile shade of violet can be worn year-round, $80 at The Voluptuous Vixen (818 Chartres St., 504-529-3588; www.thevoluptuousvixen.com).

Chic paper placemats are both whimsical and practical additions to a holiday party. Kitchen Papers, $25 at Scriptura (3301 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, Metairie, 504-219-1113; 5423 Magazine St., 504-897-1555; www.scriptura.com).

Display hometown pride with an aluminum reproduction of the iconic New Orleans water meter, $32 at Ricca’s Architectural Sales (511 N. Solomon St., 504-488-5524; www.riccasarchitectural.com).

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Feed your favorite foodie with these Holiday Gifts!

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Buy $100 in Gift Cards & receive a

25 BONUS GIFT CARD $

Purchase thru December 30th By Phone { 539-5520 }

Online { neworleans-food.com } or In Restaurant:

Magazine St & Louisiana

BuffaloExchange.com #iFoundThisAtBX

AWARD WINNING COOKBOOK $35 Ralph Brennan’s New Orleans Seafood Cookbook Order Autographed Copies Online: www.ralphbrennancookbook.com


WHAT’S

in store

Into the By Katie Walenter

S

WOODS

Discoveries’ Discoveries motto is “global Furniture & Finds style for owner Scott everybody. Every McKearn stands budget.” The stores’ selections outside the store’s provide customers newest location. P H OTO BY with furniture C HERY L G ERBER at a variety of price points. “We have our ‘extreme value’ stained and painted mahogany furniture from Indonesia that even a college student can afford, and we also have one-of-a-kind items that would cost a small fortune if they were at a typical furniture store or boutique,” McKearn says. Discoveries also offers customized finishes on any piece of furniture. Customers can find matching bedroom, living room and dining room sets in stock. “A customer can furnish an entire room or their entire home in one shopping session,” McKearn says. If a piece a customer likes is at a store in a different city, Discoveries will transfer it to the nearest location for free. In February, the first franchise location will open in Denver. It’s part of McKearn’s plan to grow Discoveries Furniture & Finds into a national brand. “The franchise store in Denver is going to be our first foray into a high-traffic/ high-rent shopping center,” McKearn says. “This is an experiment for us as we look at expanding into other markets with stores modeled after the new Magazine Street store. … The success of this location will help to determine our expansion plans.”

SHOPPING NEWS

by Missy Wilkinson

PARIS PARKER (citywide; www.parisparker. com) hosts a holiday personal shopping event from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18 at all salon locations. There will be wine, cheese and “mini” spa services. Local fashion bloggers will attend the event.

The 2000 and 2100 blocks of Magazine Street host GREEN HOLIDAY HAPPENING from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19. There will be door prizes, gifts, drinks and refreshments at participating stores, which include GREEN SERENE, SPRUCE, BRANCH OUT, UNIQUE PRODUCTS and ZUKABABY.

The NEW ORLEANS FOOD CO-OP (New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 504-2645579; www.nolafood.coop) holds an owner appreciation day from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19. There will be samples, holiday recipe guides and demonstrations. Members get 10 percent off purchases.

YVONNE LAFLEUR (8131 Hampson St., 504-8669666; www.yvonnelafleur.com) hosts a trunk show from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 21, featuring Onezieme bags and designer Onezieme Mouton will make an appearance. There will be hors d’oeuvres, Champagne and complimentary gift wrapping.

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cott McKearn has imported furniture since 1995. After working as a direct importer of high-end furniture for retailers such as Neiman Marcus, Horchow and Saks Fifth Avenue — and then for his own furniture store, Habitat Imports (now closed) in Baton Rouge, McKearn developed a new concept in 2005. “I was totally focused on cutting out the middleman mark-up,” McKearn says. He opened Discoveries Furniture & Finds (120 E. Morris Blvd., Hammond, 985345-2577; 318 N. Rampart St., 504-569-0310; www.discoverieswholesalewarehouse. com) in a 15,000-square-foot, open-air warehouse in Hammond in 2006. “Our mission is to bring in an everchanging mix of handcrafted, solid wood furniture and accessories at direct import price points that are a quarter to half off the price you would pay elsewhere,” McKearn says. Within a couple of years, McKearn added French Quarter and Baton Rouge locations. Soon Discoveries will launch a second New Orleans location at 2850 Magazine St. The store’s furniture selection includes tables, bookshelves, chairs, hutches, benches, vanities and headboards, as well as accessories, mirrors and art. McKearn and his wife, Cat, make biannual trips to India, Indonesia, China and occasionally Morocco to buy directly from furniture makers and artisans. The trips allow McKearn to blend his passion for furniture and travel. “I am a stimuli junkie and love beautiful, interesting things,” he says.

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FORK + center

+

Email dining@gambitweekly.com

NEW ORLEANS

Midnight at the oasis

Round-the-clock Middle Eastern fare. By Scott Gold

A

Eggspansion

The breakfast and lunch cafe The Broken Egg opened in Mandeville in spring 1994. It became popular. Very popular. Soon ownership decided to expand, first with a string of franchises called Another Broken Egg (www.anotherbrokenegg.com) along the Gulf Coast and then nationally, from California to Washington D.C. There had been no expansion in the New Orleans market outside of the Northshore until now. Hoosier Hospitality Group, an Indianapolis, Ind.-based company headed by New Orleanian and Ruth’s Chris Steak House veteran Kevin Armantrout, is opening two new locations in the Crescent City. The first location at 2917 Magazine St., a space formerly occupied by Cafe Rani and, for a brief time, La Fin Du Monde, is expected to open Jan. 27, 2014. “It’s a natural place for us,” Armantrout says. “It has a great courtyard, where we think people will really enjoy themselves.” The breakfast menu includes “biscuit beignets” with honey marmalade, cinnamon rolls and more. For lunch, there is a menu full of burgers, sandwiches, salads and entrees. The new Another Broken Eggs also will serve dinner. “We’re actually piloting a dinner program in this location,” Armantrout says. “We’re going to be open until 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday to serve dinner in both locations. “The dinner menu will have many of our breakfast items and some Southern flair to it. We’re doing redfish, etouffee, red beans and rice and so on. But you can always get your bananas Foster French toast, eggs Sardou or our lobster and brie omelet. And, of course, there will be a full bar. We use a vodka infused with peppers, radishes and herbs for our bloody mary.” A Lakeview location is slated to open Feb. 10, 2014 at 607 Harrison Ave. Armantrout has ties to another local restaurant. His brother Glen Armantrout is the CEO of Cafe Reconcile PAGE 42

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

long with hurricane season and cavernous potholes, it is a fact of life in New Orleans that it is not easy to find a good place to eat on certain days and at certain hours. Many restaurants close at some point between Sunday and Tuesday, and when it comes to dining in the wee hours, pickings can be even slimmer, especially for thoughtful, wholesome fare. Enter Cleo’s Mediterranean Cuisine & Grocery, a grocery store and restaurant in the Central Business District. The store/eatery is open 24 hours seven days a week, which is a welcome option for the neighborhood, especially for downtown service industry workers and others who keep odd or late hours. Cleo’s serves hot cups of Egyptian tea, American breakfasts and Middle Eastern-style sandwiches, even if a shift at a hotel, restaurant or hospital means someone is hunting for a meal at 4:30 a.m. on a Sunday. A visit to Cleo’s reveals a split vibe. Half of the clean, modern space is filled with grocery racks and refrigerators stocked with sodas, energy drinks, candy, beef jerky and similar items, and the other is fashioned as a dining room, with comfortable high-backed modern chairs and tables. Friendly service is available at the counter or via server. There’s no alcohol available, but if you happen to be in the market for a hookah, Cleo has pipes for sale. Proprietor Tarek Madkour serves Middle Eastern More important than its convenient hours is its cuisine. Cleo’s dishes at Cleo’s Mediterranean Cuisine & Grocery. offers, by far, some of the best, authentic Middle Eastern fare in P H O T O BY C H ER Y L G ER B ER the city. The extensive menu ranges from breakfast items — egg sandwiches with turkey bacon or sausage (no pork) — to numerous appetizers, soups, salads, seafood and vegetarian plates, as well as sandwich what versions of many of popular items, including falafel, gyros, kebabs and shawarma. Cleo’s Mediterranean Cuisine & Grocery With sandwiches topping out at $5.50 and entrees hovering in the $12 range, the where price is hard to beat. 165 University Place, (504) 522-4504; Appetizers include spot-on hummus, plated with a lovely pool of olive oil flecked www.facebook.com/cleosnola with spicy red peppers, as well as the best, smoky baba ghanoush to be found in New Orleans. The kibbeh, filled with savory lamb, spices and pine nuts, is similarly when a pleasure, as is excellent falafel, with a perfectly crispy exterior and a fluffy, warm, 24 hours daily green filling. Cool and creamy lebna offers a nice contrast to the hot starters. Among the entrees, the lula kebab — ground lamb and beef mixed with garlic, how much herbs and spices — is a standout. Chicken shawarma is tender and well seasoned, inexpensive but the lamb and beef versions of that dish were on the tough side, though flavorful. Shrimp kebabs were also nicely spiced and well grilled. All entrees are generwhat works ously portioned, especially the ample side salad, which requires a plate of its own. excellent kibbeh, falafel, hummus, There are a couple of hitches to note at Cleo’s. The naked fluorescent bulbs on baba ghanoush and lula kebabs the ceiling illuminate the space well, but they remind diners they’re eating in a what doesn’t convenience store. Also, when I arrived at 9 a.m. one weekday seeking a plate of beef and lamb shawarma can be tough; the classic Egyptian breakfast of foul (a fava bean dish), the store was — to my harsh fluorescent lighting shock — dark, empty and locked up, despite the lighted sign flashing “OPEN” and the listed round-the-clock hours. No explanation could be found. check, please “Well,” my companion said, “foul me once… ” authentic, flavorful Mediterranean Despite that experience, Cleo’s is a welcome oasis in what is otherwise a desert in an all-hours grocery store of late-night options for inexpensive, tasty and filling cuisine.

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FORK + CENTER [CONTINUED] (www.cafereconcile.org), which offers training and work experience to atrisk youth. The new Another Broken Egg restaurants will participate in a program to hire its graduates to work in both locations, and will contribute a portion of proceeds to Reconcile’s teaching program. — SCOTT GOLD

More eggspansion

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

The online farmers market Good Eggs (www.goodeggs.com/nola) began service in New Orleans in summer and its steady growth includes serveral recent additions. It moved to a facility twice the size of its original location, added Wednesday service, and as of this week, expanded its delivery areas to include Metairie, Algiers, Gretna, Jefferson and Harahan. It also expanded its offerings with gift boxes and office boxes (available Tuesday only).

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Good Eggs was founded in San Francisco as a means to connect local food producers with consumers, but its website is the key to its mission. “We’re a technology company,” says New Orleans director Tess Monaghan. The software developed by the larger San Francisco branch has enabled the New Orleans location to grow quickly. Good Eggs is a conduit. It finds producers and helps them set up a “web stand” on the Good Eggs site. Consumers order online, and payments go directly to the producer. Then Good Eggs collects the groceries (it doesn’t buy them or stock its own shelves) and bundles them for pickup at designated locations or delivers them for a $3.99 fee. The array of products includes fruit, vegetables, meat, seafood, dairy, pantry items, staples, snacks and prepared foods. There are many organic and gluten-free options. Good Eggs currently works with 60 producers and handles roughly 500 products, Monaghan says. Customers must order by midnight Sunday for Tuesday pickup or delivery, midnight Monday for Wednesday and midnight Tuesday for Thursday. A list of pickup sites is available on the website, and locations include Faubourg Wines (2805 St. Claude Ave.), Swirl Wine Bar and Market (3143 Ponce de Leon St.), Romney Pilates (5619 Magazine St.), Church Alley Coffee Bar (1228 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.), the Good Eggs headquarters at 1746 Tchoupitoulas St. and others. Growth has been dictated by demand. “People request certain types of bread or fruit,” Monaghan says. “We always follow up and reach out to new suppliers.” Requests for Metairie and West Bank delivery prompted Good Eggs expansion to those areas. “Our goal is to scale up to the customer density that makes it work,” Monaghan says. Good Eggs’ new curated gift boxes of Louisiana products include items such as Poirier’s Pure Cane Syrup, Bread & Circus’ Tomato Chow Chow Jam and Dark Roux and Veggies, Inglewood Farm Organic Pecan Oil, Pepperland Farms Satsuma Habanero Pepper Jelly and others. There are two types of office gift boxes, and they include selections of fruit, bagels or sweets, condiments and other items. Good Eggs also is getting into some stockpiling of goods and trade with other branches. Louisiana rice and sugar are available at the Brooklyn Good Eggs. New Orleans Good Eggs will stock olive oil from San Francisco and possibly beans and produce from the Northeast, Monaghan says. The growth also includes hiring. New Orleans Good Eggs now has a staff of 10, most in full-time positions. — WILL COVIELLO


EAT

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NEW ORLEANS

3-COURSE interview

Mike Kantor Second Harvest Food Bank

For many New Orleanians, the holidays are a time to think about the needs of others. Gambit spoke with Mike Kantor, Director of Public Affairs & Community Engagement at Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans, about its mission to feed the hungry and how New Orleanians can help out. For more information, visit www.no-hunger.org. What’s your mission at Second Harvest and how does it operate? Kantor: Here in Louisiana, one in six households are at risk for hunger, and it’s far more than most people probably realize. Second Harvest distributes over 20 million meals annually throughout our 23-parish service territory throughout Louisiana. It’s a lot of hunger and a lot of meals. We are a central distribution hub, which means that we buy food, prepare food and receive food donations, and then distribute those meals to our more than 300 partner agencies. Our partner agencies are food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, churches, community centers, etc. We also have mobile pantries and school pantries. And then we partner with different organizations to provide specialty meals.

What’s the best way New Orleanians can help? K: We have a number of ways people can get involved. There are a ton of volunteer opportunities to help, whether it’s working in our community kitchen to plate meals for seniors or schoolchildren, answering calls on our public assistance benefit helpline, and of course, a lot of folks organize food drives through their schools, churches or businesses. The number one way to contribute, however, is a financial donation. We have relationships with food producers and distributors, so we can really maximize those funds — way more so than a straightforward food donation. A $10 donation, for example, can provide 28 meals for a family in need. And unfortunately, there’s been an increase in that need, and an increase in the lines at the partner agencies we serve, and we’re struggling to meet it. So we need those donations now more than ever. We can agree that jobs that pay a living wage are the best way to solve hunger. But with the recession, with persistent underemployment and unemployment, families are still struggling to put food on the table. Government needs to work with the communities to help fill the gap, and help families dealing with hunger help achieve self sufficiency. And that’s what we’re really aiming to do. — SCOTT GOLD

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Many people think about hungry families during the holidays. What does Second Harvest do to help in these times? K: One of the things we’ve done this holiday season is to partner with Peoples Health to provide 1,750 Thanksgiving meals to seniors. Here at our community kitchen, we prepared those meals and plated them with our kitchen staff and volunteers, then delivered them to 10 senior centers throughout the New Orleans metro area just prior to Thanksgiving. We made sure the meals were specially prepared for the dietary-needs seniors, too. There was a green salad, roasted turkey with gravy, fresh green beans, sweet potatoes and low-sugar pie for dessert. For the Christmas meal, we’ll be serving over 1,000 of the Orleans and Jefferson Parish Council on Aging’s seniors. Those are just a couple examples of what we do. We certainly receive a huge outpouring of support during the season, which really helps us operate through the rest of the year. Sadly, though, hunger doesn’t take a holiday. It’s a year-round struggle that we’re fighting. During the course of the year, contributions go down. After the holidays, people are really going to be hungry, and that’s really when we need the community to continue to support what we do.

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EAT

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NEW ORLEANS

on all of your holiday meal favorites

BEER buzz Andrew Godley, founder and head brewer of Parish Brewing Co. (www.parishbeer.com) in Broussard, La., hopes to provide Louisiana with a new holiday tradition focused on local beer. Parish’s second release of its annual Grand Reserve Barleywine has been released by the brewery. Originally released in December 2012, the first vintage was well received by the beer community, Godley says. “We sold out at most retailers in a matter of hours from release,” he says. It was a gamble to create such an ambitious beer, he adds, but, “It seems people really like strong beer that’s quaffable, smooth, accessible and not too radical.” The brewing process began last spring, when Godley tweaked the 2012 recipe. “We brewed the same recipe as the prior year but added more hops and used two yeast strains instead of one,” Godley says. “We used our house English ale strain for the primary fermentation and then added an American ale strain at bottling to help further attenuate the beer and assist in bottle conditioning.” Godley is pleased with the results. “The balance of hops and carbonation to malt sweetness is perfect,” he says. “The complex layers of flavor and aroma from fermentation, hops and malts are all there and so delicious. As good as last year’s Grand Reserve was, I am firmly convinced this year’s vintage is even better.” Parish produced 50 percent more bottles of Grand Reserve this year, and next year it will double or triple that amount. Godley recommends buying at least two bottles, “one to drink this holiday season and others to keep for years in the future to taste alongside future vintages.” The 2013 vintage is an 11 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) barleywine and is available at craft beer retailers. — NORA McGUNNIGLE

USED BY LOCAL CHEFS & SOLD WORLDWIDE

FREE SHIPPING UNTIL MARCH 4th

WINE of the week 2012 Allan Scott Pinot Noir

MARLBOROUGH, NEW ZEALAND RETAIL $15

The most attention-getting New Zealand wine varietal has quietly shifted from sauvignon blanc to pinot noir. It’s a great place to grow the fickle red grape, but New Zealand vintners did not keep pace with the rest of the grape-growing world until the mid-1980s when they noticed what American producers were able to do. Forty years ago, Allan Scott Family Winemakers, located in Marlborough, on the northeastern tip of the South Island, set out to take full advantage of new wine-making technologies and the grand terroir of the region. This pinot noir exudes aromas of strawberry, herbs, mushrooms and sweet earthiness. On the palate, one experiences excellent balance and fruit complexity. Decant 20 minutes before serving. Drink it with herb-roasted chicken, rack of lamb, pork and veal chops, grilled vegetables, mushroom risotto and truffled cheeses. Buy it at: Whole Foods Markets. — BRENDA MAITLAND

Try on smoked & fried turkeys, hams steaks & fish VERSATILE * LOW SALT

Email Brenda Maitland at winediva1@bellsouth.net

NEW MEDITERRANEAN BLEND IN STOCK!

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Email Nora McGunnigle at nora@nolabeerblog.com

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


EAT

FIVE

in

DRINK

NEW ORLEANS

5

Five meat pies

1

PLATE dates DEC

18

520 Capdeville St., (504) 371-5161 www.capdevillenola.com

2

DEC

19

Cochon Restaurant 930 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 588-2123

www.cochonrestaurant.com

The fried meat and oyster pie is buttery pie dough filled with ground pork, bacon, oysters, vegetables and rice.

3 4400 Banks St., (504) 482-2426

DEC

21

Chocolate, Cheese & Champagne

7 p.m. Thursday Bittersweet Confections, 725 Magazine St., (504) 523-2626

www.bittersweetconfections.com Bittersweet Confections chocolates are paired with Champagnes and cheeses from St. James Cheese Co. Liquor-filled chocolates and truffle-filled cheeses are featured. Visit bittersweetconfections.eventbrite.com to make reservations. Admission $45.

Feast of the Seven Fishes

6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Saturday Red Gravy, 125 Camp St., (504) 561-8844

www.redgravycafe.com Chef Roseann Melisi Rostoker serves a five-course traditional Italian advent seafood dinner. Visit bit.ly/redgravy7 for menu details and reservations. Dinner $65.

OFF

the

menu

www.crescentpieandsausage.com

A meat pie filled with duck confit, onions, peppers, ricotta cheese, mushrooms and leeks is served with bread and butter pickles.

4 Remoulade

309 Bourbon St., (504) 523-0377 www.remoulade.com

A favorite at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, the Natchitoches-style pie is filled with ground beef and pork, vegetables and Cajun seasonings.

5 Wayfare

4510 Freret St., (504) 309-0069 www.wayfarenola.com

Pie specials change daily, with past selections including boudin pie; fennel sausage with marinara; and salmon coulibiac with mushrooms, dill and hard-boiled egg.

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food.

Stupor bowl

“You will be allowed to have food in your car and have drink in your car. And provided you’re in the boundaries of a single parking space, you’ll be able to eat or drink right next to your car. However, you’re not going to be able to take out a lounge chair, you’re not going to be able to take out a grill, and you’re not going to be able to take up more than one parking space. And it’ll all be watched very carefully.” — Al Kelly, chairman of the Super Bowl XLVIII host committee, during a Dec. 9 news conference about plans for the Feb. 2 game at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. Even better: no one will be allowed to walk to the Super Bowl site (ticketholders must use New Jersey Transit or an approved shuttle) and there will be “fewer than 13,000 parking spots” available. ESPN.com points out helpfully, “There is potential for snow and ice.”

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Crescent Pie & Sausage Co.

6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday Finn McCool’s Irish Pub, 3701 Banks St., (504) 486-9080

www.finnmccools.com Nate the Pie Guy and Beignet Roule sell desserts, Boo Koo BBQ & Burgers serves more substantial fare and Finn McCool’s serves frozen Irish coffee and other dessert drinks. There is an ugly sweater contest. Visit www.myhousenola.com for details.

Capdeville

The cast of hand pies changes regularly, but there is always one on the menu, such as a spicy sausage, Gouda and rice pie served with arugula and Creole mustard vinaigrette.

Mid-City Dessert Pig-Out and Ugly Sweater Party

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


to

EAT

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AFRICAN Motherland Cafe — 1700 N. Galvez St., (504) 342-3996; www.facebook. com/motherlandcafe — This family restaurant serves Senegalese and Gambian food, and vegetarian dishes are available. Thiebou djenne is a fish and rice stew, and boulettes are fried balls of fish. There also are house-made ginger drinks and wonjo, made with hibiscus. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

AMERICAN

BAR & GRILL American Sports Saloon — 1200 Decatur St., (504) 522-2410 — This sports bar serves burgers made with house-ground patties, chicken wings, 12 beers on tap and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Bayou Beer Garden — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., (504) 3029357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $ Down the Hatch — 1921 Sophie Wright Place, (504) 522-0909; www. downthehatchnola.com — The Texan burger features an Angus beef patty topped with grilled onions, smoked bacon, cheddar and a fried egg. The house-made veggie burger combines 15 vegetables and is served with sun-dried tomato pesto. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Jigger’s Bar & Grill — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 828-3555 — The sports bar serves sandwiches and bar noshing items. Half or full-round muffulettas are filled with Italian ham, Genoa salami, provolone cheese and house-made olive salad and served toasted. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Rendon Inn’s Dugout Sports Bar — 4501 Eve St., (504) 826-5605; www.therendoninn.com — The Boudreaux burger combines lean ground beef, hot sausage and applewood-smoked bacon on a ciabatta bun with cheese, onions and remoulade. Fresh cut fries are served with Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of truffle oil. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ The Rivershack Tavern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Shamrock Bar & Grill — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 301-0938 — Shamrock serves an Angus rib-eye steak with a side item, burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, grilled chicken, spinach and artichoke dip and more. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE Boo Koo BBQ — 3701 Banks St., (504)

202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ Hickory Prime BBQ — 6001 France Road, (757) 277-8507; www.hickoryprimebbq.com — Proprietors Billy Rhodes and Karen Martin have won several barbecue competitions. They serve Texas-style brisket, smoked chicken, ribs and more. The pulled pork platter features pork cooked for 12 hours over hickory and white oak and it comes with two sides. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Saucy’s — 4200 Magazine St., (504) 301-2755; www.saucysnola. com — Saucy’s serves slowsmoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled chicken. The cochon blue is a sandwich of pulled pork, blue cheese and melted mozzerella on a bun. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS Charcoal’s Gourmet Burger Bar — 2200 Magazine St., (504) 644-4311; www.charcoalgourmetburgerbar. com — This burger specialist’s patty options include beef, bison, shrimp and veggie. The House burger is dressed with cheddar, lettuce, onion, tomato, pickles, mayonnaise and mustard and served with house-made chips. The Cobb salad features romaine lettuce, grilled chicken, avocado, tomato, onion, applewood-smoked bacon, blue cheese, croutons and buttermilk ranch or honey-mustard dressing. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Cheeseburger Eddie’s — 4517 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 455-5511; www.mredsno. com — This eatery serves a variety of specialty burgers, Mr. Ed’s fried chicken, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, tacos, wings and shakes. Besides patty melts and chili-cheeseburgers, there also are seafood burgers featuring tuna, salmon or crabmeat. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE Antoine’s Annex — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines. com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Caprese panino combines fresh mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes and balsamic vinaigrette. The ham and honey-Dijon panino is topped with feta and watercress. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Huh! A Restaurant & Bar — 3401 N. Hullen St., Metairie, (504) 2292484; www.huhrestaurant.com — This restaurant serves salads, sandwiches, burgers, entrees and sweet and savory crepes. The king cake crepes are available in plain and filled varieties topped with purple, green and gold icing and sugar. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., and open Sundays during New Orleans Saints games. Credit cards. $$ Knuckleheads Eatery — 3535 Severn Ave., Suite 10, Metairie, (504) 888-5858; www.knuckleheadsnola.com — This casual eatery serves burgers, sandwiches, wraps, salads and bar noshes. Mulligan Mike’s all-Angus chuck burger is topped with grilled ham and Swiss or cheddar cheese and comes with fries and a pickle. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ O’Henry’s Food & Spirits — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, (504) 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Somethin’ Else Cafe — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somthin’ Else offers noshing items including shrimp baskets, boudin balls and alligator corn dogs. There are burgers, po-boys and sandwiches filled with everything from cochon de lait to a trio of melted cheeses on buttered thick toast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Treasure Island Buffet — 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 443-

8000; www.treasurechestcasino. com — The all-you-can-eat buffet includes New Orleans favorites including seafood, salad and dishes from a variety of national cuisines. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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OUT to EAT

HOLIDAY COCKTAILS

Spirits holiday CHEER & relief

PEPPERMINT PATTY

SALTED CARAMEL

THAT BRING YOU

3701 IBERVILLE ST • NOLA 70119

504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON 11AM-3PM • TUES-THUR 11AM-9PM FRI-SAT 11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH 9AM-3PM

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

SNICKER DOODLE

50

LET US DO THE WORK FOR YOU!

order our baguette sandwich, cheese or charcuterie platter to satisfy your crowd. 5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

PoBoys PoBoys PoBoys 3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

daily. Credit cards. $ Breads on Oak — 8640 Oak St., Suite A, (504) 324-8271; www.breadsonoak.com — The bakery offers a range of breads, muffins, pastries and sweets. Pain au chocolat is a buttery, flakey croissant filled with dark chocolate, and a vegan version also is available. The breads include traditional, hand-shaped Parisian-style baguettes. No reservations. Breakfast Thu.-Sun., lunch Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Cafe Freret — 7329 Freret St., (504) 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin. Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Cafe NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www. cafenoma.com — The cafe serves roasted Gulf shrimp and vegetable salad dressed with Parmesan-white balsamic vinaigrette. Other options include chipotle-marinated portobello sliders and flatbread pizza topped with manchego, peppers and roasted garlic. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Fri. Credit cards. $ Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. For breakfast, an omelet is filled with marinated mushrooms, bacon, spinach and goat cheese. Tuna salad or chicken salad avocado melts are topped with melted Monterey Jack and shredded Parmesan cheeses and served on a choice of bread. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $

CHINESE Five Happiness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Jung’s Golden Dragon — 3009 Magazine St., (504) 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COFFEE/DESSERT Angelo Brocato’s — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — This sweet shop and serves its own gelato, spumoni, Italian ice, cannolis, fig cookies and other treats. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Rue de la Course — 1140 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 861-4343; www.facebook.comruedelacourse — The coffeeshop offers a

selection of bagels (plain, sesame, everything, honey whole wheat or cinnamon-raisin) from Artz Bagelz. The Downtown sandwich includes turkey, bacon, Swiss cheese, avocado, tomato, lettuce, sprouts and mayonnaise on a choice of bagel and comes with chips, potato salad or coleslaw. The Lakeview features chicken or tuna salad dressed with lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise on a bagel and comes with a side. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Cash only. $ Pinkberry — Citywide; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY Bayona — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ One Restaurant & Lounge — 8132 Hampson St., (504) 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes inlcuding char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE Antoine’s Restaurant — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Cafe Gentilly — 5325 Franklin Ave., (504) 281-4220; www.facebook. com/cafegentilly —Crab cake Benedict is French bread topped with poached eggs, a hand-made crawfish sausage patty and hollandaise. Breakfast is available all day, and the creamed spinach, crawfish and Swiss cheese omelet can be served in a po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Ignatius Eatery — 3121 Magazine St., (504) 899-0242; www.ignatiuseatery.com — The menu includes classic Creole dishes such as red beans and rice, speckled trout meuniere and crawfish etouffee as well as sandwiches, salads and pasta. Crawfish Ignatius pasta features crawfish cream sauce with mushrooms, tomatoes, onion and bell peppers topped with grated Parmesan. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ The Landing Restaurant — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www. neworleansairporthotel.com —

The Landing serves Cajun and Creole dishes with many seafood options. Louisiana crab cakes are popular. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Ma Momma’s House — 5741 Crowder Blvd., (504) 244-0021; www.mamommashouse.com — Traditional home-style Creole dishes include red beans and rice, shrimp pasta, fried chicken, cornbread and more. Chicken and waffles includes a Belgian waffle and three or six fried chicken wings. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Thu.-Mon., dinner Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$ Roux on Orleans — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www.bourbonorleans. com — This restaurant offers contemporary Creole dishes including barbecue shrimp, redfish couvillion, gumbo and catfish and shrimp dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Saints & Sinners — 627 Bourbon St., (504) 528-9307; www. saintsandsinnersnola.com — Styled to reflect era of Storyville, the restaurant serves Creole and Cajun dishes, raw oysters, seafood, steaks, po-boys, burgers and more. The Politician’s Special features a trio of jambalaya, crawfish pie and a cup of gumbo. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$$ Willie Mae’s Scotch House — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 822-9503 — This popular neighborhood restaurant is know for its wet-battered fried chicken. Green beans come with rice and gravy. There’s bread pudding for dessert. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

DELI Kosher Cajun New York Deli & Grocery — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www. koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ Mardi Gras Zone — 2706 Royal St., (504) 947-8787; www.mardigraszone.com — The 24-hour grocery store has a deli and wood-burning pizza oven. The deli serves po-boys, salads and hot entrees such as stuffed peppers, beef stroganoff and vegetable lasagna. Vegan pizzas also are available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Martin Wine Cellar — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , (504) 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium’s dinner menu includes pork rib chops served with house-made boudin stuffing, Tabasco pepper jelly demi-glaze and smothered greens. The Deli Deluxe sandwich features corned beef, pastrami, Swiss cheese, Russian dressing and Creole mustard on an onion roll. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, early dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Qwik Chek Deli & Catering — 2018 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie, (504) 456-6362 — The menu includes gumbo, po-boys, pasta, salads and hot plate lunches. The hamburger po-boy can be dressed with lettuce, mayo and tomato on French bread. Shrimp Italiano fea-


OUT to EAT tures shrimp tossed with cream sauce and pasta. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ETHIOPIAN Cafe Abyssinia — 3511 Magazine St., (504) 894-6238 — The menu includes a variety of wots, traditional stews served over injera bread, and tibs, dishes of sauted meats or vegetables. Yebeb alicha is lamb in mild garlic-ginger curry sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH Baie Rouge — 4128 Magazine St., (504) 304-3667; www.baierougenola.com — Shrimp and risotto Milanese features jumbo shrimp cooked with lemon over saffron risotto served with hericots verts. Pig Dip features pork debris, caramelized onions and garlic aioli on French bread with a side of smoked pork jus. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$ Martinique Bistro — 5908 Magazine St., (504) 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. New Zealand lamb loin is served with cucumber and sweet onion pickles, Israeli couscous, Meyer lemon-watercress aioli and tomato-sherry vinegar demi-glace. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO

INDIAN Julie’s Little India Kitchen At Schiro’s — 2483 Royal St., (504) 944-6666; www.schiroscafe. com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Nirvana Indian Cuisine — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN Amici Restaurant & Bar — 3218 Magazine St., (504) 300-1250; www.

con, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE Asuka Sushi & Hibachi — 7912 Earhart Blvd., (504) 862-5555; www.asukaneworleans.com — Asuka serves sushi and grilled items from the hibachi. The Shaggy Dog roll features tempura-fried shrimp, snow crab and avocado topped with crabstick and eel sauce and spicy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Kakkoii Japanese Bistreaux — 7537 Maple St., (504) 570-6440; www.kakkoii-nola.com — Kakkoii offers traditional sushi, sashimi and Japanese cuisine as well as dishes with modern and local twists. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Kyoto — 4920 Prytania St., (504) 891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Mikimoto — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ Miyako Japanese Seafood & Steakhouse — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 410-9997; www. japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Rock-N-Sake — 823 Fulton St., (504) 581-7253; www.rocknsake. com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Yuki Izakaya — 525 Frenchmen St., (504) 943-1122; www.facebook. com/yukiizakaya — This Japanese tavern combines a selection of small plates, sake, shochu, live music and Japanese kitsch. Dishes include curries, housemade ramen soups, fried chicken and other specialties. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

LATIN AMERICAN La Macarena Pupseria and Latin Cafe — 8120 Hampson St., (504) 862-5252; www.pupsasneworleans.com — This cafe serves Latin and Caribbean dishes, tapas and appetizers like guacamole and chips. Spanish garlic shrimp is served with refried black beans, saffron rice and tropical salad. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Mon. Cash only. $$ PAGE 53

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Breaux Mart — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, (504) 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, (504) 737-8146; www. breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

amicinola.com — Amici serves coal-fired pizza and Italian dishes. The broccoli rabe salsica Italiana pie is topped with marinara, mozzarella, sauteed bitter Italian greens and Italian sausage. Pasta carbonara features pancetta and green peas in white sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Andrea’s Restaurant — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Cafe Giovanni — 117 Decatur St., (504) 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Maximo’s Italian Grill — 1117 Decatur St., (504) 586-8883; www. maximosgrill.com — Sit at the bar overlooking the open grill and watch chefs prepare dishes like the fish of the day pan-sauteed in habanero-infused olive oil and served with seasonal vegetables. Osso buco is a braised veal shank served with garlic, thyme and white wine demi-glace, herb-roasted Parmesan potatoes and grilled asparagus. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, lunch Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ Mosca’s — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ Red Gravy — 125 Camp St., (504) 561-8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves rustic Italian fare. Pork bracciole features pork loin stuffed with cheese, currants and pignoli nuts that is braised slowly in tomato sauce and served over house-made pappardelle. Reservations accepted. Breakfast Mon. & Wed.-Fri., lunch Wed.-Mon., dinner Thu.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Ristorante Filippo — 1917 Ridgelake Drive, Metairie (504) 835-4008 — The Creole-Italian menu includes a crabmeat salad featuring half of a tomato filled with jumbo lump crabmeat over romaine lettuce dressed with remoulade and balsamic vinaigrette. Veal Sorrentina is sauted veal layered with prosciutto and eggplant, topped with marinara and mozzarella and served with spaghetti marinara. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 8852984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, ba-

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OUT to EAT PAGE 51

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN Attiki Bar & Grill — 230 Decatur St., (504) 587-3756 — This restaurant and hookah bar serves an array of Mediterranean dishes. Tomato Buffala features baked tomatoes and mozzarella topped with basil and olive oil. Grilled filet mignon is topped with creamy mushroom sauce and served with two sides. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ Pyramids Cafe — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — Diners will find Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN Casa Borrega — 1719 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 427-0654; www. facebook.com/casaborrega — The barroom and cantina is decorated with folk art, and there’s seating in the back courtyard. Chicken enchiladas are served with mole, rice and beans. Pozole de puerco is Mexican hominy soup featuring pork in spicy red broth with radish, cabbage and avocado and tostadas on the side. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Juan’s Flying Burrito — 2018 Magazine St., (504) 486-9950; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 569-0000; www.juansflyingburrito.com — Juan’s serves tacos, burritos, quesadillas, nachos, salads and more. Roasted pork tacos are topped with spicy slaw. Vegetarian Mardi Gras Indian tacos feature roasted corn, beans, cheese and spicy slaw on corn tortillas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Lucy’s Retired Surfers’ Bar & Restaurant — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD Bombay Club — 830 Conti St., (504) 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — This elegant French Quarter hideaway is styled like an English manor and is known for its martini menu. Louisiana crab and roasted Creole tomato fondue is finished with manchego cheese, scallions and grilled crostini. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ The Columns — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — There’s live music

in the Victorian Lounge at the Columns. The menu offers such Creole favorites as gumbo and crab cakes and there are cheese plates as well. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Gazebo Cafe — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ House of Blues — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Little Gem Saloon — 445 S. Rampart St., (504) 267-4863; www. littlegemsaloon.com — Little Gem offers creative contemporary and Creole dishes and live jazz. Louisiana black drum is topped with jumbo lump crabmeat and served with spinach, black-eyed peas and sherry cream. Rabbit and cauliflower gratin is served with apple-cabbage preserves. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ The Market Cafe — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Siberia — 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855; www.siberianola. com — The Russki Reuben features corned beef, Swiss cheese, kapusta (spicy cabbage) and Russian dressing on grilled rye bread. Potato and cheese pierogies are served with fried onions and sour cream. No reservations. Dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD Cafe B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700; www. cafeb.com — This cafe serves an elevated take on the dishes commonly found in neighborhood restaurants. Grilled redfish is served with confit of wild mushrooms, spaghetti squash, charred Vidalia onion and aged balsamic vinegar. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Joey K’s — 3001 Magazine St., (504) 891-0997; www.joeyksrestaurant.com — This casual eatery serves fried seafood platters, salads, sandwiches and Creole favorites such as red beans and rice. Daily specials include braised lamb shank, lima beans with a ham hock and chicken fried steak served with macaroni and cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Katie’s Restaurant — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www. katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted PAGE 55

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

7 On Fulton — 700 Fulton St., (504) 525-7555; www.7onfulton. com — New Orleans barbecue shrimp features a peppery butter sauce made with blonde ale. Oven-roasted lobster tail is topped with Louisiana crawfish and corn cream sauce and comes with fingerling potatoes and asparagus. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Dick & Jenny’s — 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 894-9880; www. dickandjennys.com — The menu combines contemporary Creole dishes and Italian items from Christiano’s pop-up. Pork loin roulade is stuffed with goat cheese and pine nuts and served with spinach, stone-ground grits and balsamic-infused pork jus. Pappardelle is served with pulled duck confit, charred pepper and mustard greens. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ Heritage Grill — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 934-4900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com — This power lunch spot offers dishes like duck and wild mushroom spring rolls with mirin-soy dipping sauce and panfried crab cakes with corn maque choux and sugar snap peas. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$ Manning’s — 519 Fulton St., (504) 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Ralph’s On The Park — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include turtle soup finished with sherry, grilled lamb spare ribs and barbecue Gulf shrimp. Tuna two ways includes tuna tartare, seared pepper tuna, avocado and wasabi cream. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Restaurant R’evolution — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www. revolutionnola.com — Chefs John Folse and Rick Tramanto present a creative take on Creole dishes as well as offering caviar tastings, house-made salumi, pasta dishes and more. “Death by Gumbo” is an andouille- and oyster-stuffed quail with a roux-based gumbo poured on top tableside. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Sainte Marie — 930 Poydras St., Suite 101, (504) 304-6988; www. saintemarienola.com — Barbecue jerk shrimp are served with coconut rice and mango chow chow. Sam’s Yak A Mein combines braised beef, chicken, shrimp, egg noodles and a soft-boiled egg. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Tomas Bistro — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semi-boneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and

Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Tommy’s Wine Bar — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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OUT to EAT PAGE 53 pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. No reservations. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

PAN ASIAN Lucky Rooster — 515 Baronne St., (504) 529-5825; www.luckyroosternola.com — The menu features a mix of Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese and Japanese dishes. Korean-style fried chicken is served with chili-garlic sauce and kimchi slaw. Lucky Rooster soup comes with five-spice chicken, wokseared vegetables and crunchy wontons. The bar offers creative cocktails and house-made sodas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS Bear’s Poboys at Gennaros — 3206 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 833-9226 — The roast beef po-boy features beef slow-cooked in house, sliced thin, soaked in gravy and dressed with lettuce, tomato, pickles and mayo on toasted Leidenheimer bread. The 10-ounce Bear burger is topped with roast beef debris, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, pickles and mayo on a toasted brioche seeded bun and served with fries or loaded potato

SEAFOOD Acme Oyster House — 724 Iberville St., (504) 522-5973; 1202 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155; 3000 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 309-4056; www. acmeoyster.com — The original Acme Oyster House in the French Quarter has served raw oysters for more than a century. The full menu includes char-grilled oysters, cooked seafood dishes and New Orleans staples. The Peace Maker po-boy combines fried shrimp and oysters. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Chad’s Bistro — 3216 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-9935; www.chadsbistro.com — The seafood Napoleon features fried eggplant medallions topped with crabmeat on a bed of angel hair pasta topped with shrimp au gratin sauce. The seafood boat is a bread loaf filled with fried shrimp, oysters and catfish and stuffed shimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri. dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Galley Seafood Restaurant — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-0955 — Galley serves Creole and Italian dishes. Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Grand Isle — 575 Convention Center Blvd., (504) 520-8530; www. grandislerestaurant.com — The Isle sampler, available as a half or full dozen, is a combination of three varieties of stuffed oysters: tasso, Havarti and jalapeno; house-made bacon, white cheddar

and caramelized onions. The baked Gulf fish is topped with compound chili butter and served with local seasonal vegetables and herb-roasted potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood & Italian Restaurant — 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, (504) 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, (504) 8380022; www.mredsno.com — The menu includes seafood, Italian dishes, fried chicken, po-boys, salads and daily specials. Eggplant casserole is stuffed with shrimp and crabmeat. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Red Fish Grill — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

STEAKHOUSE Austin’s Seafood and Steakhouse — 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-5533; www. austinsno.com — Austin’s serves prime steaks, chops and seafood. Veal Austin features paneed veal topped with Swiss chard, bacon, mushrooms, asparagus, crabmeat and brabant potatoes on the side. Reservations recommended. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

The Perfect Gift Card 2035 METAIRIE ROAD |

www.marktwainspizza.com

TAPAS/SPANISH Mimi’s in the Marigny — 2601 Royal St., (504) 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Hot and cold tapas dishes range from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Vega Tapas Cafe — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE Doson Noodle House —135 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 309-7283 — Traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlights the menu. The vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ Pho Tau Bay Restaurant — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, (504) 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Rolls-N-Bowls — 605 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 309-0519; www.facebook.com/rolls-nbowlsnola — This casual Vietnamese eatery serves spring rolls, pho, rice and vermicelli bowls, banh mi, stir fry entrees and bubble tea. The vermicelli bowl features noodles over lettuce, cucumber and carrots; shrimp are optional. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Marks Twain’s Pizza Landing — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza. com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Mellow Mushroom — 1645 Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 327-5407; 3131 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 644-4155; 8827 Oak St., (504) 345-8229; www.mellowmushroom. com — The Holy Shiitake pie tops an olive oil and garlic brushed crust with shiitake, button and portobello mushrooms, carmelized onions, mozzarella, montamore and Parmesan cheeses and black truffle oil. The Enlightened Spinach salad is topped with dried cherries, apples, candied pecans and feta cheese. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Slice Pizzeria — 1513 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., (504) 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com — Slice serves pizza by the pie or slice, plus salads, pasta and more. The Sportsman’s Paradise pie is topped with Gulf shrimp, andouille, corn, diced tomatoes and caramelized onions. Full bar available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www. theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies and diners can build their own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. The menu also includes salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Wit’s Inn — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

salad. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Dress It — 535 Gravier St., (504) 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Killer Poboys — 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — At the back of Erin Rose, Killer Poboys offers a short and constantly changing menu of po-boys. The Dark and Stormy features pork shoulder slowly braised with ginger and Old New Orleans Spiced Rum and is dressed with house-made garlic mayo and lime cabbage. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun. Cash only. $ Magazine Po-Boy Shop — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Wilma’s Cheesesteaks — 801 Poland Ave., (504) 304-5411; www. jugheadsneworleans.com — Wilma’s specializes in cheese steaks on toasted Dong Phuong bread. The regular cheese steak features thin-sliced rib-eye, sauteed mushrooms, onions, peppers and garlic and melted provolone and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


MU S I C 5 8 FIL M 6 3

S TAGE 7 3 E V EN T S 7 8

AE +

A RT 69

what to know before you go

That 70 show Walter “Wolfman” Washington celebrates his 70th birthday. By Alex Woodward

W

the Coal Mine,” and Johnny Adams — who got Washington his Dew Drop gig (and the apartment) — hired Washington as his sideman, a gig that lasted for nearly 20 years. Washington also scored his first international tour with Lastie’s A Taste of New Orleans. Washington recently returned from a two-week tour in Europe, where he visited many places he hadn’t been to in decades. “The people still remember,” he says. Washington remembers his first show on a European tour in Holland, where he got so high after visiting a “coffeeshop” that he stopped a solo on “Every Day I Have the Blues,” wandered off and had to crawl back to the stage on his hands and knees. Lastie called him onstage: “Get ’em, Wolf!” The next morning, Lou Rawls and other luminaries were in the hotel lobby waiting to meet “Wolf.” Washington’s wild style — big suits, a flat cap and a wide, wolfish grin — signal his unleashed guitar acrobatics, which growl with the blues and bounce and glide warmly as if in the hands of a jazz guitarist. As a bandleader, first with the psychedelic-named Solar System and currently (since the ’80s) with the Roadmasters, he channels his style into a funk monster, sometimes playing with his teeth, a move he borrowed from Jimi Hendrix. Then there’s his voice, which rings out soulful rhythm-andblues — Adams helped him bring out his howl. “Johnny Adams was the one who really helped me with my voice, showing me how to utilize my voice where I can sing and have freedom,” Washington says. “He showed me how to sing in different keys and utilize as wide a range as I can. He’d come and get me every day, and we’d go by his house, he’d show me how to play guitar, show me different chords, different phrases. “A lot of cats don’t play the blues anymore,” Washington says. “What I’ve done is combine blues and funk into a way that I know: my style of music.”

Walter “Wolfman” Washington in a performance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. P H O T O B Y J ER R Y M O R A N

DEC

20

Walter “Wolfman” Washington’s 70th birthday bash 10 p.m. Friday The Maple Leaf, 8316 Oak St. (504) 866-9359 www.mapleleafbar.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

alter “Wolfman” Washington was the youngest in the crew. “I was the new kid on the block,” he says. It was the first real guitar gig for the teenager and high school dropout: playing in the house band at the venerable New Orleans music institution the Dew Drop Inn. Washington, born in 1943, taught himself to play guitar and lived in an apartment near the club. (“It wasn’t but a room,” he says, “but I had my own room.”) Today, his resume reads like a brief history of New Orleans music: singing in the church choir with Ernie K-Doe, learning guitar with a spiritual group, logging countless hours at the Dew Drop Inn and going on the road with Lee Dorsey, Irma Thomas and David Lastie and A Taste of New Orleans — not to mention anchoring and elevating his blues-funk Roadmasters and performing alongside Joe Krown and Russell Batiste Jr. at weekly gigs at the Maple Leaf. On Dec. 20, Washington celebrates his 70th birthday at the Maple Leaf, where admirers like Anders Osborne, Stanton Moore and Ivan Neville will join him. Lastie gave Washington his nickname. When he first picked up guitar, Washington was just “wolfin’” — he wasn’t playing “real” chords. Instead he used an open tuning approach with all the strings tuned to a chord, and he hammered one finger on the fretboard. When he was 16, he joined a spiritual group and volunteered to play guitar, despite his crude start. “In the group, nobody wanted to play guitar,” he says. “I decided, ‘Well, I’ll try it.’ I knew how to sing.” The group performed on a radio program where other spiritual groups lined up inside the studio. “They had this guitar player playing behind these other groups, playing with all his fingers,” he says. “I sat there and watched him for at least an hour and a half — just watching his fingers, the way they go, how he played. When I came home and was trying to play like that, it just wasn’t sounding like that. “I tuned that thing and started playing, using that same fingering like I saw that dude was doing. Those chords started playing so pretty. That got me started and really interested in playing guitar.” Washington’s gigs at the Dew Drop and at Off Limits on Dumaine Street sometimes lasted until early morning or later. “It got to a point where all I had was a night life,” he says. “We’d start playing, then all these musicians would come after work — (Off Limits) was one of the headquarters. That was their last stop. They’d come in and start jamming. Sometimes we wouldn’t leave there until 6, 7 o’clock, sometimes 12 o’clock (noon) in the day. The club stayed open 24-7. Cats would come in and jam any time of day.” In the mid 1960s, Washington backed Dorsey for two years following the hits “Ride Your Pony” and “Working in

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MUSIC LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

TUESDAY 17 Banks Street Bar — Eric Keyes, 9

Chickie Wah Wah — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8

Bullet’s Sports Bar — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7:30

Columns Hotel — Andy Rogers, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Cafe Negril — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

d.b.a. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Columns Hotel — John Rankin, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — Treme Brass Band, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Hook & Wendell Brunious, 9:30

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Cafe Negril — Gettin’ It, 7; Sam Cammarata & Dominick Grillo, 7:30; Another Day in Paradise, 9:30

Bombay Club — Lucas Davenport, 7

Chickie Wah Wah — Osborne, Fohl & Sansone, 8

Dragon’s Den — Divergent Rhythms feat. The Real Steven, 10 Hard Rock Cafe — Tyler Kinchen & the Right Pieces, 9 Kerry Irish Pub — Jason Bishop, 9 The Maison — Gregory Agid, 6; The Billionaires, 9 Maple Leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 11 Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 Spotted Cat — Andy J. Forest, 4; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10 St. Louis Cathedral — Musaica, 6 Tropical Isle Original — Way Too Early, 1 Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — David Beddinghaus, 5:30

WEDNESDAY 18 Banks Street Bar — Major Bacon, 10 Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 7

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Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Geo Bass, 8 and 9

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Leah Rucker, 9:30 Freret Street Publiq House — Rich Aucoin & The Madd Wikkid, 8 Hard Rock Cafe — Russell Welch Hot Jazz Trio, 4 House of Blues — Jet Lounge, 11 House of Blues Voodoo Garden — Domenic, 6

This time of year, Judith Owen and Harry Shearer are in the spirit. Sorry — spirits. “It remains today that people go out and get a bit liquored up because they want some Dutch courage,” Owen told Gambit in 2009, on the audience participation that becomes the main attraction in Act II of her and hubby Shearer’s annual Holiday Sing-Along. That was their fifth edition, and except for the venue — the two nights of caroling and carousing are moving across the street, from the Contemporary Arts Center to the Ogden Museum of Southern Art — not much has changed. Together, Owen (an English singer/songwriter who has been called the female Randy Newman) and Shearer (New Orleans’ adopted town crier, better known as bassist and black-rose peddler Derek Smalls of This Is Spinal Tap and voice to a quarter of the cast of The Simpsons) travel the country every December, stopping in major cities to roast chestnuts and each other with help from regional guests: Loudon Wainwright in Brooklyn, Jon Langford in Chicago and seemingly everyone they know — mighty windbags Christopher Guest, Jane Lynch, Michael McKean and Catherine O’Hara among them — in L.A. Here, they call on Leah Chase, Evan Christopher, Tom McDermott, Phil DeGruy and Matt Perrine, as well as anyone willing to try recounting “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” sans Benny Grunch’s crib sheet, after a dozen dips of eggnog. Tickets $35. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

THURSDAY 19 Bayou Beer Garden — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

Art — Benny Grunch & the Bunch, 6 Rivershack Tavern — Christian Serpas & Ghost Town, 8

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — NOJO Jam, 8

Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Eudora Evans, 8

The Maison — Jazz Vipers, 6; 8Ball & MJG, 9:30

Bullet’s Sports Bar — Neisha Ruffins, 7:30

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Geno Delafouse & French Rockin’ Boogie, 8:30

Maple Leaf Bar — Eddie Roberts Trio feat. Ike Stubblefield, 10

Cafe Negril — Soul Project NOLA, 9

Roosevelt Hotel — Ingrid Lucia, 5:30

Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — George French Quartet, 8:30

The Roosevelt Hotel Bar — Kirk Duplantis Trio, 9

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Jerry Embree, 8

Circle Bar — Jack Orion feat. Lynn Drury, 10

Siberia — The Unnaturals, DiNOLA, Gristnam, Ossacrux, Happy Talk Band, 8

Roosevelt Hotel — Robin Barnes, 5:30 Rusty Nail — Jenn Howard, 9 Siberia — Power Trip, Iron Reagan, Mammoth Grinder, Classhole, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; The Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 St. Louis Cathedral — Jeremy Davenport, 6 Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — David Beddinghaus, 5:30 Yuki Izakaya — Kanako Fuwa’s Moshi Moshi feat. Detroit Brooks, 8

PREVIEW

Judith Owen and Harry Shearer’s Holiday Sing-Along

Columns Hotel — Kristina Morales, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Andrew Duhon, 7 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Todd Duke, 10; Vivaz, 10 Freret Street Publiq House — Brass-A-Holics, 9:30 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — James Rivers Movement, 8 The Maison — Erin Demastes, 5; Barry Stephenson’s Pocket, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — The Trio feat. Johnny Vidacovich & Friends, 11 Ogden Museum of Southern

Spice Bar & Grill — Stooges Brass Band, 9 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6 Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 5

DEC

20 21 THRU

Judith Owen and Harry Shearer’s Holdiay Sign Along 7 p.m. Saturday; 6 p.m. Sunday Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St. (504) 539-9650 www.ogdenmuseum.org

FRIDAY 20 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9 Banks Street Bar — Round Pegs, Egg Yolk Jubilee, Lyn Drury, 7 Bayou Beer Garden — Adam Crochet & Tell Ya What, 9 Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Cyril Neville’s Swamp Funk, 10 Bombay Club — Tony Seville, 6; Don Vappie, 9:30 Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Eudora Evans, 9 Bullet’s Sports Bar — Guitar Slim Jr., 7:30 Capri Blue Bar at Andrea’s Restaurant — Phil Melancon, 8 Carrollton Station Bar and Music Club — Andrew Duhon, 7

ans, 6; DiNOLA, Steamcog, 10 DMac’s — Vincent Marini, 7 Freret Street Publiq House — Megan Simone & The Shepherd Band, Tank & The Bangas, 9 Golden Lantern — Nighthawk, 7 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Autotomii, Invincible Czars, 9 The Maison — Leah Rucker, 4; New Orleans Jazz Vipersn, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — Walter “Wolfman” Washington’s 70th Birthday Blowout, 10:30 Oak — Jenn Howard, 9; Aaron Wilkinson, 9 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5 The Red Maple Restaurant — Riccardo Crespo, 8:30 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Bonerama, 9:30

Vaso — Tonya Boyd-Cannon, 10

Champions Square — Charlie Daniels Band, Travis Tritt, 7

Siberia — Metronome The City, Sunrise:Sunset, Shock Patina, 9

Vaughan’s — Corey Henry & the Treme Funktet, 9

Chickie Wah Wah — Paul Sanchez, 8

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Robin Barnes, 5

Circle Bar — Left of the Dial, 10 Columns Hotel — Ted Long, 6

Spotted Cat — Washboard Chaz Trio, 6; Cottonmouth Kings, 10

Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — John Royen, 5:30; Robin Barnes, 9

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Yuki Izakaya — Norbert Slama, 8; Black Pearl, 11

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Hot Club of New Orle-

St. Roch Tavern — James Jordan & the Lonely Nights Band, 8 Tipitina’s — Flow Tribe’s Christmas Crunktacular, Mississippi Rail Company, 10 PAGE 61


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


MUSIC LISTINGS PAGE 58

Treasure Chest Casino — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 7

er feat. special guests, 10

the Special Men, 10

Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Philip Manuel, 5

Pearl — DeSoto Street Band, 8

BMC — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 6

Ritz-Carlton — Catherine Anderson, 1

Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 7

Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — John Royen, 5:30; Robin Barnes, 9

SATURDAY 21 21st Amendment — Chance Bushman, Adam Arredondo, Russell Ramirez, Joseph Faison, 8 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9

Rock ’N’ Bowl — The Topcats, 9:30 Siberia — Gal Holiday, 6 Spotted Cat — Panorama Jazz Band, 6 Tipitina’s — Chris Mule & the Perpetrators, Funk Monkey, 10 Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — John Royen, 5:30; Robin Barnes, 9

Banks Street Bar — Refried Confuzion, 10

Yuki Izakaya — Norbert Slama, 8; Montegut, 11

Bayou Beer Garden — Revealers, 9

SUNDAY 22

Blue Nile — Corey Henry’s Treme Funktet, Derrick Freeman’s Smokers World, 10

Banks Street Bar — NOLA County, 4; Ron Hotstream, 7

Bombay Club — Lucas Davenport, 6; James River Movement, 9:30

Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like It Hot, 11 a.m.

Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Geo Bass, 8 and 9 Buffa’s Lounge — Royal Rounders, 8 Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 Capri Blue Bar at Andrea’s Restaurant — Phil Melancon, 8 Carrollton Station Bar and Music Club — Twangbangvroom, 9 Circle Bar — Kileen Foundry, 10

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Cedric Burnside Project, 11 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Fitzpatrick, 10 Freret Street Publiq House — Scorseses, The Breton Sound, Hazy Ray, 10 Hermes Bar — Ingrid Lucia, 10:30 House of Blues — Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, 9 House of Blues Voodoo Garden — Cody Blaine, 1

Cafe Negril — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 Circle Bar — Dead Marshes, 10 Columns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

1/4

ERIC LINDELL

Dmac’s Bar & Grill — Danny Alexander, 8

1/11

DARIA & THE HIP DROPS

Hard Rock Cafe — 90 Degrees West, 9

1/18

FLEUR DE TEASE

1/25

THE FRONT BOTTOMS

1/30

DELOREAN

1/31

TAKE ART TO HEART

2/7

ASH

Hi-Ho Lounge — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8 House of Blues — Home for the Holiday: Andrews Family feat. Trombone Shorty & James Andrews, Herlin Riley, John Boutte, Rebirth Brass Band, Kermit Ruffins & The Barbecue Swingers, 7:30 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

DMac’s — Michael Pearce, 11 a.m; Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 6

Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

The Maison — Dave Easley, 4; Brad Walker, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — Joe Krown, Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10 Preservation Hall — Lars Edegran’s St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Big Al Carson, 1 & 2:30 Ritz-Carlton — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 Spotted Cat — Rites of Swing, 3; Pat Casey & the New Sounds, 10

Howlin’ Wolf Den — Radioactive Red, Flymo, 9

St. Louis Cathedral — St. Louis Basilica Christmas Concert, 6

Louisiana Music Factory — Alexis Aiken, Tommy Malone, Cyril Neville, 2

Three Muses — Raphael & Norbert, 5:30 Tipitina’s — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

MONDAY 23

Maple Leaf Bar — Gravity A’s Holidazed & Confused, 10:30

Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8

Oak — Billy Iuso, 9

Banks Street Bar — South Jones, 8

One Eyed Jacks — The Last Waltz performed by Little Mak-

DJ SOUL SISTER’S NYE DANCE PARTY

Maple Leaf Bar — George Porter Jr. Trio, 10

Howlin’ Wolf Music Club — Benjy Davis, Lucy’s Walk, 9

The Maison — Rambling Letters, 4; Smoking Time Jazz Band, 7; Street Legend Brass Band, 12 a.m.

12/31

d.b.a. — Luke Winslow King, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10

d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Lu & Charlie’s Revisited feat. Germain Bazzle, 8

BJ’s Lounge — King James &

12/29 THE BREEDERS

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

12/28 JESSE TRIPP & THE NIGHTBREED

Columns Hotel — David Doucet, 8

The Maison — Chicken Waffles, 5; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 7; Gene’s Music Machine, 10

House of Blues — Jake Miller, 6

12/21 THE LAST WALTZ TRIBUTE

Circle Bar — A Circle Bar Christmas Spectacular, 10

Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Living Legends feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 Rock ���N’ Bowl — Johnny J & The Hitmen feat. Derek Huston, 8 The Roosevelt Hotel Bar — Jazz Factory Night with the James Partridge Septet, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville & Friends, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6 Yuki Izakaya — Miki Fujii & Friends, 8

CLASSICAL/CONCERTS Campo Santo: A WInter Concert. Marigny Opera House — 725 St. Ferdinand St., (504) 948-9998; www.marignyoperahouse.org — William Chandler, Ms. Mec, Phil Rollins, Leesaw Anne and Marie Oliver perform. Admission $15. 8 p.m. Thursday. Christmas Recital to Benefit St. Vincent de Paul — Holy Name of Jesus Church, 6367 St. Charles Ave., (504) 865-7430; www.hnjchurch.org — Ashleigh Alleman sings Christmas carols accompanied by Jonathan Szymanski on organ. A reception follows. Donations accepted. 3 p.m. Sunday.

VOTED

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Bombay Club — Tony Seville, 7

Chickie Wah Wah — Alexis & the Samurai, 8

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

NOW SHOWING 12 Years a Slave (R) — The locally filmed movie adaptation of Solomon Northup’s slave narrative tells the story of a free New Yorker being kidnapped and sold into slavery. Canal Place, Elmwood, Grand The Armstrong Lie (R) — Alex Gibney’s documentary chronicles athlete Lance Armstrong’s rise and fall. Canal Place

Beyond All Boundaries (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. World War II Museum Black Nativity (PG) — A street-savvy teen who lives with his single mother (Jennifer Hudson) stays with far removed family (Forest Whitaker and Angela Bassett) for Christmas in director Kasi Lemmons’ film adaptation of Langston Hughes’ play. Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank The Book Thief (PG-13) — The book-turned-film features a young girl who steals books to share with others and is sent to live with a foster family at a Jewish safe house in Germany during World War II. Canal Place, Elmwood, Regal Dallas Buyers Club (R) — A Texas electrician (Matthew McConaughey), after being diagnosed with HIV, makes a buyers club where fellow HIV-positive people buy alternative treatments. Canal Place, Elmwood Delivery Man (PG-13) — A once-frequent sperm donor

Frozen (PG) — A prophecy traps a kingdom in a never-ending winter in this animated Disney film. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Great White Shark 3D (NR) — Shark encounters are shared in the documentary. Entergy IMAX The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) — The second installment in the Hobbit has Bilbo and Gandalf going on a journey to retrieve their gold from Smaug the dragon. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Prytania, Westbank Homefront (R) — Jason Statham, James Franco and Winona Ryder star in this action-thriller about a former DEA agent and the local meth kingpin who hates him. Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (PG-13) — Francis Lawrence directs the second movie in the Hunger Games series featuring Katniss and Peeta becoming targets of the Capitol following their hubbub-sparking victory. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Hurricane On The Bayou (NR) — The film tells the story of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX Oldboy (R) — In Spike Lee’s latest joint, a remake of a dark 2003 Korean thriller, an ad rep seeks revenge after having been kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years. Elmwood

7 best picture

GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATIONS ®

I N C L U D I N G

Penguins 3D (NR) — A king penguin returns to his native land in the sub-Antarctic to find a mate. Entergy IMAX Philomena (PG-13) — A journalist grows deeply vested in the true story of a woman whose son was taken away after she was forced to live in a convent while pregnant. Canal Place, Elmwood Santa v. Snowman 3D (G) — A lonely snowman discovers Santa’s Workshop but gets caught. Entergy IMAX Thor: The Dark World (PG-13) — In the sequel to 2011’s Thor, the title character (Chris Hemsworth) embarks upon his most challenging journey yet. Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Tyler Perry’s A Madea Christmas (PG-13) — The ballsy, buxom family matriarch visits a friend’s daughter out in the country for Christmas. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Westbank

OPENING FRIDAY American Hustle (R) — A con artist (Christian Bale) and his sexy partner (Amy Adams) are forced to work for an FBI agent (Bradley Cooper) who teaches them how to break up mob rings and crooked political posses. Canal Place, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank

“‘AMERICAN HUSTLE’ IS

EXPLOSIVELY ENTERTAINING.

ELECTRIFYING PERFORMANCES FROM A TOP-TIER CAST.” PETER TRAVERS

“ THE SHARPEST, MOST EXHILARATING COMEDY IN YEARS.” RICHARD CORLISS

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (PG-13) — The follow-up to the 2004 cult classic has kind-of-big-deal Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) delving into 24-hour news in New York. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Dhoom 3 (NR) — A circus performer joins a new show so he can rob its owners, men he accuses of murdering his father. Westbank Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) — Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) struggles to get author P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) to agree to a film adaptation of her Mary Poppins novels. Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Wadjda (PG) — A Saudi girl participates in a Quran reading competition in hopes of buying a new bike with the prize money. Chalmette Walking with Dinosaurs 3D (PG) — The animated 3-D documentary-style family movie lets audiences try to imagine what it was like when dinoPAGE 65

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND ANNAPURNA PICTURES PRESENT AN ATLAS ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A DAVID O. RUSSELL FILM CHRISTIAN BALE BRADLCASTING EY COOPER AMY ADAMS JEREMY RENNER AND JENNIFERMUSICLAWRENCE “AMERICANMUSICHUSTLE” LOUIS C.K. MICOSTUME CHAEL PEÑA ALESSANDRO NIVOLA BY MARY VERNI EU, CSA LINDSAY GRAHAM, CSA SUPERVISOR SUSAN JACOBS BY DANNY ELFMAN DESIGNER MICHAEL WILKINSON EDITED PRODUCTION DIRECTOR OF BY JAY CASSIDY, A.C.E. CRISPIN STRUTHERS ALAN BAUMGARTEN, A.C.E. DESIGNER JUDY BECKER PHOTOGRAPHY LINUS SANDGREN, F.S.F. EXECUTIVE WRITTEN PRODUCERS MATTHEW BUDMAN BRADLEY COOPER ERIC WARREN SINGER GEORGE PARRA BY ERIC WARREN SINGER AND DAVID O. RUSSELL PRODUCED DIRECTED BY CHARLES ROVEN RICHARD SUCKLE MEGAN ELLISON JONATHAN GORDON BY DAVID O. RUSSELL

STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS SHOWTIMES

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

The Best Man Holiday (R) — Malcolm D. Lee’s holiday-themed sequel to the 1999 classic black romantic comedy The Best Man is about college friends reuniting after 15 years, rekindling romance and reigniting rivalries. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank

(Vince Vaughn) learns that not only has he fathered 533 children in the past 20 years, but 142 of them are filing a lawsuit to reveal his identity. Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank

Out of the Furnace (R) — When a steel mill worker (Christian Bale) vanishes and law enforcement isn’t doing enough to find him, his brother (Casey Affleck) takes matters into his own hands. Canal Place, Clearview, Elmwood, Westbank

C O M E D Y

FILM

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Morial

64


FILM LISTINGS PAGE 63

REVIEW

American Hustle (R) Directed by David O. Russell Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence Wide release

PAGE 67

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Writer/director David O. Russell loves the characters he invents for his movies and he wants you to love them too. That’s the unlikely revelation Russell says he experienced while taking several years off from a career that already had yielded much-admired films including Three Kings and Flirting With Disaster. When the filmmaker returned from hiatus, he began a trilogy of films — The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook and now American Hustle — that he has widely described as focusing on characters who strive to lead rich and passionate lives. Emotion is the only thing that matters in these movies. That’s a road fraught with peril for even the most talented filmmaker, but one that Russell navigates with remarkable grace in the exhilarating American Hustle. The film’s full-bodied success was only hinted at by Russell’s previous movies. No less than five unforgettable and award-worthy performances from an amazing ensemble cast show what it really means to collaborate on a character-driven film. American Hustle began as a nuts-and-bolts retelling of the infamous Abscam sting operation of the late 1970s and early 1980s, in which FBI agents posed as Arab sheiks to bribe corrupt public officials. The original script was good enough to make Hollywood’s Black List, an annual survey in which film executives vote on their favorite unproduced screenplays. But that didn’t stop Russell from rewriting it to suit his newfound vision. He turned the story’s focus on two fictionalized con artists in love, Irving (Christian Bale) and Sydney (Amy Adams), FBI agent Richie (Bradley Cooper), who busts the couple and forces their participation in an escalating series of stings, and Irving’s estranged wife Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence), a loose cannon in danger of blowing everyone’s cover. The good-hearted Mayor Carmine Polito (Jeremy Renner) of Camden, N.J., becomes a primary target of the FBI. All defy categorization because Russell’s script delivers the substance the actors need to dig deep and make the characters their own. Each has moments inspired and surprising enough to steal the movie outright. With its propulsive style and joyous use of period music to set the tone, American Hustle carries a single, undeniable touchstone on its back: Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas. (It’s not hard to guess who shows up for a brief turn as the scariest mobster in America.) But there’s a life-affirming warmth to Russell’s film that’s just not a part of Scorsese’s world. Russell helms a famously chaotic set, in which he shouts new lines to his actors on the fly as the cameras continue to roll. As in many of the year’s best Hollywood films, the director keeps his technique simple with natural lighting and three-dimensional sets that encourage spontaneity among the actors. It all adds up to a gaudy celebration of 1970s style wrapped around the most unsentimental and mischievous love story in ages. If there’s one endearing quality shared by each of the characters in American Hustle, it’s that all are trying to figure out whom they’re going to be when they finally grow up. There’s nothing easier to relate to than that. “Some of this actually happened” reads the title card that starts the movie, and even when the credits roll you get the feeling that it’s all still happening somewhere, to somebody. Reinvention may be the biggest and most American hustle of all. — KEN KORMAN

www . M IKIMOTOS U S

American Hustle

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65


Arts market SATURDAY 12.21 & SUNDAY 12.22.

of new orleans

A vibrant market featuring fine art and craa, delicious food and accvices for kids 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in Palmer Park, at the corner of S. Carrollton & S. Claiborne Aves. For more info call: (504) 523-1465 or visit: www.artscouncilofneworleans.org

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Ring In the New Year at NOON at the Louisiana Children’s Museum

Celebrate the New Year with the whole family at the Louisiana Children’s Museum’s annual New Year’s Eve celebration, December 31 from 9:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. Enjoy live music by the Lagniappe Brass Band, create a one of a kind paper bag party hat and festive noise maker, and share your wish for the New Year on a Wishing Whirligig. The fun continues with a lively countdown to NOON with “Wendy” and Count from Sesame Street, and a colorful confetti toss and balloon release! General Admission - $10 per person Member Admission - $5 per person Pre-register at www.lcm.org! The LCM will close at 3 p.m. on New Year’s Eve.

(504) 523-1357 | www.lcm.org

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FILM LISTINGS NEW ORLEANS PELICANS

PAGE 65

REGULAR SEASON THRU APRIL 16

JEFF DUNHAM JAN 22 @ 7:30 PM

NBA ALL-STAR GAME FEB 16 @ 7:00 PM

THE EAGLES

THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND & TRAVIS TRITT

FEB 23 @ 8:00 PM

R+L CARRIERS NEW ORLEANS BOWL FREE CONCERT

311

CHAMPIONS SQUARE

MAR 11 @ 8:00 PM

DEC 20

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ MAR 15 @ 7:30 PM

R+L CARRIERS NEW ORLEANS BOWL DEC 21 @ 8:00 PM ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL JAN 2 @ 7:30 PM

In Wadjda, the first feature film by a female Saudi Arabian filmmaker (Haifaa Al Mansour), a Saudi girl (Waad Mohammed) enters a Quran recital competition determined to use prize money to buy her own bicycle, confronting a litany of conservative religious mores in Saudi Arabia. It screens at Chalmette Movies.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS American Promise (NR) — Middle-class black parents document their son and his best friend through their matriculation at Manhattan’s prestigious Dalton School. 6 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, Zeitgiest Frosty the Snowman (G) — The cartoon tells the story of Frosty the Snowman and his magic hat. There’s snow, arts and crafts and Christmas treats. 9:30 am. Friday, Prytania How the Grinch Stole Christmas (PG) — Ron Howard’s remake of the Dr. Seuss cartoon stars Jim Carrey as the Grinch. There are movie snacks and hot drinks from SoBou and a s’mores station. 6 p.m. Wednesday, W French Quarter Inglourious Basterds (R) — Quentin Tarantino’s actiondrama about Nazi France is presented on 35 mm film. 10 p.m. Sunday, Prytania

Is the Man Who is Tall Happy? (NR) — Michel Gondry’s latest film is a series of interviews with Noam Chomsky, done in hand-drawn animation. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Zeitgeist It’s a Wonderful Life (NR) — James Stewart and Donna Reed star in the 1946 Christmas classic about a man who wishes he’d never been born. 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sunday, Prytania The Nightmare Before Christmas (PG) — The screening of Tim Burton’s animated tale of Jack Skellington discovering Christmas Town is BYOB. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Pretty Old (NR) — Gathr hosts a screening of Walter Matteson’s documentary that follows five women competing in the Ms. Senior Sweetheart Beauty Pageant. 7:30 p.m. Monday, Zeitgeist The Punk Singer: A Film About Kathleen Hanna (NR) — Sini Anderson explores the life of activist-musician Kathleen Hanna of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre. 9:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, Zeitgeist

The Theatres at Canal Place, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., (504) 581-2540; www. thetheatres.com; Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, (504) 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies,com; AMC Clearview Palace 12, Clearview Mall, 4486 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 887-1257; www.amctheatres.com; AMC Elmwood Palace 20, 1200 Elmwood Park Blvd., Harahan, (504) 733-2029; www.amctheatres.com; Entergy IMAX Theatre, 1 Canal St., (504) 5814629; www.auduboninstitute. org; The Grand 16 Slidell, 1950 Gause Blvd. W., Slidell, (985) 641-1889; www.thegrandtheatre.com; Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., (504) 8912787; www.theprytania.com; Regal Covington Stadium 14, 69348 Hwy. 21, Covington, (985) 871-7787; www.regmovies. com; W French Quarter, 316 Chartres St., (504) 581-1200; www.wfrenchquarter.com; AMC Westbank Palace 16, 1151 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, (504) 263-2298; www.amctheatres. com; Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MONSTER JAM JAN 25 @ 7:00 PM

SAINTS GAME DAY TAILGATING

CLUB XLIV SAINTS PREGAME

3 HRS PRIOR TO EACH HOME GAME

3 HRS PRIOR TO EACH HOME GAME

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the New Orleans Arena Box Office, select Wal-Mart locations or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000. www.mbsuperdome.com | www.neworleansarena.com | www.mbsuperdome.com/square

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (G) — The 1964 Rankin / Bass stop-action animation tells the tale of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer the Misfit Toys. There’s snow, arts and crafts and Christmas treats. 9:30 am. Saturday, Prytania 

SAINTS VS. BUCCANEERS DEC 29 @ 12:00 PM

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ART

REVIEW

LISTINGS 

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

GALLERIES A Gallery For Fine Photography. 241 Chartres St., (504) 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Beyond Thought: Homage to Clarice Lispector,” photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through December. Photographs and photo books from all eras by various photographers, ongoing. AKG Presents the Art of Dr. Seuss. 716 Bienville St., (504) 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com/dr-seuss — Works by Dr. Seuss, ongoing. Alex Beard Studio. 712 Royal St., (504) 309-0394; www.alexbeardstudio. com — Drawings and paintings by Alex Beard, ongoing. Anton Haardt Gallery. 2858 Magazine St., (504) 309-4249; www.antonart.com — “Deep Blues,” Southern folk art group exhibition, ongoing. Ariodante Gallery. 535 Julia St., (504) 5243233; www.ariodantegallery.com — Group craft exhibition, through December.

Barrister’s Gallery. 2331 St. Claude Ave., (504) 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — Group photography exhibition, through Jan. 4. Beneito’s Art. 3618 Magazine St., (504) 891-9170; www.bernardbeneito.com — Oil paintings by Beneito Bernard, ongoing. Benjamin Franklin High School. 2001 Leon C. Simon Drive, (504) 286-2600; www. benfranklinhighschool.org — “The Franklin Collection: Volume 2,” alumni mixed media exhibition, through January. Boyd | Satellite. 440 Julia St., (504) 581-2440; www.boydsatellitegallery. com — “Celebrity,” photographs of celebrities and entertainers by Steven Forster, through December. Byrdie’s Gallery. 2422 St. Claude Ave., (504) 656-6794; www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Streets Not to Cross,” cyanotype-based mixed media exploration into the demographics of New Orleans by Philip Roderic Yiannopoulos, through Jan. 7. Callan Contemporary. 518 Julia St., (504) 525-0518; www.callancontemporary. com — “We Thought We Were Drowning But It Was Only Love,” paintings by Margaret Evangeline, through December. Carol Robinson Gallery. 840 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-6130; www.carolrobinson-

Artist Spaces: Close to Home and The Art of Empathy

THRU DEC

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Artist Spaces: Close to Home: photographs by Tina Freeman The Art of Empathy: Photographs by E2 (Elizabeth Kleinveld and Epaul Julien) Octavia Art Gallery, 454 Julia St. (504) 309-4249 www.octaviaartgallery.com

Artists’ studios have long inspired a certain fascination among the general population, as well as other artists. Like historic house tours, they often are organized into a kind of pilgrimage, but unlike the work spaces of writers or musicians, art studios tell us much about a visual artist’s creative process and can be very personal, even psychological. Tina Freeman’s photograph of George Dureau’s studio (pictured), is both poetic and poignant. Gorgeously cluttered with symbolic, if often prosaic, objects that in his hands became magical, it no longer exists because Dureau, 82, is in a nursing facility. Ersy’s studio similarly resembles a workshop where elves assemble magical dreams, and proto-postmodernist Robert Tannen’s repurposed manufactured objects and natural forms take over his living and work spaces like mushrooms after a rain. Freeman’s photographs are lovingly crafted art objects that also contribute to our community’s collective memory. Elizabeth Kleinveld and Epaul Julien’s photographic versions of paintings from art history reflect their concerns about ethnic stereotyping seen in some news reports after Hurricane Katrina, but they lend themselves to a variety of interpretations. Here all races and orientations are reflected in remakes of European masterpieces — including Manet’s The Luncheon on the Grass, David’s The Death of Marat and Velazquez’s Venus at Her Mirror — in images that avoid trite multicultural moralizing by being so beautifully and wittily crafted that they invite us to see the world anew, without the stereotypical expectations that often attend notions of race, gender or ethnicity — concepts already put through the Creole blender that is Julien and Kleinveld’s native New Orleans. Other mind-bending works in this year’s PhotoNOLA expos include Wallace Merritt’s meditative views of Paris made even more timeless by the absence of people or automobiles, being shown at Cole Pratt Gallery, and Brooke Shaden’s buoyantly otherworldly series of female figures seemingly transported into a realm of daydreams made real, which is on display at Soren Christensen Gallery. — D. ERIC BOOKHARDT

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Arthur Roger Gallery. 432 Julia St., (504) 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery. com — “Chromaccumulations,” minimalist art by Pard Morrison; “Still Life / Nightscape,” exhibition of object scans on dye-infused aluminum by Kate Blacklock; “Threadbare,” collection of photography by David Halliday; All through Dec. 28.

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ART LISTINGS gallery.com — “Annual Christmas Exhibition,” group painting exhibition, through December. Catalyst Gallery of Art. 5207 Magazine St., (504) 220-7756; www.catalystgalleryofart.com — Group exhibition of New Orleans-inspired art, ongoing. Chester Allen’s Oasis of Energy. 221 Dauphine St., (504) 292-8365; www.chesterallen-oasisofenergy.tumblr. com — “Universal Groove,” silversmithing by Chester Allen, ongoing. Cole Pratt Gallery. 3800 Magazine St., (504) 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com — “Liasons,” black and white images of Paris by Wallace Merritt; “Rising Tides,” monotytpe prints by Marie Bukowski; Both through Dec. 28. Courtyard Gallery. 1129 Decatur St., (504) 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing. com — New Orleans-themed reclaimed wood carvings by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Du Mois Gallery. 4609 Freret St., (504) 818-6032; www.dumoisgallery.com — “art*,” painting on canvas and board and photography by Brian McCormick and Amy McKinnon, through Dec, 21.

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East Bank Regional Library. 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190; www.jefferson.lib.la.us — “Blue,” cyanotype images by M. Kucera, through Dec. 27 The Foundation Gallery. 608 Julia St., (504) 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola. com — “Tips: An Insider’s Look at Bourbon Street,” PhotoNOLA exhibition by Kara Khan benefiting Cafe Reconcile, through Feb. 1. Freret Clay Center. 2525 Jena St., (504) 919-8050; www.freretclaycenter.com — “The Human Condition,” metal rusts, wood rots’ collage, ceramic tiles and vessels by Barbie L’Hoste and Bill Darrow, ongoing. The Front. 4100 St. Claude Ave., (504) 301-8654; www.nolafront.org — “PhotoBOMB,” group photography exhibition curated by Lee Deigaard and AnnieLaurie Erickson. “Lawss of the Land,” photography by JoAnne Carson and Kant Smith, through Jan. 5. Gallery Burguieres. 736 Royal St., (504) 301-1119; www.galleryburguieres.com — Mixed media by Ally Burguieres, ongoing. The Garden District Gallery. 1332 Washington Ave., (504) 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Holiday Open House,” mixed media group exhibition, through Feb. 2.

Good Children Gallery. 4037 St. Claude Ave., (504) 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Friday the 13th,” PhotoNOLA exhibition curated by Sophie T. Lvoff. “Unhad Conversations I Have With Girls I Love,” photography by Patrick Duncan, through Jan. 5. Graphite Galleries. 936 Royal St., (504) 565-3739; www.graphitenola.com — Group mixed media exhibition, ongoing. Hall-Barnett Gallery. 237 Chartres St., (504) 522-5657; www.hallbarnett.com — “Fine Photography: Featuring Wanda Boudreaux and Timothy Pakron,” PhotoNOLA exhibit curated by Edward Hebert, through January. International House. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com — “Magdalena,” mixed media juried exhibition of art about Mary Magdalene, through Jan 5. J & S Gallery. 3801 Jefferson Hwy., (504) 952-9163 — Wood carvings and paintings by local artists, ongoing. Jean Bragg Gallery of Southern Art. 600 Julia St., (504) 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Waterways of Louisiana,” group painting exhibition, through December. Jonathan Ferrara Gallery. 400 Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “circa: now,” photography, video and mixed media art by Generic Art Solutions; “Fallen Animals,” photography by Marcus Kenney; Both through December. La Madama Bazarre. 1007 St. Mary St., (504) 236-5076; www.lamadamabazarre.com — Group exhibition celebrating the whimsical and weird side of Louisiana, ongoing. Lemieux Galleries. 332 Julia St., (504) 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Spiritus Sanctus,” watercolor and colored pencil on paper about spirituality by Mary Lee Eggart; “Footnotes,” digital photography by Leslie Elliottsmith; Both through Dec. 28. Lisa Victoria Gallery. 616 Royal St., (504) 315-0850; www.lisavictoriagallery.com — Mixed media group exhibition, ongoing. M. Francis Gallery. 1938 Burgundy St., (504) 9311915; www.mfrancisgallery. com — Acrylic on canvas by Myesha, ongoing. May Gallery and Residency. 2839 N. Robertson St., Suite 105, (504) 316-3474; www.themayspace.com — “Butt Joints,” large-scale sculpture and painting exhibition by MOMO, through Jan. 25.

Michalopoulos Gallery. 617 Bienville St., (504) 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — “Down and Dirty,” paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. Morrison. 1507 Magazine St., (504) 451-3303; www.morrisonsculpture.com — Sculpture and drawings by Thomas Randolph Morrison, ongoing. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation. 1205 N. Rampart St., (504) 5224786; www.jazzandheritage. org — “Epaul Julien: A 10-Year Retrospective,” photography by Epaul Julien curated by Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, through December. New Orleans Photo Alliance. 1111 St. Mary St., (504) 610-4899; neworleansphotoalliance. org — “From the Sea,” Deb Schwedhelm’s PhotoNOLA Review Prize-winning underwater photography exhibition, through Jan. 19. New Orleans Public Library, Robert E. Smith Branch. 6301 Canal Blvd., 596-2638; www.nutrias.org — “December Quilt Exhibition at Smith Library,” quilts made by Lakeview Sheperd Center seniors, through December. New Orleans Public Library, Rosa Keller Branch. 4300 S. Broad St., (504) 596-2675; www.nutrias.org — “Inquisitive Minds, Artistic Answers,” Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana member exhibit, through Jan. 11. Newcomb Art Gallery. Woldenberg Art Center, (504) 314-2406; www.newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Women, Art and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise,” largest presentation of Newcomb arts and crafts in nearly 30 years, through March 9. Octavia Art Gallery. 454 Julia St., (504) 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery. com — “The Art of Empathy,” photography by E2 (Elizabeth Kleinveld & Epaul Julien); “Close to Home,” photography by Tina Freeman; Both through Dec. 28. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., Second floor, (504) 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Contemporary crafts by Sean Dixson, Cathy Cooper-Stratton, Margo Manning and Nellrea Simpson and others, ongoing. Scott Edwards Photography Gallery. 2109 Decatur St., (504) 610-0581; www.scottedwardsgallery.com — “Da Parish: A Journey Through St. Bernard Parish,” photography by Fridgeir Helgason, through April 5. Sheila Phipps Studio & Gallery. 8237 Oak St., (504) 5966031 — Oil and acrylic portraits and abstracts, ongoing.


ART LISTINGS Sibley Gallery. 3427 Magazine St., (504) 899-8182; www.sibleygallery.com — “Haute Lumiere,” group photography exhibition, through December. Soren Christensen Gallery. 400 Julia St., (504) 5699501; www.sorengallery. com — “The In-Between,” conceptual photography by Brooke Shaden; “Witness,” mixed media abstract art by Gretchen Weller Howard; Both through December. St. Tammany Art Association. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — “Icons: Personal Visions,” mixed media group exhibition about religious and secular icons, through Jan. 25. Staple Goods. 1340 St. Roch Ave., (504) 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/ staplegoods — “The Goods,” mixed media group exhibition, through Jan 5. Ten Gallery. 4432 Magazine St., (504) 3331414; www.facebook.com/NOLAartsalon — “Facade,” large scale mixed media on paper by Sarah Wiseman;“Grotesquerie,” paintings, sculptures and prints by Matthew Kirscht and Michael Bonfiglio; Both through Dec. 29.

Whisnant Galleries. 343 Royal St., (504) 524-9766; www.whisnantgalleries.com — Ethnic, religious and antique art, sculpture, textile and porcelain, ongoing. Windsor Fine Art. 221 Royal St., (504) 586-0202; www.windsorfineart.com — Etchings, engravings and woodcuts by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Durer, through Jan. 19. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Body Sellers: The Sex Workers of Thailand,” photography by Gerry Yaum, through December.

SPARE SPACES Bellocq. Hotel Modern, 936 St. Charles Ave., (504) 962-0900; www.thehotelmodern.com — “Dreams do Come True,” photography by L. Kasimu Harris, through Jan. 19. Bonjour Lingerie. 4214 Magazine St., (504) 309-8014; www. facebook.com/bonjournola — Mixed media black light art by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. The Country Club. 634 Louisa St., (504) 945-0742; www.thecountryclubneworleans.com —

Hey! Cafe. 4332 Magazine St., (504) 891-8682; www.heycafe. biz — Cartoons from Feast Yer Eyes magazine, ongoing. La Divina Gelateria. 621 St. Peter St., (504) 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com — Art and photographs by Thom Bennett, Mary Moring and Rita Posselt, ongoing. Old Florida Project. between Florida Avenue, Mazant Street, Gallier Street and North Dorgenois Street — #ProjectBe features tributes, remembrances and social statements spray painted in the long blighted Florida project by local artist and Gambit 40 Under 40 honoree Brandan “B-Mike” Odums, ongoing. Top Drawer Antiques. 4310 Magazine St., (504) 897-1004; www.topdrawerantiques.net — Mixed media black light art by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

MUSEUMS Ashe Cultural Arts Center. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — “The African Presence in Mexico: From Yanga to the Present,” National Museum of Mexican Art pieces about the contributions of Africans to Mexican culture, through Feb. 28. Contemporary Arts Center. 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “Unfolding Images,” group exhibition celebrating the printed image in book form, through Dec. 29. “Water,” large-scale aerial photographs by Edward Burtynsky, through Jan. 19. “Cinema Reset,” video group exhibition, through Feb. 2. “SubMERGE,” art by Lee Deigaard, through Feb. 20. Historic New Orleans Collection. 533 Royal St., (504) 523-4662; www.hnoc. org — “Occupy New Orleans! Voices from the Civil War,” collection of items conveying New Orleanians’ feelings during the Civil War, through March 9. “Civil War Battlefields and National Parks,” photography by A. J. Meek, through April 5. Longue Vue House and Gardens. 7 Bamboo Road, (504) 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “A Year and One Day,” sculpture by Andy Behrle, through Friday. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo. 701 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm.crt. state.la.us — “Images and Instruments: Medical History,” artifacts and images of 19th and 20th century medical equipment, ongoing.

Louisiana State Museum Presbytere. 751 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “They Call Me Baby Doll: A Carnival Tradition,” an exhibit about the Baby Dolls, and other black women’s Carnival groups, through January. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond”; both ongoing. Madame John’s Legacy. 632 Dumaine St., (504) 5686968; www.crt.state.la.us — “The Palm, the Pine and the Cypress: Newcomb College Pottery of New Orleans,”  ongoing. National World War II Museum. 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “We Can...We Will...We Must!,” allied propaganda posters of WWII, through Feb. 16. New Orleans Museum of Art. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — “The Making of an Argument,” photography by Gordon Parks, through Jan. 5. “Lin Emery: In Motion,” kinetic aluminum sculptures by Lin Emery, through Jan. 12. “Photography at NOMA,” group photography exhibition, through Jan. 19. “Cities of Ys,” art by Camille Henrot, through Feb. 23. Ogden Museum of Southern Art. 925 Camp St., (504) 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Into the Light,” photographs by various artists, “Currents 2013,” New Orleans Photo Alliance’s member showcase; both through Jan. 5. Works by Walter Inglis Anderson from the museum’s permanent collection; an exhibition of southern regionalists from the museum’s permanent collection; paintings by Will Henry Stevens; all ongoing.

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Old U.S. Mint. 400 Esplanade Ave., (504) 568-6993; www.crt.state.la.us/ museum/properties/usmint — “Visions of Excellence,” group exhibition of award-winning photojournalism from around the world, through Feb. 28. The Saratoga. 212 Loyola Ave.; www.moviehousenola. com — “Moviehouse NOLA,” multimedia exhibition about historic New Orleans movie theaters, through Feb. 9. Williams Research Center. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., (504) 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Daguerreotypes to Digital: A Presentation of Photographic Processes,” historical exhibition of photography from 1840 to present, through March 29.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Vieux Carre Gallery. 507 St. Ann St., (504) 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “French Quarter Scenes,” paintings by Sarah Stiehl, through Jan. 1.

“All Amzie All the Time,” group exhibition of art celebrating Amzie Adams, ongoing.

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STAGE LISTINGS

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Megan Braden-Perry, listings editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

THEATER Annie. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., Kenner, (504) 461-9475; www.rivertowntheaters.com — Kids and adults star in the classic musical about a redheaded curly top orphan named Annie and her canine pal Sandy. Ensemble cast member Madison Kerth played Annie in the Broadway national tour for 18 months. Tickets $39. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Grenadine McGunkle’s Double-Wide Christmas. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Running with Scissors presents a holiday show set in a trailer park. Tickets $25. 8:30 p.m. FridaySaturday, 6 p.m. Sunday.

NOVAC Actors Showcase. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Louisiana film actors perform scenes, and a networking reception for talent, filmmakers, aspiring actors and industry professionals follows. Lance Nichols hosts. Visit www. novacvideo.org for details. Admission $10. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Sister Act: The Musical. Saenger Theatre, 1111 Canal St., (504) 287-0351; www. saengernola.com — An aspiring R&B star witnesses a crime and is hidden in a convent for safety. There, she helps the sisters be bold and adds soul to their dull choir. Tickets start at $26. 7:30 p.m Tuesday-Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Under Milk Wood: In the Walking Haze. Saturn Bar,

BURLESQUE, CABARET & VARIETY The Amazing Acro-Cats. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — The Amazing Acro-Cats, a group of felines trained by Samantha Martin, perform their annual Christmas show. The Rock-Cats play Christmas carol selections including “A Cat in a Manger,” “Catnip Roasting on an Open Fire,” and “God Rest Ye Merry Kittens.” Visit www.circuscats. com for details. Tickets $18. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday. Beach Blanket Burlesque. Tiki Tolteca, 301 N. Peters St., (504) 267-4406; www. facebook.com/tikitolteca — GoGo McGregor hosts a free burlesque show. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Bits & Jiggles. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855 — The show mixes comedy and burlesque. Free admission. 9 p.m. Monday. Burlesque Ballroom. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., (504) 553-2299;

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AUDITION S Anthony Bean Community Theater’s 14th Season. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — The theater seeks actors, singers and dancers. Call for appointments and audition requirements. 2 p.m. Saturday. Crescent City Sound Chorus. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, (504) 6166066; www.dcc.edu — The Crescent City Sound Chorus, a chapter of Sweet Adelines International, holds auditions for its holiday chorale. For details, visit www.crescentcitysound.com. 7 p.m. Monday. The Hotel Plays. Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, (504) 523-4352; www.leh.org — The Tennessee Williams Literary Festival seeks cast members for Williams’ Hotel Plays. 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Tuesday.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Long Day’s Journey Into Night. Art Klub, 519 Elysian Fields Ave., (504) 943-6565; www.artistinc.org — Promethean Theatre Co. and Four Humours Theater present Eugene O’Neill’s posthumously released play about a family’s trials, tribulations and ultimate destruction. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

3067 St. Claude Ave., (504) 949-7532; www.saturnbar. com — Cripple Creek, Alex McMurray of the Valapraiso Men’s Chorus and WRBH Reading Radio present a production of Dylan Thomas’ radio play. Admission includes a three-course themed meal by chef Jessie Wightkin and unlimited signature cocktails. Proceeds help the theater find a permanent home. RSVP and purchase tickets online. Tickets $25. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday. A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — A.J. Allegra and Natalie Boyd direct a cast of children in a Scientology-themed parody of a kids’ holiday pageant. Tickets $25. 7 p.m. FridaySaturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Romy Kaye and the Brent Walsh Jazz Trio. Call (504) 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday. Lightwire: A Very Electric Christmas. Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., (504) 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com — America’s Got Talent finalists Lightwire Theater present a neon-lighted original holiday drama. Tickets start at $30. 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. & 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. A Night of Puppet Theatre featuring Harry Mayronne Jr. and the Amazing Pandora Gastelum. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Music, story and puppetry are combined in two shows, one about performing in Berlin and the other about being an adult in New Orleans. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday. Slow Burn Burlesque. Howlin’ Wolf Music Club, 907 S. Peters St., (504) 529-5844; www. thehowlinwolf.com — The burlesque and variety show features striptease, comedy, circus arts and music. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Friday.

DANCE Ballet Hysell’s The Nutcracker. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, (504) 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The Jefferson Performing Arts Society and Ballet Hysell present the classic holiday ballet. Adults $30, students $20, kids $15. 7:30 p.m, Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053 (504)368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

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STAGE LISTINGS

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

A family plagued by consumption, suspicions and paranoia unravels in painstaking fashion throughout Long Day’s Journey into Night, Eugene O’Neill’s 1957 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama currently being presented by Promethean Theatre Company and Four Humours Theater. In the show’s four-person family, there’s a “dope fiend,” an alcoholic and, worst of all (by their standards), two actors. This lineup may sound like the family could throw a greatparty, but the members just want to talk about their problems. The entire show takes place in the living room of a summer home in the course of a single day. The wood-paneled set and emerald green couch look like a throwback summer beach house. Directed by Stephen Eckert, the drama starts with a seemingly well-adjusted family talking and joking, but after 15 minutes of banter, the conversation devolves into a marathon of conflicting anxieties. For more than three hours, the members fight and deceive each other. They drag their shared history through the mud before they wipe their shoes and fix themselves a whiskey, collectively downing nearly two bottles during the day. The characters are emotionally embattled, and the show doesn’t lift anyone’s mood, but

it thoroughly explores family dynamics and hysteria. And the acting is very good. After the birth of her youngest son, Edmund (Glenn Aucoin), Mary Tyrone (Mary Pauley) was given morphine by her doctor to ease her pain. She became addicted. This causes problems in the family, especially between Mary, who sometimes loses touch with reality, and her husband James (Michael Martin), a gruff, miserly man who somehow comes off as lovable. Mary’s adult sons, Edmund and Jamie (Todd d’Amour), are complex characters who share a love-hate relationship. Edmund has fallen into poor health and the brothers grapple with their feelings. But most of the turmoil centers on Mary, who is brutal, sad and yet dignified and who throws out conftrontational laments such as, “I am alone. I have always been alone.” It was a delight to watch Pauley’s deranged Mary, who she played in a haunting way almost literally, since Mary becomes ghostlike. Long Day’s Journey into Night makes good on the “long” in the title, but it’s full of drama and is ultimately a compelling exploration of mental and physical disease and family dynamics. The theater at Art Klub occupies an intriguing warehouse space, but on the night I attended, space heaters were inadequare to warm it. Audiences should dress appropriately. — TYLER GILLESPIE

DEC

20 THRU 21

Long Day’s Journey into Night 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday Art Klub, 519 Elysian Fields Ave. (504) 943-6565; www.artistinc.org Call (504) 948-4167 for tickets and information PAGE 77

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RULES

Deadline to enter: 12/30/13 • Must be 21 to play • Multiple entries at the same bar will be discarded. Have fun & don’t drink and drive! Tip your bartender • Read complete rules and restrictions on bestofneworleans.com • No purchase necessary

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

that has this bars logo on it (signs/ coasters/the bartender) and either email it to drink@gambitweekly.com or Instagram your photo (tagging @gambitneworleans and the bar).

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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STAGE LISTINGS PAGE 74

Nutcracker Swing. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 8652074; www.montage.loyno. edu — The Ellis Marsalis Ensemble, Lula Elzy New Orleans Dance Theatre and the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music Orchestra, conducted by Jesse McBride, present Duke Ellington’s interpretation of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. Tickets $40. 8 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

COMEDY

Sign-up 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. Tuesday. Johnny Rock. C. Beever’s Bar of Music, 2507 N. Woodlawn Ave., Metairie, (504) 887-9401; www. cbeevers.com — Comedian Johnny Rock hosts an open-mic comedy night. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Laugh & Sip. The Wine Bistro, 1011 Gravier St.; www. facebook.com/TheWineBistroNO — Mark Caesar and DJ Cousin Cav host the weekly showcase of local comedians. Call (504) 6066408 for details. Tickets $7. 8 p.m. Thursday. Lights Up. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St., (504) 302-8264; www. tnmcomedy.com — The theater showcases new improv troupes. Tickets $5. 9 p.m. Thursday. The Megaphone Show. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St., (504) 3028264; www.tnmcomedy. com — Each show features a guest sharing favorite true stories, the details of which inspire improv comedy. Tickets $8. 10:30 p.m. Saturday. NOLA Comedy Hour Open Mic & Showcase. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., (504) 945-4446; www. hiholounge.net — Andrew Polk hosts the open-mic series that features a booked showcase. Free admission. 8 p.m. sign-up, 9 p.m. show. Sunday. Sit-Down Stand-Up. Prytania Bar, 3445 Prytania St., (504) 891-5773; www. prytaniabar.com — Jonah Bascle hosts the stand-up comedy show presented by Accessible Comedy. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Monday. Sketch Comedy. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — The Sketchy Characters perform sketch comedy. Visit www. sketchycharacters.net for details. 9:30 p.m. Saturday. Think You’re Funny? Comedy Showcase. Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., (504) 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up 8 p.m., show 9 p.m. Wednesday.

A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant

DEC

20 THRU DEC

21

A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant 7 p.m. Friday; 3 p.m. & 7 p.m. Saturday Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com

What does the “L” in L. Ron Hubbard stand for? It’s not the greatest mystery about the founder of the Church of Scientology and author of the best-selling metaphysical treatise Dianetics. But in a children’s storybook way, A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant repetitively asks if it means “leader,” “live” or something else. The intentional naivete is coy, and that’s a big part of the show’s appeal to adults who are not parents of cast members. The NOLA Project scheduled the play as its holiday show, and the entire cast is between ages 9 and 12. They breathlessly recount the life story of Hubbard and the tenets of Scientology, and most of the tale is straightforward — taken from Scientology literature and Hubbard’s writing. There is unmistakable irreverence in the introduction by a narrator (Catherine Elvir) dressed as an angel and a manger scene with young L. Ron (Aaron Richert) surrounded by barnyard animals, but the humor comes from the concept of New Age wisdom packaged in a singsong holiday pageant format, particularly one in which children explain how to be reconcile the “reactive” and analytical parts of the mind and become spiritually “clear.” The show is meant to be joyous, and directors A.J. Allegra and Natalie Boyd have the cast gleefully dancing, shimmying and singing numbers about spiritual enlightenment. There also are dance breaks and some corny bits that make the show light and fun. Outfitted in preppy attire, Richert was poised as Hubbard, espousing a philosophy of the science of the mind and rescuing lost souls. Tucker Godbold was funny as a loudmouthed New Yorker and the nasal-voiced Xenu, the ancient galactic leader who brought people to Earth and clustered them around volcanoes in Scientology’s founding mythology. Claire Bourgeois was entertaining as the hysterical and panicked Donald, and the IRS lawyer who brings Hubbard to trial for tax evasion. Most cast members played a number of roles, and they all kept the ensemble numbers upbeat and entertaining. The end of Alex Timbers’ play is unnecessarily ominous — and amusing even though it’s predictable. But the show is meant to be taken at face value — and it’s hilarious. — WILL COVIELLO

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Accessible Comedy. Buffa’s Lounge, 1001 Esplanade Ave., (504) 949-0038; www.buffaslounge.com — J. Alfred Potter and Jonah Bascle do stand-up shows on a rotating basis. 11:55 p.m. Friday. Allstar Comedy Revue. House of Blues Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — Leon Blanda hosts the stand-up comedy show with special guests and a band. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday. Comedy Beast. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., (504) 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — The New Movement presents a stand-up comedy showcase. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Comedy Catastrophe. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., (504) 9440099; www.lostlovelounge. com — Cassidy Henehan hosts the weekly comedy showcase. Free admission. 9 p.m. Tuesday. Comedy Gumbeaux. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., (504) 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open-mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. Comedy Sportz. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an all-ages improv comedy show. 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday. Friday Night Laughs. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts an open-mic. 10 p.m. Friday. Give ’Em The Light OpenMic Comedy Show. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www. houseofblues.com — Leon Blanda hosts the showcase.

REVIEW

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EVENT LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

EVENTS TUESDAY 17

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Celebration in the Oaks. City Park, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 482-4888; www.neworleanscitypark.com — Hundreds of thousands of twinkling white lights and colorful light displays grace 20 acres of City Park’s Botanical Garden, Storyland, Carousel Gardens and 2-mile train route. Beat the line by visiting www. celebrationintheoaks.com for presale tickets. Tickets $8, train $4, other rides $3, unlimited ride band $17. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily through Jan. 4.

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Crescent City Farmers Market. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. Visit www.crescentcityfarmersmarket.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Eatmoor in Broadmoor. New Orleans Public Library, Rosa Keller Branch, 4300 S. Broad St., (504) 596-2675; www.nutrias.org — My House NOLA, in partnership with the Broadmoor Improvement Association, presents a gathering of food trucks. Visit www.myhousenola.com for details on participating vendors. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Figure Drawing Class. Forstall Art Supplies, 3135 Calhoun St., (504) 866-4278; www.forstallartsupply.com — Call to register for the figure drawing class. Admission $10. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — The local chapter of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP-NOLA) hosts a night of candlelight vigils, memorials, readings and open discussion. Members, allies

and friends of SWOP-NOLA are invited. Refreshments are served. Visit www.swop-nola.org for details. 6 p.m. It’s All About the Music BIke Ride. Congo Square, Louis Armstrong Park, North Rampart and St. Ann streets — As part of NOLA Social Ride, bicyclists cruise around the city, stopping a few times along the way to enjoy free live music. More information is available at www.facebook.com/groups/ nolasocialride. 6 p.m. Miracle on Fulton Street. Fulton Street at Poydras Street near Harrah’s Hotel — Celebrate the holiday season with a faux snowfall from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., pictures with Santa Claus from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., shopping, live entertainment, light shows, a huge decorated tree, dining and holiday treats. Visit www. miracleonfulton.com for details. Through Jan. 6. Reggae Night. The Other Place, 1224 St. Bernard Ave., (504) 943-7502 — DJ Kush Master spins reggae, there’s food from Coco Hut and there are cultural vendors. Free admission. 8 p.m. Saint Sketch Figure Drawing. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-8676; www.theshadowboxtheatre. com — Artists of all skill levels are invited to sketch two live nude models. Beer, wine and drawing boards are available. Bring your own art supplies. Admission $5. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Toddler Time. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., (504) 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3 and under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m. WYES Wine and Coffee Pairing Dinners. Chefs at restaurants in New Orleans, on the Northshore and in Ba-

ton Rouge create multi-course dinners using Community Coffee in at least one of their dishes. Bus service is available for an additional $10 per person, and a portion of the proceeds benefit WYES. Visit www.wyes.org for menus and reservation instructions. Dinner $85, including tax and tip. 7 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 18 Barbershop Meetings. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Peter Nahkid leads the men’s discussion of entrepreneurship, family, love, dreams and more. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Covington Farmers Market. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Lunchbox Lecture. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call (504) 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon. Pottery and Sculpture Sessions. Freret Clay Center, 2525 Jena St., (504) 919-8050; www. freretclaycenter.com — Potters and sculptors hold three-hour workshops. Materials $20. 9 a.m. & 6 p.m. Project 1399 BIble Study. Thompson United Methodist, 1023 St. Roch Ave., (504) 327-9274 — The Bible study is independent and non-denominational. Visit www. project1399.com for details. Every other Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

THURSDAY 19 Alvar Arts. Alvar Library, 913 Alvar St., (504) 596-2667; www. nutrias.org — Alvar Library hosts an evening of music, art, writing and performance. There’s a presentation, a Q&A and refreshments. Visit www. alvararts.org for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Art Activities During After Hours. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids


EVENT LISTINGS

P H O T O BY J O N AT H A N M A N N I O N

PREVIEW

Home for the Holidays

DEC

23

Home for the Holidays 6 p.m. patron party; 7:30 p.m. concert House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999 www.hob.com

We to

Love

Cook!

Pharmaceutical Reps…

Let Us Cater Your DR's Lunches

2018 Clearview Pkwy • 504-456-6362 during weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Art on the Rocks at W New Orleans. W Hotel New Orleans, 333 Poydras St., (504) 525-9444; www. wneworleans.com — Artists in residence showcase and sometimes demonstrate their work, there’s a DJ, drink specials and giveaways of lodging at W Hotels across the country. Visit www.wneworleans. com/artontherocks for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Marketplace at Armstrong Park. Armstrong Park, 701 N. Rampart St., (504) 6583200; www.pufap.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods,

Louisiana seafood, handmade beauty products, art, crafts and entertainment. Visit www.icdnola.org for details. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. NOLA TimeBanking, DyverseCity Etsy Training. DyverseCity, 3932 Fourth St., (504) 439-4530 — Attendees can set up TimeBank accounts, learn how to run Etsy shops or get computer coaching. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous. Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church, 3900 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-3431 — Group members help each other utilize the 12-step method to recover from compulsive eating. For details, contact Sarah at

(504) 458-9965. 7 p.m. Sistahs Making a Change. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — Women of all levels of expertise are invited to dance, discuss and dine together at this health-centered event. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday & Thursday.

FRIDAY 20 Friday Nights at NOMA. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — The fourpart weekly event includes an art activity, live music,

a film and a food demo. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market, 922 Teche St. — Produce, seafood and more are available for purchase. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

SATURDAY 21 Antique Auto Club of St. Bernard Cruise Night. Brewster’s, 8751 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 309-7548; www.brewstersrestaurant.com — Antique and classic cars are displayed and there is music from the 1950s through the 1970s. 6 p.m.

Crescent City Farmers Market. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, (504) 861-5898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. German Coast Farmers Market. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. Gingerbread Tea. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (800) 850-3878 PAGE 80

Weekdays 7a.m.- 8p.m. Fri & Sat 7a.m. - 10p.m. • Sun 10a.m. - 7p.m.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

The annual fundraiser for NOCCA student scholarships features a fairly consistent local all-star lineup, including Irma Thomas performing at the early evening patron party. This year’s roster features Trombone Shorty, Theresa Andersson, Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers, Rebirth Brass Band, John Boutte, Shamarr Allen and the Underdawgs, the Eric Lindell Band, Herlin Riley, MyNameIsJohnMichael and others. The event is a fundraiser for the Daniel Price Memorial Fund, and it has raised more than $300,000 for college scholarships for NOCCA graduates. Daniel Price was a NOCCA alum and artist who was slain in San Francisco in 2003. For more information about him and the program, visit www.danielpricememorial.org. Tickets $37, patron party $127. — WILL COVIELLO

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EVENT LISTINGS PAGE 79

— There are separate lunch buffets for kids and adults, a gingerbread decorating station, elves serving hot cocoa to kids and mimosas and tea for adults. A photo with Santa and a sack to fill with sweets is given to each child. Visit www.cpneworleansairport. com/tea for details. Adults $35, kids $19. 11 a.m. & 3 p.m.

Teddy Bear House Tours. Teddy Bear House, 1525 Dufossat St., (504) 897-1302; www.facebook.com/TheTeddyBearHouse — Attendees take guided, narrated tours of a three-story house filled with holiday decor and 12,000 teddy bears. Adults $10, kids $5. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

Gretna Farmers Market. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, (504) 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Yoga. Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, (504) 658-4100; www.noma. org — The museum holds yoga classes. Call (504) 456-5000 for details. Free for NOMA and East Jefferson Wellness Center members, $5 general admission. 8 a.m.

Grow Dat Farm Stand. Grow Dat Youth Farm, 150 Zachary Taylor Drive, (504) 377-8395; www.growdatyouthfarm.org — Grow Dat Youth Farm sells its produce. 9 a.m. to noon.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

“Since 1969”

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Madisonville Art Market. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River Front at Water Street, Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www.artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features works by local artists including paintings, mixed-media works, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. OCH Recycled Art Market. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — There’s live music, entertainment and art and home furnishings crafted from reclaimed materials. Visit www.ochartmarket.com for details. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Rivertown Farmers Market. Rivertown, 400 block of Williams Boulevard., Kenner, (504) 468-7231; www.kenner. la.us — The twice-monthly market features local fruit, vegetables and dairy, homemade jams and jellies, cooking demonstrations and more. 8 a.m. to noon. R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl. Mercedes-Benz Superdome, 1500 Poydras St., (504) 587-3663; www.superdome.com — The Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns play North Texas. 8 p.m. St. Bernard Seafood & Farmers Market. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi, (504) 355-4442; www.visitstbernard. com — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

SUNDAY 22 SoFAB cooking demo. French Market, corner of Governor Nicholls Street and French Market Place; www.frenchmarket.org — Local chefs cook their signature dishes. 2 p.m. Swing Dance Lesson With Amy & Chance. d.b.a., 618 Frenchmen St., (504) 942-3731; www.dbabars.com/dbano — The bar and music venue offers free swing dance lessons. 4:30 p.m.

MONDAY 23 Tai Chi/Chi Kung. New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, (504) 6584100; www.noma.org — Terry Rappold presents the class in the museum’s art galleries. Call (504) 456-5000 for details. Free for NOMA and East Jefferson General Hospital Wellness Center members, $5 general admission. 6 p.m. Twerk & Werk Bounce Dance Class with Dwight & William. Passion Dance Center, 2619 Dreux Ave., (504) 284-3955; www.passiondancecenter. com — Bounce dancers Dwight and William, who have performed with Big Freedia and Walt Wiggady, teach a bounce dance class. Contact Tamika at (504) 376-3069 or tamika@passiondancecenter. com for details and to sign up. Class $10, $5 with college ID, first class free. 8 p.m.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS American Cancer Society. American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, (504) 833-4024; www.cancer. org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facili-

tate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. Another Life Foundation Volunteers. Another Life Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org. Bayou Rebirth Wetlands Education. Bayou Rebirth seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details. Big Brothers Big Sisters Volunteers. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, (504) 309-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information. Bilingual Evacuteers. Puentes New Orleans and Evacuteer seek bilingual volunteers to assist the Spanish-speaking population with mandatory evacuations in New Orleans during hurricane season. Email Luis Behrhorst at luis@ puentesno.org for details. CASA New Orleans. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at (504) 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans.org for details. Crescent City Farmers Market. CCFM and marketumbrella. org seek volunteers to field shoppers’ questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call (504) 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details. Dress for Success New Orleans. The professional women’s shop seeks volunteers to assist clients with shopping, to manage inventory and


EVENT LISTINGS share expertise. Call (504) 891-4337 or email neworleans@dressforsuccess. org to register. Each One Save One. Greater New Orleans’ largest one-on-one mentoring program seeks volunteer mentors. Visit www.eachonesaveone.org for details. Edgar Degas Foundation. The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call (504) 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. Girls on the Run. Girls on the Run seeks running buddies, assistant coaches, committee members and race day volunteers. Email info@gotrnola.org to register. Visit www.gotrnola.org for details about the program. Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center. The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call (504) 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. Green Light New Orleans. The group that provides free energy-efficient lightbulbs seeks volunteers to help install the bulbs in homes. Call (504) 324-2429 or email green@greenlightneworleans.org to apply. Visit www. greenlightneworleans.org for details.

Hospice Volunteers. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Carla Fisher at (504) 832-8111 for details. Iron Rail. The book collective seeks volunteers to host shows and other events, help catalog the library, host free movie nights, organize benefits and other duties. Email ironrailbookcollective@gmail.com or visit www. ironrail.org for details. Jackson Barracks Museum Volunteers. The museum seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at (504) 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo. com for details. Lakeview Civic Improvement Association. The association’s green space committee needs volunteers for the adopt-a-block program to pick up trash or trim trees. Sign up with Russ Barranco at (504) 482-9598 or rpbarranco@ cox.net.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

HandsOn New Orleans. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up for service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call (504) 304-2275, email volunteer@handsonneworleans. org or visit www.handsonneworleans. org for details.

Louisiana SPCA Volunteers. The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work PAGE 83

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EVENT LISTINGS PAGE 81

with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Visit www.la-spca.org/volunteer to sign up. lowernine.org Volunteers. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details. Meal Delivery Volunteers. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at (504) 888-5880 for details. National World War II Museum. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call (504) 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine. alpert@nationalww2museum. org for details.

Operation REACH Volunteers. Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. Public School Volunteers. New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call (504) 654-1060 for information. Senior Companion Volunteers. New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., (504) 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and oth-

Start the Adventure in Reading. The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call (504) 899-0820, email elizabeth@stairnola. org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. Teen Suicide Prevention. The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call (504) 8318475 for details. Touro Infirmary. Touro Infirmary, 1401 Foucher St., (504) 897-7011; www.touro.com — The hospital is currently in need of adult volunteers to assist in a variety of assignments, including the chemo infusion center, information desks, family surgery lounge and book cart. For information, call Volunteer Services or email Denise.Chetta@Touro.com.

WORDS Allison Alsup, Elizabeth Pearce, Richard Read. Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., (504) 648-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com — The authors discuss and sign The French Quarter Drinking Companion. 5 p.m. Monday. Barnes & Noble Jr. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. Fair Grinds Poetry Event. Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon St., (504) 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word performers. 8 p.m. Sunday. Friends of the New Orleans Public Library Book Sale. Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., (504) 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday & Saturday. Jay Mazza. Louisiana Music Factory, 210 Decatur St., 586-1094; www.louisianamusicfactory.com — The author reads from and signs Not Just Another Thursday Night: Kermit Ruffins and Vaughan’s Lounge. 4 p.m. Saturday, John Besh. Maple Street Book Shop, 7529 Maple St., (504) 866-4916; www.ma-

plestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses and signs Cooking from the Heart. 6 p.m. Thursday. Local Writers’ Group. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday. Morgan Murphy. Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., (504) 648-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com — The author discusses and signs Off the Eaten Path. 5 p.m. Wednesday. Open Mic. Drum Sands Publishing and Books, 7301 Downman Road, (504) 2476519; www.drumsandspublishing.com — The bookstore and publishing house hosts an open mic for writers of all genres. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Phillip Collier. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., (504) 899-7323 — The author discusses and signs Making New Orleans. 12:42 p.m. Saturday. Poets of Color. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., (504) 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — Poets participate in a writing circle. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday. Stacey Meyer, Troy Gilbert. Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., (504) 648-1200; www. therooseveltneworleans.com — The authors discuss and signs New Orleans Kitchens. 5 p.m. Saturday. Story Time with Miss Maureen. Maple Street Book Shop, 7529 Maple St., (504) 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The bookstore hosts a children’s book reading. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Tao Poetry. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., (504) 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffee house hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. The Well: A Women’s Poetry Circle. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., (504) 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group for writers of all levels meets at 2 p.m. Monday. Call (504) 655-5489 or email fleurdeholly@gmail.com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS Bayou Magazine. UNO Press’ nonstudent publication hosts a poetry and fiction contest. Winners receive $500. For details, visit www.uno.edu/ bayou. Deadline Dec. 30.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

NOLA Wise. The program by Global Green in partnership with the City of New Orleans and the Department of Energy that helps homeowners make their homes more energy efficient seeks volunteers. All volunteers must attend a 30-minute orientation. Email mrowand@globalgreen.org for details.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013


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CLASSIFIEDS 24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS

LEGAL NOTICES

STATE OF LOUISIANA

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

NO. 724-253 DIV. E DOCKET 5

NO.: 09-497 DIV. D SECT. 16

NO.: 2011-12683 DIV. G

SUCCESSION OF LOUISE H. GRIMES AND NOEL GRIMES

SUCCESSION OF WARDELL JOSEPH QUEZERGUE, SR.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

NO. 708-183 DIV. G

SUCCESSION OF CLAIRE ELIZABETH CASTEIX, widow of JULES ANDREW APFFEL

SUCCESSIONS OF CECILE ESCHETE WIFE/OF AND WILSON J. PELLEGRIN

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

The duly appointed and qualified testamentary executor of the above estate, Louis G. Gruntz, Jr. has made application to the Court for the sale, at private sale the undivided two fifths (2/5) interest of the below described immovable property owned by the estate (along with the remaining threefifths (3/5) interest owned by the Jules Apffel Trust):

STATE OF LOUISIANA

Whereas the Dative Testamentary Executrix of the above successions has made application for sale, at private sale, the following immovable former community property of Cecile Eschete, wife of/and Wilson J. Pellegrin for the sum of NINETY-FIVE THOUSAND AND NO/100 ($95,000.00) DOLLARS per the terms and conditions set forth in the Petition for Private Sale of Immovable Property:

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

A CERTAIN PIECE OR PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, designated by the letter “A” on a sketch attached to an act or partition passed before situated in the Village of Mechanickham (now forming part of the City of Gretna), Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana J.C. Tillotson, Notary Public, dated August 30th, 1902, being a portion of original lot number three (3) of Block number nineteen (19); Block Number Nineteen (19) is bounded by Copernicus Avenue, Fifth, Sixth and Weyer (formerly Cuvier) Streets and measures forty (40’) feet front on Copernicus Avenue, by a depth of one hundred twenty-five (125’) feet, between equal and parallel lines.

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Being the same property acquired by Cecile Eschete, wife of/and Wilson J. Pellegrin on September 30, 1948 form Marguerite Elizabeth Westermann by Act before Clayton A. Hotard, Notary Public, and recorded at COB 260, Folio in the Conveyance Records of Jefferson Parish. Notice is given to all parties including heirs/legatees/creditors of decedent and the estates and they are ordered to make any oppostion they have to such application, prior to issuance or order or judgment authorizing and homologating this application and that such order or judgment be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, in accordance with law.

THAT PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana, in that part known as HYMAN SUBDIVISION, in square No. 3 thereof, bounded by Coolidge, Harding, Oak Streets and Riverside Drive, which lots are designated by the No. 11 and 12 on a plan by S. G. Sandoz, dated July 5, 1926, revised October 12, 1926, according to which, said lots Nos. 11 and 12 measure each twenty-five feet front on Coolinge Street, same width in the rear, by a depth of ninety-five feet, between equal and parallel lines. The improvements on said property bear the Municipal No. 129 Coolidge Street. Being the same property acquired by the Apffel Trust, by Judgment of Possession, dated February 21, 1996 in the matter entitled Succession of Jules Andrew Apffel, Docket No. 486-053, recorded in the Parish of Jefferson at C.O.B. 2933, folio 193 and by decedent from the Succession of Jules Andrew Apffel, Docket No. 486-053, by order of the Court, dated February 13, 1996, by Act, dated February 19, 1996, recorded in the Parish of Jefferson at C.O.B. 2933, folio 192, the sale of the entire property on the following terms and conditions, to-wit, ONE HUNDRED NINE THOUSAND and NO/100 DOLLARS ($109,000.00), less the usual expenses to be paid by vendor.

Attorney: Terrence J. Lestelle Address: 3421 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 602 Metairie, LA 70002 Telephone (504) 828-1224

Notice is now given to all parties whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of decedent and of this estate, that they be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order or judgment authorizing, approving and homologating that application and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven days, from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law.

Gambit: 11/26/13 & 12/17/13

By Order of the Court,

By Order of the Court, Marilyn Guidry Clerk

to place your

LEGAL NOTICE

call renetta at 504.483.3122 or email renettap @gambitweekly.com

Attorney: Louis G. Gruntz, Jr. Address: 316 Shrewsbury Court Jefferson, LA 70121 Telephone: (504) 258-0547 Gambit: 11/26/13 & 12/17/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Amy Henderberg and Daryll Johnson, please contact Jennifer M. Medley, Attorney, at 504-495-1385. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Brandi B. Breaud and/or Myron A. Breaud, please contact Jennifer M. Medley, Attorney, at 504-495-1385.

STATE OF LOUISIANA

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Independent Administrator, A.R. Grimes of this Succession has filed a petition for authority to sell immovable property of the succession in accordance with the law. The petition can be homologated after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of this publication; any opposition to the petition must be filed prior to homologation. Property Description as contained in the Petition to Sell Immovable Property: TWO CERTAIN LOTS OF GROUND together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all of the rights, ways, means, privileges, servitudes, advantages and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana, and more fully described as follows, to-wit: Two certain lots of ground, situated in the Third District of this City, in Square No. 1157, (old number 53), bounded by Feliciana, Clouet, Tonti (late Force) and Miro (late Liberal) Streets, and designated as Lots 4 and 5 on a sketch made by Edgar Pilie, Surveyor, in this City on January 20, 1906, annexed to an inventory taken by James B. Ginage, Notary Public, on January 20, 1906, according to which plans said lots adjoin each other and measure each Thirty-one feet (31’) front on Feliciana Street, the same width in the rear, by a depth of One hundred two feet, ten inches, six lines (102’10”6’ “) between lines. Being the same property acquired by Ayrie Grimes from the Cotton Yardsmen Benevolent Association No. 2, by Act of Sale passed before Cyril F. Dumaine, Notary Public on May 27, 1948, registered in C.O.B. 558, Folio 87, of the Parish of Orleans.

STATE OF LOUISIANA

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION OF APPLICATION TO PAY ALLOWANCE WHEREAS, the succession representative of this Succession has made an application to the Honorable Court for authority to pay an interim allowance to heirs of this succession, which allowance is within the amount that will eventually be due to said heirs. NOTICE is hereby given that an order granting such authority may be issued after expiration of ten (10) days from the date of this publication, and that an opposition may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of the order. BY ORDER OF THE COURT, Deputy Clerk Attorney: Elizabeth A. Hammant #18247 Address: 3000 W. Esplanade Ave. N, Suite 200 Metairle, LA 70002 Telephone: (504) 838-9090 Gambit: 12/17/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO.: 2013-5226 DIV. N-8 SUCCESSIONS OF LUCINDA HOLMES, WIFE OF/AND LOUIS HAYWARD BROOKS NOTICE Notice is hereby given to the creditors of this estate and to all other persons herein interested to show cause within seven (7) days of this notification (if any they have or can) why the First and Final Tableau of Distributions presented by the administratrix of this succession should not be approved and homologated and the funds distributed in accordance herewith. Deputy Clerk

BY ORDER OF THE 24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

RESPECTFULLY SUBMITED

DALE N. ATKINS, CLERK OF COURT

Attorney: Steven E. Hayes #14362 Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes, L.L.P. One Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1100 Metairie, LA 70001 Telephone: (504) 833-5600

Attorney: Edward J. Deano, Jr. Address: 895 Park Avenue Mandeville, LA 70448 LSBA #04770 Telephone: (985) 626-1001 Gambit: 12/17/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Albert Sullivan and Sheila Anderson Sullivan please contact J. Benjamin Avin Atty, 2216 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Christopher Ivan Lund, please contact William Boyles, Atty, at 504-232-2940. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Giovanni G. Johnson a/k/a Giovanni Gregory Johnson a/k/a Giovanni Johnson AND Tynesia C. Johnson a/k/a Tynesia Coleman Johnson a/k/a Tynesia Coleman a/k/a Tynesia Johnson, please contact Jennifer M. Medley, Attorney, at 504-495-1385. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of JOSHUA LEBRAY BULLOCKS (A/K/A JOSHUA L. BULLOCKS, A/K/A JOSHUA BULLOCKS), please contact Carlos A. Ramirez, Atty, 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1400, New Orleans, LA 70112, (504) 410-9611.

Gambit: 12/17/13 Elsa Guillen Chacon, 1161 Beechwood Drive, Harvey LA, 70058 or her heirs, or anyone knowing her whereabouts please contact Geralyn Garvey (504) 838-0191. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Myron A. Breaud, please contact atty. Shyrl Patterson Bagneris, (504) 522-0303. Patricia Cassanova A/K/A Patricia Catherine Cassanova, 2521 Metairie Lawn Drive, Unit 12-306, Metairie, LA 70002, her heirs, or anyone knowing her whereabouts please contact Geralyn Garvey (504) 838-0191. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Joyce Linzsey Jackson aka Joyce L. Jackson aka Joyce Jackson, or any of her heirs or any heirs of the Succession of Desiree McCullom, please contact attorney Vincent B. LoCoco at (504) 483-2332. Property rights are involved relative to 3904-3906 Franklin Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70122. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Vyntrella Brewer Menzies, contact Atty. Bonita Watson, 504.799.2265.

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of KIMBERLY JONES BELL, WIFE OF/AND MURPHY F. BELL, JR. please contact Krystena L. Harper, Attorney, (504) 2740500. Property rights involved. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of MERVIN RUDOLPH please contact Justin A. Reese attny, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of MIA LANA MANUEL please contact Krystena L. Harper, Attorney, (504) 274-0500. Property rights involved. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of MICHAEL DUNCAN BRADLEY, please contact Carlos A. Ramirez, Atty, 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1400, New Orleans, LA 70112, (504) 410-9611. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of PONCHITTA BONDOJIA AND/OR TRENYAAE BONDOJIA please contact Krystena L. Harper, Attorney, (504) 2740500. Property rights involved. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Rose M. Cotton and/or Charles A. Stokes, Sr., contact Atty. Bonita Watson, 504.799.2265. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Shayne Leon Sparrow and/or Jessica Dorris Sparrow, please contact atty. Naomi Kim at 504-528-9500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Stephen V. Trager and Ronna Price Trager, please contact Atty. Naomi Kim at 504-528-9500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the Heirs of Carolyn Brown Turner, please contact Margaret E. Judice, P.O. Box 592, Franklin, LA 70538, or phone (337) 828-1880. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the Heirs of Harold L. Turner, please contact Margaret E. Judice, P.O. Box 592, Franklin, LA 70538, or phone (337) 828-1880. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of TIMOTHY J. BOREL (A/K/A TIMOTHY BOREL), please contact Carlos A. Ramirez, Atty, 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1400, New Orleans, LA 70112, (504) 410-9611. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of VICTORIA ANN LEE (A/K/A VICTORIA A. LEE, VICTORIA LEE), please contact Carlos A. Ramirez, Atty, 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1400, New Orleans, LA 70112, (504) 410-9611.

Attention all creditors of Shedding Productions, LLC or “Self/Less”. The film has completed shooting in New Orleans, LA. All creditor claims may be mailed to 1231 Prytania St., 4th Floor, New Orleans, LA 70130. Please file any outstanding creditor claims by December 20, 2013. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of D.V. ALEX WELLS, ADMINISTRATOR OF THE SUCCESSION OF EDWARD CAMPBELL, please contact Bobby Hawkins, Atty, 2216 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500.

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF COAHOMA COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI THE PETITION OF GIOVANNI SENAFE AND LISA PROSHKA SENAFE FOR THE ADOPTION OF A MINOR CHILD IDENTIFIED IN THE PETITION NO.: 2013-04AD SUMMONS THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI TO: Unknown father of a male child born July 18, 2013 to Natasha Mary McDonald in Coahoma County, Mississippi. You have been made a Defendent in the suit filed in this Court, seeking termination of your parental rights and adoption of the child. There are no defendents other that you in this action. You are summoned to appear and defend against the complaint or petition filed against you in this action at 11:00 o’clock A.M. on the 20th day of December, 2013, in the Chancery courtroom of the Leflore County in Greenwood, Mississipi and in case of your failure to appear and defend a judgment will be entered against you for the money or other things demanded in the complaint or petition. You are not required to file an answer or other pleading, but you may do so if you desire. Issued under my hand and seal of said Court, this 6th day of November, 2013. Edward P. Peacock, III Chancery Clerk of Coahoma County, Mississippi By: Donna Dees Deputy Clerk

Gambit: 11/19/13

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION DEPENDENCY THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND TO: • Daryl Douglas, alleged father of Joseph Derrel White, d.o.b.09/26/03, Dependency Petition 13-7-00731-9 filed 08/27/13. A Preliminary Hearing on February 4, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. and a Fact Finding hearing on February 20, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. will be held on this matter at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. These hearings will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at both of said hearings regarding your child. If you do not appear at the first (preliminary) hearing, the court may cancel the second hearing and take evidence and enter an order without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, and/ or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www. atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. SONYA KRASKI, Clerk of the Superior Court; L. PARDEE, Deputy Clerk


CLASSIFIED EMPLOYMENT

Experienced

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NEW ORLEANS

DRIVERS:

Hiring 10 LP drivers immediately. Class A w/tank, Hazmat, TWIC card 1 yr. trac./Trailer exp. Required La., Tx, Ms., Ala. Free Medical! Many Bonuses! Apply @ themartincompanies.com, or call 1-888-380-5516

ENTERTAINMENT WWOZ

WWOZ is seeking a part-time (30 hours/ week) Administrative Assistant to work in development and events. Skills/experience required: database manipulation, data entry, mailings, Excel, Word and customer service. HTML experience a plus. Please mail your cover letter and resume before 12/20/2013 to: Friends of WWOZ Attn: Crystal Gross PO Box 51840 New Orleans, LA 70151-1840 Unfortunately, we cannot accept applications via e-mail, telephone, fax, or in person. WWOZ is an equal-opportunity organization and has a strict policy of non-discrimination. Anyone able to meet the requirements of this position is welcome to apply.

JOB GURU

Dear New Orleans Job Guru, “I am an executive at local engineering firm, where I have done very well. Since it is a familyowned business, I probably can’t go any higher and I am thinking of looking for a larger employer. With the New Year coming up, I figure now is a good time to start looking. Jobs have always come to me, so this will be a new experience. Please give some tips on the best way to find something better.” — Michael B., Mandeville, LA Dear Michael,

Once you have a great résumé in hand, you should collect a variety of documents to be included in a professional portfolio. These exhibits could include continuing education certificates, professional licenses, reports or articles that your wrote or that mention you, spreadsheets and statistical printouts illustrating your performance and achievements, annual performance reviews, testimonial letters from colleagues, and other items that show your credentials and accomplishments. You can place copies of these documents in an attractive binder to take to your next interview. Some of our clients also create digital portfolios that can be placed online. The next step would be to build your online reputation. In this area, the gold standard is LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional career and business networking tool, with 200 million global users. As I have documented in previous columns, 97% of recruiters state that they use LinkedIn to find job candidates, and 67% say that LinkedIn is their sole online recruiting tool. A LinkedIn survey found that 50% of Fortune 100 companies are now hiring employees through LinkedIn. You can start with the LinkedIn free account and if you get serious about using it as a job search tool, you can consider getting a Premium Account for a low monthly rate. Your online reputation is rapidly becoming one of the most valuable commodities you can have as a professional. More and more employers are reviewing social media before making the decision to interview or hire candidates. Be sure to Google your name, and if it is fairly common, you can add your city to the search. When you review the postings, you should keep in mind two things that are red flags to potential employers: negative information or a very low level of information. Executives who are active in their fields and communities should have a decent amount of positive coverage online. Career coaching firms like ours help clients to devise a strategy to improve their online presence. If you have negative information online, you can check out reputation management firms online that can help to remove or “bury” the negative items. Burying is accomplished by gaining placement of positive items that serve to move the less favorable information farther down in search results. Removal is harder, but can, in some cases, be achieved by contacting web administrators and requesting removal of certain items. Check out my past columns for information on how to create a dynamic LinkedIn Profile, how to (and when to) use a recruiter, how to search for jobs in the “hidden” job market, how to optimize your résumé for automated scanning systems, and how to leverage your qualifications to access the best job opportunities. New Orleans Job Guru is New Orleans native Grant Cooper. President of Strategic Résumés®, Grant has ranked in the Top 2% of 340 LinkedIn National Résumé Writing Experts worldwide, and has assisted the U.S. Air Force, Kinko’s, the Louisiana Dept. of Labor, the City of New Orleans, NFL/NBA players & coaches, as well as universities, regional banks, celebrities, and major corporations.

Send your questions to New Orleans Job Guru at: grant@resupro.com or 504-891-7222

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR:

Darrell Brothers Farm Partnership, Osceola, AR, has 3 positions for grain & corn; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.50/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 1/20/14 – 11/15/14. Apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order 733809 or call 225-342-2917.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR Miyako Sushi Bar & Hibachi

Now Hiring: Host/Hostess & Servers. Apply in person, 11-2:30pm or 5-9pm, 1403 St. Charles Ave., NOLA

RETAIL FRIENDLY FACES WANTED

Now accepting applications for several full, part time positions. Must be motivated, hard working & friendly. Retail experience a plus. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 12-5pm only. Southern Candymakers, 334 Decatur St.

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS PART TIME CHILD CARE ASSISTANT POSITION $7.25/HR

Kidutopia (www.kidutopia.us) is hiring immediately! Students and individuals with knowledge of Spanish and/or French are encouraged to apply. Experience working with children is a must! E-mail your resume to mvtwo@aol.com

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS 2007 CORVETTE Z51

2007 Chevrolet Corvette Z51 2 LT Coupe 29,000 miles, excellent condition. Factory HUD and Kenwood Entertainment Unit added. Premium 18” front and 19” rear wheels. Price $31,257 For more info & to set up an appointment, contact 504-458-4741

MERCHANDISE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES Beautiful mahogany chair. Converts into a buffet table. Must see! Best offer. Call 504-488-4609.

GYMNASTICS COACH NEEDED

CHEDDAR’S IS INTERVIEWING RESTAURANT MANAGERS FOR OUR NEW CHEDDAR’S COMING SOON TO SLIDELL, LA! First thing you should know is that this isn’t a typical restaurant job. That’s because Cheddar’s isn’t a typical restaurant. We approach things differently, part of which involves setting a high bar for food, service and for our team. Cheddar’s is for people who want to play a vital role in advancing our simple idea: offering guests an inviting neighborhood restaurant with high quality handmade food at reasonable prices, while always valuing everyone (guests and associates alike) and treating them with respect. While that might be a simple idea, it’s not so simple to bring it to life. Success depends on every member of our team staying focused on and committed to, the vision, from the front of the house to the back of the house to our restaurant support center. Still with us? Good! Because with a thriving group of restaurants and plans for continued growth, we’re always interested in adding exceptional people, especially when they bring valuable experience to the table. A background in cooking from scratch, for example. Or skill in the art of serving guests. Or a talent for seamless teamwork in a high volume, fast-paced environment. Experiences like those can be powerful tools for success at Cheddar’s second only to a shared attitude and a genuine concern for our guests and each other. If it sounds like we’re talking about you, we hope you’ll talk to us. There might be a place for you on the Cheddar’s team. (By the way, don’t let geography stand in the way. Assistance is available for relocation). https://cheddarscareers.clickandhire. net/index.cfm?action=questionnaire. questionnaire CHEDDAR’S

Empire Gymnastics is currently looking for preschool and developmental coaches. Gymnastics experience is not required but preferred. All of our classes start at 4, so it’s a perfect evening job opportunity for college students looking to make some money for the year. Job starts ASAP. Please call the gym director, Greg. Serious inquiries only. www.empiregymnastics.net, (504) 734-0644 or epireacademy@bellsouth.net.

TRADE/SKILLS $FLOORING INSTALLERS WANTED

For year round work! 2 yrs. exp. Must have van, tools, plus Corporation/LLC, GL insurance, pass background and speak English. Call 504-470-4472 or email Mlopinto@us-installations.com

APPLIANCES KENMORE WASHER & DRYER Kingsize capacity washer w/many water levels & settings & options. Top loading $200. Large capacity Electric dryer with many setting & options $200. Call (504) 832-1901

CLOTHING LADIES BLACK LEATHER CAPE! Size M - 1X. NEVER WORN! $75.00 Call (504) 287-4104.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES 2 Torcheiere Floor Lamps. Nice. $20 each. Call (504) 287-4104.

ETHAN ALLEN 4 POSTER BED

MISCELLANEOUS NOW HIRING Personal Fitness Trainers

Salire Fitness is now hiring Certified Fitness Trainers for our Boot Camps and for Personal Training Sessions at our studio uptown. Send resumes to: salirefitness@yahoo.com

VOLUNTEER

QUEEN SIZE. GEORGIAN CHERRY PENCIL POST. GOOD CONDITION. CASH ONLY! CALL (504) 256-2359.

SLATE TABLE

Slate End table with metal scroll legs, $75. Call (504) 488-4609

SALON EQUIPMENT BEAUTY SALON FURNITURE FOR SALE. CALL (504) 621-6527

MISC. FOR SALE 40’ Rockwood 5th Wheel Travel Trailer

2 Super Slides. Loaded. Best Offer. Call (504) 495-8165.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3006

CRAB & DEEP WATER CRAWFISH NETS Handmade & Heavy Duty Call Melvin at 504-228-9614 for a price.

NEED HELP? Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 Email classadv

@gambitweekly.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Grant Cooper

The very first this thing you will need to do before you set out to look for a new position is to bring your résumé up to 21st century standards. Because many executives have traditionally depended on administrative staff to write their reports and create their documents, they are often ill-equipped to prepare a résumé that is commensurate with their experience. Hiring a professional writer to develop your résumé presentation and accompanying materials may generate a sound return on investment.

FARM LABOR

EMPLOYMENT

PIZZA MAKER AND BARTENDER

DRIVERS/DELIVERY

CLASSIFIEDS

87


HOME & GARDEN y a d i l o H Gambit’s Guide to Home & Garden Professionals

Call Our Trained Experts & Experience The Difference

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

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Fred Magee-Local Owner

Holiday Home & Garden Page Reach over 179,677* Weekly readers who want to spruce up for the Holidays! Plus thousands more online at www.bestofneworleans.com Call (504) 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com for more information!

* Source: Media Audit


Picture Perfect Properties PICTURE YOURSELF IN THE HOME OF YOUR DREAMS!

625 DAUPHINE • $2,995,000

3527 Ridgelake Dr., Metairie. Office Space Metairie Luxury Great Location Approx 1,350 usable sq.ft. 2nd floor of 2 story office building. Parking, efficiency kitchen, storage room, mens and womens restrooms, reception area, conference rooms, private office.

Available immediately. 1 year lease $1,700/mo. (504) 957-2360.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 3801 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 207 Metairie, Louisiana 70002 504.833.7603

FOR SALE

Upscale Furnished & Unfurnished Apartments!

ACADIAN HOME ON ONE ACRE E

OR

H HS

T OR

N

For Rent

Starting at $1800/month for unfurnished units, and $3000 to $3,600/mo. for furn. Penthouse (as little as $100/day!). • Landscaped Grounds & Seating Areas/Grill • Washer/Dryer • Complimentary Hilton Health Club Membership (includes rooftop pool!) And much, much more!

L. BRYAN FRANCHER

www.FrancherPerrin.com

251-6400

504-891-6400

LESLIE PERRIN

722-5820

NORTHSHORE FOR SALE

Heart of the Forest EXCELLENT BUILDING LOTS TWO ACRE TO FOUR ACRE LOTS

50124 Louisiana Polo Farms East Blvd. This Acadian home has three bedrooms, two baths, (master bath with Jacuzzi,) large family room with cathedral ceilings and wooden beams. Wooden floors with ceramic tile in kitchen and baths. Large laundry room. Screened back porch. Carport for two cars and workshop/storage room. Energy miser construction. The home is on one acre, very private with scenic views. Ten minutes north of I-12 at Goodbee Exit.

$299,500.00 Phone: 985.796.9130 www.LaPoloFarms.com

Ideally located 10 min. north of I-12 Goodbee Exit

Two locations! 323 Morgan St. and 407 Morgan St. Call today! (781) 608-6115 or rhapartments@aol.com

985.796.9130 www.lapolofarms.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

• 1500 to 2000 Sq. Ft! • 2 Br/2 or 2.5 Bath • Off St. Parking • High Speed Internet • Security Cameras & Alarm • Spacious Closets • Balconies in view!

Very rare & magnificent Spanish-Colonial Creole cottage c. 1800, on one of the largest residential parcels in the French Quarter. Features elegant gardens, grand pool, gorgeous wd flrs, hi ceil, working fireplaces, crown molding, custom cypress kitchen cabinets, elevator, lots of off-street parking, 3BR/2BA main house (approx.3,375 sqft liv.area), 2BR plus loft/3BA guest house w/gallery that overlooks the courtyard (approx. 1,973 sqft liv. area).

89


REAL ESTATE UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

2016 FELICITY STREET

GENERAL RENTALS

NOTICE:

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BYWATER

822 LOUISA ST.

BYWATER. $399,000. Contact John Seitz, Agent, Gardner Realtors. Cell# (504) 264-8883 or office: (504) 8916400. www.FrancherPerrin.com

CALL TODAY FOR OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS

HISTORIC RENOVATED DOUBLE 3 Bedrooms/1.5 Baths Per Side. Hardwood Floors & High Ceilings. New Kitchen & Bath Cabinets. New Interior and Exterior Paint. Hardy Siding & Yard. $149K. Call (504) 236-8069.

EMPLOYMENT

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

H2O, Gas, & High Speed Internet Included 1, 2,3 Bedrooms Available. Kenner, Metairie, Metro New Orleans, and the Westbank. Call MetroWide Apartments Today 504-304-4687

METAIRIE GREAT SAFE LOCATION

LARGE 1 BR. Walking dist. to everything needed! 1/2 Blk to Whole Foods, Lakeside Mall & Restaurants. Very Nice! $950/mo., utilities included. Call (504) 669-5711.

NEED HELP?

OLD METAIRIE $300 OFF 1st MONTH Sparkling Pool & Bike Path

Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds

1 BR apt with new granite in kit & bath. King Master w/wall of closets. Kit w/ all built-ins. Laundry on premises. Offst pkg. NO PETS. Avail now. Owner/ agent, $699/mo. 504-236-5776.

ALGIERS POINT

Call

483-3100 Email classadv

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

@gambitweekly.com

1321 Coliseum St. $450,000

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

117 S. Hennessey St., $ 329,900

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

NG

90

E AL

I ND

PE

S 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on Historic Coliseum Square. Off street parking, central air and heat, great entertaining home large front porch and balcony. in an untra convenient Lower Garden District location close to downtown. Approx 3k sq.ft.

Move in cond, lots of architectural details, 1st block off Canal, off street pkng for several cars, garage. 2 br, 2 dens, encl porch/sun rm & wood flrs. Must see to appreciate.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

COMMERCIAL SALES, LEASING AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT 4134 Florida Ave., Kenner

Office Building For Sale • $539,500.00 Sq.ft: 6786 sq ft • Zoned: C-1

Office Space: 6 Separate units: 2 - 1st floor, 4 - 2nd floor. Great deal for owner/occupant with extra income priced below market, new roof, new tile floors, 19 parking spaces with extra land available on Williams.

933 Behrmann Hwy, Gretna

End Cap Retail / Turn Key Restaurant 4600 Sq.ft • $5750.00/mo NNN

1301 W Esplanade, Kenner

Single Stand Alone Bldg Currently a Dentist Office off busy W Esplanade in North Kenner 3200 sq ft • $400,000.00

4641 FAIRFIELD ST • METAIRIE, LA 70006 • 504 207 7575

JENNIFER LANASA-EVANS ASSOCIATE BROKER

Jennifer@lanasa.com Cell (504) 250-9930 www.lanasa.com


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE

HARVEY DUPLEX • $120K OBO

JOHN SEITZ Cell: 504-264-8883 822 LOUISA ST.

BYWATER • $399,000 LET MY 25 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION AND REAL ESTATE ASSIST YOU.

NEWLY RENOVATED!

Two bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, each side. All electric, carpet throughout. Owner will finance. Approx $20,000/yr income Contact Century 21 - Sandy (504)451-2018

JSeitz@GardnerRealtors.com

504-891-6400

CONSULT WITH THE REAL ESTATE EXPERTS OF NEW ORLEANS FRANCHER PERRIN GROUP VOTED TOP 3 REALTORS IN THE CITY!

www.FrancherPerrin.com

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 1101 N. White St.

Large 1 bedroom, w/front porch, furnished kit & w/d. No pets $850/ month. Call 504-343-8651.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

MID CITY 4706 St. Peter St.

Great location one block to bus, City Park, Delgado. 2 BR, Upstairs. Hi ceilings w/fans, & ample closets in hall & bedrms. Furn. kit w/ built-ins & dishwasher. Bath w/storage, tile & claw foot tub & shower. Off st. pkg., security bars on both doors. One year lease. $960 per mo. + deposit. Water included. Call (504) 638-8667 cell.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. 1/1 Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $750/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450.

1 BR EFF. CLOSE TO UNIV

1205 ST CHARLES/$1095

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry/3 mo. min. No pets. Avail Dec. 17th. Call 504-442-0573 or 985-871-4324.

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT/ IRISH CHANNEL 1215 FOUCHER ST.

3 BR, 1.5 BA 1400 SF. Wood floors, new paint, all appliances included, fenced patio, central AC, Off St. prkg, ADT. No pets. No smoking. $2,000/ mo + deposit. Call (985) 507-3468.

1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

ROOMS BY WEEK. Private bath. All utilities included. $175/week. 2 BR avail. Call (504) 202-0381 or (504) 738-2492.

FOR RENT/OTHER PARKING SPACE

Park your small rv, trailer, small boat or vehicle. 1 blk from streetcar line. Mid City area. $100 monthly or obo. Call (504) 488-4609

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMATES.COM

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

readers need

You can help them find one.

A NEW HOME

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

Furn efficiency with liv rm, a/h unit, ceil fans, wood/tile floors, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avail Now. $575/ mo. 504-895-0016.

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Pet Emporium

Sponsored By:

CAT CHAT Gentle, Declawed Sweetie!

Panda is a great older cat with an especially sweet and friendly disposition. Previously adopted from SpayMart; Panda was enjoying life until his person become too ill to care for him. He is hoping to find another home to live out his years. Visit Panda at our Thrift Store Adoption Center: 6601 Veterans Blvd, Metairie or contact us: 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org

www.spaymart.org

PETS

PET ADOPTIONS CLIO

Adult female Chow/Golden Retriever. 5-years-old, 50 pounds. Gold Fur. Trained/Fully Vetted. Perfect family dog. Great watch dog. Loves kids. Call 504-864.2097.

Flambeaux loves, loves, loves to snuggle in a lap. He can be a little shy at first, but quickly turns into a complete lovebug. Flambeaux is about 6 months old and would love to join a family with another cat or two. Call 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org American Bulldog, 2-years-old, male 60 lbs. Trained/Fully Vetted. Happygo-lucky lovebug! Call 504-874-0598.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

92

BUBBY Kennel #A20925872

is an 8-month-old, neutered, Lab/Pointer/Beagle mix who is a roly-poly bundle of energy who has been at the shelter since early Sept. His former family had no time for him, so he’s growingup at the shelter while looking for a new home. To meet Bubby or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Breezy is a 1 1/2-year-old, spayed, DLH

with long luxurious black & orange fur. Her former family surrendered her due to allergies. She enjoys treats, playing with string and lounging on comfy chairs. To meet Breezy or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

BREEZY Kennel #A21524251

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

PIDDY - Missing Her Family

Piddy’s owner lost her home & job and had to give up her cats. Piddy is missing a warm lap, gentle strokes, and a best friend. She is sweet, calm and gentle. Piddy is about 5 years old/fully vetted. Call 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org.

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

PLACE YOUR AD ON GAMBIT’S NEW

Pet Emporium

LILLY

Fawn/Blonde Staffordshire Terrier 1-year-old, 50 pounds. Fully vetted & house trained. Loves leashed walks, car rides & snuggling on the couch & in bed. Call 504-975-5971 or 504-874-0598.

LIONEL

Bombay Kitten 6 mtonths Vetted/ Trained LOVER Short Black Coat 504975-5971.

MARY KATHERINE

Chinese Crested/Chihuahua, 2-yearsold, 10 lbs. Fully Vetted, spunky, silly, sweet! Call 504-975-5971.

MOLLY

Short Coat Calico, 9wks. KITTEN Vetted/Trained Talkative 504-975-5971.

PENELOPE

French Bulldog mix. Brindle Coat Vetted/Trained. Likes Kitties 504467-4282

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT

Featuring: • Pet Adoptions • Pet Boarding • Pet Grooming • Pet Hospitals • Pet Photos • Pet Sitting • Pet Supplies • Pet Training

And Much, Much More! Reach Over 177,000 Pet-Loving Readers Every Week! Call (504) 483-3100 or Your Account Executive for Information on Ad Sizes and Rates

Call (504) 483-3100

Southern Animal Foundation would like to welcome Dr. Christine Whatley Salvo to the staff. She will be joining Dr Craig Lamarsh and Dr Allyson Corr. Southern Animal Foundation is offering a

HOLIDAY SPECIAL Annuals for your dog are $99.00 and annuals for your cat are $69.00. This is a GREAT value. Call 504-671-8235 to schedule your appointment and meet our new Veterinarian.

1823 Magazine Street • 504-671-8235

To Advertise in

LACY

Pointer mix 7 months. Vetted/Trained Love Bug. Family Dog 504-358-3714. LADY Shepherd Terrier 2yrs. Perfect Family Dog/Trained. Vetted 504975-5971.

Bubby

Kasia is a precious 8-month-old kitten ready for a loving home. She is cute with a fun, loving personality. She would make a great addition to any family. Call 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org

FLAMBEAUX - Fluffy Lap Kitten

KENO

Weekly Tails

KASIA - Adorable Kitten


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS John Schaff CRS

NOLArealtor.com

Your Guide to New Orleans Homes & Condos

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

6728 Bellaire $499,000 Beautifully renovated in 2007. Wonderful for entertaining!! Natural cork floors, chef’s kitchen w/Viking stovetop & double ovens. Beautiful backyard w/large in-ground pool. Currently 3 BR, could easily be converted to 4 BR.

pending 1750 St. Charles #428 $309,000 St. Charles Avenue’s most prominent address. Spacious 2BR condo w/wonderful view of courtyard. Beautiful wd flrs, granite cnttrtps, ss appl., State of the art fitness center. Rooftop terrace w/incredible views. Secured o/s pkng.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

94

TREME BEAUTY

PIED-À-TERRE

(c) 504.343.6683 (o) 504.895.4663

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

new listing

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 90

More than just a Realtor!

• 1750 St. Charles #630 (2Bdrm/2Ba) ... TOO LATE! $389,000 • 905 Aline (3Bdrm/2Ba) ................... TOO LATE! $339,000 • 536 Soniat .......................................... TOO LATE! $329,000 • 760 Magazine ................................... TOO LATE! $239,000 • 4941 St. Charles (5Bdrm/3Ba) ... TOO LATE! $1,900,000 • 3638 Magazine (Commercial) ..... TOO LATE! $649,000 • 1750 St. Charles #442 ........................ TOO LATE! $229,000 • 1215 Napoleon (3Bdrm/2.5Ba) ....... TOO LATE! $899,000 • 1225 Chartres (2Bdrm/1Ba) ........... TOO LATE! $289,000 • 13 Platt (3Bdrm/2Ba) ...................... TOO LATE! $309,000 • 601 Baronne (2Br/2Ba) ................ TOO LATE! $489,000 • 1224 St. Charles (1Bdrm/1Ba) .... TOO LATE! $169,000 • 1602 S. Carrollton .......................... TOO LATE! $849,000 • 1750 St. Charles #502 .................. TOO LATE! $319,000

2226 URSULINE AVE.

1525 CLIO # 5

ANTEBELLUM TREME BEAUTY. Built in 1855 this home features a grand stairway, large porch, elegant iron work and classic facade. 4-plex with guest cottage. Fully rented. 12 ft ceilings, heart of pine floors, side yard, off street parking. Lush tropical front garden. Excellent property for investors and/or owner/occupant. $399,000

CONDO IN HISTORIC HOME. Well maintained 1 BR condo features high ceilings, original heart of pine floors, beautiful mantle. Lots of natural light. Kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters and gas range. Side balcony and common deck. Centrally located, easy access to Uptown, Downtown, CBD, I-10, GNO Bridge and French Quarter. $155,000 ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRS

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.


Holiday Helpers

• Gifts • Jobs • Events

Fleur de Lis Glass Ornaments December 5th thru 23rd Monday-Saturday 11am - 5 pm 3000 Royal Street in the Bywater 504.945.1878

VILLAGE Creating Smiles in the Childhood Memories of Adults

Give the gift of volunteering this holiday season! Volunteer Volunteer your your time time at at Canon Canon Hospice. Hospice. Call Call Paige Paige today today to to fifind nd out out about about all all of of the the many many opportunities! opportunities! 818-2723 818-2723 x3006 x3006

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SALE 50% OFF

Happy Holidays!

LARGE SELECTION OF

BLACK & GOLD & PURPLE & GOLD

CHRISTMAS ITEMS 4501 VETERANS BLVD. METAIRIE 504-888-7254

Everything for your Christmas Tree & under it too!

Crescent City Designs has GREAT GIFT IDEAS! CUSTOMIZED BOAT PADDLES

CUSTOMIZED FLEUR DE LIS MAGNETS

Your Ad Would Look Great Here!

SEWERAGE & WATER BOARD TABLE (All Aluminum)

Call Darin Zech at

(608) 393-4314 or betheldfndr@aol.com Tables are one-of-a-kind. Tables shown are for display only.

We Provide Media Blasting and Other Fabrication Services

Call now! 504.483.3100

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 17 > 2013

CUSTOMIZED TABLE

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Gambit New Orleans December 17, 2013