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Patricia Forde • Festival Director 1992 is the Fifteenth Birthday of Galway Arts Festival. The brainchild of Ollie JeMings, the Festival first saw the light of day in 1978, its inaugural line-up including John McGahem, De Danaan and Ronnie Scott. The former two have made several return appearances as the Arts Festival has steadily expanded beyond anything its founders could have imagined as they plotted and organised that first tentative yet fateful event. It's worth pausing for a moment to reflect on the Galway in which that Festival occurred. Druid were still operating out of the tiny Fo'c'sle Theatre in Dominic St , the Arts Centre didn't even exist, Kennys was the only gallery worthy of the name and the very word "Festival" suggested little beyond Horse-racing or Oyster-swallowing. Today of course it's all very different. Galway Arts Centre operates out of two premises, new Gal111ries have opened in Bridge Mills, UCG, and Abbeygate St. (River-run). Druid are internationally-renowned and new theatre groups have emerg ed; Na Fanaithe, Punchbag, Galway Youth Theatre and, most spectacular of all, Macnas.

Of course, GAF cannot claim sole credit for this eruption or artistic talent but it has cer• tainly helped create the ideal conditions for its emergence. One or its greatest successes has been its ability to display, year in year out, that "arts festivals" needn't be high­ brow, elitist affairs but can appeal to large numbers of the public, while still embodying the very highest standards of artistic excel­ lence. Thanks to its imaginative program­ ming, featuring such unforgettable groups as Footsbarn, Els Comediants, and last year's Royal de Luxe, the people of Galway, includ· ing its businesspeople and administrators can clearly see the real worth of the Arts to the Community. Subsequently, support for the Festival from these sectors has grown over the years, enabling it to be ever more ambitious in both scale and diversity. The vital role played by all the Arts Festival sponsors c annot be under-estimated, whether they be bodies like the Arts Council, Galway Corporation or FAS, large firms like Northern Telecom, Thermo-King or Smith· wicks, or the many "Friends of the Festival",

There remains a real problem in terms of suitable venues, which has to be conclusively resolved in the near future if all the good work and progress is not to be wasted. Galway Arts Festival will continue to fea­ ture the very best in international and 'native' talent. Hopefully, the next 15 years will be every bit as exciting, vibrant and sue· cessful as the first 15 have been!


Sunday, July 19. 9.00 p.m.

Ensemble 1492

The members of ENSEMBLE 1492, Europe's foremost exponents of Renais· sance music, (have come together to honour the music and people of Spain) on the 500th anniversary of the First Voyage of Discovery ot Christopher Columbus. The Quincentenary Pro­ gramme consists of sacred and secular music from the Spanish Kingdoms dur· ing the Age of Discovery, enriched with readings from Columbus' own journal of the First Voyage. Luiz Alves da Silva (counter tenor), Simon Berr idge (tenor), Henry Wickham (baritone), Christopher Purves (bass), Beatrice Delpierre (shawm, dulcian), William Lyons (shawm, dukian, flute), Richard Cheetham (alto & tenor sackbut), Patrick Jackman (bass sackbut), Christopher Wilson (vihuela), Pedro Estevan (percussion), Sonia Ritter (narrator). "A Voyage of Discovery" Ayo visto lo mappa mundi et la carta di A11011. navigare ("I have seen the map of the world and the navigator's chart") Mass - "Ayo visto lo mappa mundi'

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Mundus et musica et totus concentus B. Ramos de Pareja Qu'es mi vida preguntays Jo ha 1111es Cornago Navego in hondo mar Bernard Gonzales Ave color vini clari Juan Ponce Todos los bienes del mundo J11a11 de/ E11zi11a

Di, perra mora A11011. Danza alta ''la Spagna" Francisco de la Torre Ay, Santa Maria A11011. 0 voy Roman Durandarte, durandarte Millan Propinan de melyor A11011. Una sanosa porfia J11a11 del E11zi1111

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Arts Festival Programme St. Nicholas Church

Monday, July 20 lunchtime, 1:10 p.m.

Kathleen Dineen, soprano Malcolm Proud, harpsichord Kathleen Dineen graduated from UCC in 1980 with a B.Mus. Degree. In 1987 she was awarded an Arts Council bursary to study medieval music nt the Schola Cantorum in Basel, Switzerland. She now performs widely with various ensembles throughout Europe and the USA and has made a number of recordings with Harmonia Mundi. Born in Dublin, Malcolm Proud has lived in Kilkenny for the past ten years where he is the organist of St, Canice's Cathedral and a full·time lecturer in Music at the Waterford RTC. Since win· ning the 1982 Edinburgh International Harpsichord Competition Malcolm has performed throughout Ireland, Britain and Continental Europe and in the next few weeks will be performing in Switzer­ land and France. He has recorded for Virgin Classics, Claddagh, Hyperion, Meridian, CRD and EMI, and Meridian has recently released his recording of Bach's Sonatas for viola da gamba and harpsichord. I. English Have you ere seen the morning sun? Henry Lawes {1596-1662) Why so pale and wan fond lover? William Lawes (1602· 1645) Fine knacks for ladies Jolin Dowland (1562+ 1626) Like hermit poor Nicholns Lanier {15881666) Sellinger's Rownde William Byrd (15431623) (harpsichord solo) II. Italian Madonna, qual certezza Pllilippe Verdelotts (d. ca. 1540) Se l'aura spira Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643) (from "II Primo Libro d'Arie musicale") Two Sonatas in E major for harpsichord Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) K. 215 Andante K. 216 Allegro III. Handel My breast with tender pity swells C.F. Handel (1685-1759) (from "Hercules'') Oh had I Jubal's lyre G.F. Handel (from "Joshua")

Lunchtime Concerts are sponsored by Foras Eireann

I C. F. Shaw Trust

Tuesday, July 21 lunchtime, 1:10 p.m.

Laura Chislett,

Laura Chislctt flute

Australian flutist Laura Chislett will take time out from her European tour for this exclusive Irish recital. Praised for her "consummate virtuosity" and a "notable combination of technical control, intelli­ gence and sensitivity", Laura offers a programme of character sketches of the international flute, by composers from Australia, the USA, Korea, and the UK, making use of the bass flute (rarely heard in Ireland) and presenting differ­ ent aspects of the modern flute. Her selection of traditional pieces portrily the flute in various "pastoral'' settings. Laura Chislett studied at the Sydney Conservatory of Music and has also studied flute in Zurich and Italy. Since 1985 she has performed widely as a soloist in Europe, the USA and Australia. She is married to the British composer Chris Dench and they are currently resi· dent in Australia. Cyril Scott: The Extatic Shepherd Michael Smetanin: nontiscordardime (bass flute, 1991) Pierre O. Ferroud: Trois Pleces (1921-22) 1. Bergere captive 2. Jade 3. Toan-Yan Richard Karpen: Exchange (flute and computer generated tape, 1987) Claude Debussy: Syrinx (1914) Younghi Pagh-Paan: Dreisam-Nore (1975) Chris Dench: Sulle Scale della Fenice (1986-89) Wednesday, July 22 lunchtime, 1:10 p.m.

Sebastian Lipman, concert harp Born in France in 1965, Sebastian Lipman has been solo harpist with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra since 1988. He is taking up residence in the West of Ireland in order to pursue an international solo career, following successful performances with many of the world's finest orchestras. A graduate of the Paris Conservatory of Music and Indiana University, he has been a soloist


Olivier Messineu (1908-1992) Apparition de l'Eglise eternelle Mnx Driscl111er (1891·1971) Prelude and Fugue in A minor Leos Ja11ncek (1854·1928) Adagio Edgnr Arro (1911·1978) Three Estonian Folk Melodies Sat 25th July, 1pm, Sun 26th July, 12 noon.

Wigan Youth Jazz Orchestra The award winning Wigan Youth Jazz Orchestra have an extensive repertoire and feature music from Basie, Ellington, Rich, Ferguson, Miller, Herman, Heath, Kenton. The orchestra has toured Great Britain, USA, Hong Kong, Hungary, Poland, and France. Since 1985 the orchestra has made four albums.

Sebastian Lipman plays tire tire liarp

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with the Norwegian Radio Orchestra, the Oslo Philharmonic, and the Radio Orchestra of Berlin. Marcel Tournicr: Theme and Variations G.F. Handel: Passacaillc J.S. Bach: Giga (from Violin Partita no. 2) D. Scarlatti: Sonata in A major

American Willtls Cor1cert Bnn,I will be i11 Gnlway 011 July 17

Wednesday 22nd July. returned from a concert tour of Germany. The programme (to be announced) will include arrangements of popular pieces by Strauss and Joplin as well as some classical masterpieces for wind quintet by Milhand and Nielsen.

John Thomas: Minstrel's Adieu to his native land. Felix Godefroid: Etude de concert

Friday, July 24. 1:10 p.m. Bryan Hesford, organ

Isaac Albeniz: Malagu-ena Cabezan/Paleno/Ribagaz: Pavane and Variations Romance Hachas Granados: "Oriental", Spanish Dance no.2 Manuel de Falla: Spanish Dance no. I, "La vida Breve" Carlos Salzedo: Theme and Variations on a Theme in Ancient Style

Born in Manchester, Bryan Hesford was a pupil of varous local organists until moving to Paris to study with Marcel Dupre and also Jean Langlais. Further study in Germany under the Silesian organist and composer Max Drischner was undertaken in the late 1950's. Bryan Hesford has held appointments as organist at a number of churches in England and also in Norway and is currently organist at St. Nicholas' Collegiate Church in Galway. He has performed and made recordings in the Soviet Union, Belgium, Norway, Germany, France, and has recently returned from a concert tour of Hungary. Also a composer, Dr. Hesford has composed for the liturgies of the Church including a Mass for the Cathedral at Eger, Hungary, and a Requiem for the Latvian Choral Society in Riga.

Thursday, July 23, 1:10 p.m.

Darius Wind Quintet Marion Bauer, flute Elizabeth Kicks, oboe Deirdre O'Leary, clarinet Hilary Macken, bassoon Cormac O hAodaln, horn Formed by students at the Royal North­ ern College of Music in Manchester, the Darius Wind Quintet gives its first public recital in Ireland today. Its members come from England, and Scotland, and they have recently

Henry Purcell (1659-1695) Rondo from "Abdelazar" /.S. Bacli (1685-1750) Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring, BWV 147 Tommasso Albinoni (1671-1750) Adagio Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) Sonata No. 2 in C minor, Op. 65

Classical Concerts are organised in association with Music For Galway 3

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Fri. 24th JULY

Regina Nathan, soprano One of Ireland's foremost, young classi· cal singers, Regina Nathan is a multiple award·winner and has sung throughout Austria, Germany, France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Britain and Ireland. Selected by RTE to represent Ireland in The Fifth Cardiff Singer Of The World Competition, she won enormous critical acclaim and is in great demand as an oratorio soloist and recitalist. She appeared at the Point in Dublin with Domingo at the end of '91. Winner o f the outstanding New Entertainer Award at the National Entertainment Awards in 1991, Regina will be accompanied by the distin• guished pianist Malcolm Martineau. MOZART: Basta vincesti. DONAUDY: 0 del mio amato ben. SCHUBERT: Im Fruhling. Gretchen am Spinnrade. BRAHMS: Feldeinsamkeit. Meine Hebe ist grun. WOLF: Verborgenheit. STRAUSS: Cacilie. PUCCINI: 0 mio babbino caro. Che ii bel sogno di Doretta. BALFE: I dream't I dwelt in Marble Halls. R TAUBER: My Heart and I. WEST IRISH TRAD: I will walk with my love. IRISH TRAD: My Lagan Love. Danny Boy. STANFORD: Calico Dress. OFFENBACH: Elle a fui la toourterelle. STRAUSS: Klange der Heimat. Sponsored by

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Bank CFlreland.


NEW ORLEANS REVUE ''1'111 going to Nt'lU Or/rans, I wa111111 see the Mardi Gras, When I see the Mardi Gras, I wa1111a know what lite cnrnival for".

So sang one of New Orleans most famed denizens, Professor Longhair, in his 19-19 hit 'Mardi Gras In New Orleans'. Now, th.mks to the Arts Festival and the New Orleans Revue, the spirit of Mardi Gras is coming to Galwa y and we're ALL "gonna know what the carnival for", i.e. celebration, joyful abandon, and shakin' and shimmyin' the night away to some of the finest music on the entire planet.

New Orleans music was founded in a swirling, cosmopolitan atmosphere which absorbed the influences of many ethnic cultu res. The city's Colonial background .ind its status as the South's principal port resulted in .in nstonishingly·mixed population; French, English, Creoles, Blacks, Cajuns, Mexicans, Native Americans, Cubans ... even Chinese, amongst others. Amidst the diversity of musical styles and progressions, the "New Orleans Sound" remains constant; a free­ wheeling, happy-go-lucky spirit that harks back to the era of the great Mardi Gras and Funeral Parades. The New Orleans Revue assembles some of the finest, and most enduring exponents of that intoxicating beat. Backing the truly stellar headliners are 'The New [sland Social And Pleasure Club', an amalgam of some of the finest session-men in the State. This is where The Groove really is.

out backing strippers in the French Quarter and going on to release over a dozen fine albums. He's contributed to the soundstracks of films like "St. Elmo's Fire", "Colors", and "Angel Heart". His most recent album, "In A Sentimental Mood', shows his distinctive piano· playing and whiskey-cured voice to be as good as ever.

JOHNNY ADAMS ZACHARY RICHARD While the C.ijun/Zydeco sound provides the backbone to accordionist Zachary Richard's music, it's also imbued with clements of blues, Afro-Cuban jazz, R & B, and good olc rock'n'roll. 1 le's played to sell-out audiences throughout the U.S. and beyond.One critic wrote of his stage· show; " ... a tremendous musician, a charismatic figure and dynamic stage· performer capable of setting the house on fire".

WILLY DE VILLE

'Dr. John' (ali.is Mac Rebennack) is one of modern music's most enduring character creations, with his flamboyant Bayou­ sorcerer attire and smoky evocations of backwoods magic. He's been making music for nigh on four decades, starting

First came to prominence as frontman of Mink De Ville, whose eponymous first release was \'Oted 1977's 'Best Debut Album' by Rolling Stone, with Willy also being voted 'Best Male Vocalist'. A string of critically-acclai med albums have followed, including 'Return To Magenta', 'Le Chat Bleu' and 1987's 'M iracle', produced by M.irk Knopfler. Nominated for a Best-Song Oscar in 1988 for his "Storybook of Love", from 'The Princess Bride'. Having lived in New Orleans in the early Ei ghties, he mov.ed there permanently three years ago..

Hailed by Rolling Stone as" ... a feast of vocal fire, supple melodic swing and melancholic urgency", Johnny Adams is, quite simply, a stupendous singer. His amazing range, from a guttural baritone to soaring falsetto, enables him to handle c,·erything form ball.ids to blues, jazz and soul.In 1989, his album 'Room With A View Of The Blues' won a W.C. Handy Award (the blues equivalent of a Grammy) for Best Male Vocal.

THE WILD MAGNOLIAS

Foremost of the so-called 'Mardi Gras Indian Tribes'. These .ire actually groups of mainly black performers, extravagantly bedecked in 'Indian' beads and feathers. The 'Tribes' originated as 19th c. sod.ii organisations, inspired by the extensive Jinks between Bl.ick and Native Americ.in cultures. They also enabled New Orleans' blacks to participate in Mardi Gras, and pre$crved vanishing African drumming styles. The Wild Magnolias, led by Bo Dallis, h.ive been recording since 1970; their 1990 album 'Tm Back ... At Carnival Time'' was named as one of that year's Top Ten Albums by the 'New York Times.'

EDDIE BO

Hails from a legendary family of New Orleans jazzmen and boasts a career stretching back thirty-three years. He has a unique style of piano-playing and arranging which delightfully fuses R & B, Be-Bop and Funk. A prolific songwriter and producer, he has worked with many of his city's greatest performers. Widely acknowledged a s one of the most important and influential figures in the New Orleans' music scene.


Julie Dclpy plays Sn/Jeth i11 HVoyager. H

FOURTH FILM FLEADH FEAST

The Galway Film Flcadh is now in its fourth year and enjoys a solidly based reputation as the film-maker's, the film­ buffs and the punter's fostival. This year's Fleadh is a veritable feast, with over 100 films and a wide v ariety of categories in a very strong programme. There is a special focus this year on Song and Dance, with screenings of, among others, Top Hat, Bandwagoon, Guys and Dolls and Newsies. On Thursday night there will be a gala screening of the classic Singin' i n the Rain which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. To mark this anniversary, Donald 0 Connor star of the film, will be leading the festivities at the screening.

Other sections in the Fleadh programme include New International Releases, First Features, New Irish Shorts, Children's, Animation films, Documentaries and Conferences. All this in addition to being a meeting place for public and film­ makers beside the cinema, where food and drink and talk flow liberally until the wee small hours.

OPENING FILM

The Irish premiere of the witting and entertaining romp, Rebecca's Daughters, will open the Fleadh on Wednesday 15th.

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The premiere will be attended by its Director, well known documentary maker and social commentator K arl francis and by producer Chr is Sievcrnich, who also produced Wim Wenders' Paris Texas and John Huston's Tl,c Dead. Rebecca's Daughters is a delightfully entertaining talc, set in Wales in 1843 and starring Peter O Toole as the unjust and drunken Lord Sarn and Paul Rhys as the gallantly handsome soldier Anthony Raine (and Rebecca!) with Joely Richardson as the lovely Rhiannon.

INTERNATIONAL RELEASES AND FIRS T FEATURES

Among the International releases to be seen at the Fleadh are the award-winning Tolo The Hero, written and directed by Jaco Van Dormael and attended by producer Pierre Drouot on Wednesday 15th. Peter Greenway's no\'cl version of The Tempest, Prospero's Books is on S aturday 18th. New International releases include Hal Hartley's Simple Men, starring Robert Burke as Bill McCabe and William Sage as his wildly different brother Dennis. A plus for the Fleadh: Robert Burke will be present at the screening. The film is a quirky piece which brings a whole new meaning to the word "dysfunctional" in relation to suburban families. I Was on Mars is a 8

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first film by Swiss born director Dan Levi and is the trugi-comedy odyssey of, woman, Silvia (Maria Schrader) whc draws bad luck like a magnet and seek. sweet revenge in an unfamiliar Ne,• York City. The dreadful My Own Privat, Idaho, starring River Phoenix and Keam Ree\'es, written and directed by Gus Vm Sant who also directed Dmgstore Cowl10y and produced by Laurie Parker can b< seen on Thursday 16th. Nord is ar exciting first film by French film-make. Xa,•ier Beauvais (Thursday 16th); Ga! Food Lodging by U.S. director Allisor Anders is a dazzling debut film about the strength of three women in the Ne,, Mexico desert (Sunday 19th); the Canadi;m film-maker Srinh•as Krishna wrote, directed, co-produced and stars in Masala which is a funky, comic, epic thal has all the spices that m;:ike an Indian dish (Friday 17th). A special treat is th( Galway premiere of Barton Fink which will bring its producer. Ben Barenholtz, to Galway for his first ,·isit.

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY

Establi shed in Berlin in 1991 the Euro pean Film Academy aims to promote European cinema worldwide and presents the Europe;:in equivalent of the Osc.1rs. Three award winning Academy f ilms will be screened at the Fleadh: Ultra, Le Petit Criminel and


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Top left: HMepl1isto , directed by Istvan Sznbo a11d stnrri11g Klaus Maria Bra11dae11r, Below left: �sweet Emma, Dear Bobe·. directed by lsttta11 Sznbo. H

Children of Nature. Aina Bellis, the Secretary General of the E.F.A. will attend the Fleadh.

DOCUMENTARIES

As always, the documentary section is as hard-hit ting as ever. Thank You And Goodnight, directed by Jan Oxenberg is a unique, inventive, ceerebral comedy about saying goodbye to someone you love and the collective response of family and friends to the death of Grandma Mae Joffe, (Wednesd ay 15th); Dream Receivers is the story behind James Vance vs. Judas Priest, produced and directed by David Van Taylor (Thursday 16th). Thursday's documentary section screens The Reincarnation of Khensur Rinp oche - the fascinating story behind the search for the rein ca ma tion of spiritual master Khensur Rinpoche, produced and directed by a Tibetan and Indian film-making team. It will be followed by Alan Gilsenan's topic al documentary Prophet Songs. The award­ winning Broyher's Keeper, co-directed by Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky tells the story of the arrest of an elderly, illiterate man for the supposed murder of his equally elderly brother in a small town in the U.S. and captures the unfolding story of the arrest, trial and rallying support of the tow nspeople (Saturday 18th).

Above: Io11e Skye as Trwli i11 �Gas Footl Lotlgi11g .

TRIBUTE

Award winning Hungarian film-maker lst\'an Szabo, t o whom the Fleadh is paying tribute, will attend the Fleadh for the s creening of three of his films Confidence, the Oscar-winning Mephisto and his latest, Sweet Emma, Dear Bobe.

KIERAN HICKEY

This year's retrospective for an Irish film­ maker will focus on the work of Kieran Hickey. Four of the director's films will be screened on Sunday 19th: Exposure, Criminal Conversat ions, At tracta and the Rockingham Shoot.

NEW IRISH SHORTS

The work of young Irish film-makers is always an important aspect of the Fleadh. This year the demand for the New Irish Shorts section is greater than ever with 35 films scheduled for Friday and Saturday and Sunday and requiring a 9 a.m. start! The section features, in the main, the work of graduate students from Rathmines, Dun Laoghaire, UCO, The Galway Film Resource Centre and new work from Indep endent Irish film-

makers as far afield as New York. This year there arc also two new Irish language shorts and a first feature from Co. Down.

ANIMATION

A stronger than ever showing in this section which has ocme to be a special feature of the Fleadh. New student work from Ireland has increased in quality and will be screened on Sunday morning - as well as a special treat for audiences� Clay­ mation from the Aardman Studios in Bristol. On Friday 17th there is a programme of the extraordinary work of Jan S\•ankmajer, the Czechoslo\·.ikian model-animator.

CHILDRENS'

Regular afternoon screenings of children's films this year include An American Tail, Rockateer, Fern Gully, and Superman.

SURPRISE

Late night screenings of Cult Classics in the C ar Park (beside the Claddagh Palace) continue this year. This is an open air surprise event! So keep your eyes peeled and your dancing shoes on!

The Film Aeadh is aided by The Arts Council, R. T.E., Abbey Films, Udaris n11 Gaellschta and Galway Arts Festival. The poster is sponscred by McSwl9gans.

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Theatre Sans Fil. (Theatre Without Strings ) Montreal

JULY 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 , BIG TOP, FISHERIES FIELD ln the 1950's JRR Tolkien published what is, even today, regarded as the greatest Fantasy tale ever written. A three-volume, spell-binding epic, 'The Lord Of The Rings' has captivated the hearts and imaginations of generations of readers. In 1985 the world famous Theatre Sans Fil (Theatre Without Strings) of Montreal undertook the awe­ inspiring task of adapting it for the stage. All told, it has taken over 30,000 hours of work, but the result was spectacularly worth the long haul. Exclusively for the Galway Arts Festival, through the generous sponsorship of Northern Telecom, Theatre Sans Fil present the European premier of this multi-media show. 'Lord Of The Rings' uses a stunning combination of actors, giant puppets, state-of-the-art laser lighting and quadrophonic sound to draw the audience deep into the beating heart of this epic battle between Good and Evil.

THE STORY: The Hobbits Frodo and Sam are entrusted with a desperate mission by the great Wizard Gandalf. They must travel into the very stronghold of the enemy, into the dread Land of Mordor, to destroy the Ring of Power. This perilous task must be accomplished before Sauron, Lord of the Land of Mordor, learns that the One Ring has been found and seizes it to finally enslave all of middle earth. They are aided on their quest by the elf, Legolas, the dwarf, Gimli, the human warrior, Boromir and the mysterious and powerful Strider. Their enemies are many and terrible .... the monstrous Ores, the gaunt, skull­ headed Black Riders, the treacherous, toad-like Gollum and the Black Magic and evil sorcery of Sauron himself, whose servants these terrible beings are. 10


THE SHOW: To bring this sweeping saga to life sixty five life-sized, and larger-than-life-sized, rod-puppets are used in the classic Japanese 'Blilck Theatre' technique. Galway audiences will find that the operators, masked and dressed in black, swiftly disappear as the puppet characters come vividly, sometimes terrifyingly, to life. The pappetel?rS,f:e,. ,·�· all trained dancers and the g,iahl ,..z. "' characters move about !he stagi?.w� �-� ...·:· eerie grace. Theatre Sani;. F,il !'t�v� ii...�. . • -I . l.�!.,,t,' . d eserved reputation for �:,yr1o.n0,· e ;_ language of puppetry and creating �ir . ,. '. " I own, unique, brand of stage-i;nag1c;.,

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T he animated ch aracters ·interact seamlessly with actors ·in ,'specially ' designed masks and the !;�cj\\l Is realised with ultra-sophisticated s�cial effects, black-lights, lasers, nE\on,-';jnd ... old­ fashioned magic! There is. Jl \massive, quadrophonic sound system Jci relay the specially-commissioned, original sound­ track by Jean Sauvage and Rob ert Seguin and the pre-reco,h:led'.voices and songs of the characters,:pla'y:ecl by sorbe of Canada's most famo�us. Jctors ahd , , singers. '

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Huge, bat-winged creatureSts\v�op•d'o¼!,h· y'· from the roof to glide low, 'av.er. tlie �.; audience and hideous mo!ffl/f9 the stage to sweep their e,vil, seatc:h!ii&hf; ·· eyes over you! You will find' yourself swept, irresistibly, into this soaring

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fantasy which alternates moments of poignancy with pitched battles and desperate encounters with towering monsters.

Theatre Sans Fil have managed the all­ bu t-imp ossible task of stripp ing Tolkien's masterpiece to the bone, retaining only the essential elements of plot and character, to produce a coherent and audio-visually rivetting stage-story. This, literally, spell binding show lasts a little over two hours, with an intermission.

HTo say tl1at tlte Lord of tlie Rings is a puppet sltow is a little like saying Tlte Empire State Building is an office building". The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio.

"Star Wars meets Holy Grail .

ADAPTATION: Claire Ranger, Jacques Trudeau, Andre Viens and Pierre Voyer. DIRECTOR: Andre Viens. DESIGN: Michel Demers.

Waterloo Record.

LIGHTING DESIGN: Michel Beaulieu.

#Visually impressive and engrossing H told with humour, sincerity and ... magic .

SCORE: Jean Savageau and Robert Seguin.

".... the most spectacular array of effects I've ever e11cou11tered H. Times Globe,

nutthcun tclccum

The Whig Staandard, Ontario.

St.John.

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"STOMP"

A YES/NO PEOPLE PRODUCTION July 15, 16, 17, 18 - McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

Premiered at the Erli11b11rglz Festival in 1991, STOMP was also a huge hit in Australia at both the Sydney and Adelniiie Festiv11ls. Big, noisy and irresistible STOMP is a high-voltage show based on drumming, dance and comedy. It uses an amazing array of 'instruments', improvised from handy household objects; ranging from m atchboxes, dustbin-lids, zippo-lighters, oil-drums and brushes, up to and including the proverbial kitchen sink.

STOMP's cast of seven, including the show's creator Luke Cresswell, perform with manic energy and split-second comic timing. The show is an exhilarating routine of sound and movement, each item in the rapidly-moving programme having its own idiosyncratic style and sound ·cha meter. The core of the performance is always the percussion whose big, dense rhythms build from unlikely beginnings, like sweeping the stage floor or shaking matchboxes. The basic percussion instrument is the pair of boots worn by all the performers, hence the title.

''They take sorrwthing si1111'le 1111d Im rid it into somctl1i11g complex. TIiey bttilti poetry 011/ of l'Veryday life". The Financi.il Times. Sto11111 is gra11t-ni,lctl by 171c Britis/1 Co1mcil

Thorn:u McDonogn & Sons I.Id

SPALDING GRAY July 17, 18 - Mercy ]-foll

"MONSTER IN A BOX" is the story of everything that happens to Spalding Gray to stop him from writing the 1,900 page book 'Impossible Vacation' which, caged in il c.irdboard box, is his only prop for the show. Fact is, il lot of things happen! There's a Whoopi Goldberg mo\•ie he "must" work on, a fact-finding mission to Nicaragu.i he "must" go on and ... he ABSOLUTELY "must" return to New York for Thanksgiving .... and scare himself silly O\'Cr an AIDS test.

Spalding Gray is probably best known in Ireland for his award winning performance "SWlMMING TO CAMBODIA" which purports to tell the story of the making of the film "Tl-IE KILUNG FIELDS". So impressive was the 'finished' piece that it was, itself, made into a film by acclaimed Director

A scenefrom S11rnh-Jmw Scnife's production of Sn11111el Beckett's Co111171111y

Jonathan Demme. Art imitating Life ... imitating Art, imitating Life!

Sitting behind a plain table, wearing a check shirt and dark slacks, and .irmed with a glass of water Gray embarks on his voyage of self-discovery. Relying only on his distinctive, WASP-accented voice he re-creates his world and invites us in. I t is very funny, deeply moving and utterly fascinating.

"He's got II gift, 1111d it':; gab, 111ul it's 111ng11ifice11t". THE BOSTON GLOBE.

"There is 110 more c11ptiv11ti11g spy i11 tlw house of self-lovt• and self-mockery t/11111 Capt11i11 Spalding". CHlCAGO SUN TIMES.

"A silver haire,I 11111ster of ,iead-111111 . . . ns both writer 1111d performer... NEW YORK TIMES.

"Yortr s11br:o11scious is so close to the s11rfacr I rn11 see its periscope". SPALDING GRAY'S SHRINK.

"COMPANY"

by Samuel Beckett Adapted for the stage by Sarah-Jan, Scaife July 23, 2,1, 25 Arts Centre, Nuns Island-

One of Beckett's finest writings 'Company' portrays a character "on hi• back in the dark", whose solitude i! distributed by a 'voice'. This 'voice discusses the relative merits of differen types of 'company' and tells anecdote! about boyhood, manhood and old age· 'company' meaning anything tha interrupts nothingness.

This acclaimed production by Sarah· Jane Scaife, director of seven Becket plays at the Peacock Theatre, has alread} been seen in Dublin, Londort anc Glasgow. It features the accomplishec singer and actress Flo McSweeney, anc dance and movement performer Pau Johnson. "A11 i11111gi1111tive, daring proci11ctio11, wlzicl mixes 111e1iia freely .... catcli it before i ,iisnppears" (Irish Times)

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s,,011sored by EIREANN

"ODD HABITS"

DRUID THEATRE COMPANY July 15, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25 Druid Theatre

S1111ldi11g Grny 11rese11ts �Monsti?r 111 a Box".

Sponsored by

THE IRISH TI.MES 12

Devised .ind performed by Marianm Fahy and Deirdre O'Kane this apparent!} low-key, but extravagantly funny, piect is based on the works of two of [reland'i


most gifted writers, Mary Lavin and Frnnces Molloy. This is the real story of two very real women in the novitiate, torn between God and.Brendan Boyer, hovering between the rival claims of the Latin Mass and the Hucklcbuck. All this in an era where the only acceptable alternative to temptation was a vocation.

"GASLIGHT"

o f the country's most innovative playwrights. "Fine Day For A Hunt" started out as one segment in a trio of pieces, entitled "Go On Red", offered by Punchbag last year. It has now been developed into a full-length work and, after its Galway run, is scheduled to visit both the Edinburgh Fringe and Dublin TheatreFestivals.

DRUID THEATRE COMPANY July 16-25 - Druid Theatre The ultimate, edge-of-the scat 'Whod unnit'. A classic Victorian tale of tortous, domestic intrigue. A wife is, apparently, being driven mad by her husband. and C aculatedly deliberately... unless ... she is imagining it! Furniture developes a strange life of its , own, things dissapear. The gas-light begins to dip and fode to darkness, of its own accord, whilst footsteps can be heard prowling about in the attic. A terrified maid and the Housekeeper have been witnesses to all of this. An Inspector calls and begins to knot all the threads together ... Full of mystery and suspense, the play is richly served by a wonderful, mischicvious sense of humour and howlingly funny dialogue.

"HEROES" GALWAY YOUTH THEATRE July 16, 17, 18 - Arts Centre, Nuns Island

July 18-25 - Druid Theatre

An original stage adaptation of the wonderfully bawdy, epic 18th. Century poem by Brian Merriman (after whom the Grandparent of all Irish Sumer­ schools is named).

"FINE DAY FOR A HUNT". PUNCHBAG THEATRE COMPANY July 16- 26 Punchbag Theatre Local Galway company, Punchbag Theatre, present the world premiere of this latest work by Tom McIntyre, one

'Na Fanaithe' are a rare and precious thing, a Theatre Co. working exclusively through Irish who are instantly accessible to people who qon't speak Irish. Their vital, vivid and highly visual staging has won them a well deserved reputation for excellence. Their innovative work with puppets, masks and mime has embraced international subjects ... Lorca's 'YERMA' for GAF '91; 'PAIDiN MAIRE', by 6 Conaire and the GARCIA MARQUEZ adaptation, 'AINGEAL AN CHLADAIGH' scripted by Galway's own Maguire & McBride.

The show will also tour to 'EXPO '92', Seville, in mid-August.

"THE MIDNIGHT COURT"

A marry-up of a script li ke this, internationally-experienced theatrical Direction and a near-legendary line-up of musicians is guaranteed to be a night to remember.

NAFANAITHE

July 22-25 - An Taibhdhearc

This year they are presenting a new play by Aran Islander Dara 6 Conaola. It tells the story of a man who rebels against the everyday, 'boring' life and impulsively sets out on a 'Mission' to rele<1se others from similar drudgery.

DRUID THEATRE COMPANY

Using this popular and rowdily-faithful translation from the original Irish, Maeliosa Stafford directs what is a life­ time opportunity for some of the most respected and acclaimed singers and musicians in the country. This is likely to be one of those 'shows' which become a tale of wonder and a matter of legend, ten years down the line.

"MISIUN AR MUIR" (Sea Missiou).

"Fine D11y For A H1111t � by Tom McIntyre is

presented by P1111cl1b(lg Theatre Company.

As its title suggests, the play describes the preparations for, and progress of, a Hunt. However, this is no ordinary hunt ..... for the quarry is a Woman. This provocative central motif harks back to the time when certain of "The Gentry" N considered it "good sport to select, "prepare" and pursue some hapless serving-girl. The play is quintessential McInt yre; visual, fast, sexy and disquieting. It upends conventions of Time and Language, roaming between the 18th and 20th centuries and teasing with di fferent registers of speech, dialects, silences and things half·said and half-done.

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Established just over a year ago, Galway Youth Theatre have already secured a firm niche for themselves in the city's flourishing arts scene. While intended primarily to provide a solid grounding in theatrical skills and techniques for its its hopefuls, young dedicated productions have been characterised by an enviable degree of professionalism. "Heroes" is their third production, following the highly-acclaimed 'Don't Forget To Write' (a big hit at last year's Arts Festival) and their Christmas show 'Not The School Around The Corner', adapted from 'Nicholas N ickelby' .. "Heroes" focusses on the homecoming of a successful pop group and the various experiences which the band-members undergo while back amongst their families, friends and sweethearts. Like 'Don't Forget To Write', "Heroes" addresses issues of considerable relevance to Irish twenty-somethings, while simultaneously being fast-moving, sharp-witted and highly entertaining.

r-----= �--For Bookings

Phone Festival Box Office

091-67211.

Credit Card Bookings 091-67266

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GO N-EIRI AN T-ADH LE FEILE EALAiONA NA GAILLIMHE '92 ;

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TAIBHDHEARC NA GAILLIMHE • AMHARCLANN NAISIUNfA NA GAEILGE TEO An tSciid Lair, Gaillimh Teil: 091-62024 ( NJ!:c ) Fax: (091) 63195 Booking/Airithint (091) 63600 (lp.m. · 6p.m.)

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Our Restaurant is open all day for lunch (self service) and by night is transformed into a n elegant candlelit dining place with ·live music, great food and fine wines. Call (091) 67776for reservation.

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WEDNESDAY 15 JULY l.OOp.m.

2.30 p.m. 5.00p.m. 5.00p.m

7.00p.m.

8.30p.m.

Tlic S1111ps Came 011t, an exhibition of photographs by Bob Quinn at the Eyre Square Centre, officially opened by Minister for Tourism, Trilnsport ilnd Communic:.1tion, Maire Geoghegan-Quinn.

The Film Fleadh begins its popular childrcns' section with a classic animation film, Don Bluth's An American Tail. Running opposite this in the Claddilgh Palace Mini is the award· winning documentilry, Brother's Keeper.

The Song and D1111ce progrilmme opens with the classic 1935 Astaire-Rogers musical Top Hal. Jan Oxenberg's wonderful documentary Th,mk You and Goodnight can be seen in the Mini. The Official L.iunch of the 15th Galw.iy Aris Festival at the Festival Big Top.

Outback from the Romanian director, Bogd,m D ryer Durnitrescu, in the Mini.

Stomp · "Big, noisy and irresistible!" McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

8.45p.m.

Siamsa, an C\'tming of music, song and dance at An Taibhdhe,uc.

9.00p.m.

The Fleadh officially opens with the willy, entertaining romp, Rebecc.i's Daughters, starring Peter O'Toole, Paul Rhys and Joely Richardson. Main Cinema.

9.00p.m.

Mary Black plays a special fosth·al concert ill the Festival Big Top, A Srnithwicks Session!

1l.OOp.m.

I W.is On Mars is a tragic-comic film about sweet revenge in an unfamiliar New York. Claddagh Mini.

11.30 p.m.

A moving imaginative and skilfully compelling film: the prize-winning Toto the Hero. Claddagh Mini Cinema.

11.00p.m.

Smithwicks Sessions present S oul Train ill The Wilrwic:k Hotel.

THURSDAY 16 JULY

lOam·lpm: Film·Makcrs's Fomm. Public debate with visiting and local celebrities. Claddagh Main Cinema.

11.00a.m.

Repeat screening of Toto the Hero. Claddagh Mini.

1.00 p.rn.

Lunchtime concert with Gerry O'Connor and Vinnie Kilduff .it An Taibhdhearc.

11.00a.rn.

All festival exhi bit i o ns open until 6p.m. See exhibitions panel.

1.10 p.m.

A reading with T om McIntyre .:it the Punchbag Theatre.

2.00 p.m.

Childrens Festival opens with Theatre Scigci, the award winning Japanese company and their production of We Tlrrcc Play ill Ballygroovy Ave. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

1.10 p.m.

Druid Theatre Company present Odil Habits drawn from the work of Mary Lavin and Fr,mces Molloy.

2.00p.m.

The action-packed adventure, The Racketeer. Claddagh Palace Main. For Children.

2.30p.m.

Music.ii nostalgia with Meet me in St. Louis starring Judy Garlilnd. Claddagh Pal.ice Mini.

5.00p m.

The Film Fleadh continues its Song and Dilnce programme with the musical Bandwagon. Claddagh Main.

4.00p.m.

5.00p.m. 6.00p.m.

7.00 p.m. 7.00p.m. 7.30 p.m.

Ballygrom·y Ave. The children from Bohermore present their own show, Our Neigl1bo11r'100,I at The Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

The Fleadh Documentary section brings Dream Deceivers, the story behind James Vance vs. Jud.is Priest. Claddagh Pillace Mini. Official opening of lhe Brian Bourke exhibition at the Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street.

A special 40th Anniversary screening of Singin' in the Rain with Don.ild O'Connor, star of the film, leading the festivities at the Claddagh P.1lilce Main.

The Lebanese film Ecrans de Sable looks at a wom.1n's experience of lhe Gulf War. Claddagh Mini. Punchbag The.ilrt! Company present Torn McIntyre's Fine D11y for II Hiwt.

Special A111riverS11ry screerri11g 011 Tlmrsday 16/J, of "Singillg it1 tire Rain" witfr Damd,I O'Cam,ar(riglrl) i11 perso11 at tire Clnddag/1 Palace Ciliemn.


7.30p.m.

A Festh·al reading with Moya Riverrun Gallery.

8. 00 p.m.

Galway Youth Theatre present lforocs at the Arts Centre, Nun's Island.

8.30p.m.

Maguire and McBride, Galway's hilarious comedy duo. Aris Centre. 47 Dominick Street.

8.00p.m.

8.30p.m.

8.45 p.m.

9.00p.m. 9.30p.m.

11.00 p.m.

11.30p.m.

11.30 p.m.

9.00 a,m 11.00 a.m.

11. 00 a m. 12.30p.m 1.00p.m.

1.00p.m.

1.1 0 p.m. 200p.m.

230p.m.

4.00p.m. 500p.m.

6.00p.m.

7. 00p.m. 7.00p.m. 7.30 p.m.

8.00p.m. 8.00p.m.

Roddy al !he

8.00p.m.

Druid Theatre Company present Gasligl,t by Patrick Hamilton.

8.00 p.m.

8.30p.m.

Stomp - "Pop arl for the ears, rhythm for !he eyes and theatre for the feel." McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

830p.m.

Siamsa ill An Taibhdheilrc.

The Fleadh pilys tribute lo !he ,,ward-winning Hungilrian film-maker. Istvan Szabo, with a screening of Confidence in the Claddagh Palace Mini.

agus damhseoiri. Druid Thutre present Gasliglrt by Patrick H;imilton.

Galway Youth The;ilre present Heroes at the Arts Centre, Nun's Island, Sean Hughes at The Festival Big Top. •... brilliant. original malerial...the rising star of comedy ... unmissable... " Stomp ...winners of this year's Adelaide Festival "Best of !he Fringe" award. McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

Fleadh presents Hal Hartley's latest film Simpl e Men starring Robert Burke ill the Claddagh Palace Main. Smilhwicks Sessions present Capt.lin Hex .it The Warwick.

My Own Priv.ile Idaho starring Ri\·er Pheonix and Keanu Reeves in the Milin Cinemil.

Nord is an exciting firs.I film by French film-milker Zavier Beauvais in the Mini.

FRIDAY 17 JULY

An earl}' morning chance lo view !he work of young Irish film-makers at the Fleadh's New lrislr Slrorts section, Main Cinema

Gtilway's f111111iest duo, Maguire and McBri,ie play at Tlie Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street.

A repeat screening of Hal Hartley's Simple Men, Cl,1ddagh Mini

8.30p m.

Festival cxibitiuns !ill 6.00 p.m. See panel.

Childrens pottery workshop by Laurence O Kelly at 3 Lower Merchants Road. Admission Free. Monday to Saturday throughout the Festival. A reading with Rita Anne Higgins at The Punchbilg Th@atre.

Festival Concert with Mairlin O'Connor The Acoustic Room, The Warwiek Hotel.

9.30 p.m.

Sweet Emma, Dear Bobe, lhe Istvan Szilbo tribute concludes with his fates! film, the enchanting story of two friends. Clilddagh Main.

11.00p.m.

Druid Theillre present 0,1,I Habits.

Ballygroovy Avenue. From Japan, Theatre Seigei in the Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

11.00p.m.

The Reincarnation of Khensur Rinpoche, lhe fo:!idnaling story behind the search for the reincilrnation of a spiritual master. This is followed by another documentary, Alan Giisenan's Prophel Songs. Ireland's rebel Priesls, men and women at the edge of progressi\·e thought.

11.30 p.m.

The Song and Dance programme conlinues with Sinatra and Brando in !he 1955 musical. Guys and Dolls. Main Cinema. A chance to see the award-winning work of Aardman Animations from Bristol. Claddagh Mini. The Fleadh continues the tribute to Istvan Szabo with a screening of the Oscar-winning Mephislo in the Main Cinemil.

Nominated for Best Film and Best Actress al the 1992 European Film Awards, Voyager, al the Main Cinema.

SATURDAY 18 JULY

Festh·al exhibitions till 6 00 p.m. See panel.

l.lOp.m.

1.lOp,m.

2.00 p.m. 17

Funk OH! with P,A.M.F. al The Warwick Hotel. Smithwicks Session!

11.00 a.m.

1.00p.m.

Pu nchbag present Fille Day for a H1111t by Tom McIntyre.

The E:11ro11ea11 Film Ac,11/emy presents the first of ils three current prize-winners lo be introduced by ;i well-known member of the Academy. Ultra, the story of young hooligilns in Italy. Mini.

An even earlier ch,:mce to \'iew New lrisl, Shorts at the Cladd.igh Palace. Main Cinema.

11.00a.m.

Masala is a comedy about a five•million dollar stamp. greedy politicians, a funky deep-blue Indian, God, good fortune and bad Karma. Claddagh Palace Mini.

A Screening of the comic masterpiece, Over the Ocean, winner of 9 Israeli Academr Awards. Mini

9. 00 a.m.

11. 00 a.m.

Official opening of the Made in L.A. exhibition at the U.C.G. Gallery.

From New York, Spalding Gray presents Mo,istcr i11 a Box "Gray's liveliest monologue to date!" Mercy Hall, Newlownsmyth. Oiche Chonnamar.i le M;ilrtin Jaimsle agus a chomhludar sa Taibhdhearc. Ceolleoiri, amhranai

9.00p m

9.00p.m.

Traditional concert with Dermot Byrnes and Steve Cooney at An Taibhdhearc.

Maguire and McBride. Arts Centre, 47 Domnick Street.

Film Fleadh continue their European presentations with a repeat of Sweet Emma, Dear Bobe.. Mini Cinema.

Galway Arts Festival world premiere of S11r/i11' Witl, Tire Camel, a newly written show for children of all ages. It stars Galway's best lm•ed entertainer Littlejohn with mega-music by John Dunne, Ballygroovy Avenue, Mercy Hall, Newtown,myth. Tradition<1l conert with Steve Cooney and Seamus Begley at An Taibhdhearc. A reading with Patricia Burke Brogan al The Punchbag Theatre. Druid Theatre Company present Odd Habits.

Continuing the Fleadh'i; musical Iheme viewers get the chance lo catch Walt Disney's Newsies, starring Christian Bale and Rober! Duval. Main Cinema.


230p m. 5.00p.m.

5. 00p.m. 7.00p.m.

11.30p m.

A rare opportunity to see Holly Fisher's experimental documentary, Bullets for Breakfast in the Mini.

11.30p.m.

Powerful Double Bill: Dr. Browne Also Spoke · World Premiere of an intriguing train journey and conversation between Michael D. Higgins T.D. and the revolutionary Dr. Noel Browne. Followed by the Northern Visions documentary, The Silent Scream, a look at the different Ireland north of the border where plastic bullets wreck lives. Main Cinema.

9. 00 a.m.

Anim.ilion enthusi.ists get the opportunity to view the work of Czechlovaki.i's Jan Svankmajer. Claddagh Palace Mini.

11. 00 a.m.

11. 00 a.m.

Jaques Doillon deals with the forcees which shape the mind of a young neglected boy who resorts to a life of crime in Le Petit Crlmlnel. Cl.iddagh P.ilace Mini.

3.00p.m.

Optimism, enthusi.ism and idealism are the main elements in Brian Crumlish"s be.iutiful Tickets for the Zoo. Claddagh Mini.

5.00p m.

B.OOp.m.

Comedy with Bobby Baker and her one woman show Drinui11g 011 a Motl,cr's Experic11ce An Taibhdhearc.

5.00p m.

8.00p.m.

Druid The.:itre Co. present Gastigl,t by Patric;k H.:imillon.

7.00p.m. 7.30p.m.

B.OOp.m.

8.00p.m.

8.30p.m.

Punchbag present Fine Day for u lllmt by Tom McIntyre.

Spalding Gray presents Mo11stcr iu a Bo:r at lhe Mercy Han, Newtownsmylh.

7.00p.m.

Galway Youth Theatre present Heroes al the Aris Centre, Nun's Island.

7.30p.m.

Special Festival concert with The Sawdoctors and .i preview of their new album, "Next Stop, Woodlawn".

8.00p m.

9.00p.m. 9.00p.m.

Prospero's Books, Peter Greenaway's novel version of 'The Tempest". Main Cinema. Druid Theatre Company present 11,e Mid11igl1t Court by Brian Merriman.

SUNDAY 19 JULY

New Irislr Slrorts programme concludes .ii the Cladd.igh Main, followed by lhe New Irisl1 A11i111atio11 programme.

A chance lo see a repeat of Barton Fink. Claddagh Mini. Festival exhibitions lill 6.0 0p.m. See panel.

Macnas outdoor parade, C11pall. 'The day lhe horse will reign!" Magic, music and devilment all O\'er town. Starting Point : Eyre Square.

Kiera11 Hickey Retrospective. Four of the Irish film· maker's films will be screened in the Claddagh Palace M.iin Cinema from 5. 00 p.m. These are: Exposure, Criminal Conversation, Allracta and his fatesl work, The Rockingham Shoot.

A ldade Maior. First time film-direclor Teresa Villaverde's thought-provoking tale about Portugese migration .ii a time when Portugal was shut off from the world. Cladd.igh Mini.

Gas Food Lodging is a dazzling dibut film about three women and their men, by US director Allison Anders. Cl.iddagh Mini.

Punchbag Theatre present Firre Day for A H1111t by Tom McIntyre. Bobby Baker's one woman show Drawi11g 011 A Mother's E.Tpcrie11cc continues al An Taibhdhearc.

Ensemble 1492 honour the music and people of Spain on the 500th anniversarr, of the Voyage of Discovery of Christopher ColombJs. Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas. Pigsback Theatre Company present their hilarious comedy Tl,e Tc111lcr Trnp, " ...a trap you'll be glad you walked into." Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

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A scene from tire Yes/No P!!opfe's Production of Stomp.

B.30p.m

Last chance to catch Stomp. McDonogh Building. Flood St.

9.00p.m.

Children of Nature is this year's Academy Award • nominated film in the "Besl Foreign Film Category". The majestic journey of an Icelandic former and his childhood sweetheart. Also the premiere of the Irish-t.,nguage short, Conneely's Choice. MinL

8.30p.m.

9.00p.m. 11.00 p.m.

11.30 p.m.

;�

M.:iguire and McBride. The Arts Centre, 47 Domnick Street.

A special treal, Galway premiere of Barton Fink which brings ils producer Ben Barenholz lo Gahvar. Claddagh Mini. Salsa music with Dig Dis A Smithwicks Session at Selanla.

Swoon · the story of Leopold and Leob Also, Irish language short fiction, An Dromadoir. Premiere Claddagh Mini.

.,

·f

Bobby Baker's, one woman sltow ·orawi11g 011 a Motl11:rs ExJJeriencc· -A11 Taibhd/1earc, /11/y 18t/1 n11d 19th

-tO


9.00p.m. 10.00 p. m. 11. 00p.m.

The beautiful, political, and personal film set in Bogota over il revolutionary week•end Director Jaime Osorio's triumphant debut work., Confession To L.lura. Mini.

The Film Fleadh presents the Irish Premiere of W aterl;md, the exciting new film starring Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack in their first screen appearance together. Claddagh Main Cinema. Closing film.

The Mamin Cajun Band play a Festival Concert at the Setanta, Salthill. A Smithwicks Session.

MONDAY 20 JULY

11. 00a.m.

11.00a.m. l.OOp.m.

l.OOp.m.

l.lOp.m.

2.00p.m.

3.00p.m. 3.00p.m. 7.30 p.m.

8.00p.m. 8.00p.m.

8.00p.m. 8.00 p.m.

8 45 p.m. 11.00p.m.

11.30 p.m. 11. 00 a.m.

A reading with Dermot McGuinne. The Arts Centre, 47 Domnick Street.

Festival Concert with Christie Hen nessy at the Great Southern Hotel. A Smithwicks Session! Slams.:i at An Taibhdhearc.

The Tr.:icheids and Snowblind Waltz at Setanta. A Smithwicks Session!

Druid Theatre present 11,e Mi,llligl,t Court by Brian Merriman.

TUESDAY 21 JULY

Festival exhibitions till 6. 00 p.m. See panel.

Ballygroo\'Y Avenue. Littlejohn presents S11rfi11 tuitl, tire C,m,cl. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

Festival exhibitions till 6. 00 p.m. See panel.

11.00n.m.

Classical lunchtime concert with Malcom Proud (Harpsichord) with Kathleen Dineen (Soprano). The Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas

l.OOp.m.

Maidc BJ1ig.

1.lOp.m.

Druid Theatre present O,t,t Habits.

Ballygroovy Avenue. S11rfi11' wit11 tl,c Caml!I wilh Littlejohn. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmith.

l.OOp.m.

Alsteoiri Oga n.:i T.:ilbhdhe.irca le P11ipci1li a11

1.00p.m.

Childrens Workshop with Galway Youth The.itre. Nuns Island.

2.00p.m.

Mliai,lc Bl,ig .

• Druid The.itre Company present O,ld H11bits

Punchbag Theatre Co'9pany present Eclipsc,l by Patricia B l! rke Brogan each day until S.:it. July 25th, daily at 3.ciOp.m.

3.00 p.m.

Punchbag present Fine day for .:i Hunt by Tom McIntyre.

8.00p.m.

7.30p.m.

A reading with film-maker and writer, Bob Quinn, at tha Punchbag Theatre. Aisteoiri Og.:i na Taibhdhe.irca le P11ipcilli 11a

Classical lunchtime concert with Laura Chisletl (flute). Collegiate Church of Saint Nicholas .

Childrens Dance Workshop with Ch r i stine Humburger. The Arts Centre Nuns Island. Ballygroovy Avenue, Circus Belfast with 'Jim and Don'. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmith.

Punchbag Theatre present Fiuc Day for II Hrrnt by Tom McIntyre.

Ballygrom·y Ave. Childrens Music Hour with Evelyn Grant ,ind a cello playing Gorilla. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

8.00p.m.

Druid Theatre present Gasligl1t by Patrick Hamilton.

Druid Theatre present G as l i ght by Patrick Hamilton.

830p.m.

European premiere of 171c Lor,I of tlic Rings presented by The.itre Sans Fil and sponsored by Nortl,crn Telecom, "A special effects bonanza ....loud and colourful and full of surprises".

Pigsb.ick"fheatre Company present 11,c Tc11dcr Tr1111, "..extraordinary ...deliciously escapist." Mercy Hall, Newtownsm>•th.

8.30p.m. 8.-15 p.m.

9.00p.m.

Pigsback Theatre Company present 11,c Tcnifor Tra11 "A witty, polished show .....simply delicious".

Comedy with Miles and Milner "Original, brilliant and \'Cf}', very funny". Great Southern Hotel Siams.:i at An Taibhdhearc.

Dolores Ke.:ine with special guest, John Faulkner play a traditional concert The Acoustic Room, Warwick Hotel.

11.00 p.m

A Smithwicks Session with Something lhppens at Setanta.

11.30p.m

Druid Theatre presents 1711: .Mi,lniglrt Court.

11.30 p.m.

11.00 a m

Late night comedy with Jon Taibhdhearc.

Kenny al An

WEDNESDAY 22 JULY

Festival exhibitions till 6 00 p.m. See panel.

11.00a.m.

Ballygoovy Avenue Liltlejohn presents S11rfi11' witJ, tl,e Crmcl. Mercy Com·ent, Newtownsmyth.

1.00 p.m.

Classical lunchtime concert with Sebastian Lipman (harp). Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas.

1.00p.m.

l.lOp.m.

300p.m.

-IOOp.m. 7.30p.m .

8.00p m.

8.30p m.

Childrens reading with Eddie Lenihan .it the Arts Centre, Nuns Island. Druid Theatre present O,td H11bits by Mary La\'in and Frances Molloy.

Ballygroo\'y A\·enue Circus Belfast with 'Jim .:ind Don'. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

Na fan.:iithe present Misi1111 11r Muir at An Taibhdhearc. An adaptation of 'Isl11111l111a11' by Dara O'Conaola. Punchbag Theatre Company present fiue ,lay for a H1111t by Tom McIntyre. Druid Theatre presept G11sligl1t by Patrick Ham,llon. Comedy with Miles and Milner at The Great Southern Hotel.


8-30p-m. 8.4.Sp-m.

9_00 p-m900p-m­

ll.00p.m

11. 00 p.m. 11.30p.m. 1I.30p.m.

11. 00 a.m. 11. 00i!.m.

12.3 0p.m. l.OOp.m.

1.00p.m. l.OOp.m.

l.1 0 p.m.

3.00p.m.

,J.OOp.m.

7.30p.m.

8.00p.m.

8.00p.m.

8.30 p.m.

8.30 p.m.

8.45 p.m.

9.00p.m.

Tlic Lor,I of tire Ri11gs wilh Theatre Sans Fil continues at Festivill Big Top, sponsored by Nortlia11 Telecom.

M a cnas present Tl,c Taiii. "Upfront and visuill theatre, incorporating mime, movement and music." McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

4.00p.m.

Ceili at the Warwick. A Smithwicks Session!

BOOp.m.

Festival concert with Allan in The Acoustic Room, Warwick Hotel. A Smithwicks Session.

Festival exhibitions till 6. 00 p.m. See panel.

Billlygroo\'y A\·cnue. Littlejohn presents S11rfi11 • witl, tl1c C11111cl at Mercy Convent. Newtownsmyth. Childrens pottery workshop with Laurence O'Kelly at 3, Lower Mcrch.:mls Road. Admission free

Ba!lygroovy Avenue. From Belgium, Compagnie Gare Centrale with their highly entertaining show Little Pea at the Mercy Hall, Newlownsmyth.

Na F;mailhe present M11isi11 11r Muir. An Tilibhdhearc. Punchbag Theatre present Fine ,lay for n H1111t.

Druid Theatre present Gasligl,t by Patrick Hamilton.

From Australi.1, Blindm;m's Holiday. Acappela singing .ti its best .it An Taibhdhearc. A Smilhwicks Session!

8 30p.m

Renowned Montreal based puppet company Theo1lre Sans Fil present their award winning production of Tl,c Lord of the Rings sponsored by Nori/rem Telecom.

Tommy and John McArdle present Out of that Cl1il1il1ood Co1111try, the life and times of Patrick Kavanagh, in the Convent of Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

Macnas present 171c T11i11 McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

Traditional concert with John Faulkner and Friends at An Taibhdhearc. Druid Theatre pr�ent O,l,I lfol,its.

Ballygroo\'y A\·enue. Do1ndy Lion The.tire pr\--sent 'flu� Grrnt Fc11t/1er C1111er. Mercy Hall, Newtownsmyth.

N.i F.in.tithe pre�nt Misiu11 ,,r M11ir at An T.iibhdhearc, runchbag Thc.itre present Fiuc tl11y for II ll1111I by Tom Mcintrye Druid Theatre present G11slig/1t by Patrick Hamilto n

Opening �rform.tncc of Sarah Jane Scaife's highly acclaimed production of S.tmuel Beckett's Co111111111y Arts Centre, Nuns Island.

Festi\·al concert with Sh.iron Shannon .ti Gre.tt Southern Hotel. A Smithwicks Session.

Regina Nathan sings nt tire Collegintl! Church of SI. Nicholas

The.itre S.ins Fil present Tire Loni of Ilic Ri11gs . "Tolkien gets St.tr W.irs touch", Sponsored by Nor/hem Telecom.

011

Macn.ts p�MI 11,e T.rfo McDonogh Building, Flood S_treet.

11.00 p.m. 11.00p.m.

Martin Stephenson .ind The D.iintees at Selanta A Smithwicks Session.

11.30p.m.

11.30p.m.

Druid The.tire present 11,e Mid11igl1t Co11rt.

1.00p.m.

Childrens reading with Carolyn Swift at Arts Centre, Nuns Island. Traditional concert with Mary Custy and Eoin O'Neill at An Taibhdhearc.

From Kenya, Tilm Tamu at Setanta A Smithwick5 Session!

Fesli\'al concert with Engine Alley at the Warwick A Smithwicks Session! Druid Theatre presents 11,e Mid11iglit Court.

Litllejohn's late night comedy show at the Arts Centre, Nuns Island.

11.00 a.m.

Festival e:J1:hibltions till 6.00 p.m. See p.tnel.

l.OOp.m.

Childrens workshop with Galway Youth Theatre at The Arts Centre, Nuns Island.

11.00 a.rn.

Ballygoovy Avenue, Littlejohn presents S11rfin' wit/, tl,c Camel at the Mercy Hall, Newtown$myth.

Classical concert with Bryan He5ford (organ).

Fesli\'al concert with Regina Nathan {soprano) .tccomp.inied by Malcolm M:utine.1u on plane at lhe Collegiate Church of St.Nicholas

SATURDAY 25 JULY

FRIDAY 24 JULY

Festival exhibitions till 6 00 p.m. See panel.

Friday 24th /11/y al 9 p.m.

9.00p.m.

Si.imsa .ti An T aibhdhearc.

11.00a m.

1 OOp.m.

Druid Theatre present 0,/d Habits.

Compm1y by Samuel Beckett. A production by Sarah Jane Scaife. Aris Centre, Nuns Island.

9. 00p m.

Childrcns reading with Tony Hickey .,t Arts Centre, Nuns Island. Classical lunchtime concert with The Darius Wind Quintet, Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas

Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas.

8,00p.m. 8.00p.m

THURSDAY 23 JULY

Festival club with Global Rhythm at The Warwick Hotel.

l.OOp.m.

8.30p,m.

Druid Theatre present Tire Mitilligl1t Co11rt by Brian Merriman.

11.00p.m.

11,00a.m.

7.30p.m.

A House play a festival concert ill Setanta. A Smithwicks Session! Lille night comedy with Jon Kenny at An Taibhdhearc.

Smilhwicks Session, Toasted Heretic at The Accoustic Room, at Warwick Hotel.

11.30p.m.

3.00p m

Siamsa at An Taibhdh�arc-

8.30p.m.

11.00p.m.

1.lOp.m.

l.OOp.m.

21

lOOp.m.

Ballygroovy A\·enue. Litllejohn presents S11rfi11" wit11 tire Camel at Mercy Hall, Newlownsmyth.

Jazz from Europe"s finest young jazz musitians, The Wigan Youth Jazz Orchestra. At the Mercy H.ill. Newtownsrn yth. Tradition.ti concert with Brendan O'Regan and Nol1.1ig Ni Cathasaigh al An Taibhdhearc


1.10pm

Druid The3lre presents 0,"1 llabits.

J.lOp.m.

8.00p.m 830p m.

A reading by Michael Gonn3n and Gerald 03we 31 The Punchbag TI,eatre.

3.00p.m.

M3Cn3s present Tire T11i11. McDonogh Building, Flood

3.00pm.

Sped.ii m.itinee performance of Theatre Sans Fit's Lord of tl,c Ritigs. Suitable for children over the .ige of eight. Sponsored by Northem Telecom.

4.00p m. -1.00p m. 7.30p.m.

Sarilh J3nc Scaifo's production of Beckett's Co111111111y Arts Centre, Nuns Island.

8.00p m.

John Prine gh·es a festival concert ii! Scapoint. A Smithwicks Session!

11.00pm.

Chris M eehan ilnd his Redneck Friends at Setantil. A Smithwicks Session!

11.30p.m

Druid The3tre present Briiln Merriman's Tl,c Mi,fuigl1t Co11rt. More late night comedy with Lilllejohn. The Arts Centre, Nuns Island.

11.30p.m.

N3 F3n3ithe present M11isi11 nr Muir. An T3ibhdhearc Punchb3g Theatre present Fi11c d11yfor II lfo11t.

8.00p.m.

8.30pm.

9.00p.m.

Ballygroovy Avenue: From Belgium, Compagnie Gare Centrale present Little Pc11. Mercy Hall, Newlownsmyth.

11.30p.m.

Sped.ii Ccstival reading with John Waters .iuthor of "Jh·ing al the Crossroads" at An Taibhdhearc.

11.00 a.m.

1200noon S.30 pm. 7.30p.m. 9.00 p.m

11.00p.m.

New Orlc,ms Rcv11e, Sun. 26111 July 1. 2. 3. 4.

Druid Theatre present Gasligl,t.

Final performance of Theatre Sans Fil acclilimed production of Tl,c Lor,I of t/1c Rings, sponsored by Northern Telecom.

Macn.is present 11,c Tlli11. McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

Last Chilnce to hear Blindm3n's Holld3y ill An Taibhdhearc.

SUNDAY 26 ULY

Festival exhibitions till 6.00 p.m. Sec panel.

Europe's finest young jilzz musicians The Wig.in Youth Juz Orchestr3 play the Great Southern Hotel. Mardi Gras wilh The New Orlco1ns Revue slilrring Dr. John, Willie de Ville, Zachery Rich,uds, Johnny Adams, Eddie Do and The Wild M3gnolias. Non Stop, fi\'e hour show of great music. Festi\'al Big Top. A Smithwicks Session! Punchb3g Thc3lre present Fi11c ,f,1y for 111111111.

M.icnas present the Tlli11. McDonogh Building, Flood Streel. Closing party with The S leep W3lkcrs at the Warwick Hotcl. A Smilhwicks Session!

F11herlH Fleld, U.C G Cathedral Car Park. Claddegh Palace Clnema. Warwick Hotel, S&lthHI.

5. Mct>onoghs, Flood S1111e1

6. U.C.G. Gallery, Universlly College. 7. Collegiate Church of St. NlcholH. e. Talbhclhearc:, Middle Stniel, 9. Druid Thealnt, Chapel Lana. 1 o. Seapolnt Ballroom, Salll11"1 11. 801 Office, Comst018 12. Kenny'• Gallery, Middle Street. 13, Art• Centre, Nuns Island. 14. Art• Centre, 47 Dominick Street 15. Fr. Griffin Road Park. 16. Alvemm Gallery. 17. Aula Mulma, U.C.G. 1B. Convent ol Mercy, Newtownsmllh 19. Geogt,eghan Gallery. 20. Great Southern Hotel. 21, Setanta

CLAODAGH

SALTHILL

22


DERMOT McGUINNE

fHE McARDLE BROTHERS:

July 20 - Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street.

(et .mother return visit for this perennial =estival favourite; a warm, humorous, ·elaxed and utterly enchanting celebrn­ ion of the work of Patrick Kavanagh. rommy and John McArdle hail, like Cavanagh himself, from Monaghan and his gives their show a unique degree of 1mpathy and insight into the poet's life ind work. On each of its previous =estival appearances this show has been 1mong the first to book out and this year viii, almost certainly, be no exception.

THE PUNCHBAG READINGS

OUT OF THAT CHILDHOOD COUNTRY' uly 24 - Mercy Hall

fOHN WATERS

uly 25 - An Taibhdhearc

ohn Waters was born in Cast!erea, Co. foscommon, in 1955. In the '70's he .vorked as'a raihvay clerk, a showband ·oaclie and in a pirate radio station. Since hen he's written for Hot Press and nde pendent Newspapers, edited Magill' and 'In Dublin' and is now a :olumnist for The Irish Times. He's best mown for his book 'Jiving At The :rossroads', published last year by 3lackstaff, which was an instant critical md popular success.

i.\ radical new department in Irish writ­ ng, it's a journey to the heartl.ind of :oday's Ireland. It supplies a uniquely :icrsonal insight into the very core of the ;truggles that haunt the Irish psyche; )etween the past .ind the present, the .irban and the rural. It rescues politics :rom the politicians and gives it back to :he people.

"Jolr11 Wntas' metlwd is thr word, /,is p11s­ ;io11 truth, /11s obji:ct II belier worlrl ... a :L'Omfrrfrtl, witty and 111ovi11s bood" IRISH PRESS

MOYA RODDY

fuly 16 - Riverrun G.illery

Moya Roddy, who's based in the West of Ireland, is a new and exciting \'oice in Irish fiction. Her first no,•el, The Long Way Home', has just been published by Attic Press to w.irm reviews. It focuses :m Jo Nowd, a girl determined to escape her working class background. She jreams of being a famous dress designer �nd mixing with the rich and be.iutiful. fo's life turns upside down when she att­ �mpts to fit into other worlds filled with people unworthy of her energy .ind lo,•e. 5uffused with courage, humour and wit, The Long Way Home' is an utterly con­ ,•incing and entert.iining read.

Dermot McGuinne is the author of 'Irish Type Design' which has just been pub­ lished by Irish Academic Press. It's a var­ ied .ind fascinating study of printing types prep.ired for use in the Irish lan­ guage, and brings much new information on the subject to light. It deals with the historical development of this typograph­ ica I aspect of the Irish J.inguage and reflects, in a most interesting manner, many features of our political and reli­ gious history.

PATRICIA BURKE BROGAN

July 18- Punchbag The.itre

Patricia's first play "Eclipsed" was pre­ miered by Punchbag in Fcbru.iry of this year and h.is been an overwhelming suc­ cess. Set in .i penitenti.il convent laundry in the early 60's it has been hailed as an important play. Patrici.i is originally from Clare but has lived in G.ilway now for many years. She is a well known painter and printmaker .ind has exhibited her work both n.itionally .ind intern.itionally.

As part of its schedule for the G.ilway Arts Festival, Punchbag Theatre Company presents a series of readings by well known Joe.ii and national poets and playwrights. All the re.idings are to be held at lunchtime in the Punchbag Theatre on Quay Lane. Rita Anne Higgins Friday July 17th - 1.10 p.m.

l'atrid.i Burke Brogan Saturday July 18th· 1.10 p.m.

Tom McIntyre Thursday July 16th - 1.10 p.m.

Gerald Dawe and Michael Gorman S.1turclay July 25th - 1.10 p.m. Bob Quinn Tuesday July 21st - 1.10 p.m.

TOM McINTY RE

July 16 • Punchbag Theatre

Tom McIntyre is one of the country's most inno,·ative playwrights, his works including 'The Great Hunger', 'Rise Up Lovely Sweeney' and Punchb.ig's 'Fine Day For A Hunt'. He has .ilso published numerous poems, stories and a novel.

GERALD DAWE AND MICHAEL GORMAN

July 25 • Punchbag Theatre

Ger.ild Dawe is a poet, critic .ind found­ ing editor of the accl.iimed literary jour­ nal 'Krino'. Collections include 'The Lundys Letter' and 'Sheltering Places'. Sligo-born Mich.iel Gorm.in has long been one of G.ilway's most popul.ir poets for his possionate, witty and humane ,·erse. 'Up She Fle w', comprising new and selected poems, was published last ye.ir by S.ilmon.

23

RITA ANNE HIGGINS

July 17 - Punchbag The.itre

Rita Ann first began writing in 1982 and since then has published four volumes of poetry, NGoddess on the Mervue Bus··, "Witch in the Bushes", "Goddess and w y Witch and MPhilomena's Revenge .

Her first pl.iy "Face Licker Come Home" was premiered by Punchbag for last year·s Galway Arts Festival. Her second play '"God of the Hatch Man" is being de\.'eloped with Punchbag through work­ shop and will be premiered later this year.

BOB QUINN

July 21 - Punchb.ig Theatre

Under the n.ime Cineg.iel .ind based in Connem.ira for more than twenty ye.irs, Bob Quinn is well known for his film m.iking. Films include: Atla11tea11, Cloch, B11dawa1111y, and Poitiu, as well .is many T.V. documentary series. He scripts all his own films, wrote the book At/r111tea11: Jrrlnnd's Nort/r African and Maritime Heritage, and has published articles, sto­ ries and poems.

For the Galw.iy Arts Festival Bob will read from his latest novel "Smoki:y Hollow· published last ye.ir. TI1e Literary Programme is sponsore,l by:


:r)

.

.

-

For Galway Arts Festival they'll be presenting their autobiographical show, 'Legends On The Edge Of The Millenium', which traces their musical roots from birth to the present day.Their history of music is fost and physical, a meteoric kaleidoscope of virtuoso musicianship and vitriolic humour. Their well-skewered targets include Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Sondheim, Lloyd­ Weber and Handel, whose ''Water Music" is the basis for an unforgettable synchronised-swimming routine.

BOBBY BAKER:

SEAN HUGHES July 17 - Festival Big Top, Fisheries Field

Sean Hughes has rec ently become famous as the man who brought his living room into your Jiving-room, on Channel 4. From humble beginnings in God-forsaken Dublin, he has gone on to conquer the world. Well, that portion of the world open to comedians, anyhow. In March '91 he sold out a week at The Project Arts Centre, in April he played three weeks in Melbourne, May and June he took a break and played a 35 date UK tour. Finding himself idle in July, he trotted over to Montreal and got recorded for world-wide TV at the 'Just for Laughs' Festival and rounded off his North American vacation with a wee rest in the 'Comedy lmprov Club' in Santa Monica, California.

In a moment of weakness, during 1991, he won the Edinburgh Critic's Award (for his show 'A ONE NIGHT STAND'), which he dumped on top of his TV set beside his 1990 PERRIER AWARD, from the same Festival. Of 'One Night Stand' a bemused English critic wrote . .. "He doesn't have the audience eating out of his palm, he has them under his fingernails". SEAN HUGHES SAYS, of himself .. .'Tm

trying to find myself, witf1011t having to go to India". THE PRESS SAY: 'To be enjoyed as simple ,tcrnd-11p b11t its real joy lies i11 the surreal i11ve11tive11ess of the less obvious gags ... " THE GUARDrAN.

MILES AND MILNER

[uly 21, 22 • Great Southern Hotel

::nglish comedy-duo Miles and Milner aka The Mad Maestros) specialise in the ;atirical dismemberment of musical egends, past and present.

"DRAWING ON A MOTHER'S EXPERIENCE" July 18, 19 - An Taibhdhearc

Born in Kent in 1950, Bobby Baker initially trained as a painter but, finding it unfulfilling, she discarded her oils, acryllics, et al and switched to the more rewarding media of Chocolate, Dough, Ketchup and Orange Squash. She then took up performing as the best way of presenting her "edible artworks" to the public. "Drawing On A Mother's Experience" chronicles her adventures between 1980 and 1988, during which she abandoned live performing in order to give birth to, and rear, her two children. The show has toured widely throughout the U.K. (including the Edinburgh Festival) and garnered a hatful of ecstatic reviews in the process.

"Superb .... - a most bea11t1J11t, precise, and poig11a11t piece"

J111111y

THE GUARDIAN.

"To11clii11g, del1c,011sly batty a11d seriously revealing" TIME OUT MAGAZINE.

"THE TENDER TRAP"

PIGSBACK THEATRE COMPANY July 19, 20, 21 - Mercy Hall

It's 1956 somewhere between Hollywood and Monaco, and everything's set for a Fairytale Wedding. The groom's rich, he's handsome, he's a Prince. The bride's sexy, she's charming, she's a petrol pump attendant. There's just one problem' her boyfriend. He's mad and he wants her back. But he hasn't reckoned with Lavinia; she's seductive, she's crafty, she works for the Prince.Can he resist tl1e Tender Trap?

Written by Michael West (after Mari\•aux's La Double Iuco11stn11ce) and performed by one of this country's most exhilarating theatre companies, this show has received rapturous reviews from all the Irish papers.

25

MAGUIRE & McBRIDE "SONNETS AND SIX-GUNS" July 16, 17, 18 Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street.

Galway'!? own humorists-in-residence, Connor Maguire and Charlie McBride, have been writing and performing together since 1988. Appearanc es include; Galway Arts Festival, Listowel Writers Week and Wexford Opera Festival, to name but a prestigious few.

They have written and performed for Radio and TV, appearing on programmes such as 'The Arts Show' and 'NIGHTHAWKS'.'

Their late-night show in the Druid Theatre for GAF '91 was The Irish Times' choice for the best comedy, describing it as " . . .often hilarious ... intelligent and politically agile .."

JON KENNY & PAT SHORTT "ONE HELL OF A 00" July 21, 22 - An Taibhdhearc

This widely-acclaimed show is a brillliant mixture of comedy and music which fully lives up to its title. Us centrepiece revolves around an hilarious tribute to "d'Unbelievables", the greatest wedding band ever to hit the far-flung shores of Abbeyfeale.

Jon Kenny is a madcap performer with a wide repetoire of characters; Shortt, a dead pan comic who brilliantly underplays his roles. As comedians they juxtapose each other extremely well, as musicians they combine perfectly. 'Hell Of A Do' has already toured widely around Ireland, as well as visiting New York.

LITTLEJOHN

July 24- Arts Centre, Nuns Island

The irrepressible and irresistible Littlejohn takes a brief break from captivating the kiddies to present his "Grown-Up" show, an exuberant mixture of Music, Palaver, Rhyme, Rock'n'Roll, Wit and Wistfulness, Laughter and lots and Jots of Love-Vibes!

Aided and abetted by musical maestro John Dunne, Littlejohn regales his audience with an engaging, and very funny, series of autobiographical yarns interspersed with a wide variety of musical numbers (including an unmissable and superb Van Morrison send-up!).

Sponsored by

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t0mgratula11e

Gafw/ay Ar·ts Festital

on l$ yearrs of gtowth ancl success

F(j)ras Aiseanna Saothair

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MACNAS are Galway's own vibrant, extravagantly colourful Community Theatre Group. Founded in 1986, principally to create and perform 'street' spectaculars, they have spent seven years acquiring and honing a wide variety of skills. Learning from such groups as 'FOOTSBARN' and 'ELS COMEDIANT.5', on their memorable Galway visits, �Ci:NAS have developed a style and apw.i�ch whi�h is totally their own. T�;)"i.��ve gr�wn into an _ accomplished �'!.M�formance•company . l�.t' which devises� de�1gns and presents a form of image;��.9, su�;�-linguistic theatre unique ia.\heland. , , � J ·.; • �� .., I�

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The Company's 'titre is derived from the flexible Irish word 'Macnas', which they translate as . . "act of playing, pastime, romping, and horseplaying. . " This barely begins to describe the flavour of the immaculately controlled mayhem which characterises a Macnas show. They have mastered the rare ability to make months of research, rehearsal, design and choreography look completely spontaneous. An alternately scarified and ecstatic audience can genuinely believe that this elaborate magic is being made·up before their very eyes. Inspired and directed by a core-group of widely-experienced theatrical profess· ionals, the Company relies on rolling FAs Employment Schemes to provide its basic personnel. These y oung, enthusiastic, unemployed people are trained and motivated by 'the old dogs' and let loose to contribute their energy and excitement within a finished performance. Juggling, percussion, fire­ breathing, acrobatics and monster· making are the Honours subjects on a Macnas course. They are, perhaps, best known for creating the 68ft. GULLIVER (and his big army of little Lilliputians) for the Dublin Millenium, in '88. 'Gully' went on to appear at Gateshead {National Garden Festival, UK) and Seville (Spain, EXPO '92). In '89 they first presented "An Tir Faoi Thoinn" {The Land Beneath the Waves). A huge street-show which, :omplete with elaborately-costumed ;hoals of piranha, sharks, whales and ;ubmarine; apparently submerged the main streets of Galway City in 30 ft. of ,ea-water. The MACNAS crew were rngmented by, approx. 300 volunteers. fhis has become a key-note of their ,tyle. MACNAS don't just 'do it to you', :hey 'do it WITH you'!

'Tir Faoi Thoinn' has recently swum back from Amersfoort, Holland, where it represented Galway at the European City Forum, aided by 250 or so unsuspecting Dutch people. In 1990 they 'did it' again. Another 250/300 ordinary Galway people became a n integral part of the Macnas-magic as "An Slua Si '" (The Fairy Hoards) enveloped the whole town in sorcery. Every imaginable form of 'fairy', 'elf' or 'sprite' became locked in a combat resolved by a gigantic, open-air dancing competition. Good vs. Evil. Fifteen rounds, winner takes all. Good won. On points. Though renowned for their highly visual street performances, MACNAS have astonished and delighted the people of Galway with three sophisticated 'indoor' shows, 'ALICE IN WONDERLAND', 'TREASURE ISLAND' and 'CIRCUS STORY-. Each of these hugely popular Christmas shows involved a massive 'conversion' job on a large space, as MACNAS have no permanent home.

27

All of these elements in their history are brought to bear on the two shows they stage this year for the GAF. The hard­ taught lessons and hard-won skills culminate in a technicolour explosion of talent.

T AIN. From Wed. 22nd JULY For their indoor show MACNAS present an epic re-telling of the 8th. Century Celtic Saga, 'AN TAIN BO CUAILGNE'. It tells the tragic story of a lovers' quarrel which leads to a cattle raid . . . which leads to a war. The lovers are Medb, Warrior-Queen of Connacht and her consort, Ailill. The quarrel begins in bed as they boastfully compare possessions. Jewel for jewel, lands for lands, they are evenly matched. At last Ailill produces his prize Golden Bull and Medb is enraged to discover no rival amongst her herds and refuses to embrace him until she possesses a Bull equal to his. When Royalty fall out disputes have a way of escalating!


Ailill offers great wealth in an attempt to buy the legendary Brown Bull of Conor, King of Ulster. Ailill's messengers offend and wound the young, Ulster hero, Cuchulainn and their offer is refused. In fury Medb vows to take the Bull by force and a botched cattle-raid turns to outright war. TAIN has just returned from an ecstatic reception at EXPO '92, in Seville, where over 4,000 people saw and applauded this totally visual show. MACNAS describe TAIN as "an intense, wordless story". They have taken the driving energy which characterises their street­ theatre and translated it onto the stage. The style and presentation transcend language boundaries as they strip the story to it's bones and put on their own flesh and muscle. "It is stylised, physical and acrobatic", say Paraic Breathnach, one of the founding fathers of the group. "Most playwright's in Ireland seem to be politicians ... more concerned with speeches that action and drama. That's not how we do it! This version of the story is the one my Grandfather told me, it's simple and very powerful. It is acrobatic rather than violent and we use a lot of visual humour to relieve the tragedy". DIRECTED BY Rod Goodall. DESIGNED BY 'Tom Co nroy and Owen McCarthaigh. ORIGINAL MUSIC BY John Dunne. COSTUMES BY Charmian Goodall and Margaret Linnane. The parade is made possible by the generous sponsorship of THERMO KING (Europe), who increased their funding this year to create a day's fun and excitement for the whole City.

'

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PARADE

3.00 p.m.

Sun. 19th JULY,

On the streets, as the main feature of the Festival Parade, they present CAPALL. A huge celebration of the Horse. The central image is the giant figure of the Celtic goddess of horses, MACHA, red­ cloaked and astride a gigantic horse. As always the people of Galway join in the festivities and 250 people costumed in blue, purple and gold will hoof it with every conceivable variety of horse. Led b y eight Irish draught mares a choreographed crew of cowboy horses, hobby-horses, toy-horses, jockeys, bookies, fillies, geldings, stallions, horse­ traders and horse-thieves will trot, canter, gallop and charge along the parade route. They will be accompanied by a Brass Band, the Droghcda Samba School Band, a 40 person Coconut band and three pulsating MACNAS percussion sections. This year's parade will travel through wider streets than usual and the performance pieces will be repeated along the entire route, so there is no need to all bunch up at the end! Spread out along the route and make sure to put the children to the front so that they can SEE it! The performance IS the parade as there is no set-piece finale. Instead you are invited to join MACNAS and the parade-members for a picnic in the park, where the Patrician, St. Patrick's and Tuam Brass Bands will play on a specially created Bandstand.

YOUR COMMUNITl PAPER AND A FRIEND OF THE FESTIVAL

IGalfuav Aovertlser &

Wishing Continued Success to the Festival from another local Entertainer GALW.A...Y

-=;.--

95.s 96.s


school children. This vibrant, physical and highly visual production draws on clilssical Japilnese theatre forms l ike 'Kabuki' and the more high-brow 'Noh' to present two comic stories bilsed on the playful and observant spirit of ordinary ]ilpanese people. Their real source of inspiration is 'Kyogen', a 600 year old tradition of comedy. This Company are keenly aware of the effect of expensive, electronic toys on the way modern children actually play. Their show is a rapid-fire attempt to bring back old­ fashioned forms of fun and games which depend more on imagination than consumer durables. Coming from the home of the com p uter-game ilnd the portable, electronic 'whiltsit' these three really know whilt they are talking about!

JIM & DON ...CIRCUS BELFAST July 21, 22 • Mercy Hilll

"Jim & Don" are Jim Webster anc Donald McKendry, il Belfast-base du< who hilve been performing together sinc1 1989. In that time they have appeared a over 400 venues in Ireland, as well a! making high ly successful forays tc fcstivills in Britain, the U.S. and Ge r many. Their exuberant blend ol comedy ilnd juggling has attracted full houses and t.!nthusiilstic reviews all the way from Birmingham (England) to Birmingham (Alabama). In 1990 they consolidated their reputation as Ireland's foremost Street Entertainers by triumphing over 104 rival acts to win Clonakilty's prestigious Irish Street Entertainers Championship. Last year they ilt t racted some of the largest aud iences at Glasgow's 'Streetbiz' festival, as much for their witty repilrtee ilS their performing skills.

LITTLEJOHN "SURFIN' WITH THE CAMEL". July 18 - 25 - Mercy Hilll Galwily's most famous, fabulous and fant.istic children's entert.iiner returns to the scene of lilst year's crime ... Where? ... Well, it's cooler thilt 'Coroniltion Street', more amazing than 'Al ber t Square', brilliilnter thiln Bohermore ... yes indeedy folks, it's Lit tlejoh n's personal pilrish ... "Ballygroovy Avenue".The outstilnding hit-favourite of last year's Festival gets il pop ular return visit. LITILEJ OHN says: "Life is groovy. Birds are singing. Sun is shining. L.J.is in the kitchen, music blaring. Love is blossoming, and the camels are surfin' in the Cli!ddilgh. All is well, but .i lot can happen in one hot day in Billlygroovy". You are illl invited to return to Ballygroovy with Little Joh n, to the coolest "hot music", lorry-loads of laughs .ind enough love to fly an iron kite.

WITH: G ary McMahon and Frankie

McCafferty.

FEATURING: The mega-music of John

Dunne.

THEATRE SEIGEi "WE THREE PLAY" ("SAN-NIN DE ASOBO"). July 16, 17 - Mercy Hall Theatre Seigel are a multiple aw.ird­ winning Japanese company, established in 1979. Working from a base in Tokyo they tour extensively around Japan annuillly, plilying to audiences drawn from both primary and secondilry-level

CHILDREN'S MUSIC HOUR MUSICAL ALLSORTS" July 20 • Mercy Hall 0

The Cork Company, Children's Music Hour use "gorilla tactics" to introduce classical music to their young ilUdiences. A cello-playing gorilla leads renditions of such varied classics as 'F light of the Bum blebee', 'Greens leeves', 'Rock Around The Cl ock' and that ever· popular Irish ballad 'Ole, Ole, Ole'! The gorillil's also prone to outbursts of comically unruly behaviour, providing traumils il·plenty for the show's presenter, chief gorilla-handler, and flautist, Evelyn Grant. Somehow, Evelyn also finds the time to demonstrate the fascinating Cilpabilities of the synthesiser. Appeilring as Speciill Guest is Johnny McCarthy, il gifted performer on the fiddle, tin whistle and flute. 30

DANDY LION THEATRE CO. 0

"TI-IE GREAT FEATHER CAPER July 23 • Mercy H.ill

The Dn11dy Uon Cltildre11's Theatre Co. was formed last year by three graduiltes from the University of Ulster, in Coleraine. The trio were performers Louise King and Michael Balfour, and puppet-maker Mary Boyle. The company proved to be an instant success and have toured extensively throughout Northern Ireland. Their Festival presentation is a new show which tells the colourful tale of a group of dinosaurs who are caught up in a snowstorm and begin to freeze. They try out various ways of kee ping warm, without success. Just when all seems doomed, there arrives the Great Feather Beast, in the nick of time, to save the day, in il remarkilble fashion!


:OMPAGNIE GARE :ENTRALE LITTLE PEA" uly 24, 25 - Mercy Hall Little Pea", performed by Belgi.1n clown �gnes Limbos, is a truly inspired piece ,f theatre which is part Clown show, part 'uppet show, part political allegory, and •art warm affirmation of s hared 1umanity. It comprises forty wonderfully .,acky minutes about a little pea which is .iken from its pod, and has a series of dventures before arriving back safely to ts family. Some of its adventures are 1ownright scary! At one point sodden •eas are surrounded by barbed wir e. ome escape. An electric egg-beater on a -earch-and-Destroy Mission "deals with" he escapees like a helicopter gun·ship. ·he Edmonton Journal critic wrote: "This ddly sophisticated show serves Ill' images of

11divid11al vs. State, N11rt11ri11g vs. )ppressio11, flint are i11sta11tly accessible to 5 ear olds .... . Little kids are tlroro11gl,/y mused: big kids (like me) are i11trig11ed".

USTEOIRi 6GA NA rAIBHDHEARCA PUIPPEIDi AN MHAIDE BHlG" uly 20, 21 - An Taibhdhearc 'he Taibhdhearc (National Theatre for ne Irish language) has its 'Aisteoiri Oga' tage an Irish-language adaptation of ederico Garc;_ia Lorca's 'The Billy Club 'uppe ts'. The show pro m i s.:;_s to be ighly comical, entertaining an�; visually nchanting.

'OUR NEIGHBOURHOOD" uly 16 - Mercy Hall )ur Neighbourhood' is a play written Jr children by children. All the children l the play, who are aged between seven nd eleven, live in the Galway district of ohermore. The play is about two men;

Padraic O'Conaire and Michael Cunnis, both locally-famed storytellers. Padraic O'Conaire who is buried in Bohermore Cemetry, was one of Ireland' s best­ known short story writers and his statue in Eyre Square has long been one of the city's principal landmarks.

children, as well as several volumes of poetry. His book includes 'Long Ago By Shannonside', 'Ferocious Irish Women' and 'Strange Irish T ales For Children'. His tales are rich and varied,. comprising a mixture of humour, horror, history, mystery and magic.

Michael Cunnis is very much alive and can often be seen around the town, plying his trade in his horse and cart. He's a neighbour of the children who put the p lay together and is renowned amongst them for his Jove of horses and his story-telling. 'Our Neighbourhood's unique insight into a little bit of Galway's life and history should give this show a special appeal for both local children and young visitors.

WORKSHOPS

CHILDREN'S READINGS TONY HICKEY July 23 - The Arts Centre, Nuns Island Tony Hickey is one of Ireland's foremost writers of children's fiction. His books take much of their inspiration from his native Newbridge and the River Liffey, which figures to some extent in all eleven of his books to date. It's been his aim as a writer to refk>ct the realities and fantasies of the world in which to-day's children live. Amongst his best·known works are 'The Matchless Mice', 'The Matchless Mice In Space', 'The Black Dog', 'Spike And the Professor', 'Foodland' and 'Doreen At The Races'.

CAROLYN SWIFT July 24 • The Arts Centre, Nuns Island Carolyn Swift was born in London but has lived in Dublin for many years. She has been an actress, playwright, director and producer, and is well-known as a broadcaster. She has had a prolific output of plays, journalism, radio and television scripts, in cluding such children's favourites as 'Wanderly Wagon', 'Bosco' and 'Fortycoats'. Her books, which have won her a very loyal followiing among young readers, include many "Robber·• adventures and, most recently, 'Bugsy Goes To Cork'.

DRAMA WORKSHOP Two members of Galway Youth Theatre will give two theatre workshops in the Arts Centre, Nun's Island. Mon. 20 July, 2 p.m. and Sat. 25 July, 1 p.m.

DANCE WORKSHOP Christine Hamburger, will give this workshop at the Arts Centre, Nun's Island on Tue. 21 July at 2 p.m. She has been teaching Ballet and Dan ce for several years. Classes are limited to twenty-five, and the children must be over 5 years old.

ART WORKSHOP Mairtin O'Ceidigh will give an Art Workshop a t the Arts Centre, 47 Dominick St., on Wed. 22 July at 2 p.m.

POTTERY WORKSHOP Lawrence O'Kelly will be giving Pottery Workshops throughout the Festival at his workshop in 31, Merchant's Road. Each child will get a chance to use the Potter's Wheel and also to create their own jewellery or handwork. There are two three•q uarter hour classes per day (except Sunday) and they run from 12.30 to 1.15 p.m. and 1.15 to 2 p.m. Classes are limited to eight children per session. Registration is at GAF Box Office.

EDDIE LINEHAN July 22 • The Arts Centre, Nuns Island Eddie Linehan was born in Brosna, Co. Kerry and now lives in Crusheen, Co. Cl are. He is one ·of Ireland's most p opular storytellers, havin g five television series to his credit and seven collections of tales on t.ipe. He is also the author of many books for adults and 31

Childrens Festival sponsored by:


"MADE IN L.A."

July 15-26 - U.C.G. G.1llery.

'M.1de in LA.' is a unique exhibition of original prints by some of America's most notable a rtists. The exhibition consists of 30 lithographs and monotypes from the collection of the Cirrus G.illcry ilnd Gemini Print Studios, Los Angeles. It includes 29 pieces by such artists .is Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Sam Francis, Joe Goode, Philip Gu ston, David Hockney, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Ed M o ses, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nau man, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Rusha, Richard Serra and Frank Stella, amongst others.

The title is derived from the fact th.it Los Angeles has been the central focus of American printmaking since the 1960's when the TAMARlND LITHOGRAPHY WORKSHOP was founded. M,my of the Tamarind master-printers went on to found signific.int, independent print­ making workshops .ind the works in this exhibition are principally drawn from them. Trn11sportntio11 provided by

AerLingus �

GER SWEENEY

Painter - Riverrun Gallery.

Ger Sweeney hails from Castleb.ir, Co. Mayo, but has made G.ilway his home

and his inspiration. Widely exhibited .ind regarded as one of the most promising of the 'coming' gencratin of young Irish painters, he quote:-, as his source, Frank Kline ... "Paint never performs the same way twice". Best known, perhnps, in Galway for his striking 1989 GAF poster design ... (the Fish, remember?) ... he has tr.welled and exhibited widely in Ireland and the USA. Of his work, which is largely non-representational, Ger Sweeney says: "I invariably star t a painting with an idea in mind, but then anything can happen ... His viv id, colourful oils arc exciting and full of movement and ven·e. H

BEN REILLY

Venue to be confirmed.

One of Ireland's most promising young sculptors, Ben Reilly was born in Dublin but moved to Cork in 1983. Having acquired a Fine Art Diploma from the Crawford School of Art & Design, he's spent the past two years working with the highly-reg.irded National Sculpture Factory. He also holds a degree in Archa eology and in 1988 won a Scholarship from the Greek Government which enabled him to live .ind study in Athens for il ycilr.

He has exhibited at the Rh•errun ('91) and Triskel ('92); his G.ilw.iy exhibition includes pieces seen at the Triskel, illong with a considerable number of new works.

32

His sculptures arc mostly figurative, an are often built up from bits of s craf metal, using a v ariety o f weldin techniques. They arn primaril influenced by his interest in Archaeolog and eagerness to explore different Wa}' of working with metal.

BREDA C. ENNIS.

Printmaker. Riverrun Gallery.

Bred.i Ennis tn\\'elled to Rome in 1975, t study Art .ind 'visit the Mediterranean So taken was she with the beauty of Ital: and the experience of Italian living tha she st.iyed there. She studied at th, 'Accademi.i dell.i Bella Arti' .ind, '84, sh graduated from The Academy of Fin Arts, Rome.

The pieces she ha s chosen for thi exhibition are mainly wood-cuts an< etchings and they reflect the lrish/ltali.11 duality of her background. Her main pre occupation is trees; the shape of trees, th, growth and development f trees and th1 way living wood interacts with Man, .inc vice versa. Her ex-Professor, (Academ} of Fine Arts, Rome), said ..." With thes< new works she shows that she ha! remained faithful to her poetic world She has also become more sol.ir ... more intense, more convincing". She ha! exhibited extensively in !rel.ind, Italy anc Engl.ind.

111is c:cl1i/Jitio11 /,as being gra11t ai,lc,l b!, Coca Cola


LARGE OBJECT EXHIBITION

With works by Eoin MacCarthai gh, Paki Smith, and Bernadette Kiely. McDonogh Building, Flood Street.

This exhibition comprises only three artworks, but what it lacks in number it more than makes up for in sheer size. Eoin MacCarthaigh, well-known in Galway as one of Macnas' Design-stalwarts, has constructed an installation measuring 20 x 15 x 15 ft. Its centrepiece is the imposing Howitzer which he made for the A b b e y Th e a tre's r e c e n t production of O'Casey's 'The Silver Tassie'.

Paki Smith is supplying a painted sculpture entitled 'The Damascus Gate', comprising two 25ft high pillars (each with a 2 ft. wide base). The pillars are 4 ft. apart and are both topped by growing plants. The exhibition is completed by a 24 ft. high painting created by Bernadette Kiely.

MUSIC AND MUSICIANS Kenny Art Gallery

This multi-media show features some of Ireland's best· known musicians as seen by some of Ireland's best-known artists. The remarkable vnriety of work on displny includes; Paintings (oils, watercolours, and .icrylics), Batiks, stained glass and Sculpture in bronze, stone, wood, bogwood nnd ceramics. There is ,m equnlly impressi\'e variety of subject mntter; 'seannos' singers, rock-and-rollers, jazz quartets, choirs, wren-boys, mummers and much, much more.

Exhibiting artists include Brian Bourke, John Behan, John coll, Vicki Crowley and Miri.im Silke.

Brinn Bourke's Exfribitio11 HPoly11tycl1 H can lie seen 11/ Tlte Arts Centr(, Dominick Street throughout tli,•Jestiva/.

"Subjects" include Sincad O'Connor, Frankie Gavin, Dolores Ke.inc and Seamus Ennis. Vis1111l Arts Spo11sore1I

Made in L.A.

BRIAN BOURKE "POLYPTYCW The Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street.

A major exhibiti on, covering four subjects, by one of Ireland's foremost living artists. His work has been exhibited internationally and has won consistent critical acclaim. He is a member of the ISLAND CONNECTION GROUP, has designed for the theatre and is the entire cast of a quirky film by Bob Quinn. TIiefour subjects nrc:

1) MARY M. A continuation of a series of portraits which began with the Island Connection group show earlier this year. 2) PREGNANT WOMAN, OVERDUE. Self explanatory p ortraits of an increasingly impatient expectant mother. 3) LANDSCAPES, OWER. Made between April and early June this year. A return to large scale landscapes. 4) TRIPTYCHS. Two triptychs. "of a young woman with Heterochromic Irides",

An exhibition of original prints by some of America's most noted artists. University College Gallery.

by:

�omoomo

Art Space Studios, Paintings and Drawings. 49 Dominick Street.

Brian Bourke, Polyptych.

'Impression 5', Prints. Nimmo's Restaurant. Spanish Arch.

Ger Sweeney, Paintings.

Galway Camera Club, Photography. Irish Permanent, Eyre Square.

A major exhibition of new paintings. Arts Centre, 47 Dominick Street. Riverrun Gallery.

Breda Catherine Ennis, Prints. Riverrun Gallery.

Elizabeth Cope, Paintings. House of James Gallery.

Ben Riley, Sculptor. Venue to be.confirmed.

Claude Huart, Prints. Geoghegan Gallery, Bridge Mills.

'Music and Musicians', Paintings.

Christine Bowen, Paintings. Tigh Nei'.lchtain, 17 Cross St. from 19 July, 12.30pm - 6.00pm

Kenny Art Gallery.

'Large Objects', Sculpture

Mc Donogh Building, Flood Street. 33

'Western Remains', Group Show.

Cornstore, opposite festival office.


THE WORD on galway

The Magic of Mitsubishi

inside '

inuslc

art

thiatie , Vi video alb'um.s: ooou listings - wli t !9'

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>

, go to, where' to eat & how to get there ...

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ALL YOU NEEPi TO KNOW ABOUT THE .1 < ... 1992 C:ALWA¥ � ARTS l=ESTIVAL. l=REE ! · f

4

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&

_Spidda.l_

Caravan & Camping Par( Spiddal, Co. Galway. Tel: 091-83327 �

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.

·",'.. your guide to the c�tural capital of Ireland •••" . Tl!lr Nev, York .Tf.tu,._l)VoU,

eiffop�·-�o�hf erit:enal11ment:

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piddal mal Park

Paire Ainmhithe an Spidell Opening Hours: 11a.m.-8p.m. Daily

Admission:

Children £1.00 • Adults £1.50 • Family £5.00 with special rates for groups and tours

Located just 1.6 Km. (lml.) from Spiddal village and 10 miles from Galway City - it is the ideal base for touring Connemara, the Irish speaking Gaeltacht area. Traditional festivals, Ceilis, Beaches, Fishing, Sea, River, Harbours, Sailing Rowing and Canoeing, close by.

Splddal Animal Fann, Spiddal, Co. Galway. Phone 091-83372 for details


The 'Umbrella' is an adjunct to the official Festival Programme which showcases the talents o f the fo llowing groups and indivi duals, all of whom are based in Galway and are active year-round in its flourishing Arts-scene.

COMEDY CUMANN

SEV'NTH HEAV'N RESTAURANT

Formed in Dec. '90, the Comedy Cumann quickly became a byword for top-class comic e ntertainment. Their regular monthly shows, and occasionnl out-of­ town forays, attracted large and enthusiastic audiences. Their gigs feature both regular and guest performers, battle­ hardened veternns and raw recruits. The GAF '92 show featurs founder-members Eamonn and Fiona Kelly, plus a host of guests.

FLYING PIG THEATRE CO:

"Alas Poor Hamlet" KING'S HEAD PUB, JULY 16 - 25 (Excluding Sundny) 1.05 p.m.

Gerry Co1111eely takes 011 Mac Liammoir's classic at tire Arts Centre.

Marguerita McGoveni i11 Andrew Lloy,I Weber's ''Tell me 011 a S1111ciay H .

MARGUERITA McGOVERN:

PAT BRACKEN:

flamboyant theatrica lity, Conneely personalises and utterly captures the full rnnge o f this extraord inary script. A highly memorable performance in il highly memorable show.

"Bridie and Co." JULY 22 - 25, EYRE SQUARE, 2 p.m. and 4p.m.

"The Donahue Sisters" JULY 23, 24& 25. THE BENTLEY, 10 p.m.

Oinks! They're back! Those purveyors of aerial pork, Flying Pig, bring back their hilarious lunchtime show, 'Alas Poor Hamlet', a feast of foolish foppery and roiste ring rudeness based on Shakespeare's laughter-free original.

PEGASUS THEATRE CO.:

Puppeteer Pat Bracken has worke d extensively in theatre and television. He has devised and supplied puppets for many of RTE's children's progrnmmes. Last Dec. he made his directorial debut with Na Fanaithe's acclaimed 'Aingeal an Chladaigh'. "Bridie and Co" is a witty and captivating street theatre show featuring marionettes, muppets, music and more.

Headford's Pe gasus present Gal way writer Geraldine Aaron's black comedy, 'The Donahue Sisters' (premiered by Druid At GAF '90). The sisters are played by Concepta McHugh, Mary Bane and Mary Monaghan. Direction is by Liam Thornton.

"Laundry and Bourbon" KING'S HEAD, JULY 20 - 25, I.OS p.m.

Comedy Cumilnn Sev·nth Heav'n Restaurant - July 22, 23, 24

TABOO THE ATRE CO."

Galway's all-female theatre company present their version of James McLure's hysterical comedy about three women living in the mid-west of America.

GERRY CONNEELY:

"The Importance Of Being Oscar" JULY 21 -= 25, ARTS CENTRE (DOMINIC STREET) 8 p.m.

Ge rry Conneely triumphantly essays Macliammoir's legendary showpiece, making of it something uniquely his own. Applying his individual brand of

Margueritil McGo\•ern 'Tell Me On A Sunday" An Taibhdhearc - July 17-18

Flying Pig Theiltre Company "Alas Pool Hamlet" Kings Head Pub - July 16-25

Pat Bracken· "Bridie and Co." Eyre Square - July 22-25

Taboo Theatre Company "Laundry & Bourbon" Sev'nlh Heav'n Restaurant - July 21-26

Gerry Conneely "The Importance of Being Oscar" The Arts Centre - July 21-25 Pegasus Theatre Company "The Donoghue Sisters· The Bentley - July 23-25

"Tell Me On A Sunday"

This is a one-woman musical, featuring 17 songs about a highly-complicated love­ life. This woman knows aU the pitfalls, and jumps into every one of them. Her sharp satirical view of the typical American life-style, combined with the customary letters home to Mother, make this a funny yet rivetting look at love lost, found, lost, found and lost again. Singer: Margeurita McGovern Musical Director: Jules Maxwell Director: Paul Fahy

ARTS FESTIVAL FM RADIO 104.9FM Broadcasting daily from 10 a,m. to 6 p.m., from the Cornstore, Arts festival FM Radio will keep you abreast of absolutely everything th.it's going on! It will feature all the latest news and information on this year's exciting range of events, with a regular 'Festival Newscfosk'. There'll be a Children's Programme with Littlejohn, Comedy from Maguire and McBride, and a non-stop procession of very, very special guest stars who will play their favourite discs each afternoon between 3 and 4 p.m. Kevin Mc:Nicholas will be at the helm each lunchtime from 12 to 3, and there's a whole lot more in store! All on Arts Festival Radio•..... Turn On. Tune In. And Drop By!


AIB services cover all your financial needs. For all your banking requirements call to any of the AIB Bank branches in Galway Lynch's Castle 18 Eyre Square Salthill University Branch, Newcastle

..

f

Tuam Road The AIB Banklink facility is available at these locations. You can also use your Bank link Card to withdraw cash from Banklink at Terryland Shopping Centre, Headford Road.

I Wiil:iii

______ YOU BRING OUT THE BEST IN

us ______,


IT'S

NOT JUST A STAGE WE'RE GOING THROUGH For several years now AIB has been participating in the Arts in Ireland. We have had many happy associations with productions both here and abroad. Through our 'Better Ireland Awards' project we recognise groups and organisations making significant contributions towards enriching the quality of cultural life in Ireland. And we have a wide-ranging cultural programme planned for well into the future, ensuring that we play our part in the continued success of the Arts. A lot goes on behind the scenes in AIB.

YOU BRING OUT THE BEST IN US

Profile for Galway International Arts Festival

Galway Arts Festival Programme 1992  

Galway Arts Festival Programme 1992