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A GAMBIT PUBLICATION | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 0

HOME FASHION

BEAUTY


Beautiful NATURAL

RESULTS

SMARTLIPO-REVOLUTIONARY Laser lipolysis technology that eliminates fat from trouble areas like abdomen, thighs, arms and neck, can help you achieve a slimmer, more beautiful and confident you.

BREAST AUGMENTATION, Make the right choice with “3D Virtual IMAGNG”. View what your breast would look like with different size implants before surgery.

Face

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RESULTS THAT EXCEED EXPECTATIONS

IMAGINE A MORE CONFIDENT YOU

IMAGINE A BEAUTIFUL NEW YOU

ENHANCE YOUR INNER BEAUTY

BOTOX LATE NIGHT WED., DECEMBER 15, 2010 • 5-7PM Fraxel re:store DUAL effectively targets the skin surface for smoother, Kamran Khoobehi, MD, FACS 3901 Veterans Blvd. • Metairie, LA 70002 (Corner of Clearview and Veterans)

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microdermabrasion chemical peels OBAGI Clarisonic Pro Latisse

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10% OFF ESTHETICIAN SERVICES

DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 03


Trunk Show Sofft & Born

Fri 11/19 & Sat 11/20

4119 Magazine Street

UPTOWN 4119 Magazine Street 504.899.6800 Monday – Saturday 10 – 6

Thursday 10 – 7

FRENCH QUARTER 526 Royal Street 504.569.0005

Sunday 12:30 – 5

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

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CUE

CONTENTS

FASHION

19 31

WHAT GUYS WANT CUE KIDS

Sweet, snuggly outerwear

HOME FEATURE

A classic Henry Howard house gets dressed up for the holidays.

SHOPPING

11 43 06 CUE

09 47

BUILT IN STYLE

The royal (window) treatment

NEW&COOL

Roosters are a cock-a-doodle-DO.

CUE TIPS

Portable fireplaces, swanky aprons and arty home tours

> > > D EC EM BER .2010

INDIE FRIENDLY

Dresses, bags and home accessories from local, repurposed materials

PERSPECTIVES

Sporty, weather-hardy gear

HOME

14 21

45

DECEMBER 2010

FROM THE EDITOR

Every girl’s crazy ’bout a sharp-dressed man.

SHOP DOGS

Lucy of Thriv Apparel

BEAUTY

33 39

YOU & IMPROVED

Vibrant, “lived-in” hair color is the accessory du jour.

LUSTERPHILE

A roundup of home facial peels

ON THE COVER Model Brooks Dartez was shot by Megane Claire (www.meganeclaire. com) at Scandinavia Furniture (4513 Airline Drive, Metairie, 455-7100; www.scandinaviafurniture.com).


Belladonna Day Spa & Belladoggie Resort Spa for Dogs host acclaimed pet photographer

for her New Orleans dog portrait sessions

December 4 & 5, 2010

A portion of the proceeds from each session go to The Dag’s House Foundation. Appointments are still available for this once-in-a-dog’s lifetime opportunity to have your pets portrait created by Amanda Jones. To make an appointment or for more information please visit amandajones.com or call Belladonna Day Spa.

2900 Magazine Street • New Orleans, LA 70115 504.891.4393 • belladonnadayspa.com

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CUE 07


Style and Comfort – The Perfect Fit M U N RO · T H I ER RY R A B OT I N · M BT · L A PLU M E · F I N N CO M F O RT · T H I N K H EL L E · D R E W · SA N I TA C LO G S · A R AVO N · TAOS · O RT H A H EEL

SAVE THE DATE: Saturday, Nov. 20th MBT TRAINING DAY NEWEST STYLES • PROMO • MBT REP VISIT W W W.PERFECTFITSHOES.NET FOR FULL SELECTION F O R S H O E S I N W I D E R A N G E O F S I Z E S A N D W I DT H S I N N E R S O L E A D J U S T M E N T S A N D F I T T I N G S F O R YO U R O RT H OT I C S

Gini Davis, Physical Therapist, Foot/Ankle Specialist - Crescent City Physical Therapy Presenting an outstanding collection of stylish, comfortable shoes for any season (or reason)!

TR ANSCONTINENTAL & W. ESPLANADE ( B E T WEEN ROB ERTS MAR K E T AND CR ESCENT CIT Y PHYSIC AL THER APY )

OPEN MONDAY–SATURDAY, 10 : 00 AM –5:30 PM | 504.456.5993 W W W. PE R F EC TF IT S H O E S . N E T 08 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010


from the editor

o

oN CUE m i S SY W i L K i N S o N |

ph oto by c a r lto n m i ck l e

bservant readers may notice something different about this month’s CUE cover: there’s a dude on it. turns out, contrary to what you see represented in the bulk of fashion publications, guys do wear clothes, too. it’s not out of malice that these pages neglect you, fellows — it’s more because, if you have the privilege of being a dude, it’s really not that hard to dress well. look at our cover model. he’s just wearing a plain old V-neck shirt and corduroys, but because they fit properly and are well made, he appears stylish rather than slackerly, even though he’s conked out on a couch. a man’s clothes do matter to the fairer sex. Sometimes they matter more than i would like to admit. a guy i had written off due to his penchant for dressing like a 14-year-old mall rat (complete with spiky hair, pyramid cuff bracelet and skinny jeans) multiplied his attractiveness tenfold when he wised up and donned a V-neck and cords. this does not make me shallow. and

it’s not self-absorbed or effeminate of a man to devote attention to grooming and fashion — it’s just good etiquette. considering the prodigious amount of hair, makeup and clothing expenditures, waxing, exfoliating, plucking and coiffing women are expected to sustain, a lack of corresponding effort on a guy’s part is boorish, tantamount even to sexism. here’s to gender equality.

mArGo dUBoS | editor

editorial

dorA SiSoN |

p u b l is h e r

adv e rti s i ng adm i n istr ator 4 8 3 -3 14 0 micheles@gambitweekly.com

contributing writers

chriStiN JohNSoN

NicoLe cArroLL , m o r GA N r i B e r A production

gr aphic designers

S h e r i e d e L Ac r o i x-A L fA r o, L i N d SAY W e i S S , LY N B r A N t L e Y, Brit t BeNoit pre- press coordinator

meredith L Apre intern

m A r K W AG U eS pAc K d i s p l ay a dv e r t i s i n g

S A N dY S t e i N B r o N d U m

advertising director 4 83 -3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com

Exclusively at

micheLe SLoNSKi

m anaging editor

interns

LUZERN PURE COSMECEUTICAL SKINCARE

production director

K A N dAc e p o W e r G r Av eS

Lee cUtroNe

TRUE COSMETICS

adv e rti s i ng co or d i n ator 4 8 3 -3 13 8 christinj@gambitweekly.com acco u n t e x e c u t i v e s

JiLL GieGer

senior account executive 4 8 3 -3 131 jillg@gambitweekly.com

JeffreY pizzo 4 8 3 -3 145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com AmY WeNdeL 4 8 3 -3 14 6 amyw@gambitweekly.com

5421 MAGAZINE ST.

L i N d A L Ac h i N 4 8 3 -3 14 2 lindal@gambitweekly.com

(LOCATED INSIDE ANGELIQUE SHOE)

ABBY SheffieLd 4 8 3 -3 14 1 abbys@gambitweekly.com

MONDAY -SATURDAY • 10AM-5PM

J e N N i f e r m Ac K e Y 4 8 3 -3 14 3 jenniferm@gambitweekly.com

504.891.8992

meGAN mic ALe 4 8 3 -3 14 4 meganm@gambitweekly.com

CALL TO SCHEDULE APPOINTMENT

GAMBIT | 392 3 Bi eN v i LL e Stree t | N e W o r L e A N S , L A 7 0 1 1 9 504 . 4 8 6.5900 | response@gambitweekly.com

GoT An IdeA for cue ? Email Us: cue@gambitweekly.com DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 09


532 Saint Peter Street | new OrleanS, la 70116 5 0 4 - 5 2 2 - 8 7 3 8 | w w w. m u S e i n S P i r e d f a S h i O n . c O m 10 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010


NEW + COOL

PLAY FOWL

SHOPPING

BE COCK OF THE WALK

WITH THESE FEATHERED FINDS.

BY MISSY WILKINSON

CANVON CHICKEN, $36 AT LITTLE MISS MUFFIN ( 766 HARRISON AVE., 482-8200; 244 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 833-6321; WWW.SHOPLITTLEMISSMUFFIN.COM).

CANDY DISH, $24 AT LITTLE MISS MUFFIN (766 HARRISON AVE., 482-8200; 244 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 833-6321; WWW.SHOPLITTLEMISSMUFFIN.COM).

TURDUCKEN T-SHIRT, $25 AT DIRTY COAST (5704 MAGAZINE ST., 324-3745; WWW.DIRTYCOAST.COM).

ROOSTER ALARM CLOCK, $20 AT JUDY AT THE RINK (THE RINK, 2727 PRYTANIA ST., 891-7018).

PAINTINGS BY MADISON LATIMER, $65 (SMALL) AND $125 (LARGE) AT MUSE (532 ST. PETER ST., 522-8738).

ROOSTER PLATE, $13 AT JUDY AT THE RINK (THE RINK, 2727 PRYTANIA ST., 891-7018).

NECKLACE, $15 AT BOOTSY’S FUNROCK’N (1125 DECATUR ST., 524-1122; 3109 MAGAZINE ST., 895-4102; WWW.BOOTSYSFUNROCKN.COM). DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

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11


6 0 4 7 M A G A Z I N E S T. • 8 9 9 - 4 2 2 3 12 CUE

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H O L

I D A Y

S D C A R

FROM

New Orleans

New Orleans

DREAMING OF A

We welcome personal customization and special requests

uptown 5423 magazine st {504} 897-1555 metairie corner of 17th and severn {504} 219-1113 DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 13


HOME

B U I LT I N S T Y L E

PLaNET

Of THE

draPES the right curtains can make a world of difference. l au r en

l a b o r d e

Photo courtesy the curtain exchange

by

T

he high-ceilinged architectural treasures endemic to New Orleans neighborhoods are special, but they often necessitate some extra interior decorating planning. This is especially true when it comes to window treatments. “Because of the size of our windows, we’ve never been able to buy off the rack,” says Elaine Cullen, owner of the New Orleans location of The Curtain Exchange (3936 Magazine St., 897-2444; www.thecurtainexchange.com). “A lot of people in other parts of the country can go into Walmart and cover their windows. You can’t do that here.” Many curtain retailers offer custom services to ensure perfectly sized window coverings. In addition to ready-made window treatments and bedding, both Curtain Exchange and Peroux Custom Curtains (2929 Jefferson Hwy., Suite F, 836-6884)

curtains can create the illusion of higher ceilings and bigger windows.

UNIQUE GIFTS BY LOCAL ARTISTS nursery | herbs container gardens | cut flowers

5590 CANAL BLVD | 504-265-0725

INT 180 D on B Financ EREST AYS ELG ing FRE ARD Ava E HAR ilable DSC APE S

baby it’s cold outside!!

115 METAIRIE RD, SUITE A www.facebook.com/bellecouturenola

14 CUE

shop our coats & jackets orient expressed•3905 magazine•899.3060 10 - 5 p m m o n to sat •12- 5 dec sun da y s

> > > D EC EM BER .2010 CueNOV_10.indd 1

11/7/10 5:11:31 PM

3115 MAGAZINE · 899-9555 924 ROYAL · 525-6211 BATON ROUGE 711 JEFFERSON HWY.

Design, Build, Maintain Pool Decks • Patios • Walls Walkways • Driveways

292.9022


B U I LT I N S T Y L E provide consultation services to customers. Jared Briley, design consultant at Peroux, says customers should come to a consultation with a sketch of the window. “We tell them just to sketch the window and give all the dimensions, and we’ll work from there,” Briley says. Cullen also says it’s important to know the home’s ceiling height, especially if the ceilings are not high. “You really want (the ceilings) to look as high as possible,” she says. Curtain color is key, especially since other components of the room such as furniture, wall color, accessories and bedding are replaced more frequently. Plus, the color pool for window treatments is relatively limited. “Curtains and rugs are two of the biggest things in a room and don’t come in every color,” Cullen says. “For paints, it’s so easy to find the right color, because it comes in literally every color.” When selecting a hue, Cullen suggests thinking about which items — especially big pieces of furniture — are definitely staying in the room, and working from there. The appropriate curtain color depends on the room’s function. Cullen says vanilla linen is a popular seller for bedrooms, since it is a restful color and goes well with most bedding, which tends to be replaced more frequently than curtains. She also says red silk is a good choice for dining rooms. “Color theory says red stimulates appetite and conversation,” she says. To complement furniture without the room appearing too matchy-matchy, Cullen suggests iridescent colors. “Iridescents sell

HOME

“A lot of people in other parts of the country can go into Walmart and cover their windows. You can’t do that here.” — El AinE CullEn well because they give a hint of another color without being too strong.” Briley says a duck egg or sea glass color is popular among customers, but most people go for neutrals. “You can never go wrong with creams and taupes,” he says. The right curtain material also depends on where it will be placed. Cullen and Briley say silk dupioni is a popular material, but it’s more appropriate for formal rooms. For bathrooms and kitchens, a polyester faux-silk is better, since it can be spot-cleaned. Silk or linen curtains have to be dry-cleaned. Curtains can be expensive, but they may help cut renovation costs by hiding a home’s small quirks. They create the illusion of higher ceilings (the shorter the ceilings, the higher the curtains should be), can make windows appear larger (make the curtain rod larger than the actual window) and can be used as a partition to divide

rooms or create storage space. “Uptown homes don’t always have closets, so … curtains can be used as closet doors in a room without closets,” Cullen says. “When the curtains are closed, people think it’s a window.” Budget-friendly options exist when it comes to window treatments (Cullen suggests sheer materials, which are inexpensive and can easily be layered to make a change), but generally, window treatments involve a substantial investment of time and money. “Curtains aren’t inexpensive,” Cullen says. “They require many yards of fabric. Consider them a 10year investment. They’re not something you replace every season, so you want to buy well. Curtains also add insulation, light control and privacy, so there are good reasons to have curtains. They are definitely a good investment.”

HOLIDAYS

ARE HERE…

massage HAIR SALON | NAIL SPA

pedicure

manicure

RELAX. RENEW. RECONNECT

fo Bo rt o he k E H ar ol ly id ay s

MASSAGES | YOGA BOTOX® | LASER MICRODERMABRASION DERMA FILLERS FACIALS CHEMICAL PEELS

The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be

HOME OF THE

MINUTE WORKOUT

WAXING GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

NO CONTRACTS

MEDI SPA FRIDAYS W/ DR. MARILYN PELIAS

504.891.5121

6312 Argonne Blvd. | 504.482.2219

735 OCTAVIA ST • NEW ORLEANS 1 block from Magazine St. Whole Foods Market WWW.ONETOONEPERSONALTRAINING.COM

Open Mon-Sat \ www.myspabythepark.com twitter.com/MYSPAbythepark

DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 15


er

e own h t m o r f e g messa

n: essed wome r d ll e w f o e secret every occar o f r a e Discover th w e p ras and sha b g n i t t i f ly lp you find e h ll i perfect w s r e t t e's expert fi i n e on bras G y a e r n B o m r u sion. o p wasting y o t S ! t i f t c e azing... m a l e e f your perf d n a u will look o Y . t i f 't n ECT FIT. that do F R E P a 's t ll it unless i we don't se l, sport and a d i r b , s s e l ments ening, strap r v a e g , y g a n i d y m r e m Ev ear and sli w e p a h S ! g he largest T . K even nursin A A s p -48 and cu 8 2 s d n a B too. e south. h t n i n o i t c sele

A

Expert Bra Fitting Perfect Fit - Guaranteed!

Appointment recommended but walk-ins are welcome!

2881 US 190 The Village Mandeville 985.951.8638 www.TheBraGenie.com Mon-Sat 10am- 6pm

Personal Service â&#x20AC;˘ Expert Advice

16 CUE

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CUE 17


18 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010


W H AT G U Y S W A N T

FA S H I O N

RED FELT CRUISER BIKE, $349 TO $699 AT MASSEY’S PROFESSIONAL OUTFITTERS (509 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 648-0292; 816 HWY. 190, COVINGTON, 985-809-7544; 3363 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 885-1144; WWW.MASSEYSOUTFITTERS.COM).

N O I T R O A F R R A E O G L P EX N A URB

BY

MO

A RG

N R

R IBE

A

NAVY VEST, $18 AT TRUCK STOP CLOTHING (2209 MAGAZINE

ST., 302-1895).

BROWN LEATHER AND WOOL COAT BY KURLAND, $68 AT

TRUCK STOP CLOTHING (2209 MAGAZINE ST., 302-1895).

RED BEANIE BY 10 DEEP, $40 AT ENSIGN (5035 FRERET ST., 2673589; WWW.ENSIGNNOLA.COM).

SUUNTO WATCH WITH BAROMETER, ALTOMETER, COMPASS AND DEPTH METER, $275 AT

MASSEY’S PROFESSIONAL OUTFITTERS

(509 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 648-0292; 816 HWY. 190, COVINGTON, 985809-7544; 3363 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 885-1144; WWW.MASSEYSOUTFITTERS.COM).

LIMITED-EDITION DOWN JACKET BY PATAGONIA, $275 AT

MASSEY’S PROFESSIONAL OUTFITTERS

(509 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 648-0292; 816 HWY. 190, COVINGTON, 985-809-7544; 3363 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 885-1144; WWW.MASSEYSOUTFITTERS.COM).

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CUE 19


REVIVAL OF THE FITTEST

19TH-CENTURY ELEGANCE MAKES DEBORAH HINSON AND MICHAEL DEGEORGE’S GREEK REVIVAL HOME AN IDEAL BACKDROP FOR CHRISTMAS SPLENDOR. BY LEE CUTRONE

|

PHOTOS BY EUGENIA UHL

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CUE 21


The kiTchen Table, banqueTTe and chairs are from Villa Vici. The birdcage was purchased aT The aTlanTa anTiques markeT. rudy, a dachshund, is cozy in his red holiday sweaTer.

22 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010


W

hen hunting for the first house they would own together, husband and wife Michael DeGeorge and Deborah Hinson had differing approaches. Both wanted an old house with distinct New Orleans flavor, but Hinson’s requirements leaned toward the practical while DeGeorge’s existed on a much more visceral level. “I had owned quite a few houses at that point, but it was Michael’s first,” Hinson says. “He kept saying, ‘When I see it, I’ll know.’” After nine months and 20 property viewings, that day finally came. “The moment we opened the gate, I said, ‘We are going to buy this house,’” DeGeorge says. “He was literally standing on the front porch chasing people away while I was on the phone calling the realtor,” Hinson adds. Hinson and DeGeorge were even more enamored upon entering the elegant Greek Revival home. Built in 1864 and designed by legendary New Orleans architect Henry Howard for lumber merchant Robert Roberts, it was a preservationist’s dream — moldings, medallions, balconies and galleries all intact. “While it has elaborate medallions and great 19th-century details, it accommodates today’s lifestyle with an open floor plan,” DeGeorge says. “So many friends and family comment on how formal the house feels, but at the same time, it’s comfortable and welcoming.” DeGeorge was drawn to the house’s architecture, Hinson to its ample windows, corner lot and Lower Garden District location. The sole drawback was that the house had been divided to include a two-story apartment. Hinson and DeGeorge began working with architect Kirk Fabacher of TerrellFabacher Architects on plans for returning the house to a single residence. But when one of Hurricane Katrina’s tornados ripped off parts of the roof, blew out windows and collapsed the first- and page 25

ABOVE: LOcAL pLAstEr ArtisAn tOmmy LAchin rEstOrEd thE OrnAtE cEiLing mEdALLiOns, AddEd cOrBELs in thE LiVing And dining rOOms And rEdid thE Arch’s Egg And dArt mOLding. right: twO-yEAr-OLd JAck-hEnry’s pLAcE is sEt with dishEs frOm tiffAny & cO. And A stErLing siLVEr cup And fLAtwArE in thE grAnd BArOquE pAttErn By wALLAcE. pAgE 21: thE 10-fOOt christmAs trEE incLudEs OrnAmEnts pAssEd dOwn frOm dEBOrAh’s grAndpArEnts, As wELL As LifE-sizE Birds pErchEd On BrAnchEs. nExt tO thE trEE, An AntiquE mArriAgE cOffEr is tOppEd with A gOthic ArchitEcturAL mOdEL frOm AgOrA, rEindEEr, A cLAssicAL stAtuE And sLEigh BELLs dEBOrAh usEs tO AnnOuncE sAntA’s ArriVAL On christmAs mOrning. thE Art ABOVE thE chEst is By pEdrO friEdEBErg. DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 23


Join us at our Metairie location for a

Holiday Trunk Show

Friday, November 26th-Sunday November 28th

On select colors and styles, while supplies last

Buy 4 Beads get the 5th FREE! Receive $25 off a Fantasy Pendant

20% Off Sale Sale on select items only. See store associates for details

for a limited time

with the purchase of a Fantasy Necklace

Receive a FREE bracelet with the purchase of a decorative clasp

Join us at our Harvey location for a

Holiday Event Friday, November 26thSunday, November 28th

Receive a FREE bracelet with the purchase of a decorative clasp

Receive a FREE Collection Box or Clutch with $100 Trollbeads purchase

3331 SEVERN AVE. | NEXT TO LAKESIDE MALL | 504.779.3202 1901 MANHATTAN BLVD. | FOUNTAIN PARK CENTER | 504.304.4861 WWW.ISABELLASGALLERY.COM

24 CUE

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page 23

“So many friends and family comment on how formal the house feels, but at the same time, it’s comfortable and welcoming.” — MICHAeL DeGeOrGe

The wreaTh is made of waxed magnolia leaves. donald Tully fabricaTed The console using an iron base The homeowners found in a shop on magazine sTreeT, and The TapesTry once hung in deborah’s grandmoTher’s house.

second-story ceilings just two months after the couple moved in, the need for remodeling became immediate. Hinson and DeGeorge regrouped and began an extensive renovation, taking the house down to the studs and carefully restoring original details such as ornate plaster medallions and heart pine floors discovered under layers of thick, acoustic sub-flooring and carpet. This was not the first time the house had been damaged by a hurricane or updated for contemporary living. In 1965, Hurricane Betsy destroyed its roof, and in 1980, a previous owner renovated the kitchen to such picturebook perfection that Hinson and DeGeorge decided to keep its layout and bar design. They put their own spin on the space, knocking out a wall and installing marble counters, new cabinetry and commercial-grade stainless steel appliances. Double doors in the rear now access a patio and garden planted with Camellia sasanqua, gardenia, boxwood and creeping fig. Hinson and DeGeorge refreshed the interior’s soothing neutral colors, a holdover from previous owners Kevin and Leah Christensen of Soren Christensen Gallery, whose aesthetic the couple admired. “Leah has spectacular taste, and we followed her lead,” DeGeorge says. “We stayed pretty true to her color palette with the off-whites and grays in the parlors.” Having worked for both Neal Auction Company and New Orleans Auction before forming the Hinson Group (a marketing firm specializing in culinary and retail markets) with his wife, DeGeorge took on the task of decorating the house in a style he describes as eclectic. “We’ve mixed Lucite lamps with a 19th-century giltwood settee,” he says. “I appreciate many styles, periods and materials. Age helps, but they’re doing amazing things with reproductions. It’s about what you like

DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 25


“I appreciate many styles, periods and materials. Age helps, but they’re doing amazing things with reproductions. It’s about what you like and what makes you comfortable.” — DeGeoRGe

and what makes you comfortable.” Patience is also key to the process, DeGeorge says. He searched for furnishings the same way he searched for a house, biding his time until he found the right items. The couple shopped antiques resources for a year before discovering the front parlor’s matching crystal chandeliers at a small New Jersey auction house. DeGeorge also incorporated sentimental pieces inherited from Hinson’s family, such as an American Renaissance dresser used as a sideboard in the dining room. During Christmas at the Hinson-DeGeorge house, which includes their 2-year-old son Jackson-Henry and Hinson’s 16-year-old son Taylor, cherished family heirlooms play a starring role. Hinson inherited ornaments from her grandparents, and she rolls out her grandmother’s antique silver for Christmas day dinner. After opening gifts, the family enjoys dishes like butternut squash soup, lobster-stuffed filets, creamed spinach, fresh cranberries, horseradish mashed potatoes, pumpkin cheesecake and chocolate torte. Magnolia garlands with hydrangea and seasonal fruit and a 10-foot tree go up immediately after Thanksgiving for the family’s annual open house. “For Christmas, it’s important to have some things that … you can pass on to your children,” DeGeorge says. “But know when to take help when you need it,” Hinson adds. “If you don’t bake well, go to Whole Foods and buy a cake and call it a day. You can’t do everything. You have to have time to enjoy it.”

ABOVE: ThE gArlAnd On ThE BAnisTEr cOmBinEs mAgnOliA lEAVEs cuT frOm lOcAl TrEEs wiTh BOuquETs Of hydrAngEA. lEfT: hinsOn And dEgEOrgE rEmOVEd A wAll sEpArATing ThE kiTchEn And ThE rEAr ApArTmEnT TO EnlArgE ThE kiTchEn And Add liVing spAcE. dEgEOrgE piEcEd TOgEThEr ThE cOffEE TABlE using A BAsE And mArBlE TOp inhEriTEd frOm dEBOrAh’s grAndmOThEr, Trimming ThEm wiTh rAffiA fringE. ThE lOuis philippE sidE chAirs wErE fOund AT An AucTiOn, As wAs ThE pEdEsTAl hOlding A BusT frOm mAgAzinE sTrEET.

26 CUE

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CUE 27


28 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010


hudson jeans

current elliott

bronx shoes

CLOTHING

kensie

miss me bb dakota

la made

big buddha

and much more!!!

JEWELRY ACCESSORIES

GIFTS

622 S. CARROLLTON 路 NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118 路 504.301.9410 MONDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-6PM 路 SUNDAY 10AM-3PM DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

CUE 29


BEYOND ANTIQUES

|

GERRIE BREMERMANN

B R E M E R M A N N 3943 MAGAZINE STREET

30 CUE

> > > D EC EM BER .2010

|

504.891.7763

|

D E S I G N S W W W. B R E M E R M A N N D E S I G N S . C O M


CUE K I D S

MONKEY MITTENS, $24 AT ANGELIQUE BABY (5519 MAGAZINE ST., 899-8992).

FA S H I O N

FUZZY BEAR JACKET, $65 AT ANGELIQUE BABY (5519 MAGAZINE ST., 899-8992). PINK CROCHETED HEADBAND, $27 AT PIPPEN LANE (2929 MAGAZINE ST., 269-0106).

CUTE AND COZY SNUGGLY OUTERWEAR FOR GIRLS AND BOYS

BY MORGAN RIBERA

PLAID TRAPPER HAT, $27.50 AT NOLA’S ARK (3640 MAGAZINE ST., 304-5897).

CROCHETED BOOTIES, $60 AT ANGELIQUE BABY (5519 MAGAZINE ST., 899-8992).

PURPLE AND GREEN CROCHETED SCARF, $16 AT LITTLE LAUGHTER (5530 MAGAZINE ST., 897-4880).

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b outique

shoe

baby


“BlUE EYES wITH REd HAIR CAn BE jUST InCREdIBlE,” STEVEn SOBEl SAYS.

hue economy

the

with seasonal and economic shifts come new trends in hair color. By

Missy

Wilkinso n

P H OTO S CO U R T ES Y O F PA R I S PA R K ER CR E AT I V E T E A M

F

ashionable hairstyles — whether we’re talking about powdered wigs, dreadlocks, or sleek, flat-ironed bobs — are at least as much a reflection of economic trends as they are of a dominating cultural aesthetic. As the economy shifts, so does our follicular response, and these dramatic changes are particularly evident in this season’s most prominent hair color trends. Ombre hair — a color technique whereby the ends of the hair are lighter than the roots by tiny degrees, like the gradient shifts of hue above a horizon at sunset — is the most ubiquitous hair color trend, a favorite of It-girls from Alexa Chung to Drew Barrymore. The subtly multitonal look is a pretty twist on a punk rock aesthetic, as though some fashionable waif bleached her hair, grew out six inches of roots and then tinted her coif with a semipermanent dye. Though this DIY approach is not one any conscientious hairdresser would advocate, the careless, disheveled appearance of what the beauty industry has dubbed “lived-in color” owes much to artful neglect — and like a cactus, the more you ignore it, the more this color thrives. “We do not want it to look like fresh highlights right out of the scalp,” says Steven Sobel, whose Uptown salon has been ranked among the nation’s top 100 by Elle magazine. “These highlights are placed an inch or so away from the scalp and painted through the mid-shaft to the ends. So you have natural color at your scalp, and the highlight starts an inch or so away from the ends.” These deliberately ramshackle melanges of color represent page 35

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page 33

These deliberately ramshackle melanges of color represent a decisive shift away from the fine, blonde highlights that ruled the ’90s and early 2000s.

“liveD-in” highlights Begin aBout an inch From the root. photo courtesy oF steven soBel.

a decisive shift away from the fine, blonde highlights that ruled the ’90s and early 2000s. “For so long, everyone wanted natural (highlights)—‘I don’t want people to know I get my hair colored,’ the whole song and dance,” says Chrissie Gilberti, a color specialist at Paris Parker. “Now hair color has become an accessory, just like women’s handbags.” With that shift in perspective, hair color becomes a lot less serious, and it’s not the end of the world if roots happen to show. In fact, part of the appeal of “lived-in color” is its longevity, which means longer stretches between time-consuming, pricey salon visits. “With lived-in color, you can go four to five months without highlighting,” Sobel says. “I’m sure our economy has something to do with this. Also, people have busier lives, and they don’t want to be glued to a hair salon.” Lived-in color falls under the wider umbrella of what Brenda McField, artistic director of Mariposa Salon & Spa, calls “dimensional color,” which adds a touch of contrast and pizzazz to hair color by including a family of light, dark and medium tones. Depending on the tones, the effect can be edgy (think bold and contrasty) or conservative (multiple, subtle tones that mimic the variance found in natural hair color). “We recently added three colors to a client’s natural hair color. We gave her a gold, a red and a nice, deep brown. It is really cool to go from nondescript to all these pops of color, all on the same head of hair,” McField says. “If 10 years ago, people had told me I would be putting a light, medium and dark tone on the same section of hair, I would have looked at them strangely. But it is gorgeous.” This willingness to experiment crosses over to clients, many of whom have been requesting a color that’s not for the faint of heart: “Red is a huge trend for fall,” McField says. “Rihanna went a really vibrant, almost candy-apple red, but there is a red for everyone — everything from coppers to beautiful burnt orange colors, and again the ombre colors. Red really complements that technique.” Though reds are notorious for rapid fading, stylist Dara Johnston of Rocket Science Beauty Bar says bottle Titians can preserve their hair color by requesting a red glaze treatment to lock in color and waiting 48 hours after a color process before shampooing. Better color formulations mean reds last longer. “Red is a bigger molecule, and that’s why it doesn’t stay in the hair as long as other colors,” Johnston says. “They have figured out a way to formulate reds better so they last longer. And the glazes really add shine and lock in color.” Perhaps the most welcome hair color shift isn’t

Dimensional color, as seen here, “is not your mother’s olD highlights,” says BrenDa mcFielD. DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

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tonal as much as perceptual — the current approach to hair color is much less dire and much more fun. Gilberti says that while most of her clients are doctors and lawyers whose conservative work atmosphere prohibits them from sporting mohawks or undercuts, she finds subtle ways to inject some whimsy into their ’dos. “They can’t go to work with a big purple streak, but they want it there because of their personality,” Gilberti says. For these clients, Gilberti recommends brightly colored extensions, which don’t damage hair, last up to six months and can be tucked discreetly inside a ponytail. “Extensions are a great way to go for color. You don’t have the commitment and damage, and you still have fun,” Gilberti says of the extensions, which range in price from $50 to $250. Extensions also are a good option for people who crave the avant-garde silver tresses flaunted recently by Lady Gaga and models on Italian Vogue’s cover. Unless you come by silver hair naturally, there’s no way to get the color without incurring serious damage to your hair. “A lot of people are embracing silver, which is awesome for our older clientele,” Gilberti says. “I have been encouraging clients to grow out their natural, pretty, silvery gray hair. It is beautiful.” Ultimately, like any fashion accessory, hair color is a way to project personality aspects that may otherwise have been muted and to have fun while doing it. “Sometimes you have hair that has been sleeping for a long time, and if you put the right color on it, it is like the personality comes out,” Sobel says. “Hair color makes a big change so quickly. I think it kind of makes people wake up.” Rihanna’s candy-apple Red tResses spaRked a cRaze foR supeR-satuRated Reds like this one.

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DIANE'S BOUTIQUE Ladies Apparel & Accessories

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MATERNITY * NURSING 2917 Magazine St.

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Also at 3331 Severn Avenue in Metairie

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BUT NOT

GIVE UP

504.342.2347 • Mon-Thurs 10am-4pm Fri-Sat 10am-6pm • Nolababybump.com

FASHION!


LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

PEELOUT DO-IT-YOURSELF PEELS AND EXFOLIANTS

BY KYLA BOUTTE

S

un exposure can leave skin dry, hyper-pigmented and dull. Exfoliation via masks and peels is an ideal way to mitigate skin damage by removing dead cells from the surface to reveal a soft, glowing complexion. Whether you choose to splurge on a trip to a laser center, save with a homemade recipe, or split the difference with an at-home exfoliation treatment, there’s a peel for every skin type and budget.

INTENSIVE RESURFACING PEEL BY MURAD IS FORMULATED WITH GLYCOLIC AND SALICYLIC ACIDS TO SPEED CELL RENEWAL WHILE BAMBOO BEAD MICRODERMABRASION SOFTENS THE SKIN — $165 FOR A ONE-MONTH SUPPLY AT LOVEJOY DAY SPA & SHOP (200 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 828-1997; WWW. LOVEJOYSPA.COM).

THE BRAZILIAN PEEL IS A POTENT 30 PERCENT GLYCOLIC ACID MADE WITH AÇAI FROM THE AMAZON RAIN FOREST — $78 AT SEPHORA (LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER, 3301 VETERANS MEMORIAL BLVD., METAIRIE, 830-4567; WWW.SEPHORA.COM).

KIEHL’S OVER-NIGHT BIOLOGICAL PEEL STIMULATES SKIN’S NATURAL RENEWAL PROCESS, DISSOLVES DEAD SURFACE CELLS AND REDUCES THE APPEARANCE OF SUN DAMAGE — $52.95 AT EARTHSAVERS (LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER ANNEX, 3301 VETERANS MEMORIAL BLVD., METAIRIE, 835-0225; 3414 HWY. 190, MANDEVILLE, 674-1133; 5501 MAGAZINE ST., 899-8555; WWW.EARTHSAVERSONLINE.COM).

MICROQUATIC LACTIC RENEWAL FACIAL PEEL BY SUE DEVITT IMPROVES SKIN’S NATURAL COLLAGEN PRODUCTION WITH MDI COMPLEX, WHILE MARINE ELASTIN AND LACTIC ACID REMOVE DEAD SKIN CELLS AND TOXINS — $62 AT MAKE ME UP! (3426 MAGAZINE ST., 8919688; WWW.MAKEMEUPNOLA.COM).

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BEAUTY

LUSTERPHILE

PAGE 39

RODIAL GLAMTOX PEEL IS A CLAY MASK THAT IMMEDIATELY EXFOLIATES AND TONES SKIN WHILE REDUCING MANY TELLTALE SIGNS OF AGING — $90 AT BEAUTY.COM.

Cosmetic surgeon Dr. Marilyn Pelias has a few pointers about peels: 1. Limit sun exposure before and after a peel. 2. Don’t use excessive amounts of product; it doesn’t necessarily guarantee better results. 3. Once your skin starts peeling, resist the urge to pick at it. Let dead skin slough off on its own. 4. Use a gentle cleanser and soothing moisturizer after a peel. 5. To maximize a peel’s effects, exfoliate regularly and use sunscreen to proteect your results. Dr. Pelias is available at My Spa By The Park (6312 Argonne Blvd., 482-2219; www.myspabythepark.com) and at Dr. Pelias Cosmetic Surgery and Lifestyle Center (5601 Tchoupitoulas St., 496-8398; www.drmpelias. com).

Esthetician Torrie Jakes shares her recipe for a fall enzyme peel that naturally exfoliates and conditions the skin. “Enzymes are nice options for those who cannot use chemical peels,” she says.

GET A MORE EVEN SKIN TONE WHEN YOU REMOVE DEAD SKIN CELLS WITH BOTANICAL KINETICS EXFOLIANT BY AVEDA — $9.50 FOR A 1.7-OZ SIZE AT SALON DU BEAU MONDE (612 JULIA ST., 568-0050; WWW.SALONBEAUMONDE.COM).

PUMPKIN FACIAL MASK 2 teaspoons cooked or canned pumpkin 1/2 teaspoon honey 1/4 teaspoon milk (for oily/normal skin) or whipping cream (for dry/dehydrated skin) ORIGINS BRIGHTER BY NATURE PEEL PADS HAVE BEEN CLINICALLY PROVED TO BRIGHTEN YOUR COMPLEXION BY HARNESSING THE POWER OF FRUIT ACIDS — $37.50 AT ORIGINS (LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER, 3301 VETERANS MEMORIAL BLVD., METAIRIE, 833-1075; WWW.ORIGINS.COM).

Thoroughly combine ingredients and apply to a clean face with gentle, circular motions, avoiding the area around your eyes. Leave on skin for 10 to 15 minutes, then rinse with warm water. Gently pat your skin dry. This mask feels even better if heated just a little. Torrie Jakes operates Jakes Aesthetics (3316 Canal St., 827-2345) and is available at EarthSavers (3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-0225; 3414 Hwy 190, Mandeville, 985-674-1133; 5501 Magazine St., 899-8555; www.earthsaversonline.com).

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T. 3900 Magazine Street at General Taylor open Monday - Saturday 504.891.8101

Inhabit • Graham & Spencer • Genetic Denim • Raquel Allegra • Rag & Bone • Etoile by Isabel Marant • Jerome Dreyfuss

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CUE T I P S

SHOPPING

BY MISSY WILKINSON

FIRE STARTER A

A

s Treme creator David Simon famously posited to the New York Times last spring, “New Orleans still makes something. New Orleans makes moments.” Thanks in part to Simon, the rest of the nation is gradually getting hip to the reasons we so stubbornly and passionately stick with a city that’s nowhere near as easy to inhabit as a certain nickname would suggest. Jeanne Nathan, executive director of the Creative Alliance of New Orleans, aims to further that quest, revealing “(what) the people of New Orleans are like and why we are so hung up on living here” by putting local homes, gardens and art collections on display. Art Home New Orleans, part of a four-month festival of events celebrating the contemporary cultural trends endemic to the Crescent City, kicks off Friday, Dec. 3, when 25 area homes will be open for tours. “The homes will be a great variety, from little shotguns downtown and mansions Uptown to homes of artists and families with substantial (art) collections,” Nathan says. “People here are creative, classy, arty and interested in all kinds of different styles. You will see everything from French-American to modernist leanings, all with the special flair and style of New Orleans.” Some artist home studios will feature art available for purchase. Nathan’s intent is twofold: to promote the creative community by fostering its economic growth and to reveal the New Orleanian way of life by spotlighting the homes of its residents. “We don’t come to New Orleans because we will make money or because the climate is great. If you live in New Orleans, you live here because of the culture,” Nathan says. “Our homes begin to tell the story of who we are and why we live here. It’s all about broadening the image of New Orleans.”

PARTY ARTY

t first glance, it looks like a toaster oven gone terribly wrong, but the Brasa portable fireplace unit is actually a sleek, eco-friendly way to bring fire’s warmth and magic to an empty hearth, a coffee table, a bathroom — any place that could benefit from some spark (and what place couldn’t?). The ceramic and stainless steel fire feature houses a reservoir of bioethanol — a renewable fuel that burns clean and doesn’t require ventilation — and raises a room’s ambient temperature anywhere from 7 to 15 degrees. Portable fireplaces range in price from $165 to $625 (the Avani model, pictured here, is $385). Contact Brasa (307 Tchoupitoulas St., 596-6960; www.-brasafire.com) for more information or to arrange a viewing at the company’s showroom.

THIS HOME IS ONE OF 25 THAT WILL BE ON DISPLAY DURING ART HOME NEW ORLEANS OPEN HOUSE TOURS. P H OTO BY J O N AT H A N T R AV I ES A

ArT Home New Orleans kicks off Friday, Dec. 3, with a patron party. Homes will be open for tours during the first two weekends of December from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets for the patron party are $100; tickets for home tours are $15 per day, and both may be purchased at www.-cano-la.org.

UNDER WRAPS

T

is the season for spattered sauce, spilled wine and drips of melted candle wax, and if you’d like to protect your party frock with something equally sequined, beaded and embroidered, this silk crepe “cocktail apron” from Isabella’s Gallery (1901 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 304-4861; 3331 Severn Ave., Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery.com) has your name all over it. At $125, it’s pricey enough that you might want to double-apron, but paired with cigarette pants and ballet flats, there’s no prettier (or more tongue-in-cheek) way to flaunt your hostess-with-the-mostest status.

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Old Metairie Village Shopping Center 701 Metairie Rd., Metairie 504-304-6829 www.lil-attitudes.com


i n d i e f r i e n d ly

shopping

reTreasure

hunT

Would-be trash finds a neW and useful life at a neW orleans business.

By K a ndace P ower Gr av es

S

ometimes good ideas and serendipity intersect at the right place and time. That’s the case with REpurposingNOLA Piece By Peace (261-3275; www.repurposingnola-piece-by-peace.com), a company started in September 2009 by designer Traci Claussen, who procures local materials that otherwise would be headed for a landfill and transforms them into new products people actually use. Claussen’s line features an empire-waist dress with a top made from the sleeves of a man’s shirt and the skirt from a burlap coffee bag from PJ’s; purses, evening bags and several sizes of travel bags made from old drapes, materials found in warehouses and coffee sacks; Christmas stockings, makeup bags and shower curtains made with banners and fence wraps from the 2010 Super Bowl; chairs made from discarded bamboo flooring; beanbag chairs, dog beds and more. Made with shirtsleeves , the Her latest project is turning old band uniforms donated by Edna Karr Button PlacKet froM a Man’s High School into book bags. shirt and a cafe do Brasil cof“My philosophy is to be cool and do good,” says Claussen, whose fee sacK froM PJ’s, this dress is position at the company is “chief gatherer of the green.” There is $200. custoMers who Provide a changing slate of products available from REpurposingNOLA, their own shirt receive a 25 depending on the ideas sparked by a found material. She also limits Percent discount. production numbers so the items sold will remain uncommon. “We try to do only a few (of each item), 50 to 100 or less, so they Photo By l aurie foret

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SHOPPING

I N D I E F R I E N D LY

will be special,” she says. Her merchandise is sold through the REpurposingNOLA website and some items are carried at 12 stores in New Orleans, Metairie, Covington, New Roads and Camden, Maine. Claussen partners with other environmentally conscious businesses to get the most out of recyclable materials: coffee bean sacks from PJ’s are used in a number of products, and the 2013 New Orleans Super Bowl Host Committee’s Environmental Program provided myriad banners that hung in the Miami stadium during the Saints’ Super Bowl win for REpurposingNOLA to transform into a variety of items. REpurposingNOLA donates 70 percent of proceeds from sales of items made with the banners to “create a greener, more sustainable event in 2013,” when the Super Bowl will return to New Orleans. Claussen also has used bolts of fabrics left over from hotel renovations, as well as items found at the Green Project. So far, she hasn’t run out of ideas, and each item she produces comes with a story about the origin of the materials used to make it. “Each piece is made with peace in mind, helping the planet and keeping local people employed and happy,” she says.

ABOVE: OWN A PIECE OF HISTORY (AND A GOOD WAY TO CARRY MAKEUP) WITH THIS ZIPPER BAG MADE FROM BANNERS DISPLAYED DURING THE SAINTS VICTORY AT THE 2010 SUPER BOWL, $45. FAR LEFT: GOURMET SERVING TRAYS ARE MADE FROM SALVAGED CYPRESS, $100. TWENTY-FIVE PERCENT OF PROCEEDS GO TO REBUILDING TOGETHER NEW ORLEANS’ EFFORTS TO HELP RESIDENTS ALONG THE GULF COAST. LEFT: AVAILABLE ONLINE ONLY, THERE ARE FOUR STYLES OF RED VELVET WRISTLET BAGS — AND ONLY 16 WERE PRODUCED — FROM FABRIC CLAUSSEN BOUGHT IN A KATHMANDU, NEPAL, TEXTILE MARKET 12 YEARS AGO, $48.

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shop dogs

LUCY

pERspECTIVEs

mY

favorite things ... NAppINg BIRd-WATChINg MARdI gRAs ThRoWs sQUEAKY ToYs spLAshINg IN ThE oCEAN

By MORGAN RIBER A | PhOtOS By ChERyL GERBER

A

s the director of first impressions at Thriv (4308 Firestone Road, Metairie, 731-2989; www.thrivnp.com), an organic athletic clothing company, Lucy greets visitors with a warm nuzzle. Lucky guests receive a sloppy smooch on the cheek when they stoop to pet the spirited boxer. “She is a big girl, but she is definitely a love bug,” Thriv designer and product developer Sarah Chase says of the “gentle giant” she adopted five years ago. The peripatetic pair have resided in four states during the past five years, but they have finally found a place to settle down. “We are both not fans of the cold weather, so we’ve made New Orleans home,” Chase says. Chase pursued apparel studies at Philadelphia University and initially worked as a technical designer in Baltimore developing soccer and rugby uniforms. Last October, she joined her fiance in New Orleans, where she landed the position at Thriv. Headquartered in Metairie and founded by former Academic All-American athlete Al Andrews and his family, Thriv produces sportswear made of bamboo, organic cotton and elastane, a fiber blend that offers UPF (ultraviolet protective factor) 50 protection from the sun, temperature control,

moisture-wicking and odor-control qualities and softness superior to that found in traditional, petroleum-based synthetic sports apparel. Despite the athletic enthusiasm that permeates her workplace, Lucy is not the most active dog. “Lucy is a big fan of napping. We aren’t surprised to hear her snoring beneath the conference table at our staff meetings,” Chase says. Lucy’s ultra-relaxed demeanor lends an air of comfort and familiarity to serious business encounters. She also aids the staff in breaking down boxes in the warehouse. “She likes to be included in everything,” Chase says. When meetings transpire behind closed doors, Lucy demonstrates a peculiarly human-like habit: She eavesdrops by putting her ear to the door. With a pensive tilt of her head, she appears to feign comprehension. “It’s like she is actually considering what you are saying,” Chase says. During her time off, Lucy enjoys socializing in dog-friendly bars like The Bulldog and Monkey Hill, dining at The Columns Hotel or befriending birds at Audubon Park. “She is definitely a social butterfly,” Chase says. “At work and at play, she tries to become best friends with everything and anything that moves.” DEC E M B E R.2 0 1 0 <<<

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Old Metairie, LA

4437 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, LA 70006 504.888.2300 | FAX: 504.888.1911 NORDICKITCHENS.com


CUE-101116