Gallup Sun • November 26, 2021

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Two views of Thanksgiving TENT CITY Once again we have to move Take care of what is yours And you can have what is mine, Our love is tough Through dirt and dust Last night was scary but we’ll be fi ne.

Stay close to me And we will build Our own tent city, Society falls We welcome them all If there is a tomorrow.

There will come a day To hide under the covers One of us will have to stay awake To keep each other safe.

I sew the eye back on a Xmas doll You got from a shelter home, Empty bellies with full hearts Drawing on walls, racing shopping carts Wherever we’re at is our home.

Why can’t they see The whole world Is a tent city, Everything burns We can stay warm Save some for tomorrow.

Gratitudes, school pictures start on page 14

Once upon a time there was a boy and girl That lived on a street where fairy tales came true They told stories without using words And sang songs only they could hear.


McKinley Academy is an exceptional highly academic early college program free to all Gallup McKinley County Students. If you are interested in gaining college credits while still in high school or earning an associate degree at the same time you graduate from high school, this is the program for you! We offer dual credit courses through the University of New Mexico and highly rigorous and challenging high school courses. McKinley Academy is located on the UNM-Gallup campus in Calvin Hall. We will be taking applications from October 1 – December 1 for any GMCS Sophomores and Juniors who would like to apply to McKinley Academy for the Spring semester. Applications are available at our GMCS McKinley Academy web VLWH RU VWRS E\ RXU RIÀFH DW 810 &DOYLQ +DOO 5RRP WR SLFN up an application. GPA, current grades, and/or test results will be considered at the time of the interview.

Call 505-721-4200 Apply online @ www.gmcs.org 2

Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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11/16/21 4:07 PM


NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

Festival of Trees going strong after ten years THE GENEROSITY, PRIDE OF GALLUP ON DISPLAY

The traveling tree, which was decorated by The Community Pantry includes a weekend trip to Ruidoso. Photo Credit: Courtesy Alice Perez By Cody Begaye Contributing Editor

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he holiday season is known as a time for giving, when people reflect on the previous year and share their good fortune with others. More than friends and family, this kindness is also given to people they don’t know, as well as those less fortunate. Sharing and giving back to the community is the cornerstone for the Festival of Trees, which has become a staple in Gallup in the 10 years since its launch. The event’s organizer, The Community Pantry, states the festival is more than a display of dazzling decorated Christmas trees and wreaths. It represents the generosity and pride of Gallup and its community. “This is a time of the year

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MIYAMURA DANCES AT MACY’S Five MHS dancers take Thanksgiving to the Big Apple

Molina Health Care decorated this tree and included beauty gifts to go with it. Photo Credit: Courtesy Alice Perez

when everyone is giving,” Alice Perez, executive director of The Community Pantry said Nov. 23. “We hope that everyone realizes the amount they give through the festival counts towards purchasing and providing food for the community.” This year’s festival is being held in loving memory of Joe Vargas, a life-long resident of Gallup who passed away last year. “He was somebody that contributed all of his adult life to the children of McKinley County, and their future,” Perez said. “Knowing he put all of his time and effort into giving to our children, we decided to honor him at this year’s festival.” This recognition is given to people who dedicate themselves to serving their community, she added. TIME TO GIVE BACK The festival draws hundreds

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of visitors from Gallup and surrounding regions to donate and sponsor trees and wreaths, as well as a chance to enter to win a tree or gifts. The trees in the festival are on display at Rio West Mall, 1300 W. Maloney Ave., until Dec. 4, but The Community Pantry says visitors to this year’s festival will be required to adhere to CDC safety guidelines. “We are working with the pandemic because we don’t want 400-500 people in one place,” Perez said. While the festival may look different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the staff wants to assure the public they will continue to serve them as they have in the past, along with the community’s help. Anyone who is willing to give back by supporting The Community Pantry’s mission to help children, veterans, elders, and families in need will find

This tree was decorated by the Gallup Fire Department. It can be seen at Rio West Mall. The tree and the gifts are included. Photo Credit: Courtesy Alice Perez

the Festival of Trees is a great opportunity. The main way to participate is to donate or sponsor a decorated tree or wreath along with gifts. This allows donors to help The Community Pantry raise money and spread awareness about hungry children across the county and the state. Tickets for a chance to win one of the trees or prizes on display sell for $3 separately or for $10 for a pack of four. They are available online or at the festival site. Each of the trees can be viewed in person at Rio West Mall or online at the fundraiser website. The drawing will be held virtually on Facebook Live Dec. 4. “We call the winners of the drawing afterward, set up an appointment for them to pick up their tree,” Perez said. “This way it’s safe and there is enough room to socially distance.

“It worked out when we did this last year, so we are working to ensure everyone can have a good time,” she said. A COMMUNITY-WIDE EFFORT The Community Pantry is for every member of the community and not just the needy. It of fer s t he P roduce Program, which provides fresh produce and perishables weekly from Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. There is also the Dollar Stretcher program, which gives the pantry extra buying power by creating special food boxes that can be sold at a discount, which bypasses higher grocery store prices. The Community Pantry also grows food using its onsite Hope Garden in addition to the food it

TREES | SEE PAGE 6

WHAT’S INSIDE …

NOVEMBER’S TEACHER OF THE MONTH Once taught in Ghana

Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

11 12 13 BEES SAVE THEMSELVES FROM VOLCANO Not something most humans could do

OFPL HAS A LIBRARY WITHIN A LIBRARY Visit the seed lending library

DISNEY RELEASES ITS LATEST Our reviewer says it grows on you NEWS


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Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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Gallup goes to Macy’s for Thanksgiving By Beth Blakeman Managing Editor

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allupians can see five of their neighbors on the screen as this year’s cartoon balloon animals pass by in the Macy’s Tha nksgiv ing Day parade. Alyssa Acevedo, Shana Begay, Sophia Sanchez, Ashlin Tom and Keili Vidales will be performing and representing

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the Miyamura Patriette Dance Team under the banner MHS All Star Dance Team right in front of Macy’s Nov. 25. They will be five among about 600 dancers in this year’s event. The dance team is coached by Michelle Sanchez, who was assistant coach when they qualified to perform in the parade in 2019. Now Sanchez is head coach and her daughter Sophia, who also appeared at the 2019 performance, is captain of the dance team. “[It’s] a great opportunity for the girls to experience … meeting new people,” Sanchez told the Sun. The Miyamura dancers will all wear masks during the performance and they will wear the same costume of every

high school that qualifies which includes a short yellow skirt. They will also wear the same makeup. Spirit of America Productions, which provides the dancers and cheerleaders for the parade, specifies and provides everything for the performance. Sanchez and the team will stay a week in Manhattan, where they will practice up until their performance and return the next day. But in between, she said down time will include a Rockettes show, a harbor cruise around the Statue of Liberty, a visit to the 911 Memorial, Central Park, Times Square, the Empire State Building, the Central Park Zoo, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Broadway show “Six,” about the wife of Henry VIII. They will also get a chance to

go shopping. T he i r no n - t r a d it io n a l Thanksgiving feast will be held at Serendipity Restaurant, although the original plan was to visit Ellen’s Stardust Diner which is fi lled with Broadway singer-waiters. This could become a repeat

performance next year since those teams that qualify receive invitations to return. The first opportunity for dancers to perform in the Macy’s parade was in 1986. Before that cheerleaders were the teams positioned between the balloons.

TREES | FROM PAGE 4

for Kids and the Emergency Food Boxes. Last year, Perez said the festival brought in about $15,000. Since more people are able to gather this year, the pantry has set a larger goal of $25,000. “We were supporting about 7,500 families a month last year at the peak of the pandemic,”

Perez said. “But this year we had some lulls as the stimulus and unemployment went out— but the money runs out and so our support has gone back up.” The fluctuating number of community members needing support is a reminder of the importance of the Festival of Trees.

To view the trees and wreaths that are part of the drawing and purchase tickets to enter, visit https:// go.ra llyup.com /d 6 cfa 3 / Campaign/Details. For more information on The Community Pantry as well as to donate, visit https:// thecommunitypantry.org/.

Five members of the Miyamura High School All Star Dance Team will perform in the Macy’s Day Parade on Thanksgiving. Here are four of them dancing across Coal Avenue in Gallup. From left: Keili Vidales, Shana Begay, Sophia Sanchez and Ashlin Tom. Alyssa Acevedo is also going. She is not pictured here. Photo Credit: RAH Photography

Publisher Babette Herrmann Office Manager Mandy Marks Managing Editor Beth Blakeman Design Vladimir Lotysh Contributing Editor Cody Begaye Correspondents Rick Abasta Molly Howell Rachelle Nones Rachel Pfeiffer Photography Cable Hoover Ana Hudgeons Ryan Hudgeons Knifewing Segura On the Cover Left side: Benina Maldonado’s preschool class at Stagecoach Elementary. Photo by V. Duckett Right side: Calvin Gleason poet. Photo Courtesy C. Gleason

The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office: 1983 State Rd. 602 Gallup, NM 87301 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

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hands out in programs like Food

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Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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Amanda Skobow recognized as the Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe ‘Teacher of the Month’ LINCOLN ELEMENTARY FIFTH-GRADE TEACHER MOLDS INQUISITIVE, PREPARED STUDENTS. By Rachel Pfeiffer Sun Correspondent

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ach month, Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe recognizes one local teacher within the Gallup area for his or her determination to help students go above and beyond. Prospective teachers are nominated by students who feel they deserve to be recognized. This month, Amanda Skobow of Lincoln Elementary school is the recipient of the Teacher of the Month award. Skobow works hard to engage her students and help them develop a love of learning. She has a passion for science and math and tries to spark an interest in her students for the world around them and how it works. “Science can be super hands-on, and it’s such a cool topic to have kids explore,” she

Bethany Silva hands Amanda Skobow her “Teacher of the Month” basket at Camille’s Sidewalk Café Nov. 11. Photo Credit: Bryanny Williams said. “I love watching how my students are in awe of what the world is made out of. “They wonder about how big space is and just let their imaginations fly,” Skobow said.

Inside Lincoln Elementary fifth grade, most of the children are focused on teacher Amanda Skobow (behind the camera). Photo Credit: Amanda Skobow

The principal of Lincoln Elementary School, Dr. Edgardo Castro, said he appreciates the effort Skobow invests in engaging her students. Through kinesthetic strategies that keep kids

306 S 2nd Street Gallup, NM 87301 Call Ahead for Carry Out or Curbside 505.722.5017

Amanda Skobow and her fifth grade class. Skobow is at the top far right. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Amanda Skowbow

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Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

from sitting at their desks for long periods, to auditory strategies such as classroom discussion, Dr. Castro has recognized that Skobow wastes no time in her class. “I truly believe that all those students in Ms. Skowbow’s classroom are ready to step up on day one when they arrive at middle school,” he said. Like teachers across the world, Skobow has faced unique challenges due to the pandemic. However, the challenges she faced before, while teaching overseas, prepared her to meet them. While teaching in Ghana, sometimes she would only have one textbook for the entire class, but she learned to make the best of her circumstances. “Even with few resources, you can still make a large impact just by getting to know the students and making them feel valued and welcomed for who they are,” Skobow said.

Skobow not only takes a leadership role in her classroom, but with her fellow teachers as well. She is trained as a support expert for the platform the school uses to track grades, so she can be a resource for others. “I was extremely glad she took the responsibility because Amanda went through a rigorous training series of seminars for her to gain that expertise and then relay that to the teachers at Lincoln,” Dr. Castro said. Skobow continues to learn and grow as a teacher by consulting with her colleagues and reading books. Ultimately, what keeps her motivated is what made her fall in love with the profession in the first place—the students. “I’ve loved every class I’ve taught. On the hardest days, it’s the students who make me want to keep helping them and keep becoming a better teacher,” she said. NEWS


— Happy Thanksgiving— We would like to thank our tenants for without them we wouldn’t have a job. >)URP WKH 6WDƪ @ We would like to thank the Mayor and City Council for appointing a great Board of Commissioners to oversee our programs and to give wise guidance and GLUHFWLRQ >)URP WKH 6WDƪ @ We thank all of our dedicated employees for having a positive attitude and always SHUIRUPLQJ WKHLU ZRUN DW WKH KLJKHVW OHYHO >)URP WKH %RDUG@ We would like to thank all of our contractors and vendors who do work for us and provide the goods and services we need to maintain and keep our properties in JRRG RUGHU >)URP WKH VWDƪ DQG WKH %RDUG@ :H ZRXOG DOVR OLNH WR WKDQN WKH $OEXTXHUTXH +8' Ƭ HOG RƯ FH IRU DOO WKH WHFKQLFDO VXSSRUW DQG DGYLFH \RX JLYH XV ZKHQ QHHGHG >)URP WKH 6WDƪ DQG WKH %RDUG@ Last, we want to thank the citizens of Gallup for all your support and encouraging FRPPHQWV \RX JLYH XV SHULRGLFDOO\ >)URP WKH 6WDƪ DQG WKH %RDUG@

God Bless You! Alfred Abeita, Sr. Board Chairman

Richard F. Kontz Executive Director

Located at 203 Debra Drive in Gallup, NM – (505)722-4388 Applications may be requested by email: GHA.Main@galluphousing.com

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Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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NEWS

PUBLIC SAFETY

WEEKLY DWI REPORT Staff Reports Sheldon Wally Nov. 12, 10:52 pm DWI A vehicle crash near the 7-mile marker of H ig hway 122 in Thoreau w a s c a l le d i n t o Me t r o Dispatch. McKinley County Sheriff’s Deputies Dewayne Holder and Harland Soseeah were dispatched to the scene. A bronze Ford Focus with heavy damage was stuck in a barrier fence between the frontage road and Interstate 40. The calling party informed deputies the two vehicle occupants were sitting on the shoulder of the road and said the driver, identified as Sheldon Wally, 28, of Crownpoint, had exited the vehicle first. Holder spoke with Wally, who admitted he had been drinking prior to driving. When asked to stand up, Wally had difficulty doing so. As Holder escorted him to his unit, he saw Wally showed signs of being intoxicated, including bloodshot eyes, smelling of alcohol, and slurred speech. Wally refused to take the Standard Field Sobriety Tests and was placed under arrest for DWI. Holder checked inside the vehicle and found an open container of peach Crown Royal liquor on the floorboard. Both occupants were transported to Gallup Indian Medical Center for clearance. Holder transported Wally to the sheriff’s office after he agreed to give a breath sample. He posted results of .21 and .22. Holder also learned that Wally had an active warrant from Gallup Municipal Court. Wally was taken to McKinley County Adult Detention Center and booked for DWI, no license, an open container, roadways laned for traffic, and duty strike fixture, as well as the warrant. Wally is in custody on a $500 cash or surety bond. Amanda Arviso Aug. 21, 2:06 am Aggravated DWI A silver Ford Focus bearing

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Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

a suspended r eg i s t r a t ion tag was called in to Metro Dispatch. The caller believed t h e wo m a n could be intoxicated. Gallup Police Officer Luke Martin was dispatched to the scene near 3810 E. Hwy. 66. Martin was advised by a public service officer the car was swerving across the road near Zecca Plaza, and Martin saw it turn onto Miyamura Overpass. He followed the vehicle onto Hasler Valley Road, where he conducted a traffic stop. He met the driver, Amanda Arviso, 31, of Church Rock, whom he observed had bloodshot eyes, slurred speech, and smelled of alcohol. She appeared confused as he spoke to her and only provided her driver’s license. There was an open container of Truly brand alcohol in the center console, but Arviso denied drinking anything. A r v iso agreed to take Standard Field Sobriety Tests, but performed poorly. She was placed under arrest and was transported to Gallup Police Department for a breath test. She posted two samples of .19. She was then taken to McK i n ley C ou nt y Adu lt Detention Center and booked for aggravated DWI, mandatory financial responsibility, and display of current valid registration plate. Arviso was released on her own recognizance by Judge Janelle Griego. Tyrell Alcott Aug. 21, 1:53 am Aggravated DWI An altercation near Flame of Fire Ministries was overheard by Gallup Police Officer Julio Yazzie, who traveled to the scene and found a white Toyota driving slowly near a female who was refusing

WEEKLY DWI REPORT | SEE PAGE 23 PUBLIC SAFETY


NEWS

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

Earthweek: Diary of a Changing World Week ending Friday, November 19, 2021

By Steve Newman

Dangerously Hot Exposure to extreme heat has tripled among the world’s population since 1983, according to an analysis of population and temperature data from Columbia University. The Associated Press analysis looked at the period from 1983 to 2016 and found that the more extreme heat now affects about a quarter of the world’s population. Instead of using the more common heat index, the study looked at what is known as the wet-bulb globe temperature, which takes into account temperature, humidity, wind speed, sun angle and cloud cover. This more accurately measures the amount of stress created for workers and others who must endure the hotter conditions outside. South Asia is seeing the most added heat stress, with the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka suffering 50 more dangerously hot days each year than in 1983. But nearly half of urban centres around the world are also experiencing an increasing amount of heat exposure, the analysis found.

Eruption Survivors W hile several beeh ive s on L a Palma in the Canary Islands have been lost to lava flows and ash from the eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano since September, thousands of bees were rescued from the ash still alive after 50 days of being trapped. Beekeepers dug out six hives from beneath about 1

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+47° Hardap, Namibia

-54 Vostok, Antarctica metre of ash and found that five had survived. The thousands of bees rescued had sealed themselves in with a resinous material they can produce, and survived on their honey food reserves. Cumbre Vieja continues to erupt with vast amounts of lava, but with less force than in previous weeks. The eruption’s fi rst human victim was a 70-year-old man who died when his ash-covered roof collapsed.

Spain, wester n Australia, southern Sumatra, southeastern Missouri, and the San Francisco Bay Area .

Stinging Attacks Scorpions forced into people’s homes by heavy rain and flooding around Aswan, Egypt, stung about 450 residents, with three reportedly dying from the venom. Those stung suffered severe pain, fever, sweating, vomiting, diarrhoea and muscle

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tremors. The Arabian fat-tailed scorpions that inhabit the region are among the most dangerous scorpions in the world. Their venom can kill an adult within an hour of being stung.

Arboreal Deaths Dr y ing soils from climate change are causing trees to die at an increasing rate in forests across Europe. A new study led by Jan-Peter George and colleagues at the

Tartu Observatory in Estonia used millions of ground observations rather than satellite data to exclude tree losses from felling, disease, and pests. They found that the Norway spruce has been the hardest hit, with mortality rates 60 percent higher on average between 2010 and 2020 than between 1995 and 2009. But they say all species in every European region are seeing higher mortalities since 2012, mainly due to unusually low soil moisture. The tree deaths increase wildfire risks and cut down on the amount of carbon dioxide soaked up by forests.

Volcanic Blasts The Philippines’ restive Taal Volcano produced th ree bla st s t hat sent vapor and ash into the sky, 45 km south of Manila. The steam explosions were caused by groundwater coming in contact with magma beneath the surface. Dist. by: Andrews McMeel Syndication©MMXXI Earth Environment Service

Indian Cyclone A n u n na med tropica l stor m br ou g ht lo c a l l y heav y rain to southern India’s Tamil Nadu state. • A weaker disturbance drenched the same region six days later.

Earthquakes Residents just ea st of Ista nbul r u shed i nto t he streets as a moderate quake rocked the Turkish province of Duzce.• Earth movements were also felt in southern Iran, western Scotland, Iceland, southeastern

Six beehives were dug up after being buried beneath volcanic ash for weeks due to the La Palma eruption. Video still: Beekeepers of La Palma HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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Octavia Fellin Public Library’s Seed Lending Library sows seeds for local plant preservation By Rachelle Nones Sun Correspondent

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allup’s Octavia Fellin Public Library is one of New Mexico’s numerous seed libraries distributing fruit, vegetable, and flower seeds to participating gardeners. One does not have to possess a library card to check out seeds. “It will encourage, hopefully, more gardeners and they will start turning in more seeds, more heirloom seeds,” OFPL Deputy Director Betty Martin said. What is a seed lending library? Seed lending libraries stock collections of seeds that are shared, traded, and lent to gardeners. A beneficial long-term effect of seed libraries is the preservation of heirloom and quality seeds that have adapted to the climate, plant diseases, and insects within a local region. After borrowed seeds are harvested at the end of the growing season, gardeners who have borrowed seeds from OFPL’s seed library are

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encouraged to return harvested seeds to the library, following OFPL’s guidelines regarding seed saving techniques and proper labeling. “We do ask that whoever harvests the seeds … try to contribute one third of their total harvest, even a quarter would be fine, too,” OFPL Experiential Learning Coordinator Joshua Whitman said. “That way we can keep the seed library going.” Since the seed lending library program launched in 2020, library visitors have been combing through seed packets catalogued in alphabetical order within card catalog containers located in the main library. The seed inventory includes cilantro, thyme, sunflower and poppy seeds, Navajo tea, Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, squash, red kidney beans, blue corn, and other vegetable, flower, and herb seeds. “Typically, we try our very best to get organic seeds to make sure that they don’t require special care or special plantings with pesticides,” Whitman explained.

Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

Whitman said the library tries to obtain some of its seed supply from local farmers. OFPL Library Supervisor Johnson Bordy contributed heirloom Indian corn and squash seeds from his family’s garden and the Community Pantry has also donated seeds to OFPL’s collection. “Last harvest season and then this harvest season we got a donation from the Community Pantry of their latest harvest,” Whitman said. “We have four half boxes of seeds that I asked my colleagues to go through and inventory.” Which crops are best for inexperienced gardeners to start with? Martin recommends that novice gardeners plant a Three Sisters Garden featuring the three pillars of traditional Indigenous North American crops: squash, corn, and climbing beans. For the past two years, the library has planted its own garden. “It’s gone now,” Martin said. “But there were big, tall, huge corn stalks out there. It was really cool. “

OFPL Three Sisters Garden planted outside Octavia Fellin Public Library with seeds from the seed library on Aug. 10. Photo Credit: Courtesy OFPL During the 2020 COVID lockdown, the library had given away a lot of seeds. “I’m assuming that a lot of people were gardening that year because there was nothing else to do,” Martin said. To meet the demand during the library’s lockdown, OFPL offered curbside pick-up for seed orders placed on OFPL’s website.

Future plans for the seed lending library include marketing its availability via print publications and “Library Minute” radio promotions because Martin believes “a lot of people don’t know about it yet.” Details about the Octavia Fellin Seed Library are available here: https://ofpl.online/ seed-library/#mission

PUBLIC SAFETY


COMMUNITY

‘Encanto’ slowly casts a spell, wins viewers over By Glenn Kay For the Sun

RATING:  OUT OF  RUNNING TIME: 98 MINUTES This animated feature from Disney will be opening at cinemas on Nov. 24. It will then be available for streaming Dec. 24 on Disney+. While Pixar has always been considered the gold standard when it comes to animated family features, Walt Disney Animation Studios has also produced its share of fantastic features, including “Wreck-It-Ralph,” “Frozen,” “Zootopia,” and “Moana,” to name but a few. “Encanto” is their latest, a musical/fantasy about fi nding one’s calling in life. It isn’t the best feature from the studio, but it does build goodwill over its running time and ends up serving as a bright and enjoyable entertainment that will appeal to most young viewers. The stor y involves the M a d r i g a l s , who po s s e s s incredible powers and live in a scenic Columbian village. Heck, even their house possesses magical qualities. When each child reaches a special age, a ceremony is performed by stern, but caring family matriarch Abuela Alma Madrigal (Maria Cecilia Botero) and their unique gift is revealed. Or at least, that has been the pattern for all but one. S a d l y, g o o d - n a t u r e d Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz) did not receive a special ability on her big day and now spends her time offering advice and kindness to others preparing for their remarkable moment. Mirabel tries to stay positive, but finds it difficult when everyone around her is so special. When she witnesses an ominous omen on the family property, the lead decides to investigate and learns that the Madrigal powers may be weakening. COMMUNITY

Sur pr isingly, the stor y takes a little bit of time to build momentum. Each individual family member is introduced in a lengthy opening number, but most of the early gags earn chuckles rather than big laughs. It’s all very cute, but not exceptionally hilarious or captivating. As the story develops, things do improve significantly. When Mirabel discovers that some members of her family, including strong women like Luisa (Jessica Darrow) and beautiful, but vain sister Isabela (Diane Guerrero) are having difficulties with their gifts and are actually unhappy with their lot in life, some entertaining events ensue. The Luisa musical number is a real highlight as she complains about the high work standards that she is expected to continually provide for those in the village. In general, there is a lot of singing and dancing in the movie. Thankfully, most of the music is quite catchy and is often used to display the remarkable talents of various family members. These tunes are written by Lin-Manuel Miranda and several songs make an impression. And of course, as with other animated titles from Disney, the movie looks spectacular. The green, mountainous village environment is wondrous

Mirabel Madrigal (voiced by Stephanie Beatriz) in “Encanto” helps other members of her family to use their special powers, when she is given none of her own. Photo Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

to behold and just about every frame pops off the screen with vibrant colors. Additionally, when Mirabel discovers the truth about an uncle named Bruno (John L e g u i z a mo), who d i s a p peared years before because of his disturbing visions of the future, things improve dramatically. Numbers featuring this character are another highlight and he livens up proceedings when secrets begin being revealed about the family. It soon becomes clear that while things seem perfect on the surface, tension within the

Madrigals is simmering and literal cracks are appearing under their seemingly beautiful abode. And since all of the characters have remarkable skills, word and panic about what might happen spreads and the consequences result in a few big laughs. As one might expect, this is a Disney picture, so things are always kept light and frothy. Mirabel must help the family address deeper issues in order to save their home and the community. Admittedly, the movie starts off a little slowly and doesn’t offer anything

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overly unique stor y-w ise. However, the characters and their abilities are enjoyable to witness and, as the story progresses, the movie gains energy and comic momentum. In the end, “Encanto” isn’t the best Disney f lick ever made, but the tunes, interesting characters and second half complications eventually cast a spell and charm viewers. Note: A sweet short called “Far from the Tree” will also be playing before the feature in cinemas. V ISIT: W W W. CINEMASTANCE.COM

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Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

13


GRATITUDES Janice Brown Bradley Gallup Wreaths Across America I am grateful our veterans.

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heir Marriage was good, their dreams focused. Their best friends lived barely a wave away. I can see them now, Dad in trousers, shirt and a hat and Mom in a house dress, lawn mower in his hand, and dish-towel in hers. It was the time for fi xing things.

A curtain rod, the kitchen radio, screen door, the oven door, the hem in a dress. Things we keep. It was a way of life, and sometimes it made me crazy. All that re-fixing, eating, renewing, I wanted just once to be wasteful. Waste meant affluence. Throwing things away meant you knew there’d always be more. But then my mother died, and on that clear summer’s night, in the warmth of the hospital room, I was struck with the pain of learning that

sometimes there isn’t any more. Sometimes, what we care about most gets all used up and goes away … never to return. So … While we have it … It’s best we love it … and care for it ... And fi x it when it’s broken ... And heal it when it’s sick. This is true ... For marriage ... And old cars … And children with bad report cards … Dogs and cats with bad hips ... And aging parents … And grandparents. We keep them because they are worth it, -by Donna Calvin submitted by Janice Brown Bradley

Jennifer Lazarz, Gallup Tourism and Marketing Manager

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his is a quote that sits in a little placard on my desk. It was given to me by a fr iend and mentor, Pastor Reggie Hansome, when I worked as the director for a Christian summer camp during one summer of college. “Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go.”- William Feather. There’s a certain strength needed to

work in an often misunderstood economic development arena, so having that little sign always reminds me to hang on and keep going. My fi rst career, before coming to Gallup, was as an opera singer. In late 2020 one of the greatest friends, colleagues, and musicians that I collaborated with, pianist Logan Brown, departed this world after complications from a

heart attack. Logan played

Musician Logan Brown who collaborated with Jennifer Lazarz in her opera career. Photo Credit: Courtesy Jennifer Lazarz for some of the biggest names

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in the opera industry: Sherrill Milnes, Renata Scotto, Mignon Dunn, among others. He also ser ved on the staff of the Broadway Theatre Project as an Assistant Music Director/ Arranger for many years, working with so many incredible people, such as Mickey Rooney and his wife Jan, Ben Vereen, Na nc y Du s sau lt , Pat r ick Wilson, Jonathan Groff and more. We met during my tenure as a resident artist with Opera Tampa, where he accompanied all of our traveling concerts. He was witness to some of the funniest blunders in my early singing career, and those laughs became the foundation for a lovely friendship. It was never lost on me that this incredibly funny and humble man was such a pillar of the arts world, and had become a young opera singer’s mentor and friend because of our shared sense of humor and love for storytelling. He is very missed. Things you are grateful for? S o m a ny! Mo s t not a bly though, my brother Don Lazarz, is a Major with the Army National Guard. He was stationed in the Ukraine training troops through most of the last year, and returned home in the spring of 2021. I’m incredibly grateful for his service, for the humor and friendship he brought to his fellow deployed, and that he came home healthy and safe. This was his third career deployment, the first were in Iraq and Afghanistan. I especially love that he came home and jumped right into a new position as the principal of the high school where he teaches in Illinois. His school printed a picture of his face and fastened

columnists/watchwomanon the wall/2011/08/inspirational-keeper.html

Jennifer Lazarz’ brother Don on the trails. Photo Credit: Courtesy Jennifer Lazarz it to a science classroom skeleton with a school t-shirt and wheeled it around to events during his deployment, taking pictures to prove he was “there.” It was fantastic. I’m also incredibly grateful that my job has afforded me the opportunity to develop things that will help businesses and the community long into the future. I’m excited that in January I get to unveil a new tourism website and app, both of which have incredibly comprehensive business directories, art listings, walking tours and more. Gallup is a beautiful community and it has been so enriching working

Jon “Mr. Bananashoes,” Jennifer’s boyfriend poses with her. Photo Credit: Courtesy Jennifer Lazarz

JENNIFER LAZARZ | SEE PAGE 19 GRATITUDES


Teresa Leger Fernández U.S. Representative, D-NM Thanksgiving has always been a time to gather with loved ones and reflect on the year past. But last year families stayed home, unable to come together because of the pandemic. We went from rooms full of laughter and love, to Zoom Thanksgivings, making the best of a hard and painful year.

This year looks a little closer to what we’re used to. We’ll get to hug our loved ones and laugh around the table again. We will splash red chile on top of our mashed potatoes and gravy in true New Mexico fashion. In reflection, I realize that we can do this again because New Mexicans always step up to help their communities.

When things get tough, we come together. This year, I’m grateful for how we’ve taken care of each other with masks, vaccinations, and empathy. I’m grateful to the communities I get to serve. I’m thankful for their guidance as I navigate this great new honor entrusted upon me. My office has received thousands of letters and calls from New Mexicans that reach out to share their stories, needs, and opinions, so I

can better serve them and their communities. I’m grateful to the health workers, like David Elliot who organized care for multiple rural counties and was my guest to this year’s Presidential address. I’m grateful for Winnie, one of my youngest letter writers, who wrote to me earlier this year to ask me

TERESA LEGER | SEE PAGE 19

Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández, D-NM. File Photo

Robin Benally Judicial Specialist 2 Gratitude: Family Family is a unique gift that needs to be appreciated and treasured, even when they’re driving

you crazy. As much as they make you mad, interrupt you, annoy you, curse at you, try to control

Robin Benally on her wedding day Aug. 3, 2019. In back from left: Jonathan Thompson Jr., grandmother Nancy Begay, youngest sister Krystal Thompson holding nephew Omri Nashboo. In front, the chair bearing “In Loving Memory” was for Benally’s father, Jonathan Thompson, Sr., mother Tina Thompson and older brother Vincent Thompson holding niece Nanu Thompson. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Robin Benally

Group picture March 16 from left: Tina Thompson, Nancy Begay, Robin Benally, Justin Benally, Ernest Benally, Veronica Benally, Rosemary Marique and Venus Etsitty. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Robin Benally

you, these are the people who know you the best and who love you. -Jenna Morasca

ROBIN BENALLY | SEE PAGE 16

Myla Benally, oldest daughter of Robin Benally and Avery Benally, her youngest on Nov. 7 during annual fall pictures. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Robin Benally

Rona Yazzie at Thunderbird Supply

I

t’s been one year since we lost our beloved friend and co-worker, Violet Brown. We miss your presence. We think about you always, we talk about you still. The moments you shared with us will never be forgotten. It’s been hard to forget someone who gave you so much to remember. Thank you so much for who you were. The most caring, smart, funny person, who was well known by all, even the customers. Forever in our hearts. Our prayers are with your family. Rest in Peace, Vi. Love Always, All of us at Violet Brown. Photo Credit: Courtesy Thunderbird Supply Rona Yazzie

''A Tradition'' • A Gallup tradition with over 100 years of dedicated service. Now under new ownership, the Rollie legacy continues; providing the facilities and conveniences that serve families best with dignity, integrity and understanding. • Rollie Mortuary offers package pricing, accepts Navajo Nation Social Service packages and can assist families with pre-need planning and set up. • Rollie Mortuary offers a genuine desire to be of assistance to you and your family in this time of need.

401 E. Nizhoni Blvd. Gallup, NM 87301 (505) 863-4452 Violet Brown at Zumba Glow Party. Photo Credit: Courtesy Rona Yazzie GRATITUDES

Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

15


Jon C. Pairett Fire Marshal, Gallup Fire Department Gallup Fire Department Gratitude A few days ago I had my Thanksgiving meal with my family and one of the traditions is everyone talking about what they are thankful for. To tell the truth, every day I come to work as the Fire Marshal I am thankful for many things. The first is the professional men and women of the Gallup Fire

Department who are dedicated to serving our community. I could never ask for a better set of brothers and sisters who wear the same uniform that I do. The second item I am thankful for is the position I have — the ability it gives me to serve this amazing community. As the

Fire Marshal I oversee the Fire Prevention Office staff and we are responsible for many things, from fire inspections, public education, school fi re prevention, community risk reduction, and fire investigations. Many times when I am called to the scene it is a major event and a damage has been done to someone’s home or business. Many times people say that firefighters see people on the worst day of their life. Even though that may be true, it also allows us to see

Natasha Webster Executive Assistant, Office of the Mayor, City Manager I am grateful and honored to be a part of the community I live in and the people in it. Our area was hit hard during the pandemic and it has been a long road back. Our county had one of the highest transmission

rates in the nation. Our city went on a 10-day lockdown in 2020, and our local businesses were significantly impacted as well. There were so many hardships that so many people

experienced, we could not even begin to name them all. Yet, I will be forever amazed at the resiliency of our community. I witnessed businesses and organizations becoming creative in how to provide

people at their best even when it’s their worst day. Many times a year I see how neighbors and our community come together to help someone in need. If you watch the news and see what is happening in the world it may make you believe that only bad things happen, but there is good in this world. There is so much good in our community. There is good here in Gallup. I am truly thankful that I get to serve the people in this community and am honored to be a part of the community

goods and services — members of the community reaching out to one another to provide food and supplies for those in need—local residents getting together to pick up trash and clean up our community. When vaccinations became available, our county was in the top three for the highest vaccination rates in the state. Even

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Gallup Fire Marshall Jon C. Pairett. File Photo that comes together. That is what makes Gallup so special.

now, you see people wearing their masks (even outside!) because it is not about just keeping yourself safe, but about protecting others in our community. Members like our elders, our children, and those that are immune compromised. Our community has proven that we care for each other. Finally, I am in awe and proud of our leadership and my colleagues, the people that I work with day in and day out. Many innovative ways were created to meet the increase in services being requested from departments that had limited budgets and staff, to ensure service continuity. We had to learn new skills, create new ways of doing business and take on new projects to support the future of our community. It is easy to become jaded with all that is going on in this world. We live in a great community and I do not want that to get lost, especially in this season of gratitude.

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Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

(505) 722-9311 1981 NM-602, Gallup, NM 87301

Hours:

Tuesday - Saturday 11 am - 7 pm (Closed Sunday & Monday)

I have been highly favored by God with the family he has given and blessed me with. Without family I wouldn’t appreciate the woman I am today. I’m hardworking, I’m fearless, I’m strong, I have unconditional love, I’m sympathetic and the list goes on. God has blessed me with a family so unique, they are the reason why I go out and do great things. In his favor, I get to appreciate everything family has taught me and I’m still learning. Whether the moments are so big to enjoy and so little to remember—it’s those moments we look back [on] that make us

ROBIN BENALLY | SEE PAGE 18 GRATITUDES


Brian Colón State Auditor of New Mexico

I

am grateful for my good health and the opportunity to serve others through the painful and lasting impact of the pandemic. As State Auditor, I have the honor of working w it h civ i l s er v a nt s f rom all 33 counties to celebrate excellence in gover n ment and reiterate the difference those public servants make in the lives of New Mexicans every day. Especially during a crisis, government employees, elected officials and services are most critical for the public’s safety and well-being. The State of New Mexico and thousands of government

employee s stepped up to ser ve others and put their personal safety second. It wa s hu mbl i ng to be able to del iver mes sa ges of gratitude for that work. I am grateful to work with a team at the Office of the State Auditor that stepped up and answered the call to protect New Mexicans and precious resources during a t i me of u nprecedent ed circumstances. I am grateful to live in one of the most phila nthropic states in the nation— ou r La nd of Encha ntment. Individuals and non-profit organizations filled the gap

Brian Colón unique Happy Thanksgiving greeting. Image Credit: Courtesy Brian Colón New Mexico State Auditor Brian Colón and wife Aleli. Photo Credit: Courtesy Bryon Paez for so many families in crisis. As a child in Valencia County, I knew what it was to need help from others

year-round, and some of my fondest memories are the random acts of kindness shown

to my family during the holidays. During this week of gratitude, I feel particularly fortunate to be on the other side of the “give & receive equation” as an adult. Finally, I am grateful for my health and the health of my family. I’m so grateful to have a wonderful and loving wife, who is an immigrant, civ il engineer, educator & PhD ca ndidate. This yea r we celebrated our 25th wedding anniversar y with our beautiful 24 -yea r- old son, Rafael, and she is my greatest blessing.

Car Land Auto Sales, LLC 1221 E. Hwy 66 Gallup, NM 87301 (505) 863-7880

Lieutenant Governor Howie Morales

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s difficult as the COVID-19 pandemic has been, I am particularly grateful for the way communities across New Mexico came together to bring comfort and support to many in need. I recall seeing smiles on the faces of young kids as fi re trucks and police cars drove by with sirens on GRATITUDES

to celebrate different, but impactful birthdays. Similarly, I witnessed food, clothing, and other basic needs shared generously by everyday New Mexicans, to try to ensure no one would go without. It was a genuine testament that even though we couldn’t be together, New Mexicans still stood together. For that I am grateful.

New Mexico Lt. Gov. Howie Morales. File Photo

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Anna Peterson, Executive Director, The Mountain Pact I ’m e xc it e d t h a t D e b Ha a la nd is the Secreta r y of t he U. S . D e p a r t me nt of I nter ior, T ra cy Stone Manning is the head of the Bureau of Land Management, and Chuck Sams III is the new Director of Nationa l Park Service! Also, the restoration of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments and the proposed 20-year drilling ban near Chaco Culture National Historical Park are wonderful actions that have recently

Anna Peterson Executive Director of The Mountain Pact. File Photo been ta ken by the Biden Administration.

Bears Ears with petroglyphs. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Anna Peterson, The Mountain Pact

Christina Tsosie Senior Public Information Officer, Navajo Police Department I am grateful for the men and women who serve our country, as well as those who serve in our local communities as first responders, police officers, fi refighters, nurses, and medical professionals. I am thankful for their presence in our communities and their selfless commitment and sacrifice to protect our community. Behind all the fi rst responders are families who love them and I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge them and express my gratitude to them for supporting and uplifting them in their time of need. On behalf of my family, I want to say thank you to all our military personnel and fi rst responders for their service and sacrifice.

Debra Martinez City of Gallup, Behavioral Health

The Lujan family. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Debra Martinez This year I’m thankful that Nicole Lujan, Behavioral Health Coordinator, and Dr. Wei pushed for us to take on the Wellness Hotel. We helped many individuals at high risk for COVID and facing homelessness. We worked nights and weekends, but it was worth it. I remember around Christmas, we went and sang Christmas carols to the residents and gave gifts to the kids. It was very humbling. Our work from the Wellness Hotel led to the purchase of the Lexington. I feel very blessed to work with such amazing people. Thank you, Dr. Wei, Dr. Lozado, Ethan, Judy, and others. I’m really thankful for Nicole, her willingness

ROBIN BENALLY | FROM PAGE 16 smile. Sometimes, “I love you,” isn’t the phrase we hear, but rather complete silence. Deep

Lolee Lynn who won the Halloween Costume Contest. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Debra Martinez to help others and her love for this community is amazing. I’m also thankful for my family, the Lujans, and those who voted for Lolee Lynn. She won the Halloween Costume Contest.

down we’re thankful for those moments. Appreciate your loved ones during holidays, during fights, during those small moments and so forth, because without them, we wouldn’t be who we are today.

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Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

GRATITUDES


Martin Heinrich U.S. Senator, D-NM Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday. I love to make things like red chile elk enchiladas because it connects some of our most cherished outdoor experiences to a shared family meal. Quality time doesn’t get much better than that.

Dressed as a turkey on Navajo Elementary pre-school Parents’ Day. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Senator Martin Heinrich, D- NM. File Photo

Hidden behind a hand-designed turkey at Navajo Elementary pre-K on Parents’ Day. Photo Credit: Courtesy

The senator’s version of red chile elk enchilada. Photo Credit: Courtesy Sen. Martin Heinrich

Yvette Herrell U. S. Representative, R-NM

Ms. Barbara Decker’s 1st graders at Red Rock Elementary wear their turkeys on their foreheads. Photo Credit: Ediberto Managaytay

JENNIFER LAZARZ | FROM PAGE 14 over the past 13 months to collect history, information, and learning more about Gallup’s nuances to add to what I’ve already gathered in my six years here. We are often way too hard on ourselves about what goes “wrong” that we don’t spend enough time celebrating what is “right,” or

TERESA LEGER | FROM PAGE 15 to protect our environment and our immigrants. I’m grateful for Annette Arellano, a pre-k teacher who shared her experience about what it’s been like to teach our GRATITUDES

great, or incredible strengths and testaments to a ver y unique community. I a m so tremendously blessed with friends across the community that have become my Ga l lup fa mily. I’m a lso grateful for my boyfriend, Jon, aka Mr. Bananashoes, an elementary school PE teacher in the Fort Defiance area. It’s been a year and a half of laughs, tears,

and learning. He reminds me to eat when I get stressed, never forgets to make me feel beautiful, and fi nds my cursing endearing. He’s a wonderfully sweet and kind man with a profound love for all things soccer, so it’s been a treat going to both New Mexico United games and the games he coaches locally, where I’m becoming a soccer super fan.

youngest during a pandemic. My gratitude flows to our Native American communities, who made tough decisions to keep their elders and families safe. I’m grateful for all of the mayors, community leaders, educators, veterans, essential workers

- everyone that makes our communities better. The heart of New Mexico is found within its rich and diverse communities and I am forever grateful for having the privilege to represent you. Happy Thanksgiving!

As we prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving, I am so grateful for my faith, family and friends. God has blessed my life with so many caring people, and I am honored to live in a free country, serving the people of New Mexico and our nation. On Thanksgiving Day, we should all take a moment to contemplate the wonderful things in our lives to be thankful for. I am especially thankful for our active-duty service members, our veterans, the brave men and women of law enforcement, and all the fi rst responders who keep us safe and make

Rep. Yvette Herrell,R-NM. Photo Credit: en. Wikipedia.org this the greatest country in the world. God bless you on this Thanksgiving Day.

Service is your way of life, and our way of doing business. GALLUP 107 E. Aztec Ave., 505.722.4411 Walmart: 1650 W. Maloney Ave., 505.863.3442 1804 E. Aztec Ave., 505.722.0300

Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

19


en Elementary. Photo Credit: Courtesy Ms. Melanie Gonzales’ 4th grade class at Tobe Turp 20 Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

GRATITUDES


CLASSIFIEDS

3432. Deadline for applications is 12/02/2021. NMSU is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer. *** Job Vacancy Announcement

GALLUP SUN ARCHIVES Need a past issue? $2.00 per copy. Note issue date and send check or M.O. to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305. Subject to availability.

Fully loaded Low Mileage Stock # J21110A Priced to Move

AUTO SALES Gurley Motor Company 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe Condition: Used Engine: 8 Cyl - 5.3 L Drive Type: RWD Ext. Color: Black Mileage: 67,379 Stock#: P21130 Price: $39,888 2018 FORD FUSION SE FWD BLACK LEATHER INTERIOR! ONLY 11,800 MILES $25,900

2020 FORD ESCAPE S AWD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED! LIKE NEW! ONLY 5,400 MILES! $30,275

Pre-owned 2018 Toyota 4Runner Limited 4X4 Engine: 4.0L V6 Transmission: Automatic Mileage: 38,230 Stock#: TP21219 Amigo Automotive Center 1900 South Second St, Gallup, NM (505)722-7701 Amigoautomotive.com HELP WANTED

2019 FORD F150 XLT 4WD EQUIPPED WITH RUNNING BOARDS AND BEDLINER 80,400 MILES $42,000 Gurley Motor Co. 701 W. Coal Ave, Gallup, NM (505) 722-6621 www.gurleymotorford.com *** Amigo Automotive Center

2016 Ford Focus Hatchback Manual Transmission Leather Interior CLASSIFIEDS

Nutrition Educator, New Mexico State University, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Admin and Program Unit McKinley County, located in Gallup, NM, 30 hours per week. Education: High School diploma or GED with two (2) years of experience. Equivalency: Completion of a post-secondary degree or certificate may substitute for years of experience. Valid NM driver’s license required & personal auto required. Position is contingent upon funding. #REQ. NO 2100742S. For complete job description, qualifications and application process visit: http://hr.nmsu.edu/ jobs/. Department Contact Info: Kathy Landers, County Program Director Telephone (505) 863-

Accounting Assistant Gallup Housing Authority General Job Description: Responsible for providing administrative support to the accountant with data entry, processing, and recording transactions, and assisting with audits and all other financial and business functions related to the Housing Authority. Assists in preparation of various financial or administrative reports, financial data tracking sheets, and any other reports required by the Department. The successful candidate must have: basic knowledge of GAAP, bookkeeping principles, recordkeeping and retention procedures, budgeting, cost allocations, auditing, and financial reporting; skilled in operating standard office equipment and applicable computer software, such as Microsoft Suites; knowledge of record keeping, file management, standard office procedures and policies; ability to complete tasks with minimal instruction and meet deadlines; knowledge of cash management policies and procedures; general understanding of accounts payable and payroll processing policies and procedures; ability to deal effectively with sensitive and confidential information; ability to carry out effective communication including oral, grammatical, and written instructions in English This is a non-exempt full-time

CLASSIFIEDS WEEKLY RATES FIRST 25 WORDS: FREE! (4 consecutive weeks max.)

26-50 WORDS: $10 51-75: WORDS: $20 76-100 WORDS: $30 $10 FOR EACH ADD’L 25 WORDS

EXTRAS – $5 PER WEEK, PER ITEM: TEXT BOX, HIGHLIGHT, ALL CAPS, BOLD, AND/OR PIC/LOGO Free classifi ed: Limit one free ad per customer only. Second ad starts at $10, per 25 words.

EMAIL: GALLUPSUNLEGALS@GMAIL.COM DUE: TUESDAYS 5 PM position of 40 hours per week. Applications and/or a copy of the job description may be requested by email at: GHA.Main@ galluphousing.com. Applicants may return the application in person or may submit their applications to the email above. Position Open Until Filled Gallup Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer *** Black Mesa Fuels LLC– Gallup, NM Full-time | Part-time Hiring Class-A CDL Drivers. Two years’ experience in driving Tractor Trucks but also willing to train new licensed CDL drivers. We specialize in many types of hauling such as Belly Dump, Sand and Gravel, Water Tankers, Equipment, Box trailer freight. We have both local and on the road positions available. Full time and Part time positions are available and must be willing

to work weekends and ready to start IMMEDIATELY after hiring. Driver expectations: • Good communication skills • Good attitude • Able to follow directions written and verbally • Comply with all DOT and in-house regulations and rules. • Perform required DOT pre and post trips • Cor rectly filling out paperwork • Knowledge of Hours of Service and filling out paper logs • Safely transporting material from one location to another • Be able to perform minor maintenance on trucks or trailers • Provide your own basic tools • Perform safety checks on all equipment When applying please provide the following: ·

State Motor Vehicle Report

·

Class A CDL

·

Social Security Card

·

Long Form (Physical form)

·

Medical Card

Please apply in person at Gas up gas station at 920 E Hwy 66. Or call (505) 722-5031 ext. 104

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Ask for Jenna *** MARKETING CLERK Looking for variety and opportunity for growth? Then apply to join the Gallup Sun team! In the position of Marketing Clerk, your customer service and administrative

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 22

Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

21


CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 21

LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF MCKINLEY ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

skills will come into play in this multitasking position. As Marketing Clerk, you’ll assist the Office Manager with tasks that entail assisting advertising and classifieds customers, while honing your front and back office skills.

JACOB LaCROIX and CAROL LaCROIX Plaintiffs, v. CARROL C. NELSON and MARGARET C. NELSON their heirs, Successors & Assigns and All unknown claimants of interest.,

At least 1-2 years of sales/ customer service experience required, along with some office experience. Please email cover letter and resume to: gallupsun@ gmail.com. Explain on a separate sheet any gaps in your employment history. Pay: DOE. Paid holidays, vacation, and sick days. SEP IRA and Health Stipend.

Defendants. NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT TO: CARROL C. NELSON and MARGARET C. NELSON their heirs, Successors & Assigns and All unknown claimants of interest.,

FOR RENT Gallup Living Rentals *Hospital Area Rentals.

You or your attorney are hereby directed to file a pleading or motion in response to the Complaint to Quiet Title on file herein on or before 20 days from the date of the last publication of this Notice in the Office of the Clerk of the District Court, Eleventh Judicial District of the State of New Mexico, sitting within and for the County of McKinley, that being the Court in which said Complaint is filed, and to serve a copy of the same pleading or motion upon Plaintiffs or Plaintiffs’ attorneys, Mason & Isaacson, P.A., 104 East Aztec, P.O. Box 1772, Gallup, New Mexico 87305, (505-7224463). Unless a responsive pleading or motion is entered by you in this cause on or before the above date, judgment will be rendered against you by default. The general object of said action is to quiet the title of the following-described property in McKinley County, New Mexico:

Washer/dryer included. No pets. ● 3 bedroom/2 bath $1850/ month. ● 3 bedroom/2bath $1800/ month. *Downtown Area Rentals ● 3 bedroom/2 bath $1400/ month. Washer/dryer included. ● 2 bedroom/1 bath $1100/ month. Contact Gallup Living Rentals at (505)488-2344 or berlinda@gallupliving.com for more information. SALE 60’s Dining Room Set: Oval table Med. Dark w/one leaf, 6 lyreback chairs with upholstered seats and Lenox Fair Fields set of china. $425.00 cash o.b.o. Phone: (505) 722-7598; leave a message *** Firewood for Sale

Lot Numbered Ninety-Three (93) in Thoreau Townsite No. Two, Subdivision of McKinley County, New Mexico as shown on the

Unsplit piñon and/or cedar (juniper) for sale. Pick up only. Call 505-567-8396.

Custom Wood Works

- Owner (505) 608-0093 P.O. Box 4518 Yatahey, New Mexico 87375

Facebook: McLaughlin’s WoodWorks mclaughlinswoodworks@yahoo.com

22 Friday November 26, 2021 • Gallup Sun

Plat filed in the office of the County Clerk of McKinley County, New Mexico January 12, 1972, and to include all improvements. SUBJECT TO all legally existing easements, restrictions and reservations. WITNESS the District Judge of the Eleventh Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the seal of said Court this 2nd day of November, 2021. Clerk of the District Court By Michelle Sandy Deputy Published: Gallup Sun November 12, 2021 November 19, 2021 November 26, 2021 *** Public Notice Public Notice is hereby given that Gallup Business Improvement District, Inc. will conduct its annual BID meeting to be held virtually on Friday, December 10, 2021 at noon. The log-in information will be available 72 hours prior to the meeting from francis@gallupbid. com and on City of Gallup website. Published: Gallup Sun November 26, 2021 *** PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the McKinley County Board of Commissioners will hold a Regular Meeting on Tuesday, November 30, 2021, at 9:00 a.m. Among other items to be discussed is the 3rd reading and adoption of the proposed ordinance, “Wireless Telecommunications Facilities” Ordinance No. 2021-NOV-005, and the associated Resolutions NO. NOV-21-108 and NOVV-21109. As part of this consideration, there will be a public hearing for the Commission to hear comments regarding this issue; and, If needed, the Commission can take action on the Resolution adopting the Commission Districts for the 2022 and subsequent 10 years election cycles – Resolution No. NOV-21-105. This regular meeting will be held “In-Person” -- Adhering to the Social Distancing Protocols in effect for the meeting day -- including room capacity limits, mask requirements and other safety practices issued by the Governor’s Office due to

the COVID-19 pandemic; and the requirements of the Open Meetings Act allowing members of the public to attend and listen to meetings of the quorum of the governing body. This meeting will be held in the Commission Chambers, Third Floor of the McKinley County Courthouse, 207 West Hill, Gallup, New Mexico. A copy of the agenda will be available 72 hours prior to the meeting in the Manager’s Office and the County Clerk’s Office and can be sent electronically upon request. Auxiliary aides for the disabled are available upon request; please contact Shawna Garnenez at (505) 863-1400 at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting to make any necessary arrangements. All interested parties are invited to view. Done this 22nd day of November 2021 McKINLEY COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS /S/ Billy Moore, Chairperson Publication date: Gallup Sun, November 26, 2021 *** CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO Notice of Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that at its regular meeting on December 14, 2021, commencing at the hour of 6:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers of City Hall, 110 West Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico (the “City”), the City will conduct a public hearing to consider a proposed Ordinance, the title of which appears below. A complete copy of the Ordinance is available for public inspection during normal and regular business hours at the Office of the City Clerk, 110 West Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico 87301. The title of the proposed Ordinance is: AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A WATER PROJECT FUND LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT BY AND BETWEEN THE NEW MEXICO FINANCE AUTHORITY (“FINANCE AUTHORITY”) AND THE CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO (THE “BORROWER/ GRANTEE”), IN THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF SEVEN MILLION SEVEN HUNDRED EIGHT THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED

SEVENTY-ONE DOLLARS ($7,708,271), INCLUDING A LOAN AMOUNT OF THREE MILLION EIGHTY-THREE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED EIGHT DOLLARS ($3,083,308), EVIDENCING AN OBLIGATION OF THE BORROWER/ GRANTEE TO UTILIZE THE LOAN/GRANT AMOUNT SOLELY FOR THE PURPOSE OF FINANCING THE COSTS OF 1) CONSTRUCTION OF REACH 27.7B OF THE NAVAJO GALLUP WATER SUPPLY PROJECT TO CONNECT REACHES 27.6 AND 27.7A, CONSISTING OF 3.6 MILES OF AN 18 INCH WATERLINE AND METER STATION AND 2.) DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A CONJUNCTIVE USE SUPPLEMENTAL GROUNDWATER SUPPLY WELL LOCATED IN THE G-80/SJ1491 WELL FIELD TO OFFSET THE DELAY IN SURFACE WATER FROM THE SAN JUAN RIVER, AND SOLELY IN THE MANNER DESCRIBED IN THE LOAN/ GRANT AGREEMENT; PROVIDING FOR THE PLEDGE AND PAYMENT OF THE LOAN AMOUNT AND AN ADMINISTRATIVE FEE SOLELY FROM THE NET SYSTEM REVENUES OF THE JOINT WATER AND WASTEWATER SYSTEM OF THE BORROWER/GRANTEE; CERTIFYING THAT THE LOAN/GRANT AMOUNT, TOGETHER WITH OTHER FUNDS AVAILABLE TO THE BORROWER/GRANTEE, IS SUFFICIENT TO COMPLETE THE PROJECT; APPROVING THE FORM OF AND OTHER DETAILS CONCERNING THE LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT; RATIFYING ACTIONS HERETOFORE TAKEN; REPEALING ALL ACTION INCONSISTENT WITH THIS ORDINANCE; AND AUTHORIZING THE TAKING OF OTHER ACTIONS IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF THE LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT. A general summary of the subject matter of the Ordinance is contained in its title. Publication of this notice constitutes compliance with NMSA 1978, § 3-17-3. Publication date: Gallup Sun, November 26, 2021 CLASSIFIEDS


COMMUNITY CALENDAR NOVEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 2, 2021 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26

THANKSGIVING CLOSURE

Octavia Fellin Public Library will be closed today through Sat., Nov. 27 for Thanksgiving. During that time services will be available at ofpl. online, featuring downloadable e-books, audiobooks, magazines, streaming movies, virtual programs and other resources. For more information email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

GMCS THANKSGIVING BREAK

Through Nov. 26

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 28

COVID-19 VACCINE DRIVE UP

8 am-3 pm @Shiprock High School (US-64, Shiprock). First and second doses of COVID-19 Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for those age 12 and over; third doses//Booster shots are available for the three COVID-19 vaccines – Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. For more information contact Shiprock Health Promotion at (505) 368-6300. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29

CREATIVE CORNER – SAND PAINTING

4 pm. @ the Main Library (115 W. Hill Ave.). Celebrate and honor Native American Heritage Month by making your own sand painting. Traditionally sand paintings are used in ceremonial prac-

WEEKLY DWI REPORT | FROM PAGE 10 to get inside. Yazzie activated his unit’s emergency lights and followed the car onto Tenth Street, where it stopped and he met the driver, Tyrell Alcott, 21, of Gallup, whom Yazzie noted had bloodshot eyes and was moving slowly. Alcott said his girlfriend wanted her wallet back, which was why she was next to the Toyota. Alcott admitted having two drinks about two hours prior to driving, while Yazzie noted a strong smell of alcohol coming from inside the car. He asked Alcott if he would perform the Standard Field Sobriety Tests and he agreed. Alcott performed poorly on the tests and was placed under arrest. He refused to give a breath sample. He was then transported to McKinley County Adult Detention Center CALENDAR

tices, but we will be using the fundamentals to create a unique painting. Supply kits are available at OFPL on a first-come, first-served basis using the Supply Request Form at ofpl.online. For more information email jwhitman@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30

REGULAR COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING

9 am-11:30 am @207 W. Hill

MCKINLEY COUNTY 5-11 YEAR OLD AFTER HOURS IMMUNIZATION CLINIC

9 am-6:30 pm @ 1919 College Dr. To register, visit https://cvvaccine.nmhealth.org/ or call (505) 722-4391 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1

MITTEN TREE

In the spirit of holiday giving OFPL will be collecting new mittens, gloves, hats, scarves, socks, and earmuffs to decorate our Mitten Tree! Donations will be accepted throughout the month of December and will benefit the children & families served by McKinley County. Help provide our community with warm hands and warm hearts.For more information email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

UNWRAP THE GIFT OF READING

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out, unwrap, and read! Rate it by filling out the card with each book. All cards that are returned by Jan. 14 will be entered in a prize drawing. Post a picture with your book on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram and tag us @galluplibrary for a second entry into the drawing. For more information email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

are available at OFPL on a first-come, first-served basis using the Supply Request Form at ofpl.online. This week we will create a Stuffed Gingerbread Man. For more information email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

FAFSA – FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID

Jump-start your career with a Google Career Certificate scholarship. Prepare for entry-level positions in data analytics, IT support, project management, user experience design - no college degree or relevant experience required. Apply for a scholarship at ofpl.online now through Nov. 30. For more information email bmartin@ gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

8 am-5 pm. @Student Services Building UNM-Gallup Campus (705 Gurley Ave.) Bring FSA ID; 2020 Federal Taxes; 2020 W2s; Parent FSA ID; Parent 2020 Federal Taxes/2020 W2

FAMILY STORYTIME

11 am. Join us in the Children’s Branch (200 W. Aztec. Ave.) for storytime activities,

songs, rhymes and readalouds every week! Age 0-4. For more information email bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2

NEIGHBORHOOD MEETING DISTRICT 1

6:30 pm-8:30 pm @ Gallup Senior Center 607 N. 4th St. Neighborhood Meeting with City Councilor Linda Garcia (Dist. 1).

CRAFTY KIDS

Begin the holiday cheer early by unwrapping the gift of reading! Throughout the month of December select a wrapped book to check

4 pm on Facebook and YouTube @galluplibrary (all ages) for family-friendly crafts and step-by-step tutorials for all skill levels. Supply kits

and booked for aggravated DWI and having no license. Alcott was released on his own recognizance by Judge Virginia Yazzie.

identified as Charla Lynn Tyler, 43, of Fort Wingate, Ariz., whom he had found asleep at the wheel. Once he had awakened her and she exited the vehicle, Tyler appeared to stagger. Her eyes were bloodshot and her speech was slurred. Medical staff evaluated Tyler at the scene when Strandy spoke with her. At first she seemed uncooperative, but she began telling him how she ended up there. As she spoke, Strandy verified the signs of intoxication, also noting that she smelled of alcohol. Tyler admitted to drinking a 24-oz. can of Bud Light earlier in the day before she agreed to take the Standard Field Sobriety Tests. She began the tests, but soon stopped and refused to continue. She was placed under arrest and agreed to give a breath test. She posted results of .27 and .28. A f t er receiv i ng med ical treatment from Gallup Indian Medical Center, Tyler

Charla Tyler Aug. 8, 5:59 pm Aggravated DWI A white passenger car was parked in the median of U.S. Highway 491, where callers to Metro Dispatch said it had struck a light pole on the turn signal near Metro Avenue. Those callers also reported a female passed out in the driver seat. Ga l lup Pol ice O f f icer Matthew Strandy arrived at the scene and found the car, a Chevrolet Cruz, with heavy damage to its front bumper. A McKinley County Sheriff’s Officer met Strandy and said he had spoken with the driver,

ONGOING

GOOGLE CAREER CERTIFICATE SCHOLARSHIP

BOOSTER WEBSITE

The New Mexico Department of Health has a COVID-19 eligibility tool at https://vaccineNM.org. A short questionnaire will help determine eligibility for the Pfizer booster and allow for an appointment to be scheduled.

MCKINLEY COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICE VACCINATIONS

8 am-5 pm. Closed from 12 pm-1 pm @ 1919 College Dr. COVID vaccinations (Moderna and Pfizer) for children up to age 18 and adults 19 and older. Register on cvvaccine. nm.org or call for assistance (505) 722-2004. WIC services at (505) 722-2004.

was transported to McKinley County Adult Detention Center and booked for aggravated DWI. Tyler was released on her own recognizance by Judge Robert Ionta. Randall Tom Aug. 8, 12:42 am Aggravated DWI Gallup Police Officer Warren Bowannie wa s leav ing the detention center when he saw a dark passenger car enter the intersection of Mine Run Road and Highway 66, where the driver turned on the hazard lights and exited the vehicle. Bowannie approached the blue Chevy Cruz and saw the driver begin to walk toward him with a flashlight. The driver staggered as he walked and began asking what was happening. He was identified as Randall

RMCHCS COVID VACCINATION CLINIC

8 am-5 pm Mon.-Fri. @ College Clinic (2111 College Dr.). No appointments needed. For COVID testing please call (505) 236-1074 and someone will come out to your vehicle to obtain a specimen.

RMCHCS RAPID CARE

9 am-6 pm Mon.-Fri. Closed weekends. @ 1850 E. Hwy. 66. Acute care, Minor sprains & strains, minor procedures, physicals – DOT Employment and sports.

RECOVERY MEETINGS

6:30 pm Thursdays Across Nations/Celebrate Recovery, Window Rock, Ariz. Contact: Steve Maus (505) 371-5749; Steven,maus@ acrossnations.com 6:30 pm-8:30 pm Tuesdays Joshua Generation Celebrate Recovery, 1375 Elva Dr. Gallup. Contacts: Pastor Debra Chee (505) 702-5132; dchee4@ gmail.com Pastor Dennis Gallegos (505) 870-2175; joshuageneration. gallupnm@yahoo.com 7:00 pm Thursdays Zuni Christian Reformed Church, Celebrate Recovery, 19C Pia Mesa Rd. Zuni, N.M.. Contact: Tim Eisenga (505) 782-5649; teisenga@zunichristianmission.org To post a nonprofit or civic event in the calendar section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: Monday at 5 pm.

Tom, 43, of Pinehill, N.M., and Bowannie noted he smelled of alcohol, had bloodshot eyes, and slurred his speech. Tom said he was coming from his aunt’s house, and Bowannie told him he would have to perform the Standard Field Sobriety Tests to see if he was able to drive. Tom refused to take the tests, but did consent to the breath test after being placed under arrest. Afterward, Bowannie found numerous open containers of different alcoholic beverages in Tom’s vehicle. Once he wa s taken to Gallup Police Department, Tom refused to give a breath sample. He was taken to Gallup Indian Medical Center for clearance, after which he was taken to McKinley County Adult Detention Center and booked for aggravated DWI, open container, and a suspended license. Tom was released on his own recognizance by Judge Cynthia Sanders.

Gallup Sun • Friday November 26, 2021

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FRIGIDAIRE

BENCHCRAFT BY ASHLEY

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With Christmas just around the corner, & prices as low as this… here’s your chance to get some terrific gifts for everyone in the family. You may even spot something for yourself. Get here early!

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BY ASHLEY

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