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VOL 7 | ISSUE 303 | JANUARY 15, 2021

NO VACANCY

JAM-PACKED 60-DAY SESSION AIMED AT ROARING BACK TO LIFE Staff Reports

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City Council approves funds to clean up homeless camps By Kevin Opsahl Sun Correspondent

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allup wants to clean up it s t r a n sient camps, which will require the city to spend more than it usually would, given that contractors must wear personal protective equipment to shield themselves from coronavirus. With that in mind, member s of t he cit y cou nci l

unanimously approved $75,000 on Jan. 12 for the planning and development department’s clean and lien program to help it get through the next budget cycle, which ends mid-year. “It’s very costly, but it is necessary. It is a life, health and safety issue that we need to stay on top of as best we can,” C.B. Strain, planning and development director for the City of Gallup, said. “If we don’t, it will get a lot worse.”

The new funding for the clean and lien program came just months after the council had approved the same a mou nt back i n Aug u st . Between then and now, the planning and development department spent $48,000 just to clean up transient camps — 24 in all — and another

NO VACANCY | SEE PAGE 18

A N TA F E – G ov. Michelle Lu jan Grisham’s agenda for the first session of the 55th New Mexico Legislature a n nou nced on Ja n. 13, i nclude s t he E xecut ive Budget Recommendation for Fiscal Year 2022, and positioning for a swift and robust recovery from the pandemic to provide for sustainable progress and continued forward momentum in public education, economic development and public health and safety beyond the COVID-19 crisis. “New Mexico will recover from this challenging year,” Lujan Grisham said. “The question is what kind of future we want to make for ourselves after we put these crises behind us. We still have the power to decide what we will become. And the time to decide is this session, this year. “We can choose to return to the same-old, or we can set ourselves up to roar back to life after the pandemic, ready to break new ground and thrive. I look forward to working closely with the Legislature in the coming weeks to achieve our shared vision of a prosperous, healthy and happy New Mexico,” she concluded. The governor’s priorities for the session include helping New Mexico small businesses, supporting New Mex ico con su mer s a nd

boosting the state’s economy. P A N D E M I C REL IEF FOR SM A L L BUSINESSES: • Modifying the Small Business Recovery Act of 2020 to ensure state funding is accessible to more New Mexico small businesses. The act, approved by the Legislature in the summer 2020 special session, originally allocated $400 million in funds from the New Mexico State Severance Tax Fund to provide loans to New Mexico businesses and nonprofits that experienced fi nancial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic, though not all of those funds were expended. This would supplement the $100 million in small business grants allocated in the second 2020 special session. • Providing flexibility and opportunity to restaurants and eateries by allowing alcohol delivery and reforming the state’s liquor licensure program. E X P A N D E D OPPORTU NITIES FOR MOR E N E W M E X IC O BUSI N E SS - OW N ER S AND KEEPING LOCAL DOLLARS LOCAL: • Reforming the state procurement code to include preference for Native-owned businesses, minority-owned businesses, women-owned businesses and promoting

JAM-PACKED | SEE PAGE 18


Gallup-McKinley County Schools Expectations during School Re-entry

Parent/Guardian Reminders Do not send your student to the bus or to school when they are sick. x If your student has symptoms such as a cough; congestion/runny nose; body/muscle aches; new loss of smell sensation; fatigue; vomiting; diarrhea or a temperature greater than 100.4° F, keep your student at home. x Contact your primary provider or COVID hotline to discuss these symptoms. x Coronavirus hotline: 1-855-600-3453 x Non-health related COVID hotline: 1-833-551-0518 x If student is sick, do not return until Department of Health criteria is met and there is documentation the student can return to school. Do not send your student to the bus or school if they are currently quarantined due to COVID 19 close contact exposure. If your student has been in direct contact with a positive COVID person within the last 14 days, they need to stay home. Notify the school and follow the directions of your primary health provider. Students who are in quarantine will automatically revert to the remote learning option until cleared to come back to school. x Temperature and symptoms check of your student(s) before leaving for school. o You cannot leave a student at a bus stop before the student’s temperature is checked as they board the bus and are cleared to get onto the bus. x Ensure students bring and wear a face covering/mask to school every day. Face covering/masks should not distract from the educational process. o Schools will provide a face covering/mask if needed. o Teach your student the proper method of using face covering/masks. x Practice good hygiene at home and at school (hand washing and keep clean) x Reinforce/talk with your child about social distancing rules at school. x Have your student bring a water bottle to school. o Disposable cups will be provided by water fountains at schools to limit crowds and contact with water fountains. Student’s exhibiting symptoms of illness will be sent home. When a student arrives at the health office ill and it has been determined the signs and symptoms the individual presents are of possible COVID-19 nature, the following will occur: x Student will remain isolated until leaving campus. x Parent/guardian of student will be notified immediately with a request for immediate pick up from the school setting and personal belongings will be brought to the health office for the student. x Campus administrator will be notified immediately for immediate release from the school campus. x If student is sick, do not return until Department of Health criteria is met and documentation states the student can return to school. x Schools are following NMDOH guidelines for cleaning of facilities. Counselors and Student Support Advisors (SSAs) are here to help. These staff members will provide support for the social and emotional needs of students either in-person or in virtual settings. x When appropriate, referrals will be made to further address mental health concerns. x Resources are provided on the GMCS website www.gmcs.org

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Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

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LOCAL NEWS

Battery charges filed against pre-school teacher By Beth Blakeman Associate Editor

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criminal compl a i nt h a s be en f iled aga inst the president of t he McKinley County Federation of United School Employees and Lincoln Elementary (451 Boardman Dr.) pre-school teacher Patrice Carpenter, charging her with three petty misdemeanors, also referred to as battery on Dec. 7 in Gallup Magistrate Court. According to the complaint, a parent named LaNisha Coble heard from her daughter that a juvenile male was being grabbed and dragged by their teacher, Patrice Carpenter. Coble spoke with the boy’s parents, Tamera Madrid and her husband. Also, according to a police report submitted by Officer Nicole Diswood, the girl who

reported this to her mother said the teacher had pinched her, spanked her and pulled her hair. Madrid and Coble went to the school and made a complaint against Patrice Car penter, with Principal Edgardo B. Castro, for mistreating their children. Madrid said she was called in by the Central Office to view video footage of what happened to her son. GPD Patrol Officer Nicole Diswood viewed the footage from Nov. 19, which showed the boy with other students on the playground. In her report she said, other children came out to play and got on the jungle gym. Diswood said the video showed Carpenter yelling at the children, who ran away leaving the one boy still standing by the jungle gym. She said she saw Carpenter grab his

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Lincoln Elementary School. Photo Credit: Courtesy of GMCS arm and pull him toward her, then push him, causing him to fall to the ground. In the statement of probable cause, Diswood described the second incident based on her viewing of the video shown to her by Darren Soland, Gallup McK inley County Schools District principal investigator. This incident reportedly occurred on Nov. 30. Diswood said she saw Carpenter grab the same boy’s hood as in the video from Nov. 19, while he was playing and drag him to where she was sitting and make him sit on the concrete. She said the video showed the boy trying to crawl away when she grabbed him again by the hood and dragged him back by her side. The boy tried to crawl away again and Carpenter again grabbed him by the hood and dragged him back, making him sit down on the pavement.

The complaint talks about a third incident from Dec. 3, which Diswood also viewed on video, in which the boy was playing with other children on the playground when Carpenter grabbed him by his hood and dragged him to where she was sitting and made him sit down. On the New Mexico Courts website, the criminal complaint fi led Dec. 10 in McKinley County Magistrate Court says Carpenter is charged with “unlawfully and intentionally touch [ing] or apply[ing] force” on three separate occasions “in a rude, insolent or angry manner, contrary to NMSA 1978, § 30 - 03 - 04. (a petty misdemeanor).” Ca r penter pleaded not guilty to all three charges. Gallup McKinley County Schools Superintendent Mike Hyatt told the Gallup Sun “We don’t comment on personnel

matters or investigations.” Br ia n Ber na rd, Vice President of McFuse said he did not want to speak about the case. “Not at this time. It’s premature. It’s a personnel issue. Nothing’s happened yet other than allegations.” C a r p e n t e r ’s a t t o r n e y, Joseph F. Arite, said the case is ongoing. A pre-trial hearing before the Honorable Pat A. Casados has been set for Feb. 11 at 10 am. In addition to the people quoted in this article, the Sun attempted to reach Patrice Carpenter, LaNisha Coble, Ta mer a M a d r id , D e put y D.A. Paul Bleicher, Lincoln Elementary School Principal Edgardo Castro and Gallup Police Officer Nicole Diswood in connection with this case and received no response by press time.

WHAT’S INSIDE …

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WELLNESS HOTEL PROGRAM Bringing back the Lexington Hotel

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GGEDC GETS A MILLION-PLUS For job creation

Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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KANGAROOS RELATE TO HUMANS A lot like dogs, goats

PET FOOD RECALL Check FDA website for details

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BACK FROM COLLEGE To help disengaged Gallup students

NEWS


Wellness Hotel Program gets funding until end of January By Kevin Opsahl Sun Correspondent

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allup’s Wellness Hotel Program got a fi nancial shot in the arm by county commissioners on Jan. 4 to keep housing homeless people who are at risk of contracting coronavirus.

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Accounts Representative Sherry Kauzlarich Associate Editor Beth Blakeman Circulation Manager Mandy Marks Editorial Asst./ Correspondent Kevin Opsahl Correspondent Dominic Aragon Photography Knifewing Segura Ana Hudgeons Ryan Hudgeons Cable Hoover On the Cover Left side: The top of 218 W. Coal Ave. served as a camp for transients in the fall of 2020. Photo Courtesy Gallup Fire Dept. Right side: Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office: 1983 State Rd. 602 Gallup, NM 87301 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

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One hundred twenty-five thousand dollars will be split between a Days Inn that houses approximately 50 individuals and the contractors that provide support for the program, according to Debra Martinez, manager of Gallup’s Behavioral Health Investment Zone, which focuses on ways to help residents live a healthy life. “It’s very important,” she said of the funding, before noting the program is, “potentially saving lives.” A n t h o n y D i m a s , J r. , McKinley County manager, said the money was approved to be used until Jan. 31 or until the $125,000 is spent, whichever comes first.  “We’re being good neighbors to help them,” Dimas said, noting that the county provided

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$350,000 to help the program from October to December 2020.   The WHP was established by the City of Gallup and McKinley County early last year, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the U.S. Those eligible for rooms at the Days Inn must be experiencing homelessness, over the age of 65 — with some exceptions — and capable of independent living. Residents are screened for temperature and symptoms daily and if they are suspected of having coronavirus, they’re sent to another hotel for isolation and quarantine. The city, however, is not in charge of that hotel, Martinez said.   The WHP houses families and individuals ranging from the age of 1 to 83. Though it includes only 45 people right now, at its peak there were over 60, according to Martinez.  Ma r tinez sa id she a nd another staffer have other jobs besides ones with Gallup and the WHP is “a big undertaking”

Lexington Hotel sign. Since its heyday, the hotel was sold to a foundation to house homeless people, and purchased by the City of Gallup when the CARE 66 Foundation gave it up. Photo Credit: roadarch.com

and “we just don’t have the capacity” to keep it going. The $125,000 came just as the program is about to take a different form in a new location — the historic Lexington Hotel in downtown Gallup. G a l lu p C i t y M a n a ge r Maryann Ustick told the Gallup Sun the county funding was important to provide a “bridge” between when federal funding for the Wellness Hotel Program

ran out and when the newly-renovated hotel can open. After the meeting, County Commissioner Billy Moore confirmed Ustick’s comments.  “Rat her t ha n lose t he momentum that they have going, the county has offered to step up and provide the funds to keep it going for another

WELLNESS HOTEL | SEE PAGE 17

Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

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GGEDC to use new grant to create jobs Staff Reports

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Ga llup nonprof it that focuses on economic development just received the largest private donation in its history to create high-paying jobs in the city and McKinley County. Greater Gallup Economic Development Cor poration announced a $1.25 million do n a t io n f r om T r i - S t a t e Generation & Transmission Association, a not-for-profit power supplier cooperative. Tom my H aw s , boa r d pre sident of t he GGEDC, st ated t hat t he f u nd s a re significant given the closure of the Escalante Generating St ation, t he “i ndef i n ite idling” of Gallup Refinery by Marathon Petroleum Cor p. and the COVID-19 pandemic, wh ich have a ll placed the r e g i o n’s e c o n o m y u n d e r “g r e a t s t r e s s.” E s c a l a nt e was a 125 -megawatt power pla nt located in McK inley County that wa s operated by Tri-State until it closed

in August 2020. MPC shuttered its crude oil processi ng faci l it y i n Ga l lup a nd Ma r t i nez, Ca l i f. t he sa me mo nt h due t o de c r e a s e d product demand as a result of the pandemic. “We are grateful for this do n a t io n f r om T r i - S t a t e and their recognition of the Greater Ga llup Econom ic Development Cor poration as the primary local leader to drive economic diversification in Gallup-McKinley County,” Haws said. In an email to the Gallup Sun, Michael Sage, deputy director of GGEDC, wrote that his orga nization will “leverage this new fund along with its industrial knowledge and economic development skillset to help new catalytic projects which will create new jobs.” Sage said these projects a re ones that create “the opportunity to produce rapid and high levels of job creation and private investment.” Sage poi nted to Rh i no Hea lth’s decision to have

Gallup Refinery run by Marathon Petroleum, shut down after COVID-19 hit the area. Photo Credit: marathonpetroleum.com

a surgical glove ma nufact u r i ng pla nt i n McK i n ley County as one example of a catalytic project. That might give GGEDC the incentive to recr uit other ma nufacturers to the area. The GGEDC might also ask other companies if they want access to rail, now that Carbon Coal Road connects U.S. Highway 491 to the Ga llup Energ y Logistics Park, Sage said. GGEDC Executive Director Patty Lundstrom

Holding the million-plus dollar check award to the Greater Gallup Economic Development Corporation are from left: Mayor Louie Bonaguidi, Board Member (Ex-Officio), Tony Tanner, Board Member, Tommy Haws, Board President, and Tim Hoisington, Planning, Scheduling & Maintenance Supt. for the Tri-State Team, and Bryan Rychener, Engineering Supt. Photo Credit: GGEDC believes the grant from TriSt a t e w i l l “m a i nt a i n t he great momentum” from her nonprof it’s work with the McK inley Paper Company, which received $5 million from the state last year to install new equipment and keep the plant running, saving over 100 jobs and creating

a nother 10. The compa ny had relied on the Escalante Generating Station for power. GGEDC was founded in 2012 to help create jobs in McKinley County. The nonprofit launched a business retention and expansion program that has operated for eight years.

Escalante Generating Station closed in August 2020. Photo Credit: GGEDC

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Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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Gallup Sun â&#x20AC;¢ Friday January 15, 2021

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NEWS

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

Earthweek: Diary of a Changing World

By Steve Newman

Week ending Friday, January 8, 2021 Baked-In Warming A new repor t w a r n s t h a t t he amount of global warming already “baked in” to the atmosphere due to surging greenhouse ga ses is now enough to warm the planet more tha n the 2.0 -degree Celsius cap outlined in the Pa r is climate agreement. Writing in the journal Nature C lim at e C h an ge, a tea m from Texas A&M University, C a l i for n i a’s L aw r e nc e Livermore National Lab and China’s Nanjing University says the atmosphere is now set to warm to about 2.4 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. But they say that amount of warming can be delayed for centuries if the world quickly stops spewing extra greenhouse gases from the burning of carbon fuels.

4.2 5.0

Croatia was hit on Dec. 29 by a

4.2 6.1

Danilo

Chalane

magnitude 6.4 temblor that killed at least seven people and infl icted extensive damage. • Earth movements were also felt in Indonesia’s Sulawesi Island, eastern Taiwan, southeastern Idaho and around Southern California’s Salton Sea.

CO2 Fuel Earthquakes

with a transparent box door that made it impossible for the marsupials to get it, they observed the animals’ behavior. The roos almost always turned to a nearby human for help. “They’d look straight up at my face, like a dog or a goat would do, and back at the box, and some even came up and scratched my knee like a dog pawing [for attention],” McElligott said.

-64° Toko, Siberia

Oxford University researchers say they have found a way to

cheaply and simply convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into jet fuel. The technique uses heated citric acid, hydrogen and an iron-manganese-potassium catalyst to turn the CO2 into a fuel that would power jet aircraft. Even though the process would i nclude captu r i ng ca rbon emissions, the Oxford team says the process could be the most viable option for many commercial airline fleets to go carbon neutral until they can convert to electric propulsion or other greener options.

+110° Dampier, W. Australia

Imogen

Shorter Days

Tropical Cyclones

Pla net Ea r th wa s spinning on its a x is dur ing 2020 more rapidly than at any other point in modern history, and experts believe it could rotate even faster during 2021. Scientists at the International Earth Rotation Service, based in Paris, say the spin peaked last year on July 19, with Earth completing its rotation 1.4602 milliseconds faster than the average daily rate of 86,400 seconds. They say the previous shortest-day record, which occurred in 2005, was beaten 28 times during 2020. The rate of Earth’s rotation is not constant and is affected by quakes, tropical cyclones and other factors.

Please Help Me Kangaroos have show n they can use body language to ask humans for help, busting earlier beliefs that only domesticated animals have such an ability. Alan McElligott and colleagues at the City University of Hong Kong tested 16 roos living in captivity with the same methods used to study horses, dogs and goats. After blocking food from the kangaroos

At least seven people died from severe weather that Tropical Storm Chalane brought to Madagascar, Mozambique and Zimbabwe during the closing days of 2020 and the beginning of 2021. • Tropical Storm Imogen swamped parts of far northern Queensland after spinning up over Australia’s Gulf of Carpentaria. • Cyclone Danilo briefly attained Category-1 force as it churned the open waters of the central Indian Ocean.

Caribbean Rumble O f f ic i a l s i n S t . Vincent a nd the Grenadines warned its residents living near La Soufrière volcano to be prepared to evacuate. The volcano produced strong tremors as it began forming a new lava dome and spewed gas emissions for the first time in years. • Martinique’s Mount Pelée began rumbling in December, prompting French territorial officials to issue a yellow alert. Dist. by: Andrews McMeel Syndication ©MMXXI Earth Environment Service

Kangaroos at three locations across Australia asked for human help when tested by researchers. Photo Credit: Alexandra Green / City University of Hong Kong

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Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT


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Navajo Nation settles claims from 2015 mine disaster Staff Reports

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INDOW ROCK, N A V A J O NATION — The Navajo Nation Department of Justice announced a settlement with Kinross and Sunnyside Gold Corporation on Jan. 13, resolving its claims against the mining companies for creating the conditions that led to the Aug. 2015 Gold King Mine spill. This unprecedented disaster, triggered by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and its contractors, released millions of gallons of toxic acid mine waste into the waters upstream of the Nation, which then coursed downstream in a yellow plume through two hundred miles of the Nation’s sacred San Juan River. Under the terms of the settlement, Sunnyside, on behalf of itself and Kinross, will pay the Navajo Nation ten million dollars. The Nation filed suit in U. S. District Court for the District of New Mexico in Aug. 2016.

The complaint detailed the mining companies’ role in creating the conditions that led to the spill. As alleged in the complaint, the conduct of the mining companies shifted the flow of toxic mine water to the Gold King Mine, leading to the buildup of toxic contaminants that the USEPA recklessly burrowed into in Aug. 2015. “The Gold King Mine blowout damaged entire communities and ecosystems in the Navajo Nation,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said. “We pledged to hold those who caused or contributed to the blowout responsible, and this settlement is just the beginning. It is time that the United States fulfills its promise to the Navajo Nation and provides the relief needed for the suffering it has caused the Navajo Nation and its people,” he said. Navajo Nation Speaker Seth Damon added, “The settlement reached in the Navajo Nation’s ongoing efforts to obtain relief for the Gold King Mine Spill is a significant step forward. Our families and communities

connected to the San Juan River experienced intense pain and suffering when the river ran orange with heavy metals. On behalf of the Navajo Nation Council, I wish to express our appreciation to the Navajo Nation Department of Justice and the Hueston Hennigan law fi rm for pursuing this litigation on behalf of the Navajo Nation. The Council will continue to move forward in holding the federal government accountable and in ensuring a disaster like the Gold King Mine Spill never happens again.” The Navajo Nation is represented by Attorney General Doreen N. McPau l a nd Assistant Attorney General Paul Spruhan of the Navajo Nation Department of Justice, and John C. Hueston, Moez M. Kaba, and Andrew K. Walsh of Hueston Hennigan LLP. “This settlement compensates the Navajo Nation for the mining companies’ part in this devastating spill,”

GOLD MINE | SEE PAGE 16

The Gold King Mine waste water spill in Aug. 2015 turned the Animas River gold in color. Photo Credit: en.wikipedia.org

Pet food recall issued for product shipped to New Mexico

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NEW MEXICANS ENCOURAGED TO CHECK THE LIST OF RECALLED PRODUCTS ON FDA WEBSITE

NEW DETOX PROGRAM IN GALLUP Accepting New Clients Learn more at our website:

fourcornersdetox.org (505) 490-7270 or (505) 413-3447 Aspergillus flavus or aflatoxin could be dangerous to to animals. The Food and Drug Administration has issued an alert warning that it may be in some brands of pet food. Photo Credit: dreamstime Staff Reports

For job opportunities, visit the careers page on our website. 10

Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

L

AS CRUCES — The U.S. Food & Dr ug Administration has issued an alert

regarding a pet food recall. On Dec. 30, Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc. announced a recall of certain lots of Sportmix pet food

TOXIC PET FOOD | SEE PAGE 17

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT


Gallup Sun â&#x20AC;¢ Friday January 15, 2021

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OPINIONS

Secy. of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver responds to Trump Campaign’s withdrawal of frivolous election lawsuit By Maggie Toulouse Oliver N.M. Secy. of State

“T

he Trump campa ig n today [Jan. 11] f iled to w it hd raw t hei r l aw su it a ga i n st my Office attempting to invalidate New Mexico’s secure a nd l aw f u l 2 02 0 G ener a l Election and withdrew their overly burdensome public

records requests motivated by an outlandish conspiracy theory involving Dominion Voting Systems. As no new facts have come to light since they filed this lawsuit and records requests, except the anti-democratic hor ror show t h a t pl ayed out as the U.S. Capitol last Wed ne sd ay [Ja n. 6], t h i s withdrawal suggests that the Trump campaign knew from

the very beginning that their lawsu it wa s ba seless a nd that it was simply a political show. L et me be cle a r : New Mexican election officials ra n one of the sa fest a nd most secure elections in our state’s history and yet this lawsuit attempted to throw out the votes of every New Mexico voter who cast a lawful ballot last November.

I’m pleased that they have sought to withdraw their frivolous lawsuit, but it’s only the first step President Trump and his enablers should be taking to fix the damage they have wrought on our democratic republic. New Mex ico voters deser ve strong, pro -active condemnations of the President’s actions. Simply w it hd raw i ng t h is lawsu it

Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver does not undo the weeks of lies and disinformation parroted by President Trump and leaders of the New Mexico Republican Party like Steve Pearce and Yvette Herrell.”

Marijuana is back on the table at the N.M. Legislature By Mike Daly Contributor

T

he A lbuquerque Jou r n a l put s out a week ly i n ser t on Mondays titled

Business Outlook. This Dec. 28 edition was almost entirely about possible cannabis legalization at the upcoming N.M. legislative session. Marijuana legalization in some form seems a sure thing. But we

need to pay particular attention to how this sensitive issue is addressed by our legislature. “L ega l i ze Tod ay for a brighter tomorrow” is the title of five full pages of advertising

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by Ultra Health who label themselves New Mexico’s #1 Cannabis Company in the 28 December Business Outlook. The articles included, while mildly informative, are almost entirely about proper marketing of the product and how much tax the state can collect. It should be noted that Mexico just legalized possession of small quantities of marijuana and it is also legal in Canada. I agree it should be legalized, but for the same reason I feel all drugs should be. Prohibition simply does not work. The prohibition of alcohol in the 1930s and our more recent and much longer experience with the so-called “war on drugs” demonstrates it in spades. We need to legalize to control the use and spread and take away the incentive for illegal marketing, just as

Mike Daly

we have rather successfully done with alcohol except that we do not control alcohol advertising. T he c a n n a bi s we a r e talking about here is a powerful drug. While stoned, users

MARIJUANA | SEE PAGE 22

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Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

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NOTICE OF AIR QUALITY PERMIT APPLICATION C&E Concrete, Inc. announces its application to the New Mexico Environment Department for a technical revision of air quality permit #3407 for the existing Milan HMA plant. The expected date of application submittal to the Air Quality Bureau is January 18, 2021. The exact location of the Milan HMA plant is UTM Zone 13, UTM Easting 241,070, UTM Northing 3,900,570, NAD 83 (35°, 12', 53.2076" N; 107°, 50', 40.5486" W), Township 11N, Range 10W, Section 1. The approximate location of this site is 3.6 miles northeast of the intersection of Highways 122 and 605 in Cibola County. For this technical revision, C&E Concrete is requesting a change in the sulfur content limit of Unit 14 drum dryer/mixer burner fuel from 2% to 0.5%. The present sulfur content requirement for the drum dryer burner fuel is located in Permit 3407, Condition 2.c.i. The burner fuel oil that is presently being used meets all requirements specified in 40 CFR Part 279, Standards for the Management of Used Oil. The estimated maximum quantities of any regulated air contaminants will be as follows in pound per hour (pph) and tons per year (tpy). These reported emissions could change slightly during the course of the Department’s review: Pollutant: PM 10 PM 2.5 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Carbon Monoxide (CO) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Total sum of all Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Toxic Air Pollutant (TAP) Green House Gas Emissions as Total CO2e

Pounds per hour 10.6 pph 7.0 pph 10.4 pph 28.9 pph 27.2 pph 8.7 pph 1.8 pph 2.2 pph n/a

Tons per year 18.2 tpy 11.0 tpy 16.9 tpy 74.5 tpy 48.8 tpy 15.8 tpy 2.9 tpy 3.4 tpy < 10,000 tpy

The standard operating schedule of the facility is from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the months of September through February, and from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the months of March through August, 6 days a week and a maximum of 52 weeks per year. The maximum operating schedule is from 6 a.m. to midnight for the months of September through February, and from 5 a.m. to midnight for the months of March through August, 7 days a week and a maximum of 52 weeks per year. The owner and operator of the Facility will be: C&E Concrete, Inc. PO Box 2547 Milan, NM 87021 If you have any comments about the construction or operation of this facility, and you want your comments to be made as part of the permit review process, you must submit your comments in writing to this address: Permit Programs Manager; New Mexico Environment Department; Air Quality Bureau; 525 Camino de los Marquez, Suite 1; Santa Fe, New Mexico; 87505-1816; (505) 476-4300; 1 800 224-7009; https://www.env.nm.gov/aqb/permit/aqb_draft_permits.html. Other comments and questions may be submitted verbally. With your comments, please refer to the company name and facility name, or send a copy of this notice along with your comments. This information is necessary since the Department may have not yet received the permit application. Please include a legible return mailing address. Once the Department has completed its preliminary review of the application and its air quality impacts, the Department’s notice will be published in the legal section of a newspaper circulated near the facility location.

Attención Este es un aviso de la Agencia de Calidad de Aire del Departamento de Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México, acerca de las emisiones producidas por un establecimiento en esta área. Si usted desea información en español, por favor de comunicarse con la oficina de Calidad de Aire al teléfono 505-476-5557.

Notice of Non-Discrimination NMED does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age or sex in the administration of its programs or activities, as required by applicable laws and regulations. NMED is responsible for coordination of compliance efforts and receipt of inquiries concerning non-discrimination requirements implemented by 40 C.F.R. Part 7, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 13 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972. If you have any questions about this notice or any of NMED’s non- discrimination programs, policies or procedures, you may contact: Kristine Pintado, Non-Discrimination Coordinator, New Mexico Environment Department, 1190 St. Francis Dr., Suite N4050, P.O. Box 5469, Santa Fe, NM 87502, (505) 827-2855, nd.coordinator@state.nm.us. If you believe that you have been discriminated against with respect to a NMED program or activity, you may contact the Non-Discrimination Coordinator identified above or visit our website at https://www.env.nm.gov/NMED/EJ/index.html to learn how and where to file a complaint of discrimination.

Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

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The ďŹ lm industry is the spark plug for New Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic recovery By James Gollin Chair, Gov.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Council on Film and Media Industries

N

ew Mex icoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s f i l m industry is uniquely poi s ed for r a pid g row t h, a nd c a n ser ve as the spark plug to re-ignite our COVID-battered economy. The sad truth is that even before COVID, our state ranked at or near the bottom of the nation in areas from education to child poverty. We need to not just recover, but to leap to a 21st century economy that can boost employment in communities that have been

out to eat. With tips from fi lm industry patrons, restaurant workers can buy school supplies for their children, creating another round of sales tax revenue. Depending on how many times each film dollar circulates through the New Mexican economy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; what economists refer to as direct, indirect, and induced

spending â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the resulta nt activity completely covers or significantly mitigates the costs of the incentives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Film induced tourismâ&#x20AC;? also brings well-documented income and revenue to our state. Admittedly, every dollar of fi lm spend is not alike. Some create more benefit than others, and the incentive program

could benefit from modest tweaks, a subject that is discussed within the working groups of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grishamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly reorganized Council on Film and Media Industr ies, which I chair. https://nmfilm.com/about/ governors-council/ One key fi nding of the Film Council is that the industry

needs to grow beyond its current sweet spot of fi lm production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post-productionâ&#x20AC;? is key, including visual effects, gaming, sound design, and booming new fields from virtual reality to artificial intelligence. On-site editing and

FILM INDUSTRY | SEE PAGE 16

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James Gollin here for generations, as well as stimulate the migration of talented creatives from New York, California, and beyond. Unlike other sectors which are in structural decline or have limited prospects for growth, the fi lm industry is poised to double in size as soon as COVID abates, then to double again over the next few years, and then can continue to grow for decades. This is a quick-starting industry that can rapidly deliver much needed jobs to New Mexico. There is an annual ritual before each legislative session wherein opponents of the fi lm industry criticize the fi lm incentive, often recycling falsehoods. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look at some facts. First, available rebates are not based on the total cost of a fi lm, but only on the strictly delimited â&#x20AC;&#x153;qualifyingâ&#x20AC;? expenditures in New Mexico. This spending stimulates the economy, creating waves of taxable activity. For example, when carpenters build a movie set, they pay tax on their income and then might take the family

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‘Promising Young Woman’ effectively updates the revenge fl ick By Glenn Kay For the Sun

RATING:  OUT OF  RUNNING TIME: 113 MINUTES This film will be available to rent on streaming services Jan. 15. Movies involving characters doling out justice and getting revenge on crooks are fairly common, but the new film Promising Young Woman attempts to update and modernize the formula, as well as infuse some dark comedy into the proceedings. Admittedly, it can be a bit on-the-nose in its attempts to deal with the issues at hand, but thanks to this new spin and a phenomenal leading performance, the results are impressive and make a lasting impression. Cassandra “Cassie” Thomas (Carey Mulligan) is a solitary ex-med student whose life has seemingly been on hold for 10 years. This is all a result of a horrible incident on campus involving a close friend, which caused the protagonist to drop out of school and disappear from view. Now working in a coffee shop, her focus has dramatically changed. She secretly goes into various nightclubs and pretends she is intoxicated, eventually surprising any creep who attempts to take

COMMUNITY

advantage of her. When Cassie runs into a graduate from the same medical institute named Dr. Ryan Cooper (Bo Burnham), a relationship develops. However, it also puts the lead back into contact with those responsible for the tragedy. As she seeks retribution and learns more details about what happened, Cassie becomes even more determined in her pursuits. The mov ie relies on a unique and grim sense of humor as Cassie pulls schemes on her unsuspecting targets. The movie also earns a couple of chuckles from the lead’s baffled parents (Jennifer Coolidge and Clancy Brown), who don’t recognize the trauma their daughter has experienced and awkwardly try to inspire her to move forward. As one might expect, things take an edgier tone when the lead meets old acquaintances who are still making excuses for the inciting incident years ago. In many cases, Cassie devises similar scenarios for them to make them experience the same fear and terror as the victim of the original crime. A few of these bits require some suspension of disbelief, but many are clever and effective in their execution. Ma na g i ng a tone t hat addresses disturbing subject matter with a bright, glossy color palette (which also contrasts the actions of the villains) and heavy doses of

Cassie Thomas (Carey Mulligan), an ex-med student, picks up men who attempt to exploit her in “Promising Young Woman.” Photo Credit: Focus Features humor, is incredibly difficult. Mulligan deserves a remarkable amount of credit for selling this challenging role. Yes, this is a character possessing inner fury and contempt who is acting out against a select group of individuals. However, there are far more facets to the role. Not only must the performer depict the character creating various guises and threats against her pursuers, she must also include a portrayal of how she contends with disapproval from her eccentric parents, as well as a budding romance that begins to melt her exterior

coldness. It’s a challenging part that is impressively handled. Of course, with so many elements at play, there are a few minor issues here and there. The meet-cute between the lead and her love interest involving playful banter occasionally comes across as overly exaggerated (even if the intention may have been to poke fun at rom-coms by adding a decidedly ickier element to their early encounters). And a couple of the nasty guys are so over-the-top in their horribleness it’s hard to relate them to the real world. Additionally,

the movie also delivers its message in a very blunt and direct manner. Regardless, the lead actress is fantastic and the message is an admirable one … and it is at times entertaining to see the protagonist take her vengeance out on those responsible for treating a young woman so horribly. As such, Promising Young Woman is a largely successful update on the revenge fl ick and is a fi lm that should linger in the brain a little longer than others of its ilk. V ISIT: W W W. CINEMASTANCE.COM

Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

15


Former Gallup student brings excitement to learning HONORED BY LOCAL ELKS LODGE By Beth Blakeman Associate Editor

M

ercedes Bischoff received a Cer ti f icate of Appreciation from the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks Lodge 1440 Jan. 12. The stor y of the honor goes back to Bischoff’s years growing up in Ga llup. In 2017 she applied to become a National Elks Legacy Scholar in order to receive scholarship funds. She won and chose to attend Gonzaga University in Washington State. But she didn’t forget her home town. Bischoff used to attend Sacred Heart Schools and her mother taught at Del Nor te Elementar y School, where she herself taught as a substitute for one semester. In August, while thinking about the problem of students disengagement due to remote instruction, she came up with an idea to inspire them. She decided to create and distribute kits that included science projects, puzzles and books, arts and crafts projects to stimulate the minds of the students who had disconnected from Zoom and email instruction styles, “to instill

GOLD MINE | FROM PAGE 10 Attorney General McPaul said. “We will continue to pursue

Gallup resident, Gonzaga University student Mercedes Bischoff is honored by the BPOE Chapter 1440 in Gallup with a plaque for her work distributing supplies to Title 1 students and students in need, Jan. 12. Photo Credit: Jon Fouser, BPOE #1440 that passion for learning.” She appl ied for a Cornerstone grant from the Elks in October and started

reaching out to the schools in November with kits put t oget her w it h her si st er Camille.

On Jan. 12, she was honored at a kit giveaway by BPOE, Lodge 1440 and continued distributing those kits that were not picked up throughout the

week. She estimates she gave out around 50. Each one included “a book, an activity, and a mask, and a backpack.

the Nation’s claims against the USEPA and their contractors— Environmental Restoration, LLC, and Weston Solutions, I nc.— for t r ig ger i n g t h i s

preventable disaster that has so harmed the Navajo Nation.” Hueston Hennigan partner John C. Hueston added, “Securing this important settlement is just one step in our

commitment to obtain full and fair compensation for the Navajo Nation.” Claims also remain pending on beha lf of approximately 300 individual Navajo

tribal members. Those claims were fi led in a separate 2018 lawsuit and are handled by the Egolf Ferlic Martinez & Harwood Law Firm in Santa Fe.

FILM INDUSTRY | FROM PAGE 14

incentive system, Sony shifted gears and moved its post-production center to Vancouver. Eventually, Gov. Mar tinez came to support fi lm incentives as a key to fostering economic growth, but the damage was done. Vancouver’s gain was our loss. Let’s not repeat that error. With nearly unlimited land, wind, and sun, New Mexico is a natural location for the massive data farms needed by streaming ser vices and other industries of the future. We can become a global center for Big Data, accessible to the world through new investments in broadband internet, as evidenced by Facebook’s

successful new server farm near Los Lunas. Is the film incentive system perfect? Of course not. But let’s discuss how we can improve it, bringing more local Native and Hispanic storytellers into the process, empowering women, training our students to participate in the tech-centric world of post-production, and further developing film tourism. L et’s not enda nger t he i ndu st r y t h at i s ou r be st hope for economic growth, but rather seek to remove obst acles to it s potent ia l advance, and nurture a new generation of New Mexican filmmakers.

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One of the kits created for students of Del Norte Elementary School and Sacred Heart Schools by Mercedes and Camille Bischoff. Photo Credit: Mercedes Bischoff

Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

special effects will effectively double the economic impact of each fi lm. Thankfully, the new Netflix expansion will include post-production. As a cautionary tale, recall that during the latter days of the Richardson administration, Sony Imageworks announced that it planned to center its post-production activ ities in New Mexico, and started construction of a massive tech campus that was to employ hundreds or even thousands of high wage workers. When Gov. Martinez threatened to upend the fi lm

COMMUNITY


TOXIC PET FOOD | FROM PAGE 10 products. On Jan. 11, Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc. expanded the recall to include additional products (not just Sportmix) that contain corn and were made in the company’s Oklahoma manufacturing plant. The recalled products may contain potentially fatal levels of aflatoxins. The FDA is working with several state departments of agriculture to investigate these products. While the New Mexico Department of Agriculture is unaware of any reports of affected pets in New Mexico, recalled pet food has been identified in the state. New Mexico Agriculture Secretary Jeff Witte said consumers in the state are encouraged to check the list of recalled products on the FDA website. “Not on ly shou ld New Mexicans check the list of products, but they should

WELLNESS HOTEL | FROM PAGE 5 month,” he said. Ustick said the Lexington Hotel had been purchased by the city two and a half years ago, when the CARE 66 Foundation gave it up. But the building was in disrepair and the city simply “kept the utilities going.” More recently, renovations have been going

specifically check the product codes listed on the FDA website,” Witte said. Witte also said this serves as an important reminder that pet owners should always keep the original pet food and pet treat packaging until the product is completely used up. “You should not empty pet food into a container and throw away the packaging,” he said. “You should also not just take photos of the product codes and discard the packaging, because there would be no proof that it is actually the product you have. Afl atoxins are toxins produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus, and at high levels it can cause illness and death in pets. The toxins can be present even if there is no visible mold.  The clinical signs of pets suffering from aflatoxin poisoning include: • Sluggishness • Loss of appetite • Vomiting • Jaundice (yellowish tint to the eyes, gums or skin due to

liver damage) • Unexplained bruising or bleeding and/or • Diarrhea Afl atoxins can also affect blood clotting and cause longterm liver problems and/or death in some cases. Anyone who suspects their pet has been eating products contaminated with aflatoxins should do the following: • Immediately stop feeding the suspected food, especially if the pet is showing signs of illness. • Contact your veterinarian. • Submit a report to the FDA electronically through the Safety Reporting Portal or by calling the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in the New Mexico district at (303) 236-3044. It’s most helpful to work with the pet’s veterinarian to submit medical records as part of the report. NMDA regulates commercial feed, including livestock feed, poultry feed, fish feed and pet/specialty pet food, at the state level through the New

Mexico Commercial Feed Act. “Rest assured that the N M DA S t a t e C h e m i s t r y Laboratory is capable of testing for afl atoxin in animal feed,” Witte said. The N M DA State Chemist Laboratory became an International Organization for Standardization accredited laboratory in 2019.  This  ISO 17025: 2017 accreditation means that the lab has met specific criteria to qualify as an accredited testing lab, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed. The accreditation demonstrates the lab’s capacity to deliver reliable results. NMDA Feed, Seed a nd Fertilizer inspectors are available to assist in investigating possible toxicities and obtain official samples. The goals of the commercial feed team are consumer protection, animal protection and human health protection. In the unfortunate circumstance in which an animal dies of suspected aflatoxin toxicity,

NMDA Veterinary Diagnostic Services is available to perform diagnostics. The NMDA VDS Division became a fully-certified ISO laboratory in 2018. Just as with the chemistry lab, the ISO 17025 certification means that the VDS lab has met specific criteria to qualify as an accredited testing lab and demonstrates the lab’s capacity to deliver reliable results. The VDS lab tests numerous animal samples, including carcasses for necropsies, tissue samples and bacterial swabs, as well as bodily fluids, such as blood, serum and plasma. “At NMDA, we are doing our best to stay on top of this issue, and we encourage New Mexicans to be vigilant about checking the FDA website for a list of products and product codes,” Witte said. T h i s i n v e s t i g a t io n i s ongoing.  Please visit  https://bit. ly/38Gh6xF for more information and updates on the recall.

on and it’s hoped that by Feb. 1, the Lexington will be permanent supportive housing. Moore explained why he thinks the Wellness Hotel Program is significant.  “This time of year, with the cold weather and everything, I think it’s important we provide opportunities for people to get out of the weather, to have a place to sleep,” he said. “This has been a big concern for

McKinley County and the Gallup area for a number of years.” Ustick called the Wellness Hotel Progra m “cr itica lly important.”

“When the pandemic hit, we found that our homeless population was terribly at risk and so we ended up having community spread among our

homeless population,” she said. “It was very clear that we had to do something to help prevent them from catching COVID-19 on the street.”

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17


NO VACANCY | FROM PAGE 1 $13,000 to clea n up other properties. Strain told council members that what was left was not even enough to clean one transient camp, so his department needed more money. He told the Sun the new money could go to clean and lien and at least 24 more transient camps.  “Because they’re not slowing down,” Strain said. “We kind of chase them around; we dismantle one and then they pop up in another spot. It’s kind of like a cat chasing a mouse. At the same time, we need to stay on top of it, because it will get a lot worse.” He sa id the clea n a nd lien program doesn’t always recoup the money it’s budgeted for. “ It ’s a b a l a n c i n g a c t between public safety and health and the budget — public safety takes priority, of course,” Strain said. He reminded the council at the Jan. 12 meeting that the department must still tend to

JAM-PACKED | FROM PAGE 1 spending within New Mexico through set-asides for the required percentage of business contracts. ESTABLISHING A N ESSENTIA L NEW REVENUE SOURCE FOR T H E STAT E A N D EMPLOY MENT SOURCE FOR TENS OF THOUSANDS OF NEW MEXICANS: • Legalizing adult-use recreational cannabis through legislation that protects the state’s medical cannabis program, providing for workplace safety and roadway protections and enforcement and clear labeling of products. ENSU RI NG EV ERY N EW M EX ICA N H A S THE OPPORTUNITY TO CREATE A FULFILLING CA REER W ITH THE REQUIRED EDUCATION AND SKILLS AND WITHOUT BURDENSOME DEBT: • Funding the Opportunity Scholarship at $22 million would benefit up to 30,000 students. • Budgeting $4 million for a pilot project to target four-year

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typical properties, not just homeless camps. “Council, I know you get complaints on these all the time, so we got to go in there and clean these up as well,” Strain said. TR A NSIENT CA MP PROBLEM Strain explained the program’s purpose, saying it was developed to deal with residents’ problems with property upkeep — from weeds to dilapidation or inoperable vehicles. Code enforcement officers can visit the property to give owners notice of their violations up to three times. If nothing is resolved, the city comes to clean up and pays for it with a lien on the property.  “We’ll go and foreclose on the lien after a certain amount of time and then get our money back if they [the owners] don’t voluntarily pay,” Strain said. “Now, the majority of them are really good about getting on a payment plan. Some of them aren’t and we have to go to court.” The clean and lien program has been “really good at cleaning up a lot of problem areas,” he said.

Within the last few years, the program has cracked down on transient camps — both on public and private properties, Strain said. “These things aren’t slowing down; there’s a bunch of them in town and they just keep growing,” he told council members. Strain said some of the transients are suspected of criminal behavior, so it’s not uncommon for law enforcement to join the code enforcers — who are not armed — when they visit a camp. “A lot of them are aggressive, so we need back up by the police to help clear them out,” Strain explained. “And then the same process kicks in. We’ll get a contractor to go in there and give us an estimate. Then, they’ll clean it up and get rid of debris and everything else and it’s done.” But just because one transient ca mp is disma ntled doesn’t mean the city has heard the last of the people who lived there. “They typically just go on their way and they generally just wind up setting up camp somewhere else,” Strain said.

“If there are people with warrants, they will be arrested and dealt with on the [police department] end.” CITY COUNCIL REACTION T ra n sient ca mps were front and center at the meeting when it came to discussing the clean and lien program. Dist. 4 Councilor Fra n Palochak, said she knows there has been an increase in such camps, in part because of COVID-19. “People a re setting up ca mps a nd they a re ver y unhealthy,” she said. “I have people that go on walks in the country and come upon these camps and people are using the bathroom without facilit[ies].” In an interview with the Gallup Sun, Jan. 13, she mentioned two instances in which citizens in her district notified her of transient camps.  “As soon as I am notified of transient camps, I go check it out myself [to see] if it is a valid complaint,” Palochak wrote in an email. In one instance, a camp consisted of “mattresses, blankets, trash, and the smell

of feces and urine,” she wrote. The area was later fenced off. On the Northside of the city, camps and people living in vans were observed. Palochak said during the meeting that the new spending for the clean and lien program was appropriate, especially given the personal protective equipment that is needed for contractors to clean the camps. “We’re not just blowing money,” she said. “This is something that is absolutely critically needed.” “I do approve the $75,000 increase,” Dist. 1 Councilor Linda Garcia said. “We need to have more money put in.” Garcia thanked Strain for keeping everyone up to date on the transient camp issue. She noted that she has heard of growth among the camps, as well as a change in their level of sophistication. Strain also commented on the changes he’s seen at at least one of the transient ca mps. He sa id t hat one located by a concrete culvert had generators and had become “a pretty sophisticated little community.”

degree-seeking students who previously received the Lottery Scholarship and lost eligibility, but have one or two semesters left to complete their degree. PROTECTING NEW MEXICO CONSUMERS: • Refor m i ng predator y lending practices by limiting annual interest rates and increasing maximum loan size. • Supporting the education, health and opportunity of New Mexico children and families. • The governor will also support a proposal endorsed by the state agriculture and livestock community to create a state meat inspection program INVESTING IN G E N E R A T I O N A L I M PROV EM EN TS I N EDUCATION AND WELLBEING FOR NEW MEXICO CHILDREN: • Providing for a one percent distribution of the state’s multi-billion dollar Land Grant Permanent Fund for early childhood education, which requires voter approval. REDUCING THE COST OF HEALTH INSURANCE AND MEDICAL EXPENSES FOR WORKING FAMILIES: • Creating a Health Care Affordability Fund that will

replace a recently phased-out federal fee, expanding coverage to up to 23,000 uninsured New Mexicans in its fi rst year and driving down premiums for tens of thousands of residents who receive coverage through the state exchange. B O O S T I N G E C O N O M I C A L LY DISA DVA N TAGED SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND COMMUNITIES: • Establishing a Family Support Index that improves the economically disadvantaged metric in the at-risk index and calculates an at-risk index for each school to provide more precise information for local funding decisions and budget oversight. • Setting an annual disparity calculation that ensures f i n a l S t a t e E q u a l i z a t ion Guarantee payments are equalized with a per-pupil floor. • Consolidating funding, support and accountability for programs associated with addressing Yazzie-Martinez. • Ensuring reversions for public school support revert to the state support reserve fund rather than the general fund, which will keep funds intended for public education available for educational programs.

• Addressing disparities within the Impact Aid funding mechanism. ADDRESSING NEEDS OF DIFFERENTLY-ABLED NEW MEXICO STUDENTS: • Creating an ombudsman’s office dedicated to special education, which will investigate and advocate for reforms on behalf of families in the state special education system. PROTECTING HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS: • Eliminating a provision within state law that criminalizes health care providers who perform abortion services. • Rooting out racial injustice in New Mexico. ACK NOW L EDGI NG AND REDUCING INSTITUTIONAL RACISM WITHIN GOVERNMENT: • With the support of the Governor’s Council for Racial Justice, enacting Sen. Linda Lopez’s previous legislation that addressed equity and antiracism in hiring, retention, pay equity, accountability in government and more. • The Council for Racial Justice, which has met regularly since August, has also endorsed the proposal to pull a percentage of funding from the Land Grant Permanent

Fund, among other proposals, including the establishment of a race equity director in the Governor’s Office. • Promoting and maintaining the clean environment New Mexicans deserve. CREATING A CLEAN FUEL STANDARD: • Reduci ng em is sion s from the transportation sector: In 2018, 15 percent of New Mexico’s greenhouse emissions were attributed to transportation, second only to the emissions from the oil and gas industry. This reduction is achievable by focusing on the fuels. A Clean Fuel Standard reduces the carbon intensity of the fuels used in tra nspor tation. Ca rbon intensity is a measurement of a fuels emission profile that includes its production, shipping, and use. A Clean Fuel Standard would apply to those who refi ne, blend, make or import fuel – not fuel retailers (i.e., gas stations). With a Clean Fuel Standard, transportation emissions will be reduced by 230,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalents annually, as the clean fuel standard requires a reduction of 10 percent by 2030, and 20 percent by 2040.

Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS WEEKLY RATES FIRST 25 WORDS: FREE! (4 consecutive weeks max.)

GALLUP SUN ARCHIVES Need a past issue? $2.00 per copy. Note issue date and send check or M.O. to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305. Subject to availability. AUTO SALES Gurley Motor Company

ment corporation seeking an experienced full time Maintenance Technician position and full time manager’s position for a Gallup apartment community. Interested applicants send resumes to shannon@ kay-kay.biz. *** Part time position in optometric office. Must be reliable and a quick learner. Will train. Apply at Vision Clinic 1300 S. 2nd St.

Ford C-Max Hybrid Only 13,000 miles Was $17,725 Now $15,500

LD

SO

2017 Ford Fusion SE AWD Only 35,100 miles Loaded with Sunroof Was $20,275 Now $16,840

*** NIGHT AUDITOR Experience Preferred Red Roof Inn 3304 W. Hwy 66, Gallup Apply in person or call: (505) 879-7611 *** DELIVERY DRIVER The Gallup Sun is hiring an independent contractor delivery driver. You must have a vehicle, valid driver’s license, registration, and insurance. Email resume or work history to gallupsuncirculation@ gmail.com ***

2019 Ford Ranger Certified Used Vehicle comes with additional Ford warranty at no charge! Like New! Only 14,238 miles Was $35,695 NOW $31,000 Gurley Motor Co. 701 W. Coal Ave, Gallup, NM (505) 722-6621 www.gurleymotorford.com FOR SALE For Sale Steel Shipping Container 20 ft. x 8 ft. x 8 ft. Big enough to store a car. It is water and critter proof. $2500 call Brent 505-387-2572 HELP WANTED Established property manageCLASSIFIEDS

WRITERS WANTED The Gallup Sun seeks area talent to write articles for our paper. We’re seeking freelance correspondents, and one fulltime local reporter. Training provided. Send cover letter and resume to: gallupsun@ gmail.com LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES COUNTY ASSESSOR ORDER NO. 20-122 NOTICE OF REQUIREMENTS TO REPORT CERTAIN MATTERS RELATING TO PROPERTY VALUATION AND CLAIMING EXEMPTION FROM PROPERTY TAXATION The County Assessor hereby publishes notice to property owners, pursuant to Section 7-38-18 NMSA 1978, as

follows: 1. All property subject to valuation for property taxation purposes not valued by the Assessor in 2020 for property taxation purposes must be reported to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021, unless it is not subject to valuation for property taxation purposes in 2021. The report must contain the required information and be on a form that is obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-38-8 NMSA 1978. 2. If you have made improvements to real property during 2020 and the improvements cost more than Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000), the improvements must be reported to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. The information required and the form may be obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-38-8© NMSA 1978. 3.All real property owned by any nongovernmental entity and claimed to be exempt from property taxation under the provisions of Paragraph (1) of Subsection B of Section 7-36-7 NMSA 1978 shall be reported for valuation purposes to the appropriate valuation authority. If a change in eligibility status or ownership of the property has changed, the change shall be reported no later than the last day of February 2021. Section 7-388.1 NMSA 1978. 4. If you own property that has decreased in value during 2020, and that property is subject to valuation for property taxation purposes, you must report the decrease in value to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. The report must contain the required information and must be on a form that is obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-38-13 NMSA 1978. 5. If you believe that your real property is entitled to head-of-family exemption, veteran exemption or disabled veteran exemption from property taxation, you must apply to the Assessor for exempt

26-50 WORDS: $10 51-75: WORDS: $20 76-100 WORDS: $30 $10 FOR EACH ADD’L 25 WORDS

EXTRAS – $5 PER WEEK, PER ITEM: TEXT BOX, HIGHLIGHT, ALL CAPS, BOLD, AND/OR PIC/LOGO Free classifi ed: Limit one free ad per customer only. Second ad starts at $10, per 25 words.

EMAIL: GALLUPSUNLEGALS@GMAIL.COM DUE: TUESDAYS 5 PM status no later than thirty (30) days after the mailing of the County Assessor’s notices of valuation in order to be entitled to the exemption from taxation in 2021. Exceptions: If an exemption from taxation was in effect for 2020 and the basis of the exempt status or use is unchanged from that year, application for exemption need not be made for 2021. If you have previously been granted an exemption and now have a change in ownership or status you must notify the Assessor of the change no later than the last day of February 2021 of the change. If required, application for exemption must contain the required information and must be on a form that is obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-38-17 NMSA 1978. 6. Property subject to valuation is presumed to be nonresidential and will be so recorded by the Assessor unless you declare the property to be residential no later than the last day of February 2021. If your property has changed in use from residential to nonresidential or from nonresidential to residential use you must declare this status to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. The declaration must contain the required information and must be in a form that may be obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-38-17.1 NMSA 1978. 7. If you are a person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older or disable, and whose “modified gross income” was not greater than $35,400 in 2020 and you own and occupy a single-family dwelling you may be eligible for a limitation on the taxable value of your residence. The limitation of

value specified in Subsections A, B and C under Section 7-36-21.3 NMSA 1978 shall be applied in the tax year in which the owner claiming entitlement files with the county assessor an application for the limitation. The application must contain the required information and must be on a form that is obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-3621.3 NMSA 1978. 8. If your land was valued in 2020 in accordance with the special method of valuation for land used primarily for agricultural purpose, and the land is still used primarily for agricultural purposes, you need not reapply for that special method of valuation in 2020, but it is no longer used primarily for agricultural purposes, you must report the change to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. If your land was not valued in accordance with that method of valuation in 2020 and it is now used primarily for agricultural purposes, application must be made under oath, in a form and contain the information required by department rules and must be made no later than thirty (30) days after the mailing of the County Assessor’s notices of valuation in order to be entitled to the exemption from taxation in 2021. Section 7-36-20 NMSA 1978. 9. If you own “livestock” that is subject to valuation for property taxation purposes, you must report such livestock to the Assessor. All such livestock present in the county on January 1, 2021 must be reported to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. If the

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 20

Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

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the County Assessor.

CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 19 livestock is transported into the county after January 1, 2021, it must be reported to the Assessor no later than the first day of the month following the first month in which the livestock has been present in the county for twenty (20) days. The report must contain the required information and must be on forms obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-36-21 NMSA 1978. 10. If you own a manufactured home [that was not previously assessed] and it was present in the county on January 1, 2021, you must report it to the Assessor no later than the last day of February 2021. The report must contain certain required information and must be on a form obtained from the Assessor’s office. Section 7-36-26 NMSA 1978. THIS NOTICE IS ONLY A BRIEF STATEMENT OF THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 7-38-8, 7-38-8.1, 7-38-13, 7-3817, 7-38-17.1, 7-36-7, 7-36-21.3, 7-36-20, 7-36-21, and 7-36-26 NMSA 1978, and related Taxation & Revenue Department Regulations. It is not intended to reflect the full content of these provisions, which may be examined at the office of

Done this 30th day of November 2020 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Santiago Chavez, Director Property Tax Division Publish: Gallup Sun January 8, 2021 January 15, 2021 January 22, 2021

telephone number is (505) 924-1000. You are further notified that unless you enter an answer in said cause within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, a judgement by default will be entered against you. IN WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereto set my hand and seal of said court this 06 day of January 2021.

*** STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF MCKINLEY ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MINDY R. SNYDER, Petitioner. v. KELLY JIM, Respondent. No. D-1113-DM-2020-00167 NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION TO: KELLY JIM You are hereby notified that an action has been filed against you in the above-entitled cause of a dissolution of marriage. The Petitioner is represented by an attorney and their name is the Law Office of Dorene A. Kuffer, P.C. (Dorene A. Kuffer), address is 500 4th Street NW, Suite 250, Albuquerque, NM and

__________________________________ ________________ _ ____ _ __ ___ __ _ ___ _____ _____ _____ Deputy Clerk

Dated: 12/23/20. Publish: Gallup Sun January 8, 2021 January 15, 2021 January 22, 2021 *** ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF McKINLEY STATE OF NEW MEXICO In the Matter of the Estate of PAUL JEROME LANDAVAZO, Deceased. No. D-1113-PB-2020-00043 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

SUBSCRIBE TO THE GALLUP SUN! Three Convenient Delivery Options Snail Mail: __ 1 yr. $59.95 __ 6 mo. $29.95

*Home Delivery: __ 1 yr. $45 __ 6 mo. $25

PAUL J. LANDAVAZO, JR. has been appointed Personal Representatives of the Estate of PAUL JEROME LANDAVAZO, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative at the offices of Mason & Isaacson, P.A., 104 East Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico, 87301, attorneys for the Personal Representative, or filed with the District Court of Cibola County, New Mexico.

Digital (Email): __ 1 yr. $35 __ 6 mo. $20

*Gallup metro area only

Name: ________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________ City/State/Zip: _________________________________________ Phone: ____________________________________ (for billing purposes only)

portal/ Sealed bids for such will be received at the Procurement Office until 2:00 PM (MDT, LOCAL TIME) on JANUARY 26, 2021. FAX and HARDCOPY PROPOSALS will NOT be accepted. Offerors will not be able to upload proposals or documents after the specified CLOSING date and time. Public Bid Opening shall be conducted through online meeting software. Dated the 11th Day of January, 2021 By: /S/Charles Long, President Board of Education Gallup-McKinley County School District No. 1 BID ISSUE DATE: January 11, 2021 PUBLISH: Gallup Sun January 15, 2021

PAUL J. LANDAVAZO, JR. *** MASON & ISAACSON, P.A. James J. Mason Attorneys for Personal Representatives 104 East Aztec Avenue Gallup, New Mexico 87301 (505) 722-4463 Published: Gallup Sun January 8, 2021 January 15, 2021 January 22, 2021 *** ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS NOTICE TO BIDDERS Public notice is hereby given that the Gallup-McKinley County Schools, Gallup New Mexico, desires to purchase the following: OSMO FOR SCHOOLS LEARNING SYSTEM Fixed Price Agreement ITB-2021-25KC NIGP Commodity Code(s): 20847, 78532, 78553 As more particularly set out in the BID documents, copies of which may be obtained by downloading from the Gallup-McKinley County Schools Bonfire eBidding website: https://gmcs.bonfirehub.com/

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS NOTICE TO BIDDERS Public notice is hereby given that the Gallup-McKinley County Schools, Gallup New Mexico, desires to purchase the following: ITB-2020-24RB NEW TELEHANDLER Price Agreement Commodity Code(s): 56075 As more particularly set out in the bid documents, copies of which may be obtained by downloading from the Gallup-McKinley County Schools eBidding platform website https://gmcs.bonfirehub.com/ portal Sealed bids for such will be received until 2:00 PM (LOCAL TIME) on February 4, 2021. FAX and HARDCOPY PROPOSALS will NOT be accepted. Offerors will not be able to upload proposals or

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 21

Mail Check to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305 Fax: (505) 212-0391 • Email: gallupsun@gmail.com Credit Card #: __________________________________ Exp: ________ 3-4 digit code: ________ Billing zip: _________

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Pay By Phone: (505) 722-8994 The Gallup Sun is distributed weekly, on Fridays. Forms received after Wednesday, the subscription will start the following Friday.

20 Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

www.nmhu.edu CLASSIFIEDS


CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 20 documents after the specified CLOSING date and time. Dated the 15th Day of January, 2021 By: /S/Charles Long, President Board of Education Gallup-McKinley County School District No. 1 BID ISSUE DATE: January 15, 2021 PUBLICATION DATE: January 15, 2021 (Gallup Sun) January 17, 2021 (Albuquerque Journal) *** NOTICE OF AIR QUALITY PERMIT APPLICATION C&E Concrete, Inc. announces its application to the New Mexico Environment Department for a technical revision of air quality permit #3407 for the existing Milan HMA plant. The expected date of application submittal to the Air Quality Bureau is January 18, 2021. The exact location of the Milan HMA plant is UTM Zone 13, UTM Easting 241,070, UTM Northing 3,900,570, NAD 83 (35°, 12’, 53.2076” N; 107°, 50’, 40.5486” W), Township 11N, Range 10W, Section 1. The approximate location of this site is 3.6 miles northeast of the intersection of Highways 122 and 605 in Cibola County. For this technical revision, C&E Concrete is requesting a change in the sulfur content limit of Unit 14 drum dryer/ mixer burner fuel from 2% to 0.5%. The present sulfur content requirement for the drum dryer burner fuel is located in Permit 3407, Condition 2.c.i. The burner fuel oil that is presently being used meets all requirements specified in 40 CFR Part 279, Standards for the Management of Used Oil. The estimated maximum quantities of any regulated air contaminants will be as follows in pound per hour (pph) and tons per year (tpy). These reported emissions could change slightly during the course of the Department’s review:

Pollutant: PM 10 PM 2.5 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Carbon Monoxide (CO) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Total sum of all Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Toxic Air Pollutant (TAP) Green House Gas Emissions as Total CO2e The standard operating schedule of the facility is from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the months of September through February, and from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the months of March through August, 6 days a week and a maximum of 52 weeks per year. The maximum operating schedule is from 6 a.m. to midnight for the months of September through February, and from 5 a.m. to midnight for the months of March through August, 7 days a week and a maximum of 52 weeks per year. The owner and operator of the Facility will be: C&E Concrete, Inc. PO Box 2547 Milan, NM 87021 If you have any comments about the construction or operation of this facility, and you want your comments to be made as part of the permit review process, you must submit your comments in writing to this address: Permit Programs Manager; New Mexico Environment Department; Air Quality Bureau; 525 Camino de los Marquez, Suite 1; Santa Fe, New Mexico; 87505-1816; (505) 476-4300; 1 800 224-7009; https://www.env.nm.gov/aqb/ permit/aqb_draft_permits. html. Other comments and questions may be submitted verbally. With your comments, please refer to the company name and facility name, or send a copy of this notice along with your comments. This information is necessary since the Department may have not yet received the permit application. Please include a legible return mailing address. Once the Department has completed its preliminary review of the application and its air quality impacts, the Department’s notice will be published in the legal section of a newspaper circulated near the facility location. Attención

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Pounds per hour 10.6 pph 7.0 pph 10.4 pph 28.9 pph 27.2 pph 8.7 pph 1.8 pph 2.2 pph n/a

Este es un aviso de la Agencia de Calidad de Aire del Departamento de Medio Ambiente de Nuevo México, acerca de las emisiones producidas por un establecimiento en esta área. Si usted desea información en español, por favor de comunicarse con la oficina de Calidad de Aire al teléfono 505-476-5557. Notice of Non-Discrimination NMED does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age or sex in the administration of its programs or activities, as required by applicable laws and regulations. NMED is responsible for coordination of compliance efforts and receipt of inquiries concerning non-discrimination requirements implemented by 40 C.F.R. Part 7, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 13 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972. If you have any questions about this notice or any of NMED’s non- discrimination programs, policies or procedures, you may contact: Kristine Pintado, Non-Discrimination Coordinator, New Mexico Environment Department, 1190 St. Francis Dr., Suite N4050, P.O. Box 5469, Santa Fe, NM 87502, (505) 827-2855, nd.coordinator@state.nm.us. If you believe that you have been discriminated against with respect to a NMED program or activity, you may contact the Non-Discrimination Coordinator identified above or visit our website at https://www. env.nm.gov/NMED/EJ/index. html to learn how and where to file a complaint of discrimination. PUBLISH: Gallup Sun January 15, 2021

Tons per year 18.2 tpy 11.0 tpy 16.9 tpy 74.5 tpy 48.8 tpy 15.8 tpy 2.9 tpy 3.4 tpy < 10,000 tpy

*** LEGAL NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Public Notice is hereby provided that the Gallup-McKinley County Schools is accepting competitive sealed proposals for: HUMANOID SOCIAL ROBOTS FOR ASD STUDENTS No. RFP-2021-26KC Commodity Code(s): 57876 As more particularly set out in the RFP documents, copies of which may be obtained by downloading from the Gallup-McKinley County Schools eBidding platform website https://gmcs.bonfirehub.com/portal/?tab=openOpportunities Sealed proposals for such will be received until 2:00 P.M. (LOCAL TIME) on, FEBRUARY 4, 2021. FAX, EMAIL and HARDCOPY PROPOSALS will NOT be accepted. Offerors will not be able to upload proposals or documents after the specified CLOSING date and time. The Gallup-McKinley County School Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all proposals, waive any formalities or minor inconsistencies, and/or cancel this solicitation in its entirety. Dated the 13th Day of January 2021 By: /S/ Charles Long, President Board of Education Gallup-McKinley County School District No. 1 RFP ISSUE DATE: January 13, 2021 PUBLISH: Gallup Sun January 15, 2021

*** CITY OF GALLUP, MCKINLEY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE Notice is hereby given of the title and of a general summary of the subject matter contained in Ordinance No. S2021-1, duly adopted and approved by the City Council of City of Gallup on January 12, 2021. A complete copy of the Ordinance is available for public inspection during normal and regular business hours in the office of the City Clerk, at 110 W. Aztec Ave., Gallup, New Mexico 87301. The title of the Ordinance is: CITY OF GALLUP, MCKINLEY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ORDINANCE NO. S2021-1 AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A WATER PROJECT FUND LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT BY AND BETWEEN THE NEW MEXICO FINANCE AUTHORITY (“FINANCE AUTHORITY”) AND THE CITY OF GALLUP (THE “BORROWER/GRANTEE”), IN THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF IN THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF Five million seven hundred ninety-two thousand eight hundred twenty-nine dollars ($5,792,829), including a Loan Amount of Two million three hundred seventeen thousand one hundred thirty-two dollars ($2,317,132) EVIDENCING AN OBLIGATION OF THE BORROWER/ GRANTEE TO UTILIZE THE LOAN/GRANT AMOUNT SOLELY FOR THE PURPOSE OF FINANCING THE COSTS OF CONSTRUCTION OF REACH 27.11 TO CONNECT TO REACHES 27.5, 27.9, AND 27.10, TO DELIVER WATER TO NAVAJO NATION CHAPTERS SOUTH OF GALLUP, INCLUDING 1.4± MILES OF 14” WATERLINE, 1.3± MILES OF 12” WATERLINE, AND A METER STATION, AND SOLELY IN THE MANNER DESCRIBED IN THE LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT; PROVIDING FOR THE PLEDGE AND PAYMENT OF THE LOAN AMOUNT AND AN ADMINISTRATIVE FEE SOLELY

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***

CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 21

LEGAL NOTICE

FROM THE NET SYSTEM REVENUES OF THE Joint water and wastewater System of the Borrower/Grantee; CERTIFYING THAT THE LOAN/GRANT AMOUNT, TOGETHER WITH OTHER FUNDS AVAILABLE TO THE BORROWER/GRANTEE, IS SUFFICIENT TO COMPLETE THE PROJECT; APPROVING THE FORM OF AND OTHER DETAILS CONCERNING THE LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT; RATIFYING ACTIONS HERETOFORE TAKEN; REPEALING ALL ACTION INCONSISTENT WITH THIS ORDINANCE; AND AUTHORIZING THE TAKING OF OTHER ACTIONS IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF THE LOAN/GRANT AGREEMENT. A general summary of the subject matter of the Ordinance is contained in its title. This notice constitutes compliance with NMSA 1978, § 6-14-6, as amended. PUBLISH: Gallup Sun January 15, 2021

NOTICE OF ORDINANCE PASSAGE BY TITLE AND SUMMARY ORDINANCE NO. S2021-2 PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the governing body of the City of Gallup, New Mexico, at its regular meeting of January 12, 2021 passed, adopted and approved the following entitled Ordinance: AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A REQUEST BY PAUL M. AND KIMBERLY E. MADRID, PROPERTY OWNERS, FOR VACATION OF A FIVE FOOT (5’) WIDE PUBLIC UTILITY EASEMENT (P.U.E.) ALONG THE EASTERN PROPERTY BOUNDARY LINE BEGINNING ON THE NORTHEAST PROPERTY BOUNDARY CORNER THEN COMMENCING SOUTH SEVENTY-SIX FEET (76’) TO THE SOUTHEAST PROPERTY BOUNDARY CORNER ON THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 402 JEFF KING STREET. The purpose and subject matter of the Ordinance is contained in the title. A com-

plete copy of the Ordinance is on file in the Office of the City Clerk, Gallup City Hall. CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO By: /s/ Alfred Abeita II, City Clerk PUBLISH: Gallup Sun Friday, January 15, 2021 *** PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the McKinley County Board of Commissioners will hold a Regular Meeting on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. Among other items there will be on the Agenda a segment for the County Board of Finance to hear the financial reports, and, The Board of County Commissioners shall conduct a public hearing pursuant to NMSA 1978 §7-2-14.3(G) to consider whether or not McKinley County should adopt an ordinance giving an Income tax rebate. Adhering to the Social Distancing Protocols, issued by the Governor’s Office; and the requirements of the

Open Meetings Act allowing members of the public to attend and listen to meetings of the quorum of the governing body, this meeting will be physically closed to the public but open to the public via technology services. Members of the public may view the live stream feeds offered on the approved Facebook account of the McKinley County Office of Emergency Management. Members of the public are welcome to call in with comments about any of the items on the agenda and comment for the public hearing. The comment call in number (505.863.1400) will be monitored beginning at 8:45 am on the day of the meeting; and it will stop being monitored at 9:50 am on the day of the meeting. Please give your name, and the Agenda Item Number you desire to comment on, and a return phone number. When, at the appropriate time for making comments on the agenda items, (beginning at approximately 9:01 am) the Commission Chair will call you on your return number so you can make your comment. The Commission Chair pursuant to state law and county policy can limit

MARIJUANA | FROM PAGE 12

SITE SUPERVISOR Full-time position at McKinley County Senior Program - Thoreau. This is a professional position involving the day-to-day management of the Senior Center. Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at pmsnm.org. Click Jobs@PMS. Toll-free hotline 1-866-661-5491. EOE/AA/M/F/SO/Vet/Disability

Van Driver and Cook (20 hrs/wk) Part-time position at McKinley County Senior Program - Thoreau Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at pmsnm.org. Click on Jobs@PMS. Toll-free hotline 1-866-661-5491. EOE/AA/M/F/SO/Vet/Disability

Medical Assistant II or Certified Medical Assistant Full-time position at Western New Mexico Medical Group - Gallup. Must be graduate of medical assisting program. Excellent benefits. Apply on-line at pmsnm.org. Click Jobs@PMS. Toll-free hotline 1-866-661-5491 EOE/AA/M/F/SO/Vet/Disability

Follow us on Facebook! 22 Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun

experience an emotionally st i mu l at i ng env i ron ment during which otherwise dull sights, sounds, tastes and thoughts become intensely rich. These effects are very tempting. Unfortunately, there are other effects that are not so desirable. It clouds thinking. In youth it impairs brain development. Regular use creates a fog in the brain and impairs one’s ability to take in information. Other effects i nclude d isr upt i ng motor skills and, like alcohol, reducing one’s inhibitions. Our society has a big problem with drug and alcohol addiction and those problems are closely related to crime. In McKinley County, of the hundreds charged with misdemeanor offenses one former County Staff Worker estimated that about 70% of these hundreds of cases involved drug and alcohol-impaired people. And most are repeat offenders. Meanwhile our treatment center can handle about 30 people at a time and

the time of comments and reduce common or cumulative comments as needed; comments will be limited to 3 minutes. The members of the County Commission at their option can participate by phone or other technological participation methods. A copy of the agenda will be available 72 hours prior to the meeting in the Manager’s Office and the County Clerk’s Office and can be sent electronically upon request. All interested parties are invited to attend via the live stream mentioned herein. In addition, please take note that at the next Regular meeting scheduled for Tuesday February 2nd beginning at 9:00 am, Done this 13th day of January 2021. McKINLEY COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS /S/ Billy Moore, Chairperson Publication by posting date: January 13th, 2021 before 3:00 pm. Publication date: Gallup Sun January 15th, 2021

there is very little follow-up care. Using marijuana taxes to cover the cost of regulating it and any balance used to care for those in treatment would pay larger dividends than any short-term gain from placing them into the general fund, which, of course, is what many of the legislators want to do and why Ultra Health is marketing this idea in their ads. Nor way a nd Sweden revised their criminal justice system to empha size making the criminals good citizens capable of taking care of themselves and their recidiv ism rate went from over 70% to 20%. We could do the same thing. As for drug legalization, Portugal d id t h i s i n a n i ntel l igent manner and their addicted popu lat ion d ropped f rom 100,000 to 30,000. When we think of all the crime and violence associated with the drug trade and the cost of our “war” and incarceration of addicts, doesn’t it make sense to take a broader look beyond tax advantages? CLASSIFIEDS


COMMUNITY CALENDAR JANUARY 15 - JANUARY 21, 20211 FRIDAY, January 15

LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD MEETING

5 pm Zoom Meeting Join Zoom Meeting: https:// us02web.zoom. us/j/84677687384 Meeting ID: 846 7768 7384 Join Meeting by Phone using one tap mobile +13462487799,,84677687384# US (Houston) +16699006833,,84677687384# US (San Jose) Dial by your location +1 346 248

CHILDREN’S LIBRARY EVENT – TOTALLY TRUE, NON-FICTION IN THE NEW YEAR

Visit YouTube @galluplibrary to view episodes of the OFPL “Totally True” series where we’re exploring the OFPL non-fiction collections in books and online. NewsBank is the topic. Videos are posted Wed., Fri a@ 11 am

FACULTY/STAFF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK

9:30 am – 4 pm @ https://unm. zoom.us/j/93396017990 Final Day. Guests at meeting will be Dr. Carolyn Kuchera, John Zimmerman and Dr. Caniel Primozic. SATURDAY, January 16

VIRTUAL CRAFTS HANGOUT

1 pm @ ofpl online for the Virtual Crafts Hangout – an afternoon of chatting and crafting. For more information: jwhitman@gallupnm. gov; (505) 863-1291. MONDAY, January 18

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY

City offices closed.

FOOD DRIVE

St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church and the City of Gallup will honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy by hosting a food drive. The community is invited to participate by bringing non-perishable food items to the church as a donation for Gallup’s local Community Pantry. For more information: Mona Frazier (505) 409-9851.

CREATIVE CORNER

4 pm @ YouTube @gallup library. Create your own art using materials found around your home! Courses are geared towards individuals approximately 15-years of age and older. Supply kits are available at OFPL on a firstcome, first-serve basis and to request supplies go through the Online Request Form. This week we will focus on Shaving Cream Tote Bags. (Create a colorful tote bag to carry all of your essential needs.) Videos are posted weekly For more information: jwhitman@gallupnm. gov; (505) 863-1291. CALENDAR

TUESDAY, January 19

RETURN TO HYBRID LEARNING

Gallup McKinley County Schools

KEEP GALLUP CLEAN AND BEAUTIFUL

4 pm-5 pm Join with Google Meet: Meeting ID = meet.google.com/ond-pgdo-vvv Phone # = (US) 1(401)-285-3449 PIN = 987 507 239#

VIRTUAL ARTIST TALK

7 pm LIVE on the @ gallupARTS Facebook and Instagram pages with Dana Aldis & Christian Bigwater.

DRIVE-UP COVID-19 TESTING

1:30 pm-2:30 pm @ UNM Gallup Lions Hall parking lot (705 Gurley Ave.). Pre-registration is preferred, but not required at cvtestreg. nmhealth.org NM Dept of Health 1919 College Drive

EVERYBODY IS TALKING TUESDAYS! – RESTAURANT REVIEWS AND NEW YEAR IDEAS

4 pm YouTube, @galluplibrary. Join the creative genius of the Octavia Fellin Public Library and our unusually talented neighbors for booktalks, author-talks, movie-talks, pop-talks, food-talks, maker-talks, tech-talks.

TECH SHORT TUESDAYS

5 pm @galluplibrary. for “How to” tech shorts. This month we are focusing on Tech Products and emerging tech. For more information: libtrain@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291. WEDNESDAY, January 20

TECH TIME EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

FAFSA HELP 4 pm YouTube @galluplibrary (Facebook Live). Need help with FAFSA or just don’t know what to do to get started? This live session will give you an opportunity to see the process, ask questions, and get some guidance on how to complete this important step for college funding.

CHILDREN’S LIBRARY EVENT – TOTALLY TRUE, NON-FICTION IN THE NEW YEAR

Visit YouTube @galluplibrary to view episodes of the OFPL “Totally True” series where we’re exploring the OFPL non-fiction collections in books and online. Twice Toward Justice by Claudette Colvin is the topic. Videos are posted Wed., Fri a@ 11 am THURSDAY, January 21

DRIVE-UP COVID-19 TESTING

1:30 pm-2:30 pm @ UNM Gallup Lions Hall parking lot (705 Gurley Ave.). Pre-registration is preferred, but not required at cvtestreg. nmhealth.org NM Dept of

CALENDAR

Health 1919 College Drive

CRAFTY KIDS

4 pm on Facebook and Youtube @galluplibrary (all ages) for family-friendly crafts and step-by-step tutorials for all skill levels. This week we will focus on Q-Tip Doll ONGOING

VIRTUAL ESCAPE ROOM 2

All Day. The time for another virtual escape room is here! Access our digital escape room collection on our website http://ofpl.online or through social media @ galluplibrary. Escape Room 2 will be posted beginning Jan. 2. Registration is not required, play anytime at home. For more information: libtrain@gallupnm.gov; (505) 863-1291 for more information.

WE READ, WE TALK BOOK CLUB REGISTRATION

We are be reading Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse for our January session. Discussions will be held Jan. 21 at 6 pm and Jan. 30 at 3 pm. Both sessions will be held via Zoom. Participants must attend one session to keep their book. For more information: childlib@gallupnm.gov; (505) 863-1291.

OFPL VIRTUAL JURIED ART SHOWCASE

Call to Artists! OFPL is seeking visual art from community artists in the first OFPL Virtual Juried Art Showcase. 2021 Virtual Theme: “Art for ArtSake.”. Submit 1-3 high quality image(s) of 2D or 3D medium visual arts for OFPL’s Virtual Juried Art Showcase. Visual art may include drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, weaving, and more. Juried art showcase is divided into the following age categories: 0-4, 5-7, 8-12, 13-17, and 18+. Please see showcase requirements below: Submission deadline: Feb. 28 by 11:59 pm. Send all submissions to jwhitman@gallupnm. gov by deadline.  For more information: jwhitman@gallupnm.gov; (505) 863-1291.

UNM-GALLUP HOLIDAY STEP CHALLENGE

Individual challenge with prizes. Goal is 420,000 steps. The challenge is six weeks or 42 days long. For more information: mchenry25@unm. edu; (505) 862-9389.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

Big Brothers Big Sisters is looking for more mentors to make a difference in the life of a young person. Mentors and mentees can meet for socially distance friendly interactions or hangout virtually playing games, cooking, reading, etc. via Facetime, Zoom, or other platforms. For

more information call 505726-4285 or go to bbbsmountainregion.org/volunteer to sign up today.

RMCHCS FLU VACCINES (ADULTS ONLY)

Urgent Care Clinic (520 Hwy. 564). Walk-ins 5 pm- 9 pm, Sat., 9 am - 9 pm and 12 pm-5 pm Sun. Please bring insurance information. For those with no health insurance there will be a $25 fee. Pre-registration can be done during hours of operation, 9 am-9 pm. For more information: (505) 863-2273.

RMCHCS COVID-19 DRIVE-UP TESTING

9 am-5 pm Mon.-Fri. @ Urgent Care Center (520 NM Hwy 564, north of the New Mexico Cancer Center). Closed on Sundays. Rapid testing is not available. DIAL-A-STORY Storytime anytime, call (505) 862-9177 to hear a story any time of the day or night. Stories will change daily, at the end feel free to leave us a message to let us know what stories you want to hear. For more information: childlib@ gallupnm.gov; (505) 863-1291.

LIBRARY CARD REGISTRATION ONLINE

Today’s libraries have programs and resources that go far beyond books. From virtual story times, family game nights and art classes, to opportunities to borrow audiobooks and stream movies, there’s something for everyone at the library. To explore all that the library has to offer, visit your library at ofpl.online to register for a free library card. For more information: bmartin@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 8631291 for more information.

CURBSIDE CHECKOUT SERVICES

OFPL staff continues to provide essential services to our community by offering curbside checkout, virtual classes, workshops, and public education through our social media platforms. Visit ofpl.online for the online request form. • DVD/CD check out limit is 10 - 30 library items total. OFPL Staff is on-site Monday through Friday from 11 am-5 pm. and will assist with curbside checkout. Beginning Jan. 9, there will be Saturday curbside pick-ups only from 12 pm-4 pm and must be scheduled in advance. New requests will not be processed on Saturdays. Free Comic Book to keep with your curbside order while supplies last. Call (505)-8631291 for all inquiries including reference services.

Friends’ support library programs, services, and collections through a variety of in-kind activities. If you are passionate about helping our community grow stronger, join the Octavia Fellin Public Library Friends’ Group and get involved in event planning, local and State advocacy, fundraising and philanthropy. To join please visit https://ofpl.online/partners-of-ofpl/#friends and our Friends’ Coordinator will contact you with more information. For more information: childlib@gallupnm.gov or call (505) 863-1291.

NAVAJO IHS COVID-19 TESTING SCHEDULE

7 am-7 pm @Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility (Sun.-Sat.) 8:30 am-4:30 pm @ Piñon Health Center (M, T, W, F) 1:15 pm-4:30 pm @ Piñon Health Center (Th) 8:30 am-4 pm @ Tsaile Health Center (M,W,F) 1 pm-4 pm @ Tsaile Health Center (Th) 9 am-1 pm @ Rock Point Clinic (T) 8:30 am-12 pm @Crownpoint Healthcare Facility (M.T,Th,F) 12:45 pm-3:45 pm Drive-Up @ Crownpoint Healthcare Facility (M.T,Th,F) 9am-3:30 pm Walk In Clinic @ Pueblo Pintado Clinic (M-Th) 9:30 am-11:30 am; 1 pm-3:30 pm (Drive-Up) @ Pueblo Pintado (F) 9 am-12pm Drive Up @ Thoreau Clinic (M, F) 9 am-4 pm @Gallup Indian Medical Center (M-F) Car-based testing located on Government Circle Dr. (Next to Emergency Dept.) @Gallup Indian Medical Center 8 am-3:30 pm Drive-Thru @ Tohatchi Health Center (M, T, Th, F) 12 pm-3:30 pm Drive-Thru @ Tohatchi Health Center (Wed.) 8:30 am-4 pm @Kayenta Health Center (Sun.-Sat.) 8:30 am-4 pm @ Inscription House Health Center (M, T, Th, F) 1 pm-4 pm @ Inscription House Health Center (Wed.)

NAVAJO IHS FLU VACCINE SCHEDULE

8 am-5 pm @Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility (M, T, W, F) 1 pm-5 pm Drive-Thru @ Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility (Th) Flu vaccinations are given in the Outpatient department.

To post a nonprofit or civic event in the calendar section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or OFPL is recruiting new fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: members for our Friends of the Library Group. The OFPL Monday at 5 pm.

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY REGISTRATION

Gallup Sun • Friday January 15, 2021

23


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220 S. FIFTH • GALLUP, NEW MEXICO 87301 (505) 722-2271 • www.RicoAutoComplex.com m Dealership availability and hours of operation are subject to change in accordance with all federal and local laws and restrictions. MUST BE A CURRENT OWNER/LESSEE OF A 2007 MODEL YEAR OR NEWER NON-GM VEHICLE FOR AT LEAST 30 DAYS PRIOR TO THE NEW VEHICLE SALE. Excludes SL models. Not available with lease, special finance and some other offers. Take new retail delivery by 2/1/21. ©2021 General Motors. All rights reserved. GMC® Sierra® Acadia® Terrain® Canyon® 1

24 Friday January 15, 2021 • Gallup Sun GMGW0111002_GMC_Rico_JAN_GallupSun_10x13.indd 1

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Gallup Sun • January 15, 2021  

Gallup Sun • January 15, 2021  

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