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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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JANUARY 04, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 01

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Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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Our annual list of New Year’s resolutions ... for others New Orleans know-it-all

The “pop-up” restaurant trend takes hold

15

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll

FRIDAYS

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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The Puzzle Page

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Comic Tig Notaro comes to town Best bets for your busy week

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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A little talk with Girl Talk

Ian McNulty on Sylvain 5 in Five: 5 terrific tofu dishes Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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commentary

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Be It resolved ... t’s a Gambit tradition each year to make a list of New Year’s resolutions — not for us, but for local public figures. We realize that many will go unfulfilled, but that has never tempered New Orleans’ (or our) sense of optimism. So, without further ado, we offer our suggestions for 2011: • Mayor Mitch Landrieu is off to a good start, but the honeymoon will soon be over and the list of things for New Orleans’ mayor to do in 2011 is long. As some public schools prepare to revert from control by the Recovery School District (RSD) to the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB), Landrieu has said he wants to play a role. Public education is not officially within his mayoral purview, but this mayor is not one to run from a challenge — even if it’s one that he brings on himself. If Landrieu decides to take on this one, he should do all he can to help make it a clean, smooth transition. On another educational front, many are learning that Landrieu can be a pit bull when he finds it necessary, and we can’t think of a better place for him to sink his teeth than the disaster looming at the University of New Orleans (UNO), the city’s oldest and largest private university. The Louisiana State University System seems to be on a mission to marginalize — if not subjugate — UNO. Landrieu and the entire metro area cannot afford to let that happen. In 2010, the mayor doubled the city budget for the New Orleans Recreation Department (NORD) and established a new city commission to oversee NORD. This year, Landrieu will be expected to produce results by summer. We’d also like to see him continue his hands-on approach to working with Sheriff Marlin Gusman on the proposed new prison. And finally, he should lend his political capital to the efforts to stabilize revenue streams for the Sewerage & Water Board, the Levee Board, the OPSB and other tax-recipient bodies. • New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas’ honeymoon is almost over, too. He’s doing a good job of cleaning up NOPD’s image and performance, but it’s not enough simply to be honest during his own tenure. The city’s long-term need is structural reform that will outlive this administration and restore citizens’ faith in the local police for years to come. Meanwhile, he should continue to work with the feds in their ongoing investigations and in the Justice Department’s intervention to reform NOPD. And as citizens we have one responsibility: stop the killing. • Members of the New Orleans City Council seem to be getting along with the mayor — and one another — better than any council in years. They should continue their efforts to promote both comity and progress. • No one has done more to clean up Louisiana politics in the last 50 years than U.S. Attorney Jim Letten and his team of investigators and prosecutors. We hope they resolve to keep up the good work and bring their ongoing investigations to swift and just conclusions. The NOPD trials in the case of Henry Glover were masterfully handled. Next up: the NOPD trials in the matter of the Danziger Bridge, possible indictments in Jefferson Parish and additional work in the investigation of the Nagin Administration. • Newly elected Jefferson Parish President John Young Jr. and the Parish Council are still getting comfortable in their new roles vis-avis one another. As a councilman, Young was the outsider who often sparred publicly with his colleagues. Now, as parish president, he holds the ultimate “insider” job — and the parish needs its president and council to work together more than ever. Young and the council must resolve to navigate the political waters that lie ahead with one eye on the need to accommodate each other’s views and the other on citizens’ demands for reform and restoring trust in government. • The OPSB and the RSD need to stop their turf wars and remember their common purpose: children’s education. Stop bickering over who’s in charge. Post-Katrina voters have no patience with selfserving politicians who engage in spats over fiefdoms. If you persist, they’re liable to take away all your authority in the next round of cit-

I

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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izen-led reforms. Put the kids first, not your own political interests. • Gov. Bobby Jindal: Rip up your frequent-flyer cards and show some real leadership and creative thinking on the 2011 budget rather than relying on foolhardy solutions (slashing higher education funds across the board) and cockamamie one-time plans (selling off state prisons to plug the gap). Focus on Louisiana, and do the job you say you want. • Kenneth Feinberg, the “BP claims czar,” should show his allegiance to the people of the Gulf Coast. Before the claims process becomes a Road Home-style disaster, Feinberg should cut the red tape and start reimbursing local businesses (including local restaurants and those who do business with local restaurants), all of which suffered the effects of the BP oil disaster.

Gov. Bobby Jindal: Rip up your frequent-flyer cards and show some real leadership and creative thinking on the 2010 budget • Speaking of BP, the oil giant should spend less on self-promotional ads telling us how responsible the company is and put some green into actually showing us how responsible it is — with projects like wetlands restoration, seafood promotion and tourism promotion for New Orleans. • Glen “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Bryan Batt, Kermit Ruffins, and all the performing artists who made it big on the national stage in 2010: Keep doing what you’re doing. You make us all proud. • In 2010, David Simon and the cast and crew of HBO’s Treme embraced New Orleans (warts and all), and most of us agreed that the fictionalized portrait they painted was accurate in spirit, even if it wasn’t always pretty. Our wish for Season 2 is that Treme’s creators keep showing off all our ups and downs, joy and sadness, intelligence and music. • Local sports fans and arts lovers: It’s time to step up and help save a couple of local treasures. The New Orleans Hornets need an attendance of 14,213 at home games by the end of January, or the team can exercise a clause in its lease to depart the New Orleans Arena and move. Meanwhile, the financial woes of Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre — the country’s oldest community theater — have reached crisis levels. Paid staffers have been fired and the remainder of the current season has been canceled. The theater’s board hopes to keep Le Petit alive, but it will need everyone’s help. • To the New Orleans Saints: Bring home the Lombardi Trophy ... again! And to everyone else, from Uptown to Backatown: Love thy neighbor. Practice random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty. Pause each day to realize what we have here and be grateful for it. Happy New Year.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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HEY BLAKE, I HAVE LIVED IN THE FAUBOURG ST. JOHN FOR MANY YEARS AND JUST BECAME AWARE OF SOME VERY INTERESTING CITY PARK TRIVIA THAT I DOUBT MANY LOCALS ARE AWARE OF. “BIG LAKE,” LOCATED ON THE NORTHEAST SIDE OF THE NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART, WAS DESIGNED TO LOOK JUST LIKE LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN. I LOOKED ON GOOGLE MAPS, AND THERE IT IS. I HAVE TRIED TO FIND THE BACKGROUND OF THIS PROJECT BUT CANNOT FIND THE ARCHITECT, CONTRACTOR, ETC. PLEASE ENLIGHTEN US ON THIS UNUSUAL UNDERTAKING.

City Park. The board bought a tract of land between today’s Friedrichs and Lelong avenues; right in the middle of it was Big Lake. When the golf club built a grand clubhouse in 1904, members used a boat to retrieve golf balls out of Big Lake. HEY BLAKE, DO YOU HAVE ANY HISTORY ABOUT THE BUILDING AT 5256 MAGAZINE ST., THE NEW ORLEANS ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS BUILDING?

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DEAR GREG, You are right; Big Lake does resemble Lake Pontchartrain. The park has many lagoons and, other than the ones along City Park Avenue, they are not natural. All were planned and dug by park management and the WPA. It was in 1894 that George Grandjean described his plans for a lake in the park. Grandjean, a member of the City Park Board and a civil engineer, suggested that the Metairie Bayou be deepened and widened to create the lake. In doing this, several small islands, inlets and peninsulas were created. He also suggested roads, walkways and footbridges as part of the improvements to the park. Grandjean’s bill came to a mere $300. Ten companies bid on the excavation of the bayou, and J. Bentley & Company won the contract. During the winter of 1895, workers had dredged as far as the east boundary of the park. Another company, G. E. Mott, extended a 1,400-foot pipe from there to Bayou St. John. A pump was added, and water from the bayou filled the new lake. The lake was a triumph for the park — and Grandjean. The water coming from the bayou was so plentiful that the lake started to overflow regularly. A fire truck was employed to pump the water out until the park installed outlet pipes to the Orleans Canal. Big Lake, as the new body of water became known, was also the first water hazard for the first golf course created in City Park. In 1897, several businessmen interested in playing golf — including the president of the City Park Board — were determined to create a golf course near

This fine arts school Uptown was built from lumber and architectural details saved when two buildings that once occupied the site were deconstructed to make way for the present structure.

DEAR BONGO, For many years it was believed that the house was built in 1874 by Judge John Henry Ilsley. This house of late Classic design, however, was actually built in 1883 in a Retardataire style (the perpetuation of styles and motifs after they have passed out of fashion). In 1883, the owner of the house was Dennis McRedmond, who instructed builder Patrick Burns to completely dismantle the two buildings already on the site. Redmond must have believed in recycling, because he had his builder reuse the bricks, lumber and windows from the buildings. What resulted was a home with eight rooms. There was a center hall and two kitchen rooms in a wing in the back. The front galleries are now enclosed, but originally they had cast-iron railings. Each room is about 16 feet by 18 feet, and all are perfect for the art school and gallery that occupy the house today.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > MORE SCUTTLES CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 11 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“A junkie can go sell his television and sell the radio and pay for a fix. But sooner or later … he’s got to face his addiction. I would prefer to have us face our addiction.” — State Treasurer John Kennedy on Gov. Bobby Jindal’s proposed “fire sale” of state prisons and land holdings to help close the 2011 budget shortfall. Kennedy and others are urging the governor to come up with a long-term, rather than a one-time, solution to funding.

Underground and Gourmet THE “POP-UP” RESTAURANT TREND COMES TO NEW ORLEANS WITH ONE-DAY-A-WEEK PIZZA AND BURGER JOINTS THAT HAVE PROVED VERY POPULAR.

“Obviously, you just want to punch your ticket to the big show — and we’ve done that.” — New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, the day after the team defeated the Atlanta Falcons 17-14, clinching its second playoff berth in as many years.

BY SAR AH GR AINER

W

FBI: CRIME STILL UP IN NEW ORLEANS

no one does that shit here.’ Customers line up We made real goofy-looking at the takeaway pizzas,” says Friedman. “But window of Pizza we ate them and thought, Delicious. The “pop‘You know, this is better than up” restaurant in the Bywater is cash only, most things I’ve had here.’ So takeout only and is we had this ongoing fantaonly open on Sunday sy of opening a pizza place nights. that would be good. But I was PHOTO BY teaching high school. Greg SARAH GRAINER was still in his last year of college. It wasn’t a reality.“ Not long after, the pair came across a shared kitchen space in the Bywater used by bakers and cooks for independent ventures, and began focusing on perfecting their product. Augarten and Friedman felt it crucial to master a thin, crispy crust and sauce from scratch, with a rotating lineup of ingredients sourced largely from local farmers markets. Experimentation still plays a big role at Pizza Delicious, where the “menu,” a blog (pizzadelicious.blogspot.com) updated by Friedman changes every week. Recent pies have included peppadew,

The FBI has released the latest iteration of its semi-annual Uniform Crime Report (UCR), which tracks crimes in major metro areas around the country. The December report brought the first look at 2010 crime numbers, covering the first half of the year. Nationally, the UCR shows violent crime (murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault) dropped 6.2 percent in comparison to the first six months of 2009, with the most significant drop in the South (the Northeast remained virtually unchanged). The bad news: While New Orleans showed a few declines — particularly in property crime and motor vehicle theft — the city was holding steady or actually trending up in some of the worst areas. There were 105 murders in the first half of 2010 (2009 saw 97); forcible rape remained virtually unchanged; and robbery went from 485 to 497. PAGE 11

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the New Orleans Saints running back, appeared on the NBC game show Minute to Win It in September, where he played for New Orleans Children’s Hospital. On Dec. 28, Thomas went to the medical center to present hospital administrators with his winnings: $37,500. “A lot of people hailed us as heroes this year,” Thomas said, “but the people at Children’s Hospital are my heroes” — which is why “Frenchy” is our hero.

John Raphael,

pastor of New Hope Baptist Church in Central City, spent the week after Christmas sleeping, praying and fasting in the neutral ground at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and South Claiborne Avenue. Raphael, a longtime advocate for nonviolence, is asking for a truce between warring factions in the city as well as for local radio stations to drop all songs with violent lyrics. He also asked that no one shoot guns in celebration on New Year’s Eve.

Anthony Jones,

the city’s chief technology officer under former mayor Ray Nagin, pleaded guilty in federal court last month to conspiracy to commit bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds. In a factual basis submitted to the court with his plea, Jones said he conspired with computer vendor Mark St. Pierre to funnel the payoffs. Jones will be sentenced on March 30. He faces a possible five years in prison as well as criminal forfeiture and fines.

Steven Godfrey,

an Atlanta Falcons fan and guest columnist at the football website SBNation.com, trash-talked the New Orleans Saints and their fans last week, writing “New Orleans has exploited every iota of their 2005 disaster to better celebrate a Super Bowl win.” He added his belief that the city chooses to “capitalize upon Hurricane Katrina as a means of fabricating a redemption narrative for their football team.” After furious Who Dat backlash, SB Nation removed the essay — and the Saints beat the Falcons on MNF.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

aiting outside the pick-up window at Pizza Delicious feels more like a tryst than a standard takeout experience. After calling the number on a hand-drawn flyer to get the address, customers picking up their food form a small line in a darkened alley marked only by a hand-painted sign hanging on a fence, proclaiming “PIZZA.” The line snakes around an unassuming building that sits on a quiet stretch of North Rampart Street in the Bywater. On a particularly busy night, a customer explains to his friends how the process works in the sort of fervent whisper one might use to lay the ground rules of purchasing from a particular drug dealer: “So it’s only on Sundays, and if there’s a special, you gotta get it. The specials are great. Call way ahead of time. You’ll be waiting sometimes for, like, three or four hours.” It is not an inaccurate estimate. The one-day-a-week pizza joint draws customers who often wait hours for the New York-style pies doled out by co-owners Michael Friedman and Greg Augarten. Every Sunday since Pizza Delicious opened in February 2010, crowds have gotten larger and the waits longer. “The first week we did it, 30 of our friends showed up or something and then ... just all these people. I don’t know them and they’re coming from all over the place,” Friedman says. “That’s the craziest part to me.” Pizza Delicious originated when Friedman and Augarten, transplanted New Yorkers, couldn’t find New York-style pizza. Roommates at the time, the pair made pizzas at home, experimenting with recreating a thin crust and incorporating ingredients they didn’t typically find on pizzas in New Orleans. “We were just like, ‘Aw, man, broccoli rabe on a pizza,

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transforming into MVB (Most Valuable Burger) every Sunday night. already the burger joint has weekly regulars. Partner rene Louapre says he was inspired by pop-up restaurants in other cities (specifically including Ludo Bites) and by Pizza delicious, the local “trailblazers,” as he calls them. “in general, form follows function,” FriedMan and augarten, With the help of a small crew of friends they called says Louapre. “We wanted to do a burgin after early attempts to go it alone, er restaurant, but none of us had the adopt their shared space on Sundays time. We just wanted to start testing starting at 5 p.m. this is how Pizza the concept, so for us, the pop-up resdelicious became the city’s first “pop-up” taurant was appealing.” if it wasn’t for the menu taped to the restaurant, a business that pops up in front door of Slim an impermanent or goodies, walking shared space, often into MVB wouldn’t with sporadic hours seem any different and an unadverfrom entering a regtised, speakeasy vibe. Pizza Delicious ular restaurant. the the ease of startpizzadelicious.blogspot.com up has an appeal dining room is loud twitter: @pizzadelicious and lively, and the to restaurateurs operation includes who have made the MVB full table service. pop-up restaurant 3322 Magazine St. (at Slim goodies) Like Pizza delicious, a trend. Chefs in twitter: @MVBurger it’s cash only. other major cities While pop-up reshave embraced the unconventional format, opening suc- taurants are flourishing nationwide, Loucessful pop-up ventures in Los angeles, apre appreciates that new Orleans diners Chicago, San Francisco and new York are, in his opinion, particularly discerning. “this is a great food town. You’re not City, to name a few. the Pizza delicious guys say it wasn’t a movement they going to get any slack cut, whether you’re open one day a week or not,” he said. joined intentionally. “the idea wasn’t to be trendy,” says “You’ve got to make good food. We’re Friedman. “We’re aware that these things going to do the best burger we can.” are going on. But for us, one day was all we could do, so we thought, ‘Let’s see how O n t h e Ot h er Si d e O F t h e Piz z a delicious pickup window, a similar dedicathat goes.’” One of the trend’s frontrunners, and tion to customers is evident in the kitchperhaps the best example of its successes, en. the phone rings constantly and the is accomplished Los angeles chef and Top window is never empty. While frantic and Chef Masters contestant Ludovic Lefebvre, unprofessional in a way — bills go from the who runs Ludo Bites from a rotation of customer’s wallets to an employee’s hands temporary spaces for a few months at a to a Styrofoam takeout container — there time. these short-lived spots offer inven- also is a sense of harmony and order. tive, complex menus, edited or entirely in the middle of one Sunday’s rush, rewritten each time by Lefebvre, so no two a friend sends Friedman a text mesLudo Bites experiences are the same. he sage, which he reads aloud to the staff: began in 2007 at the L.a. bakery Breadbar. “Ordering Pizza delicious is like being the “the pop-up restaurant started by acci- fifth caller in a radio sweepstakes.” the dent for me,” says Lefebvre. “i did not staff laughs, but they all seem disappointwant to be tied to the huge expenses of [a ed when, shortly thereafter, a customer fine dining restaurant]. You can’t eat the opts out of ordering after being told the curtains and the paint on the walls and wait time. a tally is marked on a sheet of the only thing that should matter is what paper labeled “nOs.” Customers at the window are patient was on the plate. “i never anticipated anything. it was and appreciative. “it was hard to find just a way for me to do what i love: cook,” good pizza in new Orleans,” says uptown Lefebvre adds. “it’s so expensive to open resident and Pizza delicious customer a restaurant and it is so hard to predict if Paul Kellogg. “and this is also something a space is right or if the concept is right to do. it’s fun.” for the time. it seems to make sense in “We knew people liked pizza and would this day and age; creating a temporary want to eat pizza,” says augarten. “that’s dining experience that allows a chef to not a secret. But we have people coming express himself.” back every week telling us how important in uptown, new Orleans boasts anoth- we are to them. it’s like an experience er pop-up with its own following. Last to them. So we’re not just a pizza place, fall, uptown diner Slim goodies began we’re a story. Or an event.” Crescent City Farmers’ Market arugula, homemade meatballs and pancetta. “We just want it to taste better. We take more time. We make our own sauce because it tastes better,” said Friedman. “We know what we want, and we try to do that.”

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    As  of  Dec.  28,  2010,  the  New  Orleans  Police Department had reported 156 murders  in  the  city  for  the  year  —  fewer  than 2009, which had 174. In 2009, New  Orleans  had  the  highest  murder  rate  per  capita  in  the  United  States  (52  per  100,000  residents),  and  the  trend  looks  to hold true for 2010 as well. Final data for  the year will be released by the FBI in mid2011. — Kevin Allman

City, SPCA Agree

BP ClAimS FACilitieS get legAl BooSt

Kenneth Feinberg,  the  claims  czar  charged with administering BP’s $20 billion  compensation  fund  for  those  seeking  damages  from  the  Gulf  oil  disaster,  has  hired  a  group  of  law  firms  to  assist  Gulf  Coast  Claims  Facility  (GCCF)  offices  in  Louisiana,  Mississippi  and  Florida.  In  Louisiana,  representatives  from  Baton  Rouge-based  Long  Law  Firm  LLC  will  assist  the  claims  facility  in  eastern  New  Orleans,  while  reps  from  Lutcher,  La.based Hammerman & Gainer Inc. will join  the Gretna office.     Earlier  last  month,  after  increased  criticism that Feinberg wasn’t processing  claims  fast  enough,  Feinberg  announced  a “quick pay” option granting a lump sum  payment  of  $5,000  to  individuals  and  $25,000  to  businesses  —  provided  they  agree not to pursue any additional claims.  To date, the GGCF has paid out more than  $2.6 billion in claims — $1 billion of which  have  been  to  individuals  and  businesses  in Louisiana. — Woodward

Former WWl rePorter SuSAn edWArdS dieS At 34

    Former  WWL-TV  reporter  Susan Edwards,  who  left  the  air  in  2009  to  battle liver cancer that eventually spread  to her lungs, died Dec. 29 at her mother’s  home in Rainbow City, Ala. She was 34. In  a statement, WWL interim news director  Mike Hoss  said,  “Susie  faced  this  battle  with  a  strength  and  courage  that  was  unimaginable.  She  was  so  young  and  had  so  many  reasons  to  be  angry,  but  she  never  was.  She  was  always  the  one  picking  up  our  spirits.  She  never  said  ‘Why  me?’  only  ‘What’s  the  next  hurdle  to overcome?’”     Edwards,  an  Alabama  native,  came  to  WWL  in  2007  after  a  five-year  stint  at  a  television station in Huntsville, Ala.      Local  friends,  including  WWL-TV  photojournalist  Adam Copus  and  WVUE-TV  reporter  Bigad Shaban,  had  organized  a  fundraiser  to  offset  Edwards’  medical  and  travel  costs  at  the  Southport  Music  Hall  in  Jefferson  on  Jan.  15.  It  will  go  on,  according  to  Copus.  “Now  it’s  just  as  important  as  ever,”  he  said.  “We  still  want everyone to come and have a good  time. That’s what Susie would have wanted — that, and to help her family in any  way we could.”      Donations  can  also  be  made  to  the  American Cancer Society, or to the  ‘Susan  A.  Edwards  Fund’  by  visiting  any  Capital  One Bank. — Allman

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    Mayor  Mitch Landrieu  announced  last  week an unprecedented four-year agreement  with  the  Louisiana  Society  for  the  Prevention  of  Cruelty  to  Animals  (LA/ SPCA)  to  provide  for  animal  control  services  to  the  city  at  a  monthly  cost  of  $160,000  —  or  $1.92  million  annually  —  through  2014.  Services  include  stray  animal  trapping,  collection  and  sheltering;  disaster  and  hurricane  assistance;  bite  case  response  and  quarantine;  enforcing  the intact dog ordinance; inspecting mule  stables; relinquishment of animals; adoption and re-homing for cats and dogs; and  euthanasia  and  cremation  for  unadoptable animals.     “This is a big win for the residents and  animals  of  New  Orleans,”  said  Landrieu  in  a  statement.  “The  LA/SPCA  has  been  providing  quality  animal  control  and  enforcement  services  for  decades.  …  We  are  pleased  to  have  a  fiscally  responsible  agreement  in  place  for  the  next  four  years.”  LA/SPCA  CEO  Ana Zorrilla  said,  “We look forward to continuing these high  quality services our citizens have come to  expect for the animals of New Orleans.”     The  LA/SPCA  turned  down  a  $1.7  million  contract  offer  on  Dec.  15.  The  organization  said  that  figure  was  too  small  to  humanely  serve  animals  in  the  New  Orleans  area.  LA/SPCA  spokesperson  Katherine LeBlanc  said  the  new  agreement  reflects  a  cut  from  the  requested  amount  ($2.5  million)  and  is  below  the  organization’s cost of animal control and  care,  but  “we  know  the  animals  will  be  treated up to our standards.”      When the LA/SPCA declined the initial  contract,  the  city  began  fielding  offers  from other organizations, and reports circulated  that  a  newly  formed  group,  the  Humane Society of New Orleans, sought  to  bid  on  the  contract.  The  city  and  the  group did not confirm those reports. “The  budget process is always tough. … There’s  give and take on both sides,” said Landrieu  press secretary Ryan Berni. “When you’re  working  on  a  budget,  you  need  to  field  other alternatives.”      With  few  alternatives  to  the  LA/SPCA,  Berni said the city was focused on reaching  an  agreement  for  the  animal  control  services  that  would  be  “in  the  best  interest  of  all.”  Berni  added  city  officials  worked  through  the  Christmas  holiday  to put together the four-year agreement.

    The LA/SPCA was founded in 1888 and  has  served  as  the  city’s  primary  animal  control  provider  for  more  than  60  years.  — Alex Woodward

I always make too

11


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Top Political Stories of 2011 n past years at this time I have offered “wacky predictions” for the coming year. The problem was that some of those predictions, which were intended to be tongue-in-cheek, actually starting happening. It was too scary. This year I’m playing it straight. Herewith a look at what I think will be the biggest (foreseeable) stories of 2011: 1. The Cliff Budget — Lawmakers convene in late April to begin the ugliest session in memory. Colleges and health care are on the bubble as Gov. Bobby Jindal guards his tax virginity. UNO will struggle to free itself from LSU’s iron grip as lawmakers consider (once again) a move to abolish the four systems and five boards running postsecondary education in Louisiana. 2. Ongoing Federal Investigations — From NOPD to Mose Jefferson to the Jefferson Parish scandals to the Ray Nagin administration, there will be lots of news coming out of federal court (again) this year. And those are just the ones we know about. 3. Redistricting — Lawmakers will gather in a special session to redraw their own districts as well as those of judges, Public

I

Service Commission members and the congressional delegation. Locally, the City Council must redraw districts as well. This will mark Hurricane Katrina’s final political impact as new district lines reflect major population shifts (and losses). 4. Statewide Elections — Right now it appears no one will challenge Gov. Bobby Jindal for re-election, but a lot could change if Jindal’s numbers keep falling. Meanwhile, look for the GOP to go after (or recruit) Democratic Attorney General Buddy Caldwell to complete the party’s sweep of statewide offices. 5. GOP Legislative Majorities — Republicans now control the Louisiana House and soon may own the Senate. Will that make things easier for Jindal? Will it mark a change in state policies, or will it just move the Democratic hogs away from the trough so the Republican hogs can move in and get their fill? 6. Bobby’s Ambitions — Governor Talking Points isn’t about to shed his national ambitions; they drive his every move. He will, however, have to appear to tamp them down, at least until he gets re-elected in the

fall. Then he’ll go full-bore in time for the presidential primaries. This time next year, my prediction for the biggest story of 2012 could well be Louisiana in Bobby Jindal’s rear-view mirror.

Governor Talking Points isn’t about to shed his national ambitions; they drive his every move. 7. Jefferson Parish Elections — At a minimum, voters will choose a new assessor and several new council members. The autumn election cycle also will present parish voters with their first chance to weigh in on all parish posts after the scandals of the Broussard

Era. No one in office is completely safe. 8. NOPD Reforms — Local and federal efforts to clean up the city’s troubled police department should take hold in 2011. This will be the first major effort since the 1950s to institutionalize reform at NOPD. The new chief, the new mayor and the citizens cannot afford failure on this front. 9. Reassessments — New Orleans’ new Assessor Erroll Williams takes office this week and must immediately begin the process of equalizing — and updating — all property assessments citywide. All other assessors also must reassess property this year, triggering the quadrennial “roll back, roll forward” debates. 10. The Jail Size Debate — Sheriff Marlin Gusman is building the new jail he wants, but the debate continues over how many people the city should incarcerate. The final decision will determine how many additional jail facilities the city will build — and how big each will be. While we’re following these stories, we’ll undoubtedly see some surprising new storylines as well. It’s always a wild ride. Happy New Year.

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Church would object to the team being called the Saints. Hannan replied that he had no objections — but he reminded McKeithen that, “from the viewpoint of the church, most of the saints were martyrs.”

The story follows with the team’s misfortunes for most of the first four decades of its existence. Then again, all those martyrs are in heaven now.

Jonathan Vilma (fifth from right) organized a November event where his fellow Saints waited tables to benefit the Jonathan Vilma Foundation.

page 16

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

How a Football team Saved a City by being SaintS both on and oFF the Field.

hen Archbishop Philip Hannan got a phone call from Gov. John McKeithen in 1966, right after the NFL had awarded an expansion franchise to New Orleans, McKeithen asked the prelate if the Catholic

15


COVER STORY page 15

    And these days, so are Saints football fans, in a man-  ner of speaking.     If  sacrifice  leads  to  heavenly  reward,  then  today’s  football  Saints  have  earned  their  way  in  as  well.  On  and  off  the  field  in  2010,  team  members  selflessly  gave their time, effort and resources. The Saints’ stunning Super Bowl XLIV victory on Feb. 7, 2010, lifted the  sagging  post-Katrina  spirits  of  their  hometown,  and  their year-round work in the community helped  lead post-Katrina rebuilding 

efforts across southeast Louisiana.      More than a dozen Saints players — and two coaches  —  have  their  own  charitable  foundations  that  have  raised  millions  of  dollars  for  children,  schools,  playgrounds, the underprivileged, victims of disasters  and other worthy causes. The players and their foundations have directly touched the lives of untold thousands and inspired millions more by their example.      For all these reasons, the 2010 New Orleans Saints  —  led  by  team  captains  Drew  Brees  and  Jonathan  Vilma — are our New Orleanians of the Year.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

IT  SeeMS  IMpOSSIBLe  TO  SepArATe  Drew  Brees  the  star  quarterback  from  Drew  Brees  the  philanthropist  and  civic  champion. His dedication to both his athletic  and  altruistic  pursuits  is  so  dogged  that to single out either as demonstrably  more  impressive  would  be  neglectful  of  the  other.  More  than  anything,  this  coupling  of  attributes  explains  New  Orleans’  deep affection for Brees, who blends superhuman athleticism on the field with expressions of utter humanity off it.      New  Orleans  is  fortunate.  NFL  history  is  littered  with elite  quarterbacks who  realized  little success because of the shortcomings of  their teammates. Not only is Brees surrounded  by an extremely talented group of players, but  many of his fellow Saints also share his commitment to improving their community — and the  collective results, in both cases, are exemplary.       Brees’  charitable  work,  much  like  his  playing  career,  has  evolved.  He  and  his  wife,  Brittany,  started  the  Brees  Dream  Foundation  in  2003 

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while  he  was  playing  with  the  San  Diego  Chargers.  The initial focus of the foundation was to raise money  for  cancer  research  and  care  for  cancer  patients.  Brittany’s aunt, Judith Zopp, died of cancer while the  couple was dating at purdue University.     “Once  we  got  to  New  Orleans,  we  broadened  the  scope  of  our  foundation  with  the  rebuilding  process  and  efforts and  everything  else,”  Brees  says.  “We’ve  always had a very charitable heart between the two  of us and just have wanted to give back what’s been  given us. We feel like we’ve been blessed with a lot in  our lives and just feel strongly about it.”     The impact of the Brees Dream Foundation, which  expanded its mission to provide care, education and  opportunities  for  children  in  need,  has  increased  exponentially  in  recent  years.  Since  its  inception,  it  has  committed  or  contributed  more  than  $6  million  to charitable causes and academic institutions in New  Orleans,  San  Diego  and  West  Lafayette,  Ind.,  where  Brees played in college.     In  2010,  the  foundation  donated  money  to  local  schools,  playgrounds  and  a  home  for  visiting  cancer  patients.  Annual  events  like  rebuilding  Through  Brotherhood brought more than 100 fraternity members from around the country to New Orleans to work  with  Habitat  For  Humanity,  and  an  Amazing Racestyle  scavenger  hunt  in  the  French  Quarter  helped  raise  $100,000.  But  Brees  isn’t  satisfied  just  with  raising money; he also wants to inspire. His foundation partnered with The Idea Village on an entrepreneurship competition called the Trust Your Crazy Ideas  Challenge, which awarded a $10,000 first prize to the  high school with the winning business plan.       “Whenever you visit the schools, kids will come running up to you,” says Brees, the 2010 Sports Illustrated  Sportsman  of  the  Year.  “You  see  the  sparkle  in  their  eyes  and they love the fact  that you have reached  out to them and that  you  care  about  them.  A lot of times, people  just  need  to  know  that there’s somebody  out  there  thinking  about  them  and  caring about them.” MeANWHILe, THe LeADer of the Saints defense  has  relied  on  the  charity  of  New  Orleanians  to  help  support  a  cause  beyond  America’s  borders.  Middle  linebacker  Jonathan  Vilma  started  his  namesake  foundation  to  raise  money  for  ear th quake - r av age d  Haiti,  the  birthplace  of  his parents. Vilma, whose  goal  is  to  build  a  charter school in Haiti, enlistpage 19

Jonathan Vilma’s foundation raises money for Haiti, while Drew Brees’ Dream Foundation has several focuses, including rebuilding and children’s welfare. photos by Jonathan bachman


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

ccepting the Saints head coaching job in Katrinabattered New Orleans in 2006 may not have been a decision Sean Payton arrived at easily. Subsequently establishing his own charitable foundation, he says, was. “It came at a time when there was such a need and a demand post-Katrina,” Payton says. “I think from our players and our organization there was just so much in demand — whether it was businesses, people, different groups needing help. With the position that we were in and the timing, it made a lot of sense.” The mission of Payton’s Play It Forward Foundation is to improve the lives of families and children in the areas of health, education and social welfare in the Gulf region. Since it was founded in 2008, the foundation has raised nearly $1.5 million for dozens of organizations. Celebrities including John Goodman, Dr. Phil McGraw and Sammy Kershaw helped pack the Superdome for the foundation’s major 2010 fundraiser, the Black & Gold Gala. Organizations benefiting from the event included Kingsley House, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Louisiana, the North Rampart Community Center and Feed The Children, which used its donation to fill 14 semitrucks with food. Payton says he feels compelled to use his celebrity to benefit others. “When you’re in a position such as the head coach … I think that you do feel that obligation, and then with everything that had gone on [in New Orleans since Katrina], it was clear that it was the right thing to do,” says Payton, a married father of two. “It was an avenue for us and a way for us to also instill some of those things in our children.” — Adam Norris

17


Gayle Hatch

PEOPLES HEALTH CHAMPION

®

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

On August 15, 2004, at age 65, Gayle Hatch led the Men’s US Olympic Weightlifting Team as their head coach for the Summer Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. With decades of success as a weightlifting and strength and conditioning coach for some of America’s top athletes, Coach Hatch was the obvious choice to lead our country’s finest competitors. Just as he was the logical choice to serve as head coach of the US team at the 2009 World Weightlifting Championships in South Korea… at age 70.

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Gayle Hatch has achieved world-class recognition through a life filled with world-class experience. Athletic in his youth, Gayle took advantage of his natural physical talents by testing his boundaries and pushing himself to the limit. His dedication led to success in basketball from high school, through college and all the way into the pros. But along the way to countless awards and recognitions, Gayle learned a great deal about building muscle, strength and character. He learned discipline and what it takes to win, both physically and mentally. And thankfully, Gayle Hatch made the decision to extend the rewards of his own, personal experience to the training of other athletes.

“I’m 71 years old and I’ve learned that with pit bull persistence, you can do anything.” – Gayle Hatch –

At its core, coaching is about improving performance. Good coaches demonstrate a number of qualities including creativity, perception and the ability to inspire and motivate others. Great coaches support those qualities with a strong foundation of practical experience. It’s that winning combination that makes Gayle Hatch one of the most sought-after strength coaches in America. Gayle Hatch embodies a caliber of excellence that can only be achieved through experience. Now 71, Gayle has mastered the art of coaching athletes to their peak potential. And he continues to inspire all of us to keep getting better… and go for the gold. Gayle Hatch… Peoples Health Champion.

www.peopleshealth.com/champions The Peoples Health Champions program demonstrates the excellence that comes through life experience by recognizing exceptional achievement after age 65.

2010 Peoples Health Champions Selection Committee Joe Cook, WVUE-TV Fox 8 David Francis, The Times-Picayune Ben Hales, New Orleans Saints Angela Hill, WWL-TV Channel 4 Kip Holden, Baton Rouge Government Donna Klein, Peoples Health

David Manship, The Baton Rouge Advocate Karen Carter Peterson, LA State Senate Mark Singletary, New Orleans CityBusiness Carol Solomon, Peoples Health Jim Tucker, LA House of Representatives


COVER STORY page 16

ed  the  help  of  his  teammates  in  November 2010 for a celebrity server  fundraiser at Morton’s The Steakhouse  that raised approximately $200,000.     Vilma  says  few  Americans  can  empathize  with  the  Haitian  survivors  like residents of the Gulf Coast.      “They  can  attest  to  some  of  the  things  that  are  going  on  in  Haiti  right  now  [because  of]  what  went  on  with  Katrina  —  how  everyone  tried  to  chip  in  early  on  and  then  they  forgot  about  New  Orleans,”  Vilma  says.  “It’s  the  same  thing  that’s  going  on  now. Everyone went and donated their  money  early  and  they’re  just  forgetting about Haiti. I’m trying to keep that  [from happening].”     Last  week  Vilma  was  named  the  Saints’  Man  of  the  Year.  Members  of  the media, personnel in the Saints front  office and local nonprofits vote on nominees for the title.

    Backup  tackle  or  not,  at  6-foot-7,  Strief  makes a big impression wherever he goes. And  the  sense  of  compassion  he  and  many  of  his  teammates exhibit has only enhanced  their stature in the community.     “I’ve  never  played  anywhere  else,”  Strief  says  of  New  Orleans.  “But  I  can’t  fathom  a  team  meaning  more  to  a  city  —  or  a  city  meaning  more  to a team.”     As we went to press this week, the  Brees  Dream  Foundation  announced  a  $100,000  contribution  to  the  9th  Ward  Field  of  Dreams,  the  community  athletic  space  on  the  campus  of  George  Washington  Carver  High  School.  The  donation  will  support  construction of a top-of-the-line football field, track and lighting, and will  be open to the public without charge.     These Saints cannot be stopped. 

On the field: Jonathan Vilma in a dogpile of Minnesota Vikings. Off the field: Drew Brees plays in Heath Evans’ Softball Showdown, benefiting families affected by sexual abuse. Top phoTo by JonaThan bachman

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

FuLLBACK  HEATH  EVANS’  CruSADE  IS  perhaps  the  most  personal  of  any  of  the Saints players. He started the Heath  Evans Foundation to give hope and healing to those who have suffered childhood  sexual abuse. Evans’ wife, Beth Ann, was  a victim of sexual abuse and Evans wants  to make sure the same high-quality counseling  that  she  received  is  accessible  to  those who can’t afford it.     The  foundation,  which  has  built  up  a  network  of  counselors  in  Boston  (Evans  spent  four  seasons  with  the  Patriots),  New Orleans and Palm Beach County, Fla.  (where  he  grew  up),  also  raises  awareness  about  a  topic Evans says is often considered taboo.     “I  couldn’t  care  less  if  people  ever  remember  me  playing this game,” Evans says. “But 10 years from now I want  people to know that [the Heath Evans Foundation] is what  you run to when your family is walking through this particular abuse.”     Saints  reserve  defensive  back  usama  Young,  who  created the usama Young Youth Foundation, focuses his community  efforts  on  after-school  and  mentoring  programs  for middle and high school students in New Orleans and  Washington, D.C., where he grew up. In November, he led a  group of McDonogh 35 students on a college tour of Dillard  university and the university of New Orleans.      “I want to give them a little glimpse of what’s to come,”  Young says. “So I get them out to these colleges and get  them acclimated to what might be. I try to let them know  you can make it here.”     By his own admission, Saints reserve offensive lineman  Zach  Strief  doesn’t  have  the  kind  of  celebrity  of  many  other NFL players who are trying to make a difference off  the field. But the former seventh round draft pick’s lack of  star power hasn’t dimmed his desire to be hyperactive in  the community. Strief’s Dream Big Foundation helps raise  funds  for  organizations  such  as  CASA  (Court  Appointed  Special  Advocates),  whose  volunteers  represent  the  best  interests  of  abused  and  neglected  children  in  the  courtroom;  and  Cafe  reconcile,  a  Central  City  restaurant  that  offers life skills and job training to at-risk youth.     “I  really  admire  programs  that  help  people  to  change  their own lives,” Strief says.

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COVER STORY

Off The Field

O

By Alex WoodWArd

Drew Brees — The Brees Dream

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Heath Evans — Heath Evans

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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Foundation, www.heathevans.org Evans is an outspoken activist and supporter for the fight against sexual abuse. His foundation offers free counseling, as well as play and art therapies for childhood victims of sexual abuse in New Orleans and Palm Beach County, Fla., where he grew up. Evans, whose wife Beth Ann was a victim of sexual abuse, encourages victims to tell their stories at www.ImAVictim.com. The foundation also sponsors awareness campaigns and helps train partner organizations to look for signs of abuse.

Roman Harper — Roman Harper’s Hope*41 Foundation Strong safety Roman Harper helped ring in Roman Harper Day in his hometown of Prattville, Ala. in February 2010; the day celebrated the founding of Harper’s charity, which promotes education, health and strong families. Harper hosted the foundation’s inaugural golf tournament and auction, with proceeds benefiting the foundation. Harper also partnered with fellow safety Darren Sharper to raise funds for United Way following the Gulf oil disaster.

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Marques Colston — Colston

Jahri Evans — Jahri Evans Foundation, www.jahrievans.com/foundation.html This foundation helps underprivileged youth pursue higher education and teaches health and team values through organized sports and exercise. The foundation sponsors an annual football camp in Evans’ hometown of Philadelphia and hosts fundraisers such as celebrity bowling tournaments, auctions and dinners to benefit a scholarship fund.

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Meachem Follow Your Dreams Foundation, www.facebook.com/ pages/Robert-Meachems-Follow-YourDreams-Foundation Meachem founded this organization in 2007 to provide mentorships and financial aid to youth sports programs and kids who otherwise wouldn’t be able to participate in organized athletics. The foundation also helps pay for equipment, uniforms and team fees.

Campaign, www.thegreercampaign.org The cornerback’s campaign offers guidance counseling and support networks to help single dads build their families. Another program for kids offers an annual Boys to Men Camp, football clinics and programs to mentor young people.

cB Darren Sharper — Sharper

Kids Foundation, www.givingback.org/ sharperkids/sharperkidshome.htm Sharper and older brother Jamie, a former Seattle Seahawks linebacker, founded this grant-awarding organization, part of the national Giving Back Fund. The Sharper Kids Foundation supports charitable organizations and funds continuing education programs.

s Zach Strief — Dream Big

Stinchcomb Family Foundation Stinchomb founded this relief organization with brother Matt to help underprivileged children throughout New Orleans and the brothers’ native Georgia. The foundation partnered with Feed the Children and has donated hundreds of bicycles and toys to kids in New Orleans. The foundation also runs a youth football camp called OL 4 NO (or Offensive Line for New Orleans).

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Charities, www.colstoncharities.net Colston Charities serves foster children and underprivileged young people in New Orleans and Pennsylvania by offering financial assistance and higher education scholarships. The foundation also partners with Habitat for Humanity in Harrisburg, Penn., where Colston was born; Dauphin County, also in Harrisburg; and Jump Street, a Pennsylvania-based arts initiative.

Jabari Greer — The Greer

Jon Stinchcomb —

Leigh Torrence — The Leigh

Torrence South West Atlanta Youth (SWAY) Foundation, www.leightorrence.com/foundation.php Through the SWAY Foundation, Atlanta native Torrence helps run the 4th Down Fundamentals Youth Football Camp, a free summer program that serves more than 450 youth in the Atlanta area. SWAY also provides higher education scholarships and offers tutoring programs and SAT prep classes. In 2010, the foundation spent about $30,000 on its summer programs and scholarships.

Danny Clark — Danny Clark Foundation, www.dannyclarkfoundation.com Clark’s son, Danny Clark V, was born prematurely and weighed only 1 pound, 13 ounces. His birth inspired Clark to found a premature birth education and support organization in 2008, while with the New York Giants. The foundation also tackles literacy and sexual health issues and hosts an annual Mind, Body & Soul retreat for children, combining football and education events.

Williams Foundation, www.greggwilliamsfoundation.org Defensive coordinator Gregg Williams founded this organization to help fund school programs in his hometown of Excelsior Springs, Mo. The foundation hosts an annual Gregg Williams Tiger Classic golf tournament and auctions, and supports football clinics and local charities such as the Kiwanis Club and YMCA.

Robert Meachem — Robert

Will Smith — Where There’s A

Will, There’s A Way, www.thewillsmith. com/charities.html Since 2007, Smith’s foundation has helped local charities in his hometown of Utica, N.Y., and organized an annual football camp in the area. The foundation also partners with New Orleans groups such as Dress for Success New Orleans, the Bayou Foundation and Hands On New Orleans, and has contributed to Haiti relief efforts with musician Usher and the Powered by Service campaign.

Gregg Williams — Gregg

Forward Foundation, www.paytonsplayitforwardfoundation.com Head coach Sean Payton founded this charity in 2008 to help children and families facing homelessness, domestic violence, healthcare issues and those with other needs along the Gulf Coast. The foundation, which serves Louisiana, Texas, Alabama and Mississippi, has provided grants to organizations like the Covington Food Bank, Court-Appointed Social Advocates New Orleans, and Boy’s Hope/Girl’s Hope, among others. Play It Forward has distributed $700,000 to 21 charities.

nce they step off the field, the New Orleans Saints step in to communities in need. The team’s various charity foundations tackle a wide range of issues from sexual abuse and a lack of after-school programs for youth to the suffering in disaster-stricken Haiti. The game may be over, but the Saints ensure their fans and others that they aren’t sitting on the sideline when the clock runs down. Foundation, www.drewbrees.com Since its inception in 2003, the 2010 Super Bowl MVP’s foundation has contributed more than $6 million to charities and schools in New Orleans and San Diego. In 2010, the foundation helped raise almost $1 million for a renovation project at the American Cancer Society’s Patrick F. Taylor Hope Lodge in New Orleans, and it hosted more than 100 college students for Rebuilding Through Brotherhood, a collaborative project with Habitat for Humanity.

Sean Payton — Payton Play it

Foundation, www.facebook.com/ group.php?gid=88800865937 Strief founded Dream Big in 2006 with his wife Mandy and has helped raise funds for Cafe Reconcile. Last year’s September fundraiser benefited the Special Olympics. All proceeds from sales of the foundation’s “I Love Boys in Black and Gold” shirt benefit Dream Big and other local charities.

t Jonathan Vilma — The Jonathan Vilma Foundation, www. jonathanvilmafoundation.org Vilma founded his namesake relief organization in 2010 to help build a charter school in Haiti following the country’s devastating earthquake. Vilma’s parents emigrated from Haiti in the 1970s and much of his family remains in the country. Vilma and other Saints players waited tables at a November fundraiser to benefit the foundation, which has rasied $200,000 for Haiti relief so far.

Usama Young — Usama Young

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Youth Foundation, www.usamayoung28.com/youthfoundation.html Young’s foundation serves underprivileged children suffering from learning disabilities and kids from single-parent homes who need mentorship and guidance. It offers three programs: the Stay Focused football and cheerleading camp for kids ages 12 to 15, after-school enrichment activities, and Chalk Talk, a 30-minute guest speaker series.


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BY MISSY WILKINSON

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Shipshape hen kids and parents first enter Nola’s Ark (3640 Magazine St., 304-5897; www.nolasarkboutique. com), a children’s clothing boutique housed in a cozy, 750-square-foot shotgun house, they gravitate toward different items. Moms sift through racks of kids’ clothing, which include vintage-style shirtdresses, houndstooth fedoras, cardigans and ostrich feather-trimmed T-shirts. “Kids pretty much go straight for the toys,” says owner Jessica Alvendia. But eventually these trajectories convene at a point where the force of attraction rivals gravity’s: the cookie plate. “I love to bake, so we always have cookies,” says store manager Katrina Calnan, who keeps the shop stocked with homemade treats like snickerdoodles, cupcakes and eggnog cheesecake. “Even the police officers come in and get sweets.” Alvendia, a native of northern Louisiana, opened the shop in April 2010 to create “a children’s boutique that gives back” and carries exclusively handmade, one-of-a-kind items. Two percent of profits go to charities like Second Harvest Food Bank, Al Copeland Foundation and the Gulf Coast Restoration Network. A book signing benefiting the Heath Evans Foundation is in the works. Though she originally planned to stock only handmade items, Alvendia has expanded her merchandise to include trendy clothing lines. “I want to have items that are fun and funky. I like the more alternative look for kids — making them look like little men and women. Moms come in and they’re like, ‘I would wear this,’” Alvendia says. Though the store has a boutique feel, Alvendia wants customers to know that its prices don’t exclude anyone. “We always

WHOLE FOODS (3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-8225; Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119; www.wholefoods.com) celebrates the beginning of the Carnival season with a king cake sampling during store hours Thursday, Jan. 6.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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Owner Jessica Alvendia (left) have a sale going on. Prices vary — it is more upscale, but and manager Katrina Calnan call Nola’s Ark “a friendly, allyou can get a onesie for $20 around love-everybody shop.” or slippers for $12. We have a variety for all pocketbooks.” Nola’s Ark also carries quilts, bibs and goody bags sewn by Alvendia’s grandmother. “(My grandmother) used to sew clothes for me when I was a kid. I would stay with her in the summer when I was out of school, and she taught me needlepoint, sewing with a machine and how to make quilts,” Alvendia says. She sometimes stocks items that she sews herself, but as a business owner, mother of a 3-year-old, wife and soon-to-be graduate student, the amount of time she can devote to sewing is limited. However, her experience as a mother gives her an advantage regarding the children’s clothing market and she is adept at ferreting out small businesses as suppliers. “A lot of the clothing we carry is from little companies that started out with a mom making clothes for her kids, and the business just grew,” Alvendia says. “So these clothes are designed by a mom.”

THE NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART (1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4101; www. noma.org) celebrates its 100th birthday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8. The free event features performances by the St. Augustine Marching 100, members of the New Orleans Opera Association, the New Orleans Ballet Theatre and the Symphony Chorus of New Orleans. There also will be cake, ice cream and coffee by Cafe Du Monde. DOERR FURNITURE (914 Elysian Fields Ave., 947-0606; www.doerrfurniture.com) has a variety of furniture pieces on clearance, with discounts of more than 50 percent. Visit the store’s website and subscribe to its email list and receive $100 off a purchase of $1,000 or more.


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22

21

LEON

BROWN

28

8pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

TRiXiE MiNX featuring

29

Play HOUR

PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF

BILLIE HOLIDAY

ED PETERSEN PRESENTS BIZET’S PEARL FISHERS

8pm

CoMe PLaY WiTH US! For schedule updates follow us on:

starring

GLEN DAVID ANDREWS

NOJO JAM

irvinmayfield.com

Burlesque Ballroom

Linnzi Zaorski

“KID CHOCOLATE”

300 BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 WWW.SONESTA.COM

24

GLEN DAVID ANDREWS

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S

JASON MARSALIS

JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

BRASS-A-HOLICS

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S

AND THE

30

13

CRESENT CITY ALL-STARS

ALVIN

ED “sweetbread” BATISTE PETERSEN 8pm

MLK JR. JAZZ AWARDS 23

JAZ SAWYER’S

NOJO JAM

& Paul Longstreth 7pm 17 16

BRaSS BaND JaM

IMJazzPlayhouse

Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays 5pm-8pm WED. JANUARY 5, 12, 19, 26 SASHA MASAKOWSKI THURS. JANUARY 6, 13, 20, 27 ROMAN SKAKUN PROFESSOR PIANO SERIES EVERY FRIDAY

JANUARY 7 - TOM MCDERMOTT JANUARY 14, 28 - JOE KROWN JANUARY 21 - TOM WORRELL


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO <<<<<<<<<< << 27 >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

32

ART

35

STAGE

38

EVENTS

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CUISINE

43

NOISE NIGHT

JAN For those who’ve already abandoned New Year’s resolutions, Zeitgeist presents a night of decidedly unresolved art. Sound sorcerer Proud Father (pictured) heads a lineup of area fringe musicians (Jewel Yen, Pockets McCoy, Michael O’Keefe) performing experimental, dream-sequenced electronica while projectionists VHS Dream Factory turn their sonic visions into subliminal visuals. Admission $8. 8 p.m. Thursday. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Big Name Talent COMEDIAN TIG NOTARO PERFORMS IN NEW ORLEANS.

06

BY WILL COVIELLO JAN

F

7-9

GRAAE’S ANATOMY

Singing and dancing cabaret star Jason Graae brings his one-man show Graae’s Anatomy to Le Chat Noir for the weekend. The award-winning singer has appeared everywhere from Broadway to The Dukes of Hazzard to opera stages in New Orleans. Tickets $36 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

JON CLEARY

PHOTO BY RICK OLIVIER

posted online, all with the same slow deliberation on the efficacy of the sign, some with accounts of people who have tried to explain the translation to her, and sometimes a sweater jacket over the T-shirt. Being unassuming is her shtick. Notaro released a DVD titled Have Tig At Your Party. It features her from the waist up, standing and occasionally saying something to the camera so viewers could put it on their TV, and every once in a while, she pipes in with “Oh, look who just came in,” or “This song is cool, turn it up.” At 39, she’s hitting her stride, getting more TV exposure — recently on Comedy Central’s The Benson Interruption and NBC’s Community — and touring regularly, but she got where she is now on

Comedian Tig Notaro is becoming a familiar face on Comedy Central.

LA NUIT COMEDY THEATER, 5039 FRERET ST., 231-7011; WWW.NOLACOMEDY.COM TICKETS $15

PAGE 26

10

Chickie Wah Wah got a new piano for Christmas, and Jon Cleary has kindly volunteered to break it in. The R&B ivory tickler and Absolute Monster Gentleman is in the midst of a manic Monday residency in January, playing solo sets from his hopping 2008 LP Mo Hippa (FHQ). Call for ticket information. 8 p.m. Monday. Chickie Wah Wah, 2828 Canal St., 304-4714; www.chickiewahwah.com

JAN

10

TIG NOTARO 10 P.M. FRIDAY

JAN

RICKY GRAHAM SHOW

Ricky Graham ushers his cast of New Orleans notables onstage for a couple of Monday night performances (Jan. 10 and 17). Bitsy Mae Cissy Fay Werlein Claiborne Delahoussay (pictured) is on a quest to have weathercaster extraordinaire Nash Roberts canonized. Mr. Otto, the Meter Maid, Blind Man Dave and others join in for new songs and old jokes. Tickets $25 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Monday. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

or a TV personality and resident of Venice Beach, Calif., comedian Tig Notaro is not the best name dropper. Talking via phone in advance of her first stand-up gig in New Orleans, she doesn’t mention she’s close friends with Sarah Silverman until asked, although many Comedy Central watchers would recognize her as Officer Tig from The Sarah Silverman Program. And Silverman is producing a TV pilot starring Notaro, which they hope will begin airing this summer. Instead, Notaro mentions that her great-great-grandfather was mayor of New Orleans: John Fitzpatrick. One term: 1892-1896. His administration’s accomplishments included presiding over the electrification of streetcar lines and the creation of the city’s public library system. (A fan of boxing, he also refereed bouts, including a couple involving the renowned heavyweight John L. Sullivan.) When asked about Silverman, the story starts with pants, and becomes about pants. “I met her like eight years ago,” Notaro says. “She came up to me at a party and said she liked my corduroys. Then I saw her at a show in New York and then in L.A. a year later and she said ‘hi.’ I wore the pants for a while. I actually ripped them while I was on stage in San Francisco, because I have a habit of sticking my hand in my back pocket, and the pocket just ripped off. I was like ‘Did y’all just hear that?’” Notaro’s standup act is marked by an unflappable deadpan voice and complementing casual attire. When competing for a spot on the 2003 season of Last Comic Standing, she appeared in jeans and T-shirt and riffed on the “Do not disturb” signs at Mexican resorts, which in Spanish read “No moleste.” Many versions of the bit about using the doorknob banner to repel would-be molesters are

25


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JANUARY 04 > 2011

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PHYLLIS WALLO, M.D. IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE RE-OPENING OF HER

PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY EVALUATION  MEDICATION  THERAPY

Adults and Adolescents

504.444.5640 7611 MAPLE STREET NEW ORLEANS

a slow and steady course. She was born in Jackson, Miss., and grew up in Pass Christian, where her mother, an eccentric artist, painted donkeys and clowns on the back of their home. She took the nickname Tig from her brother’s mispronunciation of her given name Mathilde. Later the family moved to Texas, and Notaro eventually dropped out of high school. She didn’t go to college but got a facsimile experience, living with two friends attending the University of Texas at Austin. The trio later moved together to Denver, and then to Los Angeles, where one of them wanted to break into TV production. In her late 20s Notaro tried standup comedy for the first time and loved it. “It was the first time that everything really clicked for me,” she says. “I feel like it came naturally to me. I did really well the first time. It actually startled me when people laughed.” Infused with confidence, Notaro’s second try was in a competition, and she bombed. But she kept at it, becoming a regular at Los Angeles open mics, where she both met other comics and weathered the pitfalls of on the job training. “One time this woman in the audience thought she was at an improv show,” Notaro says. “After 10 minutes she started yelling ‘strawberry’ at me. Like I was going to work that in. I was like, ‘You’re at the wrong show.”’ Working in the trenches also built a network of friends and comedians. Notaro met Zach Galifianakis on the circuit and has worked on a film project with him. She and frequent writing partner Kyle Dunnigan still hit out-of-the-way open mics to work out new material. Notaro is working on a pilot called Tig Has Friends, which features standup and celebrity guests. First she interviews members of a band or the cast of a film or TV show separately, and then she rehashes the results with the whole group together. She’s also releasing a CD in 2011 after signing to the indie-rock label Secretly Canadian. One of its artists is a fan, and she’s the only comedian on the label. “It helped me as an artist to remember that you have to get your career to a certain point before you can go out and expect anyone to get behind you,” she says. Notaro expects to release the album simultaneously with the pilot if it gets picked up. She’s taking it all in stride, however, with the understated confidence that it’s not a matter of if she hits the milestone but when.


noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

BEST BIKE SHOP -GAMBIT

Free Samples GIRL TALK’S ALL DAY.

he success of Gregg Gillis’ Girl the world’s best matchmaker, whose gift Talk project can be charted by — aside from defining the U.S. Copyright three New Orleans concerts Office’s doctrine of fair use — is knowing he’s landed over the past three years, each just the right blind date for Peter Gabriel larger than the last: Tulane University in (it’s Foxy Brown), or recognizing that all April 2008, Tipitina’s in April 2009 and back-to-back nights this week at the House of Blues. In fact, Gillis notes, it’s the only measure he has. “We’re not selling records, just giving them away for free,” he says of unannounced fifth LP All Day (Illegal Art), left out on the digital doorstep in the middle of the night on Nov. 15. “We lose track of the album download tracking pretty fast, because there’s other people hosting it. There’s no marketing team, “Hello Good Morning” by Diddy anything like that. Girl Talk mashes up — Dirty Money was missing was a The only quantitasounds in live shows. little Bananarama. tive gauges of how PHOTO BY Offering the album as a free things are going, if DOUGLAS STEWARD download sparked more interest the word is spreadthan even Gillis anticipated. “It ing, are the shows. Starting from 2006 on, that’s been a simi- kind of exploded on us,” he says. “The lar thing in every city: play one show, next interactivity was at an all-time high. You year come back and have a bigger show. have those Google trend gauges, and the It’s also how I get to see how people react peak for this album was like five times the to different songs, what new material I’m last one. From there we immediately saw the ticket sales increase, needing to add working on that people respond to.” How many ears has All Day reached? double venues in some cities and increase Gillis hasn’t a clue. With no SoundScan venue size in other cities.” As thrilling and memory-jogging as the numbers for managers to pore over — no managers, for that matter — the mashup breathless LP’s 70-minute barrage is, the master relies on what amounts to a show- unhinged live shows are something else of-hands audience survey. It’s the same entirely. Confetti-snowing, toilet-papered way he assembles his stitched samples mania takes hold, with Gillis and his bank and asylum-like dance parties. Every gig of plastic-wrapped gear in the eye of a is a focus group: If crowds go crazy when swirling sweat storm. “On this new tour, he splices Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs” and we’re a lot bigger production,” he says. Ludacris’ “Move Bitch,” he knows he’s on “For the first time I’m actually touring to something. (They did, hence All Day’s with lights and a custom software guy to do some visual stuff. I feel like every opening salvo.) That pairing is the first of 373 overlap- six months there’s another step to take ping snippets that make up Girl Talk’s lat- it up. I really want it to keep growing. As est pop-music patchwork, an electric quilt the shows pick up in size and the audience of ripped genres and revisionist musical gets bigger, I want to go there as well. I history. Gillis calls it “recontextualization,” want to make it better than the last one, a fittingly mashed up word to describe more insane than the last one.”

STERLING MARDI GRAS CHARMS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

JAN

KING CAKE BABY $18.95

27


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

28

SCHEDULE

01.04.2011 Tax Workshop for Musicians and Artists, 5-7pm

02.01.2011 Touring and Merchandising, 5-7pm The Marsalis Room at NOCCA 2800 Chartres St. New Orleans, LA 70117 All seminars are FREE. Light refreshments provided.

www.sweethomeneworleans.org These seminars are presented with the support of the Surdna Foundation.


LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde

listingsedit@gambitweekly.com

FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 4 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Smashing Blonde, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 9

BLUE NILE — FitzpatrickMcGrain-Singleton, 10

BMC — Abita Blues, 7; Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan, 8 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nevous Duane, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — John Mooney, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — The Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque & Music feat. Dirty Bourbon River Show, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jay B Elston, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Heavy Mitchell, 9; Mario Ortiz, 10 OAK — Austin Alleman, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Jimmy Carpenter, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Brian Seeger Europa Trio, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Mojo Trio, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Lucy Michelle & the Velvet Lapelles, Caroline Smith & the Goodnight Sleeps, 9 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — New Orleans Oneironauts CD release, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Kris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

BMC — Mumbles, 7; Blues4Sale, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Iguanas, 8:30 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 HUDDLE SPORTS BAR — Band of Brothers, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Ched Reeves, 2; Joe Bennett, 7

preview I Love La.

In January 2007, The New York Times ran a guest editorial by Randy Newman. It was, appropriately, the lyrics to a song, “A Few Words in Defense of Our Country,” which condemned the current state of American politics through a clenched-teeth grin, belittling modern leaders in light of the more accomplished imperialists of Nazi Germany and ancient Rome. Perhaps the most flattering Times music review ever, the placement drew Newman’s acerbic ire for what didn’t run: several lines about incest in the time of Caesar. “What are they protecting, Tiberius?” Newman told NPR. “These people have been dead 2,000 years. … Kevin Caesar isn’t going to come out of the woodwork and sue them.” The serrated barbs served as a reminder that Newman — satirical voice of a generation in the 1970s but also, since 1996’s Toy Story, friendly soundtrackeur to Disney — is most animated when he isn’t. All area children whose introduction to that voice came in the snoring score for The Princess and the Frog should hear “Kingfish” and “Louisiana 1927,” two trenchant Pelican State anthems and emblems of the former New Orleanian’s Ray Charles-sings-Mark Twain aura. The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents and augments this rare performance. Tickets $27.50-$92.50. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

JAN

07

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Brian Stoltz, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Children of Spy, 7; Pat Flory, 9 OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

ONE EYED JACKS — West End Motel, Fiend Without a Face, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Ronnelle Johnson, Palm Court Jazz Band feat. Topsy Chapman, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny Angel, 8:30

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Todd Duke, 9:30

Randy Newman 8 p.m. Friday Mahalia Jackson Theater, 801 N. Rampart St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com

SALU — Fredy Omar Trio, 6

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & Deacons, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

Thursday 6 12 BAR — 101 Runners feat. Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 3 pc. Spicy, 9

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE

PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; J.P. Carmody & the Micro Brues, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Brandon Foret, 9:30 CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Doxx, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Creole String Beans, 8

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Friday 7

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

12 BAR — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 10

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Styx, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 2; Captain Leo, 7 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

THE MAISON — Kristina Morales, 6; Magnetic Ear, 10 THE MAISON (PENTHOUSE) — Parishioners CD release, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Goodnight Sleeps, 7; Jesse Dupuy, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Velvet Lapelles, 11 OAK — Christina Perez, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Mark Braud & Crescent City Joymakers, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Curley Taylor, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Claude Bryant & the All Stars, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Roseanna Vitro, Maria Marquez, Sachal Vasandani & Cindy Scott, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TELLO’S BISTRO — Jerry Nuccio, 5 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late as Usual, 9

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; King James & the Special Men, 10

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER — Jewel Yen, Pockets McCoy, Michael O’Keefe, Proud Father, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — Cha Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7

BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Mumbles (upstairs), 9; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Caroline Fourmy & Her Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, 1 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 6; Right Reverend Soul Review, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Topcats, 9:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Geb Rault, 7; Sweet Jones, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Dave Stryker Quartet, 8; Ogya Band, 10

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; John “Papa” Gros, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Gov’t Majik, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Numa Fiend, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight. JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 2; Brint Anderson, 7

Wednesday 5

MUSIC

29


Metairie Park Country Day School Minds in motion. Life in progress.

MUSIC

LISTINGS

— Colin Lake, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 7

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — C.R. Cruver, 7; Los Po-Boy-Citos, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Clarence & Funky People, 5; Some Like It Hot!, 7; Daria & the Hip Drops, 10; Ashton & Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 10

MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Agent 86, 8; Michael Millet, 9; Jule Yen, 10

OAK — Reed Alleman, 6; Mike Kobrin Trio, 10

MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE

Thursday, January 20th, 8:30 a.m. 300 Park Road. Metairie, LA 70005 – (504) 849.3110 – www.mpcds.com Country Day accepts qualified students without regard to race, color, disability, gender, religion, national or ethnic origin.

MPCD-14139-Gambit_3girls.indd 1

12/30/10 4:15 PM

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson Trio, 9:30

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Clockwork Elvis, Bonerama, 9:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

Showcasing Local Music

30

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM 1/5 TWELVE NIGHT THU CARNIVAL KICK-OFF 9PM 1/6

FRI 1/7

SAT 1/8

101 RUNNERS

W/ CHIEF MONK BOUDREAUX AND 3 PC. SPICY

JOHN LISI & DELTA FUNK 10PM SOUL SECT 8PM WILLEM MCCORMICK & DAKODA EMERSON 10PM

SUN NOCHE LATINA 6PM 1/9

FREDDIE OMAR CON SU BANDA

MON 1/3

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 1/4

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 1/5

Brian Stoltz

NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

THU 1/6

The Trio

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1; T’Canaille, 9

FRI 1/7

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Big Feets, 5; Late as Usual, 9

SAT 1/8 SUN 1/9

feat. Khris Royal & guests

Queen’s Balls feat.

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

Joe Krown Trio

feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night!

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SHAMROCK BAR — St. Anthony Soul & Blues, 10

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(504) 866-9359

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TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mojo Trio, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 8 12 BAR — Soul Sect, 8; Willem McCormick & Dakoda Emerson, 10

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Space Heaters, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Grunge Jazz Trio, 10

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Marcos Maciera (upstairs), 10; Hot 8 Brass Band, 11

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Soul Project, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Jeff Greenberg, 6; Leslie Smith, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Burgundy, 9:30

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Golden Orchid, 3; Plunge, 4; Neslort, 5

THE MAISON — For Karma, 5; Metaphysical Funk Menagerie, 7; Jeremy Phipps, Outsiders, Free Agents Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Queens’ Ball feat. Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; For Karma, 9; Eli Perra, 10

OAK — Andrew Duhon, 8

CAFE ROSE NICAUD — Troy Sawyer, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Agent Orange, A New Light, Sci Fi Zeroes, Unnaturals, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — Country Fried & My Graveyard Jaw CD release, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Dana Abbott, 9:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Ogya Band, 8

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

COLUMNS HOTEL — Ryan Way & guest, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Todd Duke Quartet feat. Michaela Harrison, 8; Little Freddie King, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & LA Sunspots, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Louisiana Dubstep, Below C Level, 10

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Kipori Woods, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dave Liebman Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Tuba Skinny, 3; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

TIPITINA’S — Approved by Snakes feat. Jason Ricci, John Lisi, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 10

HERMES BAR — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1; T’Canaille, 9

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — No Exit, Typikal Reasons, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Soundclash Beat Battle, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jaz Sawyer’s Crescent City All-Stars, 8; Brass-a-holics, midnight.

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 5 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers,

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 9 12 BAR — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 6


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

A True MID-CITY

NEIGHBORHOOD

MUSIC BAR

7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeff Greenberg, 6

BUFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. CAFE ATCHAFALAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam & Boone, 11 a.m. CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

CAFE PRYTANIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holy Ghost Tent Revival, 9

CAFE RANI â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

COURT OF TWO SISTERS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m.

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 DONNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

THE EMBERS â&#x20AC;&#x153;ORIGINALâ&#x20AC;? BOURBON HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Curtis Binder, 6

FAIR GRINDS COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bodhi3, 8 FINNEGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EASY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Laissez Faire, 3

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Irving Bannisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All-Stars, 2; Cindy Chen, 7 KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 MADIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Easley, 5

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington, 10

MULATEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAJUN RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bayou DeVille, 7 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bonoffs,

THE PRECINCT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tommy Sanctonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8 RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m.

RITZ-CARLTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & friends, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blue Grass Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Party, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Girl Talk, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Truman Holland, 2; Brint Anderson, 7

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

APPLE BARREL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8

classical/ concerts

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;awlins Johnnys, 10

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2919 St. Charles Ave., 8956602 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mon: University of Virginia Singers, 7

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jon Cleary, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Fohl, 9:30

DRAGONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 10

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1419 Basin St., 525-1052;

www.mahaliajacksontheater.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fri: Randy Newman feat. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 8

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victory Belles Christmas Show, Wed., noon; Sat., 8; Sun., 11 a.m. TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Rudyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Caribbean Funk Band, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

PARISHIONERS ROOTS ROCK BAND

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Rhinestone Runway PROMS, PAGEANTS & WEDDING BOUTIQUE

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Uke Joint, 7; Pat Thomas, 9

YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luke Winslow King, 7

BJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; King James & the Special Men, 10

Vitro, Maria Marquez, SINGERS OF SONG: Roseanna Sachal Vasandani & Cindy Scott

MY BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny T, 8

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Captain Leo, 5; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 9

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

DELFEAYO MARSALIS & Uptown Jazz Orchestra

MAT & NADDIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7

ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

Monday 10

04

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Papa Grows Funk, 10

VOILĂ&#x20AC; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m. WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mario Abney Quartet, 6

BRIAN SEEGER EUROPA TRIO

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Bishop, 9

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brent Walsh Trio, 8

THE

TUE

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30

MUSIC LINE-UP

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CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

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FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nervous Dwayne, 8

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lucien Barbarin & Tom Fischer feat. Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

03 TUE 04 WED 05 THU 06 FRI 07 SAT 08 SUN 09 MON

THU

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nola Music Series, 1; Alex Bosworth, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9; Sweet Jones, midnight

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jesse Moore, 3:30

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

SAT

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Open Mic feat. Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

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ARNAUDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FRENCH 75 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

31


Bruce was 1 of 25 artists in the country to Be awarded with the Joan Mitchell foundation’s 2010 Painters & sculPtors Grant ProGraM

FILM

Congratulations to BruCe Davenport, Jr.

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review Trip Advisor

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING FRIDAY SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG13) — Nicolas Cage stars in

taurusdabull72@yahoo.com

the film about a girl accused of witchcraft who is sent to a monastery to get rid her of the curse.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BHUTTO (NR) — The docu-

mentary explores the life of Benazir Bhutto, the first woman to lead a Muslim nation. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. Friday-Monday, then Jan. 11-13, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

DIVE! (NR) — Jeremy Seifert’s

documentary delves into dumpster diving culture and wasted food. Seifert appears at the screening. Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday, Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JANUARY 04 > 2011

FOUR LIONS (R) — The satire

32

follows a group of British Muslim men who want to be suicide bombers. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MR. SKEFFINGTON (NR)—

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 7TH AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE NO PASSES ACCEPTED

LUNCH SPECIALS $5.25

join us

FOR

STARTING AT

LUNCH

Mandarin Chicken Moo Goo Gai Pan Green Pepper Steak Shrimp with Mixed Vegetables Sweet & Sour Shrimp or Pork Curry Chicken

RELATIVITY

Daily LUNCH SPECIALS MoNdAy All DAy TueS-SuN 11AM-4PM

PG (4.729") x 5.333" Open 7 Days a Week!1/4 Mon-Sun • 11am-10pm 3501 N. Arnoult (Corner of N. Arnoult & 14th St.) Gambit Weekly Near Fat City • Metairie • 887-3295 TUESDAY: 01/04

ALL.SOW-A1.0104.GW

Bette Davis stars as a beautiful socialite who enters a loveless marriage to recover her family’s fortune. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

NIGHT CATCHES US (R) — A young man returns to the Philadelphia neighborhood where he came of age during the Black Power movement. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net RARE EXPORTS: A CHRISTMAS STORY (R) — During an

archeological dig, corporate treasure hunters accidentally release the malevolent Santa Claus. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist

Japan is not the best place to get involved with hallucinogenic drugs or narcotics. The laws are very strict, and hipster foreigners who hang out in popular nightlife districts are immediately suspect. But for a taste of tripping through the narrow streets of Tokyo amid its kaleidoscope of flashing lights, settle in for the first 30 minutes of Argentine filmmaker Gaspar Noe’s Enter the Void. Siblings Oscar (Nathan Brown) and Linda (Paz de la Huerta) live together in a tiny apartment in the shadows of one of the Tokyo commercial districts that continually flash like a casino or amusement park at night. She’s a stripper and he’s progressing from drug user to dealer. The only clunky moment in the film comes in the opening scene when Oscar mentions he’s reading The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Drug etiquette should preclude any discussion of Eastern philosophy or religion while smoking powerful drugs, but the very brief exchange tips off Noe’s intentions. The film explores similarities between brain chemicals released during trauma, sex and other intense experiences and the boutique substances the Tokyo expats imbibe. Noe delves into a free-associating and trippy nexus of mind-altering drugs, sexual desire, love, jealousy, trauma, rage and memory. The film follows a stream of consciousness throughout, with dreamy and psychedelic stretches punctuated by unpredictable crashes into reality and twisted memories and visions. The majority of the film revolves around the powerful bond between Oscar and Linda as they are torn apart. They haven’t lived easy lives, and the film scrapes against all the rough and dark edges. There is a lot of interesting camera work as most of the film comes from Oscar’s perspective, and we almost never see his face. Often he seems to float above the action and ethereally intrude on private moments. Reaching down into his unfiltered psyche is often not an easy trip, particularly as he visualizes a friend’s interest in Linda, and in flashbacks of how the two siblings were separated as children. The film doesn’t write off the pursuit of sex or drugs as superficial escape into the pleasure dome. Instead, it uses them as points of access to capture the primal desire for connection. It’s an emotionally complicated and sometimes graphic film, and if you can indulge the drug culture, it’s well worth the trip. — Will Coviello

OPENS Enter the Void JAN Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Suite D, 304-9992 www.chalmettemovies.com

07

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net SEVEN DAYS IN SLOW MOTION (NR) — After finding a camera

left by an American tourist, young Indian boys fulfill their dreams of making a Bollywood film during their stressful exam season. Tickets

$7 general, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Friday-Monday, then Jan. 11-13, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net Compiled by Lauren LaBorde For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE ®

s Entertainment Serie

BEST ORIGINAL SONG “‘COUNTRY STRONG’ IS A MUST-SEE for any country music fan!” Tony Thomas – KMPS-FM

BURGUNDY January 8 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

JAN 5 Scott White featuring Kristen Lindner JAN 19

Will Durst featuring Mike Strecker

JAN 12

Kris Shaw featuring Jerry Wayne Longmire

JAN 26

Scotty K featuring Lee Adams

THURSDAYS LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

JAN 6 Brandon Foret

JAN 13 Brandon Foret

JAN 20 Brandon Foret

JAN 27 Brandon Foret

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

SOUNDTRACK INCLUDES NEW RECORDINGS BY TRACE ADKINS RONNIE DUNN TIM McGRAW & GWYNETH PALTROW

JAN 21 Groovy 7

J JAN 14 Bobby & Stuff Like That JAN 28 Junior & Sumtin Sneaky

SATURDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

JAN 8 Burgundy JAN 22 Aaron Foret

“TIM McGRAW CONTINUES TO IMPRESS

JAN 15

Morris Day & The Time (Tickets start at $25)

8pm

JAN 29 Bottom Line DJs

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

as an actor, he’s note-perfect in ‘Country Strong’.” Tony Thomas – KMPS-FM

MUSIC BY

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A MATERIAL PICTURES PRODUCTION “COUNTRY STRONG” SUPERVISIONMUSICBY RANDALL POSTER AND EXECUTIVE MICHAEL BROOK PRODUCER MEREDITH ZAMSKY PRODUCEDBY JENNO TOPPING & TOBEY MAGUIRE WRITTEN DIRECTED BY SHANA FESTE

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 7

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

CAST ALBUM COMING SOON

JAN 7 The Topcats

33


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

® CHIPPENDALES FEAST YOUR EYES AND INDULGE YOUR WILD SIDE AT THE ULTIMATE GIRLS NIGHT OUT™! Coming to Harrah’s Theatre

Friday, January 7 at 7pm & 10pm Tickets on sale NOW! Purchase tickets online at HarrahsNewOrleans.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

Entertainment schedule subject to change without prior notice. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

34 V1_48682.1_9.625x5.333_4c_Ad.indd 1

12/21/10 3:45 PM


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

ART

review

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

and N. Miro Street; www.aortaprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “My Louisiana:

Laud, Laud, Land, Laud,” works by Jimmy Descant, through Jan. 29. Opening reception Saturday.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Andy Dahl,

jewelry by Gerry White and Melissa Myers and works by Matilde Alberny, through Jan. 30. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Connextions,” works by Veronique Molinier, through Jan. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com — “New Horizons,”

impressionistic oil paintings by John Stanford, through Jan. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Year One: Orange

Blossom,” a group exhibition featuring 20 artists, through Feb. 5. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — Works by Emily Sartor

for Prospect.1.5, through Feb. 19; “Corpus Cupiditas,” works by Steve Teeters, through Feb. 26. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart. org — “Lost Landscapes,” sculpture

by Jeff Mickey, through Jan. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My Religion,

Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March. Opening Saturday.

GALLERIES AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY.

813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596

Front St., Slidell, (985) 290-1395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

Rising Stars

If there was any question about how much the New Orleans art scene has grown in recent years, it was answered as December 2010 witnessed an art community in overdrive with overlapping major spectacles including PhotoNOLA, DesCours and Prospect.1.5. PhotoNOLA alone had shows at more than 50 venues, some extending into this month. Although more low-key than its stellar predecessor, Prospect.1.5 is still a big deal and incorporates local and big-city artists in displays of ambitious aesthetic cross-fertilization. New Orleans-born, New Haven, Conn. painter Max Toth and Bosnia-born New Orleans artist Lala Rascic (pictured) are at Good Children Gallery (4037 St. Claude Ave.). Galleries presenting their own shows along with similarly complementing P.1.5 artists include LeMieux— featuring the inspired juxtaposition of local painter Alan Gerson and Los Angeles photographer Brice Bischoff — and Heriard-Cimino — with the work of New York artist Margaret Evangeline and Baton Rouge sculptor Loren Schwerd. The Everyday Hybrid expo at Delgado is something of an oddity. The local and New York-based artists — Brad Benischek, Sesthasak Boonchai, Jennifer Odem, Alex Podesta, Regina Scully, Brian St. Cyr and Panacea Theriac — are all quite accomplished and stimulating, but so visually incongruous as a group that it can be hard to leave with a clear impression of what you saw. At Madame John’s Legacy, Michael Pajon’s cosmically kitschy, ethno-historical collages are so precise as to make many of the other artists’ works look almost laissez faire despite being broadly interesting. Everything comes together cohesively in The Machine in the Garden expo at Octavia Art Gallery, as Brian Borrello, Ralph Bourque, Daphne Loney, Michel Varisco and Christy Speakman all provide poetic explorations of the dark side of Louisiana’s carbon-based economy in contrast to the creative spirit of its people, and the incandescence of the sun, moon and stars. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JAN

08 THRU JAN

20 THRU JAN

27

The Machine in the Garden: Prospect.1.5 Group Exhibition Octavia Art Gallery, 4532 Magazine St., 3094249; www.octaviaartgallery.com

Fresh Off the Turnip Truck: Prospect.1.5 Group Exhibition Madame John’s Legacy, 632 Dumaine St., 568- 6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us

Everyday Hybrid: Prospect.1.5 Group Exhibition Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Fine Art Gallery, 615 City Park Ave., third floor, 6716377; www.dcc.edu

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Photographs by David Halliday in conjunction with PhotoNOLA; “Water, Water Everywhere So Let’s Have a Drink,” video installation by Okay Mountain Collective for Prospect.1.5; both through Jan. 29. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur

St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

Happy

Hour

f ro m 4 - 6 p m where all drinks are

2 for 1

Late night

entertainment GREAT FOR BIRTHDAYS, BACHELORETTE PARTIES, RETIREMENTS , ANNIVERSARIES, OR ANY REASON TO HAVE A GOOD TIME!!

SAT. • JAN. 1ST • 7-11PM

BTU’S SUN. • JAN. 2ND

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

JAZZ BRUNCH 11-2PM HARVEY JESUS & FIRE

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St.,

THURS. • JAN. 6TH • 5-8PM

895-6201 — “Louisiana! United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St.,

525-5584; www.bryantgalleries. com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Totally Bald,” works by Thomasine Bartlett in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Wednesday. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres

St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

5-8PM

HARVEY JESUS & FIRE FRI. • JAN. 7TH • 8PM-12AM

ALLEY CATS SAT. • JAN. 8TH • 8PM-12AM

KINGS ROW SUN. • JAN. 9TH

JAZZ BRUNCH 11-2PM HARVEY JESUS & FIRE 5-8PM

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St.,

522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 5240671; www.casellartgallery.com — Pastels by Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St.,

339-5237 — Paintings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing. THE DARKROOM. 1927 Sophie

Wright Place, 522-3211; www.neworleansdarkroom.com — “NewsPAGE 37

158 S. Military Road Slidell, LA 985-646-1728 Mon 11am-9pm Tue-Thur 11am-12am (midnight) Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Drop, Half Drop,” paintings by Deborah Pelias; “Dreaming on a World,” large-scale ink drawings by Ralph Bourque for Prospect.1.5; both through Feb. 2. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

35


The hisToric New orleaNs collecTioN PreseNTs

Drawn to Life Al Hirschfeld & the Theater of Tennessee Williams

January 11−April 3, 2011 opening reception:

Friday, January 14, 2011 Williams research center In the French Quarter 410 chartres Street Ring the bell to enter

SPRING SESSION 2011

gAllery HourS:

January 10- May 13, 2011

tuesday –Saturday 9:30 A.m – 4:30 p.m.

Offering classes in oil painting, watercolor, figure and portrait sculpture, photography, drawing and more, for the beginning, intermediate and advanced student.

© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation; all rights reserved; www.alhirschfeldfoundation.org.

THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION  The Williams Research Center

410 Chartres Street

(504) 523-4662

www.hnoc.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

OUI Teach French!

36

Alliance Française de La Nouvelle-Orléans

Individual & Group classes for adults & kids from beginner to expert!

Specialized classes

French for Travelers, Business French, French Media, French Cooking Class, French Grammar

Winter SESSION: January 10 - February 26 NEW!!! Yoga in French!

(504) 568-0770 afno@af-neworleans.org

FRENCH COOKING CLASS!

1519 Jackson Avenue www.af-neworleans.org

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE.

NEW ORLEANS ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS 5256 Magazine Street

New Orleans, LA 70115

(504)899-8111

noafa.com


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 35

worthy,” works by Colin Miller in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through January.

Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Incidental Journey,” ab-

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Sublimi-

stract expressionist paintings by Busch, through Feb. 3.

art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

artists, ongoing.

nal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,” photo-

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 —

More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Eat, Drink & Be Merry,”

a group invitational exhibit featuring 14 artists, through Jan. 30.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann, ongoing, “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Everyday Hybrid,” a group

exhibition for Prospect.1.5, through Jan. 27.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KAWLIGA STUDIOS. 3331 St. Claude Ave., (225) 276-8159 — “Any Day Now,” works by

Amy Davis, Alleyn Evans and Benjamin Mortimer in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Friday.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA|Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — “A Second of Your Time,” a

group exhibition of five artists for Prospect.1.5, through Friday.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by

James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Sculptural works in metal by Jonathan Taube; participatory sidewalk art by Tish Douzart; glass rock sculpture by Curtiss Brock, through Saturday. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Fashioning Kimono: Art Deco and Modernism in Japan,” through Sunday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “The Machine in the Garden,” a group exhibition of paintings, photographs and sculpture for Prospect.1.5, through Saturday.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

dia group exhibition featuring nine artists, through Jan. 11.

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing. specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LOUISIANA ARTWORKS. 818 Howard Ave., Suite 300, 571-7373; www.louisianaartworks.org — “Visions of Excellence,” an

exhibition by Pictures of the Year International in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Feb. 11.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www.mfrancisgallery.com — Works by Jonathan

M. Hicks for Prospect.1.5, through Saturday.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www.martinechaissongallery. com — “Fragile Beauty,” works

by Marjorie Brown Pierson in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 29.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie,

and national artists, ongoing.

PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “ ... And Beyond,” a multimePEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Southern

Isolation,” photographs by Anna Hrnjak and E. Paul Julien, through Jan. 28. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Lauren Thomas,

Ashley Beach, Sabine Chadborn, Denice Bizot and other New Orleans artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St.,

581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown

glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Poems of South

Louisiana in Black and White,” gelatin prints by Ed Hammerli in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Thursday.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

HANCOCK BANK. 4070 Lonesome Road, Suite A, Mandeville, (985) 626-1241 — St. Tammany Art

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Louisiana & Trees: Life Entwined,” a group exhibition in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 11.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out of the Blue,” a group

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Phipps, ongoing.

exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary

sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “A Three Cornered Hat,” collage by Billy Renkl, altered intaglio by Ruth Marten and found objects by Michele Muenning, through Monday. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

Association Members’ Gallery Group Exhibition, through Wednesday.

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS FEMME FEST. The Jazz and Heritage Foundation and the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana seeks female artists residing in Louisiana for the March exhibition. The exhibition is limited to the first 35 artists to register. Email phyllisparun@yahoo.com for details. LAND, CURRENTS AND UNDERCURRENTS. The annual Grand

Isle juried exhibition to be held in April seeks entries. Visit www.gicdt.org for details. Submission deadline is Feb. 1.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

RECYCLED FASHION SHOW. Local

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Business Casual,” graffiti by David Vega, through February.

MUSEUMS

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

designers create fashions from thrift store purchases for the Feb. 4 event benefiting Bridge House. Call 821-7134 for details.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters

St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

WESLEY UNITED CHURCH. 2517 Jackson Ave.; www.centralcityartistproject.org — “J. Fiber,” a

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455;

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER.

collaborative drawing project between Jane Fine and James Esber for Prospect.1.5, through Saturday.

1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Ephemera: River with Flowers,” installation by Brandon Graving, through Feb. 27. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St.,

586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “Something Old, Something New,” works by Letitia Huckaby in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 15. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave.,

Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662;

www.hnoc.org — “Seventh Ward: People, Places and Traditions,” a group exhibition in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through February. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St.,

568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012;

www.nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll

Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Great Collectors/Great Donors: The Making of the New Orleans Museum of Art, 1910-2010,” through Jan. 23. “Deja Vu All Over Again: Generic Art Solutions;” “Selections from Project 35” videos selected by Independent Curators International; both through Feb. 13, and more. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-

8027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Market-

place, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit, and more.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through Nov. 30. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Twelve Anti-Portraits,” works by Jose-Maria Cundin, through Jan. 29.

graphs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

ART

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STAGE

at

th

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LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde

After Christmas

listingsedit@gambitweekly.com;

FAX:483-3116

SALE

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm Guaranteed

Lowest Prices In Town!

CAPTAIN LOUIE. NORD’s Ty Tracy Theater, Gallier Hall, 545 St. Charles Ave., 598-3800; www.crescentcitylights.org — The all-kid cast performs Stephen Schwartz’s musical about a lonely child who finds solace in imaginary journeys with his favorite toy plane. Tickets $15 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Friday, 1 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 21-23 and Jan. 28-30. DOUBLEWIDE LUST. La Nuit

Uptown's Tobacco Superstore! 4226 Magazine St. • 309-3926

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Family members living together in a trailer look for love and escape in Ed Furman’s dark comedy. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturdays through Jan. 29.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX.

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through Feb. 20. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

MESHUGGAH-NUNS. Teatro

38

Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The sisters from Dan Goggin’s Nunsense series embark on a multi-faith cruise, and highseas hijinks ensue. Tickets $1530. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through Jan. 23.

3331 SEVERN IN METAIRIE NEXT TO LAKESIDE MALL

BURLE SQUE & CABARET

FOUNTAIN PARK CENTER

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

504.779.3202 1901 MANHATTAN BLVD. 504.304.4861

WWW.ISABELLASGALLERY.COM

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

GRAAE’S ANATOMY. Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812 — Entertainer Jason Graae performs his one-man show. Tickets $36 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 6 p.m. Sunday.

THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

3700 Orleans Avenue in the Shops at the American Can Company

504.483.6314 www.cbwines.com Under New Ownership

Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812 — Graham, along with accompanist Jefferson Turner, leads a musical tour of New Orleans. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Monday and Jan. 17.

AUDITIONS THEATER

Some things are better with company.

GET IN ON THE ACT

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly femaleimpersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

THE RICKY GRAHAM SHOW. Le

BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www. ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 3639001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. CLOSER. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. marignytheatre.org — Jonathan Mares Productions seeks women ages 25 to 45 and men ages 18 to 40 for its March production of Patrick Marber’s play. Auditions are by appointment only. Email jmares86@ aol.com for details. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BLUE MONDAY STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Monday.

BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

City Bar, 3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola. com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m.

Thursday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit

Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. GULF SOUTH COMEDY CHALLENGE. Benedict’s Planta-

tion, 1144 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville, (985) 626-4557; www.benedictsofmandeville. com — Comedians compete for cash and prizes to benefit the St. Tammany Humane Society. Call (985) 892-7387 or (985) 898-5293 for details. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Jan. 6-8.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts a stand-up comedy show with professional comedians. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SAM SINGLETON. Winston’s

Pub & Patio, 531 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-8705 — The “Atheist Evangelist” performs If the Ocean Was Whiskey and God Was a Duck. Tickets $5.75 in advance, $10 at the door. 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 7.

SCOTT WHITE & KRISTEN LINDNER. Boomtown Casino,

Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www. boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Car-

rollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The open-mic showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show 9 p.m. Wednesday.

For complete listings visit

www.bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 4 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

EVENTS

are available at the center to assist homeowners with questions and concerns. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

Wednesday 5 ALGIERS RIVERVIEW ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY MEETING . Second Good Hope

Thursday 6

Baptist Church, 800 Elmira Ave., 361-0895 — The association presents plans for an environmentally sustainable residential development in the Riverview area. Call 421-6692 for details. 7 p.m.

ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

CASA NEW ORLEANS ORIENTATIONS. CASA New

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org

Saturday 8 WINTER MAGIC . Children’s

Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Magician Glen Ghirardi performs. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 4 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

DEALING WITH LOSS. West

Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans. org for details. 7:30 p.m. MARRIAGE COMMUNICATION GROUP. Counseling Solutions

of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker leads the 6-week group for married couples who would like to improve their communication. Pre-registration is required. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesdays through Feb. 8.

ROAD HOME ASSISTANCE . Community Center of St. Bernard, 1107 LeBeau St., Arabi, 281-2512 — Representatives

Orleans, 1340 Poydras St., Suite 2120, 522-1962; www. casaneworleans.org — CASA holds orientations for those interested in becoming volunteer advocates for abused and neglected children in foster care. Call 522-1962 for details. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter. org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

JAZZ EDUCATION NETWORK CONFERENCE. Roosevelt Hotel,

123 Baronne Street, 648-1200

Thursday 6

Uprising Senior

Daniel Rasmussen graduated from Harvard in 2009 with three prominent awards for his thesis on the 1811 slave uprising along the Mississippi River in parishes upriver from New Orleans. The thesis is the basis for his recently released book American Uprising: The Untold Story of America’s Largest Slave Revolt (HarperCollins). His journalism career began in Washington, D.C., where the D.C. Press Foundation named him High School Journalist of the year in 2005. At Harvard, he began researching the slave revolt, which involved 200 to 500 slaves and resulted in the deaths of more than 100, leaving many of their remains on gruesome display along the levees. Rasmussen says his book is more Braveheart than Beloved, and he delves into the planning and execution of the revolt. C-SPAN will televise the reading and discussion at Garden District Book Shop. Free admission. — Jamie Carroll

JAN

08

Daniel Rasmussen discusses American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Saturday Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 www.gardendistrictbookshop.com

— The annual conference features clinics, panels and jazz performances by student and professional ensembles. Times vary. Visit www.jazzednet. org for details. WednesdaySaturday. LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno.org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-yearolds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www.globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING .

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — An information systems security expert gives a presentation on Internet safety. Visit www.nopc.org for details. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux,

1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 8994512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur

St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE .

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 7 13TH NIGHT INAUGURAL PARTY. Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www. generationshall.net — The Krewe of Orpheus party features an open bar, food from local restaurants and music by Vince Vance and the Valiants. Visit www.kreweoforpheus. com/13thnight for details. Admission $100. 8 p.m. ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www. adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m.

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS ANNIVERSARY. Chalmette

Battlefield of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, 8606 W. St. Bernard Hwy., Chalmette, 589-3882; www.nps.gov/jela — The anniversary event features living history presentations, cannon and musket firing, children’s activities, cooking demonstrations and more. 9 a.m. FridaySaturday.

EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each

month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PHILOCAFE . Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The topic of the New Orleans Lyceum’s meeting is “Philosophy and Psychology: Do They Need Each Other?” 7 p.m.

Saturday 8 BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N.

Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www.broadcommunityconnections.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

CAMELLIA CLUB SHOW & SALE .

Grace King High School, 4301 Grace King Place, Metairie — The club presents and sells camellia blooms. Call 833-3970 for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. judging, 2 p.m. general admission.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREEN PROJECT SATURDAY WORKSHOP. Green Project,

2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org — Demetria Christo, co-founder of EcoUrban, presents the workshop about how to conserve water in gardens and yards. Admission $5. 10 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

Market, 200 Broadway St., 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

preview

SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK FOOD DRIVE . Big Easy

Storage, 2201 W. Napoleon Ave., Kenner, 237-6990; www. bigeasyselfstorage.com — The monthlong food drive begins with a kickoff event featuring New Orleans Saints quarterback Chase Daniel. 4 p.m.

pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

39


EVENTS

LISTINGS

a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. GROW MO’ BETTA SUSTAINABLE GARDENING SERIES. Hollygrove

Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www.hollygrovemarket.com — The program discusses composting and soil building. Call 864-2009 or email ariel@noffn.org for details. Admission $5. 3 p.m. HAITI ON MY MIND. St. Claude

Art District, 2028 St. Claude Ave. — The cultural event on the first anniversary of the earthquake includes a ceremony to Damballah, a Haitian god. An exhibit presents photography and traditional, folk and contemporary arts. Call (646) 537-5797 or email regineboucard@hotmail.com for details. 6 p.m.

NATIVE NOW: PRUNING TECHNIQUES. Longue Vue

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — The program explores the habitats, biodiversity and ecological impact of native plant species. Call 293-4276 or email hschackai@ longuevue.com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 members. 9 a.m and 10 a.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

OCH ART MARKET. Zeitgeist

40

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net — The indoor and outdoor market features locally made arts and crafts, live music and food. Visit www.ochartmarket. com for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

READERS’ THEATER . Private Residence, email for details — The New Orleans Lyceum group reads George Bernard Shaw’s play Saint Joan and eats king cake. The program is limited to eight participants. Email kagreenstone@gmail.com for details. 2 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. SWAMP FASHION WORKSHOP.

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — Stephen Kwok teaches teens ages 14 to 19 to make masks out of recycled materials. Free admission. 1 p.m.

UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET.

Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants.

Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www. utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 9 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS THE GREEN GIANT AWARD. The

award honors an individual who has made significant contributions to the environmental welfare of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. Visit www.thegreenproject.org for details. Nomination deadline is Feb. 28.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 9420444, ext. 244 for details.

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details.

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 10 ON BEING JEWISH DURING WORLD WAR II PANEL . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Local Jewish veterans share their wartime experiences in the panel moderated by Judge Sol Gothard. 7 p.m.

TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Nonprofit Central, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central.org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS HORNETS. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The Hornets play the Golden State Warriors. Visit www.nba.com/ hornets for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

group holds orientations to connect locals with available volunteer opportunities in New Orleans. Call 483-7041 ext. 107 or email cho@handsonneworleans.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. IRON RAIL . The Iron Rail, 511

Marigny St., 948-0963; www. ironrail.org — The bookstore and community space seeks volunteers. Weekly meetings are 8 p.m. Wednesday.

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS. Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Ginger Morvant at ginger@la-spca.org for details. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volun-


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

teers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details.

bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS.

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and up for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda. org/summercamp for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation

REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work with public school students oneon-one in reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday. BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The

DANIEL RASMUSSEN . Historic

New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — The author discusses and signs American Uprising: The Untold Story of America’s Largest Slave Revolt. 6 p.m. Thursday. The author also appears at Garden District Book Shop (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266) 1 p.m. Saturday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a weekly free poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The group discusses Augusten Burroughs’ Dry. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FOOD BOOK CLUB. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The group discusses books focusing on food history and lore, and a cooking demonstration follows many of the discussions. 10 a.m. Saturday. LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

France St., 944-0441; www.

OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La

Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/ rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery, 2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spokenword and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday. PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Dance, Drink, Eat & Welcome Carnival LIVE MUSIC OPEN BAR GREAT FOOD

13th Night

Auction benefiing

Vince Vance &

The Valiants Friday, January 7th 8pm-12am Generations Hall

tickets available online at www.kreweoforpheus.com/13thNight $100 couple $55 single or $65/pp at the door

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WRITERS’ CIRCLE . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The group that reads and discusses books about writing, engages in writing exercises, and shares and critiques members’ works discusses Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones. 6 p.m. Monday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com

1965 BLACK BEAUTY • Good condition minus some bullet holes. • Grill-Mounted M2 Flamethrower. • Dual Hood-Mounted .30 Cal M1919 Machine Guns. • 12 Front & Rear FIM-92A Stinger Missiles. • Two ejector seats. • 500 horsepower, unlimited firepower.

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS AN ORIGINALMUSICFILM PRODUCTION A FILM BY MICHELEXECUTIVEGONDRY SETH ROGEN JAY CHOU AND CAMERON DIAZ “THE GREEN HORNET” CHRISTOPH WALTZ EDWARD JAMES OLMOS BASED UPON “THE GREEN HORNET” DAVID HARBOUR AND TOM WILKINSON BY JAMES NEWTON HOWARD PRODUCERS SETH ROGEN EVAN GOLDBERG MICHAEL GRILLO ORI MARMUR GEORGE W. TRENDLE, JR. RADIO SERIES CREATED BY GEORGE W. TRENDLE WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY SETH ROGEN & EVAN GOLDBERG BY NEAL H. MORITZ BY MICHEL GONDRY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks senior volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Join us for New Orleans’ newest tradition!

41


BYOB • BUY LOCAL • TWO DAT • NOLA DOG • ONE WORLD • ONE CHANCE •

Treat yourself to our

post Holiday Sale! All ts r shi 2! $1

Bella Nola

4236 Magazine Street • 504.897.9499

• BYOB • BUY LOCAL • TWO DAT • NOLA DOG • ONE WORLD • ONE CHANCE

NOLA GIRL • WORLD PEAS • ALTERNATIVE ENERGY • NOLA GRAFITTI

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JANUARY 04 > 2011

• NOLA GIRL • WORLD PEAS • ALTERNATIVE ENERGY • NOLA GRAFITTI •

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< A ROOST AT THE (OTHER) ROOSEVELT > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > There’s >> a new perch for upscale bar food in the CBD at the PUTTING EVERYTHING ON THE TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < Roosevelt << Hotel Bar (116 University Place, 566-9444) — just don’t confuse this modest watering hole with the unrelated, upscale hotel of the same name just next door. Chris Cody, formerly sous chef at the Delachaise and chef at Kenner’s defunct Pellicano Ristorante, designed a menu with duck confit po-boys, London broil sandwiches, crawfish waffles and shrimp corn dogs. The Roosevelt Hotel Bar is begins lunch service this week.

am

B

WRAP IT UP

There’s more to That’s a Wrap (4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-0009; www.thatsawrapnola.com) than wrap sandwiches. This new Metairie restaurant bakes its own hams and roasts its own turkeys to make deli meats of distinctive character, and it offers a quick-serve menu with unusual and refreshing touches such as roasted beets with remoulade. Smoothies and salads add to the healthy options.

five 5 IN

Five Tofu Dishes To Talk About

KIM SON

349 WHITNEY AVE., GRETNA, 366-2489 www.kimsonnola.com

“Bean cake with black pepper” features perfectly fried cubes over cabbage.

Square Meals

THE GASTROPUB TREND HITS THE HEART OF THE FRENCH QUARTER. BY IAN MCNULTY

T

bage and potato salad. Big, dark chunks of braised beef cheeks make a satisfying send-up of meat and gravy, and the obligatory $15 hamburger is built with a bulging patty on a distinctive roll. The new restaurant has some consistency issues, however. A delicately prepared redfish was flawless one night as the fish special, but the drum served a few weeks later was badly overcooked. Some dishes are just ill-conceived. Reading “crispy pork shoulder” on this menu activated cravings for a crusty, fatty, salty roast, but what arrived were disks of atomized pork beneath paneed shells. I’d skip the fried eggplant appetizer, which lacks character and is allotted too little aioli to make a difference. With its bare wood tables, prominent bar and dim lighting, Sylvain can look like a tavern, though it functions better as a conventional restaurant than a place to drink and nosh. The menu doesn’t offer much to share around the table, and while there’s a robust craft cocktail list and interesting wines, the drink prices show no mercy until you get to joke items like $2 cans of Schlitz. The building that is Sylvain sit fallow for the last few years, and its renovation bears all the character and detail of a true labor of love tempered by an admirable sense of restraint. The grace of the old architecture is the main design element, and it lends a welcome, genuine feel. A bit more age may help distill Sylvain’s menu and refine its concept. But already it’s clear the place is helping address a niche between fine dining and pub grub that’s been neglected in the French Quarter for too long.

Bar manager Murf Reeves and chef Alex Harrell offer refined cocktails and fare at Sylvain. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

517 FRENCHMEN ST., 942-1345 www.13monaghan.com

The barbecue tofu po-boy is spicy, hearty and served late.

CHINA ROSE

3501 N. ARNOULT ROAD, METAIRIE, 887-3295

Order velvety sheets of ultra-thin noodles from the “Chinese menu.”

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR

1418 MAGAZINE ST., 524-3828; 4807 MAGAZINE ST., 895-5757 www.surreyscafeandjuicebar.com WHAT

Sylvain

WHERE

625 Chartres St., 2658123; www.sylvainnola.com WHEN

Lunch Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun., dinner daily HOW MUCH

Moderate

For breakfast, order tofu over brown rice with mushrooms and onions.

YUKI IZAKAYA

525 FRENCHMEN ST., 943-1122 www.myspace.com/yukiizakaya

Kimchee ramen soup is loaded with tofu and spice.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

RESERVATIONS

Accepted

WHAT WORKS

Fresh, hearty, straightforward dishes

WHAT DOESN’T

Tavern feel without tavern function

CHECK PLEASE

A hip, handsome addition to the French Quarter

2008 Moises Pinot Noir

WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON / $30-$36 Produced by local physician James Moises, this well-crafted wine from Pommard Clone grapes channels Burgundian Pinot Noir and Oregon terroir. It exudes aromas of red and black cherries, herbal and spice notes and earthiness. On the palate, taste plum and cassis. Drink it with salmon, tuna, roast fowl, lamb chops, roasted vegetables and mushrooms. Buy it at: Vieux Carre Wine and Spirits, Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Swirl Wine Market, Dorignac’s and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: The Bistro at Maison de Ville, Le Foret, Cafe Adelaide, GW Fins, Galatoire’s, Bayona, Pelican Club, MiLa, Mike’s on the Avenue, Ruth’s Chris at Harrah’s Hotel, La Petite Grocery, Lilette, Commander’s Palace, Brennan’s, Muriel’s and Vega Tapas Cafe. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

he ambience of old New Orleans was so intense during a recent early dinner at Sylvain that it felt almost scripted. The weather was mild, and as we sat outside in this French Quarter restaurant’s narrow, sheltering courtyard we could hear the steam calliope off the riverfront and Dixieland standards from the jazz band in Jackson Square. On the table before us, however, the only obvious New Orleans link was a rapidly diminishing Sazerac. The rest — seared scallops topped with sprouts, the silken, irregular pappardelle noodles with coarsely ground bolognese sauce, the shredded Brussels sprouts with apples and hazelnuts under a fleece of pecorino — was representative of Sylvain’s approach to upscale comfort food. With its location just steps from the city’s tourism nexus — and with the storybook appeal of its building — a menu of New Orleans standards might have been expected at this address. But proprietor Sean McCusker and his business partner, local bar and nightclub owner Robert LeBlanc, had a different idea. McCusker was in New York during the rise of the gastropub, a trend led there by the savagely popular Spotted Pig. He moved to the French Quarter last year convinced his new neighborhood should have something along the same lines. He and LeBlanc brought in chef Alex Harrell, a protege of chef Gerard Maras, and they opened Sylvain in October 2010. At its best, the food here is hearty, straightforward and vividly fresh. Plump links of garlic sausage are sliced over cab-

13

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

Full service restaurant

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

with> >night time > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>>

entertainment from Tue-Sat.

158 S. Military Road, Slidell, LA 985-646-1728 Mon 11am-9pm • Tue-Thur 11am-12am Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAMELLIA CAFE — 69455 Hwy. 59, Abita

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

FREE DELIVERY

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY

TO MID-CITY & LAKEVIEW

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

GOI CUON

Spring Roll, salad roll highly recommended

PHO GA

Chicken traditional large bowl of soup

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

BUN TOM

44

Springs, (985) 809-6313; www.thecamelliacafe.com — A family-friendly atmosphere and local flavors are calling cards of Camellia Cafe. The Riverbend platter is a feast of catfish, shrimp, oysters, crab fingers, soft shell crab and hushpuppies. The Monterey chicken is grilled and topped with onions, peppers, mushrooms and cheese. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Grilled Shrimp over rice or vermicelli noodle

BRUNCH WEEKDAYS ONLY DINNER MENU 4PM-9:30PM MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

135 N. CARROLLTON 309-7286 / FAX 309-7283 525 Hwy 190 • W Slidell • 985-649-6211 Monday-Thursday 7am-9pm, Fri & Sat 7am-10pm, Sun 8am-4pm

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve

69455 Hwy 59 • Abita Springs • 985-809-6313 Monday-Thursday 8am-9pm, Fri & Sat 8am-10pm, Sun 8am-8pm

St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224 Pon-

tchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

CAFE

THE BREAKROOM CAFÉ — 3431 Houma

Blvd., Metairie, 941-7607 — Breakfasts of eggs, waffles or burritos are served any time at the Breakroom. The breakfast platter rounds up two eggs, bacon and a hashbrown patty. At lunch, the signature Breakroom sandwich is piled high with corned beef, pastrami, purple onion, lettuce and tomato. There’s also a selection of salads and a coffee bar. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 8617890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban poboy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601 Gallier

St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide

range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City

Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania St.,

899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-

3615 — The signature Lot-o-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dish-

es from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2. com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St., Suite

4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness. com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-4422;

www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno. com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486;

www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-

9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.


mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CELLERS OF RIVER RIDGE — 1801 Dick-

ory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www. cellersrr.com — 1801 Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellarsrr. com — The deli at this wine shop serves up hearty dishes and creative sandwiches like the “spicy bird” with smoked turkey, applewood-smoked bacon, pepper Jack cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo on a croissant. The shrimp remoulade salad is served over romaine with cucumbers and tomatoes. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metai-

rie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleansstyle barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

made Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C

Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

INDIAN

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St.,

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

944-6666; www.schiroscafe. com — The cafe offers home-

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like

OR

MI

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

CUBAN & MEXICAN FOOD PUERCO FRITO - $9.90 PORK FAJITAS - $8.00 ROPA VIEJA - $7.75

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620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

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201 st. charles ave. MONDAY-FRIDAY 7AM-2PM

504-522-8198

Sandwich Specials! monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

HAPPY NEW YEAR

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MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3-6PM

ans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 468-2187 — American Pie serves breakfast around the clock and a menu of burgers and Americana classics. The Reuben has melted Swiss over pastrami and sauerkraut and is served with fries or chips. Chicken quesadillas with provolone and sauteed onions and peppers are one of the changing daily specials. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $

MONDAY − 2 for 1 Martinis TUESDAY − 2 for 1 Margaritas

LUNCH & DINNER served til 1AM

230 DECATUR

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www.attikineworleans.com 587-3756

DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

Totally retro 50’s diner complete with a full soda fountain menu & all your classic diner favorites.

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

K• 2 ee

hourS

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4

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A

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

BELLY DANCER

AMERICAN PIE DINER — 2244 Veter-

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Fri. Credit cards. $

in c

LEt us catEr

I DELIVER!

Attiki

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

Free

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45


Out2Eat stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JaPaNESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-

46

7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Or-

leans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRNEaN/ MIDDLE EaSERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honeybaked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili

Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 8380022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and

crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZa MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $ SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT & BAR —

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W.

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried sea-

food to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd.,

Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEaFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Harrah’s

GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St.,

872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-

5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive,

Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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Bieri & Son, angelton, TX, has 2 positions for grain &hay. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/1/11 - 12/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3075243.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

market PLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

NEED HELP?

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

Special Rates

BUY

VOLUNTEER

Spoor Farms, Angelton, TX, has 4 positions for grain and rice. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/1/11 - 12/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 611727.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016 To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100


CLASSIFIEDS NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS 01 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE Exc. cond. Fully loaded, Leather interior. Convertible top w/gold trim. $300 dn, take over pmts of $110 w/ warranty. 836-9801, 24/7

PET ADOPTIONS COONEY

1yr old sweet and playful Calico kitty,shots spayed microchiped ,rescue 504 462-1968

MIND-BODY-FITNESS

Elijah

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. Lic LMT 4005. 504-7172577. www.amazinghands.us

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

PAIN MANAGEMENT & RELAXATION t-PNJ-PNJNJOVUFT t%FFQ5JTTVFt4XFEJTI

NEW

Thai Massage/ Body Work on the Table

Full Body Massage(Swedish/ Deep Tissue). Deluxe Salt Scrub.

For Combo Specials: www.RightTouchNola.com Private Spa Like Studio, Tropical Garden in Fauborg Marigny - FQ. Flexible hours. LA #4553 Male Massage Therapist, Chris

(504) 458-5996

MERCHANDISE FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

XXXBUPVDIPGBMPIBNBTTBHFQMBOFUDPN .FNCFSPG### 1SPWJEJOH5IFSBQFVUJD.BTTBHF/PO4FYVBM

bandy

Kennel #A11933533

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Lollipop and Jellybean

7 months old sweet playful kittens with personality plus, spayed/neutered ,shots, microchip. rescue 504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 5yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Sweetpotato

XL black and white very sweet male kitty, neutered ,vacs, rescue 504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS A Nurturing home/family filled with love, joy & security awaits your newborn. Expenses Paid. Lisa 1-888-391-6121. www.Lisaadopt.com

SERVICES MOVERS Atmosphere Movers, inc.

Free Estimates Call: 1-866-7Move ME (766-8363). See Coupon in Gambit Issue 12/14 or go to bestofneworleans. com to receive $50 OFF Any Move this Holiday Season.

weekly Tails

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

Call (504) 483-3100

4 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

chewy

Kennel #A11520464

Bandy is a 2-year-old, spayed, Retriever mix who came to the shelter with an injured eye, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s since been removed. She enjoys belly rubs and sits for treats. Bandy will require TLC during her complimentary heartworm treatment. To meet Bandy any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Chewy is a 9-month-old, neutered, solid black DSH with a bobtail. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been at the shelter since Sept. and is quite the snuggler. To meet Chewy or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

FOR THE HOLIDAYS GIVE THE GIFT OF RELAXATION

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Apartment Condo Guide

NEW ORLEANS AREA

CORPORATE FURNISHED MONTHLY APARTMENTS

RENT INCLUDES EVERYTHING! PARKING, UTILITIES, INTERNET, CABLE!

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT $1200/mo. 2325 PASADENA AVE. METAIRIE 70001

5 APARTMENTS AVA I L A B L E N O W !

10 MINUTES TO DOWNTOWN N.O.

504-491-1591

N.O. RIVER FRONT 2000 SQ. FT, PENTHOUSE!

2 BEDROOMS. PLUS LOFT BED., 2.5 BATHS. SPECTACULAR VIEWS OF RIVER/CITY- PRIVATE ROOF TOP DECK. GYM, POOL, MONTHLY $3600 Available from 4/15/11

504-366-7374

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

50

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE GETAWAY EVERYDAY!

Nice loft boathouse w/view of lake/marina. 40ft cov slip, granite kit. $279K. Jennifer 504-250-9930, lanasa.com. HGI Realty 504-207-7575

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1BR, 1 BA,, Nwly Remod, Furn. Qn Size Bd, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Laund Fac. Sec Cameras. $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS SHOP/OFFICE/WAREHOUSE

CARROLLTON GREAT RIVERBEND COTTAGE

Revenue $775 Upper, 2470 sq. ft. MUST SEE! 8129 Maple, NOla 70118. $425,000. Call 504-314-1455.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

Available in Mid City 2300 sf, $800/mo. 504-813-2920 or jr70121la@aol.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $695 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

UPTOWN WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

$795 CALL

899-RENT

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 4211 S. BROAD

Totally renov sgl 2 br house, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d hkps, fully furn kit. $1350/mo + dep. Call Joe, 400-7273.

Big Beautiful Bargain

2-3BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrpln. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/ mo. 874-3195

BYWATER

NEED HELP? Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

METAIRIE

BYWATER STUDIO (2 apts)

Downstairs avail. now, upstairs avail end of Jan. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, $900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

Condo For Rent

2Bd/1Ba. 835sqft. Faces pool. Patio/ OS Pking.Laundry Facil./Pool on Premises. $850/mth 504-289-4411

5717 General Diaz Street New Orleans, LA 70124 3 Bedrooms/3 Baths $249,000

HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. ALL NEW 1 bdrm $660. Laundry, wtr. pd, pkg-1 car. 780-1706 www. orrislaneapts.com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing. Appraisals.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker Office: (504) 895-1493 • Other: (504) 430-8737 • farmeran@gmail.cOm


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GRETNA

620 Derbigny St. Commercial Property 2758 sq. ft. • $175,000 Kathy Hunter • 985-688-5873 Prudential Gardner

UPTOWN

GENTILLY

7444 ST CHARLES AVE, #108 1st flr condo in great area! 2 bdrms, 2 ba, hdwd flrs, furn kit w/granite counters, cen a/h, pool, pkg, brick patio. $265,900. Debbie Prejeant 504-952-0959 or 504-866-2785 dprejeant@latterblumpm.com LATTER & BLUM

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1804 N. RAMPART

1218 HILLARY

2BR/1BA, close to Tulane. Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

1 room efficiency , furn kit. Prking, 2 blks to Qtr. Only $600/mo. with water paid + 1 mo dep. 504-9451381 or 504-908-1564.

1629 TOLEDANO #102

FRENCH QUARTER APTS

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. $1035/mo. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

NEW RENTAL

6317 S. PRIEUR

OFF STREET PARKING

637St. Phillip

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $650 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394. 1713 BURGUNDY, 1 bd/1 ba, furn kit, all elec, ac, carpet, wtr pd. 1 yr lse. $850 + dep. 949-5518, 418-2513

GENTILLY LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

6217 Catina Street

2Br/1Ba. furn kit,w/d, CA/H. alarm, ceil fans, Cerm. tile, carpet. garage. Wtr Pd. $1100/mo. Call 400-9345

UNIVERSITY AREA 7941 NELSON Your New Home!

Upper duplex, 2 brm, 1 bath, os pkng. $1150/mo. 251-2188 or 813-7782

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BEDROOM APT

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569 Efficiency. No pets. Lease $650/mo. 269-9629 or 458-6509

Dublin Near St. Car

3/1.5 upper Nr Univ, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs,ceil fans, scrn porch. $1150+deposit. Owner/ Agent,442-2813

Efficiency, near Mag.

1 Pers. Studio, 930 Jackson. Hrdwd Flrs. Cen A/H. W/D. Utilities Incld. $500/mth +dep. No Pets. 250-9010

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/mo CARONDELET Dble, 3 BR/1B, hdwd flrs, yd, balc, w/d hkkps, $1025/mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo 891-2420

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

504-949-5400 (Parking) gated,offstreet,French Quarter $200

930 St Ann SQ

1/1 1 yr lease, unfurn, cat poss

$650

3315 Iberville #1

1/1 good loc, good storage, lots of light $700

3315 Iberville #2

1/1 Freshlypainted,lotsnatlight,goodloc! $650 1/1.5 Wd flrs,exposed brick,crtyrd,PARKING! $1500

519 Iberville #5

2/2 renovw/balconyovercourtyard! $1600

527 Spain

1/1 shotgun style apt in fab location $800

1 ST CHARLES AVE APT

631 dauphine

eff 1yr lease, w/d on site, crtyd

835 St. Louis “A”

2/2 Ground flr units Cetral AC ctyd WD $1600

526 Madison

1/1 furnished w/utils incl

8519 Pritchard Place

3/2 Carrolton/univ area,a/c,w/d hkps $1200

1012 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 bdrms, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood floors, w/d, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

$600

$1250

1.5/1 greatlocation1blocktoStCharles $850

1107 S. PETERS #305

1700 Napoleon

Rockn’ reno. 1 br condo. Lg kit, loft br, hi ceil, pkg, sec. Great city views! RE/ MAX N.O. PROP 494-2208.

712 St. Philip

1/1 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1625

715 Royal H

1/1 cozy 125 sqft in the heart of the FQ $700

5224 Coliseum

2/1 2ND FLR, 950 SQFT, LOVELY!

232 Decatur #3A

1/1 Furnished, balc w/ grt views! $1950

1205 ST CHARLES/$1195

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail Jan 2

WAREHOUSE DIST.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine ONLY 4 LEFT! STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

330 Julia Unit 310 Completely renovated furn. studio space in epicenter of Historic WH/ Arts District. Wd flrs, travertine bath, maple cabs, SS appls. Rftp sundeck, pool & fit room. $160,000

Shaun Talbot • Talbot Realty Group

504-525-9763 • www.talbot-realty.com sktalbot@talbot-realty.com

Cassandra Sharpe Commercial & Residential Broker

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450. Private Patio! 1 br, furn kit, off st prkg, secure, paid water, cen a/h w/d. $1000/mo. Call 504/237-4902.

FRENCH QUARTER

1, 2 & 3

French Quarter Realty

1026 Bienville

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multi-family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

1017 Ursulines

4526 A St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. post-Katrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

$1100

Representing

Faubourg Saint Charles Condos Unit #9

FOR SALE

1 BDRM, fully furnished, pool, 1 parking space $399K Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 Cell: 460-7829

sharperealestate@me.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

1/1, $775/mo. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504432-1034 Latter and Blum.

GRT LOCATIONS!

NEW ORLEANS

51


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2010 PC LLC

52

E E R F

Online Classifieds

now on bestofneworleans.com upgrade your ad to print in front of

112,000 Gambit Weekly readers CALL (504) 483-3100 TODAY.


CLASSIFIEDS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

talk

53


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS warehouse district • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 TOO LATE! $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $239,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JANUARY 04 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 48

54

330 s. diaMoNd st. HISTORIC BUILDING IN WAREHOUSE DISTRICT PRE-1850. Stand alone building on street with beautiful neutral ground. Artist studio since 1997, open floor plan-loft style. Can be developed into exquisite residence or commercial space. Enclosed patio. Zoned CBD-8. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. $425,000

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

MICHAEL ZAROU abr, gri, srs

(504) 895-4663

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


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WORLD FAMOUS GOSPEL BRUNCH EVERY SUNDAY SATURDAY JANUARY 8 9PM

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FRIDAY JANUARY 14 8PM  10:30PM

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