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VOL 4 | ISSUE 180 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

ECHOES OF THE REVOLT Gallup Film Festival screens revolutionary documentary. Page 15

GETTING THE GRADE

A-GRADE SCHOOL SEEKS CHARTER DESIGNATION. STORY PAGE 4


2

Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

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NEWS Middle College High School makes the A-grade SCHOOL ON UNM-G CAMPUS SEEKS CHARTER DESIGNATION

Gallup-Mckinley County Schools NMPED Grades

By Rick Abasta Sun Correspondent

D

espite a rocky relationsh ip between Ga l lup McK i n ley County Schools and Middle College High School, there’s a sunny spot that shines in the form of an A-grade for the Middle College. The traditional school grading system is mandated by New Mexico Public Education Department, and started about seven years ago. With an overall score of 75.85 percent, MCHS readily stomped on the C-grade it received the previous school year. Dr. Robert Hunter, Middle College CEO, found it difficult to swallow the C as they have a tradition of receiving brag-worthy report cards from the state each year. As noted in past Gallup Sun reports, the school faced challenges and disagreements with the district this year, which ultimately ended with the revoking of its charter in 2019. But, as for grades throughout the district as a whole, in the pa st f ive yea rs in McKinley County, Crownpoint Elementary School and Twin Lakes Elementa r y School received the most Ds — five and four, respectively. Nearly 20 of the 35 GMCS schools listed in the sidebar of this story had no Fs over the fiveyear grading period. Moreover, when it comes to New Mexico schools underperforming, the state capital of Santa Fe takes the cake. The grades revealed that among the larger districts across the state, the Santa Fe Public Schools’ performance

5 4

STAMP OF APPROVAL County Commissioners give their go-ahead on several resolutions

GRADE: 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

TOTAL F

Catherine A. Miller Elementary School

F

D

F

F

D

F

D

4

Chee Dodge Elementary School

D

F

F

C

C

C

C

2

Chief Manuelito Middle School

D

D

D

B

B

C

C

0

Crownpoint Elementary School

F

F

F

D

C

F

F

5

Crownpoint High School

C

B

B

C

C

C

D

0

Crownpoint Middle School

D

D

D

D

A

B

B

0

David Skeet Elementary School

D

F

D

B

B

D

D

1

B

0

SCHOOL

GMCS Superintendent Mike Hyatt. File Photo wa s most concer ning, with a majority of D and F schools—56 percent D and F grades. The districts of Farmington, Gadsden and Hobbs most improved over the past five years with very few schools earning failing grades. Meanwhile, Hunter said MCHS has applied for a school charter from the state, but he doesn’t anticipate an answer back for about two years. “The application is the first step,” he said. Applications are due to the state education department by Oct. 1, and the Legislature will process the applications in December. “The decision is made at that point, but we probably wouldn’t see any happen until the following year,” Hunter said. In the meantime, MCHS reached a settlement agreement with GMCS that will allow the school to remain in operation for the school year. The 14-page settlement

A-GRADE | SEE PAGE 6

6

Del Norte Elementary School Gallup Central Alternative

D

B

C

C

C

C

C

0

Gallup High School

D

B

C

C

C

C

C

0

Gallup Middle School

C

C

D

C

B

B

B

0

Indian Hills Elementary School

B

D

F

A

A

C

C

1

Jefferson Elementary School

D

C

C

D

C

B

B

0

John F. Kennedy Middle School

C

C

D

C

B

C

F

1

Lincoln Elementary School

D

D

D

C

B

A

D

0

Middle School High School

C

A

A

A

B

C

A

0

Miyamura High School

C

B

C

B

C

C

B

0

Navajo Elementary School

F

F

D

D

D

D

F

3

Navajo Middle School

B

F

D

C

D

D

C

1

Navajo Pine High School

D

B

C

C

C

C

D

0

Ramah Elementary School

D

D

D

C

D

B

A

0

Ramah High School

C

B

C

B

C

B

C

0

Red Rock Elementary School

C

C

B

C

B

B

B

0

Rocky View Elementary School

D

D

F

F

C

D

C

2

Roosevelt Elementary School

B

D

F

D

D

D

C

1

Stagecoach Elementary School

D

F

F

D

D

D

B

1

Thoreau Elementary School

C

D

F

D

B

D

F

2

Thoreau High School

C

B

C

D

C

D

D

0

Thoreau Middle School

B

C

C

F

D

D

C

1

Tobe Turpen Elementary School

D

C

D

C

C

C

C

0

Tohatchi Elementary School

F

F

D

C

C

C

C

2

Tohatchi High School

C

B

C

C

B

C

C

0

Tohatchi Middle School

C

F

F

D

C

F

C

3

Tse'Yi'Gai High School

C

C

C

C

B

A

B

0

Twin Lakes Elementary School

F

F

F

C

C

F

D

4

WHAT’S INSIDE …

BACK ON THE BEAT Terminated officer returns to GPD

Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

7

GARY IN GALLUP Former Gov. Johnson campaigns for Senate

19 20 BOARDS TO WALLS Apache Skateboards founder exhibits at UNM-G

STILL CYCO After all these years, Suicidal Tendencies still rocks hard

NEWS


McKinley County Board of Commissioners approves budget presentations Rick Abasta Sun Correspondent

T

he Sept. 11 special meeting of the McKinley C ou nt y B o a r d of Commissioners focused on the review and

approval of the 2019 fiscal-year budget letter received from the New Mexico Department of Finance and Administration. County Finance Director Sara Keeler reported before commissioners on eight budget resolutions for the Pueblo

Pintado Fire Station, Pueblo P i nt a do wat erl i ne, Zu n iBlackrock Fire non-capital equipment, EMS funding, a severance tax bond for a Sheriff’s Department pursuit vehicle, the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial, Red Lake Chapter

road projects and Sheriff’s Department equipment.

CORRECTION: In the article “New Mexico Governor candidate holds rally in Gallup,” published Sept. 7, the Gallup Sun incorrectly reported that Court of Appeals candidate Kristina Bogardus had endorsed a candidate. Bogardus is prohibited from endorsing any candidate for office per the New Mexico Code of Judicial Conduct and had not given any endorsement. The Gallup Sun sincerely regrets the error.

THANK YOU ADVERTISERS

McKinley County Finance Director Sara Keeler. File Photo

NEWS

Amazing Grace Personal Care - 17 Bubany Insurance Agency - 6 Butler’s Office City - SALE - 17 Castle Furniture - 3 Gallup Housing Authority - 9, 19 Garcia’s Judo Team - 8 Gallup McKinley County Schools - 2, 12-13 Harbor Freight insert Highlands University - 22 Larry’s Automotive Repair & Maintenance - 9 Octavia Fellin Public Library - 16 Pinnacle Bank - 18 Physicians Committee - 1 Rico Auto Complex - 24 Rocket Lounge - 7 Small Fry Dentistry - 14 TBK Bank - 8 Thunderbird Supply Co. - 5 Tractor Supply Co. - insert TravelCenters of America - 10

Resolution No. SEP-18 055 was for $1,260,000 for the Pueblo Pintado Fire Station. “This is a budget increase in Fund 222, which is our fire excise tax, for the expenses for

COUNTY BOARD | SEE PAGE 14

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Assistant Editor Mia Rose Poris Accounts Representative Raenona Harvey Calendar Editor Lealia Nelson Photography Cayla Nimmo Knifewing Segura Correspondents Rick Abasta Cody Begaye Boderra Joe Design David Tsigelman Left: A Don Diego de Vargas reenactment at the Santa Fe Fiesta. Right: Protesters stand up against the Entrada. Photos by Brian Fishbine, Picture This Production Company for Veiled Lightning The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office: 102 S. Second St., Gallup, NM 87301 The Gallup Sun, pending USPS number 1, is mailed weekly. Application to mail at periodical rates is pending in Gallup NM. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

5


Diocese of Gallup announces cooperation with AG’s office

Terminated police officer returns to the GPD

T

R

By Mia Poris Sun Editor

he Diocese of Gallup received an inquiry Sept. 5 from New Mex ico At tor ney General Hector Balderas, requesting documents and records from the diocese. In a Sept. 5 press release, the diocese said it looked forward to cooperating with the Attorney General to ensure the safety of all the members of the diocese. Fol low i n g a n Au g u s t Pennsylvania grand jury report, the AG’s office is investigating all three Catholic dioceses in New Mexico — Gallup, Las Cruces and Santa Fe — for material related to priest-abuse allegations. Last month’s report showed that more than 300 priests in Pennsylvania sexually abused more tha n 1,000 children over 70 years. The report also revealed that a Pennsylvania bishop had sent priests to New Mexico to be treated. Suzanne Hammons, spokesperson for the Diocese of Gallup, told the Sun in a Sept. 10 email that many state attorney generals “are now undertaking investigations of their own by requesting documents from Church officials.” The Diocese of Gallup, though, is “a little different,” Hammons said. The Gallup diocese underwent a Chapter 11 bankruptcy

process in 2013, with the order confirming the plan released in 2016, Hammons said in an email. The Diocese’s files had already been reviewed as part of that process. “We also have about half of our territory in the State of Arizona (one of the only Dioceses in the country in more than one state),” Hammons wrote. In order to be proactive in the protection of children, the Diocese of Gallup is reaching out to other potential interested parties, like the Arizona Attorney General. Hammons said the Catholic Church, country wide, welcomes the intervention of outside authorities who would “step in and help us to root out abusers once and for all.” The Diocese said in their press release that they remain committed to the ongoing protection of children, transparency and to providing healing for survivors of sexual abuse. “Since the U.S. Bishops often speak and act as a body, this is an issue that must be addressed across the board,” Hammons told the Sun in an email. “Especially because traditionally, Church leaders have spoken about or acted on many issues — immigration, charity, abortion, etc. But many are now asking: why should we listen to Church leaders when they cannot seem to even get their own house in order? And it’s a fair question.”

a result, Morrissette, who worked in the detective squad, was promoted from sergeant to lieutenant. Her action against Boyd continued after he was promoted by Hart to be his deputy chief, and eventually, Boyd was reprimanded after an internal affairs investigation. But when Morrissette asked to see a copy of the report, her request was rejected.

She filed suit in state district court to get that report released to her, and eventually, District Court Judge Robert Aragon ruled in her favor, although it still took several weeks for the city to comply with the order. Ac c or d i n g t o Gr ove r, Morrissette continued to have problems with Boyd and Hart, and Boyd eventually issued charges against her, claiming falsely that she was derelict in her duties. A s a r e s u lt of t he s e charges, Morrissette found herself demoted to sergeant a nd then to patrol status before she was terminated outright. More legal battles resulted, and ultimately city officials became involved. Several weeks after she wa s ter m i nated, t he cit y agreed to reinstate Morrissette with back pay and a position as liaison with the schools and community was created for her.

MCHS, which operates on the campus of UNM-Gallup, to remain in operation through June 2019. At that time, the charter will end. As for the school’s relationship with GMCS, Hunter said, “We’ve been attempting to work together.” Mike Hyatt, superintendent of Gallup-McKinley County

Schools, confirmed there is an agreement in place with MCHS. “We signed an agreement to extend the relationship under a correction action plan until June 30, 2019,” Hyatt said. “I’m just glad that we could eventually come to an agreement. I wish we could have came to an agreement sooner.”

Staff Reports osanne Morrissette is back on duty with t he Ga l lup Pol ice Department, working as a school and community liaison as a result of a legal battle to get her job back after she was terminated earlier this summer. Morrissette’s problems with the police department, according to state court records and her Albuquerque attorney, Thomas Grover, began almost three years ago about the time Robert Cron retired as police chief and Phillip Hart was named as his replacement. T he compla i nt aga i nst Boyd, who wa s a captain at that time, alleges that he came into Morrissette’s office and yelled at her for several minutes. When Cron retired, several high-ranking officers decided to retire, too, and a number of positions opened up. As

A-GRADE | FROM PAGE 4 agreement, which can be found on the GMCS website, includes a 53-page charter contract, a four-page corrective action plan, and an eight-page July 6 notice of intent to revoke charter. T he ag reement a l lows

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NEWS


Former Gov. Gary Johnson visits Gallup THE U.S. SENATE CANDIDATE COVERS MARIJUANA AND OTHER CAMPAIGN TOPICS By Rick Abasta Sun Correspondent

F

ormer governor Gary Johnson is running for the U.S. Senate as a Libertarian. But jumping into the race wasn’t necessarily a planned political move. “This came as a complete surprise to me, running for the U.S. Senate,” he said to a crowd of about 25 people at Sammy C’s restaurant in Gallup Sept. 10. The crowd ate appetizers and listened to reasons why they should join the campaign effort. Johnson said he stepped in to help the Libertarian Party after former candidate Aubrey Dunn, the current state land commissioner, dropped out of the Senate race. Previously, Johnson said he didn’t want to be in the Senate because, “it was about bellying up to the trough and adding to the deficit.” What’s at stake, Johnson sa id, is “potentia lly being the swing vote in the U.S. Senate and that would have huge implications for New Mexico, I believe, in a positive way.” With a $21 trillion deficit looming over the federal government, Johnson said he would love to be on the Senate budget committee to balance the budget. “ Yo u c a n n o t b a l a n c e the federal budget if you’re not goi ng to cut m ilita r y

Libertarian Senate candidate Gary Johnson attends a campaign event at Sammy C’s in Gallup Sept. 10. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo s pend i ng,” he s a id. “You cannot balance the budget if you’re not going to reform social security. You can’t balance the budget if you’re not going to reform Medicaid and Medicare.” Johnson spoke of his work with the Base Realignment and Closure of military installations as a means of cutting defense spending. “ I w a s go v e r n o r a n d I h e a d e d u p t h e BR AC Commission, which was about reducing military bases in New Mexico and what came out of that process was the recognition that dollars are really effectively spent here,” he said.

He added that New Mexico ha s the g rou nd for a r my ma neuver s a nd t he most restricted airspace and the only supersonic corridor for the Lower 48.

Alamagordo is currently trying to expand the military base there to accommodate 115 F-16s. “It would mean thousands of jobs and we’re not talking

call center jobs. But to do that, they need to expand the airspace east and west of Alamagordo,” he said, adding that his opponent, Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M, doesn’t support the expansion. “The last I’ll say about Heinrich is that he supports Medicare for all. That’s slated to be $32 trillion? That’s the last thing we need to do,” he said. Gesticulating for effect a nd s p e a k i n g q u ick ly t o cover nu merou s a rea s of his platform, Johnson said he is going to tackle the big issues for com ing generations. He said he suppor ts term limits. “I think that legalizing recreational marijuana in New Mexico would lead to 30,000 jobs. I believe in uber-everything. I think there are a lot of federal issues that could uber-ize electricians, plumbers, doctors, lawyers,

GARY JOHNSON | SEE PAGE 10

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Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

7


Weekly Police Activity Reports Staff Reports

DITCHED 9/4, Gallup A Gallup woman was placed under arrest Sept. 4 when police arrived at her apar tment a n d fo u n d her pa s sed out and unaware. Va ler ie Ay ze, 3 3, wa s charged with three counts of abandonment of a child. Management and residents of the Chuska Apartments who said they were concerned about the welfare of Ayze’s children notified the Gallup Police Department at about 4 pm. They said they were concerned because the mother was too intoxicated to look after her children. GPD O f f ic e r D ou g l a s Hoffman said he found Ayze in the backyard with two men, surrounded by several empty beer and vodka bottles. As he

walked away to call for backup, he said the three walked into the apartment and locked the door. Officials for the state’s Children, Youth and Families Department arrived at about the same time as other officers, and the management of the complex opened the door to Ayze’s apartment. According to the report, Ayze was passed out on a bed with one of the men. Hoffman said when he managed to wake Ayze up, he asked about the whereabouts of her children, ages 9 through 12, and she said she didn’t know. At that point she was arrested. The children were later found in another apartment, in the care of a family member, who said they had been watching over them for the past two days because their mother was drinking. According to the report, the children were turned over to the CYFD.

IN THE WEEDS 9/3, Gallup It began as a report of a

stolen vehicle from wh ich the occupants managed to escape into a motel room. Just after 3 pm on Sept. 3, one of the suspects, identified as Monique Lopez, 26, of Gallup, was seen escaping from the room through a back window and heading for the nearby fields and bushes. A few minutes after she escaped the room, however, she was reportedly found hiding out in the weeds. L a t e r, whe n s he w a s searched, GPD officers found drug paraphernalia in one of her pockets. She was charged with evading arrest and possession if drug paraphernalia. It was also discovered that she had an outstanding warrant for her arrest from an outside county.

STATION STRIKE 9/3, Gallup Nathaniel Aver y, 33, of

L u p t o n , Ariz. is faci ng a ssau lt charges after he reportedly struck a clerk in the face at a gas station convenience store. The clerk, who worked at Giant North, 701 U.S. Highway 491, said Avery came into the store the first time about 4 pm on Sept. 3. He walked around for a few minutes and then had to be escorted out of the store. He returned a little later, and when told to leave, he reportedly hit the clerk in the nose and upper lip area and then left the store. When police arrived, he could not be found in the area, but the clerk gave the police a description of what the suspect was wearing. About four hours later, police were notified of a man “down and out” on the 500 block of Highway 491. T he ma n matched t he description of the person who was being sought for the attack at the gas station, so he was taken into custody and then transported back to the gas station where the clerk confirmed his identity. When Avery was arrested, he reportedly told police his name was Nathaniel Cleveland and gave them the wrong social security number. He refused to give his real name, but was recognized when he was transported to the county jail. According to the report, police found Avery had an outof-county warrant out for his arrest.

SHOOTING SHOPS 9/2, Gallup A Gallup man and woman have been charged with g u n v iola t ion s a f t er repor tedly shooting at bu s i n e s s e s Sept. 2. Russell Russell Frye Fr ye, 55, a nd Tau ra Ramirez, 44, have been charged with shooting at a bu i ld i ng, unlawful carrying of a firearm and negligent use Taura Ramirez of a deadly weapon. At about 7 pm, a witness said he saw the two on a motorcycle in front of Good Fellas on East Highway 66. He was at the Miyamura overpass waiting for a light when he said he saw Frye take out a handgun and fire at the business. He then gave the gun to Ramirez, who also fired. As they were driving away, a security guard came out and watched them leave. He found six cartridge shells where they had been parked, according to the report. The witness said he followed the two as they traveled to the Shop n’ Save, where they shot at the building and the ground. They got back on their motorcycle and returned to Good Fellas. W he n p ol ic e a r r i ve d ,

POLICE ACTIVITY | SEE PAGE 10

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Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

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NEWS


WEEKLY DWI REPORT Staff Reports Loren Watchman Sept. 2, 2:19 am Aggravated DWI Gallup P o l i c e Department O f f i c e r F r a nc i s Collins said he wa s on r e g u l a r patrol when he saw a car run a stop sign. W he n he a p pr o a c he d Watchman, 31, of Window Rock, Collins immediately noticed signs of intoxication, so when the driver admitted he had consumed alcohol before driving, Collins asked him to take a field sobriety test. Watchman said he was taking codeine for a pain in his right knee but pointed to his left knee. He took the test and failed; he claimed he had stomach pains. He refused to take a breath alcohol test. Armondo Eddie Sept. 1, 8:44 pm Aggravated DWI G P D O f f i c e r Brandon S a l a z a r said he and another officer were d i s pa t ched t o H a s sler Valley Road because of reports of a driver asleep in his car with the engine running. When he got to the site, Salazar found Eddie and a

female passenger asleep with the car on. Salazar said he attempted to turn the engine off without waking them, but was unable to, so he woke the two up and had them exit the vehicle before it was turned off. Eddie, 34, of Churchrock, admitted he’d had three beers earlier. Since he was showing signs of intoxication, he was asked to take field sobriety tests, but he refused. He did agree to take a breath alcohol test and posted samples of .24 and .23. There was no information in the report of what happened to the female passenger. Hyrason Gorman Aug. 30, 2:15 am Aggravated DWI G P D O f f i c e r F r a nc i s Collins was d i s pa t che d to a car crash on the west side of G a l lu p. A t t he s c e ne , he reportedly found Gorman standing outside his vehicle, complaining of pain in his left elbow. Gorman, 25, of Crownpoint, admitted he had been drinking at a local bar. Collins noticed slurred speech and other signs of intoxication. Gorman said he was heading home to Crownpoint when he was stopped. He twice refused to take field sobriety tests as well as

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a breath alcohol test. When he was taken to the hospital for treatment of his elbow injury, he was given a breath alcohol test and blew a .13. Collins said Gorman kept falling asleep throughout the ordeal and had to be woken up. According to the report, he was was verbally disorderly at times. Stewart Dennison Aug. 26, 1:30 pm Aggravated DWI G P D O f f i c e r Brandon S a l a z a r said he was on reg u l a r patrol when he not iced a ca r w it h expired registration. He conducted a traffic stop and spoke with Dennison, who said he was the designated driver for the group in the vehicle. Dennison, 28, of Brimhall, showed signs of intoxication but told Salazar the last drink he had was at 8 pm.

He agreed to do the field sobriety tests but failed and was arrested for DWI. Another officer on the scene gave him a portable breath test and he posted a sample of .17. He later agreed to take a breath alcohol test and posted samples of .16 and .15. Blayne Jake Aug. 17, 8:24 pm Aggravated DWI G P D O f f i c e r P a t r ick L a rgo sa id he was dispatched to the area of Allison Road a nd U.S. Highway 66 in connection with a car that crashed into a ditch. According to the report, as

he was headed to the scene, La rgo hea rd on his radio that another officer had to break the driver’s side window because the driver was unresponsive. By the time Largo arrived at the scene, however, Jake was responsive, and after nodding when asked if he had consumed any alcohol that night, he agreed to take the field sobriety tests. He on ly got pa r t way through them, when he reportedly admitted he was “out of it” and was arrested for DWI. Jake later agreed to take a breath alcohol test and posted samples of .32 and .31. Besides Agg ravated DW I, he wa s charged for careless driving and for having an open liquor bottle in his car.

ATTENTION NEWS HOUNDS! Have a news tip? Want to write up a guest submission for the paper? Email us at: gallupsun@ gmail.com

Job Vacancy Announcement Front Desk Person Gallup Housing Authority General Job Description: This person’s primary duties include handling front desk functions. Person will serve as the initial “point of contact” with the public, applicants, tenants, and vendors. Person will provide general administrative, secretarial, and clerical support to each of the following departments: Housing, Finance, Administration, and Maintenance as needed. Person will assist the Executive Director and other staff in preparation for Board meetings, agenda’s, public notice of meetings, recording and filing of meeting minutes as well as approved resolutions. The successful candidate will have excellent computer skills and significant experience with Word, Outlook, and Excel spreadsheets. Must be skilled in standard office procedures and operations. Must maintain confidentially when required; and also have ability to communicate effectively with applicants, tenants, other employees, and the general public. The successful candidate should have significant experience in performing similar work in a high-paced public service environment. Relevant college coursework is highly preferred. Applicant must have a current valid driver’s license. A criminal/credit background check may be required. Part-time or job sharing may be considered on this particular position. Employee Benefits available only for full-time employees! Applications and/or a copy of the job description may be obtained at 203 Debra Drive, Gallup NM 87301 or may be requested by email at: GHA.Main@galluphousing.com. Applicants may apply in person or submit their applications to the email above.

505-870-9849 203 Burke Dr. Gallup, NM NEWS

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Gallup Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

9


GARY JOHNSON | FROM PAGE 7 accountants,” he said. Such an effort would prov ide reg u la r people w it h affordability in the jobs that they hold. They could move from one job to a nother, depending on the pay, he said, adding that it could be more affordable for the employee to

be an entrepreneur. “I am firmly opposed to our militar y inter ventions — 9/11 is tomorrow. I completely supported us going into Afghanistan to get Osama bin Laden. We got him. It’s 16 years now that we’ve been in Afghanistan,” he said. Johnson said if he is elected to the U.S. Senate, he is never going to get re-elected.

“I ran for president twice, in 2012 and 2016. I learned a lot. What works is low tax, low regulatory environment. I didn’t create one single job in New Mexico. The private sector creates jobs,” he said. “I do believe that I created an environment where businesses did thrive and hire.” Visit: www.garyjohnsonsenate.com

POLICE ACTIVITY | FROM PAGE 8 according to the report, they fou nd F r ye a nd made a n arrest. Ramirez had left before police arrived. By this time, police had seen a video taken from outside of the Shop n’ Save that confirmed Ramirez as a suspect, too. They went to her home address a nd arrested her.

BUSTED BURGLAR 8/28, Gallup G P D officers a r rested a ser ia l burglar Aug. 28 a t a loc a l trailer park. T y l e r Wauneka, 24, of Edgewood, was charged with aggravated burglary, breaking and entering, possession of a firearm

by a felon, possession of burglary tools and resisting arrest. Police were dispatched to the Desert West on Aztec Avenue after the manager reported finding a man in one of the abandoned trailers. He told the man to leave. According to the report, the man told police he’d heard the intruder was a suspect in a stolen car case, so when he found the man’s bag outside another of his trailers, he called the police. The police surrounded the trailer, went inside and found Wauneka hiding in a cabinet. He was told to come out and after refusing several commands, he eventually exited and was arrested. It tur ned out, Wauneka had a long histor y of burglary arrests going back to 2011. Police said they also found jewelr y and guns in his bag.

STAY UPDATED FIND US ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/Gallupsun Former Gov. Gary Johnson attends a campaign event at Sammy C’s in Gallup Sept. 10 — the Libertarian candidate is running for U.S. Senate. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

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Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


OPINIONS Child advocates decry Trump Administration plan to incarcerate children By James Jimenez, executive director New Mexico Voices for Children

A

LBUQUERQUE — James Jimenez, executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children, issued the following statement on the Trump Administration’s proposed

NM Voices for Children Executive Director James Jimenez

regulations regarding the Flores Settlement Agreement Sept. 9. “We are appalled that the Trump Administration has taken another step away from simple human decency by trying to subvert the Flores Settlement Agreement. The number one priority of the Flores agreement is that children not be incarcerated. This

MADAME G

foundational principle recognizes that the best way to ensure a child’s well-being is to keep them out of jail. These standards of protection have been in place for decades and there is no reason they should be discarded. “Because of this Administration’s policies, hundreds of separated children remain terrified and alone in

detention six weeks after the court-ordered reunification deadline. With this moral stain still on our nation, the Trump Administration is moving to try and replace family separation with indefinite family incarceration in an unacceptable bid to jail children indefinitely and

CHILD ADVOCATES | SEE PAGE 14

GUIDE TO THE STARS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 17

Since Sept. 9, Venus has been in Scorpio. This intense pairing will remain there until Oct. 31. Madame G recommends that you get used to the unexpected and prepare for intense and passionate moments. In addition, a First Quarter Moon rises on Sept. 20 setting the tone for new beginnings. This is a good thing. Consider it pre-planning for the upcoming New Year, now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

You’re a passionate person. You feel things deeply, and your reactions are often a react now, think later sort. Madame G recommends that you take five minutes each day to breathe deeply and refocus the mind. Be kind to yourself and forgive your short comings. Then share your perspective with your community. Do this by sharing a smile or lending a helping hand.

You’re an amazing friend, loyal sibling, and son or daughter. There’s no need to kick yourself for all that you’ve done wrong. You’re enough. Care for your friends and family and let the rest float away. There are no expectations except the ones we make for ourselves. If you force it on yourself, then you can’t blame anyone else. Let go. Breathe free. Good luck!

You’re a leader. You may not be in a position of power, but you’re a leader. In this world, people will judge you by how you treat others. If you keep finding yourself stuck in a trap or that people just don’t react well to you, stop what you’re doing. Instead, consider how you lead others and you may find the answer. You’re a leader. Be a good one.

This is a new beginning. It could be epic. Maybe this is what you’ve been waiting for. You can’t imagine that life will be better or different when you’re stuck in a trap. But, you can do so much more than you ever imagined. Give yourself a chance to break free and live a new one.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The world is open and available to you. You’re a person who gets things done. You take pride in your work, even if it’s not what you love. But, you do put effort into making a quality product. This is a wonderful quality. Now apply it to your everyday life. You can make the most out of this world by doing what you do best—making the best of every situation. Go you!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) So this is love? If someone is hurting you verbally, physically, or emotionally—that’s not love. They may care about you, but they don’t have enough self-control to love you the way you need or deserve. Remember, you’re a beautiful soul with a giving heart. You are as worthy of love as anyone. It’s often hard to see your own worth. Wake up and know you’re worth loving. NEWS

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Love your family and yourself. Show your friends how to live the best life by pursuing your dreams. You can also give back by teaching others what you’ve learned—there is a greater sense of accomplishment, when you give back to the community. Spread your joy and purpose.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Live free! Enjoy your life and work hard toward your goals. You’re capable of more than you think. No one ever said work had to be a bummer; put some love and a smile into it and take note of how everything changes. Hard work and lots of love are an amazing pair.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) At the end of the road, you have a choice. You can move forward, turn around, or go another direction. You can also stop where you land. The choice is yours and there is no right answer. You will find challenges and triumphs at any point. You must decide what is worth doing and what is worth fighting for. What’s worth your effort? More importantly, what’s your time worth?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) This is the end of one road and the beginning of another. Keep pushing forward. You can only do your best. But, this may not be enough. If it’s not, you may need to rethink the effort and the time. If it’s not working, but you refuse to let go—keep working towards your goals. Maybe you just need a mentor or a coach. The answer might be easier than you think.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You can do so much more than you think. Don’t give up now. Give yourself a break and break free. This is the life you were meant to live. Sometimes we just have to stop and remember that we are alive and what a gift that is. Have you been grateful lately? There’s much to give thanks for.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Life is what you make of it. You can live the life of your dreams, but you’re going to have to work for it. Give up your need to be right. Look to helping others. Give yourself the chance to break through barriers and allow yourself to be bad at something. You can do so much more than you ever imagined, if you just try. Don’t give up before you begin. Good luck!

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

11


GMCS Schools are 2017-2018 GMCS PARCC and SCHOOL GRADE DATA

12

At GMCS…”EDUCATION MATTERS”

Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

OPINIONS


English Language Arts 1 year Change in Percent Proficient Among 10 Largest Districts 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Growth (2017 to 2018)

Gallup Albuqurque Farmington Gadsden McKinley Public Municipal Independe County Schools Schools nt Schools Schools 3.4

3.3

3.3

5.6

Hobbs Las Cruces Los Lunas Municipal Public Public Schools Schools Schools 1.8

1.4

1.6

Rio Ranco Roswell Publis Independe Schools nt Schools 0.8

2.8

Santa Fe Public Schools 0.7

English Language Arts 2 year Change in Percent Proficient Among 10 Largest Districts 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Growth (2016 to 2018)

OPINIONS

Gallup Albuqurque Farmington Gadsden McKinley Municipal Independe Public County Schools Schools nt Schools Schools 2.3

6.3

6.5

7.9

Hobbs Las Cruces Los Lunas Municipal Public Public Schools Schools Schools 4

2.8

1.1

Rio Ranco Roswell Publis Independe Schools nt Schools 2.5

4.6

Santa Fe Public Schools 3.3

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

13


COUNTY BOARD | FROM PAGE 5 construction of Pueblo Pintado Fire Station. This was missed in the final budget,” Keeler said. Finance only received a partial encumbrance of the funding for the project, she said, which was for the engineering portion of the project. County Fire Chief Jason Carlisle said construction of the fire station would be completed six months from the start date. “This was an oversight on my part, we thought that we were going to get this expended before the end of the fiscal year 2018, but it never happened,” Carlisle said. As FY 2019 came around, he was going through bids for construction and realized the oversight, he said. “So does this mean this is finally going to get off the ground?” Commissioner Carol Bowman-Muskett asked. “Yes, it is going to get off the ground. The bid was awarded I think three commission meetings ago and they’re just waiting on a purchase order from us. Unfortunately, construction will not be completed before you guys leave office,” he said.

Commissioner Bill Lee asked where the $1.2 million was coming from. “It’s in carryover cash. It was never encumbered. So it’s moving the budget from FY 2018 to FY 2019,” Keeler said. The commissioners listened to all of the budget presentations before approving them in one fell swoop. The budget items included $136,000 for the Pueblo Pintado waterline; $9,098 for Zuni Blackrock Fire; $10,458 for EMS; $58,000 severance tax bond for Sheriff’s Department pursuit vehicle; $515 state funding for the Gallup Ceremonial; $66,824 for Red Lake Chapter road projects; and $8,000 for Sheriff’s Department E&E grant for equipment. All of the items passed unanimously. The commissioners a l s o a p p r o v e d P S A No . 18 - SEP- 3 9 93 for Sy st em s Management Co. to provide I T ser v ices for McK i n ley County Metropolitan Di s pat ch Aut hor it y. T h i s included transferring $60,000 from the salary and benefits of one computer tech position into professional services. Georgene Dimas, director of Metro Dispatch, said she

does not need a computer tech position, but rather, competent IT-support for the new hi-tech dispatch equipment. “We have been getting by with the assistance of county IT. We utilized their on-call services, but what they give is minimal. I need that ongoing management services,” she said. Dimas said the computer tech position was advertised and a candidate was hired. “He came in and worked for two weeks and he resigned. He said this wasn’t a computer tech job,” she said. Dimas said an IT technician can use remote access to enter into the Metro Dispatch server and network and fix 85 percent of issues online. She said services for this per-hour contract amounted to $41,400. “I am asking for $60,000 to cover when we have events that aren’t covered in services. I need someone with public-safety answering point experience. It’s overwhelming,” she said. P SA P c e nt er s a n s wer emer genc y c a l l s for t he police, fire department and ambulance. The commission unanimously approved the request.

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Letter to the Editor

E

ditor, The Sept. 11, 2001 A mer ica n tragedy that shook the nation to its core and changed our course forever is still felt even after 17 years; for many, healing has never taken place and every year the hurt is relived on this Day of Infamy. The question of why and how this happened has been pinned on terrorists from the very beginning with the information televised by the national media although other questions have remained unanswered. When the hijacked airplanes were f lown into the World Trade Center Twin Towers, it was stated that 15 of the 19 were citizens of Saudi Arabia with two from United Arab Emirates and two from Egypt and Lebanon. All 19 were men affiliated with al-Qaeda, an international terrorist organization. Saudi Arabia remains a Middle Eastern ally of America and was a key part in the subsequent invasion of Iraq, a war that lasted from March 20, 2003 to Dec.18, 2011. The day of the attacks also included another plane, United Airlines Flight 93, that was hijacked and brought down in a (Shanksville) Pennsylvania countryside by passengers who responded to the now famous creed “Let’s roll!” There is no official indication that any of the passengers were able to break into the cockpit but they definitely frustrated the plans of the terrorists. Meanwhile, in the chaos that was created by the Twin Tower attacks, another building — World Trade Center 7, north of the Twin Towers — also came down. A National Institute of Standards and Technology report cited the collapse was because of fires

fueled by office furnishings and that it did not collapse from explosives or from diesel fuel fires. No plane struck the 47-story structure the Secret Service and the Central Intelligence Agency were based in. Many people of all nationalities survived the suicide attacks, both from escaping the Towers and in the surrounding impact areas; the survivors described themselves as blessed and fortunate with some even participating in the subsequent rescue efforts. The scene was apocalyptic with pure destruction likened to a war zone with the two icons gone and debris everywhere amid the lamentation of people. Hospitals were overflowing a nd medica l supplies immediately depleted coupled with heroic first responders bringing in more victims by the minute. Ground Zero was two huge holes in a city that was mortally wounded with highways into New York City closed. President George W. Bush learned of the attacks while he was at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Fla., reading to a class of second graders. I had just taken my lunch break and was driving to a nearby fast food joint when the news came on the radio. My first concern was for my younger brother who lives in Ithaca, NY, which is quite a distance from New York. He is still safe. In all my travels throughout America, I have not yet visited New York City but when I do, the 911 Memorial Site will definitely be a stop where I shall pay my respects to those who took their final Spirit Journey on that fateful day of Sept.11, 2001. Mervyn Tilden Gallup, New Mexico

CHILD ADVOCATES | FROM PAGE 11

children. This is despite the fact that time and time again DHS has proven itself unable or unwilling to ensure the basic safety and health of the people it jails. I believe that we are better than this and that we can safeguard our nation without harming children. We must demand that Flores is followed.”

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Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

subject them to more trauma and abuse. “What’s more, the proposed regulations would allow the Depa r tment of Homela nd Security (DHS) to jail children indefinitely while DHS ‘self-certifies’ that the jails are safe for

NEWS


COMMUNITY Impactful film inspires ‘monumental’ social change DOCUMENTARY REVEALS RELEVANCE OF 1680 TODAY

Mia Rose Poris Sun Assistant Editor

V

eiled Lightning, a documentary that’s been on the film festival circuit of late, inspiring social change and receiving national acclaim, is also playing on the Gallup Film Festival big screen. The film “weaves archival footage, informant interviews, original art and exclusive news coverage” to explore the way “protest movements unfurling across the Southwest and the nation provide for social and environmental justice and fight genocide, oppression, exploitation and appropriation to save Indigenous culture while simultaneously creating a way for us to all heal from our national history,” according to its website. The woman behind the feature is producer Jaima Chevalier, who recently corresponded with the Sun over email. Chevalier, whose godparents were Cochiti and whose mother taught at the Santa Fe Indian School, grew up on a ranch on the outskirts of the City Different. “I am fixated by NM histor y,” the filmmaker, who learned her craft from Silver

Horn Media President Tony Martinez, said in a Sept. 11 email. “It is the driving force behind all of my work in written and cinematic form.” Veiled Lightning, she said, is the result of “an amazing group of collaborators: Ashley Browning (Sundance Full Circle Fellow in 2017), Gomeo Bobelu from Zuni, Natachee Mo m a d a y G r a y, T a z b a h Gaussoin and many others.” According to Chevalier, one of the main themes of the film is the way the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 continues to echo in contemporary society. “New Mexico is a wellspring for many extremely talented Native artists who focus on the theme of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, a.k.a. The First American Revolution,” she said. “One example is Virgil Ortiz; another is Cliff Fragua,” whose Po’Pay sculpture “stands in Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C., one of New Mexico’s two official state sculptures.” Po’Pay was a Tewa medicine man who sought to restore Pueblo customs and freedom to his people after his imprisonment by the Spanish. On Aug. 10, 1680, he led an organized revolt in which most Pueblos participated, ultimately forcing the Spanish to flee, and

which left 400 dead, including 21 Catholic priests. The Pueblo people remained free until 1692, when New Mexico was conquered again, this time by Gov. Pedro de Vargas. Chevalier said people like “Joe Sando and Herman Agoyo — both now deceased — spent decades trying to get the state to recognize Po’Pay. Veiled Lightning began as an exploration of this ‘revolt’ art, if you will, but it grew organically to encompass an echo of the revolt that began as soon as we started shooting. That echo is the protests of the Santa Fe Fiesta Entrada.” The film has contributed to what Chevalier called “a monumental change in Santa Fe that eliminated the Fiesta Council’s annual depiction of armed conquistadors re-taking the city from the Natives after the Pueblo Revolt,” also known as the Entrada. In 2015, the crew shot footage of a small group of protesters who rekindled “the long-simmering feud over the Fiesta Council’s Entrada,” Chevalier said, but they didn’t anticipate anything coming of the protest. “After all, the Entrada has been protested for many decades without success.”

Veiled Lightning screens at the GFF on Sept. 15.

Jennifer Marley at the Entrada during the Santa Fe Fiesta protest Sept. 8, 2017. Marley was arrested for pushing through a police line; her case, along with those of seven other protestors, was dismissed. Photo Credit: Ryannel Johnston for Veiled Lightning COMMUNITY

In 2016, though, two primarily female-led protest groups “burst onto the scene,” according to Chevalier. These were Red Nation and In the Spirit of Po’Pay. A large protest began against the reenactment of the 1962 Spanish re-occupation of Santa Fe that occurred 12 years after the Pueblo Revolt. The Veiled Lightning team shot the event with nine cameras, coming out with shots that for med a 360 -degree radius. “Interviews with the protest leaders showed how this event was poised to make history, and sure enough, the following

year an even larger protest led by the same women resulted in eight arrests and massive turmoil,” Chevalier said. “Over 80 police officers, with 100 more in reserve, made for a powder keg situation. The specter of SWAT officers looming ominously over the plaza where women and children protested was enough to convince civic, religious and pueblo leaders that the Entrada had to go.” And indeed the Entrada did go. This year, a decision was reached to end the

IMPACTFUL FILM | SEE PAGE 21

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

15


Changes exhibit brings extra color and creativity to the Children’s Library By Dee Velasco For the Sun

P

atrons wa ndered about Octavia Fellin Ch i ld ren’s Br a nch S e pt . 8 , e nj oy i n g refreshments and taking in all the various types of arts and crafts on display. The occasion was the opening reception of an exhibit of works by residents at the Coyote Canyon Rehabilitation Center. A c c o r d i n g t o C oyo t e Canyon’s mission statement, “CCRC, Inc. is a non-profit organization that provides quality person-centered supports and assistance to adults with developmental disabilities to achieve independence and freedom of choice.” Located on East Navajo Route 9 in Brimhall, the organization offers day habilitation, community living and employment services. The art department offers arts and crafts, allowing for creative exploration and giving residents tools

to sell their work to the public. And this is exactly what the exhibit at the Changes Children’s Branch offered — CCRC brought various items for sale, including jewelry, paintings, photography and woodwork. O ne r e s ide nt , F a r r el l Saltwater, was on hand to display and sell his paintings and woodwork. One particular wood piece was a unique rockand-roll guitar made out of wood and other items. The guitar was painted red and black with a heavy metal design. “I shaped it out and got some bits and pieces and I just put it all together,” Saltwater said. “I then did the back and painted it over like Freddy Kruegers’ t-shirt [laughing].” Saltwater, who said he likes rock music and to sing, wanted his piece to be like one of his favorite heavy metal bands, Metallica. Saltwater also had with him a painting with woodwork attached to it called “Long Live

“Long Live Rock,” a painting of Shiprock at night, was made of paint and wood by Farrell Saltwater. Photo Credit: Dee Velasco Rock.” It was a painting of the famous rock monolith “Shiprock” in Shiprock, N.M. at night. “I just wanted to paint it and put some wood to make it look like how it feels,” Saltwater said. Resident Julie Yazzie was also showcasing her talent in

the art of jewelrymaking. She crafted her pieces from items she gathered at the CCRC art department. “I make these,” She said. Francesco Bufaro, a community living trainer who

assists Yazzie, was there to help her explain her beautiful jewelry. “Basically, I help her and assist

EXTRAVAGANZA | SEE PAGE 21

(Left to right) Community Living Trainer Francesco Bufaro and resident Julie Yazzie take a moment for the camera at the CCRC opening reception at Octavia Fellin Children’s Branch Sept. 8. Photo Credit: Dee Velasco

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Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

COMMUNITY


The Predator is assisted by its entertaining cast RATING: «« OUT OF «««« RUNNING TIME: 107 MINUTES By Glenn Kay For the Sun

S

ome 31 yea r s a go, Arnold Schwarzenegger appeared in one of his g r e a t e s t a nd mo s t iconic films, Predator. Two sequels have followed since that time, along with a pair of tie-ins featuring the titular beasts. None of them featured its heavyweight star, and none of them were particularly memorable. However, Hollywood is trying to rebuild the monster’s brand once more with The Predator. In this sequel, a spacecraft crashes and the violent alien pilot comes across soldier Quinn McKenna (Boyd Holbrook). After their encounter, the shocked protagonist collects some alien weaponry as proof of the event and mails it back home. The material unexpectedly ends up in the hands of his young son, Rory (Jacob Tremblay). Of course, Quinn soon finds he was right to be precautious. He’s immediately interrogated by government agents and taken away with a group of psychologically troubled veterans. When another creature arrives, violence erupts. Fearing for his son’s safety, Quinn and the gang break free from their shackles and team with

With snappy dialogue and unlikely protagonists, The Predator, starring Boyd Holbrook, delivers some funny lines and bloody carnage. Photo Credit: 20th Century Fox a scientist, played by Olivia Munn, to try and save the day. Co-writer/director Shane Black (Iron Man 3, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, The Nice Guys) wrote several action hits of the ’80s like Leather Weapon and has a feel for the genre. This effor t in some ways seems like it’s come right out of the era, albeit on a slightly smaller scale. It’s filled with exaggerated violence and some blunt and politically incorrect verbal jabs. Some work and some don’t. Random characters are occasionally killed in the service of a joke, which

is something you rarely see nowadays. What the movie excels at is delivering snappy dialogue. Many of the eccentric heroes are likable and entertaining, and their interactions are amusing to witness. There’s a good running gag about how the creature’s name is technically inaccurate. The writing also gets some mileage out of the troubled heroes’ attempts to make the female scientist feel comfortable around them. Their behavior and comments are for the most part very unsuccessful.

While their behavior won’t impress some, for this reviewer these unlikely protagonists are the best part of the feature. Much of the movie takes place in a small town, and the setting does add a little variety to the proceedings. For the most part, the action is well-handled. It’s very over-thetop and graphic, yet the tone is light enough that it isn’t disturbing. There are few minor issues, including a couple of

moments during the chaos wherein some of the bloodshed and deaths aren’t easy to make out. I also couldn’t quite figure out why the scientist was so good at operating weaponry, but in a movie like this, one must allow for some ridiculous elements. And overall, the movie also has some difficulty balancing so many characters. Between Quinn, his newfound buddies, government agents, a son and ex-wife, the tagalong scientist and several creatures, there’s almost too much to deal with. There’s something to be said for simplicity in a movie like this (the original certainly had it) and the film would have benefitted from focusing almost entirely on the troubled veterans. T h e P re d at or isn’t a n entirely necessary addition, but if one is generous, it will deliver some funny lines and bloody (yet silly) carnage. Fans will also find out a bit more background about the creature itself. What does work comes mostly thanks to its entertaining cast of characters and one-liners. The movie is flawed and certainly nowhere near as effective the original, but it’s still the best sequel in the franchise and will provide the requisite thrills to fans of the series. V i s i t : w w w . CinemaStance.com

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Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

17


DVD/Blu-ray Roundup for Sept. 14, 2018 By Glenn Kay For the Sun

O

nce again, it’s time for another look at highlights coming your way on Blu-ray and DVD. There are plenty of interesting releases arriving, including a huge box-office hit. So if you can’t make it out to the movies this week, be sure to give one of these titles a try!

BIG NEW RELEASES! Filmworker Stanley Kubrick is considered one of cinema’s greate st creat or s. This documentar y goes behind the scenes to give credit to the filmmaker’s right-hand man, Leon Vitali. After playing the role of Lord Bullingdon in Barry Lyndon, Vitali gave up his acting career to assist the director, working together for decades until Kubrick’s passing. The movie chronicles their relationship. It received a lot of acclaim, with most calling it a fascinating look behind the scenes at its subject, capturing Vitali’s devotion and skill in working with an obsessive and reclusive artist. Hare Krishna! The Mantra, the Movement and the Swami W ho Started It All - Srila Prabhupada is the focus of this documentary. It follows his arrival in the United States in the 1960s and how he built support and developed the Hare Krishna movement. The press wasn’t particularly fond of this examination of his life. While a couple of reviewers thought it would appeal to followers, the majority said the movie comes across as little more than a

feature-length commerical. Hearts Beat Loud - In this comedy/drama, a widower decides to spend more quality time with his teenage daughter by starting a band with her. It goes well at first, but causes conflicts when the father starts taking the pursuit seriously and focusing on his own dreams, instead of facilitating those of his offspring. Notices were really strong for this independent feature — most thought it was a sweet and charming little picture buoyed by a likable cast. It stars Nick Offerman, Kiersey Clemons, Ted Danson, Sasha Lane, Blythe Danner and Toni Collette. Hope Springs Eternal This independent production involves a teenage girl who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer. She has completely accepted her fate, enjoying herself while preparing for the inevitable. However, the lead gets the shock of her life when the cancer goes into complete remission, leaving the protagonist confused about what to do and how her friends will react to her continued presence at school. Most of those who saw it liked it. There were a few who thought it had difficulty shifting tones, but most enjoyed the lead actress and thought it was an appealing coming-ofage tale. The cast includes Mia Rose Frampton, Stony Blyden and Juliette Angelo. Ocean’s Eight - This hit spin-off of the Ocean’s 11 series follows the sister of Danny Ocean. She recruits an all-female team to steal valuable jewels during the Met Gala in Manhattan. The movie generally received more positive than negative notices. A portion of viewers critiqued the film for being workmanlike and omitting any danger or surprises from the heist itself. However,

more called it light and fun entertainment with a cast that appeared to be having a good time together. It stars Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Mindy Kaling, Rhianna, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Richard Armitage and James Corden. S u p e r F l y - T he 1972 Blaxploitation classic gets a redo in this modern take on the character. In this version, the drug-dealing protagonist yearns to get out of the business, but to do it, he must set up one last score. His plan requires him to double-cross his mentors, deal with cartels and not get caught by the fuzz. Reaction was split for this action redo. Roughly half commented that it a glossy redo that doesn’t add anything to the character or match the original, while the others appreciated the style and energy on display, as well as the work of the lead actor. It features Trevor Jackson, Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis and Jennifer Morrison.

BLASTS FROM THE PAST! For the past year, MVD’s been putting out some interesting Blu-rays featuring cult genre films in the action and horror genres. Their new line MVD Marquee appears to be delivering bigger studio pictures. This week, the distributor has three titles of note. The first is a “Special Edition” of Barbershop (2002). The well-received comedy stars Ice Cube, Anthony Anderson, Cedric the Entertainer and many others. It follows the lives of workers and customers at a Chicago barbershop. The disc comes with numerous bonuses, including

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nmpinnbank.com 0418_NM_AMBITION_4C_5925x24894_AD.indd 1 18 Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

4/5/18 10:47 AM

an audio commentary with the director, producers and writer. T hey a l s o have a “Special Edition” Blu-ray of Barbershop 2: Ba ck in Business (2 0 0 4). T h i s follow-up details more comedic hi-jinx with Ice Cube and Cedric the Entertainer at the titular locale as they fight with a beauty shop next door operated by a rival (played by Queen Latifah). The release includes a director/ producer commentary, a cast commentary led by Cedric the Entertainer, deleted scenes, outtakes, music v ideos, a behind-the-scenes photo gallery and multiple trailers. Finally, you can also pick up the series spin-off, Beauty Shop (2005), starring Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone, A nd ie M a cDowel l, A l f r e Woodard and Mena Suvari as the employees at the competing business. This Blu-ray includes director commentary on selected scenes, featurettes on the production, a gag reel and multiple trailers. Shout! Factory has a couple of notable horror flicks. The first one, not to be confused with the Peter Jackson film of the same name, is Brain Dead (1990). This Roger Corman production is about a neurosurgeon asked to retrieve information from the brain of an asylum inmate. Along the way, the doctor’s own sanity is called into question. It’s a well-regarded little B-picture and the distributor’s given it a new 2K scan and a commentary with the movie’s co-writer/director, along with deleted scenes and a trailer. Shout! Also has The Seventh Sign (1988), which has been out-of-print for a long, long time. It’s a supernatural thriller about a housewife (played by Demi Moore) who begins having apocalyptic visions. Soon, she’s joined by a Vatican priest and the pair try to decipher her visions in order to save the world. Aside from finally being in high definition, this release includes new interviews with the director, writers and supporting cast members. Criterion’s delivering a Bluray of the French coming-of-age drama Cold Water (1994). The film has been given a 4K digital restoration with new subtitles

supervised by the filmmaker, new interviews with the director and cinematographer, and a 1994 French television program about the movie. Finally, Mill Creek’s been putting out plenty of Benji movies on Blu-ray over the past year, each with various extra features. The latest title to get the treatment is Benji: Off the Leash! (2004), in which the mutt teams up with some outcasts (of both animal and human variety) to try and stick up for one another in the city. This disc arrives with a director/crew commentary, a behind-the-scenes short and a collection of memorable clips from five Benji flicks.

YOU KNOW, FOR KIDS! Here are some titles that may be of interest to kids. Barbie: Dolphin Magic The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That: Season 2, Volume 2 ScoobyDoo! and the Gourmet Ghost SpongeBob SquarePants: The Legend of Boo-kini Bottom

ON THE TUBE! And here are the week’s TV-themed releases. American Masters: Wyeth (PBS) T he Big Bang T heor y: Season 11 The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That: Season 2, Volume 2 Chicago P.D.: Season 5 Family Pictures (1993 miniseries) The Great British Baking Show: Season 5 (UK Season 3) Law an d O rde r: Tr ue Crime: The Menendez Murders Modern Family: Season 9 NOVA: Animal Mummies (PBS) Rescue Me: The Complete Series Rolling Stones: Stories from the Edge (HBO documentary series) Scorpion: The Final Season Television’s Lost Classics: Volume 1 Television’s Lost Classics: Volume 2 This Is Us: Season 2 COMMUNITY


Apache Skateboards founder speaks at UNM-G ARTIST URGES YOUTH TO ‘BE YOUR TRUEST SELF’

By Cody Begaye Sun Correspondent

T

he auditorium in Calvin Hall at the University of New Mexico Gallup was filled Sept. 5 for an artist lecture by Douglas Miles, whose artwork is on display in the Ingham Chapman Gallery as part of the exhibit New Native American Art to Brighten Your Day, which runs through Sept. 24. Miles, who hails from San Carlos, Ariz., may be known to locals as the founder of Apache Skateboards, which has operated for the past 15 years. During the lecture, Miles said Apache Skateboards began as a personal project that caught the attention of the community and evolved into a business. “[Apache Skateboa rds] started as a father making something for his son,” he said. “The board was unique, and everyone wanted one [when they saw it].” Miles said he initially had to be persuaded by his parents, who were artists in their own right, to begin creating his own pieces. Painting, he said, differs from other forms of art as an isolated form of expression. “Painting is not like being in a band,” Miles said. “[The audience] sees you right away, hears you right away.” Miles is San Carlos Apache and was raised in Phoenix, Ariz. He said this upbringing allowed him to learn things in a different way than if he’d lived on a traditional reservation. Regardless of location, though, Miles said being

discriminated against and looked down upon has urged many Native Americans to embrace their creativity through art. “We’re a powerful people,” he said. Miles described how he has applied such an ideology to his own life — he’s depicted proud Native American people in his large murals that span upward of 10 feet. He showed the lecture crowd photos of his work in New Orleans, where he worked for Amnesty International in order to shine attention on the plight of political prisoners. Locally, Miles was commissioned by Nativo Lodge in Albuquerque to repaint a number of hotel rooms. Guests at the hotel can gaze at the large Native faces in their rooms, a feeling Miles admits can be imposing. But he also said the scope of the paintings reinforces how important the people are to their community, specifically the women. “Women will always be important,” he said about subjects of the mural. “They will never not be important.” Miles’ work can also be found in San Carlos, Ariz.; on display at the Tempe Center for the Arts in Tempe, Ariz., a secluded space near San Carlos Lake; and in the South Bronx of New York City, where he’s painted a sizable mural that measures 120-feet-long. Miles said he continues to look for new techniques and tools to implement into future pieces. He sees his work as more than a living — it’s his way of expressing and sharing himself with others.

Apache street artist Douglas Miles poses for a portrait in front of his work “Bounce” at the opening of his exhibit New Native American Art to Brighten Your Day at the Ingham Chapman Gallery at UNM-G Sept. 5. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo “What people don’t understand is I make culture,” he said. “I’m giving you something you’ve never heard before.” Miles wrapped up the lecture by advising students and younger

artists not to think only of financial gain from creating and sharing work. Art can be whatever the artist wants to say, however they want to say it, he said. If an artist starts to get materialistic and

think about impressing people, they are likely to lose their passion and forget what made them want to create in the first place. “Be your truest self — you kind of can’t go wrong,” he said.

Job Vacancy Announcement Maintenance Technician Gallup Housing Authority Person will perform a variety of maintenance and repair functions to housing units, such as: painting, taping and texturing walls, repair or replacement of sinks, toilet bowls, showers, tubs, �xtures, doors, screen doors, windows, electrical lights, water heaters, and appliances. Duties also include grounds maintenance. Person must be able to comprehend the Work Order System currently utilized by the GHA; to determine material requirements, tools, and equipment needed to perform the work; to work on site with minimal supervision; and to perform all other duties as assigned by supervisors. Person must be to read, write and complete required reports. Person will have to perform heavy liing; loading and unloading of service vehicle. Job involves climbing, crawling, bending and reaching. Current driver’s license required. Must pass background check if job offer is made. Medical physical may be required aer job offer is made. Applications may be picked up at the Main office of the Gallup Housing Authority located at 203 Debra Drive in Gallup, NM 87301; or requested by email at: GHA.main@galluphousing.com. Applicants may apply in person or submit by email the email address given above. Deadline: Open until Filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Visitors of the Ingham Chapman Gallery at UNM-G look at the opening show of New Native American Art to Brighten Your Day by Douglas Miles Sept. 5. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo COMMUNITY

Gallup Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

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’80s thrash punk band “Still Cyco” SUICIDAL TENDENCIES READY TO ROCK ALBUQUERQUE

By Dee Velasco For the Sun

T

he punk-rock music gen re h a s a lway s been hard to describe – from the style to the outburst of lyrics to the bands that play it. Those who are drawn to punk can tell you why they love it, though, and like so many of us who have our own taste for the genre, the reasons are pretty much the same. It was a part of growing up, it molded or disrupted attitude, it was pure euphoria when you wanted to shut the world out or let the world in on your own world. It simply described you when you couldn’t describe yourself. One punk rock band that shaped so many lovers of this genre — and beyond — is Suicidal Tendencies, an American crossover thrash punk band formed in 1980 in Venice, Calif., by vocalist Mike Muir, also known as “Cyco Miko.” The band’s current lineup includes Muir,

guitarist Dean Pleasants, bassist Ra Diaz and drummer Dave Lombardo. The band’s on tour promoting their most recent album Still Cyco Punk After All These Years, and the “Still Cyco Punk” World Wide Tour 2018-2019 is set to make a stop in Albuquerque Sept. 19 at the Sunshine Theater. The Gallup Sun got the chance to speak with Pleasants and learn about the happenings of the band. Sun: Without further ado, just have to say, it’s an honor and privilege to be speaking with you and it’s all good brother. Wow, since 1980, the band has been jamming that long, that’s crazy. Pleasants: Yeah, the band has been around for a bit, I’ve been in it since 1996 and the guys are still jumping around and thrashing about on stage [laughs]. Sun: You guys just recently put out two new albums, Get Your Fight On! and Still Cyco Punk After All These Years, but before we get to that, let’s

Suicidal Tendencies members Dave Lombardo, Mike Muir, Dean Pleasants and Ra Diaz. Photo Credit: Courtesy talk about your tour the “Still Cyco Punk” World Wide Tour 2018-2019. Pleasants: We’ll be kicking it off in Phoenix and looking forward to that. We’ll be playing some new songs of the new Still Cyco punk record and mixing it into our set, you know. We play a lot from different records from the first

The Community Pantry invites you to attend its 1st Annual Hope for the Holidays Winter Gala!

When: Nov. 17, 6:30 pm Where: Gallup Elks Lodge, 1112 Susan Ave., Gallup, NM Cost: 2 tickets for $50 or 1 ticket for $30 Join us for an evening filled with fun, food, silent auction, 50/50 raffle, dancing and more! We're a non-profit organization that feeds thousands of hungry people in our community and we need your support to continue our mission!

Table Sales Available! $500 = Table for 8, Table Tent, & program mention. $750 = Table for 8, Table Tent, program mention, 1 garden box, 1 bottle of wine, & meat box to donate to family of choice.

$1,000 = Table for 8, Table Tent, program mention, 1 garden box, 2 bottles of wine, table gift, & ....meat box to donate to family of choice.

Tickets can be purchased at The Community Pantry, or by any Board Member.

1130 E. Hasler Valley Road, Gallup, N.M. (505) 736-8068 • www.thecommunitypantry.org

20 Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

record to now, definitely looking forward to doing this man, very cool. Sun: With a band like yours, tell me what’s keeping it strong and lasting this long, especially for a thrash punk band in this day and age? Pleasants: You know, I think it’s because we’re still like what I consider the truly blue-collar, hardcore underground band; even though we have a big name, we still approach it like that. We work hard at what we do, we put a lot of time and effort into being who we are, playing live is our thing. That’s our bread and butter, and I think people love seeing us live — if you haven’t seen Suicidal and you come see a show and whoa. We have this energy. We love giving the energy to the crowd and them giving it back to us. They can go to a show and forget about the chaos for a couple hours and have a great time you know. But we definitely love it. Sun: Now, with so many people labeling your music, how would you describe it? Because it goes from one genre to a different element down to the other end of the spectrum. Pleasants: You know, I think we’re just a very hard rocking thrash and punk band. Everybody in the band, from Dave, Rob, Mike and myself, can play and do all types of music. When you embrace and love music, you’re always trying to grow, and I never feel like I’m ever gonna be the best that I can be on the guitar. To describe our music, I just think that we really, you

know, love doing this type of music like hard-core thrash, it’s a mixture of things, it’s hard to put just one particular label on it. I always say, when people ask me what kind of music I play, I always say we play loud music — it’s punk rock, you know. It’s got everything in it, you’re gonna dance at one point in it in the slam pit, we’re playing subliminal, the tempos change, it’s like a fusion. Sun: Wow, that’s a great description, it’s almost like what people think about heavy metal and the negative vibe you get from those who truly don’t know it’s much more than that. Pleasants: Yeah, yeah. They think it’s just someone banging on a guitar until they come see it, and then they say, “Oh, wow, OK. The guy playing it has technique, style and works hard at it to develop all these different styles.” Sun: In regard to the last question, is punk rock still alive because you guys do what you love or is there another reason why? Pleasants: Yeah, I still th i nk pu nk rock is a live because we’ve had bands that come up to us like Limp Biscuit, Ice-T, and say that we were a big influence to them and why they started their own bands. So I believe it’s still alive from those who bought their first Suicide album and then followed other bands like The Dead Kennedys, Black Flag, Circle Jerks. There are so many bands out there that at some

STILL CYCO | SEE PAGE 22 COMMUNITY


SPORTS 360 Lynx sweep Bengals, 5-1 By Boderra Joe Sun Correspondent

R

ehoboth Chr istia n School seniors and captains of the boys’ soccer team, Allen West and John Barriga, carried the Lynx to a 5-1 victory against the Gallup High School Bengals during a non-conference home game Sept. 11. Scoreless in the first half beneath the sun, the Bengals went up 1-0 with 12:32 remaining in the first half, when senior

and captain Justin Martinez found his way through Lynx defenders. The advantage didn’t last for long, though, as West answered back with a clear breakaway in front of the net to tie the game with 7:33 remaining on the clock.

BATTLE IT OUT Drenched in sweat and scuffed with turf burns, both teams battled each other on both ends of the field, taking

shots left and right to determine who will lead the first half. With a minute left, West found a gap and dribbled his way within the 18-yard box, and fired a shot that bounced off the Bengals’ goal keeper’s hands, keeping the ball alive when West again jumped midair to head the ball in, putting the Lynx up 2-1.

FULL FORCE Lynx still dominated the

field as Barriga found himself a huge gap within the 18-yard box to lead the second half 3-1 with 29 minutes remaining. The Gallup Bengals were not done fighting. They managed to keep pushing their defensive line up and to push the ball more, forcing the Lynx to be off-sides. The Bengals used all their strength and speed in taking every shot possible to take the lead, but it wasn’t enough to close out West and Barriga’s control and speed. West again found an opening through Bengals defenders to put the Lynx up 4-1 with 12

minutes remaining in the second half. Eleven minutes stood when fresh legs, Lynx senior Kiedis Begaye, challenged his Bengals opponent on the other end of the field. Begaye stole the ball, dribbled toward the goal and assisted to Barriga, who curved it in the back of the net to end the game. Lynx took on Miyamura H ig h School S ept . 13 at Miyamura. The Bengals’ played Sept. 13 against Valencia High School. For more information, please visit: www.maxpreps.com

Rehoboth Lynx player Allen West (1) weaves his way through Gallup Bengals defenders during a non-confer- Rehoboth Lynx player John Barriga (6) receives a pass and puts it in passed a Gallup Bengals goalkeeper Sept. 11 at ence game Sept. 11. Photo Credit: Boderra Joe Rehoboth. Photo Credit: Boderra Joe

IMPACTFUL FILM | FROM PAGE 15 dramatization during the Fiesta. Leading up to the decision to remove the Entrada, Veiled Lightning was screened at various venues to raise awareness on the matter. The New Mexico History Museum screened the film twice. In making the documentary, filmmakers shot 300 hours of footage across the state and in six Pueblos, and interviewed more than 90 individuals. One such figure was Jennifer Marley — a lead organizer of the Red Nation, a coalition dedicated to Native liberation — at her home in San Ildefonso Pueblo. Marley was arrested along with seven other protestors in September 2017 for pushing her way through a line of police officers during the Entrada. All eight protestors’ cases were dismissed. More than 100 people protested the reenactment in Santa Fe during last year’s Fiesta event. Chevalier said Veiled Lightning has “enjoyed an amazing tour of the film festival circuit, with new developments poised to bring New Mexico even greater coverage for its role in this important social justice issue. Our team worked extensively with people from Acoma, Gallup, Zuni Pueblo, Quemado and Hopi lands.” As for Chevalier, while her film makes the festival rounds to broad acclaim, she’s “currently assisting flamenco legend Maria Benitez with her memoirs, and working on a television script about the Pueblo Revolt with a fantasy vibe,” she said. SPORTS

EXTRAVAGANZA | FROM PAGE 16

A conquistador during the Entrada at a Santa Fe Fiesta. This year, an agreement was reached to do away with the reenactment. Photo Credit: Brian Fishbine, Picture This Production Company for Veiled Lightning Chevalier will be in Gallup for the GFF screening. The documentary will be screened at 10 am on Sept. 15. Visit www.gallupfilmfestival. com for screening and ticket information, and www.veiledlightning.com to learn more about the film.

her in living everyday, like helping her cook, cleaning, and other people assist her, too,” Bufaro said. “She even has a job there as a janitor.” Yazzie is one of many who take advantage of the art department at CCRC, where the residents create art in various mediums. All exhibition proceeds go back to the organization, and the residents’ works are created to enhance their skills, Bufaro said. “We like for them to make their own art and it helps them, and it’s fun, too,” he said. M a rko s Ch avez , a technolog y tra iner at Octavia Fellin, said the CCRC group was there a year ago, and the library wanted to have them back again for this event. “It was a joint-venture

that they’ve done a show here before about a year ago, and it was a great way to showcase their artwork once again, and we had the space available and we were more than happy to accommodate,” he said. “I think it’s great every time we’ve had them, and they’ve always had some unique pieces and it’s neat to see a lot of the colors and the creativity that goes into them.” Saltwater’s wooden guitar was one of Chavez’s favorite pieces on display, along with a shield made with feathers. “I really love that piece and I might even purchase that one,” he said. For more information about the Octavia Fellin Public Library, contact (505) 863-1291; for more information on CCRC, Inc., call (505) 735-2261 or visit: www.ccrcnm.org.

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

21


CLASSIFIEDS WEEKLY RATES

FIRST 25 WORDS: FREE! (4 consecutive weeks max.)

26-50 WORDS: $10 51-75: WORDS: $20 76-100 WORDS: $30 $10 FOR EACH ADD’L 25 WORDS

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CLASSIFIEDS and love, and we provide the supplies and vet care. For info., email: babsie220@gmail. com Did you lose a pet? Advertise your lost baby for FREE. Send pic and text. Deadline for submission Tuesday 5 pm. Email: gallupsun@gmail.com

EMAIL: GALLUPSUN@GMAIL.COM DUE: TUESDAYS 5 PM LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES GALLUP SUN ARCHIVES Need a past issue? $2.00 per copy. Note issue date and send check or M.O. to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305. Subject to availability. HELP WANTED September 11, 2018 McKinley County is now accepting applications for the following positions: POSITION Special Projects Coordinator DEPARTMENT Manager’s Office FOR BEST CONSIDERATION September 20, 2018 Applications and additional information regarding positions can be found on the County web site www.co.mckinley. nm.us Dezirie Gomez CPO Human Resource Director *** DELIVERY The Gallup Sun has an immediate opening for a responsible and reliable Gallup-based individual to help deliver its weekly newspapers. This independent contract driver

will serve as an alternate for Thursday evening pickup from the print plant outside of town. Must have Thursday evenings and Fridays available. Background, references and DMV check required. Hourly + mileage. Submit cover letter, resume or work history by email only to: gallupsun@gmail.com HOMES FOR RENT UNFURNISHED: 1 bedroom house 2 bedroom apartment 1 year lease required. NO pets. Call (505) 863-4294 for information before 7 pm *** PLACE YOUR REAL ESTATE AD HERE! FIRST 25 WORDS FREE. LOGO and/or PHOTO $5 EACH. APPEARS ON GALLUPSUN.COM FOR FREE! EMAIL: gallupsun@gmail.com CALL: (505) 722-8994 MOBILE HOMES MOBILE HOME SPACES Mobile Home Spaces – Single wide – any size $215/mo. Double Wide $265/mo. Call Mike 505-870-3430 or Carmelita 505870-4095. PETS Volunteers Wanted Four Corners Pet Alliance is in desperate need of foster homes for dogs and cats. You provide the temporary home

Place an tribute in the Gallup Sun It will last the whole week and forever on GallupSun.com Easy form to fill out. Short form FREE! Artistic, customized tributes available. Phone: (505) 722-8994

Email: gallupsun@gmail.com

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22 Friday September 14, 2018 • Gallup Sun

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TAHOE SUV POLICE PURSUIT RATED 4x4 VEHICLES until Thursday, October 18th, 2018 at 2:00 P.M., Local Time, at which time bids will be opened and publicly read aloud, in the County Commission Chambers, as more particularly set out in the specifications, copies for such may be obtained from the Purchasing Department, 207 West Hill Street, Gallup, New Mexico, 87301, or McKinley County website: http://www.co.mckinley.nm.us/bids.aspx . McKinley County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to waive informalities. For more information please contact Hugo G. Cano at (505) 722-3868, Ext. 1076. The Procurement Code, Sections 13-1-28 Through 13-1-199,

NMSA, 1978 imposes civil and criminal penalties for code violations. In addition the New Mexico criminal statutes impose felony/penalties for illegal bribes, gratuities and kickbacks.

STILL CYCO | FROM PAGE 20

know you got a busy schedule, so thank you very much, Dean, and all the best on your new album and the tour. Catch Suicidal Tendencies at the Sunshine Theater Sept. 19. Visit: www.suicidaltendencies.com

point have been influenced by punk rock and fused it into their music. Sun: Man, I could talk to you forever [laughing], but I

DATED this 14th day of September, 2018 BY:/s/ Genevieve Jackson______Chairperson, Board of Commissioners PUBLISHED: Friday, September 14, 2018, The Gallup Sun

MAIL DELIVERY 1 year subscription. Send check for $59.95 to:

Gallup Sun Publishing PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305

DATED this 14th day of September, 2018 BY:/s/ Genevieve Jackson______Chairperson, Board of Commissioners PUBLISHED: Friday, September 14, 2018 The Gallup Sun

Suicidal Tendencies’ new album Still Cyco After All These Years. Photo Credit: Courtesy

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR SEPT. 14-20, 2018 FRIDAY, Sept. 14 TECH TIME 10:30 am12:30 pm @ Octavia Fellin Public Library Main Branch, 115 W Hill Ave. Free computer training is available each week. Class size is limited to 10 participants per session. No registration required. This week: Using Google Apps Class. Call (505) 863-1291 email libtrain@gallupnm.gov. CREATION STATION 3D (AGES 9 AND UP) 2 pm @ Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. This month we’re making custom keychains using the free online modeling TinkerCAD and printing your creations on the Library’s 3D printer for you to keep. Call (505) 726-6120. SATURDAY, Sept. 15 BOOK CLUB 9 am-6 pm @ Main Branch. Register at either library (today is last day to register) for a free copy of Killers of the Flower Moon by Davis Grann. This is a story about greed, depravity, and serial murder in 1920s Oklahoma. Discussions will begin in October so get ready for some good food and tons of fun. Call (505) 863-1291 or email libsuper@ gallupnm.gov. MESSY SCIENCE SATURDAY 2 pm @ Children’s Branch. Get ready for volcanoes, rockets and reactions at the library for messy science. MONDAY, Sept. 17 TECH TIME 3-5 pm @ Main Branch. Free computer training is available each week. Class size is limited to 10 participants per session. No registration required. This week: Computer Skills II Class. TUESDAY, Sept. 18 TECH TIME 10:30 am @ Gallup Senior Center. The Gallup Senior Citizen’s Center will host computer classes presented by the library. These classes are specially designed for anyone 55+ and will teach the basic skills needed to access a computer. There will also be one-on-one help sessions. No registration needed. Contact the Senior Citizen’s Center at (505) 722-4740 for Senior Center questions. For library information, call (505)8631291 or email libtrain@ gallupnm.gov. MAKER ZONE CALENDAR

CALENDAR

4-5 pm @ Children’s Branch. We provide the supplies, you provide the ideas.

ups. Starts Tuesday, Aug. 14, 6-8 pm. Journey Church, 501 S. Third St. (505) 979-0511.

GALLUP INTERFAITH COMMUNITY The Gallup Interfaith Community will meet at 6:30 pm. Bring food or drink for a shared mean. All are welcome in friendship and community. 151 State Hwy. 564 (Boardman Drive near Orleans Manor apartments. Call (505) 870-1942.

CITY OF GALLUP’S SUSTAINABLE GALLUP BOARD Meets on the first Monday from 3-5 pm at the Octavia Fellin Library. When those Mondays are holidays, the meetings are on the following Monday. Community members concerned about conservation, energy, water, recycling and other environmental issues are welcome. Call (505) 722-0039 for information.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 STORY TIME (AGES 2-4) 10:30 am @ Children’s Branch. An active and energetic program for toddlers, featuring music, movement, rhymes and stories. TECH TIME Noon-1 pm @ Main Branch. Join us each month for discussions on technology related topics that affect the community. Sessions are free and no registration is required. Call (505) 863-1291 or email libtrain@gallupnm. gov. September Topic: One-2-one Technology Help. WEDNESDAY NIGHT FILMS 5:30-7 pm @ Main Branch. This week’s film: Just Before I Go. THURSDAY, Sept. 20 CRAFTY KIDS 4-5 pm @ Children’s Branch. Fun crafts for the whole family. This week’s activity: Rainbow Stick Art. TECH TIME 5 pm @ Main Branch. Free computer training is available each week. Class size is limited to 10 participants per session. No Registration required. Call (505)863-1291 or email libtrain@gallupnm. gov. This week: MS Excel for Beginners Class. ONGOING ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Window Rock AA Group meets at Fellowship Hall WR Christian Center across from N.N. Fairgrounds/Wellness Center, Hwy 264, Mondays at 5:45 PM. Closed Speaker Meeting, limited to persons who have a desire to stop drinking. We cannot accommodate children. No attendance forms, smartphones. Visit aa-fc.orgfor more info. CELEBRATE RECOVERY A Christ-centered recovery program that helps you heal from the pain of your un-managed hurts, habits and hang-

CHURCHROCK CHAPTER Now accepting toy donations for the Christmas toy drive until Wed. Dec. 20. The toys will be distributed at the annual community Christmas dinner on Thursday Dec. 21. Please drop off an unwrapped toy for distribution at Churchrock Chapter. Let’s spread the Christmas cheer by giving. Call (505) 488-2166. Churchrock Chapter Administration. CO-DEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS Meets Wednesday, 6-7 pm, at First United Methodist Church, 1800 Redrock Dr. (in the library). All are welcome. COMMUNITY PANTRY The Hope Garden offers organic produce for sale from 10 am-noon, Tue - Fri., 1130 E. Hassler Valley Road. All funds go to helping feed local folks. Call (505) 726-8068 or when visiting, ask for Vernon Garcia. COMMUNITY PROVIDERS All meetings will be the last Thursday of every month. Speakers for the Community Providers Agenda Sept. 27 meeting are needed. Please contact Bill Camarota bcamorota@rmchcs.org or Ben Welch bwelch@gallupnm.gov. RMCHCS East Campus, 12 Noon in the Chapel. FRIDAY NIGHT HOOTENANNY Gallup’s longest-running live show! Every Friday night from 7-9 pm. Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe, 306 S. Second St. GALLUP-MCKINLEY COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY Wednesdays are low-cost Spay and Neuter Days, at the Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society. For more information, please call (505) 863-2616, or email: gmchumanesociety@gmail.com. Location: 1315 Hamilton Rd. GALLUP SOLAR Gallup Solar is hosting community conversations about all things solar Wednesdays from 6 to 8 pm at 113 E. Logan. Call: (505) 728-9246 for

info on topics and directions. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Habitat for Humanity yard sales are held every Saturday, 9 am-noon on Warehouse Lane, weather permitting. Volunteers wishing to serve on construction projects may sign up there or call (505) 722-4226. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY - WORK SESSIONS Habitat for Humanity work sessions held each week. Volunteers to serve on decision making meetings or wish to volunteer at or help fund construction projects. Call Bill Bright at (505) 722-4226. MCKINLEY COUNTY HEALTH ALLIANCE McKinley County Health Alliance convenes on the second Wednesday of the month from 11 am-1pm at the New Mexico Cancer Center across from UNM-Gallup. Everyone is welcome to attend and engage in discussions about health, education, economic, and environmental inequities and to help facilitate change in those systems. Call (505) 906-2671. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Overeaters Anonymous 12step meetings. Held every Saturday at 10 am. The First Methodist Church, 1800 Red Rock Drive. Open to anybody who has a desire to stop compulsive eating. Contact info. (505) 307-5999, (505) 721-9208 or (505) 870-1483. RECYCLING COUNCIL McKinley Citizens Recycling Council is a local nonprofit working to increase recycling through education, community outreach, and partnership with local government agencies. MCRC meets the first Saturday of the month at 2 pm, at Red Mesa on Hill St. For more information, please call (505) 722-5142 or visit Recylegallup.org.

Lane: Rehoboth Christian School’s annual fall carnival. Visit the Rehoboth Sports and Fitness Center from 4-8 pm for fun for the whole family. Proceeds benefit the band and choir programs at Rehoboth. GALLUP CHILDREN’S WRITERS AND ILLUSTRATORS GROUP Sept. 22: Community members interested in learning more about writing or illustrating children’s books are invited to attend the first Gallup meeting of The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. Held in the study room of the Children’s Library, 200 W. Aztec, from 10 am to noon. Everyone is welcome to attend. Info: newmexico@scbwi.org. GALLUPARTS - ARTSCRAWL LINEUP The entire 2018 lineup is outlined below: Oct. 13 – Sixth Sense; Nov. 10 – In Black & White; and Dec. 8 – Let’s Have a Ball. RAINBOW CIRCLE MEETING On Sept. 30, the rescheduled Rainbow Circle meeting will take place at 5 pm. Location: Viro Circle Park, one block south of Aztec and S. Clark. In the event of inclement weather: Red Mesa Center, 105 W. Hill. ANNUAL INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S DAY On Oct. 8, the 14th Annual Indigenous People’s Day will take place. Call (505) 5678561. Noon-5 pm at the Gallup Cultural Center, 201 E. Hwy. 66. THE GALLUP VETERAN’S BENEFIT BALL 2018 On Nov. 2, an evening to honor and say thank you to our local Veterans! Event proceeds will be donated to the local Veterans Helping Veterans organization. Dinner/ Dance (semi-formal dress) Hilton Garden Inn 6-11pm. Tickets can be picked up at Sundance Motors on 1121 N US 491; 10 am-5 pm. Call (505) 870-5957. There will be a silent auction held the night of the event. All proceeds will be donated to benefit local Veterans Helping Veterans organization.

RECYCLING DEPOT The Recycling Depot will now be open from noon-1:30 pm on the first Saturdays of the month. Educators and artists are encouraged to come by and see what’s available. Volunteers will accept some items, such as paper towels and toilet paper rolls. This is a free service of the McKinley To post a nonprofit or Citizen’s Recycling Council. civic event in the calendar Call (505) 722-5152. SAVE THE DATE FALL CARNIVAL Sept. 21, 7 Tse Yaaniichii

section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: Monday at 5 pm.

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018

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Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018  

Gallup Sun • Friday September 14, 2018  

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