Issuu on Google+

PAGE

16

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

GA MBI T > VO LUME 3 4 > NUMBER 5 0 > D EC EMBER 1 0 > 2 013

.COM

THE SCRAMBLE

FOR SHERIFF

PAGE

35

REVIEW: NEW ORLEANS

CAKE CAFE

PAGE

37

TALKING TIKI WITH

‘BEACHBUM’ BERRY


BULLETIN BOARD CLASSIFIEDS

504-891-6400

CONSULT WITH THE REAL ESTATE EXPERTS OF NEW ORLEANS

THANK YOU FOR VOTING FRANCHER PERRIN GROUP THE #1 REALTOR IN THE CITY!

We love our hospice volunteers and are always looking for new additions to our wonderful team! Our hospice volunteers are special people who can make a difference in the lives of those affected by terminal illness. We would like to announce a new exciting track for those interested in a future medical career. Many physicians and nurses received their first taste of the medical field at Canon. If you would like to be become a hospice volunteer and work with our patients and families, please call today!

To Volunteer Call Paige

504-818-2723 ext. 3006

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Voted “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 10 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers.” New student special: 10 classes for $60. www.wildlotusyoga.com - 899-0047.

2

L. BRYAN FRANCHER

251-6400

625 Dauphine - French Quarter ............................ $2,995,000 927-41 Julia St. ................................................ SOLD $2,715,000 620 Conti ........................................................... SOLD $2,330,000 2228 St Charles Ave. - Gard Dist Centerhall ... SOLD $2,314,000 340 S Diamond St - Warehouse Dist ............ SOLD $1,195,000 730 St. Philip C - French Quarter .................. SOLD $1,140,000 924 Burgundy .................................................... SOLD $1,000,000 4501 & 07 Tchoupitoulas - Comm ..................... SOLD $925,000 5111 Pitt - Uptown ..............................................SOLD $760,000 4020 Prytania - Uptown ................................ SOLD $645,000 5005 Laurel - Uptown .................................... SOLD $575,000 2211 Napoleon - Uptown ................ SALE PENDING $565,000 2918 Esplanade Ave. ...................................... SOLD $525,000 4832 Camp - Uptown ...................................... SOLD $520,000 3130 DeSoto - Bayou St. John ........................... SOLD $500,000 4621-23 Laurel St. - Uptown ............ SALE PENDING $499,000 818 Congress St. - Bywater ......................................... $475,000 3016 Laurel St. - Irish Channel ......................... SOLD $410,000 4822 Chestnut - Uptown .............................. SOLD $400,000 822 Louisa - Bywater ...................................... SOLD $399,000 1801 Burgundy ............................................................... $329,000 3915 Constance ............................................................... $299,000 2529 Danbury Dr. ........................................................... $178,000 2124 Seventh St. ............................................................... $149,000

www.FrancherPerrin.com

LESLIE PERRIN

722-5820

BAD TRAFFIC RECORD/TICKETS? MAY COST YOU INSURANCE DOLLARS CALL ATTORNEY DOMINICK SAVONA, JR. 504-366-3551 EXT. 14 CREATIVE CONCEPTS BEAUTY SALON HOLIDAY SPECIAL! Relaxer, Retouch with Haircut and/or Demi Permanent Color, ONLY $55. Regularly $80. Expires Jan. 31, 2014. CALL (504) 931-6570. DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Gene Redmann, 504-834-6430. FURNITURE TAXI (We move furniture) 504-390-9237 GET A POWERFUL RESUME You Can Get a Better Job! STRATEGIC RESUMES GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 504-891-7222 Metairie 504-835-7558

to place your ad on the

For “TRAVEL LOVERS” Only

HERMAN MHIRE

“ICELAND”

DECEMBER 7 - 15, 2013 OPENING: SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 6-8 PM

Immerse yourself in our 2014 Summer Packages from New Orleans!

MELISSA BONIN GALLERY 3714 MAGAZINE STREET NEW ORLEANS, LA 70115

Experience

-idyllic, indulging, intrepid -invigorating, inviting, iridescent

Proudly presented by CARLA GALLO TRAVEL of New Orleans Celebrating over 25 years of “crafting” dream trips worldwide

Tel-504-524-4848 email europe74@aol.com

SEE OUR FULL AD ON PAGE 88 MAKES A GREAT X-MAS GIFT!

PERMANENT MAKEUP GRAND OPENING Call Today for a FREE Consultation agelessbeautymandeville.com Rhonda cell (662) 647-4752 GET HIRED FASTER! Use 21st Century Search Skills New Orleans #1 Career Coach GRANT COOPER, CareerPro New Orleans 504.891.7222 Metairie 504.835.7558 PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR MIGNON FAGET JEWELRY DIAMONDS, ROLEX, OLD U.S. COINS CHRIS’S FINE JEWELRY, 3304 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE CALL (504) 833-2556. LEARN TO SEW - $10-$15 PER HOUR Courses for Beginners & Advance Sewers. Adults & Children 11 & Up Call Carolina Gallop @ 504-931-7779 for info. or email carolinagallop@gmail.com Alteration services also provided. Benefiting All Souls Tutoring Program.

PH O TO G R APH S

THE GALLERY WILL BE OPEN FROM 11 AM - 5:30 PM ON DECEMBER 7 AND DECEMBER 12-15, AND BY APPOINTMENT www.hermanmhire.com

to place your ad on the

BULLETIN BOARD CALL 483-3100

BULLETIN BOARD call 483-3100


3385-MBNOgetingameGambit_3385-MBNOgetingameGambit 9/11/13 4:49 PM Page 1

Jamie Moll President/General Manager

Jim Henderson Sportscaster

Christopher Stuben General Sales Manager

“There’s something that gets fans excited........RIGHT HERE… IN NEW ORLEANS…. RIGHT NOW! IT’S THE BEGINNING OF A FANTASTIC SEASON WITH INCREDIBLE OFFERINGS! And its only at Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans. “GET IN THE GAME” Tom Benson Owner

of New Orleans

mbofno.com 3727 Veterans Boulevard Metairie, LA • 504-456-3727 Service open on Saturdays

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Get in the Game!

3


CONTENTS

STAFF Publisher | MARGO DUBOS Associate Publisher | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER

December 10, 2013

EDITORIAL Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | MISSY WILKINSON Staff Writer | ALEX WOODWARD Editorial Assistant | MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY Feature Writer | JEANIE RIESS Contributing Writers

+

Volume 34

+

Number 50

JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, SCOTT GOLD, GUS KATTENGELL, KEN KORMAN, BRENDA MAITLAND, NORA MCGUNNIGLE, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

Editorial Intern | LAUREN HARTMAN

PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Senior Graphic Designer | LYN VICKNAIR Graphic Designers | PAIGE HINRICHS, JULIET MEEKS, DAVID KROLL, JASON WHITTAKER Pre-Press Coordinator | KATHRYN BRADY

DISPLAY ADVERTISING fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 [sandys@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140 [micheles@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Coordinator | CHRISTIN GREEN 483-3138 [christing@gambitweekly.com] Events Coordinator | BRANDIN DUBOS 483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | JILL GIEGER 483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] Account Executives

37 ON THE COVER Light, Camera, Action ..........................................19 How Lightwire Theater has grown into a global company

JEFFREY PIZZO

483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDA LACHIN

483-3142 [lindal@gambitweekly.com] SHANNON HINTON KERN

483-3144 [shannonk@gambitweekly.com] KRISTIN HARTENSTEIN

483-3141 [kristinh@gambitweekly.com] KELLIE LANDECHE

483-3143 [kelliel@gambitweekly.com]

MARKETING

Marketing & Digital Assistant | ANNIE BIRNEY Marketing Interns | RYAN MCGUIRE, CAITLIN MILLER

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

4

483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified Advertising Director | RENETTA PERRY 483-3122 [renettap@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | CARRIE MICKEY LACY 483-3121 [carriel@gambitweekly.com]

BUSINESS Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller | GARY DIGIOVANNI Assistant Controller | MAUREEN TREGRE Credit Officer | MJ AVILES

OPERATIONS & EVENTS

7 IN SEVEN

Seven Things to Do This Week........................... 5 A John Waters Christmas, Running of the Santas and more

NEWS + VIEWS

News.............................................................................7 District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro on how his office is attempting to fight New Orleans’ domestic violence problem Bouquets & Brickbats ...........................................7 This week’s heroes and zeroes C’est What? ................................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll Scuttlebutt...............................................................10 News briefs from all over Commentary............................................................15 Mary Landrieu’s dilemma Politics/Clancy DuBos .........................................16 The race for Orleans Parish Sheriff

Operations & Events Director | LAURA CARROLL Operations Assistant | KELLAN DUNIGAN

50

PULLOUT

SHOPPING + STYLE

CUE .................................................................. PULLOUT Snowflake dressing and urban lumberjacks Holiday Gift Guide................................................. 27 Wrappers’ delights What’s in Store ......................................................33 Zeus’ Place

EAT + DRINK

Review ......................................................................35 New Orleans Cake Cafe Fork + Center ...........................................................35 All the news that’s fit to eat 3-Course Interview .............................................37 Tiki expert Jeff “Beachbum” Berry Drinks ........................................................................39 Beer Buzz and Wine of the Week Last Bites ..................................................................41 Foodie calendar, 5 in Five, Off the Menu

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

A&E News .................................................................49 Snapping a look at PhotoNOLA Music .........................................................................50 PREVIEW: Cat Power

Film.............................................................................54 REVIEW: The Armstrong Lie Art ...............................................................................58 REVIEW: The Great Picture Stage..........................................................................62 REVIEW: Charles Busch REVIEW: Nocturnes (I-III) Events .......................................................................67 Crossword + Sudoku ...........................................84

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place ........................................................... 72 Pet Adopt-A-Thon .................................................. 74 Employment ........................................................... 77 Home + Garden .......................................................78 Legal Notices..........................................................79 Mind + Body + Spirit ..............................................80 Services....................................................................80 Picture Perfect Properties.................................81 Real Estate .............................................................82

GAMBIT COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Chairman | CLANCY DUBOS + President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS

COVER DESIGN BY Dora Sison COVER PHOTO BY Zack Smith

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2013 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

811 Conti St. • 504-523-8619

Monday-Sunday 10am-6am erinrosebar.com


seven things to do in seven days

Running of the Santas

The Yule jog starts at the South Pole (Barcadia, 601 Tchoupitoulas St.) at 9 a.m. and makes its way to the North Pole (Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive). During the day, there’s live music, a costume contest and more at stops in the Warehouse District. Visit www.runningofthesantas.com for information.

David Dondero with Barton Carroll and Narcissy

Tue. Dec. 10 | Barton Carroll is best known as an integral part of Eric Bachmann’s Crooked Fingers band, but the Seattle-based singer/guitarist has branched further out on each of his four solo albums since 2006. His latest and best, Avery County, I’m Bound to You (Skybucket), surveys the blue ridges and great smoky valleys of his native North Carolina. Narcissy opens and David Dondero headlines at 10 p.m. at Circle Bar.

John Waters Christmas

Tue. Dec. 10 | In Female Trouble, filmmaker John Waters (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray) memorably presented all the high and dashed hopes of a Baltimore teen’s (Divine) Christmas wish for cha-cha heels. The director/artist recounts his favorite holiday tales and obsessions in a very blue Christmas tribute. At 8 p.m. at Civic Theatre.

Anton, Neko, Kuri

Thu. & Sat. Dec. 12 & 14 | Tokyo alternative theater company Faifai’s multimedia drama follows a sick cat, Anton, as he

observes and documents his neighborhood. At 8 p.m. Thursday and 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Contemporary Arts Center.

Vespers of 1610

Thu.-Sat. Dec. 12-14 | Claudio Monteverdi’s Vespers is a collection of religious hymns in Latin presented here by the New Resonance Orchestra, 12 singers and 12 dancers. At 8 p.m. at Marigny Opera House.

Aaron Neville

Sun. Dec . 15 | In recent years, Aaron Neville has released albums of gospel (I Know I’ve Been Changed) and doo-wop tunes (My True Story). He presents a holiday concert at 8 p.m. at the Civic Theatre.

The Grasshoppers with Aurora Nealand and Blind Texas Marlin

Sun. Dec. 15 | Dave Fera’s reliable, cyclical canon (Mahayla, Big Blue Marble) gets a new update with the Grasshoppers, featuring New Orleans rock scenesters Ike Aguilar, Adam Campagna, Sam Craft and Jason Songe. Blind Texas Marlin and Aurora Nealand open at 9 p.m. at Siberia.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

DEC

5


6

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


NEWS +

VIEWS

BOUQUETS + brickbats ™ heroes + zeroes

S C U T T L EB U T T 10 C O M M EN TA RY 15 C L A N C Y 16

knowledge is power

More domestic help

The New Orleans criminal justice system is trying new approaches to combat the city’s domestic violence problem. How are the courts dealing with the cases? By Alex Woodward

raised $225,000 in donations and pledges for the New Orleans shelter that provides services to at-risk and homeless young people. Ninety-three people spent the night at the shelter Nov. 14 to raise the funds. Covenant House serves more than 100 people daily and provides food, clothing, counseling, job training and other resources.

That move upset Municipal Court judges, who said the state’s backlog of misdemeanor domestic violence cases choked the dockets and exhausted the staff. Cannizzaro says the move has, in many cases, been more efficient, in part because cases no longer languish on long Criminal Court dockets. According to Cannizzaro, “Time is the enemy” in domestic violence cases, where the victim — whose testimony is integral to a conviction — often fears retribution from his or her spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend, or losing the parent of his or her children along with financial support. According to Cannizzaro, misdemeanor domestic violence offenses (including simple battery) have a greater and faster chance of coming before a judge in Municipal Court. “It’s freshest in (a victim’s) mind — the fear, the pain and all of that is still present,” he said. “We’ve maintained prosecutions of those cases in Municipal Court for the misdemeanor charges … and we still prosecute the felony cases for the felony charges — the felony batteries, the attempted murders, the strangulations, cases like that — in state court. The big challenge is trying to keep the victims engaged.” Cannizzaro says his office inside the FJC has helped victims stay involved with their cases. “They see that as a place they can go rather than have to come to an office or wait for a phone call from an assistant or an investigator,” he said. The DA has five prosecutors and a supervisor inside its domestic violence office, as well as victim and witness counselors and investigators.

James “Jimmy” Coleman Jr.,

president of the board of directors of the National Coast Guard Museum Association, received the Spirit of Hope Award at a ceremony at the Pentagon Library in Washington, D.C., Nov. 19. The New Orleans resident was among award recipients representing each branch of the military.

Steve Dicharry,

executive director of the Louisiana Community Development Authority, spent tens of thousands of public dollars on liquor, personal travel, dental work and various luxuries — using the agency’s credit card. In a Nov. 27 report, WVUE-TV’s Lee Zurik revealed Dicharry’s spending after reviewing four years’ worth of records. Dicharry’s annual salary is about $148,000.

PAGE 9

c’est

?

The Federal Communications Commission is reconsidering its prohibition against cellphone calls on airplanes. What do you think?

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

86%

Keep the ban

14%

Lift the ban

THIS WEEK’S Question: Gov. Bobby Jindal turned down the Medicaid expansion option under the Affordable Care Act. What do you think?

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Annual snapshots of Louisiana’s domestic violence rate reveal it is routinely in the top 10 states for domestic violence homicides. The Violence Policy Center’s (VPC) 2011 report showed Louisiana with the ninth-highest rate of domestic homicides that year (from No. 4 in 2010). The report, which used FBI murder statistics, tracked women killed by men in incidents with one victim and one offender. Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence Director Beth Meeks said the VPC’s strict ranking formula leaves out dozens more deaths related to domestic violence, including incidents with multiple victims. In its response to the VPC report, the coalition wrote that Louisiana saw a 16 percent increase in domestic violence homicides from 2010 to 2011. In New Orleans, NOPD and criminal and civil courts handle thousands of domestic violence-related cases annually. So far this year, NOPD has arrested or has warrants for more than 2,000 people on domestic violence charges. In 2010, Cannizzaro began moving misdemeanor cases from Orleans Parish Criminal District Court into Municipal Court in an attempt to focus on felony cases. (In 2009, Cannizzaro began trying misdemeanor domestic violence cases in Criminal District Court, where some cases spent as much 18 months on the docket. Those cases returned to Municipal Court under the DA’s charge. The city’s domestic violence code broadly covers domestic violence, including dating, LGBT and stalking violence, rather than a single offender against the opposite sex, as defined in the state statute.)

donated $25,000 to LSU Health Sciences Center to benefit cancer research. The donation came from proceeds from the annual Krewe du Cure event held at Harrah’s New Orleans casino Sept. 14. The foundation has donated more than $800,000 to cancer research, and the Alvin C. Copeland/Cancer Crusaders Endowed Chair in Neuroendocrine Cancer was established at the LSU Health Sciences Center in 2011.

Covenant House sleepout participants

T

he New Orleans Family Justice Center (FJC) occupies a second floor of the U.S. Post Office building on Loyola Avenue. It houses 15 agencies, including a 24-hour crisis line, legal clinics and mental health counselors — and it’s home base for not only the New Orleans Police Department’s (NOPD) domestic violence unit detectives, but also the Orleans Parish district attorney’s domestic violence prosecutors. The center receives 11,000 calls on its crisis line each year and directly serves more than 1,200 people who enter the office. (Executive Director Mary Claire Landry said FJC likely will help nearly 1,500 people in 2013.) Those departments share a quiet floor with comfortable offices (several decorated with flowers), and that proximity, according to Orleans Parish District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro, helps his office pursue — and keep together — cases against domestic violence offenders. While a network of agencies, including the FJC and the New Orleans Health Department, provide much-needed resources to victims and families, Cannizzaro and the courts are trying to find ways to keep families safe and offenders off the streets. “The resources are there,” Cannizzaro told Gambit. “The prosecutors are there, an investigator is there, a police officer is there — we can do a lot of the work in building the case all under one roof.”

The Al Copeland Foundation

7


8

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


NEWS VIEWS PAGE 7

only a probation, it can be revoked on a second offense, leaving something “hanging over their head.” “If we show there has been some act of violence, then the judge may certainly consider that second charge more seriously than otherwise,” Cannizzaro said. So far this year (through November 2013), 736 people have applied for petitions for protection from abuse — though only 191, about 26 percent, received protective orders from those petitions, according to Patricia Glorioso, a domestic violence coordinator at Civil District Court. There were more than 3,000 protective orders issued in 2012. Tania Tetlow, director of Tulane University’s domestic violence clinic, told Gambit that many people seeking those protective orders typically do so without an attorney. Civil District Court Judge Bernadette D’Souza — who was elected last year as the city’s first domestic section judge handling domestic cases exclusively — holds civil protection order hearings in her court daily. D’Souza says the 26 percent figure is misleading, because if the petition “on its face rises to the level of family violence,” then the court will grant a temporary restraining order, which grants a 15-day window where the defendant has to be served. If he or she isn’t served, the case doesn’t go forward.” Prior to her election last year, D’Souza worked for Southeast Legal Services, which assists with filing protective orders from its office within the FJC. “Normally if you get a civil injunction from a court, if you violate it you may be in contempt of court, but the police aren’t going to arrest you,” Tetlow said. “With a protective order, it’s a crime to violate them. The advantage is you don’t have to wait for an abuser to come and beat you up again. If he’s outside your door you can call the police and they have the power to arrest him.” D’Souza said within her court, “safety is really paramount.” D’Souza often sees abuse in her court involving children, whom she calls the “silent witnesses” in domestic violence cases. “Family violence often tends to create a toxic stress,” she said. “They have to deal with it day in and day out.” Despite efforts to put domestic violence offenders behind bars, Cannizzaro said, “This is not about trying to destroy families or break families up. … We certainly want to provide services to the victims and to women to get them the things they need, to maintain a healthy household for their children. “It’s about trying to get families back together … in a peaceful and nonviolent setting, which is conducive to raising children, so the violence does not beget violence.” For an earlier report on Louisiana’s domestic violence, see “Domestic Help,” Gambit, Nov. 19, or visit www.bestofneworleans.com/dv.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

“If the victim stays with us, and she wants to cooperate, her word, her testimony, is going to be the best evidence,” Cannizzaro said. “She may make a 911 call. Those are recorded. We can play the 911 call. If she is bruised, we can take photos of that. If the officer notices bruises, cutting, bleeding, those photos can be taken if the officer notices that.” In cases where witnesses don’t want to cooperate or get involved, the DA will proceed with the evidence that remains. That approach contrasts with a series of domestic violence cases in 2009 and 2010 that preceded Cannizzaro’s move to Municipal Courts. In 2009, Criminal District Court Judge Keva Landrum-Johnson sentenced Damian Jordan to a five-year suspended sentence for burglary and battery of his girlfriend. Though Jordan’s rap sheet included prior misdemeanor battery charges in Municipal Court, LandrumJohnson viewed Jordan as a first-time offender in Criminal Court. He spent 21 days in jail — then shot and killed his uncle’s girlfriend, her children and her sister. In 2010, Todd Fussell pleaded guilty to domestic battery, a misdemeanor, for punching his ex-girlfriend. LandrumJohnson gave him a suspended sixmonth sentence — but two weeks later, he broke into his ex-girlfriend’s home and stabbed her. Landrum-Johnson revoked his probation, which meant he had only the six-month sentence that earlier had been suspended. Also in 2010: Criminal District Court Magistrate Commissioner Marie Bookman dropped Alfred Andrews’ domestic battery charge; days later, Andrews killed his wife, her mother and her sister. Criminal District Court Judge Frank Marullo criticized the DA’s office for the domestic violence misdemeanor caseloads after Marullo acquitted Deante Brumfield of domestic violence battery, despite a videotape showing Brumfield punching his ex-girlfriend on a streetcar. The DA denies that judges are not made aware of a felony offender’s misdemeanor rap sheets. Cannizzaro said it’s not uncommon for attorneys in Municipal Court to follow cases to Tulane and Broad, and in most cases, offenders have histories of domestic violence before even approaching a felony charge. “We may well charge him with the felony offense but let the judge know, make the judge aware of his background prior to the imposition of his sentencing if we’re successful in convicting him,” Cannizzaro said. “Certainly we’re going to let the judge know about the background even at the time of arrest, even if he comes before the magistrate for the bond hearing. We have had occasions, unfortunately, where the judges have not taken the case seriously, they have given them a very low bond, and unfortunately experienced circumstances where the perpetrator will go out and kill the victim.” Though it’s uncommon, the DA may reduce charges to “salvage some conviction,” knowing that if the defendant gets

9


SCUTTLEBUTT Quotes of the week

“Many good friends and supporters have encouraged me to run for Governor in 2015 — to bring my focus and leadership to the challenges we face as a state. We started to consider this as a family over Thanksgiving. We certainly haven’t made our decision yet, so we’ll be reflecting and praying on it very carefully through the Christmas holidays. As we do, please keep us in your thoughts and prayers. And of course, please offer any insights you have.” — Sen. David Vitter in a Dec. 4 email to supporters, confirming what political watchers have long thought he would do.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

“Whatever you decide, we have your website waiting for you.” — The Louisiana Democratic Party on Twitter, promoting its new anti-Vitter website, www.vitterforgovernor. com. As of press time, it was more of a placeholder than an indictment of David Vitter, featuring only a goofy picture of the senator and a photo of him next to some dead alligators on a swamp hunt.

Looking to use your Flex Plan dollars? Look no further than St. Charles Vision. You can use your prepaid FSA dollars for prescription eyewear, sunglasses, eye care and contact lenses, and at St. Charles Vision we carry a wide selection of exclusive eyewear from the world’s most innovative and iconic designers. Don’t let your FSA dollars expire— make an appointment today to see our experienced Doctors of Optometry at one of our six convenient locations. UPTOWN

504.866.6311

ELMWOOD

504.733.0406

SEVERN

504.887.2020

MANDEVILLE 985.626.8103

CHATEAU

504.712.3551

WESTBANK 504.328.9733

www.stcharlesvision.com

We treat all foot conditions including: Ingrown Toenails Ankle Sprains Corns & Callus Removal Bunions • Fungus Hammertoes Diabetic Foot Care Dr. Maria Markiewicz, DPM Dr. Leon T. Watkins, DPW, FACFAS Heel Pain • Injuries Dr. D. Elaine Fulmer, DPM Arch Problems

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 www.gulfsouthfootandankle.com

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

10

“A bright light has gone out but millions of candles of courage & hope were lit by his remarkable life that will burn for generations to come.” — U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, shortly after the announcement of the death of South African leader Nelson Mandela Dec. 5. Mandela, who spent decades in prison in his fight against Apartheid before becoming South Africa’s president, was 95.

They do declare

Candidates line up for February election

Several people whose names are expected to appear on the Feb. 1 ballot held their official kickoffs last week, including Orleans Parish School Board President Ira Thomas, who has announced his intention to challenge Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman (for more on the race, see Clancy DuBos’ “Politics,” p. 16). Thomas made his announcement Dec. 5 at the Reserve of Orleans banquet hall in the 7th Ward. The other declared candidate in that race is former Sheriff Charles Foti, who held the office just before Gusman. As of press time, New Orleans City Council Vice President Stacy Head, who holds one of the council’s two at-large seats, was scheduled to make her campaign announcement Dec. 7 at the Pavilion of the Two Sisters in New Orleans City Park. Her only announced challenger is Eugene Green, a former chief of staff for former U.S. Rep. William Jeffer-


NEWS VIEWS

Landrieu council coalition at risk Race for Palmer’s seat is wide open

Mayor Mitch Landrieu may face an easy race for another four years in office as the week of qualifying opens, but his City Council majority appears to be on the bubble on the eve of citywide elections. Two of the mayor’s consistent council allies — at-Large Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson and District D Councilwoman Cynthia Hedge-Morrell — are termlimited. Clarkson was expected to retire from public office when her term ends in May, but now she’s being courted to run for her old District C seat in the

wake of District Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer’s decision not to run for a second term. Hedge-Morrell is running for Clarkson’s at-large seat, but she faces at least one major challenger: attorney Jason Williams. The 41-year-old Williams ran a strong race for district attorney in 2008, finishing third. He also is the son-in-law of former Mayor Sidney Barthelemy. It will be interesting to see if Landrieu gets involved in that contest. The other at-large council member, Stacy Head, is not term-limited. Head, who is not a Landrieu ally, is expected to face eastern New Orleans businessman Eugene Green, and possibly others, but she is expected to hold her seat. Palmer’s announcement last week further complicates the mayor’s council politics. Palmer, who has been an ally of the mayor, would have been the favorite had she chosen to seek a second term from District C. Until her decision not to run again, Palmer faced only one challenger: former Civil Court Judge (and one-time mayoral candidate) Nadine Ramsey. With Palmer out of the running, the field is expected to grow significantly. Others reportedly looking at the race include Clarkson, state Rep. Jeff Arnold (who previously said he would not run — but that was when Palmer was expected to run again), Algiers attorney and City Planning Commission Chairman Craig Mitchell, and attorney D’Juan Hernandez, president of the Algiers Economic Development Foundation — and brother-in-law to state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson. On other council fronts, District A Councilwoman Susan Guidry, District B Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell and District E Councilman James Gray were set to qualify this week. As of late last week, none had drawn major opponents. While Hedge-Morrell is giving up the District D seat because of term limits, that seat could remain in the Morrell political family. State Rep. Jared Brossett, who got his political start as a City Hall aide to Hedge-Morrell, appeared to be the leading candidate to succeed her as of last week. If he wins, it’s unclear if he will be as closely aligned with Landrieu as Hedge-Morrell has been. Like other members of the city’s legislative delegation, Brossett sometimes had differences with the mayor. Of course, once qualifying opens on Wednesday (Dec. 11), anything can — and probably will — happen. Candidates have until 5 p.m. Friday (Dec. 13) to qualify. — CLANCY DUBOS

Oyster marquee ornament $40

Celebrate the holidays with gifts inspired by New Orleans from

The Shop at The Collection REGUL AR SHOP HOURS Tuesday–Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Sunday: 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Keeping Templeman open Cantrell’s motion provides extended housing for some inmates

The New Orleans City Council closed its Dec. 5 regular meeting with an old topic — a discussion of the size of PAGE 13

533 Royal Street in the French Quarter (504) 598-7147

S P E C I A L M O N D AY H O U R S December 16: noon–4:30 p.m. December 23: 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Shop anytime at www.hnoc.org/shop!

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

son. Green announced last summer he would run for an at-large position. Under the city’s new election law, candidates must declare for one of the two at-large council seats. With City Council President Jackie Clarkson leaving her at-large seat in the spring because of term limits, most of the at-large contenders are expected to run for her soon-to-be-empty seat rather than challenge incumbent Head. Among those who have said they’re likely to enter the race: District D Councilwoman Cynthia Hedge-Morrell (who is term-limited out of her current position), former interim District E Councilman Freddie Charbonnet, and defense attorney Jason Williams, who ran for district attorney in 2008. Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer said last week she would not run for re-election in District C, a diverse district that covers Algiers, the French Quarter, the Faubourg Marigny and parts of Mid-City and Bywater. That left the field wide open for the only formally declared candidate so far, former judge Nadine Ramsey, who also ran for mayor in 2010. State Rep. Jeff Arnold, D-Algiers, who was known to be considering the District C race, announced last month he would not run. Now, he says, “I never say never.” A possible wild card is Clarkson, who is term-limited as an atlarge candidate but who reportedly has been besieged with calls in the wake of Palmer’s announcement. Clarkson was first elected to the council as a District C representative in 1990, but lost her bid for re-election in 1994 to Troy Carter, who bested Clarkson by fewer than 100 votes. She returned as District C representative from 2002 to 2006, then won her current at-large seat. If Clarkson changes her mind about retirement and jumps into the race for District C, she would be an immediate frontrunner and inject a note of interest into a municipal ballot with few surprises so far. Qualifying for all races is this week: Wednesday through Friday (Dec. 11-13). The primary is Feb. 1, 2014, with a runoff if necessary March 15, 2014. — KEVIN ALLMAN

11


12

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


#1 - Gambit - 12/04/13

NEWS VIEWS [MORE SCUT TLEBUT T] PAGE 11

Boar-ing down … with drones

Fighting Louisiana’s ‘outlaw quadrupeds’

Drones were in the news last week after a Dec. 1 60 Minutes report on Amazon.com’s plan to use drones to deliver packages — but a more interesting and less speculative use for the unmanned flying vehicles appeared in The Economist: the use of drones to eradicate feral hogs. A group called Louisiana Hog Control is using drones with heat-seeking cameras and laser pointers to pinpoint the location of wild pigs, which are then shot on the ground by hunters. The group’s slogan: “We Fly — Pigs Die.” The drones, which are called Dehogifliers, have come under fire by some environmentalists. The state of Colorado is considering a ban on “the use of drones (unmanned aerial vehicles) as an aid in scouting, hunting and taking

of wildlife.” In Louisiana, however, hogs are not protected game; unlike many other wild animals, state law allows them to be “taken year-round during legal daylight shooting hours by holders of a valid hunting license,” according to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, which classifies them as “outlaw quadrupeds.” In 2011, the state amended the law against outlaw quadrupeds, allowing night hunting “with or without the aid of artificial light, infrared or laser sighting devices, or night vision devices.” That law was passed because hogs are blamed for destroying crops, wetlands, levees and beneficial wildlife, and they breed quickly, presenting a problem for farmers and rural landowners, particularly in Texas and Louisiana. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department estimates there are 1.5 million feral hogs in Texas, and they’re an increasing problem in southeast Louisiana parishes as well — including Orleans Parish. Last month, WWL-TV broadcast video of feral hogs running through the New Orleans City Park golf course. — KEVIN ALLMAN

“THE GHOST WHISPERER”

BETTER THAN EZRA

DECEMBER 30

JAMES VAN PRAAGH JANUARY 25 TICKETS ON SALE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM!

Scuttlebits

All the news that doesn’t fit

• The Louisiana National Guard has not been able to handle benefit enrollment requests for same-sex couples due to wording in the state constitution — despite a new federal law that allows same-sex couples to obtain benefits. Last week, a workaround was found: Some employees at state National Guard sites will now enjoy federal status when it comes to handling the paperwork … • Kenneth Polite Jr. was officially invested as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana at a Dec. 5 ceremony in New Orleans. State Supreme Court Chief Justice Bernette Johnson handled the honors, while U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder spoke beforehand. Sen. Mary Landrieu was also on hand; Sen. David Vitter, who did not support Polite’s nomination but made no move to block it, did not attend … • State Sen. Dan Claitor, R-Baton Rouge, announced his intention to join the race for Louisiana’s 6th Congressional District, and did so with a bang. “I don’t want Louisiana to become the focus of the national media because we have extremists running for a particular office,” he told The Times-Picayune — taking a direct swipe at former state representative and current Family Research Council head Tony Perkins, who has said he’s mulling the race. The seat is being vacated by Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-Baton Rouge, who is challenging Sen. Mary Landrieu in next year’s U.S. Senate race. — KEVIN ALLMAN

METER MEN

FEBRUARY 28

For ticket information: 800-745-3000 Ticketmaster.com or harrahs.com. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Orleans Parish Prison (OPP). This time the impetus was Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman’s proposed expansion of the jail. The council passed a motion that will begin discussion in the City Planning Commission of whether the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office can keep open Templeman V — a temporary detention center —while it builds its new 1,438bed facility. The motion says Templeman V must close within 18 months of the end of construction of the new facility, and it will accommodate inmates with mental health and other medical needs. However, the new facility won’t have room to house those inmates, or inmates who have to remain separated from other inmates. Gusman proposes a stopgap for housing those particular inmates. According to the council motion, Templeman V, along with two other small (and temporary) facilities in the detention campus will be able to house 500 inmates. The motion also puts a cap on the jail’s total beds, reading, “In no event shall the total number of inmates housed outside the 1,438-bed facility exceed 500.” This would put the population of OPP closer to 2,000 (temporarily) than the 1,438 beds that were agreed upon — and written into city ordinance — in 2011, when the council authorized construction of a new prison. That lower number was recommended by a 2010 task force comprised of members of the New Orleans criminal justice community. The motion to keep Templeman open first passed the City Council’s Criminal Justice Committee on Dec. 3. District B Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell introduced the motion at Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s request. — ALEX WOODWARD

HARRAH’S THEATRE

13


ALL INCLUSIVE!

December 31, 2013 9:00pm - 2:00am Hyatt Regency New Orleans THIS INCREDIBLE EVENT FEATURES: • ENDLESS, FULL OPEN BARS • MASSIVE, Themed Party Areas GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

• Live Music From New Orleans’ own:

14

Cowboy Mouth • Kermit Ruffins

Flow Tribe • Brass-a-holics

Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band

• The Hottest DJs including DJ Mike Swift, DJ Raj Smoove DJ Lemonhead! • Performances by 610 Stompers Bustout Burlesque • First Class Cuisine • Huge Midnight Confetti Celebration • Party Favors, etc • Much, Much, More! © 2013 Scandinavian Tobacco Group Lane Ltd.

TICKETS & INFO:

www.bignightneworleans.com


#1 Gambit 11/26/13

COMMENTARY

thinking out loud

Real ‘social engineering’ conveniently omitting the fact that some of the money came from the Recovery Act he had derided. Thus, Jindal is not entirely allergic to federal funds when it suits his own political ends. Sadly, the map of states rejecting Medicaid expansion dovetails with the map of the states with the most health problems — Louisiana among them — and several are in the Deep South. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, a dermatologist, said recently, “I can’t think of anything worse right now than to have expanded Medicaid and have all these people on an entitlement program right now and for this entire thing to go under.” Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant proposes a $4.4 million transfer of state funds to offset the loss of federal funding, calling it a way to “weather the Obamacare storm.” There are two problems with that argument: Bryant would be robbing Peter to pay Paul (the money would come from somewhere else in Mississippi’s already-

The Magic of the Season Comes Alive

Jindal is not entirely allergic to federal funds when it suits his own ends. strapped state budget), and it’s far less than the nearly $1 billion his state is turning down. Jindal’s solution is no better. In an October interview with Fox News’ Chris Wallace, Jindal said bluntly, “We don’t need the government running our health care.” Just minutes later, when asked for his solution to the Louisiana health care crisis, Jindal told Wallace, “We’re the only state that has a state-operated network of charity hospitals. … We had 10 state-operated hospitals when I became governor.” What’s a state-operated hospital if not a form of government-run health care? And given that Jindal got his start in state government in 1996 as the director of Health & Hospitals, what does it say that Louisiana remains at or near the bottom of nearly every available wellness matrix? There is indeed some “social engineering” in health care, but in Jindal’s Louisiana, it’s Darwinian in nature. Only the strong (and wealthy) survive. Come Jan. 1, when Jindal passes up billions in Medicaid money — which some other Republican governors have managed to accept — we’ll see Jindalist social engineering in action. It won’t be pretty.

November 26 - January 6 Snowfall, dancing lights, a 30-foot tree and a larger-than-life Café Du Monde gingerbread house! Experience it all in the heart of downtown New Orleans on Fulton Street.

November 26 - December 21 Fridays & Saturdays, 6pm - 10pm Enjoy live entertainment, take photos with Santa, see the Reindeer, get crafty in Santa’s Workshop and kiss at Mistletoe Row. www.miracleonfulton.com #miracleonfulton FultonStreetNOLA @FultonStNOLA @fultonstnola

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

ast month, Arizona Sen. John McCain told Fox News’ Greta van Susteren that the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, is the “ultimate experiment in social engineering.” Never mind that nearly every other developed country in the world manages to provide health care to its citizens without falling under the yoke of socialism. Never mind that the version of Obamacare being rolled out is actually based on a 1989 plan from the ultra-conservative Heritage Foundation, which called on Americans to carry health insurance the same way drivers carry liability insurance. And never mind that “Obamacare” had a different name when then-Governor and later 2012 GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney enacted a version of it in Massachusetts in 2008, where it was nicknamed Romneycare. Like Obamacare, Romneycare needed a good amount of tweaking after its implementation. Some object to the Affordable Care Act on principle. For others, it’s more political, which brings us to Gov. Bobby Jindal. The governor has made his opposition to Obamacare plain — in speeches, on talk show appearances and in an increasing number of op-ed pieces, most of which he writes for the Beltway establishment he claims to distrust. Among Jindal’s arguments: Obamacare would cost too much for the citizens of Louisiana. But the true cost of health care is about to come due after Jan. 1. Twenty percent of Louisianans have no insurance at all — the fourth-highest percentage in the country. Under Obamacare, the feds are offering billions of dollars to help cover each state’s poorest residents — an extension of the Medicaid program, which has been part of the bedrock of the American health system for nearly 50 years. More than 200,000 of the poorest Louisianans could get coverage under this extension, but Jindal is hell-bent on turning it down. Why? Jindal says it would hand over too much control to the federal government and eventually cost Louisiana too much money. In truth, Medicaid expansion in Louisiana would be entirely paid for with federal funds for the first three years before a gradual, 10-year phase-in would result in a 90-10 split. Just to be clear, that’s 90 percent of the cost being picked up by the feds. We’ve seen this act from Jindal before. In 2009, the governor decried Obama’s Recovery Act, before turning around and quietly accepting $3.2 billion in federal Recovery Act funds. When he toured the state later that year handing out gigantic sweepstakes-like checks to the leaders of Louisiana parishes, Jindal put his own name on the checks as the payor —

15


CLANCY DUBOS

Follow Clancy on Twitter: @clancygambit

POLITICS

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

No cakewalk for Gusman

16

ith Mayor Mitch Landrieu expected to coast to re-election, the hottest race on the Feb. 1 ballot could be the contest for Orleans Parish sheriff. Qualifying for mayor, council, sheriff and other local offices in New Orleans runs Wednesday through Friday (Dec. 11-13). Incumbent Sheriff Marlin Gusman has done everything humanly possible to attract a bevy of major opponents, but so far only two have taken the bait: Charles Foti Jr., who held the sheriff’s job for 30 years before becoming the state attorney general in 2004; and school board president Ira Thomas, a former New Orleans police lieutenant who now serves as chief of security at Southern University New Orleans. State Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans, is also looking at the race, but he says he won’t decide until some time this week. The lack of a large field of challengers doesn’t mean Gusman’s re-election will be a cakewalk. All three men have strong personalities, and everyone expects a hardfought, in-your-face campaign. An October survey of New Orleans voters by University of New Orleans political scientist Ed Chervenak found 56 percent of voters disapproved of Gusman’s performance, while only 33 percent approved. More important, the strong voter disapproval of Gusman had no racial split: blacks as well as whites gave him low marks. Gusman has been the subject of scandal repeatedly in recent months. His jail is the subject of a federal consent decree and several civil lawsuits. A video shot inside the prison several years ago (and introduced as evidence in federal court) showed inmates partying, drinking, doing drugs and flashing a loaded handgun. The video went viral and is sure to surface again during the campaign. Several of Gusman’s former supervisors have been convicted on federal corruption charges. They are said to be cooperating in an ongoing investigation. Inmateon-inmate violence is commonplace, as are escapes.

All of which should make Gusman an easy target, but as qualifying week begins he remains the favorite. Though hardly a stemwinding campaigner, Gusman has one key edge over his opponents: money. Gusman’s latest campaign finance report, filed in November, showed him with almost $550,000 cash on hand. Foti’s last report, filed in FebruCharles ary (from his attorney Foti general’s campaign account), showed him with about $150,000; he says he plans to spend up to $400,000 in this race. Thomas’ latest report, also filed in February, showed him with zero in his account. He declined to say how much he plans to spend but said he is raising money for this contest. When he announced his re-election bid two weeks ago, Gusman anticipated criticism from his opponents — so he went on offense. Without mentioning Foti by name, Gusman said he “inherited a prison system with substandard, outdated physical facilities scattered over several blocks with a population of 6,000 inmates.” He repeated the “inherited” mantra several times in his announcement speech. Foti literally laughed at that. “Ten years he’s been in office,” Foti said. “I left him with cash in the bank and an office that was wellrun. Marlin’s problem is not the buildings. It’s his operation of the buildings, his delivery of services and his supervision of people.” Thomas, who was a cop for 28 years and ran for sheriff in 2004, has drawn a bead on both Gusman and Foti. “There were issues confronting that office in 2004, such as poor medical conditions, violence, questionable debts,” Thomas said. “Those issues are still prevalent today, nine years later. Marlin won

Marlin Gusman

the job understanding what the issues were and he vowed to clean it up. Nine years later, he hasn’t done the job, plain and simple.” Thomas says Gusman refuses to make the office transparent and accountable, and he “hasn’t been a partner in the criminal justice process.” He also cites “exorbitant contracts” that Gusman has awarded, particularly one for legal services. Gusman, and to some extent Thomas, may paint Foti as the sheriff who created the jail’s problems in the first place. For his part, Foti will point to the lower numbers of escapes, deaths, stabbings, rapes and other problems during his 30-year tenure compared to Gusman’s nine-plus years on the job. “I bring experience in the operation and maintenance of a safe jail, and providing community service to the public, rehabilitation services to inmates, and restitution services to the victims,” Foti said. Gusman, too, will point to programs he has established to help rehabilitate inmates — and to the fact that he reduced the population of the jail by more than half. He also reined in the far-flung political empire that Foti built as sheriff. There are significant stylistic differences among the three men, along with a genera-

Ira Thomas

tional difference. Gusman and Thomas are in their mid-50s; Foti just turned 76. Two other factors may boil just below the surface: Foti is a cousin of Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who has feuded with Gusman in recent months over the cost of the jail’s federal consent decree. So far, Landrieu remains neutral in the race, and he and Gusman reached a temporary (and tenuous) budget accord in October. The other factor is race. Gusman is black, as is Thomas; Foti is white. Even though black voters do not approve of Gusman’s performance, that doesn’t mean he won’t portray himself as the keeper of a black political “franchise” — just as then-Mayor Ray Nagin did to win re-election in 2006, despite a poor record in office. I’m not saying Gusman would resort to something as ham-fisted as Nagin’s “Chocolate City” comment, but others could play the race card for him, potentially to great effect. Foti says he does not believe race will be a deciding factor because concern about public safety — which includes safety in the local jail — cuts across all demographic lines. The only thing that seems certain right now is that the race for sheriff could overshadow all others on the Feb. 1 ballot.


A HOLIDAY TRADITION RÉVEILLON DINNER

DECEMBER 1 – JANUARY 6

Three Courses § $38 For reservations, call 504-593-8118

Menu not available on January 1

Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. OpenTable is a registered trademark of OpenTable, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Four Courses § $65 For reservations, call 504-533-6111

17


18

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


LIGHT,

CAMERA, N O I T AC

Eleanor and Ian Carney created the holiday show Lightwire: A Very Electric Christmas. P H O T O BY Z A C K S MITH

BY W IL L C O V IEL LO

A

s New Orleans’ Lightwire Theater advanced on the NBC competition show America’s Got Talent in the summer and fall of 2012, judges Howard Stern and Sharon Osbourne repeatedly called the group a “million-dollar act.” The live audience at the group’s audition performance in St. Louis gave Lightwire a standing ovation. During the 90-second piece, the theater was completely dark as Lightwire’s glowing T-Rex-like dinosaurs romped and roared at the crowd amid colorful dancing flowers. The dance-based performance group creates its costumes using

electroluminescent wire to render just the significant features — such as the T-Rex’s fearsome head and jaws, powerful legs and long tail. In the dark, the illusions of the creature’s loping gait, startling lunges and whiplike tail are almost magical. When the judges critiqued the performance, Stern gushed his approval. “I know this is going to sound sappy, but we are the greatest country in the world. … We have the most creative people in the world,” Stern said and then told Lightwire, “You’re everything that makes America great.” Stern, Osbourne and Howie Mandel all voted for Lightwire to advance in

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Following a semifinalist finish on season seven of America’s Got Talent, New Orleans’ Lightwire Theater launches two new shows and tours the world with its vibrant stories of dinosaurs, birds and wonder.

19


COVER STORY

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

the competition. As the group traveled to Las Vegas and New Jersey for successive rounds, company founders and directors Ian and Eleanor Carney and cast members often quoted Stern as both comic relief and assurance. “I’m what makes America great,” they’d say, as they worked on routines or waited to perform or appear in front of the judges. Lightwire just missed the finals, edged out by a live painting/musical performance group. But it gained exposure to national and international audiences, and now it’s in New Orleans getting ready to launch two new shows, which will double the company’s size and put it in front of general audiences everywhere. The first one, Lightwire: A Very Electric Christmas, debuts Thursday at the Joy Theater. “It’s the first time in 27 years we won’t be doing the Nutcracker,” Eleanor says as the group finishes a rehearsal just before Thanksgiving. Eleanor and Ian met in a dance class when they were 13. Both have enjoyed successful careers as professional dancers, and for years, December meant they starred as the Sugar Plum Fairy and Cavalier in a dozen to 20 performances of the holiday classic, a bread-and-butter show for most ballet companies. Lightwire is booking its shows around the world, but New Orleans is still the Carneys’ home, and this is an opportunity made possible by a commission by the Joy’s owners. “The Joy wanted to start the tradition of a Christmas show,” Ian says. “With all the theaters downtown, the Joy wanted to offer something special, something different.”

20

A Very Electric Christmas is the group’s third show, and it’s an original work that builds on past characters and includes a few familiar but altered characters from Nutcracker, including the namesake Nutcracker and toy soldiers. There’s no Clara, and the main characters are a family of birds who are about to celebrate Christmas in New Orleans when a sudden snowstorm disrupts their plans. The Carneys retained some elements of the holiday classic, such as the signature “Russian Dance,” a brief triumphant movement that is one the most recognizable snippets of Tchaikovsky’s score. “Thank God Tchaikovsky is a genius,” Ian says. “That score is one of the most brilliant scores ever written. We wanted to give nods to that score without doing Nutcracker. It’s a great thing for the dancers.” The show also features more recent holiday classics, such as “Jingle Bell Rock,” and references to contemporary popular culture, some of which only adult audiences will appreciate. While the company spent late November finishing the choreography and music for the show, it also built pieces for the next production, Lightwire: The

Ian Carney, Johnathon Whalen, Eleanor Carney, Ian Blanco and Andrea Carlin work on costumes in Lightwire Theater’s prop shop. P H OTO BY Z AC K S M I T H

Show, which will debut in Dallas Feb. 21. In January, the company will begin choreographing that piece, which will build on many characters used on America’s Got Talent and in its past shows, Darwin the Dinosaur and The Ugly Duckling. It’s meant to take advantage of the TV exposure, and it’s a two-act show aimed at all ages, incorporating more contemporary cultural elements and electronic music. (Darwin and Ugly Duckling are each one hour long and play mostly to young audiences.) Since early summer, Lightwire has been developing its new shows three blocks from the Joy Theater in

LOUISIANA CHAMPIONS DAY PRESENTED BY ACADIAN AMBULANCE SERVICE

11 STAKES RACES WORTH $1.1 MILLION DOLLARS DECEMBER 14TH • FIRST POST: 12:30PM $10 CLUBHOUSE ADMISSION GENERAL ADMISSION IS FREE

WWW.FGNO.COM

STARLIGHT RACING | FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20

The Bucktown All-Stars in the Clubhouse and DJ Crush in the Miller Time Beer Garden $10 CLUBHOUSE & MILLER TIME BEER GARDEN ADMISSION & $5 GENERAL ADMISSION WITH KIDS 12 AND UNDER FREE.


COVER STORY

“There’s always something that’s made to be a dinosaur hip; the massive second-floor ballroom of a hotel that’s being renovated. The gutted space has exposed steel beams, an uncovered cement floor and no heating or air conditioning. But at more than 70,000 square feet, it allows the company to create two full-scale theater spaces backed by draped black plastic. Several billboard-size banners in Russian and Chinese advertise performances of Darwin the Dinosaur in Russia and Taipei. The stage area where the cast is working on the holiday show is flanked by the green lightwire-outline of a French Quarter streetlight with a Royal Street sign and a more than 20-foot backdrop featuring a colored-wire rendering of a Christmas tree topped by a fleur-de-lis. Black costume pieces covered in electroluminescent wire surround the stage area. The batteries, wires and hodgepodge of joints and plates that make up the odd exoskeletons are apparent in normal lighting. “Everything is built from Home Depot and Sports Authority,” Ian says while adjusting a costume piece. “This is a motocross vest.” The Lightwire team creates all its own costumes. Besides sports equipment such as soccer shin guards and bike helmets, they use fishing gear and plumbing supplies and whatever else they can repurpose. “You have to look at the world sideways,” Ian says. “There’s always something that’s made to be

it’s already made, you’re just not looking at it right.” a dinosaur hip; it’s already made, you’re just not looking at it right.” The big innovation for Lightwire is its use of electroluminescent wire. Development of the idea for a dance-based show performed in the dark with light-up costumes was hatched in New York,

P H OTO BY Z A C K S M I T H

where the Carneys worked with fellow professional dancers Corbin and Whitney Popp, who performed in the Broadway show Movin’ Out, a rock ballet choreographed by Twyla Tharp and based on the music of Billy Joel. Ian performed in the Movin’ Out from its opening in 2002 to its December 2005 close. There, he and Corbin began discussing dance pieces with lightwire costumes. “When we found this medium, we found that it was all so exciting,” Ian says. “Confusing the uniform was much more interesting.” “It’s erasing the dancer,” Eleanor says. “Bringing life to an inanimate object, putting your movement on it and your personality in it. It’s a challenge in a totally different way. You can do things that you can’t do in a traditional sense with dance.” Ian saw it as a way to emphasize movement while telling new kinds of stories. “I think that you boil a dancer down to their essence when you say that the only thing you have here is your movement,” he says. “You don’t have the benefit of your pretty smile. How are you going to bring this character to life? In all of our pieces, if you don’t feel for these characters, you’re not going to sit there for a show.” They started creating costumes with the

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

21


COVER STORY electroluminescent wire, but living in New York presented some obstacles. “You couldn’t build a show in New York,” Eleanor says. Moving cumbersome costumes and finding rehearsal space was prohibitive. “We’d have to take two taxis to go to a studio.” Nevertheless, New York offered them limited opportunities to test their creations. The Carneys lived near City Park in Manhattan, and once they took a couple of ostrich costumes to the park at 4 a.m. to shoot videotape of the costumes in darkness. The park closes at 1 a.m., and police officers soon arrived. “They were like, ‘What are you doing?,’” Ian says. But the officers were more amused than concerned when the Carneys lit up the white ostrich costumes. “Those cops were like, ‘That is the coolest thing I have ever seen,’” Ian says. “Both cops melted like children. Then they found out we were in Billy Joel’s show. We asked, ‘Do you need us to leave?’ They said, ‘No, you just do what you wanna do.’” In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Carneys wanted to move home. Ian attended Metairie Park Country Day and Tulane University and was the son of artists. His father was painter Hal Carney and his mother is choreographer Diane Carney, whose Ballet Hysell will present The Nutcracker at Jefferson Performing Arts Society while A Very Electric Christmas runs at the Joy. Eleanor attended Louise S. McGehee School and her mother was a writer for the Dixie Roto magazine in The Times-Picayune. Ian and Eleanor danced professionally with several ballet companies before moving to New York. The Carneys convinced the Popps to move to New Orleans with them, and together they founded CORBiAN

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

“It’s not easy to make people understand what we do.

It’s light; it’s not dance exactly.” Visual Arts and Dance. They debuted their first show, Darwin the Dinosaur, in 2007. It featured battling dinosaurs, a scientist, fish and birds. As they began to develop their second show, The Ugly Duckling, the company changed. The Popps left New Orleans when Corbin entered dental school, and they now have three children and live in Denver, and they consult with the Carneys on choreography and technical aspects. The Carneys created Lightwire Theater but Darwin still tours under both companies’ names. While the group was on America’s Got Talent, Corbin developed technological improvements, including using rechargeable batteries to get brighter light and creating a switching system that allowed characters to transform on stage. He still builds pieces for their shows. The Carneys committed to making Lightwire Theater a full-time focus in January 2012. After teaching dance at Tulane University for four years, they decided to stop teaching and dancing for other companies. They completed the semester in May, and then scouts for America’s Got Talent found video of Lightwire Theater on YouTube. The timing was perfect, but it wasn’t an easy choice for the Carneys. “We hemmed and hawed about it,” Ian says. “We had

The company that competed on America’s Got Talent included (l. to r.) Michael Quintana, Eleanor Carney, Brian Falgoust, Ian Carney, Brian Peterson and Erin Kernion. P H OTO C O U RT E S Y O F NB C

two touring shows out. Our work was good. Did we want to put it in front of these three guys — Howard Stern — who could push an ‘X’ and say, ‘You’re terrible,’ and people will believe them?” But there were possibilities too. “What if this is our opportunity?” Eleanor asked. “It’s not easy to make people understand what we do. It’s light; it’s not dance exactly.” Ultimately, the exposure was hard to pass up, especially since they had so much professional experience. Even if their act was less conventional than the singers, dancers and comedians competing on the show, they knew they’d be polished and prepared. But being on TV still added pressure. “It’s an incredible level of pressure,” Ian says. “With Movin’ Out, I performed at the Tony Awards. So we were at Radio City (Music Hall). We opened the Tony Awards with Billy Joel singing from Times Square. I remember that feeling: Millions of people right now are going to watch.” “We’re not nervous performers, but you know that 10 million people are going to see you,” Eleanor adds. “At the end of the day, it’s going to be Ian and me standing in the middle.” In response to challenges from the judges, they worked hard to create new pieces and new effects with their third and fourth appearances. Their final performance featured three creatures battling with light sabers. “It was great because it pushed us artistically like we had not been pushed before,” Eleanor says. “We’re storytellers,” Ian explains. “Give us an hour and a half, and it’s no problem. But when you get 90 seconds, it’s hard. What are you going to say? You have to boil it down to two sentences. It taught us to focus on what the essence is.” PAGE 24

22


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

23


COVER STORY PAGE 22

Lightwire: A Very Electric Christmas DECEMBER 12-22 THE JOY THEATER, 1200 Canal St.; (504) 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com Tickets $30-$90 (not including fees)

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Ian Carney introduces children the Dinosaur after a perform to Darwin ance in Moscow.

24

America’s Got Talent also offers its audiences personal offstage drama, but “Our biggest fault is that we’re not interesting enough,” Eleanor says with a laugh. “We have just loved each other and been married,” Ian says. “We work really hard. I don’t have a drinking problem. We’re not heroin addicts. They were like, OK, you’re going to be the couple that loves each other and dances ballet. They didn’t push us. We felt they represented us fairly on the show.” Entertainment producers liked what Lightwire brought to the stage. The company was invited to perform for three months in a live stage version of the show in Las Vegas. Following that engagement, Lightwire competed on the French TV station TF1’s talent show The Best: Le

Meilleur Artiste and reached the final round. That was followed by 25 days performing in a Sony promotional campaign in France. Then they returned to Las Vegas for another run of America’s Got Talent Live. Finishing Lightwire: The Show will give the company four shows, and there will be three companies touring at once. It’s a challenging period of growth and the Carneys are hands-on with everything. In mid-November, Eleanor returned from a tour in Belarus and immediately had to fly to British Columbia to replace a dancer who left the touring company. She spent 10 days with the group while Ian worked on the choreography of A Very Electric Christmas. Eleanor plays the baby bird in the bird family, but for a few rehearsals, someone else had to fill her scenes in The Ugly Duckling’s duck costume.

Because the company creates its own lightwire outfits, each touring group has to include a manager who understands all the technological aspects of the equipment to maintain and repair it after energetic performances. Lightwire has grown from a touring theatrical show to an entertainment company with shows booked everywhere from Hong Kong to Abu Dubai, Paris to Belarus and Estonia. As their small business grows into a large one with 19 performers split between three companies, they handle the little details, like taking their own publicity photos, while directing and starring in their own shows. The Carneys believe they’re just scratching the surface of the medium’s potential. They would like to do more TV programming, and they’re thinking about creating their own resident live stage show. “We want a full-scale installation show,” Carney says. “Like Cirque du Soleil does. We want to create a world you just can’t believe.” It’s a lot to undertake, and sometimes their outfits are a source of relief. “You know what we need to do right now?’” Ian sometimes tells Eleanor when the stresses of the business pile up. “To run around as a dinosaur.” But that’s not always easy. Just like they were stopped in Central Park, the police were called one night when they were running around in Audubon Park. “The cop said, ‘I stopped you because cars are stopping in the middle of the road because you’re a dinosaur — and that’s not normal,’” Ian says. “Seriously, I asked him, ‘You got called out to find a glowing red dinosaur?’” But the minor traffic stop is worth it to them. “Every time you get so bogged down with building and everything else, you just put a costume on and go run around the park,” Ian says. “It just lights people’s faces up and you remember why you do it.”


The Riddles of Existence Written and illustrated by Dalt Wonk 5.5” x 8.5” set of 53 cards

$45

lunapress.com I am the most ancient of Gods. I wake the earth from her repose. No man can look me in the face. Without my help, no garden grows.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

25


26

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


1.

Trinkets Holiday gifts for good girls and boys BY KATE GRACE BAUER

2.

1 She’ll make a dramatic entrance in a cashmere and fox fur cape, $999 at Yvonne LaFleur (8131 Hampson St., 504-866-9666; www.yvonnelafleur.com).

2 Inspired by rag dolls, handmade dolls by Jess Brown are playful, sweetly nostalgic works of art, $180 each at Pippen Lane (2930 Magazine St., 504-269-0106; www.pippenlane.com).

3 Bath products by Michel Design Works, including

soap, room spray and a soy wax candle, bring beautiful scents and packaging to the powder room, $14 and up at Belladonna (2900 Magazine St., 504-891-4393; www.belladonnadayspa.com). PAGE 28

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

3.

27


PAGE 27

6.

4. 5.

4 Impress the man in your life with a wool club jacket

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

with leather sleeves, $245 at American Apparel (3310 Magazine St., 504-895-4970; www.americanapparel.com).

28

5

A leather bootie has both walkability (it’s by comfort brand Kork-Ease) and wow factor (check out the platform sole and on-trend buckle), $235 at Perfect Fit Shoes (5525 Magazine St., 504-456-5993;  www.perfectfitshoes.net).

6 This tray depicting iconic St. Louis Cathedral is

as elegant as it is sturdy. Made of waterproof Lucite, it’s the perfect way to pass Champagne or canapes, $92 at Hazelnut (2735 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-626-8900; 5515 Magazine St., 504-891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com).

Diamond Earrings - $895 Pendant - $495


7.

9. 8.

7

This intricate 14-karat rose gold ring is inspired by a humble cigar band, $1,075 at Marion Cage (3719 Magazine St., 504-891-8848; www.marioncage.com).

8

Upgrade your sleigh with this Mercedes-Benz SLS starting at $201,500 at Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans (3727 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504456-3727; www.mbofno.com).

9

Handmade from embossed plastic, these handbags by MeDusa are quirky and colorful, $94 and up at SOPO (629 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-609-2429; www.soponola.com). PAGE 30

8

$

29

$

10

$

24

$

18

$

14

$

10

$

29

$

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

8

$

29


OUTERWEAR FOR WOMEN & MEN

PAGE 29

10.

Men’s & Women’s jackets, hoods, vests, scarves and shirts

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Men’s & Women’s fleeces and jackets in assorted colors

30

Men’s & Women’s fleeces, ski jackets, rain shells, assorted triclimates and e-tip gloves

FREE GIFT WRAPPING 502 Leontine at Tchoupitoulas Mon - Sat 10AM - 6PM & Sun 12PM - 5PM Gift Certificates • Free Parking 504.891.1119 mgoldbergclothier.com

11. 12. 10 Don’t commit a party

foul by showing up without the ultimate party fowl. Turducken (a chicken stuffed in a duck stuffed in a turkey) is $3.99 a pound at Rouses (citywide; www.rouses.com).

11

Decorated with 23-karat gold, this bone china and porcelain crab plate slides into the dishwasher for easy cleanup, $100 for a set of six at The Historic New Orleans Collection (533 Royal St., 504-523-4662; www.hnoc.org).

12

Be the favorite at the party or the saint from back home by sending holiday decorated king cake to New Orleanians across the country, $49.95 shipped, $16.95 picked up at Randazzo’s Camellia City Bakery (3501 Pontchartrain Drive, Slidell, 800-684-2253; www.kingcakes.com).


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

31


32

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


WHAT’S

in store

Pup SQUAD By Lora Ghawally

A

t Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St., 504-3044718; www.zeusplace.com), framed photos of pups line the tangerine-hued walls like family portraits brightening a home. This welcoming atmosphere is a subtle indicator of the business’ threefold purpose: grooming and boarding pets, and rescuing animals that need a home. Owner Michelle Ingram opened Zeus’ Place in March 2006. She was eager to rehabilitate local animals throughout the city, which was in the early stages of recovery from Hurricane Katrina. “Rescuing animals is my true love,” says Ingram, who has rescued animals since the late 1990s. “At that time, there was a real need for helping animals around New Orleans.” Ingram took on the store’s first rescue case before the business opened. While the shop was undergoing remodeling, a man pulled up to the storefront with a litter of Rottweiler puppies yelping in his trunk. “He was looking to get rid of the dogs,” Ingram says. “They were dehydrated and overheated.” The team at Zeus’ Place revived the dogs, named each one after a New Orleans Saints player and placed them in homes. Zeus’ Place upholds that mission today, taking on both highly

adoptable animals and more difficult cases from local shelters. The store currently has seven kittens, eight adult cats and four dogs available for adoption. Zeus’ Place provides boarding and doggie daycare services Monday through Friday, hosting an average of 60 to 70 animals at a time. The shop accommodates both short-term and long-term stays, and reservations are preferred. Though they usually take only dogs and cats, the store has served as a temporary pad for pigs, birds, rabbits, a rooster and a bearded dragon, among other critters. Anxious petowners can check on their furbabies online, viewing footage from the boarding area’s 22 webcams. The spacious pet pens sport whimsical monikers like Palm Beach and Martha’s Vineyard, so pets can experience a fun-filled retreat even if they can’t go on vacation with their owners. The shop also offers grooming. Groomers Randi Boudin and Jany Casillas have worked at Zeus’ Place since 2009. Their services include baths, flea dips, nail trimming, haircuts and teeth cleaning. “They take their time, and they really love the animals,” Ingram says.

SHOPPING

Santa and Mrs. Claus visit THE SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE’S VISITOR CENTER (61389 Hwy. 434, Lacombe, 985-882-2000; www.

By Lauren Hartman

fws.gov/southeastlouisiana) from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14. Bayou Gardens is open, and there will be free hot chocolate, cookies and photos with Santa in his “Cajun Cottage.” FASHION WEEK NEW ORLEANS (www. fashionweeknola.com) is accepting applications through Tuesday, Dec. 31, for its 2014 Top Design Competition. Visit www.fashionweeknola.com/top-designers for an application. The competition spotlights emerging fashion designers,

who will compete on the runway for a prize package. Fashion Week New Orleans takes place March 18-23. THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF LOUISIANA (www.humanela.org) has partnered with FIRST BANK AND TRUST (citywide; www.fbtonline.com) for a holiday pet food drive. Now through the first week of January 2014, bring donations of dog and cat food (dry or canned), kitty litter, chew toys and other goods to local First Bank and Trust branches.

Zeus’ Place owner Michelle Ingram cradles a canine companion. P H O TO BY C HERY L G ERBER

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

New clients at PURE HAIR STUDIO (141 W. Harrison Ave., Suite E, 504-304-4424; www.facebook.com/purehairstudio) receive a free haircut with color services, a half-price haircut and 20 percent off products. Mention this “Shopping News” item to receive the special offers.

NEWS

33


KEEP IT HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Supporting local businesses during the holidays makes your community merrier all year long. 

FROM OUR KITCHEN TO YOUR TABLE Entertaining is a whole lot easier with our tasty selection of ready-to-serve party trays and platters. Our finger sandwiches and mini-muffalettas feature only the finest meats and cheese, including our own homemade deli meats. We also offer whole pans of your favorite family foods like lasagna, macaroni and cheese, and jambalaya.

To place an order for our signature sandwich trays, party trays and other selections, please call or visit any of our locations.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

TURDUCHENS

34

A Rouses Signature Recipe! Turduchens are a Rouses signature. We stuff a de-boned chicken with a boneless duck breast and Rouses fresh sausage or dressing. That chicken and a second helping of sausage or dressing is then stuffed into a de-boned turkey. We also have stuffed boneless chickens, chicken breasts, pork roasts, center loin roasts and more.

COMPLETE HOLIDAY MEALS Our chefs use only the finest, freshest ingredients to prepare your holiday dinner. We offer complete holiday meals ham or turkey) with traditional fixings, as well as dressings and side dishes available item-by-item.

For locations, phone numbers and a copy of our holiday menu, go to www.rouses.com.

www.rouses.com


FORK + center

+

Email dining@gambitweekly.com

NEW ORLEANS

Icing on the cake

A casual cafe serves fresh baked goods in Faubourg Marigny. By Scott Gold

E-Booty

New Orleans Cake Cafe bakes its own pastries, cupcakes and breads. P H O T O BY C H ER Y L G ER B ER

was a hearty omelet stuffed with roasted vegetables and goat cheese. A generous mug of steaming cafe au lait was a good complement to the meal. Cake Cafe also offers one of its cupcakes for only $1 with a meal. This is a bargain worth the taking, if only to enjoy later. Of the three I tried, all were simple but tasty, including red velvet, wedding cake and an outstanding sweet potato cupcake with crumbled pecans and a drizzle of cane syrup. The thick and creamy frosting stands up well to the texture of the cake. Not everything at Cake Cafe is outstanding. The Reuben was served with an undressed salad of simple mixed greens, and while generous portions beg for one to sit for a while to digest and chat, the staff encourages guests to relinquish tables quickly to accommodate waiting patrons, especially during busy weekend hours. Still, I’m looking forward to returning before my New Year’s diet begins. Until then: Let us eat cake.

what

New Orleans Cake Cafe & Bakery

where

2440 Chartres St., (504) 9430010; www.nolacakes.com

when

breakfast and lunch Wednesday through Monday

how much inexpensive

what works

excellent baked goods, generous portions, friendly prices

what doesn’t

long lines and few tables at peak times

check, please

sweet treats and hearty breakfast and lunch fare

In a move that’s more Silicon Valley than 9th Ward, Booty’s Street Food (800 Louisa St., 504-266-2887; www. bootysnola.com), a Bywater spot for refashioned street food, is now accepting payment in Bitcoin. It becomes the first restaurant in New Orleans to embrace the electronic currency. Bitcoin is an open-source peer-topeer electronic money and payment network introduced in 2009 by developer Satoshi Nakamoto. Users purchase Bitcoins online, and then use a QR scanner to make payments, often via smartphone. The setup allows users to pay for goods and services without going through traditional banks and credit card companies, thus avoiding applicable fees and regulations. According to the Booty’s website: “We’re enthusiastically allowing guests to pay with Bitcoin for three reasons: 1) Credit card processing fees eat up a significant amount of our revenue each month and offering a lower-fee way to pay means that we can pass on our higher profitability to customers; 2) Alternatives to our current financial system are intriguing to explore, especially as we see ourselves as a community business serving our neighbors; and 3) We’re nerds and we’re proud of it.” Booty’s owners Nick Vivion and Kevin Farrell say they’re unsure whether the venture will pan out. When news of Booty’s Bitcoin move made it on reddit.com, user kajunkennyg said that it would “be really awesome to be able to go party on Bourbon and not have to worry about carrying a wallet. Just a locked cellphone and my btc app to get wasted! Checkmate pickpockets!” — SCOTT GOLD

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

ew Orleans Cake Cafe & Bakery aims to be a quintessential Big Easy corner cafe, serving coffee, baked goods and extensive breakfast and lunch menus. Judging by the lines of patrons looking for doughnut and java fixes — or maybe a hearty Southern breakfast — locals appreciate what it has to offer. The restaurant and bakery has a small but cozy dining room, its bright yellow walls adorned with paintings of bayou scenes and photos of Mardi Gras Indians and local legends such as Dr. John. On a first visit, one quickly feels at home; this would be a good place to share a lazy lunch with a friend or, as one solo diner did, enjoy a few cups of coffee while digging into a copy of A Confederacy of Dunces. A counter display holds a trove of baked goods including gooey cinnamon rolls, large glazed doughnuts, savory croissants stuffed with ham and cheese and many other offerings. Custom-baked cakes are a specialty of the house and patrons are advised to order at least 24 hours in advance. Flavors include butter pecan, German chocolate, lemon and angel food cake. For those simply in the market for a hearty meal, Cake Cafe is a good bet. A Reuben sandwich, fashioned with house-made sauerkraut, was appropriately hot, meaty and dripping with melted cheese and Russian dressing. This is hardly diet fare, and the sandwich calls for at least three napkins. Similarly satisfying, if not quite as messy, is a sandwich filled with local crabmeat, bacon, melted brie and sauteed spinach, which the cafe suggests pairing with its challah bread. That nonkosher combination (offered during Hanukkah) made me chuckle. The lunch fare at Cake Cafe is solid, but the breakfast menu is where it truly delivers. Lumberjack-sized portions of eggs, biscuits, organic yellow grits and other familiar items are well-executed and cheerily delivered. A helping of fried eggs atop grits with a crispy fried boudin cake would have proved a filling meal on its own, but the addition of a generous buttermilk biscuit ensured I wouldn’t be hungry for some time. A special of cornmeal-dusted oysters, also paired with eggs and grits, was cooked perfectly, as

PAGE 36

35


EAT

DRINK

NEW ORLEANS

PAGE 35

FORK + CENTER [CONTINUED]

Frankie & Johnny’s tune-up

a modern interpretation of 19th century style drinks

Transport yourself to early 1900s and celebrate the New Year in glitz and style at Bellocq. Cocktail and Champagne specials.

Join Chef Marcus Woodham and ring in the New Year with the tastes of South Louisiana with feast true to our region with a family-style approach.

MUSIC BY DJ ANN AND DJ BUNNY. DOORS OPEN AT 8:00PM ‘TIL.

3-COURSE MEAL, COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE, $60 PER PERSON. 7:00PM OR 9:30PM.

CALL US AT (504) 962-0911 AND RESERVE A TABLE.

CALL US AT (504) 962-0909 OR VISIT TIVOLIANDLEE.COM FOR RESERVATIONS.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

2 LEE CIRCLE • NEW ORLEANS

36

For fans of Frankie & Johnny’s (321 Arabella St., 504-243-1234), Black Friday was a very good day. After completing repairs and upgrades, the eatery’s new owners reopened the casual seafood restaurant Nov. 29. The restaurant dates back to 1942, and the former owners shut its doors in February due to a number of difficulties, including well-publicized sanitation issues. Current owners Anthony Macaluso and Woody Valls couldn’t be happier with how everything is shaking out so far. “It’s been very exciting,” Macaluso says. “Opening day, people came in droves, and they were even waiting for us to open the doors.” The owners finished a thorough renovation. “We had to take all the walls down to the studs but kept the bar as is, and just refinished it,” Macaluso said. “We also found that there were windows behind the paneling that were covered up, so we restored those as well. There’s a lot more natural light in here right now. We wanted to renew the place but keep the same feel, so we made sure to put back the black-and-white checkered floor, which is one of the ways that people really know they’re in Frankie & Johnny’s.” Other additions include a new oyster bar and a kids’ game room. There also is a renovated front porch offering alfresco dining. Longtime patrons will recognize some returning waitstaff as well, including Cliff Smith, who managed the eatery for 18 years. The menu promises the familiar fare from years past with some subtle changes. Old favorites including fried chicken and seafood, stuffed artichokes and bell pepper rings remain, but now salads can be topped with seared tuna, grilled shrimp and other options. There are 15 beers on draft, including several from local breweries, and the wine list was expanded. From 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, happy hour features 25 percent off all liquor, wine, beer and oysters. Frankie & Johnny’s is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. — SCOTT GOLD

Making bacon

Major Bacon, the blues-rock band known for serving BLTs during Wednesday gigs at Banks Street Bar & Grill (4401 Banks St., 504-486-0258; www.banksstreetbarandgrill.com), has founded the Bacon Appreciation Club of NOLA (B.A.C.O.N.) with monthly meetings featuring bacon-themed food and drink. B.A.C.O.N. meetings are 9 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month at Banks Street Bar with free BLTs and praline bacon, and there are bacon cocktails and shots for sale. Guests who bring their own bacon dishes for the bacon bake-off have a chance to win a $20 bar tab, be named the month’s king or queen of bacon and get a picture with the band posted online at www.facebook.com/majorbaconband and www.majorbaconband.com. The inaugural meeting of B.A.C.O.N. is Dec. 11. — MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY


EAT

DRINK

NEW ORLEANS

3-COURSE interview

Jeff Berry Local author, mixologist, rum expert and cocktail historian Jeff “Beachbum” Berry (www.beachbumberry.com) has written extensively about vintage tropical drinks and cuisine. His latest, Potions of the Caribbean, focuses not on the tiki culture for which he’s known, but on the Caribbean. The book is available at www.cocktailkingdom.com.

You’ve written five books about cocktails, particularly tiki-inspired drinks. What made you head to the Caribbean for your latest?

P H O T O B Y O L I V I ER KO N I G

Author of Potions of the Caribbean

Berry: Actually, I wasn’t going to write another book, because I’d already covered pretty much everything about the tiki era that I wanted to know. The books were kind of a process of discovery for me: As I was writing, I discovered all about the lost recipes from the tiki bars that are disappearing. Once I satisfied my curiosity about what they were and where they came from, I thought that was pretty much it. It finally began to dawn on me at the end of my third book, Sippin’ Safari, that I’d been swimming in the wrong ocean. The more I learned about the origins of these drinks, the more I realized that they all had roots in the Caribbean. The two main creators of the 40-year tiki craze — Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic — both traveled to the Caribbean, Cuba, Jamaica and Trinidad, which is where they learned how to mix tropical drinks.

B: Yes, I do. I found that the more tiki drinks I drank and the more complicated they became, the more I appreciated the foundation on which all of these drinks are built, which is the three building blocks: rum, lime and sugar. That, basically, is a daiquiri. When I find myself at home and I want a drink, I find myself going for one of those. If you have lime, sugar and the right rum, a daiquiri is really hard to beat. For rum, I recommend Havana Club Cuban rum, which you can’t get here, but also Cana Brava, a really nice Cuban-style rum. Most domestic white rums taste like vodka, but Cana Brava has that body and long finish that you don’t usually get with white rums, but you do get with a proper Cuban. Another one is a recipe that I haven’t made. It’s the oldest complete recipe I found, since most were fragments. This was a German syphilis cure from 1575 made from guaiac wood from Venezuela. [The drink is] boiled like a hot toddy. It didn’t really work on the guy who invented it, unfortunately, because he died of the disease, so they gave up on it after that.

What’s the most surprising thing you learned in writing this book?

B: From the mixological point of view, it’s about how much we owe Christopher Columbus. Of course, he introduced forced labor, colonial oppression and all that awful stuff, but he also introduced lime — which he called crab lemons — and sugar. You can’t have rum without sugar. Of all this, I was shocked to find out just how miserable Caribbean history was. I’d studied the Pacific islands, so I didn’t know too much about it going into this book. From 1492, it was just one long catalogue of brutality and maltreatment. You look at the tourist ads and the Caribbean looks like such a romantic place, but when you dig under the surface, you’re like, “Wow, really?” I have to think that alcohol and later cocktails played an important part in carrying on with such a life. And personally, without sounding too callous, I’m very grateful to them all for doing that. — SCOTT GOLD

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

The book is filled with vintage recipes from Caribbean cultures. Do you have any favorites?

37


38

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


EAT

DRINK

NEW ORLEANS

BEER buzz For nearly 20 years, I have greeted the holiday season with the ultimate winter ale: Anchor Brewing’s (www.anchorbrewing.com) Christmas Ale. This traditional release, which revived the American tradition of holiday beer in the post-Prohibition age, was first brewed in 1975, but every year both the recipe and label change. The base recipe and its variants are a secret, but the ale is always dark, spiced and delicious. This year, I rounded up several holiday beers that are available in Louisiana. In addition to Anchor’s, I picked up two from Southern Tier (www.stbcbeer.com), since they are new to the market. Old Man Winter is a nonspiced dark ale and 2XMAS is a spiced beer. I also brought Saint Arnold Brewing Company’s (www.saintarnold.com) Christmas Ale and another longtime favorite, Samuel Smith’s (www.samuelsmithsbrewery. co.uk) Winter Welcome, to the tasting party. Though I’m fond of Anchor’s Christmas Ale, I generally don’t care for spiced beer, so I was surprised that I enjoyed Southern Tier’s 2XMAS ale. This 8 percent alcohol beer hid its warming alcohol nicely with fig and caramel malt notes. The clove, cardamom and cinnamon spices were very apparent and came just to the line of what I can handle, but didn’t cross it. 2XMAS is much lighter in color and mouthfeel than the Anchor, which may increase its appeal to those who shy away from dark beers. Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome Ale is another old tradition. This beer is a solidly British style (no spices) with Fuggles and Golding hops to balance the caramel maltiness. Saint Arnold’s Christmas Ale, that brewery’s tradition since 1995, is an Old Ale style, which this year has a great malt backbone but with a hops presence that ensures it’s not too sweet. Both are easy drinking and enjoyable. — NORA MCGUNNIGLE

WINE of the week 2009 H&G Priorat Red Blend PRIOR AT, SPA IN RETAIL $14

Located southwest of Barcelona, Priorat is one of only two regions bearing Spain’s top wine classification, DOCa or DOQ, designating “origin of highest quality.” Vineyards are situtated on rocky slopes ranging from 325 to 2,300 feet above sea level, and the region’s volcanic history means crushed rocks and other rugged characteristics comprise the soil along with decomposed slate, quartz and mica. Grapes for this terroir-driven wine were grown near the town of Gratallops, considered the best growing area in Priorat. It’s a blend of 60 percent garnacha, 30 percent carinena and 10 percent syrah, and each varietal was fermented separately in temperature-controlled stainless steel tanks. The freshly pressed juice was left with the skins for 22 days to extract maximum flavor and color, then the wine was aged six months in 3-year-old French and American oak barrels before blending. The robust wine offers aromas of dark ripened fruit, cedar and spice, and flavors of black cherry, plum and vanilla with earth notes on the mineral-tinged finish. Decant 30 minutes before serving. Drink it with paella, pasta carbonara, grilled meats and sausages, wild game, roasted root vegetables and manchego cheese. Buy it at: Whole Foods Markets. — BRENDA MAITLAND

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Email Nora McGunnigle at nora@nolabeerblog.com

Email Brenda Maitland at winediva1@bellsouth.net

39


on all of your holiday meal favorites

USED BY LOCAL CHEFS & SOLD WORLDWIDE

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

FREE SHIPPING UNTIL MARCH 4th

40

Try on smoked & fried turkeys, hams steaks & fish VERSATILE * LOW SALT

NEW MEDITERRANEAN BLEND IN STOCK!


EAT

FIVE

in

DRINK

NEW ORLEANS

5

Five dishes with satsuma

PLATE dates DEC

13

1 Cafe Amelie

912 Royal St., (504) 412-8965 www.cafeamelie.com

Satsuma- and habanero-glazed grilled shrimp are served as an appetizer.

DEC

13

2 Chiba

8312 Oak St., (504) 826-9119 www.chiba-nola.com

The sushi restaurant’s satsuma-strawberry roll combines scallops, yellowtail, wasabi tobiko, strawberry, mango, jalapeno, tempura flakes and satsuma-ponzu sauce.

3

DEC

14

Sips of the Season and caroling 5 p.m. Friday K. Gee’s, 2534 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 626-0530

www.kgeesrestaurant.com The Old Mandeville Business Association hosts a holiday-themed, 14-stop family pub crawl with seasonal cocktails and drinks for kids. The event concludes with caroling at the Mandeville Trailhead. Candles and songbooks are provided. Registration $15.

Dolce Vita Pizzeria grand opening

6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday Dolce Vita Pizzeria, 1205 St. Charles Ave., (504) 324-7674

www.dvpizzeria.com Chef Bogdan Mocanu, formerly of Domenica, opens a restaurant featuring wood-fired pizza. There will be complimentary samples and beer and wine for sale. RSVP to info@dvpizzeria.com.

Pop-up brunch at Dat Dog

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday Dat Dog, 5030 Freret St., (504) 899-6883

www.datdognola.com My House NOLA, Dat Dog and Laura Sugerman of Sugerman’s Bagels host a cash-only pop-up brunch. The menu includes bagels with gravlax, prosciutto and goat cheese strata, lemon-garlic-sage hash browns and creme brulee French toast with satsuma compote. Tickets $17. Brunch cocktails $8.50.

Crescent City A Legendary Dining Experience in New Orleans

Restaurant August www.restaurantaugust.com

For dessert, steamed chocolate is served with satsuma, pecan butter and whipped Creole cream cheese.

4 St. Lawrence

219 N. Peters St., (504) 525-4111 www.saintlawrencenola.com

Herbaceous chicken liver pate is served with satsuma jelly, pickled beets and toasted French bread.

5 SoBou

310 Chartres St., (504) 552-4095 www.sobounola.com

The menu includes yellowfin tuna escabeche with Scotch bonnet chilies, pickled fennel and satsumas.

OFF

the

menu

1934 – 2013

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food.

Make your reservation TODAY!

Bar scene “We’re all in a play called New Orleans. We dress up and play the part, and I assume the role of bartender.” — Chris Hannah, bartender at Arnaud’s French 75, in the December issue of Spirit magazine. Writer Rien Fertel profiled several local bartenders, including Chris McMillian of Kingfish; Abigail Gullo of SoBou; Nick Detrich of Cane & Table; and Cheryl Charming of the Bourbon O’ Bar.

P H O T O B Y C H ER Y L G ER B ER

301 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 299-9777

TUES–FRI 11:30am–9:30pm SAT 4–10pm • SUN 12–9pm 1001 N. BROAD ST. • MIDCITY

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Steak House

@ St. Phillip • 4 blocks off Esplanade Ave.

821-3271

41


42

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


to

EAT

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AFRICAN Motherland Cafe — 1700 N. Galvez St., (504) 342-3996; www.facebook.com/ motherlandcafe — This family restaurant serves Senegalese and Gambian food, and vegetarian dishes are available. Thiebou djenne is a fish and rice stew, and boulettes are fried balls of fish. There also are house-made ginger drinks and wonjo, made with hibiscus. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

AMERICAN

Knuckleheads Eatery — 3535 Severn Ave., Suite 10, Metairie, (504) 888-5858; www.knuckleheadsnola.com — This casual eatery serves burgers, sandwiches, wraps, salads and bar noshes. Mulligan Mike’s all-Angus chuck burger is topped with grilled ham and Swiss or cheddar cheese and comes with fries and a pickle. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ O’Henry’s Food & Spirits — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, (504) 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Somethin’ Else Cafe — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somthin’ Else offers noshing items including shrimp baskets, boudin balls and alligator corn dogs. There are burgers, po-boys and sandwiches filled with everything from cochon de lait to a trio of melted cheeses on buttered thick toast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Treasure Island Buffet — 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 443-8000; www. treasurechestcasino.com — The all-youcan-eat buffet includes New Orleans favorites including seafood, salad and dishes from a variety of national cuisines. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

American Sports Saloon — 1200 Decatur St., (504) 522-2410 — This sports bar serves burgers made with houseground patties, chicken wings, 12 beers on tap and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Bayou Beer Garden — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., (504) 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Down the Hatch — 1921 Sophie Wright Place, (504) 522-0909; www.downthehatchnola.com — The Texan burger features an Angus beef patty topped with grilled onions, smoked bacon, cheddar and a fried egg. The house-made veggie burger combines 15 vegetables and is served with sun-dried tomato pesto. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Jigger’s Bar & Grill — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 828-3555 — The sports bar serves sandwiches and bar noshing items. Half or full-round muffulettas are filled with Italian ham, Genoa salami, provolone cheese and house-made olive salad and served toasted. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Rendon Inn’s Dugout Sports Bar — 4501 Eve St., (504) 826-5605; www. therendoninn.com — The Boudreaux burger combines lean ground beef, hot sausage and applewood-smoked bacon on a ciabatta bun with cheese, onions and remoulade. Fresh cut fries are served with Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of truffle oil. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ The Rivershack Tavern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Shamrock Bar & Grill — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 301-0938 — Shamrock serves an Angus rib-eye steak with a side item, burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, grilled chicken, spinach and artichoke dip and more. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE Boo Koo BBQ — 3701 Banks St., (504) 202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ Hickory Prime BBQ — 6001 France Road, (757) 277-8507; www.hickoryprimebbq. com — Proprietors Billy Rhodes and

Karen Martin have won several barbecue competitions. They serve Texas-style brisket, smoked chicken, ribs and more. The pulled pork platter features pork cooked for 12 hours over hickory and white oak and it comes with two sides. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Saucy’s — 4200 Magazine St., (504) 3012755; www.saucysnola.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled chicken. The cochon blue is a sandwich of pulled pork, blue cheese and melted mozzerella on a bun. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS Charcoal’s Gourmet Burger Bar — 2200 Magazine St., (504) 644-4311; www.charcoalgourmetburgerbar.com — This burger specialist’s patty options include beef, bison, shrimp and veggie. The House burger is dressed with cheddar, lettuce, onion, tomato, pickles, mayonnaise and mustard and served with house-made chips. The Cobb salad features romaine lettuce, grilled chicken, avocado, tomato, onion, applewood-smoked bacon, blue cheese, croutons and buttermilk ranch or honey-mustard dressing. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Cheeseburger Eddie’s — 4517 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 455-5511; www.mredsno.com — This eatery serves a variety of specialty burgers, Mr. Ed’s fried chicken, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, tacos, wings and shakes. Besides patty melts and chili-cheeseburgers, there also are seafood burgers featuring tuna, salmon or crabmeat. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE Antoine’s Annex — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Caprese panino combines fresh mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes and balsamic vinaigrette. The ham and honey-Dijon panino is topped with feta and watercress. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Breads on Oak — 8640 Oak St., Suite A, (504) 324-8271; www.breadsonoak.com — The bakery offers a range of breads, muffins, pastries and sweets. Pain au chocolat is a buttery, flakey croissant filled with dark chocolate, and a vegan version also is available. The breads include traditional, hand-shaped Parisian-style baguettes. No reservations. Breakfast Thu.-Sun., lunch Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Cafe Freret — 7329 Freret St., (504) 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin. Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. For breakfast, an omelet is filled with marinated mushrooms, bacon, spinach and goat cheese. Tuna salad or chicken salad avocado melts are topped with melted Monterey Jack and shredded Parmesan cheeses and served on a choice of bread. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

CHINESE Five Happiness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Jung’s Golden Dragon — 3009 Magazine St., (504) 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COFFEE/DESSERT Angelo Brocato’s — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — This sweet shop and serves its own gelato, spumoni, Italian ice, cannolis, fig cookies and other treats. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Rue de la Course — 1140 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 861-4343; www.facebook. comruedelacourse — The coffeeshop offers a selection of bagels (plain, sesame, everything, honey whole wheat or cinnamon-raisin) from Artz Bagelz. The Downtown sandwich includes turkey, bacon, Swiss cheese, avocado, tomato, lettuce, sprouts and mayonnaise on a choice of bagel and comes with chips, potato salad or coleslaw. The Lakeview features chicken or tuna salad dressed with lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise on a bagel and comes with a side. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Cash only. $ Pinkberry — Citywide; www.pinkberry. com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY Bayona — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ One Restaurant & Lounge — 8132 Hampson St., (504) 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes inlcuding char-grilled oysters

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Huh! A Restaurant & Bar — 3401 N. Hullen St., Metairie, (504) 229-2484; www. huhrestaurant.com — This restaurant serves salads, sandwiches, burgers, entrees and sweet and savory crepes. The king cake crepes are available in plain and filled varieties topped with purple, green and gold icing and sugar. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., and open Sundays during New Orleans Saints games. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL

Cafe NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www.cafenoma.com — The cafe serves roasted Gulf shrimp and vegetable salad dressed with Parmesan-white balsamic vinaigrette. Other options include chipotle-marinated portobello sliders and flatbread pizza topped with manchego, peppers and roasted garlic. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Tue.Sun., dinner Fri. Credit cards. $

43


OUT to EAT topped with Roquefort cheese and red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE Antoine’s Restaurant — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Cafe Gentilly — 5325 Franklin Ave., (504) 281-4220; www.facebook. com/cafegentilly —Crab cake Benedict is French bread topped with poached eggs, a hand-made crawfish sausage patty and hollandaise. Breakfast is available all day, and the creamed spinach, crawfish and Swiss cheese omelet can be served in a po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Ignatius Eatery — 3121 Magazine St., (504) 899-0242; www.ignatiuseatery.com — The menu includes classic Creole dishes such as red beans and rice, speckled trout meuniere and crawfish etouffee as well as sandwiches, salads and pasta. Crawfish Ignatius pasta features crawfish cream sauce with mushrooms, tomatoes, onion and bell peppers topped with grated Parmesan. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

44

The Landing Restaurant — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www. neworleansairporthotel.com — The Landing serves Cajun and Creole dishes with many seafood options. Louisiana crab cakes are popular. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

popular neighborhood restaurant is know for its wet-battered fried chicken. Green beans come with rice and gravy. There’s bread pudding for dessert. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

DELI

Kosher Cajun New York Deli & Grocery — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www. koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ Mardi Gras Zone — 2706 Royal St., (504) 947-8787; www. mardigraszone.com — The 24-hour grocery store has a deli and wood-burning pizza oven. The deli serves po-boys, salads and hot entrees such as stuffed peppers, beef stroganoff and vegetable lasagna. Vegan pizzas also are available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $ Martin Wine Cellar — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , (504) 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium’s dinner menu includes pork rib chops served with housemade boudin stuffing, Tabasco pepper jelly demi-glaze and smothered greens. The Deli Deluxe sandwich features corned beef, pastrami, Swiss cheese, Russian dressing and Creole mustard on an onion roll. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, early dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Qwik Chek Deli & Catering — 2018 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie, (504) 456-6362 — The menu includes gumbo, po-boys, pasta, salads and hot plate lunches. The hamburger po-boy can be dressed with lettuce, mayo and tomato on French bread. Shrimp Italiano features shrimp tossed with cream sauce and pasta. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Ma Momma’s House — 5741 Crowder Blvd., (504) 244-0021; www. mamommashouse.com — Traditional home-style Creole dishes include red beans and rice, shrimp pasta, fried chicken, cornbread and more. Chicken and waffles includes a Belgian waffle and three or six fried chicken wings. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Thu.-Mon., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ETHIOPIAN

Roux on Orleans — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www.bourbonorleans.com — This restaurant offers contemporary Creole dishes including barbecue shrimp, redfish couvillion, gumbo and catfish and shrimp dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Baie Rouge — 4128 Magazine St., (504) 304-3667; www.baierougenola.com — Shrimp and risotto Milanese features jumbo shrimp cooked with lemon over saffron risotto served with hericots verts. Pig Dip features pork debris, caramelized onions and garlic aioli on French bread with a side of smoked pork jus. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$

Saints & Sinners — 627 Bourbon St., (504) 528-9307; www.saintsandsinnersnola.com — Styled to reflect era of Storyville, the restaurant serves Creole and Cajun dishes, raw oysters, seafood, steaks, po-boys, burgers and more. The Politician’s Special features a trio of jambalaya, crawfish pie and a cup of gumbo. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$$ Willie Mae’s Scotch House — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 822-9503 — This

Cafe Abyssinia — 3511 Magazine St., (504) 894-6238 — The menu includes a variety of wots, traditional stews served over injera bread, and tibs, dishes of sauted meats or vegetables. Yebeb alicha is lamb in mild garlic-ginger curry sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH

Martinique Bistro — 5908 Magazine St., (504) 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. New Zealand lamb loin is served with cucumber and sweet onion pickles, Israeli couscous, Meyer lemon-watercress aioli and tomato-sherry vinegar demi-glace. Reservations recommended.

Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO Breaux Mart — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, (504) 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, (504) 737-8146; www. breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN Julie’s Little India Kitchen At Schiro’s — 2483 Royal St., (504) 944-6666; www.schiroscafe. com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Nirvana Indian Cuisine — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN Amici Restaurant & Bar — 3218 Magazine St., (504) 300-1250; www. amicinola.com — Amici serves coal-fired pizza and Italian dishes. The broccoli rabe salsica Italiana pie is topped with marinara, mozzarella, sauteed bitter Italian greens and Italian sausage. Pasta carbonara features pancetta and green peas in white sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Andrea’s Restaurant — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Cafe Giovanni — 117 Decatur St., (504) 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Maximo’s Italian Grill — 1117 Decatur St., (504) 586-8883; www. maximosgrill.com — Sit at the bar overlooking the open grill and


OUT to EAT watch chefs prepare dishes like the fish of the day pan-sauteed in habanero-infused olive oil and served with seasonal vegetables. Osso buco is a braised veal shank served with garlic, thyme and white wine demi-glace, herb-roasted Parmesan potatoes and grilled asparagus. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, lunch Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ Mosca’s — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ Red Gravy — 125 Camp St., (504) 561-8844; www. redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves rustic Italian fare. Pork bracciole features pork loin stuffed with cheese, currants and pignoli nuts that is braised slowly in tomato sauce and served over house-made pappardelle. Reservations accepted. Breakfast Mon. & Wed.Fri., lunch Wed.-Mon., dinner Thu.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Ristorante Filippo — 1917 Ridgelake Drive, Metairie (504) 835-4008 — The Creole-Italian menu includes a crabmeat salad featuring half of a tomato filled with jumbo lump crabmeat over romaine lettuce dressed with remoulade and balsamic vinaigrette. Veal Sorrentina is sauted veal layered with prosciutto and eggplant, topped with marinara and mozzarella and served with spaghetti marinara. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine. com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE

Kakkoii Japanese Bistreaux — 7537 Maple St., (504) 570-6440; www.kakkoii-nola.com — Kakkoii offers traditional sushi, sashimi and Japanese cuisine as well as dishes with modern and local twists. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Kyoto — 4920 Prytania St., (504) 891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Mikimoto — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 4881881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ Miyako Japanese Seafood & Steakhouse — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 410-9997; www. japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Rock-N-Sake — 823 Fulton St., (504) 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ PAGE 46

PoBoys PoBoys PoBoys 3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Asuka Sushi & Hibachi — 7912 Earhart Blvd., (504) 862-5555; www.asukaneworleans.com — Asuka serves sushi and grilled items from the hibachi. The Shaggy Dog roll features tempura-fried shrimp, snow crab and avocado topped with crabstick and eel sauce and spicy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

45


OUT to EAT PAGE 45

Yuki Izakaya — 525 Frenchmen St., (504) 943-1122; www.facebook. com/yukiizakaya — This Japanese tavern combines a selection of small plates, sake, shochu, live music and Japanese kitsch. Dishes include curries, housemade ramen soups, fried chicken and other specialties. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

STEAK NIGHT SPECIAL ON WEDNESDAYS

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

LATIN AMERICAN

La Macarena Pupseria and Latin Cafe — 8120 Hampson St., (504) 862-5252; www.pupsasneworleans.com — This cafe serves Latin and Caribbean dishes, tapas and appetizers like guacamole and chips. Spanish garlic shrimp is served with refried black beans, saffron rice and tropical salad. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Mon. Cash only. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

46

7 On Fulton — 700 Fulton St., (504) 525-7555; www.7onfulton. com — New Orleans barbecue shrimp features a peppery butter sauce made with blonde ale. Oven-roasted lobster tail is topped with Louisiana crawfish and corn cream sauce and comes with fingerling potatoes and asparagus. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Dick & Jenny’s — 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 894-9880; www. dickandjennys.com — The menu combines contemporary Creole dishes and Italian items from Christiano’s pop-up. Pork loin roulade is stuffed with goat cheese and pine nuts and served with spinach, stone-ground grits and balsamic-infused pork jus. Pappardelle is served with pulled duck confit, charred pepper and mustard greens. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ Heritage Grill — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 934-4900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com — This power lunch spot offers dishes like duck and wild mushroom spring rolls with mirin-soy dipping sauce and panfried crab cakes with corn maque choux and sugar snap peas. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$ Manning’s — 519 Fulton St., (504) 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Ralph’s On The Park — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include turtle soup finished with sherry, grilled lamb spare ribs and barbecue Gulf shrimp. Tuna two ways includes tuna tartare, seared pepper tuna, avocado and wasabi cream. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Restaurant R’evolution — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www.

revolutionnola.com — Chefs John Folse and Rick Tramanto present a creative take on Creole dishes as well as offering caviar tastings, house-made salumi, pasta dishes and more. “Death by Gumbo” is an andouille- and oyster-stuffed quail with a roux-based gumbo poured on top tableside. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Sainte Marie — 930 Poydras St., Suite 101, (504) 304-6988; www. saintemarienola.com — Barbecue jerk shrimp are served with coconut rice and mango chow chow. Sam’s Yak A Mein combines braised beef, chicken, shrimp, egg noodles and a soft-boiled egg. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Tomas Bistro — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semi-boneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Tommy’s Wine Bar — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

Attiki Bar & Grill — 230 Decatur St., (504) 587-3756 — This restaurant and hookah bar serves an array of Mediterranean dishes. Tomato Buffala features baked tomatoes and mozzarella topped with basil and olive oil. Grilled filet mignon is topped with creamy mushroom sauce and served with two sides. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ Pyramids Cafe — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — Diners will find Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

Casa Borrega — 1719 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 427-0654; www. facebook.com/casaborrega — The barroom and cantina is decorated with folk art, and there’s seating in the back courtyard. Chicken enchiladas are served with mole, rice and beans. Pozole de puerco is Mexican hominy soup featuring pork in spicy red broth with radish, cabbage and avocado and tostadas on the side. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Lucy’s Retired Surfers’ Bar & Restaurant — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD

Bombay Club — 830 Conti St., (504) 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — This elegant French Quarter hideaway is styled like an English manor and is known for its martini menu. Louisiana crab and roasted Creole tomato fondue is finished with manchego cheese, scallions and grilled crostini. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ The Columns — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — There’s live music in the Victorian Lounge at the Columns. The menu offers such Creole favorites as gumbo and crab cakes and there are cheese plates as well. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Gazebo Cafe — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ House of Blues — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Little Gem Saloon — 445 S. Rampart St., (504) 267-4863; www. littlegemsaloon.com — Little Gem offers creative contemporary and Creole dishes and live jazz. Louisiana black drum is topped with jumbo lump crabmeat and served with spinach, black-eyed peas and sherry cream. Rabbit and cauliflower gratin is served with apple-cabbage preserves. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ The Market Cafe — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Siberia — 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855; www.siberianola. com — The Russki Reuben features corned beef, Swiss cheese, kapusta (spicy cabbage) and Russian dressing on grilled rye bread. Potato and cheese pierogies are served with fried onions and sour cream. No reservations. Dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD

Cafe B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700; www. cafeb.com — This cafe serves an elevated take on the dishes commonly found in neighborhood restaurants. Grilled redfish is served with confit of wild mushrooms, spaghetti squash, charred Vidalia onion and aged balsamic vinegar. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$


OUT to EAT Joey K’s — 3001 Magazine St., (504) 891-0997; www.joeyksrestaurant. com — This casual eatery serves fried seafood platters, salads, sandwiches and Creole favorites such as red beans and rice. Daily specials include braised lamb shank, lima beans with a ham hock and chicken fried steak served with macaroni and cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Katie’s Restaurant — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. No reservations. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA

Marks Twain’s Pizza Landing — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza. com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www. theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies and diners can build their own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. The menu also includes salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Wit’s Inn — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

Bear’s Poboys at Gennaros — 3206 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 833-9226 — The roast beef po-boy features beef slow-cooked in house, sliced thin, soaked in gravy and dressed with lettuce, tomato, pickles and mayo on toasted Leidenheimer bread. The 10-ounce Bear burger is topped with roast beef debris, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, pickles and mayo on a toasted brioche seeded bun and served with fries or loaded potato salad. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Dress It — 535 Gravier St., (504) 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black

Killer Poboys — 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — At the back of Erin Rose, Killer Poboys offers a short and constantly changing menu of po-boys. The Dark and Stormy features pork shoulder slowly braised with ginger and Old New Orleans Spiced Rum and is dressed with house-made garlic mayo and lime cabbage. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun. Cash only. $ Magazine Po-Boy Shop — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Wilma’s Cheesesteaks — 801 Poland Ave., (504) 304-5411; www. jugheadsneworleans.com — Wilma’s specializes in cheese steaks on toasted Dong Phuong bread. The regular cheese steak features thin-sliced rib-eye, sauteed mushrooms, onions, peppers and garlic and melted provolone and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

SEAFOOD

Acme Oyster House — 724 Iberville St., (504) 522-5973; 1202 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 246-6155; 3000 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 309-4056; www. acmeoyster.com — The original Acme Oyster House in the French Quarter has served raw oysters for more than a century. The full menu includes char-grilled oysters, cooked seafood dishes and New Orleans staples. The Peace Maker po-boy combines fried shrimp and oysters. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Chad’s Bistro — 3216 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-9935; www.chadsbistro.com — The seafood Napoleon features fried eggplant medallions topped with crabmeat on a bed of angel hair pasta topped with shrimp au gratin sauce. The seafood boat is a bread loaf filled with fried shrimp, oysters and catfish and stuffed shimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri. dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

herb-roasted potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood & Italian Restaurant — 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, (504) 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, (504) 8380022; www.mredsno.com — The menu includes seafood, Italian dishes, fried chicken, po-boys, salads and daily specials. Eggplant casserole is stuffed with shrimp and crabmeat. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Red Fish Grill — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

STEAKHOUSE

Austin’s Seafood and Steakhouse — 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-5533; www. austinsno.com — Austin’s serves prime steaks, chops and seafood. Veal Austin features paneed veal topped with Swiss chard, bacon, mushrooms, asparagus, crabmeat and brabant potatoes on the side. Reservations recommended. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH

Mimi’s in the Marigny — 2601 Royal St., (504) 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Hot and cold tapas dishes range from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Vega Tapas Cafe — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE

Doson Noodle House —135 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 309-7283 — Traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlights the menu. The vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

Galley Seafood Restaurant — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-0955 — Galley serves Creole and Italian dishes. Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Pho Tau Bay Restaurant — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, (504) 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Grand Isle — 575 Convention Center Blvd., (504) 520-8530; www. grandislerestaurant.com — The Isle sampler, available as a half or full dozen, is a combination of three varieties of stuffed oysters: tasso, Havarti and jalapeno; house-made bacon, white cheddar and caramelized onions. The baked Gulf fish is topped with compound chili butter and served with local seasonal vegetables and

Rolls-N-Bowls — 605 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 309-0519; www.facebook.com/rolls-nbowlsnola — This casual Vietnamese eatery serves spring rolls, pho, rice and vermicelli bowls, banh mi, stir fry entrees and bubble tea. The vermicelli bowl features noodles over lettuce, cucumber and carrots; shrimp are optional. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Mellow Mushroom — 1645 Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 327-5407; 3131 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 644-4155; 8827 Oak St., (504) 345-8229; www.mellowmushroom. com — The Holy Shiitake pie tops an olive oil and garlic brushed crust with shiitake, button and portobello mushrooms, carmelized onions, mozzarella, montamore and Parmesan cheeses and black truffle oil. The Enlightened Spinach salad is topped with dried cherries, apples, candied pecans and feta cheese. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

47


48

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


MU S I C 5 0 FIL M 5 4 A RT 5 8 S TAGE 62 E V EN T S 6 7

what to know before you go

Extended exposure

AE +

PhotoNOLA features photo exhibits and events. By Will Coviello

W

Two major PhotoNOLA events happen at NOMA. Local photographer Deborah Luster delivers the keynote lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday. Luster is known for photos of Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola and exploring scenes of violent crime in New Orleans. The lecture is followed by the PhotoNOLA gala (tickets $25), which features music by the Norbert Slama Trio, circus entertainers, a photobooth, hors d’oeuvres and wine. Major PhotoNOLA events include two days of portfolio reviews, in which photographers get individual feedback from photography professionals (photographers must sign up in advance on the website). The public can view photos from the portfolio review at Photowalk. Seventy photographers display their work from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday in the Ogden Museum of Southern Art’s Patrick F. Taylor Library. Admission is free. There are three current photo exhibits in conjunction with PhotoNOLA. They include The Mythology of Florida, Annie Collinge: The Underwater Mermaid Theater and Into the Light, featuring photos from Ogden’s permanent collection. The Contemporary Arts Center is showing Water and The Great Picture, the largest photograph in the world (see “The Great Picture and PhotoNOLA,” p. 60). During December, the museum also features Unfolding Images, a temporary library of photo books. There are approximately 65 photography exhibitions in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, most of which opened the first week of December and run through

the end of Sky Tampa by Deb Schwedhelm is in her solo the month show at the New Orleans Photo Alliance gallery. or beyond. A few notable shows include PhotoNOLA DEC DEC New Orleans Various locations photogwww.photonola.org raphers Louviere + Vanessa’s The Oblivion Atlas at A Gallery for Fine Photography (241 Chartres St.), David Halliday: Threadbare at Arthur Roger Gallery (434 Julia St.) and Gerry Yaum: Body Sellers, about young sex workers in Thailand, at Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center (1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.). Several St. Claude art district galleries hold opening receptions for photography shows Saturday, which is the district’s monthly night of gallery openings. In Jefferson Parish, the East Bank Regional Library (4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie) presents a show of M. Kucera’s cyanotypes. At the Old U.S. Mint, the Louisiana State Museum presents photos from Pictures of the Year International’s photojournalism competition, culled from more than 50,000 entries in sports to war reporting. The New Orleans Photo Alliance (1111 St. Mary St.), which organizes PhotoNOLA, hosts a show of 2012 PhotoNOLA Photography Review winner Deb Schwedhelm’s work featuring underwater photos.

12 - 15

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

hen Russell Lord arrived in New Orleans to begin work as the New Orleans Museum of Art’s (NOMA) Curator of Photographs, Prints and Drawings in October 2011, he barely had time to participate in PhotoNOLA, the citywide photography festival featuring shows, portfolio reviews and other events. But he signed on as a portfolio reviewer anyway, and then again in 2012 and this year. During PhotoNOLA, NOMA has four photo shows up, including the project Lord had started in 2011, Photography at NOMA. For it, he culled 133 photographs from more than 10,000 photos in NOMA’s collection, and they represent all sorts of photos: fine art, documentary, scientific, advertising and more. “It tries to get to the cultural ambitions of photography,” Lord says. “How it’s been part of every facet of our life since its introduction in the 19th century.” NOMA also has two other photo exhibitions open at the museum. Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument features pictures the photographer and filmmaker (Shaft) shot in the 1940s in New York. There’s also a show of gifts to the photo collection in the recently opened A. Charlotte Mann and Joshua Mann Pailet Gallery. Lord also curated Water, the show of large-scale photos by Edward Burtynsky on view at the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC). The show features mesmerizing pictures of water works and aerial views of waterways, and Burtynsky wanted to premiere the exhibition in an area affected by water issues. Lord wasn’t able to house the show at NOMA and suggested it could be part of a growing relationship with the CAC. Lord also wanted to take advantage of the timing. “PhotoNOLA weighed in our decision about when we would have all of this material up,” he says. “PhotoNOLA is a pretty substantial effort to bring in all these scholars, curators, gallery owners, publishers and photographers. Lord adds that his goals for NOMA are similar to PhotoNOLA’s: making New Orleans a bigger part of national and international discussions of photography. Lord cofounded Focus, a group of photography curators and scholars from institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Getty Center, the Yale University Art Gallery and others. He convened a meeting of the group in New Orleans in November, and many are returning to see shows at PhotoNOLA or to review portfolios.

49


MUSIC LISTINGS

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Rocky’s Hot Fox Trot Orchestra Christmas Show, 8:30 Roosevelt Hotel — Robin Barnes, 5:30 Rusty Nail — Jenn Howard, 9 Siberia — Helen Gillet feat. Leyla McCalla, 9

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

Tropical Isle Original — Way Too Early, 1

THURSDAY 12

Banks Street Bar — Peezy N Dem, 9

WEDNESDAY 11

Banks Street Bar — Hookum High Rollers, Swamp Lillies, 7

Bombay Club — Lucas Davenport, 7

Banks Street Bar — Major Bacon, 10

Bayou Beer Garden — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

Bombay Club — Monty Banks,  7

Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Eudora Evans, 8

Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Geo Bass, 8 and 9

Bullet’s Sports Bar — Neisha Ruffins, 7:30

Cafe Negril — Gettin’ It, 7; Sam Cammarata & Dominick Grillo, 7:30; Another Day in Paradise, 9:30

Cafe Negril — Soul Project NOLA, 9

Bullet’s Sports Bar — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7:30 Chickie Wah Wah — Jon Cleary, 8; Nigel Hall Band, 10 Circle Bar — Dave Donero, Barton Carroll, Narcissy, 10 The Civic Theatre — John Waters, 8 Columns Hotel — John Rankin,  8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

St. Louis Cathedral — Evan Christopher, 6 Yuki Izakaya — Kanako Fuwa’s Moshi Moshi feat. Detroit Brooks, 8

TUESDAY 10

50

Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; The Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

St. Louis Cathedral — Melody Clouds, 6

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

d.b.a. — Treme Brass Band, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Hook & Wendell Brunious, 9:30 Dragon’s Den — Divergent Rhythms feat. The Real Steven, 10 Hard Rock Cafe — Domenic Fusca, 4 Hi-Ho Lounge — Stellar’s Jay, 9 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Jason Marsalis, 8

SUN 3/13

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

Chickie Wah Wah — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8; Indian Blue feat. Johnny Sansone, John Fohl & Monk Boudreaux, 10 Circle Bar — Coco Nut, 10

Carousel Piano Bar & Lounge — George French Quartet, 8:30 Carrollton Station Bar and Music Club — Papa Mali, Mark Mullins, Dave Malone, 10 Circle Bar — Brazos, Ski Lodge, 10

Columns Hotel — Andy Rogers, 8

Columns Hotel — Kristina Morales, 8

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

d.b.a. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Jenna McSwain, 9:30 Hard Rock Cafe — Josh Garrett Band, 9 Hi-Ho Lounge — Emily & the Velvet Ropes, 9

d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Strange Roux, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 10 Freret Street Publiq House — Brass-A-Holics, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — Getting It, The Kirk Nasty, The Melataun, 8 House of Blues — Kasey Musgraves, 8

Kerry Irish Pub — Jason Bishop, 9

House of Blues — Jet Lounge, 11

The Maison — Gregory Agid, 6; The Messy Cookers Jazz Band, 9

House of Blues Voodoo Garden — Domenic, 6

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — James Rivers Movement, 8

Maple Leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 11

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori Woods, 5; NOJO Jam, 8

Little Gem Saloon — Derrick Freeman’s Smokers World, 9

Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

Little Gem Saloon — Fancy Pants, 9

Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

The Maison — New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 6; Smoke N Bones, 9:30

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Geoff Clapp Quartet feat. Wes Anderson, 8 & 10

Maple Leaf Bar — Eddie Roberts (New Mastersounds) & Friends, 10

Spotted Cat — Andy J. Forest, 4; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10

Old Point Bar — Lucas Davenport, 8

Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

The Maison — Erin Demastes, 5; Shot Gun Jazz Band, 7; Barry Stephenson’s Pocket, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — The Trio feat. Johnny Vidacovich & Friends, 11 Oak — Steve Kelly, 9 Ogden Museum of Southern Art — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Band, 6 Old Point Bar — Gunja Dinns, 8 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Wayne Singleton & Same Ol’ Two Step, 8:30


MUSIC LISTINGS Roosevelt Hotel — Ingrid Lucia, 5:30 The Roosevelt Hotel Bar — Kirk Duplantis Trio, 9 Siberia — Liquor Store, Church shoes, Sideshow Tragedy, Giorgio Murderer, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Brian Seeger Organic Trio, 8 & 10

The Maison — Rambiling Letters, 4; The Billionaires, 7; The Local Skank, 10; Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, 11:30 Maple Leaf Bar — Dave Jordan Band, Fatty Waters, 10:30 Bob Roth’s Lounge — Von Zipper & the Pope, 7 Oak — Jenn Howard, 9

Spice Bar & Grill — Stooges Brass Band, 9

Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Chapel Blues, 9:30

Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6

One Eyed Jacks — George Porter Jr. & His Runnin’ Partners, 9

Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 5 Vaso — Tonya Boyd-Cannon, 10 Vaughan’s — Corey Henry & the Treme Funktet, 9 Yuki Izakaya — Norbert Slama, 8; Black Pearl, 11

FRIDAY 13 8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9 Antieau Gallery — Salt Wives, 6 Banks Street Bar — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 Bayou Beer Garden — Big Al & the Heavyweights, 9 Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Mia Borders, 10 Bombay Club — Tony Seville, 6; New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 9:30 Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Eudora Evans, 9 Bullet’s Sports Bar — Guitar Slim Jr., 7:30

Carrollton Station Bar and Music Club — Pigeon Town, 9 Chickie Wah Wah — Paul Sanchez, 8; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 11:11 Columns Hotel — Ted Long, 6 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Linnzi Zaorski, 7; Chubby Carrier, 10 DMac’s — Vincent Marini, 7 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — The Eric Traub Trio, 10 Golden Lantern — Nighthawk, 7

Saenger Theatre — Maze feat. Frankie Beverly, 8 Siberia — Mountain of Wizard, Die Rotzz and Sexual Injury, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Washboard Chaz Trio, 6; Cottonmouth Kings, 10 St. Roch Tavern — James Jordan & the Lonely Nights Band, 8 Tipitina’s — Dragon Smoke, St. Paul & the Broken Bones, 10 Treasure Chest Casino — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 7 Wild Lotus Yoga Downtown — Wild Lotus Band, 7:30 Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Shannon Powell Trio, 5

SATURDAY 14 21st Amendment — Chance Bushman, Adam Arredondo, Russell Ramirez, Joseph Faison, 8

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Sunpie & The LA. Sunspots, 10 Hermes Bar — Leroy Jones, 9:30 House of Blues — NOFX, 7:25 House of Blues Voodoo Garden — Cody Blaine, 1 Howlin’ Wolf Den — NolaRado, 2 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Shannon Powell, 8; Storyland Swing Band, midnight Little Gem Saloon — Kid Merv, 7 The Maison — Smoking Time Jazz Band, 4; T’ Canaille, 4; Los Po-boy-citos, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — Grayson Capps, 10:30 Oak — Jon Roniger, 9 Old Point Bar — Space Heaters, 9:30 Ritz-Carlton — Catherine Anderson, 1 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Eric Lindell & the Sunliners, The Mulligan Brothers, 9 Saenger Theatre — Maze feat. Frankie Beverly, 8 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Stanton Moore, David Torkanowsky & James Singleton, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Panorama Jazz Band, 6 Tipitina’s — Crowbar, White Light Cemetery, Delta Doom, The Void, 10 Yuki Izakaya — Norbert Slama, 8; Montegut, 11

8 Block Kitchen & Bar — Anais St. John, 9

SUNDAY 15

Banks Street Bar — Fatty Waters, 10

Bombay Club — Tony Seville, 7

Bayou Beer Garden — Egg Yolk Jubilee, 9 Blue Nile — Soul Project, 10 Bombay Club — Lucas Davenport, 6; Sasha Masakowski, 9:30 Bourbon Orleans Hotel — Geo Bass, 8 and 9 Buffa’s Lounge — Royal Rounders, 8 Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

Hermes Bar — Johnny Sansone, 9:30

Capri Blue Bar at Andrea’s Restaurant — Phil Melancon, 8

Howlin’ Wolf Music Club — HAMP Fest feat. Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Mike Dillon Band, Vox & the Hound, 9

Chickie Wah Wah — Susan Cowsill’s Covered in Vinyl, 10

Casa Borrega — Latin Jazz Festival, 5

Howlin’ Wolf Den — Water Seed, Kendra Joi, Soul Theory, 9

Circle Bar — Baak Gwai, Granddaddy Longlegs, Glish, 10

Le Bon Temps Roule — Tom Worrell, 7

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Little Gem Saloon — Raw Oyster Cult, 10:30

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

VOTED

Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like It Hot, 11 a.m. The Civic Theatre — Aaron Neville, 7 Columns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — Mikey B3 Band, 9 DMac’s — Michael Pearce, 11 a.m; Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 6 House of Blues — Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m. Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Lu & Charlie’s Revisited feat. Germain Bazzle, 8 Lakeview Presbyterian Church — Benny Grunch & the Bunch, 5 The Maison — Dave Easley, 4; Linnzi Zaorski, Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 7; Soul Project, 10 PAGE 53

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Capri Blue Bar at Andrea’s Restaurant — Phil Melancon, 8

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Six Strings of Christmas feat. Jonathan Boogie Long with Samantha Fish, 9

d.b.a. — Tuba Skinny, 7; Joe Krown, Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10

51


NEW ORLEANS PELICANS REGULAR SEASON THRU APRIL 16

NBA ALL-STAR GAME FEB 16 @ 7:00 PM

THE EAGLES FEB 23 @ 8:00 PM

311 MAR 11 @ 8:00 PM

JEFF DUNHAM

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ

NEW ORLEANS ARENA

JAN 22

MAR 15 @ 7:30 PM

SAINTS VS. BUCCANEERS DEC 29 @ 12:00 PM R+L CARRIERS NEW ORLEANS BOWL DEC 21 @ 8:00 PM

LHSAA STATE FARM PREP CLASSIC CHAMPIONSHIP DEC 12 - 14

ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL JAN 2 @ 7:30 PM

THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND AND TRAVIS TRITT R+L CARRIERS NEW ORLEANS BOWL FREE CONCERT

DEC 20 @ 7:00 PM SAINTS GAME DAY TAILGATING

CLUB XLIV SAINTS PREGAME

3 HRS PRIOR TO EACH HOME GAME

3 HRS PRIOR TO EACH HOME GAME

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the New Orleans Arena Box Office, select Wal-Mart locations or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000. www.mbsuperdome.com | www.neworleansarena.com | www.mbsuperdome.com/square

52


MUSIC LISTINGS PAGE 51

PREVIEW

Cat Power

CIGARETTES © SFNTC 4 2013

After all the battles — with the performance anxiety that forced her to appear with her back to befuddled audiences; the alcoholism and substance abuse that left her contemplating suicide in a Miami apartment (and her label insuring her tours); the landslide of hype that came too soon, the marionette strings she would snip from her skin and the lasting, calcifying bedrock of off-pop songs lying beneath — Chan Marshall won the war with P H O T O BY herself. Rising to the new CAMILLE G A RM EN D I A Sun (Matador), backed by a wind farm of synthesizers propelling her most pointed Cat Power DEC compositions since 2003 turnaround You Are Free, 8 p.m. Monday the human turbine known as Cat Power, forceful and feral once again at age 41, finally lets herself go House of Blues, with the beat. It doesn’t all work, but even when 225 Decatur St. she sounds like she’s fighting the current (as on (504) 310-4999 a sagging midsection that starts with “Real Life”), www.hob.com observing her so far out of her discomfort zone is as enthralling for us as it is energizing for Marshall. The album, in utero for eight years (a New York Times article from 2006 had the name and proclaimed it “finished”) before establishing dual citizenship in Malibu (where Marshall lived) and Paris (home to mix-master Philippe Zdar), begins and ends with a mirrored four-pack of tracks that evoke the solar cycle of its title: first single “Ruin,” an upward march of piano octaves and mounting dissatisfaction, 11-minute set piece “Nothin’ But Time” loaded with magic-hour mantras sung by Marshall and shouted back at her by a male chorus. “You wanna forgive/ And not be forgotten,” she tells herself. “You wanna live!” they reinforce. And just when you’re not sure that will be enough, who else but Iggy Pop shows up to share with her the final word: “It’s up to you to be a superhero/ It’s up to you to be like nobody.” That part, Marshall has down pat. Tickets $25 general admission, $75 balcony seating. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

16

Old Point Bar — John Autin, 3:30 Ritz-Carlton — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 Siberia — The Grasshoppers, Aurora Nealand & Blind Texas Marlin, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ed Volker Trio, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Pat Casey & the New Sounds, 10

Banks Street Bar — South Jones, 8 BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 6 Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 7 Chickie Wah Wah — Alexis & the Samurai, 8

House of Blues — Cat Power, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 The Maison — Chicken Waffles, 5; Gene’s Music Machine, 10

visit www.sfntc.com

Maple Leaf Bar — George Porter Jr. Trio, 10

Circle Bar — Infinite Apaches, Roosevelt House Band, 10

Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

Columns Hotel — David Doucet,  8

Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Living Legends feat. Maynard Chatters, 8

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

For more information on our organic growing programs,

The Roosevelt Hotel Bar — Jazz Factory Night with the James Partridge Septet, 9

St. Louis Cathedral — Amanda Shaw, 6

d.b.a. — Luke Winslow King, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10

Three Muses — Raphael & Norbert, 5:30

Dmac’s Bar & Grill — Danny Alexander, 8

Yuki Izakaya — Morella & the Wheels of If, 8

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9:30

MONDAY 16

Hard Rock Cafe — The Mumbles, 9

Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6

Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8

Hi-Ho Lounge — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8; Kelcy Mae, 10

Yuki Izakaya — Miki Fujii & Friends, 8

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville & Friends, 8 & 10

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Maple Leaf Bar — Joe Krown, Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 10

53

New Orleans Gambit 12-10-13.indd 1

11/13/13 9:02 AM


FILM

LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

NOW SHOWING 12 Years a Slave (R) — The locally filmed movie adaptation of Solomon Northup’s slave narrative tells the story of a free New Yorker being kidnapped and sold into slavery. Canal Place, Elmwood, Grand

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

The Best Man Holiday (R) — Malcolm D. Lee’s holiday-themed sequel to the 1999 classic black romantic comedy The Best Man is about college friends reuniting after 15 years, rekindling romance and reigniting rivalries. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank

54

Beyond All Boundaries (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. World War II Museum Black Nativity (PG) — A street-savvy teen who lives with his single mother (Jennifer Hudson) stays with far removed family (Forest Whitaker and Angela Bassett) for Christmas in director Kasi Lemmons’ film adaptation of Langston Hughes’ play. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank The Book Thief (PG-13) — The book-turned-film features a young girl who steals books to share with others and is sent to live with a foster family at a Jewish safe house in Germany during World War II. Canal Place, Elmwood, Regal Dallas Buyers Club (R) — Based on true events, this movie tells the story of a Texas electrician (Matthew McConaughey) who, after being diagnosed with HIV, makes a buyers club where fellow HIV-positive people buy alternative treatments. Canal Place, Elmwood Delivery Man (PG-13) — A once-frequent sperm donor (Vince Vaughn) learns that not only has he fathered 533 children in the past 20 years, but 142 of them are

filing a lawsuit to reveal his identity. Canal Place, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Frozen (PG) — The Disney animated movie tells the tale of what happens when a prophecy traps a kingdom in a never-ending winter. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank Great White Shark 3D (NR) — Shark encounters are shared in the documentary. Entergy IMAX Homefront (R) — Jason Statham, James Franco and Winona Ryder star in this action-thriller about a former DEA agent and the local meth kingpin who hates him. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (PG-13) — Francis Lawrence directs the second movie in the Hunger Games series featuring Katniss and Peeta becoming targets of the Capitol following their hubbub-sparking victory. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Prytania, Regal, Westbank Hurricane On The Bayou (NR) — The film tells the story of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX I Am Divine (NR) — Jeffrey Schwarz’ documentary tells the story of how Divine became John Waters’ star actress and a drag icon. Chalmette Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (R) — An octogenarian and his 8-year-old grandson go across the states secretly filming the public’s reactions to their antics, which include tipping caskets at funerals and doing pole dancing routines at girls’ beauty pageants. Elmwood, Grand, Regal Last Vegas (PG-13) — A trio of men in their 60s throw a

Vegas-style bachelor party for their notoriously single friend (Michael Douglas) who finally proposes to his girlfriend who is half his age. Elmwood, Grand, Regal Oldboy (R) — In Spike Lee’s latest joint, a remake of a dark 2003 Korean thriller, an ad rep seeks revenge after having been kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years. Canal Place, Elmwood, Westbank Out of the Furnace (R) — When a steel mill worker (Christian Bale) vanishes and law enforcement isn’t doing enough to find him, his brother (Casey Affleck) takes matters into his own hands. Canal Place, Clearview, Elmwood, Westbank Penguins 3D (NR) — A king penguin returns to his native land in the sub-Antarctic to find a mate. Entergy IMAX Philomena (PG-13) — A journalist grows deeply vested in the true story of a woman whose son was taken away after she was forced to live in a convent while pregnant. Canal Place, Elmwood Santa v. Snowman 3D (G) — A lonely snowman discovers Santa’s Workshop but gets caught. Entergy IMAX Thor: The Dark World (PG-13) — In the sequel to 2011’s Thor, the title character (Chris Hemsworth) embarks upon his most challenging journey yet. Canal Place, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Regal, Westbank

OPENING FRIDAY The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) — The latest installment in the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit series has Bilbo and Gandalf going on a journey to retrieve their gold from Smaug the dragon. Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Westbank Tyler Perry’s A Madea Christmas (PG-13) — The ballsy, buxom family matriarch visits a friend’s daughter out in the country for Christmas. Canal Place, Chalmette, Clearview, Elmwood, Grand, Westbank

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 12 Years a Slave: Solomon Northup’s Odyssey (NR) — Gordon Parks’ 1984 made-for-television film was the first on-screen presentation of the story of Solomon Northup. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgiest American Promise (NR) — Middle-class black parents document their son and his best friend through their matriculation at Manhattan’s prestigious Dalton School. 6 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, Zeitgiest


FILM LISTINGS REVIEW

The Armstrong Lie

The Armstrong Lie (R)

PAGE 57

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

The first red flag signaling the bumpy ride ahead for Directed by viewers of The Armstrong Lie — a two-hours-plus docAlex Gibney umentary about disgraced cycling champion Lance Limited release Armstrong — occurs two minutes into the film. In his awkward opening narration, director Alex Gibney explains that after intending to make a documentary about Armstrong’s comeback from retirement in 2009 he “had to put the film aside” when Armstrong’s “doping scandal erupted.” Coming after years of public accusations and mounting evidence against Armstrong, that eruption might have been welcomed as serendipity, an instance of being in the right place with a camera as dramatic events unfolded. But Gibney had all but completed a film portrait of Armstrong as a true American hero. Gibney shot a lot more footage and reimagined his film, but the result is a troubling and schizophrenic work that doesn’t really match the story it’s required to tell. Gibney should have known better. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary in 2006 for Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, and won the award two years later with Taxi to the Dark Side. Gibney has built a reputation as an important filmmaker with a gift for handling complex subject matter. But he allowed his admiration for Armstrong to cloud his judgment. That’s not hard to understand: On the surface, Armstrong’s story seems one of singular courage and dedication. Early in his career, Armstrong beat testicular cancer that had spread all the way to his brain and went on to win the grueling Tour de France bicycle race an unprecedented seven times. He founded what came to be known as the Livestrong Foundation, which has raised $500 million to “inspire and empower” cancer survivors. Under pressure mainly through damning testimony delivered by former teammates, Armstrong confessed his well-hidden and careerlong use of performance-enhancing drugs to Oprah Winfrey in a January 2013 interview. As seen in The Armstrong Lie, the cyclist’s greatest skill has been using his personal charisma and the power that came with his success to convince — or bully, as needed — teammates, race officials and journalists to support a story that was obviously too good to be true. It’s intermittently fascinating to see Armstrong’s personal pathology put on vivid display. He remained a uniquely self-righteous liar happy to destroy those who crossed him — right up until the moment his house of cards collapsed. The film also features amazing footage from deep inside the world’s greatest cycle races gathered with cameras attached to the bikes of Armstrong’s teammates. But this technique creates one of the film’s many unanswered questions: Why would fellow cyclists who’ve trained their entire lives for these races and who routinely shave their legs for the tiniest reduction in wind resistance agree to saddle their bikes with bulky HD cameras? Abuse of Power might have been the most fitting title for Gibney’s film. The Armstrong Lie seems a missed opportunity because it refuses to offer a meaningful perspective or analysis of the most flagrant cheating scandal in sports history. Armstrong’s story surely says a lot about American culture and our collective worship of celebrity, athletic success and money (Armstrong earned $125 million over the course of his cycling career). Instead, Gibney allows Armstrong the last word, and he suggests vindication may be his when future generations view his achievements in the context of widespread doping in his sport. Don’t believe the hype. — KEN KORMAN

55


56

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


FILM LISTINGS PAGE 55

Filmmaker/photographer Gordon Parks’ version of Solomon Northrup’s account of being kidnapped and sold into slavery premiered on PBS in 1984. Parks also composed the score for Twelve Years a Slave: Solomon Northrup’s Odyssey. It screens at Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center through Dec. 12.

Casino Royale (NR) — James Bond comes out of retirement in this 1967 spy movie spoof. 10 a.m. Wednesday, Prytania Elf (PG) — The Downtown Development District hosts a free outdoor screening of a 2003 comedy about a tall man raised as an elf (Will Ferrell) with food from Dat Dog Express for sale. Bringing chairs and blankets is encouraged, and the first 50 families get free fleece blankets. 6:30 p.m. Friday, Spanish Plaza Is the Man Who is Tall Happy? (NR) — Michel Gondry’s latest film is a series of interviews with Noam Chomsky, done in hand-drawn animation. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Zeitgeist It’s a Wonderful Life (NR) — James Stewart and Donna Reed star in the 1946 Christmas classic about a man who wishes he’d never been born. 10 a.m. Sunday, Prytania

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (R) — Quentin Tarantino’s sequel to Kill Bill is presented on 35 mm film. 10 p.m. Sunday, Prytania Live at the Foxes’ Den (NR) — A corporate lawyer reconsiders his career options after befriending the staff and regulars at a cocktail lounge. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist The Nightmare Before Christmas (PG) — The midnight screening of Tim Burton’s 1993 animated fantasy about the king of a Halloween village learning what Christmas is about is BYOB, and the 9:30 a.m. screening features kids’ activities. 9:30 a.m. & midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Pretty Old (NR) — Gathr hosts a screening of Walter Matteson’s documentary that follows five women competing in the Ms. Senior Sweetheart Beauty Pageant. 7:30 p.m. Monday, Zeitgeist The Punk Singer: A Film About Kathleen Hanna (NR) — Sini Anderson explores the life of activist-musician Kathleen Hanna, of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre. 9:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, Zeitgeist

The Theatres at Canal Place, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., (504) 581-2540; www.thetheatres. com; Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, (504) 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies,com; AMC Clearview Palace 12, Clearview Mall, 4486 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 887-1257; www.amctheatres. com; AMC Elmwood Palace 20, 1200 Elmwood Park Blvd., Harahan, (504) 733-2029; www. amctheatres.com; Entergy IMAX Theatre, 1 Canal St., (504) 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org; The Grand 16 Slidell, 1950 Gause Blvd. W., Slidell, (985) 641-1889; www. thegrandtheatre.com; New Orleans Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com; Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., (504) 891-2787; www.theprytania.com; Regal Covington Stadium 14, 69348 Hwy. 21, Covington, (985) 871-7787; www.regmovies.com; AMC Westbank Palace 16, 1151 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, (504) 263-2298; www.amctheatres. com; Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

A Band Called Death (NR) — DJ Soul Sister hosts a screening of a rockumentary about Death, the first black punk band. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Comedy Theater

You Will be my Son (R) — The owner of an affluent vineyard and his son work together. 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. Friday-Monday, Chalmette

57


ART

LISTINGS

Best Color Retention • Unsurpassed Durability • Better Paint

MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE

COATINGS Your Local FarrellCalhoun Paint Dealer

Delivery Available • 504-948-9620

nolapaintandsupplies.com • farrellcalhoun.com

2900 Elysian Fields Ave Mon-Fri 7A.M.- 5P.M. | Sat 8A.M.- 12P.M.

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

OPENINGS Barrister’s Gallery. 2331 St. Claude Ave., (504) 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — Group photography exhibition. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. The Foundation Gallery. 608 Julia St., (504) 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola. com — “Tips: An Insider’s Look at Bourbon Street,” PhotoNOLA exhibition by Kara Khan benefiting Cafe Reconcile. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Freret Clay Center. 2525 Jena St., (504) 919-8050; www. freretclaycenter.com — “The Human Condition,” metal rusts, wood rots’ collage, ceramic tiles and vessels by Barbie L’Hoste and Bill Darrow. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

58

The Front. 4100 St. Claude Ave., (504) 301-8654; www.nolafront. org — “PhotoBOMB,” group photography exhibition curated by Lee Deigaard and AnnieLaurie Erickson. “Lawss of the Land,” photography by JoAnne Carson and Kant Smith. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Gallery talk 2 p.m. Sunday.

Follow us on Facebook

The Garden District Gallery. 1332 Washington Ave., (504) 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Holiday Open House,” mixed media group exhibition. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. Good Children Gallery. 4037 St. Claude Ave., (504) 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Friday the 13th,” PhotoNOLA exhibition curated by Sophie T. Lvoff. “Unhad Conversations I Have With Girls I Love,” photography by Patrick Duncan. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Panel discussion 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. International House. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com — “Magdalena,” mixed media juried exhibition of art about Mary Magdalene. Award ceremony and artists’ reception 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation. 1205 N. Rampart St., (504) 522-4786; www. jazzandheritage.org — “Epaul

Julien: A 10-Year Retrospective,” photography by Epaul Julien curated by Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. Ogden Museum of Southern Art. 925 Camp St., (504) 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Currents 2013,” New Orleans Photo Alliance’s member showcase. Jurors’ talk and opening reception 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. Saint Lawrence. 219 N. Peters St., (504) 525-4111; www. saintlawrencenola.com — “Exit Stage Right,” behindthe-scenes music festival photography by Zack Smith. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Staple Goods. 1340 St. Roch Ave., (504) 908-7331; www. postmedium.org/staplegoods — “The Goods,” mixed media group exhibition. Artists’ reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Body Sellers: The Sex Workers of Thailand,” photography by Gerry Yaum. Opening reception 5 p.m to 8 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES A Gallery For Fine Photography. 241 Chartres St., (504) 568-1313; www.agallery. com — “Beyond Thought: Homage to Clarice Lispector,” photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through December. Photographs and photo books from all eras by various photographers, ongoing. AKG Presents the Art of Dr. Seuss. 716 Bienville St., (504) 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com/dr-seuss — Works by Dr. Seuss, ongoing. Alex Beard Studio. 712 Royal St., (504) 309-0394; www.alexbeardstudio.com — Drawings and paintings by Alex Beard, ongoing. Anton Haardt Gallery. 2858 Magazine St., (504) 309-4249; www.antonart.com — “Deep Blues,” Southern folk art group exhibition, ongoing.

Ariodante Gallery. 535 Julia St., (504) 524-3233; www. ariodantegallery.com — Group craft exhibition, through December. Arthur Roger Gallery. 432 Julia St., (504) 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery. com — “Chromaccumulations,” minimalist art by Pard Morrison; “Still Life / Nightscape,” exhibition of object scans on dye-infused aluminum by Kate Blacklock; “Threadbare,” collection of photography by David Halliday; All through Dec. 28. Beneito’s Art. 3618 Magazine St., (504) 891-9170; www. bernardbeneito.com — Oil paintings by Beneito Bernard, ongoing. Boyd | Satellite. 440 Julia St., (504) 581-2440; www.boydsatellitegallery.com — “Celebrity,” photographs of celebrities and entertainers by Steven Forster, through December. Callan Contemporary. 518 Julia St., (504) 525-0518; www.callancontemporary. com — “We Thought We Were Drowning But It Was Only Love,” paintings by Margaret Evangeline, through December. Carol Robinson Gallery. 840 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery. com — “Annual Christmas Exhibition,” group painting exhibition, through December. Catalyst Gallery of Art. 5207 Magazine St., (504) 220-7756; www.catalystgalleryofart.com — Group exhibition of New Orleans-inspired art, ongoing. Chester Allen’s Oasis of Energy. 221 Dauphine St., (504) 292-8365; www.chesterallen-oasisofenergy.tumblr. com — “Universal Groove,” silversmithing by Chester Allen, ongoing. Cole Pratt Gallery. 3800 Magazine St., (504) 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Liasons,” black and white images of Paris by Wallace Merritt; “Rising Tides,” monotytpe prints by Marie Bukowski; Both through Dec. 28. Courtyard Gallery. 1129 Decatur St., (504) 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing. com — New Orleans-themed reclaimed wood carvings by Daniel Garcia, ongoing. Du Mois Gallery. 4609 Freret St., (504) 818-6032; www. dumoisgallery.com — “art*,” painting on canvas and board and photography by Brian McCormick and Amy McKinnon, through Dec, 21. East Bank Regional Library. 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190; www. jefferson.lib.la.us — “Blue,” cyanotype images by M. Kucera, through Dec. 27 Gallery Burguieres. 736 Royal St., (504) 301-1119; www.galleryburguieres.com — Mixed media by Ally Burguieres, ongoing.


ART LISTINGS Graphite Galleries. 936 Royal St., (504) 565-3739; www.graphitenola.com — Group mixed media exhibition, ongoing. J & S Gallery. 3801 Jefferson Hwy., (504) 952-9163 — Wood carvings and paintings by local artists, ongoing. Jean Bragg Gallery of Southern Art. 600 Julia St., (504) 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Waterways of Louisiana,” group painting exhibition, through December. Jonathan Ferrara Gallery. 400 Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “circa: now,” photography, video and mixed media art by Generic Art Solutions; “Fallen Animals,” photography by Marcus Kenney; Both through December. La Madama Bazarre. 1007 St. Mary St., (504) 236-5076; www. lamadamabazarre.com — Group exhibition celebrating the whimsical and weird side of Louisiana, ongoing. Lemieux Galleries. 332 Julia St., (504) 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Spiritus Sanctus,” watercolor and colored pencil on paper about spirituality by Mary Lee Eggart; Footnotes,” digital photography by Leslie Elliottsmith; Both through Dec. 28. Lisa Victoria Gallery. 616 Royal St., (504) 315-0850; www.lisavictoriagallery.com — Mixed media group exhibition, ongoing.

Martin Lawrence Gallery New Orleans. 433 Royal St., (504) 299-9055; www.martinlawrence.com — Mark Kostabi exhibition, through Sunday. Melissa Bonin Gallery. 3714 Magazine St., (337) 380-6927; www.melissabonin.com — Photographs by Herman Mhire, through Sunday. Michalopoulos Gallery. 617 Bienville St., (504) 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — “Down and Dirty,” paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. Morrison. 1507 Magazine St., (504) 451-3303; www.morrisonsculpture.com — Sculpture and drawings by Thomas Randolph Morrison, ongoing. New Orleans Photo Alliance. 1111 St. Mary St., (504) 610-4899; neworleansphotoalliance. org — “From the Sea,” Deb Schwedhelm’s PhotoNOLA Review Prize-winning underwater photography exhibition, through Jan. 19. New Orleans Public Library, Robert E. Smith Branch. 6301 Canal Blvd., 596-2638; www. nutrias.org — “December Quilt Exhibition at Smith Library,” quilts made my Lakeview Sheperd Center seniors, through December.

Newcomb Art Gallery. Woldenberg Art Center, (504) 314-2406; www.newcombartgallery. tulane.edu — “Women, Art and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise,” largest presentation of Newcomb arts and crafts in nearly 30 years, through March 9. Octavia Art Gallery. 454 Julia St., (504) 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “The Art of Empathy,” photography by E2 (Elizabeth Kleinveld & Epaul Julien); “Close to Home,” photography by Tina Freeman; Both through Dec. 28. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., Second floor, (504) 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — Contemporary crafts by Sean Dixson, Cathy Cooper-Stratton, Margo Manning and Nellrea Simpson and others, ongoing. Sheila Phipps Studio & Gallery. 8237 Oak St., (504) 596-6031 — Oil and acrylic portraits and abstracts, ongoing. Sibley Gallery. 3427 Magazine St., (504) 899-8182; www.sibleygallery.com — “Haute Lumiere,” group photography exhibition, through December. Soren Christensen Gallery. 400 Julia St., (504) 5699501; www.sorengallery. com — “The In-Between,” conceptual photography by Brooke Shaden; “Witness,” mixed media abstract art by Gretchen Weller Howard; Both through December. Ten Gallery. 4432 Magazine St., (504) 333-1414; www.facebook. com/NOLAartsalon — “Facade,” large scale mixed media on paper by Sarah Wiseman;“Grotesquerie,” paintings, sculptures and prints by Matthew Kirscht and Michael Bonfiglio; Both through Dec. 29. UNO-St. Claude Gallery. 2429 St. Claude Ave., (504) 2806493; www.finearts.uno.edu — “Objects in Mirrors,” group photography exhibition, through Sunday. Vieux Carre Gallery. 507 St. Ann St., (504) 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “French Quarter Scenes,” paintings by Sarah Stiehl, through Jan. 1. Whisnant Galleries. 343 Royal St., (504) 524-9766; www.whisnantgalleries.com — Ethnic, religious and antique art, sculpture, textile and porcelain, ongoing. Windsor Fine Art. 221 Royal St., (504) 586-0202; www. windsorfineart.com — Etchings, engravings and woodcuts by Rembrandt van Rijn and

Albrecht Durer, through Jan. 19.

MUSEUMS Ashe Cultural Arts Center. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — “The African Presence in Mexico: From Yanga to the Present,” National Museum of Mexican Art pieces about the contributions of Africans to Mexican culture, through Feb. 28. Contemporary Arts Center. 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “Unfolding Images,” group exhibition celebrating the printed image in book form, through Dec. 29. “Water,” large-scale aerial photographs by Edward Burtynsky, through Jan. 19. “Cinema Reset,” video group exhibition, through Feb. 2. “SubMERGE,” art by Lee Deigaard, through Feb. 20. Historic New Orleans Collection. 533 Royal St., (504) 5234662; www.hnoc.org — “Occupy New Orleans! Voices from the Civil War,” collection of items conveying New Orleanians’ feelings during the Civil War, through March 9. “Civil War Battlefields and National Parks,” photography by A. J. Meek, through April 5. Longue Vue House and Gardens. 7 Bamboo Road, (504) 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “A Year and One Day,” sculpture by Andy Behrle, through Dec. 20. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo. 701 Chartres St., (504) 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Images and Instruments: Medical History,” artifacts and images of 19th and 20th century medical equipment, ongoing. Louisiana State Museum Presbytere. 751 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm.crt. state.la.us — “They Call Me Baby Doll: A Carnival Tradition,” an exhibit about the Baby Dolls, and other black women’s Carnival groups, through January. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond”; both ongoing. Madame John’s Legacy. 632 Dumaine St., (504) 568-6968; www.crt.state.la.us — “The Palm, the Pine and the Cypress: Newcomb College Pottery of New Orleans,” ongoing. National World War II Museum. 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “We Can...We Will...We Must!,” allied propaganda posters of WWII, through Feb. 16. New Orleans Museum of Art. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — “The Making of an Argument,” photography by Gordon Parks, through Jan. 5. “Lin Emery: In Motion,” kinetic aluminum sculptures by Lin Emery, PAGE 60

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

M. Francis Gallery. 1938 Burgundy St., (504) 931-1915; www. mfrancisgallery.com — Acrylic on canvas by Myesha, ongoing.

New Orleans Public Library, Rosa Keller Branch. 4300 S. Broad St., (504) 596-2675; www. nutrias.org — “Inquisitive Minds, Artistic Answers,” Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana member exhibit, through Jan. 11.

59


ART LISTINGS PAGE 59

The Great Picture and PhotoNOLA

REVIEW

THRU DEC

15

The Great Picture: The world’s largest photograph Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3805; www.cacno.org

The Great Picture, on view at the Contemporary Arts Center, is billed as the biggest photograph ever made. At more than 107 feet wide and 31 feet tall, its total of 3,375 square feet is a number more associated with buildings than photographs. In fact, it PhotoNOLA was made in an aircraft hangar that was THRU turned into a giant pinhole camera and exhibitions DEC darkroom for the occasion. The image itself Various locations; is a stark military airport rendered as a vast www.photonola.org black-and-white negative on photo-sensitive cloth. Dark and ghostly, it recalls photography’s early days, when most photos were dark and ghostly, but it took almost two more centuries to make one this big — a final salute, perhaps, to the old darkroom photography process in an overwhelmingly digital age. The exhibition of the world’s biggest photograph coincides with the annual PhotoNOLA festival, which gets bigger each year (also see p. 49). Founded by the New Orleans Photo Alliance in 2006, when the survival of the city was still uncertain, PhotoNOLA sponsored workshops and portfolio reviews by 2007, and since then local galleries and museums have participated in steadily increasing numbers with their own photo exhibitions in conjunction with the event’s official offerings. Under the leadership of Jennifer Shaw, the scale of these events has increased dramatically as the number of related exhibitions has grown, with more than 60 gallery and museum shows in addition to the Dec. 12-15 workshops and lectures. All this activity has turned PhotoNOLA into a national event, and how such a low-key organization has managed to orchestrate it with mainly grassroots, volunteer support is one of those mysteries that make New Orleans one of the DIY capitals of the world. This year’s fundraising offerings include Josephine Sacabo’s limited-edition print Las Estrellas and the new Luna Press book Inventing Reality: New Orleans Visionary Photography (which I curated). — D. ERIC BOOKHARDT

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

31

60

through Jan. 12. “Photography at NOMA,” group photography exhibition, through Jan. 19. “Cities of Ys,” art by Camille Henrot, through Feb. 23. Ogden Museum of Southern Art. 925 Camp St., (504) 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Into the Light,” photographs by various artists, through Jan. 5. Works by Walter Inglis Anderson from the museum’s permanent collection; an exhibition of

southern regionalists from the museum’s permanent collection; paintings by Will Henry Stevens; all ongoing. Old U.S. Mint. 400 Esplanade Ave., (504) 568-6993; www. crt.state.la.us/museum/properties/usmint — “Visions of Excellence,” group exhibition of award-winning photojournalism from around the world, through Feb. 28. The Saratoga. 212 Loyola Ave.;

www.moviehousenola.com — “Moviehouse NOLA,” multimedia exhibition about historic New Orleans movie theaters, through Feb. 9. Williams Research Center. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., (504) 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Daguerreotypes to Digital: A Presentation of Photographic Processes,” historical exhibition of photography from 1840 to present, through March 29.


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

61


STAGE LISTINGS

ADD A

Lil’ Soul TO YOUR

Black & Gold

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, listings editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

WHEN WE

cater YOUR NEXT GAME PARTY!

VOTED BEST SOUL FOOD!

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

2401 St. Ann St. • NOLA • 70119 Mon-Sat 11am-5pm • 504-822-9503

62

THEATER 3 x 3. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Actors perform three writers’ new one-act plays. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Annie. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., Kenner, (504) 461-9475; www.rivertowntheaters.com — Kids and adults star in the classic musical about a redheaded orphan named Annie and her dog Sandy. Ensemble cast member Madison Kerth played Annie in the Broadway national tour. Tickets $39. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Anton, Neko, Kuri. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 5283800; www.cacno.org — The autobiographical performance piece follows Anton, a stray cat suffering with leukemia, observing his neighborhood. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — A family of naughty children almost ruin the church’s annual Christmas pageant. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Deathtrap. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-8676; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — Frederick Mead directs Ira Levin’s comedic thriller about a writer (James Howard Wright), his wife (Margeaux Fanning), a playwright (Adam Stephenson), an attorney (Doug Barden) and a Dutch psychic (Rebecca Meyers). Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday. Disney Junior Live on Tour: Pirate and Princess Adventure. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., (504) 280-7171; www.arena.

uno.edu — Mickey and Minnie Mouse, characters from Sofia the First and Jake and the Never Land Pirates, Cinderella, Peter Pan and Captain Hook have a high seas adventure. Kids help Doc McStuffins take care of her toys before the show. Tickets start at $18. 7 p.m. Thursday, 10:30 a.m., 4 p.m. & 7 p.m. Friday. Grenadine McGunkle’s Double-Wide Christmas. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Running with Scissors presents a holiday show set in a trailer park. Tickets $25. 8:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday. Long Day’s Journey Into Night. Art Klub, 519 Elysian Fields Ave., (504) 943-6565; www.artistinc.org — Promethean Theatre Co. and Four Humours Theater present Eugene O’Neill’s play about a family’s trials, tribulations and ultimate destruction. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday. National Performance Networks Live & Onstage Performance Showcases. The Civic Theatre, 510 O’Keefe Ave., (504) 272-0865; www.civicnola.com — Local thespians, dancers, poets, musicians and puppeteers perform as part of the annual meeting of National Performance Network and Visual Artists Network. Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday, 3:30 p.m. Saturday. The Naughty List: An Evening of Monologues, Mistletoe & Mistakes. Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., (504) 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — Seven local playwrights present monologues about the holiday season and an ugly sweater contest. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday. Pat Bourgeois’ Debauchery. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — In its fourth year, the city’s

REVIEW

Charles Busch

Playwright/actor Charles Busch (Vampire Lesbians of Sodom, Psycho Beach Party) performed an evening of cabaret material in a one-night show at Cafe Istanbul as part of the Broadway at NOCCA series. There were some bright spots — a tribute to the hard-boiled dialogue of films noir was amusing, as were a few of Busch’s stories about show business — but much of the evening was wan, low-key to the point of slowness and creaky in spots, particularly a Bette Davis-Joan Crawford reading, a tired cliche that got chuckles rather than laughs. Busch, who has been sharp and amusing in drag personae in spoof films like Die, Mommie, Die! and on YouTube videos, was surprisingly downbeat throughout the evening, and his singing voice was strained from one of the earliest numbers (Billie Holiday’s “My Old Flame”). A guest appearance by New Orleans’ own Varla Jean Merman (aka Jeffery Roberson) jolted the audience to life in the middle of the show with an indescribably crazy Swiss bell-ringing act as performed by Robersonas-Varla-as-Quasimodo (“Ring Them Bells,” with lyrics by Ricky Graham). It brought down the house. Busch’s pianist Tom Judson was fine, offering occasional jokes and a nice solo. Unfortunately, things slowed down considerably after that, and by the time Busch and Judson encored with a duet of “Close to You,” Busch’s voice seemed to be gone entirely. During the curtain call, the audience applauded politely for Busch and Judson, but Merman/Roberson did not, for whatever reason, take a bow. This was Busch’s first appearance in New Orleans, and it would be great to see him return with one of his plays. — KEVIN ALLMAN only live soap opera has an ongoing storyline full of humor, romance and drama. Ugly Christmas sweaters are encouraged and Southern Rep’s Christmas party follows. Admission $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, A Very Merry Unauthorized Children’s Scientology Pageant. Mid-City Theatre, 3540 Toulouse St., (504) 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — A.J. Allegra and Natalie Boyd direct a cast of children in a Scientology-themed parody of a kids’ holiday pageant. Tickets $25. 7 p.m. FridaySaturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. Young Audiences’ Winter Spotlight. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., (504) 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — Students from 11 Young Audiences programs in Orleans and Jefferson parishes dance, sing, play instruments and present a film. Free admission, donations to support Young Audiences accepted. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

BURLESQUE, CABARET & VARIETY The Amazing Acro-Cats. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — The Amazing Acro-Cats, a group of felines trained by Samantha Martin, perform their annual Christmas show. The Rock-Cats play Christmas carol selections including “A Cat in a Manger,” “Catnip Roasting on an Open Fire,” and “God Rest Ye Merry Kittens.” Visit www.circuscats.com for details. Tickets $18. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday. Beach Blanket Burlesque. Tiki Tolteca, 301 N. Peters St., (504) 267-4406; www. facebook.com/tikitolteca — GoGo McGregor hosts a free burlesque show. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Bits & Jiggles. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., (504) 265-8855 — The show mixes comedy and burlesque. Free admission. 9 p.m. Monday.

Burlesque Ballroom. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., (504) 553-2299; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Romy Kaye and the Brent Walsh Jazz Trio. Call (504) 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday. Bustout Burlesque. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — Medianoche performs with GoGo McGregor and Cherry Bombshell. Dante and Chris McDaniel host, and Athena and Matt Bell’s Bustout Burlesque Jazz Band provide music. Tickets start at $22. 8 p.m. & 10:30 p.m. Friday. Freaksheaux to Geaux: A Time Traveler’s Delight. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge. com — Freaksheaux to Geaux explores space and time with special guests Aurora Natrix, Morgan La Rue, Eric Odditorium and


116D_NO_sister_Gambit_ad_FINAL_Layout 1 12/3/13 4:53 PM Page 1

STAGE LISTINGS Iggy Ingler. Visit timetravelersdelight.bpt. me for details. General admission $15, VIP $25. 10 p.m. Friday. Lightwire: A Very Electric Christmas. Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., (504) 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com — America’s Got Talent finalists Lightwire Theater present a neon-lighted original holiday drama. Tickets start at $30. 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. & 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Nightmare Before Christmas Burlesque. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-8676; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Rev. Spooky LeStrange and the Billion Dollar Baby Dolls present a live burlesque version of the creepy Christmas movie. Admission $10. 10:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

AUDITIONS Anthony Bean Community Theater’s 14th Season. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 8627529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — The theater seeks actors, singers and dancers. Call for appointments and audition requirements. 2 p.m. Saturday. The Hotel Plays. Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, (504) 523-4352; www.leh.org — The Tennessee Williams Literary Festival seeks cast members for Williams’ Hotel Plays. 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Monday-Tuesday. Willy Wonka Jr.. JPAS Rehearsal Warehouse, 5005 Bloomfield St., (504) 885-2000; www.jpas.org — Kids ages 7 to 14 can audition. Call Lynne at (504) 885-2000 ext. 211 to schedule a Saturday appointment.

DANCE

Accessible Comedy. Buffa’s Lounge, 1001 Esplanade Ave., (504) 949-0038; www.buffaslounge.com — J. Alfred Potter and Jonah Bascle do stand-up shows on a rotating basis. 11:55 p.m. Friday. Allstar Comedy Revue. House of Blues Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — Leon Blanda hosts the stand-up comedy show with special guests and a band. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday. Comedy Catastrophe. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., (504) 944-0099; www. lostlovelounge.com — Cassidy Henehan hosts the weekly comedy showcase. Free admission. 9 p.m. Tuesday. Comedy Gumbeaux. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 828 S. Peters St., (504) 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open-mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. PAGE 65

BroadwayInNewOrleans.com

Ticketmaster.com

800.982.ARTS

SISTERACTBROADWAY.COM

(2787) •

Groups: 504.287.0372

Due to the nature of live entertainment dates, times, prices, shows, actors, venues and sales are subject to change without notice. All tickets subject to convenience charges.

Jr. Page (7.166” x 8.083”) New Orleans SISTER ACT Ad for Gambit Weekly, Runs: 12/10 (bertsDesign Job# 109.13.116D)

PHOTOS BY JOAN MARCUS

COMEDY

ON SALE NOW! • DECEMBER 17-22 • SAENGER THEATRE

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

The Nutcracker. Jesuit High School, 4133 Banks St., (504) 483-3816; www.jesuitnola. org — Lelia Haller Ballet Classique’s Ballet Louisiane performs the classic holiday ballet. Adults $20, children 11 and under $10. 7:30 p.m. Friday, 3:30 p.m. Saturday. The Nutracker Suite. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, (504) 865-5105; www.tulane. edu — New Orleans Recreation Development Commission and New Orleans Ballet Association present a version of the classic holiday ballet performed by senior citizens and children. Tickets $5. 3 p.m. & 6 p.m. Sunday.

63


CAC 2013–2014 PERFORMING ARTS SEASON TICKETS ON SALE NOW

FAIFAI

WITH 504WARD

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

December 14, 2013 7:30pm Contemporary Arts Center $20–$25

CAC 2013-2014 Performing Arts Season: Tickets On Sale Now FAIFAI

KENNY BARRON

December 14 $20–$25

March 22 $25–$35

THE INTERGALACTIC NEMESIS

JULIAN SANDS

March 28–29 $25–$25

May 9–10 $25–$35

Join the CAC today—CAC Members receive discounted tickets and early admission to all performances. Special discounts are available when purchasing tickets to three or more programs. Call or visit the CAC box office for more details and to take advantage of this special offer!

Snowfall, dancing lights, Macy’s 30-foot tree and fun holiday times. Join us for a special Miracle on Fulton event. Featured small bites from Fulton Street restaurants, a specialty drink and cash bar with holiday drinks, local craft vendors and live entertainment from DJ Mike Swift. Purchase your presale ticket at www.wantickets.com/miracleonthursday. Guests will need to print out their Miracle on Thursday ticket to receive entry. #miracleonfulton

900 Camp Street, New Orleans I 504.528.3800 I www.cacno.org

64

Thursday, December 12 5pm - 8pm $20

FultonStreetNOLA @FultonStNOLA @fultonstnola


STAGE LISTINGS PAGE 63

Nocturnes (I-III) Friday Night Laughs. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts an open-mic. 10 p.m. Friday. Give ’Em The Light Open-Mic Comedy Show. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues. com — Leon Blanda hosts the showcase. Sign-up 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. Tuesday. Johnny Rock. C. Beever’s Bar of Music, 2507 N. Woodlawn Ave., Metairie, (504) 887-9401; www.cbeevers.com — Comedian Johnny Rock hosts an open-mic comedy night. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Laugh & Sip. The Wine Bistro, 1011 Gravier St.; www.facebook. com/TheWineBistroNO — Mark Caesar and DJ Cousin Cav host the weekly showcase of local comedians. Call (504) 606-6408 for details. Tickets $7. 8 p.m. Thursday. Lights Up. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St., (504) 302-8264; www.tnmcomedy. com — The theater showcases new improv troupes. Tickets $5. 9 p.m. Thursday.

NOLA Comedy Hour Open Mic & Showcase. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., (504) 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — Andrew Polk hosts the open-mic series that features a booked showcase. Free admission. 8 p.m. sign-up, 9 p.m. show. Sunday. Sketch Comedy. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com — The Sketchy Characters perform sketch comedy. Visit www.sketchycharacters.net for details. 9:30 p.m. Saturday. Think You’re Funny? Comedy Showcase. Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., (504) 8659190; www.carrolltonstation. com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up 8 p.m., show 9 p.m. Wednesday. The Three Charmers Comical Crescent City Christmas. Castle Theatre, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 287-4707; www.castle501.com — Jodi Borello, Becky Allen and Amanda Hebertperform Christmas-themed comedy. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Friday- Saturday.

Christmas Stockings Winter Apparrel for Pets Gifts for Animal Lovers

Inside Metairie Small Animal Hospital 835-4266 I msah.com I 101 Metairie Rd.

Skin Horse Theater’s original production Nocturnes (I-III), about human fascination with the cosmos, took a while to get off the ground, but much of the journey was exciting, even if parts drifted too long in deep space. It’s the young company’s best original work to date. A pre-launch vignette took nearly 15 minutes to show a man miss a train, overact his frustration and finally stare at the sky. Played mostly for simple laughs, it could have been done in far less time to better effect. The substantive work started with “Mission Control,” a wonderfully eclectic assortment of readings beginning with a transcript — translated from Russian via Google Translate, one actor said — of the beginning of the first manned space journey. Lined up at a long panel in front of microphones, the cast played various engineers, mission leaders and the astronaut as they prepared for launch. On the social science front, there was Gil Scott-Heron’s “Whitey on the Moon.” Two particularly strong pieces were Veronica Hunsinger-Loe dramatizing an intercepted transmission of a distressed Soviet cosmonaut in the final stages of a flight that failed, and Evan Spigelman’s inspired delivery of a Patti Smith song as a nonmusical monologue. The unpredictable mix reached joyous heights when the group sang David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and Elton John’s “Rocket Man,” but Lou Reed’s “Satellite of Love” proved one song too many. The segment was more chaotic collage than curated presentation (it was difficult to discern any greater point), but that part of Nocturnes was entertaining and had great energy. The next part, “Kosmos,” started well as Hunsinger-Loe occupied a space station and mimicked weightlessness by reclining on a barely visible swiveling black stool on a dark set. It was cleverly staged as items seemed to float free of gravity, but as the piece went on, the effect lost its freshness and started to feel campy before it ground to a slog as an overworked gimmick. Hunsinger-Loe should have put on her red space suit much sooner and progressed to the next phase, where the audience was treated to a peek at the vastness of the universe. The special effects were again creatively rendered, but there was no drama to sustain the the very lengthy display. The collection of readings and the illusion of weightlessness were witty and entertaining, but in repeated instances, extended scenes slowed the show to a crawl. Still, it’s a big step forward for the young company’s original work. — WILL COVIELLO

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Holiday Toys for Cats and Dogs

REVIEW

65


66

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


EVENT LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Megan Braden-Perry, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 866.473.7199

TUESDAY 10 Celebration in the Oaks. City Park, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 482-4888; www.neworleanscitypark.com — Hundreds of thousands of twinkling white lights and colorful light displays grace 20 acres of City Park’s Botanical Garden, Storyland, Carousel Gardens and 2-mile train route. Beat the line by visiting www.celebrationintheoaks.com for presale tickets. Tickets $8, train $4, other rides $3, unlimited ride band $17. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily through Jan. 4.

Figure Drawing Class. Forstall Art Supplies, 3135 Calhoun St., (504) 866-4278; www. forstallartsupply.com — Call to register for the figure drawing class. Admission $10. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. It’s All About the Music BIke Ride. Congo Square, Louis Armstrong Park, North Rampart and St. Ann streets

Miracle on Fulton Street. Fulton Street at Poydras Street near Harrah’s Hotel — Celebrate the holiday season with a faux snowfall from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., pictures with Santa Claus from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., shopping, live entertainment, light shows, a huge decorated tree, dining and holiday treats. Visit www.miracleonfulton. com for details. Through Jan. 6. Reggae Night. The Other Place, 1224 St. Bernard Ave., (504) 943-7502 — DJ Kush Master spins reggae, there’s food from Coco Hut and there are cultural vendors. Free admission. 8 p.m. Toddler Time. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., (504) 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3 and under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

WEDNESDAY 11 Barbershop Meetings. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Peter Nahkid leads the men’s discussion of entrepreneurship, family, love, dreams and more. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Covington Farmers Market. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Fun Under the Frescoes. St. Alphonsus Church, 2025 Constance St., (504) 524-8116; www.stalphonsusneworleans.com — The Friends of St. Alphonsus host a concert and each attendee gets three free drinks. Tickets $10. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Harrison Avenue Marketplace. Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www. harrisonavenuemarketplace. org — Friends of Lakeview and the Lakeview Civic Improvement Association present a monthly gathering with food, drinks, music, arts and crafts and kids activities. Visit the website for additional details. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Pottery and Sculpture Sessions. Freret Clay Center, 2525 Jena St., (504) 919-8050; www. freretclaycenter.com — Potters and sculptors hold three-hour workshops. Materials $20. 9 a.m. & 6 p.m. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

THURSDAY 12 Art Activities During After Hours. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Marketplace at Armstrong Park. Armstrong Park, 701 N. Rampart St., (504) 658-3200; www.pufap.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, handmade beauty products, art, crafts and entertainment. Visit www. icdnola.org for details. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. NOLA TimeBanking, DyverseCity Etsy Training. DyverseCity, 3932 Fourth St., (504) 439-4530 — Attendees can set up TimeBank accounts, learn how to run Etsy shops or get computer coaching. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous. Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church, 3900 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-3431 — Group members help each other utilize the 12-step method to recover from compulsive eat-

ing. For details, contact Sarah at (504) 458-9965. 7 p.m. PhotoNOLA Keynote Lecture and Gala. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — This year’s Guggenheim fellow Deborah Luster presents the keynote lecture at 6 p.m., followed by a gala with entertainment from the Norbert Slama Trio and The Crescent Circus, photo booths, hors d’oeuvres and wine. Tickets $25. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sistahs Making a Change. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — Women of all levels of expertise are invited to dance, discuss and dine together at this health-centered event. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday & Thursday. St. Bernard Parish Christmas Tour of Homes Presents: Docville. Docville Farm, 5124 E. St. Bernard Highway, Violet; www.merauxfoundation.org — There’s a tour of Docville Farm, photos with Santa, tasting booths, entertainment by children, Christmas lights and shopping. Proceeds benefit St. Bernard Parish charitable organizations. Tickets $15. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRIDAY 13 Friday Nights at NOMA. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — The four-part weekly event includes an art activity, live music, a film and a food demo. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Imagine Christmas. Hosanna Church, 2215 Barataria Blvd.,

Marrero, (504) 340-7036; www. hosannachurch.us — The community family Christmas event includes an inflatable park, Christmas play, craft show, pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus, a sleigh ride, marshmallow roasting, giveaways, face painting and concessions. Visit www.imaginechristmas.com for details. Free admission. 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. through Saturday. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market, 922 Teche St. — Produce, seafood and more are available for purchase. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

SATURDAY 14 Bayou Natives Christmas Native Plant Sale. Propeller Incubator, 4035 Washington Ave., (504) 564-7816; www.gopropeller.org — Bayou Rebirth sells native grasses, flowering plants, shrubs and trees. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Breakfast with Santa. Clearview Mall, 4436 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 885-0202; www.clearviewmall. com — Santa Claus has breakfast with kids. Admission $5. 10 a.m. Children’s Art Workshop. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., Second floor, (504) 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — RHINO artists lead kids in art projects like origami, collages, bookmaking and more. Call or email artboxrhino@gmail.com to register. Suggested donation for materials $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. A Children’s Christmas at the Cabildo. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm. PAGE 68

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Crescent City Farmers Market. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. Visit www.crescentcityfarmersmarket.org for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

— As part of NOLA Social Ride, bicyclists cruise around the city, stopping a few times along the way to enjoy free live music. More information is available at www.facebook. com/groups/nolasocialride. 6 p.m.

WYES Wine and Coffee Pairing Dinners. Chefs at restaurants in New Orleans, on the Northshore and in Baton Rouge create multi-course dinners using Community Coffee in at least one of their dishes. Bus service is available for an additional $10 per person, and a portion of the proceeds benefit WYES. Visit www.wyes. org for menus and reservation instructions. Dinner $85, including tax and tip. 7 p.m.

67


EVENT LISTINGS PAGE 67

LET US DO THE WORK FOR YOU!

crt.state.la.us — Kids and their families make traditional Creole ornaments, read holiday poems and stories and have cookies, cider and hot chocolate. Adults $6, kids 12 and under free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

Crescent City Farmers Market. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, (504) 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

order our baguette sandwich, cheese or charcuterie platter to satisfy your crowd.

Authorized Flowmaster + Dynomax Dealer

Selling & Installing: Mufflers, Catalytic Converters, Pipes & Performance Exhaust Systems

experience in the same location! 28+ years 5229 St. Claude Ave (@ Egania St) Lower 9 • 504.944.7733

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

marksmufflershop.com

68

Freretstivus. Freret Market, corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, (504) 638-2589; www.freretmarket. org — This Freretstivus for the rest of us features Festivus traditions like the airing of grievances, feats of strength, lousy gift exchange and the Festivus pole. There’s music, pet adoptions, food and over 90 vendors of art, gifts and collectibles. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. German Coast Farmers Market. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. Gretna Farmers Market. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, (504) 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Grow Dat Farm Stand. Grow Dat Youth Farm, 150 Zachary Taylor Drive, (504) 377-8395; www.growdatyouthfarm.org — Grow Dat Youth Farm sells its produce. 9 a.m. to noon. Hansel and Gretel. Carrollton United Methodist Church, 921 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 861-7597; www.umc.org — The Junior Committee of the New Orleans Opera Association’s Women’s Guild presents an abridged, kid-friendly production of the opera, crafting and a reception. Adults $15, kids $10. 10:30 a.m.

LLAR O D O TW AY!

TUESDWELLS

$2

WINEMPAGNE CHA

Holiday Extravaganza and Artist Market. Main Library, 219 Loyola Ave., (504) 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — The multicultural holiday and winter celebration features music, caroling, dance, storytelling and an artists’ market. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. I’m a Dancer’s Annual Christmas Fling Dance Party. Club Silhouette, 3505 N. Hullen St., Metairie, (504) 885-1771;

www.clubsilhouette.net — I’m a Dancer dance club hosts its annual Christmas dance party featuring professional dance performances, open dancing, door prizes, a 50/50 raffle and a visit from dancing Santa Claus. Attire is dressy casual. Visit www.facebook. com/imadancerno for details. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. NOLA For Life Day. A.L. Davis Park, 2600 Lasalle St. — Mayor Landrieu invites residents to join him at his sixth annual NOLA For Life Day, featuring volunteering and a resource fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. OCH Holiday Art Market. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — Handmade gifts are sold. Visit wwww. ochartmarket.com for details. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Piety Street Market. The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., (504) 908-4741; www.612piety.com — More than 40 vendors sell art, handmade jewelry and crafts, vintage collectibles and flea market finds. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Running of the Santas. Barcadia, 601 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 335-1740; www. barcadianeworleans.com — The holiday pub crawl and festival features food, drinks and costuming as Santa and Mrs. Claus, elves, reindeer and Christmas trees. Visit www.runningofthesantas. com/new-orleans for details. General admission $15, VIP $25. 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. St. Bernard Seafood & Farmers Market. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi, (504) 3554442; www.visitstbernard.com — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. StoryQuest. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — Authors, actors and artists read children’s books and send kids on an art quest through the museum afterward. 11:30 a.m. Toys for Tots for Tats. Downtown Tattoo, 501 Frenchmen St., (504) 266-2211; www. downtowntattoonola.com — Each person who brings a new, unwrapped toy valued at $20 or more gets a free Sailor Jerry tattoo. Starting at 6 p.m., there are raffles and refreshments. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Web Publishing Class. Hermann-Grima House, 820 St. Louis St., (504) 525-5661; www.

hgghh.org — Students learn how to publish to the Internet from start to finish using the latest versions of free software. Registration $35. Sat., Dec. 14, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Yoga. Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, (504) 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum holds yoga classes. Call (504) 456-5000 for details. Free for NOMA and East Jefferson Wellness Center members, $5 general admission. 8 a.m.

SUNDAY 15 SoFAB cooking demo. French Market, corner of Governor Nicholls Street and French Market Place; www.frenchmarket.org — Local chefs cook their signature dishes. 2 p.m. Swing Dance Lesson With Amy & Chance. d.b.a., 618 Frenchmen St., (504) 942-3731; www.dbabars.com/dbano — The bar and music venue offers free swing dance lessons. 4:30 p.m. Tipitina’s Foundation’s Sunday Youth Music Workshop. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-8477; www.tipitinas. com — Kids jam with local musicians. 1 p.m.

MONDAY 16 Tai Chi/Chi Kung. New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, (504) 6584100; www.noma.org — Terry Rappold presents the class in the museum’s art galleries. Call (504) 456-5000 for details. Free for NOMA and East Jefferson General Hospital Wellness Center members, $5 general admission. 6 p.m. Twerk & Werk Bounce Dance Class with Dwight & William. Passion Dance Center, 2619 Dreux Ave., (504) 284-3955; www.passiondancecenter. com — Bounce dancers Dwight and William, who have performed with Big Freedia and Walt Wiggady, teach a bounce dance class. Contact Tamika at (504) 376-3069 or tamika@passiondancecenter. com for details and to sign up. Class $10, $5 with college ID, first class free. 8 p.m.

SPORTS Pelicans. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., (504) 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The New Orleans Pelicans play the Detroit Pistons. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Pelicans. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., (504) 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com


EVENT LISTINGS — The New Orleans Pelicans play the Memphis Grizzlies. 7 p.m. Friday.

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS YLC Wednesday at the Square Vendors. Young Leadership Council (YLC) accepts proposals for the 2014 YLC Wednesday at the Square outdoor concert series for event management, stage management, audio equipment, ice, food vendors and art vendors. Visit www.wednesdayatthesquare. com for instructions. Deadline Wednesday.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS American Cancer Society. American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, (504) 833-4024; www.cancer. org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information.

Bayou Rebirth Wetlands Education. Bayou Rebirth seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details. Big Brothers Big Sisters Volunteers. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, (504) 309-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information. Bilingual Evacuteers. Puentes New Orleans and Evacuteer seek bilingual volunteers to assist the Spanish-speaking population with mandatory evacuations in New Orleans during hurricane season. Email Luis Behrhorst at luis@ puentesno.org for details.

Crescent City Farmers Market. CCFM and marketumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shoppers’ questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call (504) 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details. Dress for Success New Orleans. The professional women’s shop seeks volunteers to assist clients with shopping, to manage inventory and share expertise. Call (504) 891-4337 or email neworleans@dressforsuccess.org to register. Each One Save One. Greater New Orleans’ largest one-onone mentoring program seeks volunteer mentors. Visit www.eachonesaveone.org for details. Edgar Degas Foundation. The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call (504) 821-5009 or email info@ degashouse.com for details. Girls on the Run. Girls on the Run seeks running buddies, assistant coaches, committee members and race day volunteers. Email info@gotrnola. org to register. Visit www. gotrnola.org for details about the program. Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center. The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call (504) 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. Green Light New Orleans. The group that provides free energy-efficient lightbulbs seeks volunteers to help install the bulbs in homes. Call (504) 324-2429 or email green@ greenlightneworleans.org to apply. Visit www.greenlightneworleans.org for details. HandsOn New Orleans. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various

opportunities available, how to sign up for service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call (504) 304-2275, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. Hospice Volunteers. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Carla Fisher at (504) 832-8111 for details. Iron Rail. The book collective seeks volunteers to host shows and other events, help catalog the library, host free movie nights, organize benefits and other duties. Email ironrailbookcollective@gmail. com or visit www.ironrail.org for details. Jackson Barracks Museum Volunteers. The museum seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at (504) 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details. Lakeview Civic Improvement Association. The association’s green space committee needs volunteers for the adopt-a-block program to pick up trash or trim trees. Sign up with Russ Barranco at (504) 482-9598 or rpbarranco@cox.net. Louisiana SPCA Volunteers. The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Visit www.la-spca.org/volunteer to sign up. lowernine.org Volunteers. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details. Meal Delivery Volunteers. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at (504) 888-5880 for details. National World War II Museum. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and PAGE 70

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Another Life Foundation Volunteers. Another Life Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org.

CASA New Orleans. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at (504) 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details.

69


EVENT LISTINGS PAGE 69

greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call (504) 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@ nationalww2museum.org for details. NOLA Wise. The program by Global Green in partnership with the City of New Orleans and the Department of Energy that helps homeowners make their homes more energy efficient seeks volunteers. All volunteers must attend a 30-minute orientation. Email mrowand@globalgreen.org for details.

LIVE SAT EVERY

BANDS 9PM $12 $6

ANGUS RIBEYE W/ SIDES 1/2 LB BURGER W/ FRIES

30 BEER TAPS

23 POOL

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

BEER PONG

TOURNEY

SUNDAYS 8PM

TABLES

8 DART BOARDS

PING A R C A D E PONG

G A M E S

TA B L E S

HAPPY HOUR 3PM-6PM DAILY

4133 S. CARROLLTON AVE 301-0938

S H A M R O C K P A R T Y. C O M

“Since 1969”

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

70

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

Operation REACH Volunteers. Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. Public School Volunteers. New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach. org or call (504) 654-1060 for information. Senior Companion Volunteers. New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., (504) 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Start the Adventure in Reading. The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call (504) 899-0820, email elizabeth@stairnola.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. Teen Suicide Prevention. The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call (504) 831-8475 for details. Touro Infirmary. Touro Infirmary, 1401 Foucher St., (504) 897-7011; www.touro.com — The hospital is currently in need of adult volunteers to assist in a variety of assignments, including the chemo infusion center, information desks, family surgery lounge

and book cart. For information, call Volunteer Services or email Denise.Chetta@ Touro.com.

WORDS Angela Carll. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190; www.jefferson.lib. la.us — The author discusses and signs Where Writers Wrote in New Orleans. 7 p.m. Thursday. Barnes & Noble Jr. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. Chris Champagne. McKeown’s Books and Difficult Music, 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 895-1954; www.mckeownsbooks.com — The author signs and reads from Y’at Dictionary. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Cold•Cuts. Kajun’s Pub, 2256 St. Claude Ave., (504) 947-3735; www.kajunpub.com — The monthly poetry and performance series features three readers. Visit www. coldcutsreading.blogspot.com for details. 7 p.m. Saturday. D. Eric Bookhardt, Louviere + Vanessa, Michael Allen Zell. A Gallery For Fine Photography, 241 Chartres St., (504) 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Authors sign Inventing Reality: New Orleans Visionary Photography and The Oblivion Atlas. 8 p.m. Saturday. Friends of the New Orleans Public Library Book Sale. Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., (504) 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday & Saturday. Haiku Conference. Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., (504) 596-2625; www.nutrias. org — The Haiku Society of America hosts a haiku conference with workshops and presentations. 9 a.m. to  4 p.m. Saturday. Joy Castro, Mary Fitzpatrick & Virginia McCollam, David Spielman. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266 — Authors sign and read from Nearer Home, Days and Nights in the Dreamy City and Louisiana Eats!: The People, The Food and Their Stories. 5 p.m. Tuesday. Local Writers’ Group. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday. Open Mic. Drum Sands Publishing and Books, 7301 Downman Road, (504) 2476519; www.drumsandspublishing.com — The bookstore and publishing house hosts an open mic for writers of all genres. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Poets of Color. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., (504) 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — Poets participate in a writing circle. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday. Rebecca Snedeker, Joel Dinerstein, Dana Logsdon, Nathaniel Rich. Maple Street Book Shop, 7529 Maple St., (504) 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — Contributors and the editor read from and sign Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas. 6 p.m. Wednesday. Story Time with Miss Maureen. Maple Street Book Shop, 7529 Maple St., (504) 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The bookstore hosts a children’s book reading. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Tao Poetry. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., (504) 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffee house hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. The Well: A Women’s Poetry Circle. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., (504) 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group for writers of all levels meets at 2 p.m. Monday. Call (504) 655-5489 or email fleurdeholly@gmail. com for details. Where We Are Now: Understanding the 21st-Century South through ‘The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., (504) 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — There’s a panel discussion and book signing with editors and contributors. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FOR WRITERS Bayou Magazine. UNO Press’ nonstudent publication hosts a poetry and fiction contest. Winners receive $500. For details, visit www.uno.edu/ bayou. Deadline Dec. 30.


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

MARKET

71


YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS • AND MORE

Lakeview

CLEANING SERVICE

Susana Palma

Fully Insured & Bonded

Locally Owned & Serving the New Orleans Area for 21 Years

NOLA MARKETPLACE Inflatables for your party! Bouncy Castle •

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING LIGHT/GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING HEAVY DUTY CLEANING SUMMER/HOLIDAY CLEANING

Water Slide •

Krewe of Choctaw

Small Toddler Rollercoaster

Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, 2013

504-669-4391

lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com

$17,200

Race Car •

504-250-0884 504-913-6615

SUPER BINGO

EARLY BIRD GAMES BEGIN - 7:30PM GAMES START - 8:00PM

DOUBLE STIMULUS

“No FREE Birthday Cards on Special Games” CARD PRICES - 6 Cards for $40.00 Each Additional 2 Cards for $5.00 Bingo Star - $70.00 DOUBLE STIMULUS - $80.00

GAMES 7 DAYS A WEEK

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

The Holiday Shopping Season is HERE!

72

Don’t miss out on Holiday Sales We can help deliver your Holiday Message

Holiday Helpers Only 9 spots available

Premium Placement on the inside back cover FREE FULL COLOR

Each Spot measures 3” x 3”

multiple spots available

Publishing Weekly through the Holidays!

Each Spot $100 SPECIAL: Buy 3/Get 1 Free To Advertise or for more information call (504) 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com

3PM-8PM-10:30PM WED, THURS, FRI, SAT 12:10 NOON • SAT & SUN 1AM

1900 FRANKLIN AVE GRETNA, LA 70053 (504) 368-4443

VISIT VIDEO ROOM

WIN $1000 ™

Cristina’s

Cleaning Service

The Big Easy Made Easy.

Let me help with your

Your source for Swamp Tours • City Tours Airboat Tours • Plantation Tours Accommodations & more!

After Construction Cleaning

Don’t Let the Tourists Have All the Fun!

passportneworleans.com

cleaning needs including

Residential & Commercial Licensed & Bonded

232-5554 831-0606

or

To place your ad in

Nola Market Place Call your Classifed Rep today or Rent A Bike From Us & Experience New Orleans On Two Wheels

1209 Decatur St. (504) 202-8577

call 504-483-3100 or

email

classadv@gambitweekly.com


WIN A GIANT NEW ORLEANS BAR TAB

VALUED AT $1,000+

PRESENTED BY CAPTAIN MORGAN

HOW TO ENTER: 1 Grab your friends and

visit the participating bars between Nov. 24thDec. 30th, 2013

2 Take a photo with anything

3 Receive one entry for each

bar you photograph for a chance to win $1,000 in bar tabs. The more bars you visit, the more chances to win. Multiple photographs at the same bar will be discarded.

FOR A LIST OF PARTICIPATING BARS, VISIT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM/BARSTAMPEDE

COURTESY OF

RULES

Deadline to enter: 12/30/13 • Must be 21 to play • Multiple entries at the same bar will be discarded. Have fun & don’t drink and drive! Tip your bartender • Read complete rules and restrictions on bestofneworleans.com • No purchase necessary

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

that has this bars logo on it (signs/ coasters/the bartender) and either email it to drink@gambitweekly.com or Instagram your photo (tagging @gambitneworleans and the bar).

73


ADELAIDE

APACHE

BABY

BINDI

BLONDIE

BOGIE

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON ANIMAL SHELTER 504-883-8277

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

JEFFERSON SPCA

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

JEFFERSON SPCA

SpayMart 601-749-0268

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Sponsored By:

74

Sponsored By:

EASTBANK

504.736.6111 Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

EASTBANK

504.736.6111 Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sarah Seibold

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers

BOUDREAUX

BOWER

BUDDY

CHACO

CHASE

CHLOE

#20464316

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

#2033572

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

JEFFERSON SPCA

JEFFERSON SPCA

504.736.6111

504.736.6111

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON ANIMAL SHELTER 504-883-8277

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

In Memory of Lynette BiJou

Sylvia I. Harbin

Sylvia I. Harbin

DINAH

ELLIE

GRETTA

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON ANIMAL SHELTER 504-883-8277

SpayMart 601-749-0268

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sponsored By:

Sylvia I. Harbin

EASTBANK

EASTBANK

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

JACQUE

JOSIE

JUNE

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON ANIMAL SHELTER 504-883-8277

SpayMart 601-749-0268

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

JEFFERSON SPCA

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sylvia I. Harbin

Sponsored By:

Becky & Jim Bulger

EASTBANK

504.736.6111 Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center


Pet Adopt-A-Thon LEIGH

LEO

JEFFERSON SPCA WESTBANK

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

#21191443

504.349.5111

LOTUS

MARLON

MITCHELL

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

JEFFERSON SPCA

JEFFERSON SPCA

504.349.5111

504.349.5111

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

#20859310

WESTBANK

WESTBANK

Sponsored By:

MAX

#10329303

LA SPCA 504-368-5191 Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sylvia I. Harbin

Sylvia I. Harbin

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sylvia I. Harbin

MULBERRY

ORCHID

PANDA

PEANUT

POLLY

POPPY

WESTBANK

SpayMart 601-749-0268

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON ANIMAL SHELTER 504-883-8277

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

JEFFERSON SPCA

504.349.5111

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

JEFFERSON SPCA

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

#21523053

Michelle H.

Sylvia I. Harbin

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

WESTBANK

504.349.5111 Sponsored By:

Bill & Cathryn Marchese

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

PRIM

ROMULUS

SADE

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

SpayMart 601-749-0268

Humane Society 888-6HUMANE

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Maleah Bagwell

Sylvia I. Harbin

Sylvia I. Harbin

SAKS

SCARLET

SEYMOUR

JEFFERSON SPCA

JEFFERSON SPCA

504.736.6111

504.736.6111

SpayMart 601-749-0268

EASTBANK

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

EASTBANK

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

Sponsored By:

Sylvia I. Harbin

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

75


TODDY

#21464420

LA SPCA 504-368-5191 Sponsored By:

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers

TWIGGY

JEFFERSON SPCA WESTBANK

504.349.5111 Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

A pet portrait is a wonderful keepsake!

76

SHILOH

SUGAR PLUM

JEFFERSON SPCA EASTBANK

504.736.6111

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

TYSON

#21560325

THUMPER

JEFFERSON SPCA

SpayMart 601-749-0268

EASTBANK

504.736.6111 Sponsored By:

Southern Refinishing

We were both rescue kitties and we hope you will be too!

VIVIE

WINSTON

SPONSORED BY

SpayMart 601-749-0268

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

LA SPCA 504-368-5191 Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Julie Graff- Pet Portraits

CAT CHAT

Sponsored By:

Sylvia I. Harbin

Weekly Tails

Affectionate, Gentle kitty! Seymour is a sweet and lovable young cat. He is gorgeous too! Just look at those eyes! This super gentle boy gets along well with other cats. He is fully vetted and just waiting for a family to love. Visit Seymour at our Thrift Store Adoption Center: 6601 Veterans Blvd, Metairie or contact us: 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org

www.spaymart.org CUSTOM PET PORTRAITS by Julie Graff

Sip and Paint and Purple Pug Studio Artist

PAWS DOWN

Max was adopted from the Louisiana SPCA’s

MAX Kennel #A10329303

Southern Refinishing is the BEST DOGGONE Reglazer Around!

708 BARATARIA BLVD.

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC

Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated

Japonica Street shelter 10 years ago, when he was just a wiggly, fuzzy puppy. Unfortunately, Max was returned to us this year when his owner encountered financial difficulties and could no longer care for this gentle senior citizen. Max is completely housebroken, never destructive, and can be left loose in the house unsupervised. He gets along well with everybody he meets and can live in a household with other dogs, cats, and children. Max’s foster family is even sponsoring his adoption fee! To meet Max or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Goldie is a 1-year-old, spayed, golden bunny

with a brown button nose for better snuggling. Her family was moving and couldn’t take her with them, so Goldie is looking for a new home to hop around and play in. To meet Goldie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

- Chip/Spot Repair - Colors available - Clawfoot tubs & hardware FOR SALE

348-1770 Southernrefinishing.com (504) 208-9420 • (504) 615-3746 mail@sipandpaint.com www.sipandpaint.com

Sponsored By:

Zeus & Elektra Miller

Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center

#21356598

#21557555

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers

THOR

GOLDIE Kennel #A21211205

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org


EMPLOYMENT

PET ADOPTIONS

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

CLIO

Adult female Chow/Golden Retriever. 5-years-old, 50 pounds. Gold Fur. Trained/Fully Vetted. Perfect family dog. Great watch dog. Loves kids. Call 504-864.2097.

FLAMBEAUX - Fluffy Lap Kitten

Flambeaux loves, loves, loves to snuggle in a lap. He can be a little shy at first, but quickly turns into a complete lovebug. Flambeaux is about 6 months old and would love to join a family with another cat or two. Call 504-454-8200; adopt@spaymart.org

KENO

American Bulldog, 2-years-old, male 60 lbs. Trained/Fully Vetted. Happygo-lucky lovebug! Call 504-874-0598.

LACY

Pointer mix 7 months. Vetted/Trained Love Bug. Family Dog 504-358-3714. LADY Shepherd Terrier 2yrs. Perfect Family Dog/Trained. Vetted 504975-5971.

LILLY

Fawn/Blonde Staffordshire Terrier 1-year-old, 50 pounds. Fully vetted & house trained. Loves leashed walks, car rides & snuggling on the couch & in bed. Call 504-975-5971 or 504-874-0598.

Part time / Full time

★ SERVERS ★ ★ GREETERS ★

Houston’s Restaurant in the Garden District is accepting applications for professional servers. We are located at 1755 St. Charles Avenue in Uptown New Orleans. We are currently searching for friendly, outgoing, highly motivated individuals who will thrive in a fast-paced, team-oriented environment. Full-time and parttime positions are available. High earnings potential, reasonable business hours! Prior restaurant experience is a plus, though not necessary. Please apply directly at the restaurant between the hours of 3 PM and 5 PM Mon-Fri, and be prepared for an interview. Professional attire required for interviewing.

Miyako Sushi Bar & Hibachi

Now Hiring: Host/Hostess & Servers. Apply in person, 11-2:30pm or 5-9pm, 1403 St. Charles Ave., NOLA

DRIVERS/DELIVERY

LIONEL

Bombay Kitten 6 mtonths Vetted/ Trained LOVER Short Black Coat 504975-5971.

MARY KATHERINE

Chinese Crested/Chihuahua, 2-yearsold, 10 lbs. Fully Vetted, spunky, silly, sweet! Call 504-975-5971.

MOLLY

Short Coat Calico, 9wks. KITTEN Vetted/Trained Talkative 504-975-5971.

PENELOPE

DRIVERS:

Hiring 10 LP drivers immediately. Class A w/tank, Hazmat, TWIC card 1 yr. trac./Trailer exp. Required La., Tx, Ms., Ala. Free Medical! Many Bonuses! Apply @ themartincompanies.com, or call 1-888-380-5516

TRADE/SKILLS $FLOORING INSTALLERS WANTED

For year round work! 2 yrs. exp. Must have van, tools, plus Corporation/LLC, GL insurance, pass background and speak English. Call 504-470-4472 or email Mlopinto@us-installations.com

WWOZ is seeking a part-time (30 hours/week) Administrative Assistant to work in development and events. Skills/experience required: database manipulation, data entry, mailings, Excel, Word and customer service. HTML experience a plus. Please mail your cover letter and resume before 12/20/2013 to: Friends of WWOZ Attn: Crystal Gross PO Box 51840 New Orleans, LA 70151-1840 Unfortunately, we cannot accept applications via e-mail, telephone, fax, or in person. WWOZ is an equal-opportunity organization and has a strict policy of non-discrimination. Anyone able to meet the requirements of this position is welcome to apply.

RETAIL FRIENDLY FACES WANTED

Now accepting applications for several full, part time positions. Must be motivated, hard working & friendly. Retail experience a plus. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 12-5pm only. Southern Candymakers, 334 Decatur St.

PRYTANIA MAIL SERVICE

Packing & Shipping Help needed. Some computer skills Must have good typing skills. PT w/FT possible. UPS World Ship exp. helpful. Apply in person at 5500 Prytania, 9:30 -11 am.

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS PART TIME CHILD CARE ASSISTANT POSITION $7.25/HR

Kidutopia (www.kidutopia.us) is hiring immediately! Students and individuals with knowledge of Spanish and/ or French are encouraged to apply. Experience working with children is a must! E-mail your resume to mvtwo@ aol.com

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail.

Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3006

Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds

PIZZA MAKER AND BARTENDER

Call

Experienced

NEED HELP?

483-3100 Email classadv

@gambitweekly.com

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

NEW ORLEANS

Apply in person Mon-Fri, 1-4:30 pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

JOB GURU

Dear New Orleans Job Guru, “Is it proper to look for jobs at companies that aren’t hiring? There are quite a few cool places in New Orleans that I would love to work at, but I keep looking online, and they don’t seem to be hiring. Thank you!” — Vera C., New Orleans, LA Dear Vera, This is a great question, Vera. So many people assume a company or organization isn’t hiring because they don’t see any job announcements or ads. If you think about it and consider the statistics for attrition (people retiring, promoted, terminated, or quitting), as well as growth, it would be nearly impossible to operate any medium to large-sized business without hiring on a fairly continuous Grant Cooper basis. The fact that these companies aren’t advertising job openings may not be an indication of actual hiring. An article by Barbara Kiviat in one of my favorite online career sites, Glassdoor Blog, cites a recent survey of 16,000 businesses based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Openings & Labor Turnover. The survey asks companies how many people they are planning to hire, how they are advertising the job openings, and other questions. Steven Davis of the University of Chicago and Jason Faberman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago analyzed the BLS statistics and found that a full 42% of U.S. hires came from firms that had just stated, the month prior, that they had no vacancies they intended to fill. What this means for you, Vera, is that simply waiting for one of the companies you really like to post a job may not, in fact, be a sensible strategy. While you are waiting, they are hiring! So, who are they hiring and how are they finding these candidates? According to research conducted from 2008-2011 by Dr. John Sullivan and Associates, 46% of hiring at the nation’s top-performing firms resulted directly from referrals, while a Career Xroads survey conducted in 2011-2012 for all firms showed 29% of new hires coming from referral sources. If you have read some of my past columns, Vera, you know that I encourage today’s jobseekers to be “hunters” as opposed to “farmers” in a figurative sense of those terms. While “farmers” merely wait for jobs to be posted and then respond to those announcements (along with hundreds of others responding to the same ads), “hunters” actively seek out contacts within the companies they target, and find innovate and diplomatic ways to develop connections there. Whether it is volunteering in some capacity that gets the attention of company insiders, going to industry events where your targeted contacts will be attending, directly reaching out to company insiders via LinkedIn, creative use of social media, blogging articles that are designed to appeal to people inside the company, or in any number of other creative ways, finding someone on the “inside” who may decide to recommend you is one of the most effective jobseeking techniques you can develop in today’s hyper-competitive job market. While these techniques may not be familiar to you, Vera, I have found with many of my clients that with a bit of research, planning, elbow grease, and coaching, almost anyone can master them and achieve excellent results in landing the jobs they desire. New Orleans Job Guru is New Orleans native Grant Cooper. President of Strategic Résumés®, Grant has ranked in the Top 2% of 340 LinkedIn National Résumé Writing Experts worldwide, and has assisted the U.S. Air Force, Kinko’s, the Louisiana Dept. of Labor, the City of New Orleans, NFL/NBA players & coaches, as well as universities, regional banks, celebrities, and major corporations.

Send your questions to New Orleans Job Guru at: grant@resupro.com or 504-891-7222

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

French Bulldog mix. Brindle Coat Vetted/Trained. Likes Kitties 504467-4282

ENTERTAINMENT WWOZ

EMPLOYMENT

PETS

77


HOME & GARDEN y a d i l o H Gambit’s Guide to Home & Garden Professionals

Factory Direct Prices

The Holidays Are Coming!

Plantation Shutters

RENEW...REFRESH...REFINISH

No Middle Man Free Estimates • Free Installations • Quality Handcrafted • Interior Shutters • 42 years Experience 100% Wood • Quick Delivery No Faux Wood

www.plantationshutters.us

504-452-5184

Earl’s

Fred Magee-Local Owner

PLUMBING & HEATING

We RE-GLAZE :

L.L.C.

Complete Plumbing Service & Under Slab Repair Specialist. $25.00 off for any plumbing service Good thru 9/16/11

LMP#521

THE FLOW MUST GO ON!

888.8888

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

5107 W Napoleon Ave. Metairie, LA 70001 www.EarlsPlumbingandHeating.com

78

Bathtubs · Marble Walls ·Tile Walls ·Floors · Countertops Cast Iron · Fiberglass · Tin · Plastic · Cultured Marble

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC 7 0 8 B A R ATA R I A B LV D .

348-1770

Southernrefinishing.com

We REPAIR:

Rust on Porcelain Fixtures · Cracks in Fiberglass ·Chips, Gouges and Scratches

NO MORE MOLD!

Most Jobs are Done in Hours

Our refinishing makes cleaning easier Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated

A BEST Sewer & Drain Service, Inc. Since 1975

Royal Draperies LLC

ign Desinner iownard W s i 2013 V nA itio

Compet

QUALITY CUSTOM DRAPES • SHADES • BLINDS BEDDINGS • DECORATOR FABRICS & TRIM RODS & HARDWARE INSTALLATION & DESIGN SERVICES

504.398.4943

customdrapes@royaldraperies.net

Why Aren’t You Showcasing Your Business Here? You could reach over 135,000 potential new customers + thousands more online! Showcase your business in Home & Garden for only $100 Call today for more details (504) 483-3100

NEW ORLEANS

522-9536 LAPLACE

652-0084

KENNER-JEFFERSON

466-8581 NORTHSHORE

626-5045

WESTBANK

368-4070 SLIDELL

641-3525

MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT! 2545 DELAWARE AVE. KENNER, LA 70062 • FAX 504-468-1838

“WHEN YOUR DRAINS DON’T WORK - WE DO”™ Call Our Trained Experts & Experience The Difference

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee

SPECIALIZING IN DRYWOOD TERMITE & BEDBUG FUMIGATION

WE DO IT ALL ... TERMITES, ROACHES, RATS & ANTS TOO! NEW ORLEANS METRO VOTED BEST EXTERMINATOR BY GAMBIT 2329 Edenborn Ave • Metairie, LA READERS

(504) 834-7330 www.terminixno.com

• Knowledgeable Sales Staff • Free Do-It-Yourself Advice • Free Prompt Delivery

We Match Any COLOR NEW ORLEANS, LA

We Rent Pressure Washers, Spray Guns & Wall Paper Removers (Steamer)

NEW ORLEANS, LA

8180 EARHART BLVD. 70118 504-861-8179

5331 CANAL BLVD. 70124 504-485-6569

2801 MAGAZINE ST. 70115 504-891-7333

6820 VETERANS BLVD. 70003 504-888-4684

NEW ORLEANS, LA

METAIRIE, LA

7am-6pm • Mon-Fri • Sat 8am-5pm

Senior Citizen Discount


CLASSIFIEDS ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGAL NOTICES 22ND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ST. TAMMANY STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO.: 2011-30354 DIV. F SUCCESSION OF AUDREY MAE HURTSELL ADOLPH NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that Jeanie Adolph Morlier, as the duly appointed Administratrix of the Succession of Audrey Mae Hurtsell Adolph, pursuant to the provisions of LSA-CCP 3281 has petitioned this Honorable Court for the authority to sell the following described immovable property at private sale for the sum of $60,000.00 cash with a waiver of all rights of redhibition by the purchaser. Said immovable property is more particularly described as follows:

Improvements thereon bear Municipal No. 1101 Mercury Avenue. NOW therefore, and in accordance with law, notice is hereby given that Jeanie Adolph Morlier, Administratrix of the Succession of Audrey Mae Hurtsell Adolph proposes to sell the above referenced immovable property, at private sale, for the price and under the terms set out above, and any heir, legatee, and creditors are required to make opposition, if any they can or have, to such sale, within seven (7) days, including Sundays and holidays, from the date whereupon the last publication of this notice appears. Malise Prieto, Clerk of Court St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana Attorney: Eric R. Bissel Address: 227 N Columbia St. Covington, LA 70433 Telephone: (985) 893-1222 Gambit: 12/10/13 & 12/31/13

STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 699-304 DIV. L SUCCESSION OF SACHIKO NANJO ALFORD NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE

STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF JEFFERSON WHEREAS the duly named and qualified Testamentary Executor, R.J. DUGAS, has filed a Petition to the Court for authority to sell at private sale the herinafter described property, to wit: THAT PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana, in that part thereof known as PONTCHARTRAIN SHORES SUBDIVISION, according to a plat of subdivision, thereof made by J. L. Fontcuberta, Surveyor, dated October 30, 1956, copy of which is on file in Plan Book 31, folio 60, in the office of the Clerk of Court, Parish of Jefferson, and approved by the Police Jury under Ordinance No. 3433, said portion of ground is designated and measures as follows:, to wit: Lot No. 8 of Square 65, bounded by SONFIELD STREET, BELLE DRIVE, CONLIN STREET AND MURPHY DRIVE, said lot commences 236.91 feet from the corner of Belle Drive, and Sonfield Street, and measures 50 feet front on Sonfield Street, same width in the rear, by a depth of 137.57 feet between equal and parallel lines, all as further shown on a survey by J.J. Krebs & Sons, Inc. certified correct November 22, 1967, and resurveyed on April 19, 1969, a copy of which is annexed hereto and made part hereof. The improvements thereon bear Municipal No. 4516 Sonfield Street. Being the same property acquired by Sachiko Nanjo wife of/and Arthur I. Alford, Jr., from Dill B. Asher by Act of Sale dated April 30, 1969 before Paul Morphy, Jr., Notary Public for the Parish of Orleans and registered Conveyance Office Book 696, folio 838 for the records of Jefferson Parish; and further acquired by Sachiko N. Alford by Judgment of Possession, titled “Succession of Arthur I. Alford, Jr.” 24th JDC, Case No. 576-582, and registered in Conveyance Office Book 3068, folio 583, in the records of Jefferson Parish, on January 23, 2002. For the total gross sale price of $180,000.00 cash. The property will be sold pursuant to those terms and conditions as more fully set forth in the said Purchase Agreement attached to the Petition For Authority To Sell Immovable Property At Private Sale filed in this proceeding. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties to whom it may concern, including the heirs and/or creditors of the decedent herein, be ordered to make any opposition which they have or may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the order of judgment authorizing, approving and homologating the application; and that such order or judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. By Order of the Court Jon A. Gegenheimer Clerk of Court Attorney: Ronald J. Vega Bar No. 13038 D’Aquila, Mullins, & Contreras Address: 3329 Florida Ave. Kenner, LA 70065 Telephone: (504) 469-6699 Gambit: 11/19/13 & 12/10/13

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

NO.: 732-307 DIV. P

NO.: 309-533 DIV. O

SUCCESSION OF LOU ELLA CALLAIS, wife of/and HERMAN J. RODRIGUE, SR.

SUCCESSION OF ROBERT U. BLUM

STATE OF LOUISIANA

NOTICE OF SMALL SUCCESSION NOTICE IS GIVEN that Ella Mae Rodrigue Smith, Administratrix of the Succession of Lou Ella Callais, wife of/ and Herman J. Rodrique, Sr., is applying for authority to sell at private sale, on terms of TWENTY-TWO THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND 10/100 ($22,500.00) DOLLARS all cash, the immovable property owned by the Succession of Lou Ella Callais, wife of/and Herman J. Rodrique, Sr., described below: A CERTAIN PIECE OR LOT OF GROUND, etc., situated in the VILLAGE OF NEW MECHANICKHAM, in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana, on the right bank of the Mississippi River, opposite the FOURTH DISTRICT of the City of New Orleans, designated by the NO. 17 of SQUARE NO. 11, bounded by DERBIGNY, DOLHONDE, FOURTH and FIFTH STREETS, on a plan drawn by J.A .D’Hemecourt, Surveyor, on the 30th day of November, 1872, in correction of a plan drawn by J.G. Dreux, Civil Engineer, on the 30th day of March, 1872, and deposited in the office of W.J. McCune, late Notary Public, for reference; said lot measures 30’9” and 3’’’ front on Fifth Street by a depth of One Hundred Twenty (120) feet between equal and parallel lines. Improvements thereon 1017-19 5th Street, Gretna, Louisiana. Being the same property acquired by Lou Ella Callais, wife of/and Herman J. Rodrique from Clement A. Lapeyronnie, by act dated June 25, 1946, William John White, Notary Public, registered in COB 227, Folio 341, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. An order authorizing Administratrix to do so may be issued after ten (10) days from the date of the first and only publication of this notice. An opposition to the application may be filed at any time prior to the issuance of such order. By Order of the Court, Masie Comeaux, Deputy Clerk of Court Attorney: Brent J. Laliberte LBN 22275 Address: 1820 Belle Chasse Highway, Ste. 205 Gretna, LA 70056 Telephone: (504) 393-0315 Gambit: 12/10/13 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Albert Sullivan and Sheila Anderson Sullivan please contact J. Benjamin Avin Atty, 2216 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Amy Henderberg and Daryll Johnson, please contact Jennifer M. Medley, Attorney, at 504-495-1385. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of ANDREW LESLIE LENNON please contact J. Benjamin Avin Atty, 2216 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Beverly A. Green aka Beverly A. Green Morris, please contact Lakeisha Jefferson Atty., at 225-302-3209. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of a lost promissory note payable to Anthony Smith Financial dated March 22, 2013 in the amount of $1,525.86 and signed by a T. Mars; please contact Jules Fontana, Attorney @ 504-581-9545.

STATE OF LOUISIANA

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO EXECUTE OIL, GAS AND MINERAL LEASE NOTICE IS GIVEN, to the heirs, legatees and creditors of this Succession, and to all other interested persons, that Richard K. Blum, the duly appointed Administrator of the Succession of Robert U. Blum, has applied for an Order authorizing him to enter into an Oil, Gas and Mineral Lease in favor of Allen & Kirmse, Ltd. covering the interest of the Succession in the following described property: That certain tract or parcel of land containing 68.00 acres, more or less, situated in Sections 23, 26 and possibly 24 and 25, all in Township 21 South, Range 22 East. Lafourche Parish, Louisiana and being further described as follows: All of Lessor’s undivided interest of that portion of the herinafter described property which is located east of a line located 7 arpents, more or less, east of and running parallel to the East bank of Bayou Lafourche. A certain portion of land measuring approximately 4,100 feet from the East bank of said Bayou Lafourche, in the Town of Leeville, Louisiana, the westernmost point of the northern boundary of which is located at a point on the East bank of said Bayou Lafourche approximately 3,600 feet north bank of Sanders Canal, and the westernmost point of the southern boundary of which portion of land is located at a point on the east bank of Bayou Lafourche approximately 500 feet south of the north bank of Sanders Canal, by the depth of 40 arpents, more or less, bounded above by the lands of the Estate of J. N. Lefort and below by the lands of Louis Bernard, and located in said Sections 23, 26 and possibly 24 and 25, all in Township 21 South, Range 22 East, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Said tract of land described above and leased herein being the same property described in that certain deed from

Louis Pitre, Sr. et al in favor of Robert U. Blum, husband of Maxine G. Armfield Blum, dated November 28, 1953, and recorded at COB 187, Page 228, Entry No. 125399, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Said reference herein made for descriptive purposes only. AND All that portion of the acreage described below as Tract 127-2 and 123 which is not covered by the tract described above. Tract 127.2: That certain tract or parcel of land containing 1.832 acres, more or less, located in the East bank of Bayou Lafourche, measuring 93 feet front, more or less, situated in Section 23, Township 21 South, Range 22 East, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Said tract being bounded now or formerly as follows: Northerly by Joseph Alario; Easterly by Claernce C. Clifton, Jr., et al; Southerly by Ambrose Martin; and Westerly by said Bayou Lafourche. Said tract being a portion of the same property described in that certain deed dated March 23, 1899, recorded at COB 32, Page 515 and that certain deed dated June 9, 1900, recorded at COB 34, Page 217, of the Conveyance Records at Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Tract 123: That certain tract or parcel of land containing 3.06 acres, more or less, located on the East bank of Bayou Lafourche, measuring 64 feet front, more or less, situated in Section 23, Township 21 South, Range 22 East, Lafourche Parish Louisiana. Said tract being bounded now or formerly as follows: Northerly by Joseph Martin, Jr.; Easterly by Clarence C. Clifton, Jr., et al; Southerly by Leo J. Theriot; and Westerly by said Bayou Lafourche. Said tract is a portion of the same property described in that certain Tax Deed dated July 12, 1991, recorded at COB 1116, Page 820, of the Conveyance Records at Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. NOTICE IS GIVEN that all terms of the proposed lease are fully set forth in the copy of said lease attached as Exhibit “A” to the Petition for Authority to Execute Oil, Gas and Mineral Lease. NOTICE of this application to lease is being published once in Jefferson Parish and once in Laforche Parish. The Order authorizing the duly appointed Administrator to enter into said Oil, Gas and Mineral Lease may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION DEPENDENCY THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND TO: • Daryl Douglas, alleged father of Joseph Derrel White, d.o.b.09/26/03, Dependency Petition 13-7-00731-9 filed 08/27/13. A Preliminary Hearing on February 4, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. and a Fact Finding hearing on February 20, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. will be held on this matter at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. These hearings will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at both of said hearings regarding your child. If you do not appear at the first (preliminary) hearing, the court may cancel the second hearing and take evidence and enter an order without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, and/ or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www. atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. SONYA KRASKI, Clerk of the Superior Court; L. PARDEE, Deputy Clerk

from the date of the publication of this Notice. Any opposition to the Application must be filed prior to the issuance of the Order. Jon A. Gegenheimer, Clerk Attorney: Dwight L. Acomb Adress: 1515 Poydras Street, Suite 2323 New Orleans, LA 70112 Telephone: (504) 524-2323 Gambit: 12/10/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS

STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 06-5434 DIV. C SECT. 10 SUCCESSION OF LILLIAN MITCHELL DAVIDSON NOTICE OF FILING TABLEAU OF DISTRIBUTION Notice is here given to the heirs, creditors and all other interested persons of this estate to show cause within seven days from the publication of this notice, if any they have or can, why the tableau of distribution filed by Don D. Davidson, Provisional Administrator, should not be approved and homologated and the funds distributed in accordance with it. BY ORDER OF THE COURT, DALE N. ATKINS CLERK OF COURT Attorney: C. Richard Gerage LSBA No. 06023 Attorney for Administrator Address: 3621 Ridgelake Dr., Ste 207 Metairie, LA 70002 Telephone: (504) 834-7171 Gambit: 12/10/13

CIVIL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF ORLEANS STATE OF LOUISIANA NO.: 11-7186 DIV. D SECT. 16 DOCKET 1

SUCCESSION OF EDWARD WRIGHT KLEPPINGER NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO COMPROMISE CLAIM NOTICE is hereby given that MARY CLARE HARTMAN, Dative Testamentary Executrix of the SUCCESSION OF EDWARD WRIGHT KLEPPINGER, has, pursuant to the provisions of the Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure Articles 3198 and 3229, petitioned the Court for a Judgment authorizing the compromise of the claim asserted by MARK BERENSON, and authorizing the execution of a Settlement Agreement on behalf of the SUCCESSION OF EDWARD WRIGHT KLEPPINGER effectuating the compromise among MARY CLARE HARTMAN, Dative Testamentary Executrix of and on behalf of the SUCCESSION OF EDWARD WRIGHT KLEPPINGER, and MARK BERENSON in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Settlement Agreement executed by the parties and effective on December 2, 2013, a copy of which is attached as Exhibit “A” to the Petition of the Dative Testamentary Executrix for Authority to Compromise Claim filed in this proceeding. The Judgment may be rendered after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of this publication and any opposition must be filed prior to the rendering of the Judgment. If no oppositions is filed, the Court may grant the authority requested at any time after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of publication. Attorney: Eric M. Schorr Address: 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3815 New Orleans LA, 70170 Telephone: (504) 582-1500 Gambit: 12/10/13

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

THAT PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana, in AIRLINE PARK NORTH SUBDIVISION, being a portion of Elmwood and Lafreniere Plantations, all as per plan of said subdivision made by H.E. Landry, C.E., dated September 1, 1954, and revised October 20, 1954, and which said plan of subdivision was approved by the Police Jury for the Parish of Jefferson, under Ordinance No. 2535, recorded in COB 366, folio 627, as per plan of subdivision made by H.E. Landry, C.E., dated October 28, 1954, approved by the Police Jury for the Parish of Jefferson under Ordinance No. 2592, registered in COB 369, folio 450, and as per plan of resubdivision of H.E. Landry, Sr., C.E., dated May 5, 1955, approved by the Police Jury for the Parish of Jefferson, under Ordinance No. 2749, recorded in COB 379, folio 298, described as follows: LOT 10, SQUARE 222, which said square is bounded by Amhurst Street, Mercury Avenue, Cummins Street, Lair Avenue, Loraine Street, and Peggy Avenue, all as per print of survey made by H.E. Landry, Sr., C.E., dated February 23, 1956, a copy of which is annexed to act of sale before Shirley H. Kirkes, Notary Public, dated March 23, 1972. LOT 10, SQUARE 222 commences at a distance of 530.72 feet from the corner of Cummins Street and Mercury Avenue and measures thence 57 feet front on Mercury Avenue, 57 feet in width across the rear, a depth on the Cummins Street side of 95.81 feet and a depth on the opposite side line nearer to Amhurst Street of 95.28 feet.

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

79


80

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013


Picture Perfect Properties PICTURE YOURSELF IN THE HOME OF YOUR DREAMS!

NORTHSHORE FOR SALE

Heart of the Forest EXCELLENT BUILDING LOTS TWO ACRE TO FOUR ACRE LOTS

We’re pleased

FOR SALE

ACADIAN HOME ON ONE ACRE

to announce that

RE

HO

S TH

R

NO

Sandra Kinnion-Mejia has joined us as our bilingual Notarial Assistant “Se Habla Espanol”

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 3801 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 207 Metairie, Louisiana 70002 504.833.7603

New Orleans River Front For Rent

Upscale Furnished & Unfurnished Apartments! Starting at $1800/month for unfurnished units, and $3000 to $3,600/mo. for furn. Penthouse (as little as $100/day!). • Landscaped Grounds & Seating Areas/Grill • Washer/Dryer • Complimentary Hilton Health Club Membership (includes rooftop pool!) And much, much more!

985.796.9130 www.lapolofarms.com

This Acadian home has three bedrooms, two baths, (master bath with Jacuzzi,) large family room with cathedral ceilings and wooden beams. Wooden floors with ceramic tile in kitchen and baths. Large laundry room. Screened back porch. Carport for two cars and workshop/storage room. Energy miser construction. The home is on one acre, very private with scenic views. Ten minutes north of I-12 at Goodbee Exit.

$299,500.00 Phone: 985.796.9130 www.LaPoloFarms.com

HARVEY DUPLEX • $120K OBO

3527 Ridgelake Dr., Metairie. Office Space Metairie Luxury Great Location Approx 1,350 usable sq.ft.

NEWLY RENOVATED! 2nd floor of 2 story office building. Parking, efficiency kitchen, storage room, mens and womens restrooms, reception area, conference rooms, private office.

Available immediately. 1 year lease $1,700/mo. (504) 957-2360.

Two locations! 323 Morgan St. and 407 Morgan St. Call today! (781) 608-6115 or rhapartments@aol.com

Two bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, each side. All electric, carpet throughout. Owner will finance. Approx $20,000/yr income Contact Century 21 - Sandy (504)451-2018

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Ideally located 10 min. north of I-12 Goodbee Exit

• 1500 to 2000 Sq. Ft! • 2 Br/2 or 2.5 Bath • Off St. Parking • High Speed Internet • Security Cameras & Alarm • Spacious Closets • Balconies in view!

50124 Louisiana Polo Farms East Blvd.

81


REAL ESTATE

JOHN SEITZ Cell: 504-264-8883

NOTICE:

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BYWATER

822 LOUISA ST.

BYWATER. $399,000. Contact John Seitz, Agent, Gardner Realtors. Cell# (504) 264-8883 or office: (504) 8916400. www.FrancherPerrin.com

822 LOUISA ST.

BYWATER • $399,000 LET MY 25 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION AND REAL ESTATE ASSIST YOU.

STONES BISTRO

Stones Bistro is a turn key fine dining restaurant available on Oak Harbor Blvd., on the Oak Harbor golf greens, Bayou, & across from the club house. A beautiful place &i t is available w/ equip. for $785,000. Larry Haik, Jr., Commercial Realtor, 2010-2012 Power Broker Award Winner. 985-788-4993 Cell, ABEK Real Estate, 985-646-2111. Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission

EMPLOYMENT

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

221 S. Solomon • $310,000

NEED HELP?

JSeitz@GardnerRealtors.com

504-891-6400

CONSULT WITH THE REAL ESTATE EXPERTS OF NEW ORLEANS FRANCHER PERRIN GROUP VOTED TOP 3 REALTORS IN THE CITY!

Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds

www.FrancherPerrin.com

Call

Email classadv

@gambitweekly.com

1321 Coliseum St. $450,000

117 S. Hennessey St., $ 329,900 NG

I ND

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

PE E L

82

SA

10,600 Sq.Ft. Office Bldg.

3329 Calhoun St. • $335,000

483-3100

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

10,600 Square Foot Office building, former Slidell Sentry News building for sale at the unbelievable low price of $350,000. Larry Haik, Jr., Commercial Realtor. 985-788-4993 Cell. ABEK Real Estate, 985-646-2111. Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission

2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, hardwood floors, backyard, walk to Mid City shops and restaurants and City Park.

3 bedroom, 2 bath home on Historic Coliseum Square. Off street parking, central air and heat, great entertaining home large front porch and balcony. in an untra convenient Lower Garden District location close to downtown. Approx 3k sq.ft.

Move in cond, lots of architectural details, 1st block off Canal, off street pkng for several cars, garage. 2 br, 2 dens, encl porch/sun rm & wood flrs. Must see to appreciate.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Impeccable 2011 Contemporary Renovation. 3BR/2BA, Designer tile throughout, custom kitchen, oversized cabinets, granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, subway tile in baths. Island offered with sale along with all appliances. Ideal floorplan with vaulted ceilings. Spacious corner lot with fenced backyard, walk to neighborhood restaraunts and Tulane University. Andrew Severino Investment Specialist Sharpe Realty, LLC

1513 St. Charles Ave. #A New Orleans, LA 70130 504-571-9576 • (914) 787-9513

NEED HELP?

Consider the alternative ...

gambit

®

EMPLOYMENT SECTION

Call 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 2016 FELICITY STREET

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL RENTALS CALL TODAY FOR OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS

HISTORIC RENOVATED DOUBLE 3 Bedrooms/1.5 Baths Per Side. Hardwood Floors & High Ceilings. New Kitchen & Bath Cabinets. New Interior and Exterior Paint. Hardy Siding & Yard. $149K. Call (504) 236-8069. To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

H2O, Gas, & High Speed Internet Included 1, 2,3 Bedrooms Available. Kenner, Metairie, Metro New Orleans, and the Westbank. Call MetroWide Apartments Today 504-304-4687

METAIRIE GREAT SAFE LOCATION

LARGE 1 BR. Walking dist. to everything needed! 1/2 Blk to Whole Foods, Lakeside Mall & Restaurants. Very Nice! $950/mo., utilities included. Call (504) 669-5711.

New FQR Office open! 713 Royal MON-SAT 10-5pm Sun-1-5 Full Service Office with Agents on Duty! 522-4585 Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Dirk • Billy • Andrew • Eric

Lux fully furn.Short term rental.Prvt pool. $4,000 Treme just off of crtyrd. Recently updated. $850 ground floor furn fab location. W/D in unit $775 2nd flr unfurn Offst pkng, W/D in unit. $985 Furn corporate rental in warehouse dist. $1950 Hi Ceils, Renov Kit/Bath, Nice ctyd $1150 Dble parlor/Hdwd Flrs/Hi Ceils/ Exc Loc!! $1300 Hi Ceils/Natural Light/2 flrs/1 Bd on each $1900 Fully furn, valet prkng & crtyd, water incl $2550 Renov dplx, hdwd flrs, modern kit, w/d hkps $1350 Renov dplx, hdwd flrs, modern kit, w/d hkps $1350 Studio/1BA furn/central A/C/great spot! $900 Newlyrenov,w/d,centralac/heat,fireplace. $1,200

FOR SALE 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 2/2 1/1 1/1 3/2.5 2/2 2/1 1/1

FURNISHED ROOM GREAT FOR STUDENT

Private home near Metairie Rd. $525/ mo inclds util, cable & some use of kit. Refs & dep. Avail now. Call 985237-0931.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

Nice size grnd fl just off crtyd. $189,000 Bamboo flrs. exp wood Central HVAC. $189,000 3rd flr,exp beams,storage! Lush crtyrd $269,000 townhouse w/ common courtyard $169,900 1,600 sqft, brand renov, balcony, $599,000 lovely, crtyrd, no pets/low condo fees $149,000 HeartofFQ.Grtfrntporch.Updatedkit/ba$359,000 Penthouse condo w/pkng & balcony $999,500 Uptown single fam house w/offst pkng.$379,500 Morro Castle! Balc w/view of crtyrd&pool $375,000 BALCONY OVER ROYAL! Recently updated $375,000

COMMERICAL 512 Wilkinson Row Comm NEWPRICE!commcondo.quaintFQst$395,000

1101 N. White St.

Large 1 bedroom, w/front porch, furnished kit & w/d. No pets $850/ month. Call 504-343-8651.

NEAR CITY PARK - DESAIX

Single house, c-a/h, 2br, 1ba, w/d hkps, lrg fncd yd, pets ok. $1100/mo. 504-952-5102

MID CITY 4706 St. Peter St.

Great location one block to bus, City Park, Delgado. 2 BR, Upstairs. Hi ceilings w/fans, & ample closets in hall & bedrms. Furn. kit w/ built-ins & dishwasher. Bath w/storage, tile & claw foot tub & shower. Off st. pkg., security bars on both doors. One year lease. $960 per mo. + deposit. Water included. Call (504) 638-8667 cell.

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

500 Mandeville - 3 bd/ 1 1/2 ba ...... $2500 4721 Magazine - Comm ................... $2000 1020 Esplanade - 2 bd/ 1 ba + pkg ........ $1950 539 Dumaine - 1 bd/ 1 ba ............... $1650 1016 Burgundy - 1 bd/ 1 ba ............... $850 539 Dumaine - 1 bd/ 1 ba ............... $800 CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

You can help them find one.

A NEW JOB

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. 1/1 Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $750/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450.

1 BR EFF. CLOSE TO UNIV

Furn efficiency with liv rm, a/h unit, ceil fans, wood/tile floors, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avail Now. $575/ mo. 504-895-0016.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1095

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry/3 mo. min. No pets. Avail Dec. 17th. Call 504-442-0573 or 985-871-4324.

1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT/ IRISH CHANNEL 1215 FOUCHER ST.

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

readers need

3 BR, 1.5 BA 1400 SF. Wood floors, new paint, all appliances included, fenced patio, central AC, Off St. prkg, ADT. No pets. No smoking. $2,000/ mo + deposit. Call (985) 507-3468. ROOMS BY WEEK. Private bath. All utilities included. $175/week. 2 BR avail. Call (504) 202-0381 or (504) 738-2492.

FOR RENT/OTHER PARKING SPACE

Park your small rv, trailer, small boat or vehicle. 1 blk from streetcar line. Mid City area. $100 monthly or obo. Call (504) 488-4609

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMATES.COM

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

421 Burgundy #1 421 Burgundy #3 1125 Royal #3 611 Dauphine B 823 Burgundy #3 416 Burgundy #5 729 Dauphine A 917 Toulouse #11 816 Aline 1303 Burgundy #11 1224 Royal #2

1 BR apt with new granite in kit & bath. King Master w/wall of closets. Kit w/ all built-ins. Laundry on premises. Offst pkg. NO PETS. Avail now. Owner/ agent, $699/mo. 504-236-5776.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

French Quarter Realty

934 Burgundy 2 / 1.5 1218 Barracks “A” Studio 718 Frenchmen #4 1/1 718 Frenchmen #10 1/1 333 Julia #508 1/1 1004 Gov Nicholls studio 604 Esplanade #1 studio 604 Esplanade 2/2 412 Dauphine 1B 2/2 4124 N Rampart 1/1 4126 N Rampart 1/1 214 Chartres, Unit 6 1025 Dumaine #6 1/1

OLD METAIRIE $300 OFF 1st MONTH Sparkling Pool & Bike Path

83


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS NOLArealtor.com

Your Guide to New Orleans Homes & Condos

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

1750 St. Charles #428 $339,000 St Charles Avenue’s most premiere address. Spacious 2 BR condo with wonderful view of the courtyard. Beautiful wd flrs, granite counter tops, stainless appl. State of the art fitness center. Rooftop terrace with incredible views of the city. Secured off street parking.

John Schaff CRS

Beautifully renovated, raised Victorian with 3400 sq. feet. 4 bedroom/3 baths. Beautiful marble kitchen & baths. Incredible wood floors.

1750 St. Charles #502 $319,000 St Charles Avenue’s most premiere address. Spacious 1 BR condo with beautiful wd flrs, granite counter tops, stainless appl, marble bath. Beautiful courtyard. State of the art fitness center. Rooftop terrace with incredible views of the city. Secured off street parking.

• 1750 St. Charles #630 (2Bdrm/2Ba) ....................................................................... TOO LATE! $389,000 • 905 Aline (3Bdrm/2Ba) .............................................................................................. TOO LATE! $339,000 • 536 Soniat ..................................................................................................................... TOO LATE! $329,000 • 760 Magazine .............................................................................................................. TOO LATE! $239,000 • 1750 St. Charles #442 ............................................................................................... TOO LATE! $229,000 • 4941 St. Charles (5Bdrm/3Ba) ................................................................................. TOO LATE! $1,900,000 • 3638 Magazine (Commercial) .................................................................................... TOO LATE! $649,000 • 1215 Napoleon (3Bdrm/2.5Ba) .................................................................................... TOO LATE! $899,000 • 1225 Chartres (2Bdrm/1Ba) ......................................................................................... TOO LATE! $289,000 • 13 Platt (3Bdrm/2Ba) ..................................................................................................... TOO LATE! $309,000 • 601 Baronne (2Br/2Ba) ................................................................................................ TOO LATE! $489,000 • 1224 St. Charles (1Bdrm/1Ba) ................................................................................... TOO LATE! $169,000

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

84

PIED-À-TERRE

2226 URSULINE AVE.

1525 CLIO # 5

ANTEBELLUM TREME BEAUTY. Built in 1855 this home features a grand stairway, large porch, elegant iron work and classic facade. 4-plex with guest cottage. Fully rented. 12 ft ceilings, heart of pine floors, side yard, off street parking. Lush tropical front garden. Excellent property for investors and/or owner/occupant. $399,000

CONDO IN HISTORIC HOME. Well maintained 1 BR condo features high ceilings, original heart of pine floors, beautiful mantle. Lots of natural light. Kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters and gas range. Side balcony and common deck. Centrally located, easy access to Uptown, Downtown, CBD, I-10, GNO Bridge and French Quarter. $155,000

(c) 504.343.6683 (o) 504.895.4663

1602 S. Carrollton $849,000

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 77

TREME BEAUTY

More than just a Realtor!

ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRS

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.


CLASSIFIEDS

ADULT

Dating Easy

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT Mature GREEN-EYED BLONDE

WARNING HOT GUYS!

made

Do you deserve more attention than you’re getting? Call 504-428-1140.

WHERE GAY SINGLES MEET Browse & Reply FREE! 504-733-3939 Use FREE Code 2613; 18+.

WILD CAJUN SINGLES Send Messages FREE! 504-737-3738 USE CODE 3183; 18+.

New Orleans

504.733.3939 Lafayette

337.314.1250

New Orleans

504.737.3738 Lafayette

337.314.1255 FREE CODE

3117

For other local numbers call

1-888MegaMates 24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC

You can help them find one.

A NEW JOB

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.

FREE CODE: Gambit Weekly For other local numbers call:

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2561

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

readers need

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

85


Holiday Helpers

• Gifts • Jobs • Events

For “TRAVEL LOVERS” Only

Experience

“ICELAND” -idyllic, indulging, intrepid -invigorating, inviting, iridescent

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

Immerse yourself in our 2014 Summer Packages from New Orleans!

86

Give the gift of volunteering this holiday season!

Proudly presented by “Carla Gallo Travel” of New Orleans, Celebrating over 25 years of “crafting” dream trips worldwide Tel-504-524-4848/email europe74@aol.com From mid-May through mid-September, escape to the land of the midnight sun where one can experience the “best of both worlds!” Enjoy the sophistication of Reykjavik, one of Europe’s smallest but most beautiful capitals where you will find yourself surrounded by dramatic mountains, the Atlantic ocean, jaw dropping architecture, narrow cobblestone streets, music, art, international and local cuisine and so much more! From the capital, you are within easy reach of dreamy landscapes from jagged lush green lava fields to glistening glaciers, waterfalls, geysers, dramatic and sparkling Atlantic coastline, fishing villages and the list just goes on...

Volunteer Volunteer your your time time at at Canon Canon Hospice. Hospice. Call Call Paige Paige today today to to fifind nd out out about about all all of of the the many many opportunities! opportunities! 818-2723 818-2723 x3006 x3006

Happy Holidays!

Fleur de Lis Glass Ornaments December 5th thru 23rd Monday-Saturday 11am - 5 pm 3000 Royal Street in the Bywater 504.945.1878

Simply pick your dream and we will find an excursion to fulfill it!

Our Packages Will Begin From $2699 per person for 7 nights and to include the following: • roundtrip air from New Orleans to Reykjavik • 7 nights in 1st class properties including breakfast daily • roundtrip airport transfers • city tour of Reykjavik • full day excursion from Reykjavik to the “Golden Circle” • trip cancellation insurance

Please note that we can also do 5 night packages. We will “architect” each package to your individual needs and prices will vary based on individual request and availabilities of our suppliers. Our packages will be highly “personalized and qualitative.”

MAKES A GREAT X-MAS GIFT!

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SALE 50% OFF


Holiday Helpers

• Gifts • Jobs • Events

Crescent City Designs has GREAT GIFT IDEAS!

VILLAGE

CUSTOMIZED BOAT PADDLES

Creating Smiles in the Childhood Memories of Adults

LARGE SELECTION OF

BLACK & GOLD & PURPLE & GOLD

CHRISTMAS ITEMS 4501 VETERANS BLVD. METAIRIE 504-888-7254

Everything for your Christmas Tree & under it too! YOUR LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT PET FRIENDLY PUB

We’re Large Enough to Serve You & Small Enough to Know You

CUSTOMIZED TABLE CUSTOMIZED FLEUR DE LIS MAGNETS

We Offer:

Call Darin Zech at

One of the largest selections of spirits, bottled & draft beers NFL Sunday Ticket | NFL, NCAA & Pelicans games, too. Beer Specials for LSU & Saints games & Game Grub too! Happy Hour | Midnight Madness | Drink Specials Friendly staff serving the nicest clientele on the planet!

(All Aluminum)

(608) 393-4314 or betheldfndr@aol.com Tables are one-of-a-kind. Tables shown are for display only.

We Provide Media Blasting and Other Fabrication Services

Make Make this the this the

MostMost Wonderful TimeTime of the Wonderful of Year! the Year! Make Your Jingle! MakeCash Your Register Cash Register Jingle!

www.gardendistrictpub.com 1916 Magazine Street • 267-3392 between St. Mary & St. Andrew Street

HolidayHelpers HelpersCan Can Make Your Business Holiday Make Your Business Jolly!Jolly! included, Classifieds ToTo bebe included, callcall Classifi eds

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 10 > 2013

SEWERAGE & WATER BOARD TABLE

504-483-3100 504-483-3100

87



Gambit New Orleans 12/10/13