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Commentary

thinking out loud

State of the Coast

I

ing something), but Louisiana Democrats’ responses to the speech were muted. Mayor Mitch Landrieu concentrated on Obama’s inspiring words about education and innovation, while Sen. Mary Landrieu called the Gulf Coast omission “a big disappointment,” adding, “Even one sentence would have helped.” But it was GOP freshman Jeff Landry who really came out swinging: “The president missed a tremendous opportunity to address the ongoing situation in the Gulf of Mexico. I would have preferred empty words to absolute neglect.” Louisiana political blogger Mike Bayham noted Obama’s speech had room for the Chilean miners but not Gulf Coast fishermen. Obama should know that this disaster is ongoing. The Feinberg hearings are packed with frustrated Gulf Coast residents (one man fell to his knees begging Feinberg for

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For those weary of Bush’s insouciance during and after Katrina, it felt like déjà vu all over again. help). On the day of the speech, WWL-TV ran a story about the lack of breeding activity in some of Louisiana’s most productive oyster habitats, which has scientists “baffled.” Obama’s Oil Spill Commission was due to testify in the Senate the next day. Simply put, the oil disaster is still news — today and for many days to come. Obama has been criticized in the past for his seemingly languid attitude toward this catastrophe. Last year, Democratic strategist James Carville (who had lambasted the White House response) told Gambit, “We’re still going to be dealing with this in 2012. [Obama] might point to this [handling of the crisis] as one of his great accomplishments. I hope he can.” We agree — and his State of the Union speech would have been a fine place to start.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

n his 2006 State of the Union address to the joint chambers of Congress, President George W. Bush — who had been widely and rightly criticized for his botched response to Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods — addressed the topic head-on. “A hopeful society comes to the aid of fellow citizens in times of suffering and emergency and stays at it until they’re back on their feet,” Bush said, emphasizing the federal government’s then-$85 million commitment to rebuilding and repairing southeast Louisiana. But a year later, when Bush didn’t even mention Katrina in his 2007 State of the Union speech (16 months after the devastation) then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco spoke out: “I certainly was surprised and very disappointed that the president didn’t have a single thing to say about the Gulf Coast, about Louisiana,” she said. “I guess the pains of the hurricane are yesterday’s news in Washington, but for us it’s still very real and something we fight every day.” Judging from President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address on Jan. 25, the pains of the Gulf oil disaster likewise are yesterday’s news in Washington. In a June 2010 address to the nation, Obama called the BP oil gusher “the worst environmental disaster America has ever faced.” He promised to make “a commitment to the Gulf Coast that goes beyond responding to the crisis of the moment.” Seven months later, in his first State of the Union address after the disaster, Obama didn’t bother to say a word about the No. 1 news story in America in 2010. (In fairness, neither did Congressman Paul Ryan in the official GOP response.) Certainly no one on the Gulf Coast was expecting to have BP raked over the coals again. Nor did we expect to hear anything about the frustrations with Kenneth Feinberg’s claims process. Still, it’s easy to imagine the righteous fury of Democrats had something of this scale happened on the Republicans’ watch, only to have it ignored by the president in his State of the Union speech. Some have defended Obama by correctly noting that a one-hour speech could not include everything, but still — a months-long oil hemorrhage in federal waters, an ecological disaster that affected four states and tens of thousands of families, 11 rig workers killed in the initial blowout … not even mentioned once? For those weary of Bush’s insouciance during and after Katrina, it felt like déjà vu all over again. The State of the Union is a symbolic moment, designed equally to inspire and to let the American people know their president shares their concerns. Certainly Obama’s speech was one of his best (and, given his writing and oratorical skills, that’s say-

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HEY BLAKE, WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT A PUBLICATION SIMPLY TITLED BLUE BOOK? I OWN A COPY AND AM PRESENTLY RESEARCHING THIS PUBLICATION. IT APPEARS TO BE A LISTING OF FAMOUS NAMES AND PLACES OF HOUSES OF ILL REPUTE LOCATED IN NEW ORLEANS. IT ALSO LISTS THE NAMES OF MADAMS. IT DESCRIBES MANSIONS, LISTS THE NAMES OF LADIES OF THE EVENING ALONG WITH THEIR RACE AND NAMES ADVERTISERS SUCH AS CIGAR, LIQUOR AND JEWELRY COMPANIES. CONNIE

DEAR CONNIE, The Blue Book was the earliest guide to Storyville, the government-regulated red-light district near the French Quarter that existed from 1898 to 1917. It contained all you have described and more. Storyville had its own press, and the first edition of the 42-page Blue Book appeared in 1900. It was underwritten by Tom Anderson, a Louisiana state legislator, owner of many establishments in Storyville and companion to Storyville madam Josie Arlington. The editor of this important work was Billy Struve, whose grasp of the English language was weak; he misspelled the first word in the first book: Intruduction. There were five editions of the Blue Book, each identifiable by its cover. The second edition, a 40-page work, had a green cover, despite its name. The introduction gave advice to the reader on “how to be wise” with suggestions such as “A man who wants to be a thoroughbred rounder these days has to carry a certain amount of hot air and be a wise guy, no matter how painful.” In 1906, the third edition appeared. Business in Storyville was thriving, and this edition was reprinted several times during the next two years. Including ads, it was 96 pages long, and Tom Anderson himself promoted three of his places of business: The Stag, the Arlington and the Arlington Annex. Struve wrote a preface to this directory that included these “words to the wise”: “To know a thing or two, and know it direct, go through this little book and read it carefully, and then when you go on a ‘lark’ you’ll know ‘who is who’ and the best place to spend your time and money. Read all the ‘Ads,’ as all the best houses are advertised and are known as the ‘Cream of Society.’”

Some of the women who had detailed ads included “Miss Josie Arlington,” “Countess Willie V. Piazza” and “Mme. Lulu White.” When the fourth edition first appeared in 1908, it was 100 pages long. The edition contained the motto of the prestigious Order of the Garter in England: Honi Soit qui Mal y Pense, which means “evil to him who thinks evil of it.” This edition continued to explain why the Blue Book was necessary. It also explained the obvious: “It regulates the women so that they may live in one district to themselves instead of being scattered over the city.” This edition also contained the warning found in all previous editions: “This Book Must Not Be Mailed.” The fifth edition, which appeared in 1912, contained a massive 200 pages. This final

edition was last An advertisereprinted in 1915 ment in a Blue and listed 773 Book tells readers women — white, about the pricey “colored” and “ocrenovation of toroon,” as well Josie Arlington’s ‘sporting palace’ as cabaret enterin Storyville. t ainer s. S ome establishments promised that either Spanish or French was spoken, and many were so popular that an annex proved necessary. Every edition of the Blue Book was printed by the thousands, even tens of thousands, and bartenders distributed them to special customers for free. All others could get a copy for 25 cents from newsboys who occupied every corner of Storyville.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < QUOTES OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “Hello, this is Joel DiGrado, Sen. [David] Vitter’s Com<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < munications > > > > > > > > >Director. > > > > > > The > > > senator > > > > > >is> >on > >his > > way > > > >to> >a lunch >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> with the [Louisiana] delegation, but I wanted to let you < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < know that in the spirit of this week, Sen. Vitter announced

scuttle Butt

that his ‘dates’ to today’s delegation lunch would be Mary Landrieu and Cedric Richmond. I trust the press will applaud this for weeks since this is bipartisan and bicameral. Also, Sen. Landrieu and Rep. Richmond are from New Orleans, and Sen. Vitter is from Metairie. Some others in the delegation thought that’s the same area, but Sen. Vitter explained it’s actually opposite ends of the universe. This just shows what can happen when we’re united by higher common goals ... like not getting caught in between Reps. (Charles) Boustany and (Jeff) Landry when the food fight over redistricting erupts.” — DiGrado, posting on Vitter’s Facebook page Jan. 26. “You’ve managed to aggravate the White House and the president who appointed you, the environmental community and industry. So there is some hope that this report has found some sort of balance.” — Sen. Mary Landrieu to former Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William Reilly and former Sen. Bob Graham, chairs of President Barack Obama’s bipartisan National Oil Spill Commission. Reilly and Graham appeared in front of both chambers of Congress Jan. 26. Their report suggested the creation of a new independent agency under the aegis of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The new agency would be in charge of offshore drilling safety. Landrieu called that “a step in the right direction.”

Indie Cajun STEVE RILEY AND THE MAMOU PLAYBOYS’ NEW ALBUM GRAND ISLE HAS A LAMENT ABOUT THE BP OIL DISASTER, A SONG WRITTEN BY NEW ORLEANS UNDERGROUND MUSICIAN QUINTRON AND WAS PRODUCED BY SWAMP ROCKER C.C. ADCOCK. BY DEGE LEGG

’m pretty sure we work harder than other Cajun bands making records,” Steve Riley says. “After putting out so many records, we don’t put out a record unless we have something to say.” Cajun music — so firmly rooted in the past — has a strange and often difficult relationship with artistic evolution. On Feb. 22, Riley and his band, the Mamou Playboys, will release Grand Isle, their first record in five years. By doing so, they add to a growing trend in Cajun and zydeco music to push the musical envelope,

I

PHOTO BY ALLISON BOHL

GOP CONFERENCE RETURNING TO N.O.

Last April’s Southern Republican Leadership Conference (SRLC) in New Orleans was such a success that organizers are planning a sequel — of sorts. The Republican Leadership Conference (RLC) will be held June 16-18 at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside. (There’s no “Southern” in the title this time; PAGE 13

as evidenced by recent releases from Feufollet, Horace Trahan and BeauSoleil. Grand Isle is a genre-busting collection of songs, a pensive meditation on Louisiana and a mid-career, high-water mark for a band pushing toward its third decade on active-duty status in Cajun music. “I was about 7 years old when I learned my first song on the accordion,” Riley says. “I grew up hearing Marc Savoy, Dennis McGee and others at my grandparents’ house. All my life I’ve been around music and loved it just as long.” At 18, Riley formed the Mamou Playboys with fiddler David Greely. They soon began playing festivals, touring the U.S., Europe, Australia and Japan. Eleven albums and 22 years on down the line, they are still

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PAGE 11

BoUQuets Mignon Faget

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raised more than $67,800 for the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL) from sales of the famed jeweler’s Gulf Coast collection, which launched in May 2010 in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon explosion. The line features glassware and wildlife-inspired jewelry and designs. Since 1988, CRCL has advocated protecting the state’s wetlands and helped raise funds for coastal restoration projects.

Crescent City Lights Youth Theater

earned two awards at the National Junior Theater Festival in Atlanta last month. Students enrolled in the program earned awards for Outstanding Achievement in Music and Best Actor in a Leading Role for their production of Captain Louie. The event also marked the program’s first national performance. The festival featured more than 2,000 students, teachers and theater professionals from 52 schools in the U.S. and Canada.

Warren J. Green,

served as president of the Jugs Social Club/ Krewe of NOMTOC for 28 years until his untimely death on Jan. 23 at the Jugs clubhouse. Green was a retired Orleans Parish public school teacher and assistant principal. Under his leadership, Jugs/NOMTOC started its tradition of allowing two academic student leaders from each school whose band marches in the krewe’s annual parade to ride in the procession as guests of the krewe. Green will be sadly missed by family, friends and krewe members.

Randolph Scott,

president of the SUNO Alumni Association, appeared at a Jan. 26 rally to oppose a merger of the school with UNO, a proposition Gov. Bobby Jindal asked the state Board of Regents to study and report on. Responding to SUNO’s notoriously low graduation rate, Scott said, “Southern University was not developed to graduate people. … We don’t have to graduate anybody.” Not the best way to advocate for your alma mater’s survival.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

THIS ISN’T YOUR FATHER’S CAJUN MUSIC.

After the BP disaster, Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys decided to rename their album in progress Grand Isle. “After seeing several images of the water, coast and birds covered in oil, it stuck with us,” Riley says. “It’s simple and powerful.”

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going strong. The current lineup of the band includes Riley on accordion, fiddler Greely, guitarist Sam Broussard, bassist Sam Huval and drummer Kevin Dugas. For Grand Isle, the band — tired of the usual studio routine — turned to Lafayette musician and close friend C.C. Adcock, who produced two of their previous records (Bayou Ruler in 1998 and Happy Town in 2001). Adcock — who was hot off contributing songs and producing tracks for HBO’s True Blood soundtracks as well as producing Brit sensation Florence and the Machine — seemed the logical choice. “The band came to me, even though the two records I’d done with them got poo-poo’d by the press,” says Adcock. “I mean, I got hate mail for Bayou Ruler. But I think people are way more open now and realize the future is in pushing the envelope, not just caretaking the legacy of the past.”

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The cover of Grand Isle, with a painting of an oil-soaked bird by Allison Bohl. rocks like some kind of Lomax, indie pop. “Dance Without Understanding” has the pronounced vibe of an ’80s two-step with a Kajagoogoo haircut. Broussard’s “Pierre” — recorded entirely at home by Broussard — is steampunk meets euroDelta blues. “‘Pierre’ was improvisational songwriting: straight to hard drive, then edit,” Broussard says. “My usual method is late-’60s verse/chorus with hopefully a no-cliché zone — harmonically and especially lyrically. Vibe is big now, to suck people in. I try to do that with song, which is fading these days. Maybe I should fade with it.” “Sam recorded all that in his house, beating on file cabinets and weird shit,” Adcock says. “It didn’t have any music to it, just him and a beat. I said, ‘That’s going on the record just as it is. It’s great.’ Sam’s a genius.” Riley gives some of the best vocal performances of his career on songs like the sweet and celebratory “Lyons Point” and the Cajun-on-coconuts-inthe-Caribbean synth pop of “This is the Time for Change.” Riley says, “C.C. always pushes me hard vocally. And I need it. I want someone to push me in the studio. Pushing me to go for things — the delivery and singing with as much character as possible.” TOWARD THe enD OF ReCORDInG, In the wake of the BP oil disaster and, Greely wrote the song “Grand Isle.” The song was so good that the band ditched

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RILey AnD BAnD TOOK THeIR HAnDS off the wheel and let Adcock drive them through his Jack nietzsche-inspired, studio cheerleading and song-conjuring wizardry wherein the essence of each song is closely examined and divined by any number of traditional and nontraditional methods — depending on the situation — from sonic manipulation to alchemic tinkering to bacchanalian hoodoo summoning to the last desperate act of beating on walls in pure artistic frustration. “I just felt like something new had to be done,” Adcock recalls. “It’s a time in their careers and in Cajun music where they had to make a statement. It’d been five years since they made a record. I think things had become a little stale from constantly touring and just the monotony of what it’s like to be a working, touring band these days, which is harder and harder to do — there’s not a lot of people that can do it and still make a decent wage. People used to look to Steve and the band to be the frontrunners, and then a whole new crop of bands came up a few years ago that have breathed new life into the local scene. I felt it was the Playboys’ time to prove they’re still a vital, relevant band that can make good new music.” The lifeblood of any tradition is a combination of historical reverence and a willingness to progress into the future. For those saddled with the responsibility of care-taking a tradition, that’s a daunting task to accomplish, especially within the tourist-versus-purist confines of Cajun music. “It’s got to start with songs,” Adcock says. “It can’t just be about studio tricks, styles, special guests or being modern or retro. Being modern is just as suspect as being retro. It’s just a gimmick. The band needed some new inspiration, and that can only come from songs.

A lick is not good enough. An idea is not good enough. A style is not good enough. There is not even much need to record old, obscure Cajun covers anymore. It’s all been well-documented now and is really accessible. That ain’t a card to play any more. you got to write your own tunes and come up with new stuff, because everyone knows the old songs.” Recording at several different studios over the course of three years — in between touring — the slow pace gave the songs space to thaw, evolve and develop. “We’d written and collected a lot of songs, so we took our time, but it was a lot of work,” Riley says. “And it was the first time that I’ve completely put a record in the hands of someone else.” “Steve, David and I had wanted a different slant on things for a while, but we weren’t all on the same page about it,” says Broussard, who plays guitar and sings on the record. “Steve’s naturally adventurous, David is very organic and I have a studio where I’m kind of like an eighth-grader with an atom collider under the house — music can get hurt that way. We’ve been successful producing ourselves in the past, but when a band gets to a vision crossroads, it’s often best to call in someone from the outside. C.C. brought a sharpened aesthetic that’s part vision and part seat-of-the-pants improv, plus he’s from down here and has done his homework. The result is an album where no two songs sound the same, which is what Adcock wanted. The design is like a south Louisiana vinyl listening party; no two records ever sound the same no matter how drunk you get.” Adcock pushed the band to experiment with drum loops — a staple present in much of modern pop — to expand its musical palette. Some examples of such nonCajun-like music techniques included playing a waltz to a drum machine, using a sample of submarine sonar as part of the rhythm track, and collaborating with new Orleans protofuturist Mr. Quintron on “Chatterbox,” a song written by Quintron about going to an eatery after the funeral of Circle Bar owner Kelly Keller. Grand Isle contains many highlights. The above mentioned “Chatterbox”

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page 11

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an early working title for the album and went with the name of the coastal town that has come to symbolize so many of the ups and downs of Louisiana. “I used to camp out at Grand Isle, romping in the surf, daydreaming about becoming a marine biologist, watching dolphins coming up for air from the old Caminada Bridge,” Greely says. “It was a funky paradise without any Dairy Queens or McDonald’s. I was sad beyond measure when they fouled it up. I kept thinking: ‘Why can’t we have nice things?’” The deal was further sealed after seeing Allison Bohl’s proposed cover art of an oil-covered bird. “Instead of calling the record ‘C’est L’heure Pour Changer,’ which is long, we decided to call it something English and to the point, so people will get it right off the bat,” Riley says. “After seeing several images of the water, coast and birds covered in oil, it stuck with us. It’s simple and powerful.” The intensive sessions, guided by Adcock’s unorthodox orthodoxy yielded some of the most distinctive tunes of the band’s career. “Around here bands think they should just play live and put a mic in front of it or else they’re being fake,” Adcock says. “Cajun music is very much an ’80s music. It came to prominence in the ’80s and crossed over into a pop consciousness where teenagers were listening to it and it wasn’t just an old man’s music anymore. I wanted to address that in this record.” Like recent albums by other eminent Cajun/zydeco artists, it’s likely Grand Isle will be nominated for a Grammy Award. The songs, the timing, the collective effort and the historical stature and robust discography of Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys are very much in evidence on this album even when they are attempting to deconstruct and/or evade the legacy of their past. “Since the arrival of the zydeco/ Cajun Grammy category, there’s been a lot of unofficial live releases nominated — like these guys that record [at] Jazz Fest and get it nominated — stuff that lowers the bar of what we’re about, just floods the market and attempts to get some Grammy attention. It’s foolish,” Adcock says. “There’s really no reason not to make great records. But lately you can start to slowly see the bar being raised with local bands putting out great records. Feufollet, Lost Bayou Ramblers, BeauSoleil and others — they’re showing the best of what Louisiana musicians have to offer.”


scuttlebutt

Neglected eNviroNmeNt

In his State of the Union address last week, President Barack Obama pledged to cut Big Oil subsidies and to invest in clean energy. But the Gulf Coast and the BP oil disaster — which he called the worst environmental disaster in the U.S. just last summer — weren’t brought up (see “State of the Coast,” p. 7). Environmentalists we contacted said they expected at least a mention of the Gulf Coast. National Resource Defense Council executive director Peter Lehner said in a pre-address statement, “No review of 2010 can overlook one of the worst environmental disasters of our time. … This was a national wake-up call to break our costly and dangerous dependence on oil and move faster toward cleaner, safer, more sustainable sources of energy.” In response to Obama’s address, Gulf Restoration Network campaign director Aaron Viles wrote a blog entry asking, “How does the worst oil spill in U.S. history, which occurred just (nine) months ago, fail to secure a mention?” “What’s going on down here clearly

doesn’t mesh with presenting a shiny vision of the future,” Viles told Gambit. “The oil is still here in these communities still being affected. … I realize you can’t touch on everything, but due to the unprecedented nature of the disaster, it does seem odd it wasn’t mentioned.” Heather Emmert, Gulf States field organizer for Environment America, says Obama should have addressed the disaster. “It’s a shame he didn’t specifically bring it up,” she said, adding that instead Obama showed the country “a sign that it’s over.” “This issue (is) unfortunately in the nation’s rear-view mirror ... and the president could have focused on that need for an ongoing federal commitment to the restoration of this ecosystem and these communities,” Viles said. “It was an unfortunate opportunity that was missed.” — Alex Woodward

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according to the invitation, organizers say, adding, “We’re inviting the nation.”) Last year’s SRLC featured speeches by Louisiana pols including Gov. Bobby Jindal, Sen. David Vitter (who received a standing ovation), Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao and Rep. Steve Scalise. Among the other big names who attended in 2010 and are invited back this year: former Alaska Gov.-turned-reality-TV-star Sarah Palin, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and others. C-SPAN devoted many hours to live coverage of the speeches from the Hilton ballroom, and Fox News personality Sean Hannity broadcast his show from the hotel’s lobby. If you want to know who’s gained stroke in the GOP during the last year, the list of new invitees should provide a clue: Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky. If you want to know who’s not quite so hot with the RLC — the name of former President George W. Bush appears nowhere on the event website. This year’s guest list and agenda have not been finalized and released, and RLC representatives did not return calls before press time. Last year’s SRLC drew 3,500 people for four days of speeches and networking (this year it’s three days), capped with a straw poll for attendees’ preferred 2012 GOP presidential candidate. Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Rep. Ron Paul came in first with a virtual tie. Tied for second: Gingrich and Palin. — Kevin Allman

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clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Redistricting Free—For—All he special legislative session to draw new district boundaries for state lawmakers, judges, congressmen and others won’t convene until March 20, but the session already is shaping up as a political free-for-all. Louisiana will receive final precinct-level numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau this week. Those numbers will form the basis for all redistricting efforts — and any challenges to those efforts. Even before the official numbers arrive, concerns run high among members of the Legislative Black Caucus. “Our main concern is trying to keep the numbers in the House and Senate that we have now,” says state Sen. Ed Murray of New Orleans. “It is anticipated that the official numbers will show New Orleans losing substantial numbers of black residents, but statewide, blacks increased from 29 percent of the overall population to about 31 percent.” While such numbers seem encouraging, New Orleans could lose at least three House seats and one or more Senate seats — all in majority-black areas — because of local population decreases after Hurricane Katrina. And since Katrina, several majority-

T

black House districts in New Orleans elected white representatives. At least two local House members — Reps. Juan LaFonta and Walker Hines — say they won’t seek re-election, which means their districts are likely to be chopped up in the redistricting process. Congressman Cedric Richmond’s old District 101 seat in eastern New Orleans also could disappear. That district was hit hard by Katrina. On the Senate side, the most interesting local intrigue will be an attempt by new state Sen. Cynthia Willard-Lewis to draw herself a district that does not include neighboring Sen. J.P. Morrell. Both their districts saw significant population losses after Katrina, and neither is looking forward to facing the other in the fall elections. Meanwhile, other parts of the state will see increases in legislative strength. A key objective of the Black Caucus will be creating new black-majority districts to offset those lost in New Orleans. “There may be pockets where we can draw black districts fairly easily, such as in the River Parishes, but there may be others where the districts may not be so easy to draw,” says

Murray, a 19-year legislative veteran. In addition to battles over new legislative districts, the special session could see huge fights over new congressional boundaries. Louisiana will lose one seat in Congress, dropping from seven to six. The only Louisiana congressman who appears safe right now is Richmond. With blacks comprising almost a third of the state’s residents, and with federal law requir-

A key objective of the Black Caucus will be creating new blackmajority districts to offset those lost in New Orleans.

ing U.S. Justice Department “pre-clearance” of new districting plans, Richmond (the only black member of the state’s delegation) is assured of a safe district. Elsewhere in Louisiana, however, two white GOP congressmen will wind up in the same district. Which two? Ah, there’s the rub. Add to that an expected push from the Black Caucus to create a second blackmajority congressional district and you’ve got a recipe for war. “We represent a third of the state,” says Murray. “We think we should have a third of the congressional districts.” Lawmakers have given themselves three weeks to draw new district lines. Their decisions will have political repercussions for the next decade. Murray, former state Rep. Peppi Bruneau and state Rep. Jared Brossett of Gentilly will discuss the redistricting process at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the monthly meeting of the Alliance for Good Government at Loyola Law School, 526 Pine St. During his tenure in the House, Bruneau played a key role in redistricting efforts. Murray and Brossett currently serve on the Senate and House committees that will consider redistricting plans.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011


Dawlin’ HAWTS

from frontatown to backatown, here’s a roundup of standout valentine’s day gifts. BY M ISSY W I LK I NSON

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For sheer seduction factor, nothing beats a black patent leather pump. A platform makes this version equal parts comfy and kittenish, $96 at Gae-Tana’s (7732 Maple St., 865-9625; www.gae-tanas.com).

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Fiber-rich, vitamin-laden strawberries wrapped in decadent chocolate strike a tasty balance between naughty and nice, $1.25 each at Lolli’s Chocolates (1827 Hickory Ave., Suite 1, 739-9020; 4838 Magazine St., 8994567; www.lollischocolates.com). PAGE 18

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

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A cubic zirconia briolette stone emits an almost menacing bloodred sparkle as it dangles from a 16-inch, yellow gold chain, $90 at Symmetry Jewelers (8138 Hampson St., 861-9925; www.symmetry-jewelers.com).

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Wear your heart fashionably on your sleeve with this red satin clutch purse, $43 at Trashy Diva (829 Chartres St., 581-4555; 2048 Magazine St., 2998777; www.trashydiva.com).

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A set of gold vermeil, yellow gold vermeil and sterling silver bangle bracelets displays Marion Cage’s signature abstract interpretations of organic materials. These bracelets were inspired by vertebrae — $350 for a set of three at Marion Cage (3719 Magazine St., 8918848; www.marioncage.com).

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

FOR THE ONE YOU LOVE

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Dubbed “the love stone” for its pink color and purported metaphysical properties, rose quartz is a shoo-in for Valentine’s Day and the star of this sterling silver and Keishi pearl coral heart necklace, $305 at Mignon Faget (The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 524-2973; Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8352244; 3801 Magazine St., 891-2005; www.mignonfaget.com).

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The romantic curlicues and flourishes on this sterling silver bracelet are reminiscent of those on old cast-iron balconies, $129 at Aucoin Hart Jewelers (1525 Metairie Road, Metairie, 834-9999; www.aucoinhart.com).

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Treat yourself and your valentine to spa pampering: Now through Valentine’s Day, receive a $20 bonus gift card when you buy a $100 gift card at the Aveda Institute (1335 Polders Lane, Covington, 985-892-3826; 3330 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 4541400; www.avedainstitutes.com). PAGE 20

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

Pedal Your Way to Her Heart

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

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Help your biker babe fend off road rash — or your nine-to-fiver ward off chilly air-conditioning blasts — with this rhinestone-embellished graphic hoodie by Harley Davidson, $65 at New Orleans Harley Davidson (6015 Airline Drive, Metairie, 736-9600; www.neworleansh-d.com). A substantial book collection is sexy. Round out yours — or make a romantic overture to a scholarly friend — with Furnishing Louisiana: Creole and Acadian Furniture, 1735–1835, a collection of essays and more than 1,200 color images of indigenous furniture, $95 at The Shop at The Historic New Orleans Collection (533 Royal St., 598-7147; www.hnoc.org).

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On THe HILL, LAnDRIeU AnD COnGReSSMAn CeDRIC RICHMOnD — BOTH OF new Orleans, where Democrats can still win handily — are the lone Democratic voices for Louisiana. In the state Legislature, Republicans recently wrested control of the House for the first time since Reconstruction. Democrats still control the state Senate, but the fall elections could change that, too. For now, the juiciest intrigue is on the state level. “The rumors are getting hot and heavy that Caldwell is getting ready to switch parties,” says one longtime Democratic operative. “Then again, there has also been talk about Caldwell running for governor if no one qualifies against Jindal. He’s paranoid right now that there’s someone out there, some opposition. Caldwell is perfectly representative of what Democrats are going through right now.” Adding fuel to the speculation is the lawsuit Caldwell filed on Jindal’s behalf page 25

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

By Jeremy alford

et’s begin with a tale of two Buddys: Louisiana Democratic Party Chairman Buddy Leach and state Attorney General Buddy Caldwell. Both are white, Southern Democrats with piney-woods accents. Yet, they couldn’t be more different. Leach is an unapologetic liberal, the last of the red-hot populists. He oversees the party’s operations and is one of its most generous — and prolific — donors. Caldwell is trending conservative (he joined a slew of Republican attorneys general in suing to overturn Obamacare) and enjoys a budding alliance with GOP Gov. Bobby Jindal. He’s also the only statewide Democratic official in the Capitol. There’s also something about Mary — as in Mary Landrieu, Louisiana’s senior U.S. senator. She makes up the final part of the Bayou State’s Democratic troika; she fits right in between Leach and Caldwell as a carefully crafted centrist. “I think those three people represent what’s left of the Democratic Party here,” says political consultant Roy Fletcher, whose lance is for hire by all comers, D’s and R’s alike. “They represent the different components of the old coalition. But that has broken down. And since none of them speak the same vernacular, the Democratic Party is trying [to redefine] itself. What do they say? How do they say it? They are their own main challenge.” It’s not as if this dilemma snuck up on the Dems. Watching the Donkey Party lose control in Louisiana has been like watching a cheetah stalk and take down a gazelle. In slow motion. In high-definition. It was only a matter of time.

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for governor is different. It’s a higher profile. Can Louisiana stand to have him as governor and Mary Landrieu as a U.S. senator simultaneously? That’s a tough sale.” That’s another reason why there has never been a worse time — in recent history, at least — to be a Democrat in Louisiana. WHEN STATE DEMOCRATIC LAWMAKers convened a meeting prior to Christmas to brainstorm ways to get the party out of the muck, they gathered as the guest of party chair Leach at an unlikely place. They huddled at Grosse Savanne Waterfowl and Wildlife Lodge in Cameron Parish, which is owned by Leach. It’s an impressive spread, plush even by private hunting club standards, located on 5,000 acres of marsh brimming with 40 duck blinds. It was the site of a fundraiser for Jindal shortly before Leach became chairman of the Louisiana Democratic Party in January 2010. Leach, for whatever it’s worth, also contributed $1,000 to Vitter in 2005. Leach told reporters last year he was merely thanking Vitter for his support of Fort Polk. The lodge was an appropriately odd setting for these strange times. Some lawmakers moaned about the wheels falling off, while others questioned whether their Republican counterparts had the winning message after all. State Rep. Reed Henderson of Chalmette, a firebrand even in the best of times, says many different topics were discussed, but the gathering also PAGE 27

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

last year challenging President Barack Obama’s Democratic-backed health care law. When contacted by Gambit about the possibility of switching parties, Caldwell offered “no comment.” Kevin Franck, communications director for the Louisiana Democratic Party, said, “In his heart, Buddy Caldwell is a Democrat, and whichever way the political winds blow, he’ll always be a Democrat.” “Things are dicey right now,” the operative adds. “What happens if Caldwell does switch and Mary (Landrieu) decides not to run for re-election? Where are we at then? There will be no strong elected (statewide) personality. It’s all dying on the vine.” Sen. Landrieu says she’s enjoying her time on the Hill and her possible exit has been greatly exaggerated. “I have served happily for 14 years and intend to serve another term or two, should that be the people’s wish,” she says. “I am very comfortable with my centrist record of accomplishment and look forward to continuing to serve Louisiana and working on issues important to the state, like our coastal recovery, championing small businesses and advocating for education reform.” State Sen. John Alario of Westwego and Natural Resources Secretary Scott Angelle recently switched from Democrat to Republican. Former Congressman Charlie Melancon, a Democrat, was put to rout by the otherwise tainted Republican David Vitter of Metairie in November, and former Gov. Kathleen Blanco is staying on the sidelines. The only A-lister left seems to be New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who is still in his first year as mayor. “Of course he can run statewide,” says Joshua Stockley, political science professor at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. “He was recently lieutenant governor, and we know he has a record of winning statewide. But does he really want to do that? However, running

Former Gov. Kathleen Blanco (center), once the state’s most powerful Democrat, is staying on the sidelines — at least for now. U.S. Sen. David Vitter soundly won re-election as a Republican, and Democratic U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu is stressing her bipartisanship more than ever.

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C VER STORY PAGE 25

There are rumors that Louisiana Attorney General Buddy Caldwell, the only statewide Democrat in the capitol, could run for governor — or that he may defect to the Republican Party. saw some raw emotions in the wake of the disastrous fall elections. There, as in recent elections, the party’s greatest historical strength — its diversity — served as a temporary hindrance. It’s only temporary, Henderson insists. Republicans probably thought they had a mandate under President George W. Bush — until Barack Obama swept into office. Politics is cyclical. Still, Democrats are finding it difficult to brand themselves. “Organizing Democrats is like trying to herd cats. We don’t stand for anything,” Henderson says. “The problem is this wide spectrum of issues and you can’t concentrate a beam on any one thing. I think the voters know what they want. The parties don’t. The people who are really controlling the votes are the conservative middle. This country is middle-

to-right, and so is Louisiana. I think we, as Democrats, need to make some changes. Because I was born a Democrat and I plan to die a Democrat. That’s just the way it is.” Oddly enough, one “tangible” idea to come from the Grosse Savanne meeting was a call for fresh faces — including those of some lawmakers — to run for positions on the Democratic State Central Committee. The committee runs the state party machinery, such as it is, and it also serves as Leach’s boss. “I’ll probably not only run for state representative, but also for the state central committee,” Henderson says. As for the current party administration, Henderson adds, “I don’t see any leadership there now.” The tricky part, according to another lawmaker, will be finding a way to appeal to white voters without isolating the African-American base that has historically stood with Democrats. In recent years, the party’s treatment of African-American candidates has drawn strong criticism. Former state Sen. Don Cravins Jr. of Opelousas and current Sen. Lydia Jackson of Shreveport — both of whom are black — threatened to run for Congress as nonparty candidates in 2010. Two years earlier, Rep. Michael Jackson of Baton Rouge did just that — and helped unseat then-new Democratic Congressman Don Cazayoux of New Roads. Cazayoux is now the U.S. attorney

in Baton Rouge, a position to which he was appointed by Obama. “This isn’t going to be an easy fix, and I haven’t heard a good idea on how to do it from anyone,” says the same lawmaker, who spoke under the condition of anonymity. “It’s going to take a lot of leadership. Good leadership. And a lot of people concerned are looking to Cedric [Richmond] to be that leader.” Richmond, a former member of the state House, reclaimed the New Orleans-based congressional district for Democrats last year — with Obama’s help. He ousted former Republican Congressman Anh “Joseph” Cao. Richmond is now seen as a rising star — and a potential powerbroker — in the Louisiana Democratic Party and in the African-American community. Meanwhile, in the state House, a passel of lawmakers has made the big switch, including Reps. Noble Ellington of Winnsboro, Simone Champagne of Jeanerette, Walker Hines of New Orleans and Fred Mills of Parks, who was promoted to the state Senate on Jan. 19. The surge in GOP legislative strength, however, may eventually give the GOP the same headaches that diversity has given Dems. Clearly, not all recent Republican converts are like-minded. Alario and Ellington, for instance, were old guard Democratic lawmakers frequently associated with the politics of former Gov. Edwin Edwards, whom Republican stalwarts view as the PAGE 29

T

hings haven’t always been so dismal for Louisiana Democrats. Party optimists say their current misfortunes won’t last forever, either. Politics change with the tide, constantly rising and falling. A look at the personalities who have kept the Democratic philosophy alive in Louisiana over the past 80 or so years proves that point. Back in his heyday, Gov. Huey Long didn’t confine himself to state politics. At the 1932 Democratic National Convention, he spoke in favor of nominating New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt for president and brokered the votes of sev-

who recently hired Edwards to work at his law firm when the ex-governor was released from federal prison after doing time for shaking down potential casino license holders. The Associated Press reported that Edwards will serve as a private business consultant and quoted Leach as saying Edwards “will have no role in the Louisiana Democratic Party.” Pondering the future of the Louisiana Democratic Party brings to mind Caroline Fayard of New Orleans. Though she lost the lieutenant governor’s contest by 14 points to Republican Jay Dardenne last year, the Democratic newcomer received 64,210 more votes than Congressman Charlie Melancon, a Democrat from Napoleonville who shelled out $4 million in his bid for the U.S. Senate against incumbent Sen. David Vitter. Fayard made an impressive statewide debut at age 32. Ravi Sangisetty, a 36-year-old Houma attorney who lost the 3rd Congressional District race, likewise distinguished himself in his debut. As the party searches for future leaders, the legislative roster in New Orleans offers a large palette. Reps. Neil Abramson and Walt Leger III have shown great potential, observers say. Also, Rep. John Bel Edwards of Amite is said to be making early, yet noticeable waves as chairman of the Legislature’s Democratic Caucus. In the Senate, the same can be said of Sens. J.P. Morrell and Karen Carter Peterson, the latter of whom is said to have good White House connections. Both senators are youthful Democrats who appear well-positioned to craft the party’s future image. — Jeremy Alford

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

DEMOCRATS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

eral state delegations. In a touch of political foreshadowing, Long became disillusioned with FDR and appeared to be on his way to mounting a third party effort when he was assassinated in 1935. When four-time Gov. Edwin Edwards was at the height of his power in the 1970s and ’80s, he more or less was the Louisiana Democratic Party. It During his fourwasn’t until former U.S. term tenure as Sen. John Breaux, now a governor, Edwin lobbyist, rose to power Edwards was the Democratic Party and became involved in Louisiana. in party affairs — particularly in the 1990s PHOTO BY A.J. SISCO — that key personnel began staffing the party, raising substantial money and giving the party structure and purpose. Federal Judge James J. Brady became a driving force during this period as well, serving as the hands that partly molded the administrative side of the modern state party. Breaux also created the prototype for the white Southern Democrat — what became known as the Blue Dog Democrat (or, in Louisiana, the John Breaux Democrat). During the tenures of both Edwards and Breaux (who got his political start as EWE’s driver), former state Sen. Cleo Fields of Baton Rouge emerged as the premier statewide black power broker. Fields garnered quite a reputation in the late 1990s for getting voters to the polls by any means possible, from chartered buses to Mardi Gras floats. Today, the Democratic Party chairman is former Congressman Buddy Leach, a wealthy businessman

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LEACH, AN EXCITABLE FELLOW EVEN AT 76 years old, was reportedly put into the chairmanship because he can cut a check, which is something he reportedly has done many times for the party in recent years. Although in years past he has contributed to Republicans as well, Leach is on Team Donkey and he contends he has a plan.

“We have several potentials for next year’s statewide elections and, remember, Democrats did very well on the local level last year. We have the mayors of New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Shreveport and Monroe. That’s not bad,” Leach says. “And I think recruitment results from what we’re embarking on now, educating people and letting them know that Louisiana Democrats are about working people, middle-income families. I think from that, we’ll recruit men and women who hold these beliefs.” Leach says his office is also overseeing seminars to help Democrats run for office, and he has staffers looking into the recent voter purges on the state level in hopes of getting folks re-registered. As for his own party position, Leach says he plans to finish his current term as chairman and isn’t going anywhere. Through no fault of his own, Leach inherited a train wreck. He took over from Chris Whittington, a former chairman who was elected to a four-year term in 2008 despite opposition from Melancon and the Landrieu siblings. State central committee members interviewed for this story say the incident proved there was no longer a central power base. In years past, the party’s Washington contingent — including former Sen. John Breaux — wielded considerable influence over the party’s central committee. That no longer is the case. In fact, the party’s fortunes declined rapidly after Whittington came to power in 2005 — at the hands of nowdisgraced former Agriculture Commissioner Bob Odom and former Baton Rouge state Sen. Cleo Fields. By all accounts, Whittington would not have survived in the days of party control by the D.C. crowd. These days, the wheels of the machine appear to have come off completely. One former DSCC member says it has been a “cult of personalities,” a story that can be traced through turnover. The party burns through execu-

tive directors — most famously Britton Loftin, who resigned in 2009 amid a sexual harassment lawsuit. Since 2008, there have been four communications directors. Bob Mann, who served as press secretary to Breaux and later to Gov. Kathleen Blanco and now chairs the Manship School of Mass Communications at LSU, says there needs to be a distinction,

a strong candidate. When we don’t have a strong candidate for Democrats to get behind, the party is what it is now.” Whatever the party’s problem area, change is needed — and soon. Louisiana was once a one-party state with Democrats firmly in control. There was a brief period of party parity, but now things are all going the GOP’s way. Henderson, among others, stops short

“ORGANIZING DEMOCRATS IS LIKE TRYING TO HERD CATS.

WE DON’T STAND FOR ANYTHING.

... I THINK WE, AS DEMOCRATS, NEED TO MAKE SOME CHANGES. BECAUSE I WAS BORN A DEMOCRAT AND I PLAN TO DIE A DEMOCRAT. THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” — STATE REP. REED HENDERSON

especially during a building year like this, between the Louisiana Democratic Party and Louisiana Democrats. “People need to ask what Louisiana Democrats can do to get out of this funk, because the party itself is not in a funk,” Mann says. “It’s probably better funded than ever before. It has the most professional staff it has seen in five or six years. Being able to get elected statewide has less to do with the Louisiana Democratic Party and more with having

of proclaiming the political sky is falling. In fact, he insists there is no crisis; it’s just a downside of the political cycle. “A lot of people were distraught over the fact that we got creamed,” Henderson says. “But you know what? The Republicans got creamed two years ago and they came back. We can come back, too. It may just take a little while.” Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.

U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu is the last strong Louisiana Democrat in Washington and once held sway over the state party’s central committee. PHOTO BY A.J. SISCO

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

essence of what’s been wrong with Louisiana for decades. “A lot of these new Republicans aren’t going to fit into the hard right,” says Fletcher, a veteran of the presidential and gubernatorial campaign circuits. “They all tend to be more moderate conservatives, not ideological conservatives.” Robert Kirby Goidel, director of LSU’s Public Policy Research Lab, says recent developments and trends put the Louisiana Democratic Party in an uncomfortable position. The Republican converts aren’t likely to come back, he says, nor will independents (who tilted strongly toward the GOP in the recent elections). And no one expects any Republicans to switch to the Democratic Party any time soon. “That means Democrats need to figure out how to recruit better. They need a farm team,” Goidel says, referring to the minor league teams owned by major league franchises, usually as a training grounds for the big time. “If you’re a moderate right now, you’re looking at the electoral landscape and realizing that it’s better to run as a Republican than as a Democrat. So, it’s better for Democrats to focus on the long view right now rather than the short view. There’s no magical candidate out there that’s going to make all of this better.”

Cedric Richmond, who captured a Republican-held seat in Congress in 2010, was the one bright spot in a disastrous election for Louisiana Democrats.

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Need for Speed ormer Louisiana Tech University offensive lineman Preston Washington opened Velocity Sports (4115 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-5000; www.velocitysp.com) in October 2009 to offset a lack of resources for local athletes. “New Orleans produces a lot of athletes, and there was no training facility in the city,” he says. Now Washington’s coaches train athletes as young as 8 years old and work with Little League, school sports teams and individuals who just want to get fit. “We have trained a kid or adult for almost every sport,” Washington says. “We even have ice hockey training.” The 17,000-square-foot gym features cardio and circuit training equipment, free weights and a separate training area where adults meet for boot-camp style workouts. It includes a 60-yard track and 22 yards of indoor turf. Owner Preston Washington says working with athletes is the most Every personal trainer — or coach, in Velocity Sports’ parlance — holds a degree rewarding part of his job. in kinesiology or exercise science and is certified by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association. “Our slogan is ‘Train like a pro,’” Washington says. “You are training the same way a pro athlete trains.” Even people whose aspirations are more cosmetic than athletic can benefit from training at Velocity Sports. “Some people just want to be in the best possible shape they can be in,” Washington says. “People get bored with treadmills, and they get interested in other kinds of training. I think, as a whole, the fitness world has evolved.” Founded in 1999 by Loren Seagrave, a former head women’s track and field coach at LSU, the Velocity Sports franchise is built around the premise that speed can be taught. “For many years, people were under the assumption that you were born with speed,” Washington says. “Research shows you can actually create speed with training. Some of his clients have completed a 40-yard dash 5 to 6 percent faster over a 12-week training period, proving that speed and athleticism improves for those who are willing to work hard. “There are opportunities to learn better running mechanics to create a faster individual,” he says. “Practice makes perfect.”

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SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET is a Lower 9th ward market held every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 5500 St. Claude Ave. Fresh, local produce from urban farmers, seafood and baked goods are for sale at the rain-or-shine farmers market. Visit www.sankofafarmersmarket.org or call 8754268 for more information. LOLA BOUTIQUE (622 S. Carrollton Ave., 3019410; www.facebook.com/lolaboutiqueofneworleans) celebrates its grand opening from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3. Attendees will receive cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and 25 percent off any purchase. BRIDGE HOUSE holds its second annual RECYCLED FASHION SHOW 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4 at the HOWLIN’ WOLF (907 S. Peters St., 5229653; www.howlin-wolf.com). Local designers transform thrifted garments into one-of-a-kind designs, which will be auctioned at the event. Tickets are $25 general admission, $35 for VIP seating and may be purchased at www.bridgehouse.org or www.howlin-wolf.com. Contact Anne Springer at 821-7134 or aspringer@bridgehouse.org for more information. The YA/YA STUDIO (338 Baronne St., 529-3306; www.yayainc.com) hosts a Mardi Gras ladder workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 5. Supplies, instruction and everything else you need to make your own parade route ladder is included in the $200 fee. For more information, contact Madania Graves at 343-6230 or madania@yayainc.com.

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TREY TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT PREMIERES NEW WORK

EVENTS • PAGE 33 TRIBUTE TO THE CLASSICAL ARTS MUSIC • PAGE 35 NOISICIAN COALITION ART • PAGE 43 VISIONS OF THE EVERYDAY

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SUNDAY

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

FEBRUARY2011 1

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FRIDAY

THURSDAY

NEW ORLEANS PREMIER JAZZ VENUE NO COVER • 7 NIGHTS A WEEK 8PM MON - SAT • 7PM SUNDAYS

5

3

4

10

11

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S

NOJO JAM

PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF

6

KHRIS ROYAL

7

8

“CANNONBALL” ADDERLEY 8pm

9

BILL SUMMERS

12

NOJO JAM

PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF BEN

13

ED “Sweetbread” WEBSTER8pm PETERSEN

14

16

15

DON VAPPIE

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IRVIN MAYFIELD’S

NOJO JAM

CELEBRATE VALENTINE’S

DAY

20 TYLER’S 21 REVISITED FEATURING

GERMAINE

BOB

DUKE ELLINGTON ED “Sweetbread” 8pm

PETERSEN

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23

SHAMARR

ALLEN 8pm 24

19

18

LEON “KID

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8pm

KINFOLK

BRASS BAND

Burlesque Ballroom starring

TRiXiE MiNX featuring

Linnzi Zaorski

CHOCOLATE”

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FEBRUARY 5, 12, 19, 26

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EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

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FRENCH

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AND THE

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PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF

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Play HOUR

PRESENTS THE MUSIC OF

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1/27/11 9:39 AM

SATURDAY

irvinmayfield.com

For schedule updates follow us on:

IMJazzPlayhouse

Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays 5pm-8pm WED. FEBRUARY 2, 9, 16, 23 SASHA MASAKOWSKI THURS. FEBRUARY 3, 10, 17, 24 ROMAN SKAKUN

PROFESSOR PIANO SERIES EVERY FRIDAY FEBRUARY 4 - DAVE REIS FEBRUARY 11, 25 - JOE KROWN FEBRUARY 18 - TOM WORRELL


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 35 39 41 45 46 51 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < FEB BRAD WALKER AND SIMON LOTT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

DUO WITH WATIV

Trey McIntyre Project 8 P.M. FRIDAY MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER, 1419 BASIN ST., 287-0351 OR 522-0996; WWW.NOBADANCE.COM TICKETS $20-$125

CAT’S-PAW

Dance Hall

The Trey McIntyre Project and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band premiered Ma Maison in 2008.

THE TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT AND THE PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND DEBUT A NEW COLLABORATION. BY WILL COVIELLO

M

Hall Jazz Band. Together, Jaffe and McIntyre listened to volumes of Preservation Hall recordings as well as other traditional jazz, particularly music by Jelly Roll Morton. At its Dixon Hall premiere, the band played in the orchestra pit, but a subsequent performance at the Hollywood Bowl featured the band onstage, which was the original intent. (On tour, the company normally uses recorded music.) Now armed with two pieces, the two groups will do more live shows together, and six tour dates are planned. The premiere features both New Orleans-themed pieces and a set by the band. (On tour without the band, the company will add a piece set to Roy Orbison’s “In Dreams.”) The Sweeter End begins with a slow, dirge-like version of “St. James Infirmary,” sung by Mark Braud, and it makes the transition to the more uptempo remix version, featuring the vocals of Clint Maedgen. The choreographed piece, of course, is not improvisational, and the band and dancers will spend the week working on the live piece. There are both advantages and challenges to the arrangement, says company dancer and assistant director Jason Hartley. “It makes everything a lot easier with live music,” Hartley says. “You don’t have to produce as much energy yourself. “Ideally there’s some evolution,” he adds. “It’s not going to be the same performance every time. With a live band, it encourages you to find the nuances.”

A terrorist with an environmental agenda takes a government official hostage and lures a reporter into his plan in Cat’s-Paw, a mystery thriller about manipulation and unconventional tactics. Mark Routhier directs InSideOut Productions’ Michael Aaron Santos and Ashley Ricord. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students/ seniors, $7 on Thursdays. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, through Feb. 18. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com

TRIBUTE TO THE CLASSICAL ARTS

FEB

03

FEB

07

Tribute to the Classical Arts honors top performances in opera, dance and classical music from 2010. The luncheon is emceed by WWLTV anchor Angela Hill, and there will be special recognition for lifetime achievement as well as performances by nominated artists. The luncheon is sponsored by Gambit, WWNO 89.9 FM, Adler’s, Uptown Costume and Dancewear, The Hotel Monteleone and Hall Piano Company. Call 483-3129 for reservations. Tickets $45. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday. Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 523-3341; www.bestofneworleans.com

ARNAUD SUSSMANN

Mentored by Itzhak Perlman at Juilliard and awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2009, French violinist Arnaud Sussmann has, by age 24, achieved a lifetime’s worth of accolades. His versatile playing, both solo and with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Two ensemble, has filled Carnegie Hall, the Smithsonian and the Louvre. Tickets $25 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Monday. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 895-0690; www.-tulane.edu

FEB

07

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

a Maison, the first collaborative piece created by choreographer Trey McIntyre with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, has drawn critical acclaim and become one of the company’s most popular works since it debuted in New Orleans in 2008. A companion piece titled The Sweeter End premieres Friday, and it finds harmony in the way both the dance company and band manage to be simultaneously traditional and modern. The piece is set to hip-hop producer King Britt’s remixed version of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band playing “St. James Infirmary.” “We took the remix and scored it so we could play it live,” says Preservation Hall artistic director Ben Jaffe, laughing at the reversal of the composing process. “Trey liked the arrangement and the way it’s old and modern at the same time.” The Trey McIntyre Project is in just its third year as a full-time touring company, but it has risen to the top of the field quickly and will be on tour nationally and internationally for 30 weeks this year. McIntyre is a prolific choreographer and is known for grounding his work in traditional ballet technique and using music as a central creative element. He’s choreographed dance to everything from Beethoven to the Beatles, and some of his best-known pieces incorporate blues and rock. Ma Maison was initiated as a commission from the New Orleans Ballet Association, which tasked him with working with New Orleans musicians. McIntyre came to the city and decided to partner with the Preservation

02

Two of the most active performers in New Orleans’ improvisational music circuit, saxophonist Brad Walker (pictured) and twisted timekeeper Simon Lott (drums) create scattered, paranoid nighttime atmospherics — foggy SOS signals, leaves rustling, a basketball dribbling — from everyday instruments. WATIV, Will Thompson’s quartet with Lott, guitarist Chris Alford and bassist James Singleton, opens. Call for ticket information. 10 p.m. Wednesday. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 2185778; www.theallwayslounge.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

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1/14/11 3:10 PM


S:2.281”

noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

Decibullies THE NOISICIAN COALITION CROSSES THE SECOND LINE. uiet please: The Noisician Coalition wants to talk about earplugs. No, seriously. “We’re starting something where we’re giving back to the community,” says Executive Minister of Dis-Information Elizabeth Zibilich. “One of the things we want to promote is protection of your hearing, especially musicians and people who work in clubs. ... In the long run, that’s your money. That’s where you make your living.” Given its appearance (A Clockwork Orange milk-drinkers overthrowing the Red Army) and origins (October 2005 in anarchic, post-K New Orleans), you might take NoiseCo — the loosely configured, post-apocalyptic marching band (heavy on the marching, light on the band) led by Grand Emperor Kakophonos MattVaughan Black and his Dali-mustachioed Archduke of the Ceaseless Noize, Robert Starnes — for nihilists. In fact, the 30-deep krewe has many causes it champions, says Director of Discordance (and official videographer) David S. White, whose Vimeo channel is an online repository for the group’s public service announcements. There’s fire safety, for which NoiseCo members traveled to the moon to underscore the importance of snuffing out oxygen. And there’s Cell Phone Psycho, White’s short film starring Billy Slaughter as a chatterbox moviegoer and NoiseCo as Batesian avengers. “It’s sort of our PSA for ‘silence is golden,’” Zibilich says. The spots are outtakes from greenscreen sessions from filming Cell Phone Psycho, which kicks off an exhibition of steampunk culture at Zeitgeist. NoiseCo, with its retro-futurist garb and Frankenstein instruments, are no-brainer musical guests. “Many of our members have that sort of aesthetic,” Zibilich says. Like their titles, NoiseCo members play — or bang on — bastardized versions of normal gear, modified with pedals and processors. “I’m sort of in the drum corps,” White says. “My instrument is generally a metal washtub that I’ve built out with pots and pans. It’s sort of a tom set. … The drum instruments you can play the same way every time, but the electronic instruments are all circuit-bent. Rarely will those instruments produce the same sound twice in exactly the same way.”

Q

there’s

FEB

04

10 P.M. FRIDAY ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER, 1618 ORETHA CASTLE HALEY BLVD., 8275858; WWW.ZEITGEISTINC.NET TICKETS $7 GENERAL ADMISSION, $6 STUDENTS/SENIORS, $5 MEMBERS

Extended hours Valentine’s Day weekend.

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

Noisician Coalition

S:10.833”

The group emerges several The Noisician Coalition colortimes a year to fully distorts storm the French the concept of a Quarter, connectmarching band. ing — however incongruously — New Orleans’ history of second lines to its current noise movement. “It wasn’t any real statement,” says White, a founding member. “It was just something to do.” Mardi Gras and Halloween are now staples, as is a noise ball held in April. “We’re trying to do more community outreach now,” White says. “We’re starting a campaign to make people aware of battery recycling, which is near and dear to us. We go through so many batteries on these parades with the electronic instruments. Then the hearing protection too, because we’re just so loud. ... We’re just this cacophony of noise.” Despite a polyrhythmic showdown at the 2009 Voodoo Experience with its Pacific Northwest doppelganger, the Portland, Ore.-based MarchFourth Marching Band, NoiseCo doesn’t pretend to attempt anything as subtle as melody or harmony. “I couldn’t say musical ability is one of our strong suits,” White says. “It’s not a prerequisite for our marching club at all. There are some talented musicians that are members. That’s not exactly showcased when they march with us.”

nothing more romantic than sharing a sizzling steak dinner.

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MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde

listingsedit@gambitweekly.com

FAX:483-3116

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 1 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Delux, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Candy RiedlLowe, 7 BLUE NILE — Neslort, 10

BMC — Royal Rounders, 7; Maryflynn & Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — John Mooney, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Tom Paines, 6

COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

36

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Aaron Fletcher, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 7

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Ashley Beach, 8; Cliff Hines, 9; Michael Girardot, 10 OAK — Austin Alleman, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Jimmy Carpenter, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom Worrell, 5

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Credo Blues Society, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Tom Fitzpatrick CD release, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 2 12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — New Orleans Oneironauts, 9

BAYOU PARK BAR — Grunge Jazz Trio, 9 BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 BMC — Lynn Drury, 7; Blues4Sale, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Iguanas, 8:30 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL — Kristina Morales, 8

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FRAT HOUSE — Days Taken, Bastard Suns, None Like Joshua, Jack Fiskio, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Camp Lo, 9

HUDDLE SPORTS BAR — Band of Brothers, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Ched Reeves, 2; Joe Bennett, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Brian Stoltz, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

preview

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30

Mon Amelie

French composer Yann Tiersen’s delicate, personal scores for Amelie (2001) and Good Bye, Lenin! (2003) imbued as much personality into those charming fantasies as did the starring turns by then-unknown leads Audrey Tautou and Daniel Brühl. Like Tatou, whose mischievous adventures in Montmarte moved in graceful waltz time to a mysterious cobblestone symphony of strings, accordions, xylophones and keys, Amelie shined new light on Tiersen outside of France, where his avant-garde pop compositions had long borne the mark of an auteur. His sixth LP, October release Dust Lane (Anti-) conjures a fantasy world entirely of Tiersen’s making, an uneasy autumn colored by loss (both his mother and best friend died during the recording) and anxiety (a mise-en-scene of tense guitars and electronic waves replaces the plucky bounce of previous works). Sean Carey, of wintry Wisconsin folkies Bon Iver, opens. Tickets $20 advance purchase, $23 at the door. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

FEB

05

Yann Tiersen 11 p.m. Saturday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — David Newbould, 7; Pat Flory, 9 OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SHAMROCK BAR — Beth Patterson, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

Thursday 3 BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL —

Armand St. Martin, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Ruby Moon, 7; LowStress Quintet, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Brandon Foret, 9:30

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Murder By Death, Builders & the Butchers, Damion Suomi & the Minor Prophets, 9:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Phenomenal Woman Benefit Concert feat. Two Lips, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 2; Captain Leo, 7 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

OAK — Billy Iuso, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blue Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Caroline Fourmy & Her Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Alex Peters Quartet, 9:30

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Foret Tradition, 9:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Tanglers, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Iguanas, 10

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — Andrew Duhon, 9:30

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom McDermott, 5

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Fitzpatrick, 10

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Matt Lemmler Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TELLO’S BISTRO — Jerry Nuccio, 5 THREE MUSES — Washboard Rodeo, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tuba Skinny, Erika Lewis, 8

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

BIG AL’S SALOON — Brandon Foret Band, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Kelcy Mae, 5; Paul Sanchez, 8; Geraniums, 10

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Stoop Collective, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Dustin O’Keefe, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — For Karma, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — Jonathan “Dragon” Cushionberry, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — Doctor Jazz, 6

D.B.A. — Rik Slave & the Phantoms, Unnaturals, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

One Chamber Emptee, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Rabbit, Dongals, Habitat, 9

Friday 4 12 BAR — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 10

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8 AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BABYLON LOUNGE — Autumn Day Stranglers, Chaos Aeon,

DRAGON’S DEN — Boogie Blind, Big Easy Brawlers, 10

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FRENCH MARKET — Johnette Downing, 11 a.m.

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Dappa, YF Banga, Fijah, Mizery da Beast and others, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Bionica, Alan Hampton, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Professor Piano Series, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 7 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; PAGE 38


s Entertainment Serie

THE CHEE WEEZ February 5 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

FEB 2 Tommy Drake featuring Donnie Johnson FEB 16

Tom Rhodes featuring Slim Bloodworth

FEB 9 FEB 23

Bob Biggerstaff featuring Chase Durousseau Tom Hester featuring Mike Weldon

THURSDAYS LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 3 Brandon Foret

FEB 10 Brandon Foret

FEB 17 Brandon Foret

FEB 24 Brandon Foret

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 4 Foret Tradition

FEB 25 No Idea

SATURDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 5 The Chee Weez FEB 19 Boot Hill

FEB 12

John Waite • 8pm (Tickets are $10 with a mychoiceSM card)

FEB 26 Al “Lil Fats” Jackson

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2011 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

FEB 18 Groovy 7

FEB 11 Junior & Sumtin Sneaky

37


MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 36

Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — C.R. Cruver, 7; NOLA County, 11

THE MAISON — Clarence & Funky People, 5; Some Like It Hot!, 7 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — USA 2000, 7; Agent 86, 8; Mike Millet, 9; Devil Killing Moth, 10 OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 7; Mike Kobrin Trio, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Wise Guys, 9:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Liquid Peace Revolution, Enharmonic Souls, Local Skank, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

38

TIPITINA’S — Rebirth Brass Band, Flow Tribe, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TOOLOULA’S — AKA, 10

TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — Doctor Jazz, 6

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9 ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER — Noisician Coalition, 10

Saturday 5 ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — PYMP, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU PARK BAR — Fat, Stupid,

Ugly People, Sci-Fi Zeroes, 10

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; WATIV, 10; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Blues4Sale, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Chee Weez, 9:30

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. CAFE ROSE NICAUD — Troy Sawyer, 8

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Tony Italiano, Spillway, Mary Lasseigne Band, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Danny Alexander Blues Band, 9 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 10

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Roebucks, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Truth Universal presents Grassroots (downstairs), 10:30

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FRENCH MARKET — WWOZ Community Music Stage, 10 a.m.

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Leroy Jones Quartet, 9:30

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Truth & Salvage Company, Jonathan Tyler & the Northern Lights, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — The Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque & Music feat. Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 2; Irving Bannister’s

All-Stars, 5

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Country Fried, 11

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Benjy Davis Project, 12; Country Fried, 1 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Igor, 7; Destiny, 8; Eli Perra, 9; Todd Wait, 10 OAK — Ingrid Lucia, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Johnny J. & the HitMen, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. William Smith, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes & Louisiana Sunspots, 9:30 SATURN BAR — Valparaiso Men’s Chorus, 11

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dr. Micheal White & the Liberty Jazz Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Two Fresh, Mux Mool, Body Language, Ryan Pearce, 8188, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Papa P, 10

TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — Doctor Jazz, 6

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 6 12 BAR — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 6

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, Ratty Scurvics & His Imaginary Quartet, Lady Baby Miss, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

COURT OF TWO SISTERS — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m.

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 FINNEGAN’S EASY — Laissez Faire, 3

FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA — Nervous Dwayne, 8

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 2; Cindy Chen, 7 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 5

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30

ARNAUD’S FRENCH 75 BAR — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

BLUE NILE — Mainline, 10

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — Johnny Angel, 10

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Alex Bosworth, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Larry Sieberth, 11:30 a.m.

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Stephen Richard Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 2; Brint Anderson, 7

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Jay P. Dufour, 8; Songwriter’s Symposium, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 8

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m.

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Martin Krusche, members of Magnetic Ear, 1:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

Monday 7

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

classical/ concerts

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

COVINGTON TRAILHEAD — 419

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7 CHICKIE WAH WAH — John Rankin, Don Vappie, Raphael Bas, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. — Luke Winslow-King, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 DRAGON’S DEN — Rubymoon, Domenic, 10 DUBUISSON’S ART CORNER — Jeffrey Bianchi, 6:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S

N. Hampshire St., Covington — Fri: Mardi Gras Fest Beer Stroll presents Storyville Stompers Brass Band, 5:30 DEGAS HOUSE — 2401 Esplanade Ave., 821-5009; www.degashouse.com — Thu: Mark Weliky Trio, Neospectric, 7 OUR LADY OF HOLY CROSS COLLEGE — Moreau Center,

4123 Woodland Drive, (800) 259-7744 — Wed: Gregg Kallor, 5:30 SATCHMO’S — Danna Center, Loyola University, 6363 St. Charles Ave. — Thu: Neslort, 7:30

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Wed: Victory Belles, 1; Fri: Victory Big Band, 8 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Scott Slapin, Amy Pfrimmer, Yui Asano, 5; Mon: Taize, 6 TULANE UNIVERSITY — Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www. tulane.edu — Sun: Junior Philharmonic Society, 2 UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS — Performing Arts Center,

280-SHOW; www.uno.edu — Tue: Musical Excursions Concert Series feat. Brazillian Guitar Quartet, 7:30

UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA —

6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — Sat: Imagination Movers, 3


FILM

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) chronicles the true story of an American mountain climber (James Franco) who was trapped in an isolated Utah canyon after a boulder fell on his arm. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

BLACK SWAN (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren

Aronofsky directs Natalie Portman as a veteran ballerina whose psyche begins to crumble after nabbing the lead role in Swan Lake. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania BLUE VALENTINE (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ryan

Gosling and Michelle Williams star as a couple who rely on one night and memories of their courtship to revive their rocky marriage. Canal Place

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The latest

installment in the C.S. Lewis book series continues Edmund and Lucy Pevensieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Narnia adventures. Hollywood 14

COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

DEEP SEA (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX THE DILEMMA (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron

Howard directs Kevin James, Vince Vaughn and Winona Ryder in the comedy about a man who discovers his best friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife is having an affair. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE FIGHTER (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark

Wahlberg stars as boxer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Irishâ&#x20AC;? Micky Ward, a world lightweight champion trained by his brother (Christian Bale). AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; After his media mogul

father dies, a directionless playboy (Seth Rogan) decides to fight crime. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

GULLIVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TRAVELS (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Jack Black stars as a modern-

experience the mediterranean

TUE

01

Zeitgeist opens an ongoing multidisciplinary series titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anachronistic World of Steampunk Artâ&#x20AC;? with a film and concert (see p. 35) Friday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also an art show. The feature film Zenith by Vladan Nikolic combines retro and futuristic elements â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and bills itself as steampunk â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but ultimately itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dystopic conspiracy thriller with some crafty nods to Fight Club and the novel Fahrenheit 451, with some Blair Witch Project jittery hand-cam effects. Steampunk is most simply summed up as a time-warping fusion of technology and aesthetics, as in a computer powered by a steam engine or space travelers in Victorian garb. In Zenith, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a time gap bridged by videotapes. In 2044, the main character Jack (Peter Scanavino) is disillusioned with his world and believes global conspiritorial activities are depriving individuals of free will. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s convinced the masses have been genetically altered to be blissfully ignorant, rendering them intellectually blank and apolitical. On the personal side, his father was obsessed with conspiracies, and Jack traces both his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity and shadowy figures and plots via a series of videotapes left for him to discover. The tapes allow Zenith to jump back and forth in time, and there are scenes with Jack talking to the camera, suggesting he also is making tapes (digital messages in a bottle) for future generations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or actually, the viewing audience, in order to spur us to join the resistance movement. Jack finds fellow travelers in an erudite prostitute and an embittered bookshop owner. In both the present and videotaped past, mysterious agents and thugs seem to close in on people who may be on the brink of exposing the Bilderbergers or whatever grand cabal it is that the rebellious individuals are probing. Vladanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film often is entertainingly fast-paced and visceral â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Fight Club â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in heated nightclub sex scenes, drug deals and a couple of bruising interrogations. At other times, it delves into obscure maundering and paranoia. Heavy use of conspiracy buzzwords and some contrivances (like the official billing â&#x20AC;&#x153;a film by anonymousâ&#x20AC;?) may help it become a cult film for people who enjoy conspiracy kitsch, but it indulges a few too many conspiracy cliches. Vladanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s filmmaking is impressive, but the movie is more enjoyable as pulp fiction than the ominous, almost believable harbinger he seems to have had in mind. Also screening are the short films Cell Phone Psycho by local filmmaker David S. White and Nickel Children. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Will Coviello THRU FEB

10

Zenith 7:30 p.m. Friday-through Feb. 10 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

day Gulliver, who is mistakenly assigned a travel piece on the Bermuda Triangle and finds himself trapped on an island of tiny people. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 01 > 2011

Gwyneth Paltrow stars as an alcoholic, emotionally unstable country star who embarks on a tour to save her career. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

FREE BLTS FEB THE

preview

FRI

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MUSIC BAR

MUSIC LINE-UP

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING

NEIGHBORHOOD

SAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Attiki

A True MID-CITY

SUN

LISTINGS

39


FILM

LISTINGS

Hollywood 14 THE HEART SPECIALIST (NR) — Zoe Saldana stars in the

dramatic comedy about a group of first-year medical students and their secretive chief resident. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

INSIDE JOB (PG-13) — Charles

Ferguson’s Oscar-nominated documentary takes a look at the 2008 financial crisis. AMC Palace 20

I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS (R) — The film is based on the life

of Steven Jay Russell, played by Jim Carrey, a newly outof-the-closet con artist who escaped from Texas prisons four times to be reunited with his former cellmate. Canal Place

THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) — In

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

the third installment of the comedy series, Greg and Pam Focker’s entire family descends for their twins’ birthday, and misunderstandings and spying missions abound. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

40

THE MECHANIC (R) — An elite assassin takes on a young apprentice in the New Orleans-shot remake of the 1972 film. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) —

Two friends (Natalie Portman and Ashton Kutcher) try to have a strictly sexual relationship, but the arrangement becomes more complicated than they expected. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE RITE (PG-13) — A seminary

student (Anthony Hopkins) is exposed to a dark side of Catholicism after attending exorcism school at the Vatican. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A VERTIGO ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION “THE ROOMMATE” MUSIC ALY MICHALKA MUSIC ZANE SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL FRIEDMAN DANNEEL HARRIS FRANCES FISHER AND BILLYPRODUCED BY JOHN FRIZZELL EXECUTIVE WRITTEN BY DOUG DAVISON AND ROY LEE PRODUCERS BEAU MARKS SONNY MALLHI BY SONNY MALLHI DIRECTED CHRISTIAN E. CHRISTIANSEN BY

SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) — Nicolas Cage stars in the

film about a girl who, after being accused of witchcraft, is sent to a secluded monastery where monks will try to rid her of the curse. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 20, Grand

TANGLED (PG) — Mandy

STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4

chEck locAl lISTIngS FoR ThEATERS AnD ShowTImES

Moore is the voice of Rapunzel, the princess with magical golden hair, in Disney’s animated musical

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

comedy. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 THE TOURIST (PG-13) — An

American tourist (Johnny Depp) in Italy gets caught in a dangerous situation when a woman with ulterior motives (Angelina Jolie) intentionally crosses his path. Grand

TRON: LEGACY (PG) — A 27-year-old searching for his video game developer father (Jeff Bridges) gets drawn into a stunning digital world. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) — A 14-year-

old girl, a U.S. marshal and a Texas ranger try to track down her father’s murderer in the Coen brothers’ adaptation of the Charles Portis novel. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

YOGI BEAR (PG) — The famous

cartoon bear and his pal Boo Boo try to keep Jellystone Park from closing. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE WAY BACK (PG-13) —

Prisoners of war flee a Soviet Union labor camp and begin a 4,000-mile journey to freedom in the film based on a true story. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

OPENING FRIDAY HEARTLESS (NR) — A troubled man in East London with a disfiguring birthmark must leave his life of isolation to destroy a violent gang of demons. THE ROOMMATE (PG-13) — A

college freshman is assigned to a dorm room with a crazy person who becomes obsessed with her.

SANCTUM (R) — James

Cameron produces the 3-D thriller that finds adventurers stuck inside the South Pacific’s Esa-Ala Caves after a tropical storm hits.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE BIG LEBOWSKI (R)— A

slacker mistaken for a millionaire of the same name seeks restitution for his ruined rug. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

THE CANAL STREET MADAM (NR) — This documentary tells

the story of Jeanette Maier, a successful New Orleans madam until an FBI bust sparked a very public trail. A Q&A with professor Alecia Long follows the screening. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday, Tulane University, LavinBernick Center, Kendall Cram Lecture Hall; www.tulane.edu

HOW TO MURDER YOUR WIFE (NR) — A man (Jack Lemon)

mistakenly marries while drunk then starts to entertain the idea of murdering his wife (Virna Lisi) in the 1965 film. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

MY FAIR LADY (G) — A phonetics professor takes on the task of transforming a Cockney girl (Audrey Hepburn) into a refined lady. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Feb. 8, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com. NURSE.FIGHTER.BOY (NR) —

The lives of a single mother with sickle cell anemia, her son and a brooding boxer become entwined. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net SECRET SUNSHINE (NR) — A woman and her son try to begin a new life after her husband dies, but tragedy soon strikes the family again. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net SONIC ORPHANS: LOST AND FOUND MUSIC FILMS 1965-7 (NR) — Dill Daniel’s film is

a compilation reel of lost and found 16mm music clips depicting The Beatles, Avengers, Sonic Youth and other bands. Tickets $5. 10:30 p.m. Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

THE SOUND OF MUSIC (G) — A nun (Julie Andrews) leaves the convent to serve as governess for the children of a strict widower. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

Robere Lord, ceramics by Dawn Chatoney and jewelry by Sylvan Spirit, through February. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Beauty,

Power & Circumstance,” female nudes in color pencil and acrylic by Richard Johnson, through March 12. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the

Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through March 24. Opening reception 5 p.m. Thursday.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www. galerieroyale.com — “Featur-

ing Fabrics,” mixed media on canvas by Jessie Trinchard, through March 4. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Threads of Carnival,” works

in oil by Linda Lesperance, through February. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Heroes and Villains,” works by Gina Phillips; “Refresh, Reconstitute, Embellish,” works by Matthew Cox; both through March 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — Works by Emily

Sartor for Prospect.1.5, through Feb. 19; “Corpus Cupiditas,” works by Steve Teeters, through Feb. 26; artists’ reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Computer-generated imagery by Sean Capone; paintings and sculpture by Bonnie Maygarden; both through March 5. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS.

727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Sandblasted photography by Drake Fuller, feathered metal sculpture by Josh Cohen, glass Mardi Gras masks by Teri Walker and prints by Tish Douzart, through Feb. 26. Opening Saturday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “An Earthly Paradise,” works by Stefan Szczesny, through March 26. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing

My Religion, Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March. Artist’s reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www. vincentmanngallery.com —

Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photo-

graphs by Michael Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through February.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through March 26.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by gallery artists; 504

Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

tercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — Works by

Rajko Radovanovich, through Saturday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean

Mitchell, ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil

paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart.com — Works by Eu-

gene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — Photographs and paintings by Blake Haney, Zack Smith, Rob Davis and Sara Gordon, through Thursday.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “Machines on

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paint-

ings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Detritus,”

paintings by Chris Dennis, through Saturday.

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Incidental Journey,” ab-

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www. arthurrogergallery.com — Glass sculpture by Gene Koss, through Feb. 19.

Orange Blossom,” a group exhibition featuring 20 artists, through Saturday.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists

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of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

Paper,” works on paper, kinetic drawing machines and power tools by James W. Goedert, through Saturday.

BEER

2

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

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DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Year One:

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

PAGE 43

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GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through March 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ART

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS

41


42

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 41 ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Farewells

and Introductions,” a group exhibition featuring the Bare Hands Collective, curated by John Fields, through Feb. 8.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery art-

ists, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com —

“Eat, Drink & Be Merry,” a group invitational exhibit featuring 14 artists, through March 6.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com —

“Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann; “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory; both ongoing.

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “Drop, Half

Drop,” paintings by Deborah Pelias; “Dreaming on a World,” large-scale ink drawings by Ralph Bourque for Prospect.1.5; both through Wednesday.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — “The Cumulous,”

paper work by Brian Waitman, through Sunday.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate

Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

review

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works

by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,” photo-

graphs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki, paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — Works by Emily Sartor

for Prospect.1.5, through Feb. 19. “Corpus Cupiditas,” works by Steve Teeters, through Feb. 26. LOUISIANA ARTWORKS. 818 Howard Ave., Suite 300, 571-7373; www.louisianaartworks.org — “Visions of Excellence,” an

exhibition by Pictures of the Year International in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Feb. 11.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com —

“The Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by

Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24.

Some Assembly Required The wrecked pickup truck first inexplicably appeared inside an empty storefront on St. Claude Avenue, beyond a door far too small to accommodate any vehicle. Closer inspection revealed it was a full-size replica carefully crafted from cardboard (pictured), but it remained a mystery until it reemerged at the Carroll Gallery. Its creator, Bob Snead, was inspired by an actual pickup truck a drunk driver had wrecked outside his St. Claude studio. Now part of this Conscience expo, it complements David Grunfeld’s eloquent photographs documenting the travails of working folk, including oystermen in the wake of the BP disaster and others who capture some of the visual poetry of life and labor in south Louisiana. Similarly, John Barnes’ stark shotgun house sculptures and Keith Perelli’s lyrically surreal portraits based on police mug shots meld gritty urban chaos with a visionary sensibility that hints at the possibility of transcendence. James Goedert’s Machines on Paper show at Antenna features, among other things, a 1970s-era Ford Granada with Nebraska plates. It too is larger than the gallery door, but this real car was taken apart and reassembled inside — with modifications. The seats surround the relocated steering wheel, which when turned activates engine parts reconfigured into a mechanism that sketches an abstract drawing of a car, as if the Granada had taken up art in its old age. On the wall is a landscape painting like an expanse of green grass on paper; beneath it on the floor rests the lawn trimmer that created it, with colored markers tied to its plastic trim cords. Other everyday tools appear with their equally unlikely creations, and here Goedert reveals how old machines can be reconfigured to make art while incidentally providing a sense of what surrealism might have looked like had it originated in Middle America instead of Paris. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU FEB

5 THRU FEB

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Lauren Thomas,

Ashley Beach, Sabine Chadborn, Denice Bizot and other New Orleans artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown

glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Ouroboros,”

Machines on Paper: New Work by James Goedert Antenna, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.press-street.com/antenna

Conscience: Work by John Barnes, David Grunfeld, Keith Perelli and Bob Snead Carroll Gallery, Tulane University, 314-2228; www.carrollgallery.tulane.edu

drawings, paintings and sculpture by Anthony Carriere, through Feb. 15.

SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out of the Blue,” a group

exhibition and competition, through Thursday.

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St.,

James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

11

942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing. STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Suffer Little Children,” paintings and collages by Dona Lief; “Assignations,” paintings by Ann Hornback; “What Bugs Me,” sculpture by Andrew Bascle; all through March 15. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

FUEL. 4807 Magazine St., 8955757; www.fuelcoffeehouse. net — Watercolors laminated

onto wood by William Smith, ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 PAGE 44

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — Works by Stephen Collier and Tameka Norris for Prospect.1.5, through Sunday.

ART

43


ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 43 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

BALANCE

4608 freret street nola 70115 504.899.1142 freretstreetyoga.com · off street parking available ·

ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artist’s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@gmail. com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery,

4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March 31. DELGADO STUDENT ART ASSOCIATION. The group seeks

art from Delgado Community College students and alumni to be included in a calendar. Call 258-5011 or email xdesot92940@dcc.edu for details. Submission deadline is March 15.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

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Isle juried exhibition to be held in April seeks entries. Visit www.gicdt.org for details. Submission deadline is Tuesday.

LOUISIANA ART AND ARTISTS’ GUILD SPRING SHOW. The arts

nonprofit accepts works for its February juried exhibition in Baton Rouge. Artists must bring their works to the show site Feb. 17. Email laagbr@laagsite.org or visit www.laag-site. org for details.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters

St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-

2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER.

44

900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Ephemera: River with Flowers,” installation by Brandon Graving, through Feb. 27. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 5867432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “Tambourine and

Fan,” works by Jamar Pierre and Gregoryuan Mghee-Hunter, through March 12. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum

features fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Seventh

Ward: People, Places and Traditions,” a group exhibition in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through February. “Drawn to Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through February. “All That Glitters,” an exhibition of Carnival jewelry, through March 13. LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” a hands-on exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www. louisianafilmmuseum.org —

The museum features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hur-

ricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the mu-

seum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org —

“Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For: American

Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Deja Vu All Over Again:

Generic Art Solutions;” “Selections from Project 35” videos selected by Independent Curators International; both through Feb. 13. “The Most Beautiful Day of My Youth,” photographs by Bernard Faucon, through March 13. “Residents and Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Big-

Hearted Pots,” ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell — Mixed Media

Juried Art Exhibition, through Feb. 11.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring the sugar industry; all ongoing.

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER ALMOST AN EVENING.

NOCCA|Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St — The NOLA Project presents Ethan Coen’s triad of plays that share an underlying theme of hell — both on Earth and in the afterlife. Call 940-2875 or visit www.facebook.com/thenolaproject for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

BREAKING LEGS. Rivertown

Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — A professor and fledgling playwright turns to the mafia to fund his latest work in Tom Dulack’s play. Tickets $30 general admission, $28 students and seniors, $15 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

CAT’S-PAW. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — After an American terrorist group holds an EPA official hostage and detonates a car bomb in Washington, D.C., a young reporter sets out to write an expose of the organization. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students and seniors, $7 Thursday performances. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through Feb. 18.

porary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS. Cutting Edge

Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 2900760; www.cuttingedgeproductions.org — Bridesmaids at a wedding find they have more in common with each other than with the bride in Alan Ball’s comedy. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Feb. 12.

FORBIDDEN BROADWAY. Slidell

Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — Gerard Alessandrini’s satire is a rapid-fire revue of classic and contemporary Broadway musicals. Tickets $19 general admission, $14 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE. Teatro Wego,

177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 8852000; www.jpas.org — Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts’s

off-Broadway musical comedy is a series of vignettes about love and relationships. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Feb. 20. RACE PEACE. Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — Junebug Productions and Mondo Bizarro’s event features multi-disciplinary performances meant to incite discussion about race relations. Visit www.racepeace.com for event times and other details. Wednesday-Saturday.

REFLECTIONS: A MAN AND HIS TIME. Anthony Bean Commu-

nity Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — Former Councilman Oliver Thomas tells his own story of crime, punishment and redemption. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BY GEORGE! Le Chat Noir, 715

St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Banu Gibson sings George Gershwin songs. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday. HOT STUFF. AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — Harry Mayronne, Becky Allen and Chris Wecklein present the cabaret show. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Saturday.

AN ODE TO COWPOKES COWBOY VARIETY SHOW. AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — The AllWays Lounge’s two-year anniversary celebration kicks off with a variety show starring Becky Allen, Dennis Monn, Bella Blue and others. The event also features a live petting zoo and free chili. Tickets $5-$7. 11 p.m. Friday.

THE RICKY GRAHAM SHOW.

Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Graham and Jefferson Turner lead a musical tour of New Orleans. Tickets $28 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Saturday.

DANCE TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT WITH THE PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND. Mahalia Jackson Theater

for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — The New Orleans Ballet Association presents the dance company and band’s collaborative performance. Visit www.nobadance. com for details. Tickets $20$80. 8 p.m. Friday.

AUDITIONS ASCENSION COMMUNITY THEATER. Pasqua Theater, Ascension

Community Theatre, 823 Felicity

review Dead Zone Gulliver’s travels in psychedelia? Neurotica? Schizophrenia? Your guess is as good as mine. Playwright/director R.J. Tsarov lived up to his billing as a master of the macabre with Always Saturday, on the boards recently at the AllWays Lounge. The Gulliver in question is an unassuming guy named Mike (Andrew Larimer), who earns money by participating in test trials for new drugs. He’s signed up to try Always Saturday, a boutique pharmaceutical intended to treat depression, schizophrenia and other disorders. The test will last 28 days and pay thousands of dollars, but Mike quickly finds lab conditions far more draconian than those in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. A domineering bleached-blonde nurse named Stephanie (Kerry Cahill) admits Mike to the study and subjects him to a series of baffling and illogical questions. Once approved for the experiment, he slips on a hazmat jumpsuit and starts taking the mind-altering drug. The set contains only two beds, and through the first act, a second human guinea pig named Speed-O (Chris Lane) rests motionless on the second bed. Mike’s main anxiety, however, centers on having blood drawn and tested. If he only knew what was in store. Having seen the show, I can’t say with any certainty what was in store. Tsarov may be a master of the macabre, but his previous claim to fame was creating nonlinear plays. Always Saturday satisfies both descriptions. The dialogue was snappy and delivered with verve, but the script often was ambiguous. Cast members threw themselves into the grotesque comic nightmare, but at times it seemed the actors themselves reacted emphatically to situations their characters did not comprehend. Here again, we enter the mysteries of the mind. If the drug was being tested as a cure for schizophrenia, perhaps some or all of the volunteers were chosen because they had the disease. A second domineering bleached-blonde woman named Steph (Veronica Hunsinger-Loe) enters the picture. Is she the same person as Stephanie? Alter egos? hallucinations? It turns out the two women were turning into zombies. One of the ways you know that is zombies can’t speak — they can only send text messages on their iPhones, which here appear as oversized, nearly inseparable appendages. It’s unclear whether the antidepressant creates zombies or helps users see a reality of zombified texters. Maybe it was this acidic bit of satire that made me think of Jonathan Swift and Gulliver. It’s good to have the talented Tsarov back after an extended absence from local stages. His direction is more assertive and his writing is as challenging as ever. — Dalt Wonk

St., Gonzales (225) 647-1230 — The theater seeks actors, a puppeteer, a harpist, athletes and dancers, and two boys ages 6 to 9 for upcoming productions of Euripides’ Medea and Aristophanes’ Lysistrata. Call (225) 647-1230 for details. 3 p.m.

to 6 p.m. Feb. 5-6. BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctknola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi

Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

DISNEY’S ARISTOCATS KIDS.

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www. jpas.org — The theater seeks children ages 7 to 12 for the April production of the musical. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 885-2000 ext. 211 or email lynne@jpas.org for details. Saturday. TITUS ANDRONICUS. Nirvana Indian Cuisine, 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797; www.insidenirvana.com — Neutral Ground Ensemble holds auditions for its April production of the Shakespeare play. The auditions are in the group’s rehearsal space above the restaurant. Email Ross@neutralgroundensemble. org for details. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. City

Bar, 3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola.com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

A CHICK AND A SPIC. Shadowbox

Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Amy Anderson hosts the comedy show featuring Aldo Someillan and Marcia Wall. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires,

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. TOMMY DRAKE AND DONNIE JOHNSON. Boomtown Casino,

Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www. boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Contem-

STAGE

bestofneworleans.com.

45


EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

EVENTS

Tuesday 1

Tuesday 1

KINDER GARDEN: WINTER IN THE GARDEN . Longue

C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

STORYTIME WITH BETH FINKE .

Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The author and her seeing eye dog read from Hanni and Beth: Safe and Sound and discuss Hanni’s training to be a service dog. Free admission. 10:30 a.m.

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

46

MON 1/31 TUE 2/1 WED 2/2

Rebirth Brass Band Tommy Malone & Blvd. Jr.

THU 2/3

The Trio

FRI 2/4

Good Enough For Good TImes

SAT 2/5

Bill Summers & Jazalsa

SUN 2/6

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Papa Grows Funk

feat. Johnny Vidacovich, George Porter,Jr. & Skeri K.

Joe Krown Trio

feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www. hollygrovemarket.com — Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans teaches young gardeners to plant, paint, identify good and bad bugs and feed the chickens. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

FAMILY

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Showcasing Local Music

BE THERE DO THAT

Thursday 3 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 5 A CELEBRATION IN SONG . Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — The show kicks off Black History Month with African songs, storytelling, poetry and more. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m. CUB/BOY SCOUT DAY. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum features special activities for Cub and Boy Scouts and their families, including Morse code practice, WWII plane spotting and a scavenger hunt in the museum galleries. Admission free for those in Scout uniforms. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. MASTER GARDENERS.

Hollygrove Market & Farm,

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — Randy Fertel presents “The Soul of New Orleans.” Visit www.jungneworleans.com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, free for members. 7:30 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT.

Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia, and prizes include bar tabs, record store gift certificates and more. 8 p.m. Tuesdays.

MARRIAGE COMMUNICATION GROUP. Counseling Solutions

of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker leads the 6-week group for married couples who would like to improve their communication. Pre-registration is required. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesdays.

NEW ORLEANS AND THE CIVIL WAR . Metairie Park Country

Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www. mpcds.com — Louisiana Historical Society president Howard Hunter presents the program in recognition of the 150th anniversary of the war. Call 849-3113 or email calais_coulon@mpcds.com for details. Free admission. 6 p.m.

Wednesday 2 BRIGID BALL . John Paul’s, 940

Elysian Fields Ave., 948-1888; www.johnpaulsbar.com — The New Orleans Radical Faeries’ costume ball features music, food and live entertainment. Admission $10. 7 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FREE TAX ASSISTANCE . Our

Lady of Holy Cross College, Moreau Center, 4123 Woodland Drive, (800) 2597744 — The IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) and the college’s tax accounting student interns provide free tax preparation assistance. Call 3982230 for details. Noon to 3 p.m.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter. org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno. org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.


bestofneworleans.com EVENTS MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409 Andry St.,

between Douglass Street and the levee; www.globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING . Harahan Senior Center, 100

Elodie St., 737-3810 — Allen Square, Chief Information Officer for the City of New Orleans, gives a presentation on the state of the city’s computer technology. Visit www.nopc.org for details. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING . Whitney Bank Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www. whitneybank.com — The meeting discusses how to prune old and plant new roses. Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m. SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS.

The group conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET.

484 Sala Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332 Magazine St.,

891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www. pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522

St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON . Sheraton

New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — The American Heart Association’s annual luncheon features free health screenings and educational seminars, a silent auction and a fashion show. Visit www.heart.org/ neworleansgored for details. Admission $100. Screenings, seminars and auction 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. luncheon.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511

Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. LEUKEMIA CUP REGATTA KICKOFF CELEBRATION . Southern Yacht Club, 105

N. Roadway St., 288-4200; www.southernyachtclub.org — The Mississippi and

PAGE 48

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PAGE 47

Louisiana chapters of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society present the event featuring sailor, Olympics commentator and lymphoma survivor Gary Jobson. Call 837-0945, email katie.triplett@lls.org or visit www.leukemiacup.org/msla for details. 6:30 p.m. II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The Urban Land Institute’s event discusses New Orleans real estate development, and researchers and real estate analysts present statistics on homebuyer profiles, population trends, post-Katrina real estate dynamics and more. Visit http://louisiana.uli.org for details. Admission starts at $30. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The V-Day New Orleans concert featuring performances by Two Lips and Slow Burn Burlesque benefits the St. Bernard Battered Women’s Program. Admission $8 in advance, $10 at the door. 9 p.m.

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

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SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

TOP HATS & HIGH TOPS FUNDRAISING GALA . Audubon Tea

48

Room, 6500 Magazine St. — The New Orleans Hornets’ annual fundraising gala features music by Kermit Ruffins, live and silent auctions and a seated formal dinner with the entire Hornets team and coaching staff. Visit www.hornets. com for details. Admission starts at $200. 6 p.m. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PANEL DISCUSSION . Latter Memorial

Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — A panel of men and women from various social, civic and educational agencies provides insight and information on the local problem of violence against women. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. WARGAMES. National World War

TILE SALE CERAMIC & PORCELAIN OVERSTOCKED INVENTORY

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming for gamers at all levels. Pre-registration is required. A minimum number of gamers must register for the meeting to be held. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First Thursday of every month. WWII DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Marine veteran Francis Gravois speaks at the meeting. 7 p.m.

Friday 4 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/ DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair

10% OFF WITH AD www.medtilenola.com

preview Purple Prose PHOTO BY COLLEEN HEIDENREICH

NEW ORLEANS TODAY & TOMORROW. National World War

PHENOMENAL WOMAN: A BENEFIT CONCERT CELEBRATING THE FEMALE SPIRIT. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters



985/626-4476

LISTINGS

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art hosts a panel of contributors to The Best of LSU Fiction in this installment of its Southern Storytellers series. Released in 2010, the collection features 20 writers associated — most as teachers or students — with the university, including luminaries like Robert Penn Warren and Walker Percy. The lineup at Ogden includes James Wilcox (pictured), author of Modern Baptists and Hunk City, John Ed Bradley (It Never Rains in Tiger Stadium), Olympia Vernon (Eden, A Killing in This Town) and James Gordon Bennett (The Moon Stops Here, My Father’s Geisha), as well as moderators Nolde Alexius and Judy Kahn, co-editors of the collection. Admission $10, free for Ogden members. — Will Coviello

FEB

05

Southern Storytellers 2 p.m. Saturday Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9616; www.ogdenmuseum.org

fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www. adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m. Fridays. AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION HEALTH FAIR . Lakeside Shopping

Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-8000 — The health fair includes free health screenings and information, as well as a casting call for a national Go Red for Women campaign, which will feature real women affected by heart disease. Call 830-2300 for details. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

BRIDGE HOUSE RECYCLED FASHION SHOW. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters

St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — Designers create fashions out of thrift store finds at the event benefiting Bridge House’s substance abuse programs. Call 821-7134 or visit www.bridgehouse. org for details. Admission $20 in advance, $25 at the door, $35 VIP seating. 7:30 p.m. COVINGTON BREWHOUSE BEER STROLL . Covington Trailhead, 419

N. Hampshire St., Covington — A free concert from the Storyville Stompers Brass Band is followed by a “stroll” of area businesses, at which guests can sample beers from local breweries. Call (985) 8921873 or email gottaluvcov@covla. com for details. Admission $10 for stroll. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application

fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. KREWE DELUSION FUNDRAISER .

One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks. net — The fundraiser benefiting the krewe and Roots of Music features a screening of Harry Shearer’s The Big Uneasy, music by Meschiya Lake, Tom McDermott and DJ Butterfoot; and an auction. Admission $15. 7 p.m.

LUNCH & LEARN . Advocacy Center, 1010 Common St., Suite 2600, 522-2337; www.advocacyla.org — The topic of the bi-monthly lecture series on disability and senior citizen issues is “Jared Lee Loughner: Could the Arizona Shootings Happen in Louisiana? An Exploration of Louisiana’s Mental Health System.” Pre-registration is required. Call 522-2337 ext. 125 or email pfisher@advocacyla.org for details. Free admission. Noon to 1 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

2000 Lakeshore Drive, University Of New Orleans, 280-6683 — The 610 Stompers debut new moves at the ’80s-themed event with music by Band Camp and DJ Hammer, free food and drinks and a raffle. A portion of proceeds benefits the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Louisiana/Mississippi. Visit www.610stompers.com for details. Admission $25 in advance, $30 at the door. 8 p.m. to midnight. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum

of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 5 ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park,

333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague. info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 8999119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J.

Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 5812388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

FRERET MARKET. Freret Market, cor-

ner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 638-2589; www.freretmarket.org — The market offers food, arts, live music and crafts from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREEN PROJECT SATURDAY WORKSHOP. Green Project, 2831

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

Marais St., 945-0240; www. thegreenproject.org — The program discusses soil composition and bed preparation. Free admission. 10 a.m. to noon.

NORMAN DANIELS. Tulane University, Lavin-Bernick University Center, McAlister Drive, 247-1507 — The leading medical ethicist and Harvard University professor discusses health care. Free admission. 4 p.m.

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

SWEET 610 DEBUTANTE BALL . Human Performance Center,

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

IDENTITY, HISTORY, LEGACY: FREE


bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PEOPLE OF COLOR IN LOUISIANA . Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org — The symposium features speakers from around the country discussing various topics relating to New Orleans’ free people of color population in the 1800s. Pre-registration is required. Admission $45-$70. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. NATIVE NOW: LARVAL HOSTS FOR BUTTERFLIES & MOTHS. Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Plant specialists discuss the local habitat, biodiversity, and the ecological impact of gardening with Louisiana plant species. Call 293-4726 or email hschackai@longuevue.com for details. Admission $8 members, $10 nonmembers. 9 a.m. and 10 a.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. ST. JOSEPH’S DAY COOKIE WORKSHOP.

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Sandra Juneau demonstrates how to make traditional St. Joseph Day cookies and a St. Joseph’s Day altar. Admission $10 members, $20 nonmembers. 2 p.m. THROWDOWN.1.5. Second Line Stages, 800 Richard St., 528-3050; www.secondlinestages.com — The Prospect New Orleans benefit party and closing event for Prospect.1.5 features music, food, an open bar, and a silent auction of works by more than 70 New Orleans artists. Visit www.prospectneworleans.org for details. Admission $25-$250. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

Sunday 6 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New

Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 4609049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top

Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp. com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. PAGE 50

89

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

TRUTH-OUT FOR THE GULF. First Unitarian Universalist Church, 5212 S. Claiborne Ave. — Stop the Gulf Oil Disaster presents the first in a series of forums focused on how the BP oil disaster is affecting residents’ health and daily lives. Visit www.stopgulfoildisaster.org for details. 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

49


EVENTS

LISTINGS

PAGE 49

SPORTS

BLEU DEVIL CLASSIC . Dillard University, Samuel DuBois Cook Theatre, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 816-4857 — Dillard’s athletic department hosts a weekend of basketball and social events, culminating in a game against Xavier University. Times and locations vary. Call 816-4953 or visit www.dillardbleudevils.com for details. Friday-Sunday. NEW ORLEANS HORNETS. New

Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The Hornets play the Washington Wizards (7 p.m. Thursday), Los Angeles Lakers (7 p.m. Saturday) and the Minnesota Timberwolves (7 p.m. Monday). Visit www. hornets.com for details. Call for Applications

THE BIG E A SY E NTERTA I N M E N T AWA R DS

presents THE

BUILD-A-BEAR WORKSHOP HUGGABLE HEROES. The pro-

gram recognizes young leaders ages 8 to 18 with college scholarships and donations to the charities of their choice. Visit www.lovehugssmiles.com/huggableheroes.aspx for details. Application deadline is Feb. 28.

17 TH. ANNuAl

tribute tothe

ECO-FRIENDLY COOKBOOK COMPETITION . YBGreen’s

classical arts Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

FE aTURiNg livE pERFORMaNcES OF cl a SSical MUSic aNd daNcE

50

Classical Music, Opera and Dance Awards and Gourmet Luncheon MONday, FEBRUaRy 7, 2011 · 11aM–2pM · ThE hOTEl MONTElEONE

Tickets $45 · Tables for 10 $450 · liMiTEd SEaTiNg accEpTiNg RESERvaTiONS NOw! CALL 483-3129

To

benefit

&

T H E F ou N DAT IoN F oR E N T E RTA I N M E N T DE v E l op M E N T

2011 arts eDuCation aWa r D

Karel sloane-Boekbinder (JPas) 2011 sPeCial reCognition aWarD

Dr. Jean Montes

gnoYo’s Haitian Youth Music relief Project

2011 Patron aWarD

Drs. r. ranney and emel Mize

E Duc AT IoN

2011 Master of CereMonies angela Hill

2011 lifetiMe aCHieVeMent aWarD Winner PatriCia sallier seals (Hs, sallier sCHool of MusiC,nosM)

competition invites students or their parents to submit ecofriendly, vegan or vegetarian recipes for an online cookbook. The top three recipes receive cash prizes. Visit www.ybgreen. net for details. Submission deadline is Feb. 18.

THE GREEN GIANT AWARD. The

award honors an individual who has made significant contributions to the environmental welfare of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. Visit www. thegreenproject.org for details. Nomination deadline is Feb. 28.

MISS NEW ORLEANS PAGEANT.

The pageant scheduled to take place April 17 seeks contestants. Visit www.missneworleans. org or email misslouisianaunitedstates2010@yahoo.com for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST. The museum seeks

essays on the topic “Why should we remember Pearl Harbor?” for the contest that awards a cash prize. The entry divisions are middle school (grades 5-8) and high school (grades 9-12). Essays are accepted online only. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/essaycontests for details. Submission deadline is March 31.

OCHSNER STAR PROGRAM . The

hospital accepts applications for a free high school science program featuring hands-on research in a laboratory with medical scientists. Call 842-5321, visit www.ochsner.org/star or email asharai@ochsner.org for details. Application deadline is March 14.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 per-

cent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 9420444, ext. 244 for details. WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Visit www.17poets. com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DEL-RIO GARDNER . Gospel

Bookstore, 17 Westside Shopping Center, Gretna, 362-7770 — The author signs A Promise Fulfilled. Noon Saturday.

EARL HAMPTON, JR . East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The author discusses Streetcars of New Orleans: 1964 – Present. 7 p.m. Tuesday. FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Stieg Larsson’s The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

GEORGE BISHOP. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Letter to My Daughter. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

JESSICA HARRIS. Faulkner

House Books, 624 Pirate’s Alley, 524-2940 — The author and culinary historian signs her books. 1 p.m. Sunday.

KEITH WELDON MEDLEY. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The author discusses We As Freemen. 7 p.m. Wednesday. LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. NICK GALIFIANAKIS. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs If You Loved Me, You’d Think This Was Cute. 5:30 p.m. Monday.

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

France St., 944-0441; www.

yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La Divina

Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery, 2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday. PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”. Milton H.

Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. STEPHANIE BRUNO. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs New Orleans Streets. 1 p.m. Saturday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TROY GILBERT, JACQUES SOULAS & JERRY EDGAR . New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The authors sign The Cafe Degas Cookbook. 6 p.m. Friday.

UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s work. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WRITERS’ CIRCLE . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The group engages in writing exercises, and shares and critiques members’ works discusses Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird. 6 p.m. Monday. FOR COMPLETE LISTINGS, VISIT WWW.bestofneworleans.com.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <NEEDS MORE SUGAR > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Before closing in 2008, Sugar Park had earned a loyal following for its thin-crust, New York-style pizza. It’s taken some time, < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <but owners Stephen and Shannon Polier reopened the pizzeria in a thoroughly renovated cottage (3054 St. Claude Ave., 942-2047), and customers will find the new digs more familyWHAT friendly than the previous barroom incarnation. Sugar Park is Courtyard Grill BYOB, cash only and serves dinner Thursday through Monday.

am

B

WHERE

4430 Magazine St., 875-4164; www.courtyardgrillnola.com WHEN

Lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. RESERVATIONS

Accepted

HOW MUCH

Moderate

WHAT WORKS

Artful presentations, fresh vegetables WHAT DOESN'T

Some standards — falafel, hummus — lack zing

CHECK, PLEASE

Turkish and Persian twists on the familiar Middle Eastern format

Courtyard Grill’s Turkish cuisine ventures well beyond familiar Middle Eastern dishes.

Turkish Delight

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULTY

he name Courtyard Grill doesn’t reveal much about this Uptown restaurant, and a cursory glance at a menu stocked with items like hummus, grape leaves and kebabs doesn’t do much to distinguish it from the casual Middle Eastern cafes this city already has in abundance. But I discovered Courtyard Grill is quite different, and the first evidence arrived in the bread basket. Instead of the expected pita, it was filled with a sliced loaf of puffy, airy, house-made bread with a quilted, golden, crisp crust, along with a bowl of agili, a spicy, aromatic mix of tomatoes, garlic and olive oil for dipping. What followed was no ordinary kebab plate but the Iskandar kabab, a large platter mounded with strips of thin-cut crusty lamb and beef laid over hunks of crusty bread, all smothered in a mellow, buttery-smooth tomato gravy. Dessert was another surprise. Bypassing the baklava, we cut into a poached pear stuffed with walnuts and drizzled with chocolate. Courtyard Grill serves a crossroads cuisine, specializing in regal dishes from both the Turkish and Persian traditions. While many items look familiar on the menu, they often turn out very differently on the plate. The baba ghanoush, for instance, starts as the usual smoky, creamy eggplant spread, but the special version here is served over layers of sliced, grilled eggplant and topped by a fresh mix of sauteed vegetables and sumac. Doner is the Turkish rendition of those vertically grilled meats common in Middle Eastern restaurants, and it’s all over Courtyard Grill’s menu. Here, though, the doner slices of beef and lamb are more artfully combined for traditional dishes that stand out. For the döner durum, the meat is wrapped in thin, lavash-like bread

T

and sliced into thick cylinders arrayed around basmati rice, dabbed with yogurt and drenched with more of that buttery tomato sauce. For the hunkar begendi, pureed roasted eggplant and melted, stringy kashkaval cheese provide the foundation for a chunky mince of alternately rare and crusty lamb. Packed into the house bread, these meats also make sandwiches that beat the standard pita wrap hands down. Courtyard Grill opened last spring in the building that had been Tee-Eva’s praline and sno-ball shop for 16 years. Tee-Eva’s moved up Magazine Street, and the bright, mural-covered shop underwent a complete transformation. The kitchen is in front, visible from the sidewalk, and the dining room is in a cozy, cloistered space far back from the street — accessed by an elaborate side deck, ostensibly the namesake courtyard. Courtyard Grill is different than the local Middle Eastern standard, but the appeal of its hearty, robustly flavorful, attractively presented cooking is easy to grasp. To really do it up, order the gargantuan mixed kebab or the even larger kebab combo, which are both family-style feasts containing enough meat for four or more people. Work through your choice of wine (the restaurant is currently BYOB, but a bar is in the works) together with this collection of grilled beef, lamb and chicken and you’re in for a dinner that affirms a unifying pleasure of the table that spans many different traditions.

A diverse collection of local chefs will host the Chefs’ Charity for Children, a fundraiser for St. Michael Special School for developmentally challenged children. The chefs, including John Besh, Leah Chase, John Folse and Emeril Lagasse, conduct cooking demonstrations throughout the day and serve a banquet lunch of their creations. The event is March 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hilton Riverside Hotel. Tickets cost $55 and typically sell out early. Call 524-7285 for reservations.

five 5 IN

Five Spots To Find Super Bowl Snacks

COCHON BUTCHER

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-7675 www.cochonbutcher.com

Try artisanal meat trays, pimento cheese spread and boudin.

HILLBILLY BAR-B-Q

208 TALLULAH AVE., RIVER RIDGE, 738-1508 www.hillbillybbq.com

A pound of Thursday’s smoked chicken salad makes a dip for the ages.

KOZ’S

6215 WILSON ST., HARAHAN, 737-3933; 515 HARRISON AVE., 484-0841 www.kozcooks.com

Whole-loaf po-boys divide into finger sandwiches.

MIKIMOTO JAPANESE RESTAURANT & SUSHI BAR 3301 S. CARROLLTON AVE., 488-1881 www.mikimotosushi.com

Get sushi rolls delivered to many neighborhoods.

ST. JAMES CHEESE COMPANY 5004 PRYTANIA ST., 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

Pulling for the Packers? Get some cheese on the table.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Chateau Doyac Haut-Medoc BORDEAUX, FRANCE / $16 RETAIL

A blend of 70 percent Merlot and 30 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, this wine was aged in 25 percent new French barriques for one year. It offers soft aromas of forest floor, leather, cedar and black coffee, followed by firm tannins, earthy flavors, rustic notes and hints of spice and plum. The young Bordeaux will improve with time in the cellar. Drink it with rare steaks, hearty roasts and meat stews. Buy it at: Matassa’s Market and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Stella!, Tommy’s Cuisine, Tommy’s Wine Bar, Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro and Andrea’s Restaurant. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

A NONDESCRIPT FACADE CONCEALS AN EXCITING CROSSROADS CUISINE.

SCHOOL LUNCH SPECIAL

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> on a bed of sautéed vegetables. < < < < < < <Reservations < accepted. Lunch > > > > > > > >and > dinner daily. Credit cards. $ <<< FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large >> menu at Five Happiness offers <a <range of dishes from wonton

soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <sizzling < Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. and banquest facilities > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Delivery > Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax cards. $$ 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAMELLIA CAFE — 69455 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 809-6313; www.thecamelliacafe.com — The Riverbend platter is a feast of catfish, shrimp, oysters, crab fingers, soft shell crab and hushpuppies. The Monterey chicken is grilled and topped with onions, peppers, mushrooms and cheese. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat burgers topped with Gorgonzola and old-school patty melts are popular choices at this restaurant. Other options include barbecue, salads and sandwiches. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

CAFE THE BREAKROOM CAFÉ — 3431

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

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Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL BAR — 116

Univesity Place, 566-9444; www. roosevelthotelbar.com — The bar food here includes duck confit po-boys with pickled onions and Satsuma jam, and crawfish waffle cakes made with tarragon batter and topped with crawfish tails and creme fraiche. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork

Houma Blvd., Metairie, 941-7607 — Breakfasts of eggs, waffles or burritos are served any time at the Breakroom. The breakfast platter rounds up two eggs, bacon and a hashbrown patty. At lunch, the signature Breakroom sandwich is piled high with corned beef, pastrami, purple onion, lettuce and tomato. There’s also a selection of salads and a coffee bar. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ELIZABETH’S

RESTAURANT

601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www. elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE COMPANY —

5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www. stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun

St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

287-0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St., Suite 4, Gretna, 3681355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101

COFFEE/ DESSERT

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8875656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and

W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 8885533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed softshell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www. mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating

is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CELLERS OF RIVER RIDGE — 1801

Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellersrr.com — 1801 Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www. cellarsrr.com — The deli at this wine shop serves up hearty dishes and creative sandwiches like the “spicy bird” with smoked turkey, applewood-smoked bacon, pepper Jack cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo on a croissant. The shrimp remoulade salad is served over romaine with cucumbers and tomatoes. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI

& GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer

Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER AMERICAN PIE DINER — 2244 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 4682187 — American Pie serves breakfast around the clock and a menu of burgers and Americana classics. The Reuben has melted Swiss over pastrami and sauerkraut and is served with fries or chips. Chicken quesadillas with provolone and sauteed onions and peppers are one of the changing daily specials. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $

DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St.,

561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles

Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

“Since 1969”

cut

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02/10/11

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$ .99 A DOZEN

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Diners enjoy po-boys and casual fare at lunch at 5Fifty5 (Marriott Hotel, 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com). PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 8366859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave.,

410-9997;

www.japane-

sebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-

2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA focuses on local produce and refined techniques for its Southern and New Orleans cooking. New Orleans barbecue lobster comes with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

METAIRIE

1027 VILLAGE WALK

750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716

(985) 809-9101

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 01 > 2011

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur

COVINGTON

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

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Out2Eat City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock’s Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette, and seared foie gras comes with vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRaNEaN/ MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features Mediterranean cuisine such as beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville

St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honey-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, anchohoney coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

The Life on the Mississippi pie is one of the originals at Mark Twain’s Pizza Landing (2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com). PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

54

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT & BAR —

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations.

Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W.

Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Seafood-stuffed bell peppers are loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, and topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZa MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza. com — Mark Twain’s has salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia offers salads, pasta dishes, panini and gourmet pizzas made with homemade dough. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to hot sausage. There are also daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-

Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — The Peacemaker is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ity steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Pe-

ters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanish-accented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

SEaFOOD

VIEtNaMESE

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon

St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-qual-

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinen-

tal Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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55


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

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The Board of Directors of Xavier University Preparatory School (XUP) seeks a qualified candidate to serve as the President of the School. XUP is a Catholic, college preparatory school open to female students in 7th thru 12th grades.

• Demonstrate the ability to embody and promote the Catholic identity of the school • Hold a master’s or higher degree in a relevant discipline • Have at least five years experience in organizational/ educational administration For a complete job description, please log on to www.xavierprep.com.

Qualified candidates may apply by submitting a letter of interest, a resume, salary requirements and the names of three persons who can provide references (not to be contacted without notifying the candidate) to:

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Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

COLLEGES/SCHOOLS TEACH ENGL & LANG ARTS

In Middle & High school. Req Bach Engl or related, valid teacher cert., adherence to Archdiocese policies. Job in New orleans. Send resume to S. Augustine High school, 2600 A.P. Tureaud Ave. New Orleans LA 70119

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Bar in Auburn would like to bring in more funk/brass bands/rnb acts passing on I-85 to Atlanta or Montgomery/ B’ham via I-65. Negotiable on terms for details email Willialo at hotmail dot com

Garrett Admin. Service, Danbury, TX, has 5 positions for seed rice production. 3 mths experience required w/ references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 3/1/11 12/15/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX4822216.

We are looking for team members for the PJ’s Coffee Café of New Orleans at the Royal Sonesta Hotel.

COFFEE SHOP ATTENDANTS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

CALL NOw 504-828-6848

56

The New Orleans Recreation Development Commission (NORDC)

is currently accepting applications for the following positions:

Please forward your resume via fax to 504.835.6415 or e-mail to allisonj@acmeoyster.com

• • • • • •

Laborer** Recreation Leader Assistant** Senior Lifeguard Recreation Supervisor Recreation Maintenance Supervisor Recreation Coordinator I (Tennis) Applicants may apply in the Department of Civil Service

1300 Perdido Street (7th Floor) New Orleans, Louisiana Monday-Friday, 9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.

504-658-3500 **Applicants for these positions should apply at the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission (NORDC) 800 Race Street, New Orleans, Louisiana Monday-Friday, 9a.m.- 4p.m., 504-658-3000

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

LICENSED MASSAGE

Guetersloh Farm, Plains, TX, has 2 positions for cotton & peanuts. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 3/1/11 - 1/1/12 Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX4822410.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

M & M Leasing, Cleveland, MS has 6 positions for grain & oilseed crops. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.10/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/20/11 12/20/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 27472.

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Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

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Must be motivated, detail oriented, and have strong leadership skills, with particular strengths in the areas of customer service and employee relations. A minimum of 3-5 years experience in high volume, full service restaurants required. We offer a competitive salary and bonus structure, with excellent benefits including 401(K), health/dental/life insurance, paid sick and vacation, meal allowances, personal development and more.

Garrett Flying Service, Danbury, TX, has 4 positions for grain. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/25/10 - 11/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3076570.

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We are currently hiring for:

GLENN MICHAEL Requires

Wanted by Biofuels co. Must have masters deg or equiv in Acctg or Bus. & exp. providing leadership & coord of biofuel fin’l planning, debt financing, & budget mgmt/operations functions & commerce or in auditing. Applicants w/any suitable combo of edu, trainig or exp. are acceptable. Resumes to: Ms. Rebecca Noack, E D & F Man Biofuels, Inc., 365 Canal St., Ste. No 2929, New Orleans, LA 70130

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ENTERTAINMENT Gigs for NOLA music

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Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

of

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

PHASE II NOW LEASING

57


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. post-Katrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multi-family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking.

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5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

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FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine ONLY 4 LEFT! STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

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6131 Pitt St 2br/2ba "Audubon Park Tree House” $1800 1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1050

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE GETAWAY EVERYDAY!

Nice loft boathouse w/view of lake/ marina. 40ft cov slip, granite kit. $279K. Jennifer 504-250-9930, lanasa.com. HGI Realty 504-207-7575

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker

58

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $210,000, 504-832-1901.

1B/1B wd flrs, Sunroom, transoms, ctyd, w/d, Great lctn Call/txt 504669-8667

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

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1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

SHOP/OFFICE/WAREHOUSE

Available in Mid City 2300 sf, $800/mo. 504-813-2920 or jr70121la@aol.com

METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

4328 BANCROFT DRIVE $625,000 A LARGE WATERFRONT HOME ON PRESTIGIOUS STREET.

Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com

4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

Condo For Rent

2Bd/1Ba. 835sqft. Faces pool. Patio/ OS Pking.Laundry Facil./Pool on Premises. $850/mth 504-289-4411

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE

8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN STUDIO, 4012 ORLEANS

Large kitchen, new appliances, walk to Park or Bayou, $625 includes util and w/d. Call 713/204-5342.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY FRENCH QUARTER APTS

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

ALGIERS POINT

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

FRENCH QUARTER LOFT

1226 Chartres. 1 bdrm apt. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $900/mo. Mike, 919-4583.

NEW RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $650 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

GENTILLY

605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

4211 S. BROAD

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

Big Beautiful Bargain

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

BROADMOOR Totally renov sgl 2 br house, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d hkps, fully furn kit. $1350/mo + dep. Call Joe, 400-7273. 2-3 BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrplc. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/ mo. 874-3195

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504/495-6044

MID CITY

CARROLLTON 8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

LAKEFRONT

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

4208 DUMAINE STREET

1 blk City Park betw Carrollton/Cty Pk Ave, 3 lg rms cent a/h w/d hdwd flrs, ceil fans, thruout. Avail immed. $900/ mo. 504-234-0877

TREME 2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1012 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 bdrms, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood floors, w/d, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail now!

isaac Kennel #A12175693

Isaac is a 6-month-old, neutered, tuxedo DSH. He’s a playful little guy who enjoys being petted, brushed and cuddled. To meet Isaac or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

NEAR TOURO HOSPITAL

940 Aline St. Newly renov, 2 br, 1 ba, lr, nook , kit w/ appl, w/d, cen a/h, fans, hdwd flrs. Wtr pd. $900/mo + dep. No sec 8. No pets. 382-7204

NEAR UNIV * GARDEN DISTRICT

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs,ceil fans, scrn porch. $1150 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1525 Annunciation

Across from Annunciation square park, 1b/1b w/d hookup, $900/m call 504-256-1464

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

BYWATER

BYWATER STUDIO (2 apts)

Downstairs avail. now, upstairs avail end of Jan. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, $900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1510 CARONDELET

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. Util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 443-4488

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. $1156/mo. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

4201 CARONDELET

1 blk parade rt, 2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, cen a/h, w/w carpet, ceil fans. $850/mo. ASC Real Estate, 504-421-6473.

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

815 PINE ST

1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt.

Efficiency, near Mag.

1 Pers. Studio, 930 Jackson. Hrdwd Flrs. Cen A/H. W/D. Utilities Incld. $500/mth +dep. No Pets. 250-9010

Weekly tails Fritz is a 2-year-old, neutered, terrier mix. He’s full of playful, goofy, energy and enjoys giving kisses. Fritz would do best in a home without small children. To meet Fritz or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. fritz

Kennel #A12204170

jazzy Kennel #A11945019

Jazzy is a 1-year-old, spayed, bunny-love. Soft and snuggly, Jazzy is one of several bunnies currently available for adoption. To meet Jazzy or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 1017 Ursulines

(Parking) gated, offstreet, FQ

$200

931 Bienville

(parking) offstreet, gated, remote ctrl entry $175+

500 Mandeville #5

2/2 Marigny,cvd pkg,pool,all extras! $1600

3315 Iberville #2

1/1 Freshlypainted,lotsnatlight,goodloc! $650

1108 Dauphine

1/1 furn, updated w/view of crtyrd $850

1000 St Louis

2/1 renov,carpet,central a/c wd on site $1050

527 Spain

1/1 near streetcar, carpet, 800 sqft $800

1228 Royal #6

1/1 furn w/pool&w/d on site

631 Dauphine

eff 1yr lease, w/d on site, crtyd

835 St. Louis “A”

2/2 Ground flr units Cetral AC ctyd WD $1600

1037 Chartres

1/1 crtyrd, balc, wtr included

$825

718 barracks #5

1/1

$800

1700 Napoleon

$1000 $600

1.5/1 greatlocation1blocktoStCharles $850

712 St. Philip

1/1 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1625

715 Royal H

1/1 cozy 125 sqft in the heart of the FQ $700

232 Decatur #3A

1/1 Furnished, balc w/ grt views! $1950

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

bear

Kennel #A12090059

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

1 block to St. Charles 1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

1730 NAPOLEON AVENUE

Weekly Tails Bear is a 3 1/2-year-old, neutered, Chihuahua. He’s a bit shy, loves to give kisses, would do best in a home without small children and will need TLC during his complimentary heartworm treatment. Bear is one of several Chihuahuas currently at the shelter! To meet Bear or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

GRT LOCATIONS!

1137 TREME

59


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS UPTOWN ReDUCeD PRICe

• 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 TOO LATE! $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $239,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 59

62

2105 VAleNCe

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

30’x120’ LOT ZONED FOR DOUBLE. Residential block, build a single or double, for owner occupied or investment piece. Close to St Charles & Napoleon. Walk to parades. Close to Freret St which has many new renovations and businesses. $49,000

3506 ANNUNCIATION CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

office

504.895.4663

MICHAEL ZAROU abr, gri, srs

(504) 895-4663

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS 03 CADILLAC SPORTS CAR - CTS Exc cond, low mi, has all extras, looks & drives like new. $300 down, take over note $135/mo, w/wrnty. 836-9801

IMPORTED AUTOS 05 KIA RIO

fully loaded, in perfect condition. Only 40K mi. $300 down and take over note of $65/mo with warranty. 836-9801.

05 NISSAN ALTIMA

In Perfect cond, low miles, like new. Fully loaded. $300 down & take over note $118/mo with warranty. 836-9801

84’ MERCEDES BENZ 300d

Turbo Diesel. Classic Car. Runs great. 165,000 mi. Well kept. New battery $4,500 obo. (504) 897-9655.

MERCHANDISE BLDG. MATERIALS SAWS

14” table saw & 24” band saw. $1300 each. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

CRAFTS Prof Embroidery Machine

6 inch needle, baby lock, 2 years old. Many access. Excellent condition. Call (504) 881-6741.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGAL NOTICES NEW ORLEANS RECREATION DEVELOPMENT

The New Orleans Recreation Development Commission meetings will be held the 2nd Tuesday of every month (with the exception of March, this meeting will be held on the 3rd Tuesday) at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 1300 Perdido Street, New Orleans Louisiana. The dates for the Commission meetings are as follow: February 8, 2011 March 15, 2011 April 12, 2011 May 10, 2011 June 14, 2011 July 12, 2011 August 9, 2011 September 13, 2011 October 11, 2011 November 8, 2011 December 13, 2011 ************************************** The New Orleans Recreation Development Foundation meetings will be held the 1st Monday of every other month, starting in February, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 1300 Perdido Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. The dates for the Foundation meetings are as follow: February 7, 2011 April 4, 2011 June 6, 2011 August 1, 2011 October 3, 2011 December 5, 2011

SUPPLEMENTAL CITATION PROBATE PROCEEDINGS FILE NO. 2010-2548

Testamentary to Lawrence W. McMinn and Beth E. McMinn.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, BY THE GRACE OF GOD FREE AND INDEPENDENT

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the seal of the Surrogate’s Court of Monroe County is affixed hereto. WITNESS, Hon. Edmund A. Calvaruso, Surrogate of the County of Monroe, New York on the 4th day of January, 2011

To: (1) Kenneth Denton and Tammy Denton, as distributees, that is, grandnephew and grandniece of Dale L. Fones, deceased, and Katherine Denton, Jonathan Denton, Katelyn Denton, Kate Denton, and John W. Denton, IV, as distributees, that is, great grandnephews and great grandnieces of Dale L. Fones, deceased, whose estate is involved in these proceedings, whose mailing addresses and/or residences cannot, after due diligence, be ascertained by Petitioners, if living, but if deceased, their distributees, legal representatives, assigns and all persons who by purchase, inheritance or otherwise have or claim to have an interest in the estate of Dale L. Fones, derived through said Kenneth Denton, Tammy Denton, Katherine Denton, Jonathan Denton, Katelyn Denton, Kate Denton and John W. Denton, IV, whose addresses are unknown to the Petitioners A Petition having been filed by Lawrence W. McMinn and Beth E. McMinn, domiciled at 4571 Belknap Hill Road, Branchport, New York 14418 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Monroe County, at the Monroe County Court House, Room 533, Hall of Justice, in the City of Rochester, New York, on February 15, 2011, at 9:30 A.M. why a Decree should not be made in the Estate of Dale L. Fones, lately domiciled at 526 Winchester Street, Rochester, New York: (1) admitting to probate a certain instrument in writing bearing the date of September 4, 1991 and a certain instrument in writing bearing the date of March 22, 2001, relating to real and/or personal property to be duly proved as the Last Will and Testament and Codicil of Dale L. Fones; and (2) granting Letters

IMAGE BY BRIAN PERKINS

Mark Annunziata, Chief Clerk Monroe County Surrogate’s Court Attorney for Petitioners: ROBERT C. FOSTER, ESQ. Address of Attorney: 305 Liberty Street Penn Yan, New York 14527 Telephone No. (315) 536-2500 NOTICE TO DISTRIBUTEES OF DALE L. FONES This Citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not obligated to appear in person. If you fail to appear or file written objections, it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney at law appear for you. The foregoing Citation is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Hon. Edmund A. Calvaruso, Judge of the Surrogate’s Court of the State of New York, County of Monroe dated January 4, 2011 and filed with the Petition and other papers in the Office of the Clerk of said Surrogate’s Court at Room 533, Hall of Justice, Rochester, New York. The objective of this proceeding is to probate the Last Will and Testament and Codicil of Dale L. Fones, deceased, lately domiciled at 526 Winchester Street, Rochester, New York, and to appoint Lawrence W. McMinn and Beth E. McMinn as Co-Executors of said Last Will and Testament and Codicil, and to permit the transfer of real property known as 526 Winchester Street, Rochester, New York and other real property owned by the decedent. Dated: January 4th, 2011 ROBERT C. FOSTER, ESQ. Attorney for the Petitioners 305 Liberty Street Penn Yan, New York 14527-1136 (315) 536-2500

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 01 > 2011

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

LEGAL NOTICES

’s ine g t n n le Va oppi asy! Sh e E d Ma

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W i n e W e d n e s d ay s $ 5 w i n e S b y t h e g L a S S a L L d ay

C O C K T A i L t H u R s d ay s $ 5 S P e C i a L t y C O C K ta i L S a L L d ay

L U n C H s P e c I a l $ 2 0

t h r e e

C O U r S e

L U n C h

dinner: MOn-Sat 5:30-10:00 • LUnCh: wed-Sat 11:30-3:00 brUnCh: SUn 11:00-3:00

2800 Magazine Street • nOLa 70115 (504)265-0421 • coquette-nola.com


Gambit New Orleans - Feb 1, 2011