Gallup Sun ● March 24, 2023

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E E R F

For Sale

E LARRY CASUS PART TWO Pg. 8

500 E. Green Ave, Gallup NM 87301

Contact Elizabeth (505)870-7603 Keller Williams-Gallup Living 309 E. Nizhoni Blvd Gallup NM 87301

Office 505-488-2344

VOL 9 | ISSUE 417 | MARCH 24, 2023

NO GOLF IN GALLUP

Course conditions close Fox Run — for now. Story page 4 Cou

GALLUP FUN!

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 1


NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CURRENT 8-11 GRADE STUDENTS TH


Gallup Housing Authority The Top Reasons for Lease Termination #1 – Police Calls: When tenants and/or their guests conduct themse lves in such a manner which threatens the health and safety of the Hous ehold and/or surrounding GSQQYRMX] 7XEδ QYWX EGX [LIR XLI TVSFPIQW KIX SYX SJ LERH ERH VITIXMXMZI #2 – Pet Policy Violations: +IRIVEPP] RS TIXW EVI EPPS[IH 3RP] ɴGIVXMεIHɵ WIVZMGI SV GSQTERMSR ERMQEPW EV I EPPS[IH 7XMPP WSQI XIRERXW XV] XS WRIEO TIXW MR ERH [LIR GEYKLX XLI] EVI KMZIR ER STTSVXYRMX] XS VIQSZI XLIQ -J XLI] HS RSX GSQTP] XLIR XLIMV PIEWI [MPP FI XIVQMREXIH #3 – Nonpayment of Re nt: 8LI QEMR KSEP SJ TYFPMG LSYWMRK MW XS TVSZMHI EδSVHEFPI VIRXEP YRMXW JSV PS[ MRGSQI JEQMPMIW 6IRX MW FEWIH SR E JEQMP]ɱW EFMPMX] XS TE] ;LIR XLI] HS RSX TE] XLI] EVI KMZIR WIZIVEP STTSVtunities to correct the situation a nd when they do not, then their lease is terminated. #4 – Damage to Property: ,9( VI GSKRM^IW ɴRSVQEP [IEV ERH XIEVɵ MW XS FI I\TIGXIH &YX ɴHEQEKIW EFSZI ERH FI]SRHɵ RSVQEP [IEV ERH XIEV EVI XS FI GLEVKIH XS XLI XIRERXW 7SQI XIRERXW WIIQ XS XLMRO XLEX XLI] GER NYWX XIEV XLI YRMXW YT XLIR GEPP XLI QEMRXIRERGI WXEδ XS LEZI XLIQ ε\ MX ;LIR XLMW FIGSQIW E TVSFPIQ SV XLI] VIJYWI XS TE] JSV XLI HEQEKIW XLIR XLIMV PIEWI [MPP FI XIVQMREXIH

Richard F. Kontz Executive Director

#5 – Sm oking: ,9( LEW HIGPEV IH E ɴRSR WQSOMRKɵ TSPMG] JSV EPP TYFPMG LSYWMRK YRMXW ERH KEZI 4,%W XMQI XS MQTPIQIRX XLEX TSPMG] 7S RS[ 8IRERXW LEZI XS EHNYWX 7SQI WXMPP [MPP RSX ERH XLIVIJSVI XLIMV PIEWI MW XIVQMREXIH JSV RSR GSQTPMance. #6 – Unre ported Income: ,9 ( VIUYMVIW ZIVMεGEXMSR SJ E XIRERXɱW MRGSQI JSV XLI TYVTSWI SJ WIXXMRK XLIMV QSRXLP] VIRX 8LMW MW HSRI MRMXMEPP] ERH ERRYEPP] %PWS XIRERXW EVI VIUYMV I H XS VITSVX ER] MRGSQI GLERKI [MXLMR HE]W ;LIRIZIV E XIRERX JEMPW XS TVSTIVP] VITSVX XLIMV MRGSQI SV JEMPW XS HMWGPSWI EPP LSYWILSPH MRGSQI ,9( VIUYMVIW XLEX XLI VIRX FI VIGEPGYPEXIH FEGO XS XLI HEXI SJ XLI YRVITSVXIH MRGSQI ERH XLI XIRERXW XLIR S[I ɴFE GO VIRXɵ 8IRERXW EVI VIUYMVIH XS TE] MR JYPP SV WMKR E VITE]QIRX E KVIIQIRX XS TE] XLI FEGO VIRX ;LIR XLI] HS RSX GSQTP] XLIR XLIMV PIEWI [MPP FI X IVQMREXIH #7 – Unauthorized Live-ins: ;LIR XIRERXW εVWX KIX E LSYWMRK YRMX XLI] QYWX MHIRXMJ] EPP LSYWILSPH QIQFIVW [LS [MPP V IWMHI MR XLI YRMX -J XLEX GSQTSWMXMSR GLERKIW XLI] EVI VIUYMVIH XS TVSZMHI RSXMGI [MXLMR HE]W =IX WSQI XIRERXW WXMPP EPPS[ SXLIV MRHMZMHYEPW XS QS ZI MR [MXLSYX TVSTIV RSXMGI XLIWI EVI GEPPIH ɴYREYXLSVM^IH PMZI MRWɵ ;LIR XLMW MW HMWGSZIVIH XIRERXW EVI KMZIR RSXMGI ERH ER STTSVXYRMX] XS GSVVIGX XLI WMXYEXMSR -J XLI] HS RSX XLIR XLIMV PIEWI [MPP FI termina ted. #8 – Failed Housekeeping Inspections: ,9( VIUYMVIW TIVMSHMG ɴ,SYWIOIITMRK -RWTIGXMSRWɵ 8LIWI EVI GSRHYGXIH XS GLIGO [LS MW VIWMHMRK MR XLI YR MX JSV YREYXLSVM^IH PMZI MRW JSV YREYXLSVM^IH TIXW YR[ERXIH TIWXW ?M I FIHFYKW A HEQEKIW FI] SRH RSVQEP [IEV ERH XIEV ERH KIRIVEP GPIERPMRIWW ERH WERMXEV] GSRHMXMSRW ;LIR HIεGMIRGMIW EVI JSYRH XLI] EVI KMZIR E RSXMGI ERH XMQI XS GS VVIGX XLI WMXYEXMSR -J XLI] HS RSX XLIR XLIMV PIEWI [MPP FI XIVQMREXIH 1] ,SYWMRK 1EREKIQIRX WXEδ EVI [IPP XVEMRIH TVSJIWWMSREPW [LS QEREKI SYV VIRXEP TVSTIVXMIW ZIV] [IPP 8LI] EX XIQTX XS [SVO [MXL XIRERXW FY X [LIR XIRERXW EVI MR ɴRSR GSQTPMERGIɵ ERH JEMP XS VIWTSRH ERH GSVVIGX RSR GSQTPMERGI MWWYIW MR E XMQIP] QERRIV XLIR XLI WXEδ LEZI RS SXLIV EPXIVREXMZI FYX XS XIVQMREXI XLI X IRERXɱW PIEWI

Located at 203 Debra Drive in Gall up, NM Telephone: (505)722-4388 Applications may be request by email: GHA.Main@galluphousing.com


NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

Efforts underway to jazz up local greens By Holly J. Wagner Sun Correspondent

A

few seasons of irrigation problems during severe drought conditions with intermittent monsoon rain has left the Fox Run Golf Course in tatty condition, forcing staff to close the course for this year to reseed and get it back into shape. “Every year for the last three or four years, it’s been [water] outage after outage. You are seeing the damage that the course took during that time. It takes a little while for that to show up,” the city’s Director of Golf, Matthew Alcala, explained du r i ng t he Ma rch 14 cit y council meeting. The course will be closed s t a r t i n g M a r c h 27 u nt i l around October. The driving range and pro shop will remain open during the renovations, but the nea rest

Correction Last week’s cover was incorrectly dated March 14, 2023. The correct cover date is March 17, 2023.

6

101ST CEREMONIAL Legislative bill changes who will run the event

Gallup’s Director of Golf Matthew Alcala course open for a round of golf is Coyote de Malpais in Grants. “Ideally we can hopefully get at least nine holes open in October and the rest shortly thereafter,” Alcala said. That will mean no tournaments this year, although the course will still be able to host events, such as a DWI awareness run scheduled for March 30. Alcala considered the possibility of closing the course in halves, leaving nine holes at a time open while the other half was undergoing renovation. But that would stretch an already short staff, forcing them to split time between course renovation and daily maintenance at the same time they are connecting to a new

7

effluent line that will provide gray water for the course. Last year the course struggled to hire the four seasonal workers it needs just for regular operations, and Alcala isn’t optimistic that this year will be better. During last season the sta ff reseeded holes 10, 15 and 17 so they are in better shape this year, but eager golfers made that a challenge. “We closed three holes and remained open during play,” Alcala said. “We restricted the drive to the green, we reminded them again. We put up ropes. Yet they were still trying to go out and play on freshly seeded areas.” Those issues combined led to his recommendation to close the whole course at once to get it in shape. “We want to get revenues up as fast as we can, but also make the course as nice as we can for the golfers, so there’s something for people to enjoy,” Alcala said. “This option will give us the fastest way to raise our revenues and get the course back on track and give us something nice.” In a rare split vote, the city council voted 3-2 to close the whole course for the year. Councilors Fran Palochak, Dist. 4, Linda Garcia, Dist.1,

and Michael Schaaf, Dist. 2, voted for the closure, while Mayor Louie Bonaguidi and Councilor Sarah Piano, Dist. 3, favored an option to close nine holes at a time. “Closing nine holes and renovating is very common in the golf world,” Piano said. She wa s concer ned about the loss of revenue from the course, as well as displacing charity tournaments hosted there dur ing the summer. Alcala said the course hosted seven tournaments last year. Piano and Bonaguidi are also concerned that closing the course will train golfers to go elsewhere. “I’ve had a number of calls and the general consensus is ‘keep nine open,’” Bonaguidi said. “We don’t want to lose our customer base for sure. In my own business, if I ever had to remodel I would do whatever I could to stay open, even if it’s half the business.” For t hei r pa r t , gol fer s remember when the course was redone in 2014, at a cost of $5 m i l l ion. T hey have mixed reactions to the closure, but agree it w ill be worthwhile if it brings the course back for future years. “Do I have faith that they can turn it around? My faith is gone at this point. But I would

definitely go back if they can turn it around,” Isaac Leyba, who gave up his membership as the course fell into disrepair, said. Leyba thinks the problems are a management issue. “ I t h i n k m a n a ge m e n t is hurting that golf course more tha n a ny thing. With the management it has now, I don’t think it will ever get back to where it was,” he said. “There’s no leadership or accountability. The only time it seems to die is when they work on it or when they see a problem and they don’t work on it.” David Haynes, who plays with a group of fellow retirees, has similar concerns, but he’s prepared to give Alcala the benefit of the doubt. “We love pl ay i n g gol f and we want some activity in Gallup. I would like the course fixed, absolutely, but I can’t see how they can manage to get this course back in condition,” Haynes said. T he one t h i ng gol fer s agree on is that they want a place to golf without having to drive for an hour or more to do it. “We’d all rather play here if we could. The drive to Grants is an hour and it makes a long day,” Haynes said.

WHAT’S INSIDE …

HONORING A FORMER PRESIDENT Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly has passed

4 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

13 14 16 START OF SOFTBALL Lady Patriots take on the Lady Pirates

MOVIE REVIEW John Wick battles his final enemies

ANOTHER TAKE ON LARRY CASUSE Gallup man shares his opinion NEWS


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Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher Babette Herrmann Executive Director Mandy Marks Design Volodymyr Lotysh Contributing Editor/ Correspondent Molly Ann Howell Contributing Editor Cody Begaye Correspondents Dee Velasco Holly J. Wagner Photography Kimberley Helfenbein Merrisha Livingston Jenny Pond On The Cover Fox Run Golf Course reseeded their grass starting in the spring of 2022. This picture, which was taken this winter, shows the grass’s progress. Photo Credit: Fox Run Golf Course staff The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office: 1983 State Rd. 602 Gallup, NM 87301

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

Bill returns Gallup Intertribal Indian Ceremonial to local control By Holly J. Wagner Sun Correspondent

A

bill awaiting Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s signature will return the Gallup Intertribal Indian

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6 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

Ceremonial to local control after two years of tense collaboration with the state Department of Tourism. House Bill 161, which moves the ceremonial out of the state’s tourism budget and under the local government division of the Department of Finance and Administration, passed the state House on a 58-0 vote, and the Senate voted 39-0. Rep. D. Wonda Johnson, D-N.M., sponsored the bill, which drew no opposition. Her office didn’t respond to requests for comment, but GIICA Coordinator Dudley Byerley sang her praises. “I know that Rep. Johnson went way above and beyond to get this bill done,” he said. “I’ve

Rep. D. Wonda Johnson represents McKinley and San Juan counties. worked harder on that than any other bill. If we get it signed it’s going to be well worth it.” The association has run the event for much of its century-long

history. When Lujan Grisham was elected she made a commitment to bring agencies into compliance with their authorizing legislation, so in 2020 the Department of Tourism got involved and created the Intertribal Ceremonial Office. Blending the two organizations proved to be a challenge, as their missions sometimes seemed to work at cross-purposes. The state office was more focused on growing the event with online and TV exposure, while the association has remained committed to the unique local flavor and history of the event. Working more on parallel

CEREMONIAL | SEE PAGE 11

NEWS


Former Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly passes away Staff Reports

NEWS

April 1, 9:00—1:30 Real world solutions addressing questions that arise during the course of caring for someone with dementia.

F

ormer Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly, 75, passed away from a long term illness March 22. Shelly was from Thoreau, and he was elected in 2010, and assumed office Jan. 11, 2011. With the Navajo Nation Council being reorganized from an 88 member legislative body to 24, the president took office with a new government structure. He was given an additional referendum approval of a ‘line item veto’ power to red line budget measures approved by the Navajo Nation Council. Although the former president lost his re-election bid in the 2014 primary election, he was sworn into a second term Jan. 13, 2015, holding the presidency for five more months. Shelly was the fi rst sitting vice president to be elected president. He was also the second leader from the New Mexico side of the Navajo Nation to be elected, following Chairman Paul Jones of Naschitti. Chairman Sam Ahkeah from Gadii’ahi-To’koi served as vice chairman from 1943 to 1947. Ahkeak was the fi rst vice chairman to be elected chairman in 1946. T he for mer president ser ved a s v ice president from 2007 to his inauguration as president in 2011. He served in the Navajo Nation Council for 16 years representing Thoreau. While on the Council he served on the Community Development and

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Former Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly. Photo Credit: OPVP Transportation Committee, the Economic Development Committee, and the Budget and Finance as committee chairman. O t her pu bl ic s er v ice includes eight years as county commissioner for McKinley County which ran concurrent to his service in the Navajo Nation Council. T he for mer P resident was married for 57 years to Martha Shelly, originally of Coyote Canyon. They have five adult children, 12 grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. The president remained active in Navajo leadership after stepping down from office. He and his family ran a transportation business for the last seven years. The family will be holding a private service for the former president. A public memorial will be planned at a future date.

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Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 7


Honoring Larry Casuse PART 2: LOOKING BACK AT THE STORY 50 YEARS LATER By Molly Ann Howell Sun Correspondent

PART 2 OF 3 While some believe that Larry Casuse did not shoot himself, others, including the Gallup Police, stand by their opinion that he did. In 1973 the GPD officially claimed that Casuse shot himself. In a New York Times article published a few days after Casuse’s death, 11th District Attorney Louis DePauli said t hat t he prel i m i na r y coroner’s repor t showed that Casuse shot himself in the lower face and in his right side. DePauli said the gunshot

wound under Casuse’s chin was “self-inflicted.”

INTERVIEW WITH AN AUTHOR Now, over 50 years later, activists are still trying to keep Ca su s e’s s t or y a nd h is mes sage a l ive. One way David Correia, author and professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico, is doing that is through his book about Casuse, published in 2022. An Enemy Such as T hi s: L ar r y Ca s u se an d t h e S t r u g g l e fo r Na t i v e Liberation in One Family on Two Continents across T h r e e C e n t ur i e s doe sn’t solely focu s on Ca su se’s Students carry the Navajo Nation flag during a Larry Casuse memorial march in Albuquerque in 1973. Photo Credit: Tony Louderbough final days. Only the first and last chapter focus on Feb. 28 and March 1 of 1973. Once Correia heard Casuse’s story, he couldn’t get it out of his head. “At f i r s t it wa s ju s t a fascinating stor y,” Corriea said. “I was struck by what I t h i n k ever yone el s e i s str uck by when they hea r his story: this young 19-yearold Navajo college student so moved by the plight of Navajo folks being exploited i n Ga l lup a nd t he deat h s a rou nd the Nava jo In n … that he devoted his life and essentially gave his life to try and help them.” A f t er Cor rei a met t he Ca suse fa mily in 2013, he knew he had to write a book about the man who died trying to stand up for the Navajo people. He just had to figure out how to go about it.

8 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

“I couldn’t walk away from that story. It only took such a long time to write because it was such a difficult thing to write, a biography of a family, many who are still alive,” Correia said. “I didn’t want to write a book in which I used Larry’s life and death to make some argument about colonia lism. That seemed like it would cheapen his memory and legacy.” Correia wanted his book to provide context for Casuse’s death, and explain the complexities surrounding it. For Cor reia , t he m a i n complex it y is the a lcohol problem in Gallup. “The problem has always be en t h a t Ga l lup i s ju s t awash in alcohol,” Correia

LARRY CASUSE | SEE PAGE 9 NEWS


LARRY CASUSE | FROM PAGE 8 explained. “When Larry was alive there were more liquor stores in Gallup than the law allowed, and the Navajo Inn Bar was the most profitable liquor store in the entire state because it was right on the edge of the Navajo Nation, which was dr y. The law at that time actually meant the penalty for possessing alcohol was actually greater than driving drunk on the Navajo Nation.” Correia explained that in the ‘60s and ‘70s, Navajo people weren’t allowed in bars, so they’d spend their time drinking in parking lots or alleyways since they couldn’t do it back home on the reservation. Alcohol is banned on the Navajo Nation. Ac c o r d i n g t o a s t u d y done by University of Alaska A nchorage Psycholog y P r ofe s s or D r. V i v i a n M . Gonzales and Montana State Un iver sit y P rofe s s or D r. Monica Skewes in November 2021, about 60% of Native Americans surveyed believed they were genetically predisposed to alcohol abuse. The professors’ research showed that Native Americans who believed this to be true were more likely to have a drinking problem. But rather than finding out that there was a genetic link, the researchers found that the participants’ drinking problems likely stemmed from poverty, discrimination, and historical trauma. However, Correia doesn’t put the blame on past trauma. “That’s just another way to blame Navajo people for being prey to the a lcohol industry,” Correia said. He places the blame on liquor establishments that break the law, and political NEWS

leader s who ref use to do anything about the situation when it comes to a lcohol sales. I n Ju ly 2 021, t he New Mex ico leg i sl a t u re m a de some cha nges to the laws that dictate how alcohol is sold. Retailers were no longer allowed to sell minis – closed conta iners with less tha n three ounces – for off-site consumption. In Gallup, city councilors a mended a n ord ina nce in May 2021 regarding Sunday alcohol sales. The cha nge prohibited the sale of alcohol from 7 a m to 9:59 a m on Sundays. Before the law ch a n ge, a lcohol wa s not sold on Sundays in McKinley County at all. When discussing alcohol laws, Sen. George Muñoz, D-Gallup, added an amendment to the legislation with McKinley County in mind. The amendment keeps anyone who sells retail gasoline from selling alcoholic beverages other than beer with less than 10% alcohol content. However, local artist Jerry Brown said in an interview with the Sun that the change has led gas station owners to make a tough decision. “I’ve had gas station owners tell me ‘I’d rather sell liquor because I can make $4,000 a day, and selling gas I could make $2,000 a day,’” Brown said. Brown has lost multiple family members to alcohol abuse and ad jacent issues. Two of his uncles and his grandmother froze to death after they fell asleep outside after they’d been drinking. Another uncle is a survivor of cirrhosis. His father was run over by a drunk driver. “There’s so many traumas and people that I’ve lost … some people in their 20s, 30s,

and 40s, should’ve had their whole lives ahead of them, but they’re dead,” Brown said.

WHAT LARRY LEFT BEHIND Ursula Ca suse Ca r r illo was 12 years old when her brother died. She wants people to understand how caring her brother was, and that he simply wanted the Navajo Inn to close up shop, or at least change its ways. “Larry was just a young m a n w h o go t h i s h e a r t pie r c e d w he n he move d to Gallup. He saw that the Native A mer ica ns needed help a nd t h a t ’s wh a t he wanted to do,” Carrillo said. “He tried by every means to get help to them, to close that bar down. This mayor just didn’t listen.” T he Nava jo I n n d id eventually close soon after

Casuse’s death. Correia noted that Mayor Emmett Garcia made a promise to shut it down, but when he didn’t win reelection, Correia said that’s when Ga rcia cha nged h is mind and kept the bar open. Correia said it only stayed open for a few more months after Casuse’s death though. When it comes to the controversial, and sometimes violent, contention of Casuse, Correia said he doesn’t want people to think of him that way. “He wa s a rea lly quiet, i ntel l igent per son who couldn’t take it anymore that people were being brutally killed and dying in great numbers every single year around these liquor stores in Gallup,” Correia said. “It’s not glamorizing violence to say he made a really courageous decision that day [he died] a nd he decided to sacrifice his life

to try and protect other peoples’ lives, not knowing if that would really help….” For her part, Carrillo is going to tr y a nd keep her brother’s story and what he stood for alive. “I’m going to do what I can to make sure he’s a part of h istor y,” she sa id. “He deserves it.” O r g a n i z a t io n s a r ou nd Gallup, including gallupARTS and the Octavia Fellin Public Library, are holding events to celebrate Casuse’s life for the whole month of March 50 years later. As the month winds down, there are still a few event s lef t on t he schedule. T he s e cond pa r t of a “Community Conversation with Indigenous Lifeways” will focus on healing. It’s scheduled for March 25 at ART123 Gallery, 123. W. Coal Ave.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 9


NEWS

PUBLIC SAFETY

Weekly DWI Report Staff Reports Featured DWI Starla Silversmith Feb. 20, 7:35 pm DWI (Third) A Mexican Springs woman, Starla Silversmith, 40, was pulled over for speeding but was eventually arrested for her third DWI. McKinley County Sheriff’s Deputy Terence Willie was driving westbound on Highway 264 when he saw a blue Chevrolet Malibu driving eastbound at a reported speed of 64 mph in a 55-mph zone. The Caprice passed another vehicle before merging onto U.S.

Highway 491, where Willie followed. Willie conducted a traffic stop near t he 7.7 m i le m a rke r a nd met the driver, Silversmith, and passenger, both of whom repor tedly showed signs of intoxication including bloodshot eyes as well as a smell of alcohol inside of the vehicle. Willie began questioning Silversmith, who allegedly said they were traveling back to Mexican Springs from Sagebrush Liquors and she had consumed two 16 oz. cans of Bud Light prior to

driving, which she stated as 8 pm but then changed to 5 pm after Willie told her it was 7 pm at that moment. Silversmith agreed to take the Standard Field Sobriety Tests. However, she performed poorly on the tests and was placed under arrest. Silversmith was transported to the sheriff’s office for the breath test, where she posted two samples of .13. Afterward, she repor tedly stated her officer friend had told her to always do a blood draw and she requested an independent test. Willie transported her to a local hospital for the requested blood d raw a nd she wa s cleared. He then transported

her to McKinley County Adult Detention Center and booked her for DWI (third), no registration or license, open container, speeding, and driving while license revoked. Her pretrial hearing is set for March 28. Name: Kenisha Gorman Age: 19 Arrested: Jan. 27 Charge: Aggravated DWI Status: Pretrial hearing on April 13 Name: Mario Rodriguez Age: 31 Arrested: Jan. 27 Charge: Aggravated DWI Status: Pretrial hearing on April 4

Name: Misaiah Jones Age: 28 Arrested: Dec. 8 Charge: Aggravated DWI (second)

Status: Motion hearing on April 11 Name: Kami Gaddy Age: 35 Arrested: Dec. 1 Charge: Aggravated DWI Status: Sentenced to fi ne, community service on Feb. 28 Name: Tyrick Quetawki Age: 41 Arrested: Nov. 25 Charge: Aggravated DWI Status: Arraignment on March 27 Name: Cody Garcia Age: 25 Arrested: Nov. 3 Charge: Aggravated DWI Status: Final pretrial hearing on April 12

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PUBLIC SAFETY


CEREMONIAL | FROM PAGE 6

The county is also waiting on state approval for about $5.5 million in funding for maintenance and upgrades at Red Rock Park. County Manager Anthony Dimas said the fi rst priority will probably be the leaky ma i n bu i ld i ng roof, w it h improvements to campgrounds

“T

his new arrangement really just gave us full control”

close behind. A dilapidated building needs to be demolished. But those decisions will depend on the money coming through. “We’re just eager to see how this goes,” Tom said. “It goes with the whole New Beginning theme.”

– Kyle Tom, Gallup Intertribal Indian Ceremonial President tracks than as one unit, “We were still able to produce a pretty good 100th that the community enjoyed,” GIICA president Kyle Tom said, despite having to rebound from COVID-19 and a scary incident at the opening parade. This year’s event, themed A New Beginning, will run Aug. 4-13 and will return to the old schedule, with the opening parade Thursday night. Last year it was moved to accommodate the One World Beat show. “This new arrangement will really just give us full control,” Tom said. “We’re just excited to move forward and see what possibilities are there to bring our best.” One big advantage will be not having to wait for approval from Santa Fe for every expenditure. “We can work on it year round now,” Tom said. He’s previously mentioned that many of the acts book well in advance. This year the ceremonial will invest more in talent and spend less on TV production and air time, which Tom said took a bite out of last year’s budget. Tom is proud of the ceremonial funds going back into the community and of the multiplier effect it has when visitors spend money at local restaurants and businesses. “When you are investing in the event you are investing in the people,” he said. “I help the PUBLIC SAFETY

Native Sky Hoop Dancers amaze the crowd with their finesse of hoops and dancing during the Gallup Intertribal Indian Ceremonial closing parade Aug. 13. File Photo economy here and that makes me so happy. When I look at our event and how people are spending their money here…It’s a winwin-win-win when we can have people come in and spend their money.” The ceremonial had some management issues in the early 2000s, Tom noted, but more recently the county had been more involved in the financial management so the organization and the event were bouncing back despite obstacles. “When McKinley County did it they were really strict, but in a good way….it was sometimes a hassle but it made us a better organization,” Tom said. “In 2012 it started to turn around. A lot of that came from how McKinley County worked with us to be in [accounting and audit] compliance.” HB 161 roughly follows a law that’s been in place since 1978. It still provides for a nine-member ceremonial association board appointed by the McKinley County Commission, with the current board’s term ending July 1 and new members beginning five-year terms July 2. The chairperson is an ex-officio, or non-voting member. There are no term limits, but

incumbents are not guaranteed reappointment. “I expect many of these same members to be reappointed. I think there will be a lot of collaboration between the new executive director and who that will be,” Byerley said. Byerley said he’s rooting for Tom as the executive director, and said Tom will need a lot of fundraising support to keep the event fresh and successful. “Some of the board appointments that may not get renewed would be great volunteers. The ceremonial board would love to have them,” Byerley said. “It takes a lot of money to put these things together and if you’ve got nine board members, every one of them needs to be out there beating the streets.” The current legislative session ends March 31, and Lujan Grisham has 30 days after that to sign or veto this year’s bills. Any unsigned legislation does not take effect. Even when HB 161 is signed, another key element is in HB 2, the state budget legislation. A provision in HB 161 that provided an annual $300,000 allocation was scratched, but there’s a $328,000 item in HB 2 for this year. Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 11


SPORTS

Best of the Best face off The best basketball players In New Mexico competed in Gallup March 17 and 18 at Gallup High. The 3A/4A boys green team was led by Crownpoint High Coach Thai Goodluck. Photo Credit: Jenny Pond

The 3A/4A girls red team was led by Ruidoso High Coach Troy Schmidt when the best basketball players in New Mexico convened and competed at Gallup High March 17 and 18. Photo Credit: Jenny Pond

12 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

SPORTS


Lady Patriots power through a double header against Lady Pirates Lady Patriot Anna Chaparro (1) waits to steal third base during the game against the Grants Lady Pirates March 20. The Lady Patriots defeated the Lady Pirates in a double header 20-1 and 22-6. Photo Credit: Kim Helfenbein

A Lady Patriot player races to home plate during the game against the Lady Pirates March 20 in Gallup. Photo Credit: Kim Helfenbein

SPORTS

Lady Patriot Payton Guerrero (7) prepares to hit the ball during the game against the Lady Pirates March 20 in Gallup. Photo Credit: Kim Helfenbein

A Lady Patriot player prepares for the pitch during the game against the Lady Pirates March 20 in Gallup. Photo Credit: Kim Helfenbein

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 13


ts Ar

ent

Entertainm

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

‘John Wick: Chapter 4’ is over the top, but still thrilling By Glenn Kay For the Sun

RATING:  OUT OF  RUNNING TIME: 169 MINUTES T h is feat u re f rom Lionsgate will be opening exclusively at theaters on Friday, March 24. In the past decade, this rev iewer wou ld be h a rd pressed to think of an action fi lm character who has taken down more bad guys than Joh n Wick (a ccord i ng to online enthusiasts, the body

count tally after three movies is a whopping 299). The fi rst movie in the series was a literal blast, and its sequels have done everything possible to outdo their predecessors. John Wick: Chapter 4 is the latest follow-up and is intended to be the climax of the series. It’s a pretty safe bet to say that the fi lmmakers may have hit 500 after this adventure. The movie is so over-thetop that it can’t help but be a bit silly, but the charismatic leads and incredible fight choreography are thrilling to witness. A f t er bei n g s hot a nd plunging off of the edge of a Manhattan high rise, John

Wick (Kea nu R e e v e s) h a s managed to surv ive by hiding underground with the Bowery King (Lawrence F i s h b u r n e) . F u l ly hea led, he i nt e nd s t o hunt down the le a der of T he High Table, Marquis Vincent de Gramont (Bill Skarsgard). This ma n controls t he cou nci l of Keanu Reeves plays John Wick in “John Wick: Chapter 4” the final addition to the action-packed series. Photo t h e c r i m i n a l Credit: Lionsgate underworld. Naturally, the villain is also looking to cement his author- around the globe and hoping ity by wiping Wick out, send- to fi nd a way to get close to ing out his goons to eliminate Gramont. the rogue assassin. To further As mentioned, the story secure an advantage, Gramont is ridiculous and viewers do makes individual deals with have to allow for plenty of Rules: noted killer Caine (Donnie lapses in logic. Dozens upon • Kids 4-7 color the bunny on page 1 ! Yen) and rising star, Tracker dozens of bad guys fi ght and (Shamier Anderson), who also shoot at Wick in public areas • Kids 8-10 create Easter-themed begin their pursuit of Wick. artwork on 8.5 x 11 paper! Once again, the hero finds MOVIE REVIEW himself on the run, hopping | SEE PAGE 19 • 1st, 2nd, 3rd place prizes for each

Kids coloring & drawing contest!

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age group! • Parents send pic/scan of artwork to: gallupsuncirculation@gmail.com Prize Winners Announced on April 7, 2023 in the Gallup Sun * Winners must come to Gallup Sun Office with original artwork to claim prizes. * Photo will be taken.

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Now Carrying Vortex Optics Layaway Available ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


Blu-ray/DVD Roundup for March 24, 2023 By Glenn Kay For the Sun

W

elcome to another look at some of the highlights arriving on Blu-ray and DVD. This edition features a big award contender as well as a horror hit and independent fare. So, if you can’t make it out to the movies this week or need to stay indoors, be sure to give one of these titles a try! BIG NEW RELEASES!

AN UNLIKELY ANGEL: This faith-based title tells the story of a pregnant workaholic who dreads the idea of becoming a parent. A guardian angel is called in for an intervention and appears as a taxi driver at the hospital to pick up the new mother a nd get her to a business meeting. He crashes the car, which results in the protagonist falling into a coma and waking up 6 years later. She sees what has become of her family and is told to make strides to be a mother and better family member. B A BY LON: Set i n t he 1920s during the early days of Holly wood, this tale i nvolves a you ng ma n work i ng at a deca dent par ty filled w ith celeb r it ie s. He’s ex posed to their glamorous, over-thetop world a nd persona lly befriends a few of the attendees. Viewers are exposed to the rise and fall of the various characters over the following

years. It depicts how they dealt with fame and oncoming changes in the industry that threatened their stardom. LEFT BEHIND: RISE OF THE A NTICHRIST: L o ok i n g for mor e f a it h based features? This film is a sequel to the 2014 reboot of Left Behind (which starred Nicola s Ca ge), but features a n entirely new ca st. Set after the events of the last film in which millions of people vanished from Earth, the heroic pilot from the first chapter tries to warn others that the rapture has occurred. He watches as a new and charismatic leader emerges, promising to help the world. Of course, the title of this featu re suggests t he person’s intentions may, in fact, be sinister. The protagonist must reveal this figure’s real identity. LULLABY: A couple move to a new home with their newborn in the hopes of making a fresh start. After opening a book given to them as a gift, the mother begins singing a lullaby from its pages. While the parent initially enjoys the melody, she begins having visions of a nasty figure in the mirror. The baby also begins acting out. The woman becomes convinced that an evil force is trying to take possession of her child. She struggles to maintain her sanity and protect the baby.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

M 3 G A N: W h e n a t oy

designer’s sister dies a nd leaves her as guardian of her 8-year-old niece, she is overwhelmed by her new responsibility. Out of desperation, the lead decides to k i l l t wo bi rd s w it h one stone. The protagon i st g ive s the child her prototype for a new dol l w it h a r ti f icial intelligence, hoping it will assist the youngster adapt socially, and in the process help the designer work out any kinks with her creation. The doll soon displays a mean streak and goes on the rampage, putting all of the characters in danger. SERIOUSLY RED: This u nu sua l mu sica l /comedy/ d ra ma focu ses on a rea l estate agent who moonlights as a Dolly Parton impersonator. When she loses her job, she focuses on her hobby full time, gaining the attention of a booking agent and a popular female Elvis impersonator. The lead unexpectedly finds success, but as she tours and her popularity grows, she begins to feel like a phony and wonders if she should continue.

Complete Series (Sony) DVD D o c Ma r tin S er ie s 10 (Acorn) Blu-ray Hallmark 2-Movie C o l l e c ti o n : R o m a n c e in Style & Road Trip Romance (Hallmark) DVD

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds Season 1 (Paramount) Blu-ray Vienna Blood Season 3 (PBS) DVD

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YOU KNOW, FOR KIDS! Sadly, there isn’t much kid’s entertainment this week. The next edition will hopefully rectify this problem. ON THE TUBE! H e r e a r e t h e w e e k ’s TV-themed releases. D a w s o n’ s C r e e k T h e

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OPINIONS

Was Larry Casuse a champion, victim, or a misguided bully? Dear Editor, It’s the woke thing to do in Gallup. It’s been 50 years and our local media activists love to portray Larry Casuse as some sort of heroic social justice martyr. Yet what was his cause? Did he take on the Bureau of Indian Affairs for denying property rights to the Navajos, thus putting them at a huge economic disadvantage? Did he demand economic freedom on the reservation so the citizens might escape unemployment and poverty resulting in despair and substance abuse? Did he speak out against the federal welfare programs which enable the breakdown of tribal families and perpetuate their dependency on

government handouts? Did Casuse protest the demeaning nature of the federal government denying individual and economic freedoms with their claims that Navajos would only abuse and squander their rights? To deny property rights means to turn men into property owned by the state – a plantation rather than reservation. Where is the social justice outrage? Did Larry Casuse speak truth to power? No, his fight was not with the government forces of bondage but with economic freedom. It was with the private sector’s alcohol industry and the way it “took advantage” of Navajos (who were escaping the oppression and squalor of

the reservation). However, the cost of freedom is responsibility, and the voluntary exchange of free enterprise does not force anybody to purchase their products. When Larry’s demands to close a bar weren’t met, he chose violence. It was a bad choice. Substance abuse around the world is primarily a product of unemployment, father-absent homes, poverty, and the resulting low self-esteem. Global data also shows that living under communism has a large impact on alcohol consumption and mental illness. In the U.S. a codependent pathology has been enabled by the perverse incentives of federal

''A Tradition''

welfare programs initiated in the 1960s. Have you noticed how the feds have discouraged employment and productivity since the pandemic? Why work when the government will pay you more to stay home (and drink). Business owners and staff in Gallup know more than anybody that if you disrespect your customers, you go broke. That’s the way free market capitalism works, but for the government sector it’s another matter. Why is it that federal government entities – the legal guardians of American Indians – freely oppress Navajos while businesses and the City of Gallup take the blame and responsibility for things not of their making? George Floyd was no champion of justice and neither was Casuse and his misguided cause. Rather than fan the flames of division and encourage race wars our local media and social

justice activists might want to take on the real tyrants and bullies, the real enemies of the Navajo – not the white man, City of Gallup, nor private sector, but rather that “diverse, inclusive, and equitable” (Ha!) entity, the BIA. Our society has become infested with nefarious Marxists virtuously posturing as progressives and social justice warriors. Enough with the fake causes. It’s time for some real warriors to step up in the same way our Founding Fathers did against the oppressive British government. Isn’t it about time to free the Navajo from their federal plantation masters and expose the media enablers of bondage as well? And why should it take an old antiestablishment white guy to point out the obvious, fer cryin’ out loud. Sincerely, Joe Schaller Gallup, N.M.

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OPINIONS


I love annuities BUT… By Lawrence Castillo Guest Columnist

L

ove them or hate them, let the benefits they provide speak for themselves. T here i s a wel l-k now n financial planner, and you may have seen him appear on telev ision a nd in pr int adver tising, who has built h is reput at ion by ma k i ng this bold and controversial statement. “I hate annuities….” The intent of this paper is not to bring attention to or to discredit this professional pitchman. He has already done that by m a k i n g i r r e s p on s i ble statements, such as this, in public while privately buying stocks in companies that sell them. My purpose is to st ate, “ I love a n nu it ie s… but a n nu it ies may not be for everyone or used for all purposes…especially if the pu r pose of you r money is to leave par t or all of your e st at e t o you r benef ici a r ies.” In ca ses like th is, I recommend life insurance. Fol low i ng i s a br ief

listing of reasons why I love annuities if the pur pose of you r money is to spend it while you are alive: • Your money is safe in an annuity because your principal is protected. • Your money is secure in an annuity because it is protected by the strength of the insurance company that sells it. • Because annuities are tax-deferred, interest earned on your account is not taxed u nti l you w it hd raw f u nds from your annuity. • The proceeds received from your a n nuit y go directly to your beneficiary a f ter you r deat h a nd w i l l avoid probate. • A n i ndexe d a n nu it y earns interest on the income grow th of the index but is not subject to market losses. • You m ay c ho o s e a n income rider on your annuity that will guarantee lifet i me i ncome for you a nd spouse. Following is a brief listing of rea sons why I love life insurance if the purpose of you r money is to

provide for your beneficiaries after your death: • Life insurance may be used to replace the policy ow ner’s lo s t wa ge s a f t er death. • Life insurance proceeds may be used to help pay for your children or grandchildren’s education. • L i fe i n s u r a nc e pr o ceeds may be used to help pay off debts, a nd to pro tect your spouse’s financial independence. • Life insurance may be used to pay off a home mortgage, allowing your spouse to live in the fa mily home without debt. • Life insurance may be used to support your favorite charities. • L i fe i n s u r a nc e m ay be used to pay fu nera l expenses. • Life insurance provides tax advantages to the owner a nd benef icia r ie s l i ke no other product can. • S ome l i fe i n su r a nce policies may provide benefits to pay for nursing and

home health care expenses. I n conclu sion, I love a n nu it ies a nd you shou ld too if the pur pose of your income is to provide for you while you a re alive. I love life insura nce a nd recommend it to my clients if the purpose of your money is to leave it to your beneficiaries after your death. What is the purpose of your money? What do you want it to accomplish? I recommend you consult your trusted advisor to help answer this critical question for you and your family. L aw rence Ca st i l lo is a member of S y n di c at e d Columni st s, a nationa l organization committed to a fully transparent approach to money management. Lawrence Castillo Host of Safe Money and Income Radio. L and C Retirement Income Planners, 4801 Lang St. NE Suite 100 Albuquerque NM 87109. Interested in additional i n for mat ion? Reg ister for m y F R E E Ne w s l e t t e r a t

Lawrence Castillo 8 8 8 - 9 98 - 3 46 3 or cl ick my n e w s l e t t e r l i n k : h t t p s : // annuity.com/lawrence-castillo-newsletter/ Syndicated Columnists i s t he sole prov ider of this material, both written a nd conceptua l, for t h i s colu m n . A l l r ig ht s reserved.

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18 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

OPINIONS


How verbal hedges can get you out of yard work By Curtis Honeycutt Guest Columnist

A

t the dawn of every springtime, I make a list of things I want to do in my lawn and garden. This year, I hope to grow items to make salsa, increase the amount of native perennials growing, add mulch, use compost, finish my brick edging project from last year and get the kids to help me. Is this list too ambitious? Should I hedge my bets here (much as I intend to prune some hedges)? While I’ll admit my outdoor to-do list is too lofty, I can’t wait to try to make all

MOVIE REVIEW | FROM PAGE 14 in front of onlookers (who don’t appear all that bothered by the fracas and simply continue going about their business). Police never appear in the major metropolises featured. And, the evildoers even have a sinister radio network that broadcasts out of one of the observation decks of the Eiffel Tower in Paris. If that wasn’t odd enough, viewers may also question why Wick is so forgiving of Winston (Ian McShane), the friend who turned on him in the previous chapter. Additiona lly, there a re nu mer ou s conver s a t ion s between the protagonist and acquaintances who ask Wick when the violence will stop and remind him that there is no way he can win this oneman war. They note that no matter how many he slays, another will rise and take the place of the deceased. The OPINIONS

these things happen. I love working in the yard. I would never say I “kind of ” like working in the yard, because my yard work enjoyment is unequivocal. If I did want to play it safe, I’d employ a “verbal hedge,” which is a word or phrase used to lessen the impact of a statement. The “hedge” in this phrase (just like “hedge your bets”) has nothing to do with shrubbery; back in 1500s England, the verb “hedge” mea nt t o “e qu ivoc a t e or avoid commitment.” We fi nd an example of this usage in Shakespeare’s Merry Wives of Windsor: “I, I, I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God

intent is fi ne, but the chastising does seem a bit much coming from other professional killers. It also doesn’t help that the fi lmmakers seem to take an almost gleeful delight in stabbing, shooting a nd maiming characters in the most wince-inducing ways imaginable. In another movie, these issues might have been enough to turn this viewer against the feature. But star Reeves manages to keep viewers involved in Wick’s plight and never-ending quest for revenge. Chinese action hero Donnie Yen is also a great addition, adding his incredible skill and a notable threat to the proceedings. A nd a t lea s t t he f i l m appears to be leaning into the silliness when it occurs, particularly during the entertainingly exaggerated final act. There’s a fun reference to a famous movie from the late 1970s during the radio broadcasts and several characters possess a dark sense of humor. There’s also a physical

on the left hand and hiding mine honour in my necessity, am fain to shuffl e, to hedge and to lurch.” W h i le I prefer ma k i ng “shrubbery” references (thank you, Monty Python), I’ll have

to stick with hedges for now. After all, a bird in the hand is worth two in the hedge. Here are some examples of verbal hedges: “Maybe I’ll go to the lawn and garden expo this weekend.” T h i s noncom m it t a l “maybe” expresses uncerta inty about making f ir m plans for the speaker’s weekend plans. “The movie was kind of good, but I was confused by Nic Cage’s character.” Saying a phrase like “kind of” makes the speaker’s opinion of the movie less forceful. Was the movie good or not? “Kind of” doesn’t commit either way. “As far as I know, I had

no knowledge of the plans to steal the zoo’s only walrus.” You’ll see defendants in court hedge all the time. If someone uses a phrase like “as far as I know,” this absolves them from say ing, “I def initely knew about the walrus theft” or “I certainly did not know about the walrus theft.” The next time you want to get out of helping your significant other with yard work, feel free to use verbal hedging — it could get you out of trimming the shrubbery. Cur ti s Hon eycut t i s an award-winning syndicated humor columnist and author. Connect with him at curtishoneycutt.com.

gag during the bloodletting involving the steps to SacréCœur Basilica that provides a dark laugh. Of course, the action itself is about as good as you’re likely to see in any fi lm this year. There are lengthy battles with complex choreography, all set in front of visually striking locales. The Osaka hotel showdown is incredible to witness, as is the melee through Paris, including a memorable exchange on the road at the Arc de Triomphe. Not only is it all impressively staged, but many pieces

are creatively fi lmed. There’s a long overhead shot in a rundown building following Wick from room-to-room that is wonderful to behold and sure to put a smile on the face of any action enthusiast. Additionally, the fi nal climax delivers a satisfying close to the events. For t h is rev iewer, t he original film will always be the strongest. That being noted, John Wick: Chapter 4 is the best of the follow-ups. It delivers the most chaotic mayhem of any movie in the ser ies, a s well a s severa l

memorable supporting characters and closure for the central characters. While the serious asides about revenge come across as loopy, at least the movie is trying to add some meaning to the madness. In the end, if you enjoy seeing bones cracked and hundreds of thugs get riddled with bullets, then this movie is about as good as it gets. Note: For those interested, there is a brief bonus scene after the fi nal credits. V ISI T: W W W. CINEMASTANCE.COM

Curtis Honeycutt

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 19


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POSITION Deputy Clerk DEPARTMENT Clerk’s Office FOR BEST CONSIDERATION DATE April 7, 2023 Applications and additional information regarding positions can be found on the County web site www.co.mckinley. nm.us Dezirie Gomez, CPO Human Resource Director *** Entry Level Social Media Assistant - Knowledge of Jewelry Making Supplies - Ability to handle multiple projects/meet deadlines - Planning, Organizing & Scheduling Social Media Content - Help execute concepts visually, Strong attention to detail - Must be comfortable working on multiple devices and platforms: PC/Mac/iPhone - Full-Time Non-Remote Position Apply at Thunderbird Supply Co. 1907 W. Hwy 66 Gallup, NM 87301 Closing Date 3/31/23 *** Delivery Driver The Gallup Sun seeks a delivery driver to drop off newspapers at designated locations in Gallup and beyond. Job requires availability every Friday. Route pay, plus mileage. Drug testing required upon hire, plus random screenings. Must have own vehicle, drivers license, current insurance and registration. Call (505) 722-8994 to make an appointment to fill out an application, plus interview.

*** Reporter Wanted The Gallup Sun seeks a stringer or two to cover general assignment in Gallup and surrounding areas. Please email resume to: gallupsun@gmail.com NON PROFIT Freemasonry, the world’s largest and oldest fraternity, offers opportunities for personal growth and service to others. To learn more: beafreemason.org or masons.org *** Four Corners Pet Alliance is looking for like minded and compassionate animal lovers to volunteer. Foremost, we need foster homes. We’re also looking for a fundraiser coordinator, savvy social media /website master. Please email: fourcornerspetalliance.org and visit: www. fourcornerspetalliance.org LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE March 17, 2023 TAKE NOTICE: Any One with prior, equal or superior equitable or legal right, interest in/to/for/ of the NAME and Title “LOPEZ ANITA FELICE”, “ANITA FELICE LOPEZ”, “ANITA LOPEZ”, or “Anita F. Lopez”; of such name and title in any style, derivative or variation thereof capable to confuse, suspend, or clog said NAME, title, rights, or interest is hereby warranted to present their claim to Witness: “Anita Lopez” c/o PO Box 1164, Espanola, New Mexico, near zip [87532], before expiration of thirty (30) days of initial publication of this Notice; of which at this time, Let it be known I hereby Declare and Decree all Rights, Title and Interest to said title. Published: Gallup Sun March 17, 2023

March 24, 2023 March 31, 2023 April 7, 2023 April 14, 2023 April 20, 2023 *** NOTICE of PUBLIC HEARING DATE **CORRECTION** Public Hearing date: April 21, 2023 Notice to Public: In March 2023, Gallup Housing Authority previously advertised the Five-year plan public hearing date as April 14, 2023. The Corrected Date is April 21, 2023. The Gallup Housing Authority is updating its CFP five-year plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Housing Quality and Work Responsibility Act of 1999. The plans along with supporting documentation will be available for review at the Administrative Offices of the Gallup Housing Authority located at 203 Debra Drive, Gallup NM through and up to April 21, 2023, during normal business hours. On April 21, 2023, at 9:00am, the Board of Directors will conduct a public hearing to entertain any written or verbal comments that the public may have. Written comments or questions may be addressed to Richard F. Kontz, Executive Director. Published: Gallup Sun March 17, 2023 March 24, 2023 March 31, 2023 April 7, 2023 April 14, 2023 *** ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF McKINLEY

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 21 CLASSIFIEDS


CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 20 STATE OF NEW MEXICO In the Matter of the Estate Of DORA ARLENE DOWERS ZAHN, Deceased. No. D-1113-PB-2023-00009 NOTICE TO CREDITORS DENISE R. MANLEY has been appointed Personal Representatives of the Estate of DORA ARLENE DOWERS ZAHN, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative at the office of Mason & Isaacson, P.A., 104 East Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico, 87301, attorneys for the Personal Representative, or filed with the District Court of Cibola County, New Mexico. Dated: 03/17/2023.

competitive sealed bids for: DIGITAL PRINT SPECIALTY MATERIAL & FINISHING CUTTING SUPPLIES ITB-2023-40GH Commodity Code(s): 20372 & 60079 As more particularly set out in the BID documents, copies of which may be obtained by downloading from the Gallup-McKinley County Schools eBidding platform website https://gmcs.bonfirehub.com Sealed BIDS for such will be received until 2:00 P.M. (LOCAL TIME) on, APRIL 14, 2023. FAX and HARDCOPY BIDS will NOT be accepted. Bidders will not be able to upload bids or documents after the specified CLOSING date and time. The Gallup-McKinley County School Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids, waive any formalities or minor inconsistencies, and/ or cancel this solicitation in its entirety.

DENISE R. MANLEY th

MASON & ISAACSON, P.A. By James J. Mason Attorneys for Personal Representatives 104 East Aztec Avenue Gallup, New Mexico 87301 (505) 722-4463 Published: Gallup Sun March 24, 2023 March 31, 2023 April 7, 2023 *** LEGAL NOTICE

Dated this 24 Day of March 2023 By: /S/ Chris Mortensen, President Board of Education Gallup-McKinley County School District No. 1 BID ISSUE DATE: March 24, 2023 PUBLICATION DATES: March 24, 2023 (Gallup Sun) *** ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF McKINLEY

INVITATION TO BID Public Notice is hereby provided that the Gallup-McKinley County Schools is accepting CLASSIFIEDS

SETH DAMON, Plaintiff, vs. No. D-1113-CV-2023-00065

CHARLES S. DAMON, II; PATRICIA DAMON; THE ESTATE OF RENA BATES, Deceased; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF RENA BATES; and ANY UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST IN THE PREMISES ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFF, Defendants. NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO: THE ESTATE OF RENA BATES, Deceased; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF RENA BATES; and ANY UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST IN THE PREMISES ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFF, PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Plaintiff SETH DAMON has commenced an action to quiet title to the premises described below: A tract of land lying within the NW1/4 of Section 29, T12N, R18W, N.M.P.M., McKinley County, New Mexico and more particularly described as follows: Commencing for a tie at the West ¼ corner of said Section 29 and run N00°09’20”E along section line, a distance of 605.05’ to a point; Thence N88°57’E, a distance of 326.0’ to the Southwest corner of the herein described tract and the REAL POINT OF BEGINNING; Thence N00°09’20”E, a distance of 485.0’ to the Northwest corner; Thence N88°57’E, a distance of 326.0’ to the Northeast corner; Thence S00°09’20”W, a distance of 485.0’ to the Southeast corner; Thence S88°57’W, a distance of 326.0’ to the Point of Beginning. Together with a Beneficial Undivided Interest in Two (2) strips

CLASSIFIEDS WEEKLY RATES

25 WORD OR LESS: $10 26-50 WORDS: $20 51-75 WORDS: $30 76-100 WORDS: $40 $10 FOR EACH ADD’L 25 WORDS EXTRAS - $10 PER WEEK, PER ITEM: TEXT BOX, YELLOW HIGHLIGHT, PIC, AND/OR LOGO Newspaper published Fridays. Prepayment required. Classifi eds due Wednesday Noon. Deadline subject to change Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. Email: gallupsunlegals@gmail.com Offi ce (505) 722-8994

of land contiguous and appurtenant to above tract of land for access purposes of Ingress and Egress. You are hereby notified that unless you file a responsive pleading on or before May 8, 2023 with the above Court, the Judgment or other appropriate relief will be rendered against you by default. You are further notified that the name of Plaintiff’s attorney is Robert F. Rosebrough, Rosebrough, Fowles & Foutz, P.C.,

101 West Aztec Ave., Gallup, New Mexico 87301, (505) 7229121. /s/ Robert F. Rosebrough Robert F. Rosebrough Rosebrough, Fowles & Foutz, P.C. Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 1027 Gallup, New Mexico 87305 (505) 722-9121

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 22

OBITUARIES

Honor your loved one in the Gallup Sun for FREE. One headshot allowed! Download form: gallupsun.com (obituaries page) or stop by office at 1983 State Rd. 602. Let us design a custom tribute at an affordable rate! All obituaries are posted in our print and web editions!

Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 Email: gallupsun@gmail.com

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 21


CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 21 Published: Gallup Sun March 24, 2023 March 31, 2023 April 7, 2023 *** PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that The Gallup Housing Authority will conduct a special meeting of Board of Commissioners to be held on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 at 9:00 am MST, at the Gallup Housing Authority board room, 203 Debra Drive, Gallup, New Mexico 87301. This will be a “work session” to review and discuss a draft of the proposed Five Year CFP plan for 2023 thru 2027. This is for staff and board members only. The agenda will be available to the public at the Gallup Housing Authority office. Gallup Housing Authority Gallup, McKinley County, New Mexico By:/S/ Alfred Abeita, Chairman of the Board Published: Gallup Sun March 24, 2023 *** ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO FORMAL BID NO. 2308 Public notice is hereby given that the City of Gallup, New Mexico, desires to purchase the following: PLANT MIX BITUMINOUS PAVEMENT (PMBP) (Multi-Term Contract) As more particularly set out in the Bid documents, copies of

which may be obtained from the City of Gallup Purchasing Division, 110 W. Aztec Ave., Gallup, New Mexico 87301; or contact Frances Rodriguez, Purchasing Director via email at frodriguez@gallupnm.gov. Copies are available for viewing or can be downloaded from: https://app. negometrix.com/buyer/3226 Electronically submitted bids for such will be received at the Office of the Purchasing Department until 2:00 P.M. (LOCAL TIME) on April 4, 2023 when bids will be opened and read aloud in the City Hall Purchasing Conference Room via virtual conference/video calls or through other virtual means. The City of Gallup has transitioned to a new e-Bid/RFP software system powered by Mercell. All solicitations will be released electronically through Mercell and responses from bidders must be submitted electronically through this online platform. By using Mercell, prospective bidders will be provided with all information regarding a bid including addendums and changes to the project requirements. Mercell is a completely free service for all respondents. Prior to submitting a proposal, respondents are required to set up their free account with Mercell. Register your company at Negometrix. com. Only ELECTRONICALLY SUBMITTED BID PROPOSALS will now be accepted; system will not accept bids submitted AFTER due date and time. Dated this 21th day of March 2023 By: /S/ Louie Bonaguidi, Mayor Classified Legal Column: Gallup Sun Publishing Date: Friday-March 24, 2023 ***

22 Friday March 24, 2023 • Gallup Sun

ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSALS CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO Request for Proposals (RFP) NO. 2022/2023/07/P Public notice is hereby given that the City of Gallup, New Mexico, is accepting sealed proposals for the following: Lease and Operate Concession Stand at Gallup Sports Complex GALLUP, NM As more particularly set out in the RFP documents, copies of which may be obtained from the City of Gallup Purchasing Division, 110 W. Aztec Ave., Gallup, New Mexico 87301; or contact Frances Rodriguez, Purchasing Director at frodriguez@gallupnm.gov. Copies are available for viewing or can be downloaded from: https://app.negometrix. com/buyer/3226 Electronically submitted proposals shall be received via electronic bidding platform until 2:00 P.M. (LOCAL TIME) on or before April 13, 2023 where proposals will be received and recorded by the City of Gallup Purchasing Department via virtual conference/video calls or through other virtual means. The City of Gallup has transitioned to a new e-Bid/RFP software system powered by Mercell. All solicitations will be released electronically through Mercell and responses from proponents must be submitted electronically through this online platform. By using Mercell, prospective proponents will be provided with all information regarding a bid including addendums and changes to the project requirements. Mercell is a completely free service for all respondents. Prior to submit-

ting a proposal, respondents are required to set up their free account with Mercell. Register your company at Negometrix. com. Only ELECTRONICALLY SUBMITTED PROPOSALS will now be accepted; system will not accept proposals submitted AFTER due date and time. Dated this 21st day of March 2023 By: /S/ Louie Bonaguidi, Mayor Classified Legal Column: Gallup Sun Publishing Date: Friday-March 24, 2023 *** ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT AEROBIC DIGESTER BLOWER PIPING CITY OF GALLUP Formal Bid No. 2309 Notice is hereby given that the City of Gallup, New Mexico will receive ELECTRONICALLY submitted bids for construction of CITY OF GALLUP WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT AEROBIC DIGESTER BLOWER PIPING until the hour of 2:00 p.m., local time, Tuesday, April 11, 2023 at https://app.negometrix.com/buyer/3226. Bids will be electronically opened, and publicly read aloud at the Office of the Procurement Manager via virtual conference/video calls or through other virtual means. Provide new 10.75-inch OD Sch 40 steel welded blower pipe at the City of Gallup Wastewater Treatment Plant as indicated in the attached detail drawing. Work shall include all steel pipe supports including concrete footing for each support. In addition, work shall include penetrating of the existing blower building walls and using the

existing pipe as supports within the building. Demolition will involve removing the existing steel or ductile blower pipe at both the existing blower building and the existing digester. All remaining underground steel blower pipe shall be filled with sand and abandoned in place. Plans, Specifications and Bidding Documents may be obtained from DePauli Engineering and Surveying, LLC, 307 S. 4th Street, Gallup, New Mexico 87301, (505) 863-5440, upon deposit of $250.00, all of which will be refunded upon return of the documents within ten (10) days after bid opening. Plans, Specifications and Bidding Documents may also be examined and/or downloaded at https://app.negometrix.com/ buyer/3226 All solicitation will be released electronically through Mercell and responses from bidders must also be submitted electronically through Mercell online platform. Mercell will provide all prospective bidders information regarding bid solicitation including addendums to project requirements. Mercell is a completely free service for all respondents. Only ELECTRONICALLY SUBMITTED PROPOSALS will be accepted; system will NOT accept proposals after due date and time. Bid openings will be held via Zoom meeting; details regarding meeting will be provided within Mercell bidding platform. Dated this 21st day of March 2023 By: /S/ Louie Bonaguidi, Mayor Classified Legal Column: Gallup Sun Publishing Date: Friday-March 24, 2023 CLASSIFIEDS


CALENDAR

Community Calendar March 24 - March 30, 2023 FRIDAY, MARCH 24

PAINTING AND MOCKTAILS

6 pm @ OFPL’s Main Library (115 W. Hill Ave.). Complete a full painting while sipping on mocktails after hours at the library. Email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

CREATIVE CORNER - CREATIVE BOOKMARKS

4 pm @ OFPL’s main library (115 W. Hill Ave.). Create a custom bookmark using a variety of recycled materials. Email jwhitman@gallupnm. gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

remembrance, this two-part, community dialogue will use art as a starting point to create a safe space to speak together about issues of economic exploitation that impact all of us.

TEEN MAKERS CLUB

2 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). OFPL will provide a space where creative minds can give shape to their ideas, and help spread their passion. This month the focus is on origami and zoetropes as they discover animation! Email jwhitman@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

KIDZ CINEMA

1 pm - 3 pm @ Stuido123 at ART123 Gallery ((123 W. Coal Ave.). Kids ages 8+ are invited to spend the afternoon coloring, cutting, collaging, constructing and crafting!

2 pm every Saturday @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec. Ave.) for weekly family oriented film screenings. This week’s movie is Mask (1985). Email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

CHESS CLUB

GALLUP 9TH ST. FLEA MARKET

KIDS CRAFTER-NOON

4:30 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). Join the chess club at OFPL! Email pneilson@gallupnm. gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

GET UP AND GAME

1 pm - 5 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). Every Friday, come to the children’s library to unwind from a busy week! Email pneilson@gallupnm. gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information. SATURDAY, MARCH 25

VAGINA MONOLOGUES

6 pm @ El Morro Theatre (207 W. Coal Ave.). The Vagina Monologues is a play that explores consensual and nonconsensual sexual experiences, body image, and more.

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS WITH INDIGENOUS LIFEWAYS PART 2: HEALING

1 pm - 3 pm @ ART123 Gallery (123. W. Coal Ave.). Book-ending the month of CALENDAR

9 am - 5 pm @ 340 9th Street. The Gallup 9th Street Flea Market is one of the largest Native American markets in the United States. MONDAY, MARCH 27

FAMILY STORYTIME

11 am @ the Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). This week, the theme is “Planes.” Email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 8631291 for more information.

EUREKA!

4 pm @ the Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). Learn how to build a train with no wheels using magnets! Email pneilson@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information. TUESDAY, MARCH 28

CHESS CLUB

4:30 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). Join the chess club at OFPL! Email pneilson@gallupnm. gov or call (505) 863-1291 for

more information.

REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING

6 pm @ City Council Chambers, Gallup City Hall (110 W. Aztec Ave.). The meeting will also be streamed on the City of Gallup’s Facebook page at City of Gallup, New Mexico Government. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29

REVOLUTION CHESS CLUB

6 pm - 7:30 pm @ Rio West Mall’s food court (1300 W. Maloney Ave.) A free chess club that is open to players of all ages and skill levels. For more information email revolutionchessclub@gmail.com.

MIDWEEK MATINEE AT OFPL

4 pm every Wednesday @ OFPL’s main library (115 W. Hill Ave.). This week’s film is Everything Everywhere All at Once in honor of Women’s History Month.

FAMILY STORYTIME

11 am @ the Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). This week, the theme is “Planes” Email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 8631291 for more information.

TINKER TECH

4 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.) for an interactive, hands-on tech program for tweens & teens. THURSDAY, MARCH 30

CRAFTY KIDS

4 pm @ OFPL’s Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec Ave.). For more information email: bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

NEIGHBORHOOD MEETING WITH COUNCILOR LINDA GARCIA, DIST. 1

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm @ Gallup Senior Center (607 N. 4th St.). SAVE THE DATE FRIDAY, MARCH 31

CREATIVE CORNER - DEITY AND DIVINE ART

4 pm @ OFPL’s main library (115 W. Hill Ave.).Celebrate

and Honor Women’s History Month by reflecting on the important role of women and create your own deity art. Email jwhitman@gallupnm. gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information. SATURDAY, APRIL 1

UNM-GALLUP LITERARY ARTS JOURNAL CALL FOR WRITERS

Red Mesa Review, the literary arts journal of UNM-Gallup, is accepting submissions of poetry, short fiction and essays for its 2023 edition. The deadline to apply is April 1. All writers from the Four Corners region are welcome to submit their work. To learn about submission requirements, please visit gallup. unm.edu/redmesareview.

WEEKEND WORKSHOP: ART JOURNALING WITH TASHA N.

9 am - 4 pm @ ART123 Gallery (123. W. Coal Ave.). Register at www.galluparts. org/workshops MONDAY, APRIL 3

REGULAR COMMISSION MEETING

3 pm @ 207 W. Hill Ave.

THURSDAY, APRIL 6

RED MESA REVIEW 2022 RELEASE CELEBRATION

5:30 pm @ the UNM-Gallup Zollinger Library (705 Gurley Ave.). There will be readings from the submissions and light refreshments. For questions or more information, call 505-863-7531 or email markos@unm.edu. FRIDAY, APRIL 7

AMAZING WOMEN OF THE WILD WEST

11 am @ the UNM-Gallup Zollinger Library (705 Gurley Ave.). Join VanAnn Moore as she presents the history of three important New Mexico women. For questions or more information, call 505863-7531 or email markos@ unm.edu. SATURDAY, APRIL 8

OFPL CLOSED

The library will be closed so the team can support Gallup’s Easter Spring Fling and ArtsCrawl.

FRIENDS OF OFPL BOOK SALE

4 pm - 9 pm @ El Morro Theatre (207 W. Coal Ave.). Come to Gallup’s monthly block party and browse hundreds of already-enjoyed books that have been hand-picked by library staff. Fill up a bag with books for $5.

SHOW OPENING: 9TH ANNUAL YOUTH ART SHOW

7 pm - 9 pm @ ART123 Gallery (123 W. Coal Ave.). ONGOING

RECRUITING TEEN MAKERS

OFPL is recruiting Teens to help spread their passion. Get trained and certified on our MakerSpace equipment and become a Teen Ambassador for the MakerSpace! Email pneilson@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information.

WE READ, WE TALK HYBRID BOOK CLUB

OFPL’s book club book for April is The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich. Discussions will be in April via Zoom or in-person at the Main Library. Email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call 505-863-1291 for more information.

BUILD-YOUR-OWN-BUNDLE

OFPL staff who will create a bundle of material specially for you! Let them know what type of materials and genres you are interested in, and they’ll browse for you and create a custom bundle of material for you to pick-up curbside. Email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291 for more information. To post a nonprofit or civic event in the calendar section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: Monday at 5 pm.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2023 23


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