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Isle of Man Premier Magazine | no 30 | May 2014 | the [GIVE] issue

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FEATURING OFFSHORE BUSINESS

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Issue 6

May/June 2014

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY A RECIPE FOR RELOCATION BANKING - MOBILE BANKING TECHNOLOGY - A CURE FOR DATA JET LAG PLUS - MOVERS & SHAKERS, A-LIST EVENTS, ISLAND SPORTING STARS

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Great day out on the course today, I’ll upload some more pics later. Only a few weeks to go... Bring on the TT!

Wherever you are, whatever you’re doing, there are some moments you just have to share. We’re committed to giving you even more in the future.


Gallery is published eleven times a year as a fresh yet discerning guide to all that happens on the Island and beyond. Not too arty farty superior or too serious, written by the people of the Isle of Man for people everywhere.

CONTRIBUTORS

WHO WE ARE

Editorial

Publisher/Editor STEVE REDFORD DD : 07624 249249 steve@gallery.co.im

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Sales & Client Relations RACHEL MORRIS DD: 07624 209726 rachel@gallery.co.im Accounts LAURA MACGREGOR laura@gallery.co.im Design Studio design@gallery.co.im Paparazzi paparazzi@gallery.co.im

Tanya Humbles Lisa Jones Hannah Goodby Michelle Tonnesen Linda Huxley Anne Berry Jennifer Parkes Nadia Alkahzrajie Grant Runyon Les Able Suzy Holland Rebecca Lawrence Rachel Green Theo Leworthy Liz Corlett Anne Moorhouse Leon Flemming Lionel Cowin Ella Pritchard Phil Taylor Clare Bowie

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Distribution www.gallery.co.im/distribution distro@gallery.co.im

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Design Studio Emma Cooke Steve Redford Russ Atikinson Katherine Mather

CAREERS jobs@gallery.co.im

Photography Peter Kwiecinski Matt Mosur Shan Fisher

Recycle.

Gallery recycles all its storage and packing materials, boxes and any old magazines that are returned. We don’t get that many fortunately. We love to know our readers hang on to previous copies but when you move or find that they’re taking up too much space, drop them down to the recycling bins. If you want to find out more about recycling, call: 01624 686540. We put this on the green strip to look eco innit... That’s smart!

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Disclaimer. All rights reserved. Any form of reproduction of Gallery Magazine, in part or whole is strictly prohibited without the written consent of the publisher. Any views expressed by advertisers or contributors may not be those of the publisher. Unsolicited artwork, manuscripts and copy are accepted by Gallery Magazine, but the publisher cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage. All material, copy and artwork supplied is assumed to be copyright free unless otherwise advised. Contributions for Gallery should be emailed to editorial@gallery.co.im. Names have been changed to protect the innocent and no penguins were harmed in the manufacture of this magazine, you can’t prove nuffing. Why are you still reading the small print? How about researching what really makes the best paper aeroplane? Test them with your colleagues and if you send us a picture of yours we’ll send you a Mars bar..


INTRO

#30

[GIVE] Isle of Man Premier Magazine | no 30 | May 2014 | the [GIVE] issue

£ priceless

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

WWW.GALLERY.CO.IM

CONTRIBUTE contribute@gallery.co.im Rip it, scrap it, comment, critique, research, report. Opinions wanted on politics, business, news, home, property, music, gadgets, sports and culture. Something annoyed you and you want to tell the island? We’re here for you. If you’d like to see your name in... er... print, get in touch.

ADVERTISE ad@gallery.co.im We understand that the medium is the message. The quality of a magazine reflects on the businesses that advertise within it. Gallery is the Isle of Man highest quality magazine and premium print media option for stylish and progressive brands. If you have a business or strategy to promote get in touch. We don’t have pushy sales people and won’t try and badger, coerce, harass or try to sell you something you don’t want. Call us on 07624 249249 or drop us an email...

FEATURE features@gallery.co.im If you are an artist with work to exhibit, an event or entertainment organiser with an event coming up or a business with some exciting news or a new product to feature, get in touch. We’re keen to feature anything of interest that will entertain our readers.

edito A

s much as I’m trying not to, I still use Facebook pretty much every day. What can I say, I like seeing contrived motivational posters and pictures of what people I haven’t seen for 10 years are doing with their lives, preferably as a selfie.

The selfie; a visual virus of the smartphone wielding generation. Whether it’s people posing for TT photies or others jumping on the Gallery craze for selfies with pets; the genre is dominating our photographic use of digital devices. There’s even a social network dedicated to people that just want to take a selfie, check @selfieim if you’re a fan. It has, however, shown me a use for this life-editing subculture that aligns perfectly with this months’ ‘Give’ theme. #nomakeupselfie has shown that marrying the art of selfie taking, and a woman’s desire to show that they can still look perky when they’re not covered in MAC has to be a positive thing. I did watch with interest as the selfies turned to selfie/donation screenshot combinations; ladies showing they were putting their money where their faces were in the face of social media scrutiny. In fact I had no choice as Facebook became nomakeupbook for a few days. This issue is packed full of interesting creative stories, people and pet selfies! So stop reading the edito turn the page and enjoy. SR

Gallery Magazine, Quay House, South Quay, Douglas Isle of Man, IM1 5AR T: 07624 249249 E: info@gallery.co.im www.gallery.co.im

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Is 70s style making a comeback? Well, it certainly is with this Omega Speedmaster Mark II Watch; the reintroduction of a watch that first appeared in 1969. FEATURES 1969 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR HUMANKIND. FOR THE FIRST TIME. WE BROKE OUR TERRESTRIAL BONDS AND SET FOOT ON ANOTHER WORLD – AND THE ASTRONAUTS WHO TOOK THOSE FIRST STEPS ON THE LUNAR SURFACE WERE EQUIPPED WITH OMEGA SPEEDMASTER PROFESSIONAL CHRONOGRAPHS. THE SAME YEAR, OMEGA INTRODUCED THE NEW-LOOK SPEEDMASTER MARK II, A TIMEPIECE WITH A STREAMLINED CASE THAT WAS POWERED BY THE SAME SPACE-TESTED, HAND-WOUND CALIBRE 1861, FOUND INSIDE THE NICKNAMED ‘MOONWATCH’. The most memorable moment in the Speedmaster’s history was undoubtedly 21 July 1969 at 02:56 GMT, when it recorded man’s first steps on the Moon’s surface. The Apollo 11 mission was a milestone in history and the Speedmaster became the first watch (and the only watch since) to be worn on the Moon. In 2014, OMEGA has reintroduced this classic Speedmaster Mark II and updated it to include an automatic movement and tachymetric scale that is visible in the most limited light; a first in the iconic Speedmaster family.

crown and pushers. A date corrector is located at 10 o’clock on the case. The dial is complete with the three recognisable sub-dials: a 30-minute recorder at 3 o’clock, 12-hour recorder at 6 o’clock and small seconds sub-dial at 9 o’clock. A flat scratch-resistant sapphire crystal protects the matt black or grey dial. The transparent tachymetric scale on the sapphire crystal is illuminated from beneath by an aluminium ring filled with Super-LumiNova. The varnished white and black hour and minute hands are coated with Super-LumiNova, as is the central chronograph hand. The case is fitted with a brushed stainless steel bracelet, complete with OMEGA’s patented ex-tendable foldover rack-and-pusher clasp. The watch is presented with a tool that makes adjusting the date quick and easy. Distinguishing the new Speedmaster Mark II from the 1969 watch that inspired it is the Co-Axial calibre 3330. It has a self-winding movement, equipped with an Si14 silicon balance spring and a column-wheel chronograph mechanism. The new OMEGA Speedmaster Mark II is water resistant to 10 bar (100 metres/330 feet) and is delivered with a full four-year warranty.

The polished and brushed stainless steel case is barrel-shaped and has a polished

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INTRO

HIGHLIGHTS UPFRONT

UPFRONT

CULTURE

CULTURE

CSR Feature

ROCK AND NEW ROLE

WORDS

WORDS Grant Runyon ILLUSTRATION Will Bertram

To live in the Isle of Man is to be lucky enough to live in one of the safest, cleanest and wealthiest societies in the world. 

Before 2002 it was tricky to tell whether the initials WWF symbolised a love of pandas or piledrivers, a confusion which lead to much embarrassment when a mix-up on Blue Peter led to Hulk Hogan being served a basket of Viagra-spiked bamboo whilst Brutus ‘the Barber’ Beefcake was set upon by starving tigers - Jake ‘the Snake’ Roberts wisely maintained a foot in both camps and was later knighted for rescuing John Noakes from Hulkamania running wild on his bottom.  The upshot of this diplomatic bodyslam was that WWF wrestling became the WWE, the World Wildlife Fund carried on keeping an eye on the rhinos, and the world forgot about the plight of those gigantic men too old or sick to continue doing steroids and beating each other with folding chairs. Today, the confusingly-named World Wrestler Fund solicits donations of cash and miss-spelled cardboard signs to help these retired grapplers in their hour of need. A donation of just £5 can buy enough facepaint for Legion of Doom to go to the shops, £10 funds a new kilt for Rowdy Roddy Piper and £35 can rent a video camera so The Iron Sheik can record a rambling threat to break The Ultimate Warrior’s legs. 

T H E K R A N K I E S O C I ET Y ( R AI S I N G AWA R EN ESS O F K R A N K I EI S M ) How would you feel if you were a fully-grown woman, afflicted with a genetic condition that made you resemble a small Scottish boy? There’s no punchline to this joke, because it’s the true story of people who grow up with the rare and incurable condition of Krankieism, caused by a terrible mutation of the Fandabidozi gene.  The work of the Krankie society carries out medical research into this little-known disorder, as well as related light entertainment conditions such as Mallet’s Mallet, Crinkly Bottom and Chegwin Syndrome.  Give generously, because these people deserve better than to be shunned and jeered at when they walk the streets.

But that was before he heard Dire Straits’ ‘Sultans of Swing’ on the car radio while out with his father, Tony. From that moment the 11-year-old from Port St Mary decided he wanted to play the guitar. “My dad first taught me the guitar, but I didn’t really want to know about the theory, I just wanted to be able to play like Mark Knopfler or Eric Clapton I sort of fell into becoming a musician. At first I was just fiddling about, playing by ear for a hobby. I never craved fame; I just wanted instant ability.” He was taught not only by his father but, also by Peter Lumb. “Peter and my dad were great but, as an 11-year-old, I didn’t want to learn the boring stuff, like chords.”

Despite what you might read in the UK’s inkier papers, we don’t all hide gold-plated suitcases full of Chris Moyles’ money, but we certainly do alright when compared to a lot of other places. We have rich people and poor people like anywhere else, but I can’t remember the last time we were annexed by Russia, plagued by honey badgers or buried underneath an eruption of molten lava. The most stressful thing that’s happened to us in the last twelve months is some unusually gusty weather causing M&S to run out of ready meals.  As luck would have it we pulled together as a community, the tide went down and 3-for-2 Spaghetti Carbonara was restocked before the Red Cross needed to get involved.   Our fortunate position makes us a charitable community, from the hardworking families donating their clothes to the Oxfam shop all the way up to the Bentley-driving lords of finance, who selflessly write off hefty donations to donkey sanctuaries against multimillion tax liabilities in Monaco and Antigua.  Charities are so wellpublicised in dress-down days, sponsored walks and wacky facial hair challenges that it can be a real challenge to work out in which bucket you should chuck your coins next.  Most people plump for animals (cute and unthreatening), underprivileged children (sympathetic until they grow up) or disease research (hedging your bets), but this has the unfortunate side-effect of diverting attention away from issues that might be less glamorous, but are equally deserving of the £4 you would have otherwise spent on another cup of hot, sugary milk.  Why not alleviate a little more of your first world guilt and throw a few pounds to one of these lesser-known charities?     

Inbetween his studies at Castle Rushen High School, he continued to drift into music circles. “In the Isle of Man, it’s so easy to meet other like-minded people.” By the age of 17, he’d met Bob Miller, who became and still is his manager. After gaining what he admits were less than impressive A-levels, he went to see his careers adviser. “I had an opportunity to

N I C E N E WS : W E A N I N G G R A N D PA R E N TS O F F T H E DA I LY M A I L

For generations society has assumed that becoming mean about single parents, paranoid about the EU and racist towards gypsies was an inevitable side effect of ageing, alongside an interest in beige nylon trousers and cruise holidays.  Recent scientific breakthroughs have dramatically proven that this is not the case, and for the first time established a correlation between developing cartoonish right-wing views and the regular consumption of a newspaper that endorsed the British Union of Fascists and thinks that gay marriage caused the global recession.  The dedicated volunteers at NiceNews painstakingly replace the illicit buzz of the Mail’s hysterical articles about social workers and muslims with gentle Radio Times profiles of Anthea Turner, before slowly introducing National Geographic and eventually full-scale substitution with The Guardian. With your support, their success rate in preventing gran from becoming a frothing reactionary is as high as 75%; unfortunately scientific consensus remains that any pensioner already hooked on The Daily Express is beyond hope. 

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But instead of seeing the world, he saw Newark in Nottingham, where he moved to and started his career as blues rock artist in earnest.

As a child, and long before he took up the guitar, he took up the chisel. He said: “I wanted to be a paleontologist and would often be out chiseling away at pieces of rock.”

R OYA L S O C I ET Y FO R T H E P R EV EN T I O N O F C R U ELT Y TO D L I ST C EL EB R I T I ES

The western world’s insatiable demand for reality television has enabled our society to gorge itself on junk entertainment, with the tragic hidden cost that unwanted celebrities are multiplying faster than homes can be found for them. The RSPCD campaigns to remind people that a celebrity is for life, not just for one series of The Apprentice.  It offers free education to TV commissioners at Channel 4 and provides a neutering service to prevent any more of Kerry Katona’s unwanted children being found abandoned in the bins behind the tattoo parlour.  Your small donation could provide for a loving home for Craig from Big Brother, take the entire cast of Geordie Shore to the STD clinic or arrange for Katie Hopkins to be humanely destroyed.

SAV E T H E M I D D L E C L ASS C H I L D R EN  

Across the world, in areas of war and famine, it is always the innocent children who suffer most.  This is no less true in Britain’s slightlydeprived middle class communities, where children like Alfie (6) and Charlotte (3) have gone without (organic) food for weeks because Mummy lost her job copywriting part-time for an online marketing startup.  Until she contacts another schoolfriend on LinkedIn and finds work, Alfie, Charlotte and Mummy will have to survive on just Daddy’s salary as a fund manager.  This will mean no family outings to Bestival, no yoga classes and the horrible possibility that Alfie will have to catch the bus to the local comprehensive.  Have a heart don’t let Charlotte grow up in a world where she has to use Microsoft Windows and fly economy class.

“Pubs in the Isle of Man are very supportive of musicians and are incredibly useful training grounds for bands. When I was younger and still living in the Island I found it a very safe and encouraging environment to be in, so I’m really pleased to have been chosen to be a youth cultural ambassador for Island of Culture 2014 and to have an opportunity to give something back to the Isle of Man.”

move the UK and pursue a career in music, but Mum and Dad wanted me to go to university. My careers adviser, though, looked at my results and said I’d be better off taking a gap year and seeing the world.”

DAVY KNOWLES WAS ALWAYS INTERESTED IN ROCK; HE JUST DIDN’T KNOW FOR A WHILE THAT THE ROCK HE WAS INTERESTED IN WAS OF THE MUSICAL AND NOT THE GEOLOGICAL KIND.

WW F : WO R L D W R E ST L E R F U N D

“When I reached about 19, though, I realised it was time I started to learn more about the practical side, so studied theory and harmony which opened up more creative possibilities, and began to bring an extra layer to my work.” Now an accomplished singer/songwriter, he released his first solo album ‘Coming Up For Air’, in 2009. “When I’m writing a song the lyrics and the music come at the same time, but separately, sort of in parallel. I might hear something someone’s said that I could use in a song and note it down or see something and take a shot of it on my phone, then later I’ll put the two together. For me, the best songs are conversational, because then they take on that extra, human element.” Celtic influences play a big part in his work. He says Manx Celtic music “is blossoming and blooming” and he’s proud that through his work he can promote elements of Manx culture and heritage in the US. The Isle of Man has played a big part in his and the band’s career. “We cut our teeth in the Isle of Man, playing – and getting paid – in pubs, which was great. It was a shock, though, when I started playing at jam nights in London and found that you actually had to pay to play.”

C A M PA I G N TO S EN D B O N O TO M A R S

of Corporate Social Responsibility The concept of the conscious consumer demanding that business is carried out in an ethical and socially responsible manner is so wellestablished today that we almost take it for granted. With globalisation, the internet and the ever-present social media, it is close to impossible for companies, governments or even NGOs to put a foot wrong without the whole world knowing. But this was not always the case.

Here is a bit of background to understand the evolution of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) movement.

Davy is based in Chicago, where he lives with his fiancée Amber. He says: “She’s got a proper job; she’s a radiologist” - much of his life is taken up with touring (“as we’ve gained some recognition over the years the tour busses have got better”) and he’s just two states left where he has yet to perform, Alaska and Hawaii.

The main principles of CSR involve economic, legal, ethical and discretionary aspects. A corporation needs to generate profits, while operating within the laws of the state. The corporation also needs to be ethical, but has the right to be discretional about the decisions it makes. CSR and corporate sustainability represent the way companies achieve enhanced ethical standards and a balance of economic, environmental and social imperatives, addressing the concerns and expectations of their stakeholders.

”Although I’ve been a professional musician since I was 19, the fact that people actually buy our records (he’s a big vinyl fan) and pay to come and see us perform is still utterly baffling to me.” He says it’s equally baffling – and flattering – that he was invited to be the keynote speaker at the recent employability conference, aimed at helping young people make the transition from school to the workplace. “The help and advice I received from people in my early days was incredibly valuable, so for the conference I wanted to make the point that it’s really important to listen to your mentors and absorb like a sponge everything they say.”

The phrase Corporate Social Responsibility was coined in 1953 - with the publication of Howard Bowen’s “Social Responsibility of Businessmen”, which posed the question of “what responsibilities to society can business people be reasonably expected to assume?” Thus, in the 1950s, the primary focus was on businesses doing good deeds for society. During the 1960s, key events, people and ideas were instrumental in characterising the social changes ushered in during this decade. Examples of corporate social responsibility began to emerge, and the civil rights movement, consumerism, and environmentalism greatly changed the way society expected the business world to behave. Writing and budding research on the subject expanded the definition, suggesting that beyond legal obligations companies had certain responsibilities to society.

He’s seen big changes in the music industry since he started out.”‘There was a time when you’d never have seen Mark Knopfler or Peter Frampton on Twitter. Now people buy into you as a person as well as an artist. Social media is really useful for finding out where your fan base is; also, with people able to comment so easily on you and your music, there’s an added pressure to reaffirm their faith in you and do good work.”

Thanks to NASA, we believe that at some point in its long history the planet Mars may have supported basic cellular life. A full-scale manned mission is still decades away, but a consortium of megaphilanthropists has banded together with the bold vision to send a human ambassador to the red planet.  The consensus amongst experts is that only one man is suitable for this task: Bono, lead singer of U2 and coincidentally someone that both Bill Gates and Ban Ki Moon try and avoid sitting next to at dinner.  Your donations will fund an experimental, one way rocket and the campaign required to convince Bono that Martian civilisation exists and wants to be lectured about charity by a multi-millionaire tax dodger.  The journey will take at least five years, but the rocket will be fitted with a fail-safe detonator in case scientists later discover that Martians really do exist, have already heard Bono’s last album and would perceive Earth’s mission as an act of war.

“What’s been one of the nicest and most rewarding things for me is when I hear from Manx ex-pats who’ve heard Roll Away (from his debut album of the same name with Back Door Slam and includes the line: “Maybe I’ll return to this island some day”) and they say how it reminds them of home.”

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) – a group of 34 powerful industrialised countries – was also created during this decade to promote policies improving the economic and social well-being of people around the world. With the 70s, came the common use of

www.davyknowles.com

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

ACTIVE

FEATURE

WORDS

94 84

Moving to the Isle of Man can be a daunting challenge – especially if you arrive as an “accompanying spouse”. You have no natural network or approach angle to getting settled into local life. Making a new home and connecting to a foreign environment are almost always chaotic and stressful. A social network will help you settle in faster than anything else; but starting one from scratch can be a terrifying prospect.

At that time, both the OECD and the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations (UNCTC) began developing codes of conduct in an attempt to control different aspects of corporate globalisation. In 1976, the OECD, recognising the complications associated with companies operating across borders, established a set of guidelines to ease the workings of globalisation; setting the “rules of the game” for foreign direct investment, and creating an atmosphere of confidence predictability in overseas corporations. The OECD’s “Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises” covered areas such as accounting, tax payments, and operating in accordance with local laws. The rise in anti-corporate activism over environmental and human rights issues made a shift in corporate attitudes towards social and environmental issues essential. The 70s and 80s saw major international boycotts of companies investing in South Africa. This period was characterised by confrontational campaigning that forced change from companies by attacking their brand. In the 1980s, business and social interest came closer and firms became more responsive to their stakeholders. In 1987, the concept of sustainable development was introduced and finally defined in the ground breaking report; “Our Common Future” was delivered by The World Commission on the Environment and Development, under Chair Gro Harlem

Brundtland to the United Nations. In the 1990s, corporate lobbying challenged attempts to regulate their activities at a global level. Instead it achieved an extension of corporate power both logistically, through improved transport and communications, and legally, through international agreements; such as the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), and the Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) - which extended rights for corporations. Nevertheless, the anti-corporate backlash reached a climax in 1995, as the spotlight turned on Royal Dutch Shell. That year, the company stood accused of complicity in the execution of nine activists in Nigeria, as well as being hounded by Greenpeace over the decision to sink the Brent Spar oil platform. Shell temporarily lost the confidence of investors and the public. Shell’s ‘annus horribilis’ was a sign of things to come and woke up many in the business world to the importance of their public reputations and the ability of campaigners to damage them. Capitalism had to be given a human face. Step forward CSR. Shell spent millions on its PR offensive to rebuild its reputation and published a statement of business principles outlining its core values of “‘honesty, integrity and respect for people”. The company’s strategy focussed on “openness and dialogue”, pioneering the practice of producing CSR reports and triple bottom-line reporting – that is, a business model centred on People, Planet and Profit - which was introduced at the UN Earth Summit in Rio De Janeiro in 1992. Indisputably, Shell’s strategy was successful in rebuilding the company’s reputation amongst key opinion formers and decision makers at the time.

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Agenda

84 The Rise of CSR

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

Words: Lionel Cowin

MICHELLE P. TONNESEN

Food, Fun & Friendship

the term CSR, along with many attempts to officially define the phrase. For example, the UN conference of 1972 in Stockholm considered the ever-growing need to find a common ground between both communities and businesses across the globe to preserve the human environment.

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40 Rock And New Role

Giving To The Little Guys

MICHELLE P. TONNESEN

The Rise

FOR DAVY KNOWLES

Cal Cooper

PHOTOGRAPHY | Steve Babb | www.babbphotography.com

British Superbikes Supersports Class

A Recipe for Relocation The 2013 Brookfields’ Global Relocation Trend Report showed that 79% of overseas assigners were accompanied by a spouse or partner, and 43% accompanied by children. While the number of women being sent on international assignments reached a high of 21% in 2012, the fact of the matter is that the vast majority of accompanying spouses are still female. This particular group up of women decided to break this pattern and do something about it, rather than spiral into despair: They started the CoStars dinners – a monthly get-together for partners of relocated PokerStars employees. “We are a “grassroots” group which we started over six years ago as an informal way of networking and making friends,” explains Susanne, a Swede who is one of the few founding members left, as the network has grown and altered over the years. The voluntary constellation is organised by a fixed coordinator, who keeps the momentum and continuity going via group e-mails, as well as has the honour (and challenge!) of picking a different restaurant each month. The baton is passed on once every 12-18 months to whomever of the participants is keen to go next. The make-up of the diners differs from month-to-month, depending on who can make it, and who has recently moved on or off the Island. The numbers vary from two to 20, but usually around six to eight ladies join in the fun at each dinner. It’s in no way an elitist or exclusive club – its participants are a diverse crowd of both working women and stay-at-home mums; artists and accountants; teachers and IT consultants; and of nationalities ranging from North American, Eastern European and Scandinavian to Chinese, Korean and Israeli – “come-overs” in all kinds of guises. The only criteria of attendance is being an accompanying partner of a PokerStars employee or even an employee themselves; yet all women. This is not an attempt to discriminate.

While many families move for adventure or cross-cultural experiences, the mainstream move for career advancement. In an international relocation survey conducted by expat expert Robin Pascoe, 63.1% of the respondents stated that they relocated because of a partner’s career and only 5.6% because of both careers. In an age where business is conducted on an international scale and employees are anxious to spread their wings, more companies are adopting comprehensive relocation policies, as a mobile workforce is becoming an essential competitive differentiator. Thus, having a policy to address crucial relocation issues can positively impact the company’s bottom line.

The benefits are obvious when you watch the merry crowd gathered around the table this casual Wednesday evening. “It’s a great opportunity for making new friends. It takes very little effort

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BASKETBALL STAR

other than showing up and taking part in the fun – it’s a social network on a plate!” enthuses Lucia, a Slovak who only recently moved to the Island from London.

“I find it really refreshing that everyone is at the same level when at the dinner table – no matter what our status in life is, or what our husbands do. We are all in the same boat, and we can relate to each other and share information about anything from children’s sleeping problems to finding a good local dentist,” shares Kirsti, who moved here three years ago from Australia via Sweden with her family of four.

did not suspect for a moment that there would be a positive response to my e-mail to The Boss of gallery.

SEAN DOYLE A young Isle of Man basketball star has been offered a two-year placement at a prestigious American College in Seattle, and is seeking sponsorship to follow his USA dream. SIX FOOT FIVE INCH SEAN DOYLE, AGED 19, OF DOUGLAS IS HOPING TO FOLLOW IN HIS FOOTBALLER BROTHER CONOR’S FOOTSTEPS, AFTER HE SUCCESSFULLY GRADUATED FROM A COLLEGE IN BOSTON, USA LAST YEAR. As basketball is a national sport in America to be offered a place at college is a significant honour. However, scholarships are hard to come by in the basketball arena, as in some cases, colleges are not permitted to offer international students a scholarship. Sean has been working hard to save funds and has already sat the American college entry exams – SATs - and achieved the necessary grades to get into the college.

Given that the number one reason generally cited for relocation success is the thriving of the relocated person’s partner or family, this particular social gathering makes even more sense. “We are very fortunate that the company does so much to help its employees and their families relocate successfully to the Island. But this is our own thing – independent from our husbands. Our dinners do not receive support from PokerStars as such, other than spreading the “word of mouth” when newcomers arrive. It’s our golden chance to get out there, build our social network and have a bit of fun too,” says Lian who moved with her family from Ireland to the Island two years ago, when her husband got a job here at the company headquarters.

HE SIMPLY WANTS TO ULTIMATELY EARN A CRUST IN A SPORT HE LOVES AND IS TOTALLY DEVOTED TO

The cost will be in the region of £15,000 to £20,000 a year, to include fees and accommodation. This is a two-year offer. Sean has applied to many sporting support schemes, such as Isle of Man Basketball Association, Sports Aid and Chase Your Dream, but so far has not been successful.

It is clear that the dinners represent a welcome support network for both newcomers searching for key information, and the more established ladies who get to catch up with “old” friends – as well as vent any inevitable frustrations about Island life.

Due to A-level grades, he is also not eligible for funding from the Department of Education and Children. He has emailed and written to many companies, but without any success.

“And then you’re sure to know someone at the company Christmas party!” laughs Linda, another established expat Scandinavian, and the party joins in with unreserved glee. Looks like these women have found the recipe for a successful relocation!

Sean is realistic that funding may be hard to get in the Isle of Man, but what an honour it would be for him to play basketball at college in America. Sean is Manx-born, and if successful in going to the USA to play basketball will be one of a very small group

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104 A Recipe For Relocation

110

from the Island to play this sport state-side. In a bid to attract sponsors, Sean has produced a short video of him in action, which can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=s3LAPKPZpRE Sean is a left-handed player and stands at six foot, five inches with a wingspan of six foot nine inches. He has already represented the Isle of Man national team and has competed in the UK National Founders Cup (an amateur basketball tournament).

I had asked him to GIVE me a bit of room in his excellent magazine, so I could pitch for some financial assistance for my motorcycle racing grandson.

I am an athletic small forward who can vary in all positions due to my height and pace. I have also attended NBC basketball camps for the last four years

Rejection slips and the lack of even ‘thanks but no thanks’ replies to my latest fund-raising attempts at home and further afield had left me decidedly frustrated, and not the least bit hopeful that gallery would accommodate me.

B

ut the editor did reply, God bless him, and yes, he would be happy to DONATE to the cause, and he put space for 800 words and images at my disposal. The editorial theme for the May issue of gallery was “GIVE, talking around CSR activity”, he told me.

Sean plays locally for Microgaming Cavaliers, who have won the main basketball league for the past five years.

How lucky was that? Too good an opportunity to miss; a chance to expand the cause in front of a different audience.

“Having represented the Isle of Man on numerous occasions, i’m now looking to step up by gaining a place at a college in the USA,” he told Gallery.

I understood the word GIVE, it is something I have been attempting businesses and individuals to do on my grandson’s behalf for the past four years.

“I am an athletic small forward, who can vary in all positions due to my height and pace. I have also attended NBC basketball camps for the last four years,” added Sean.

But CSR spooked me, and I confess to asking Wikipedia for some assistance.

If you or your company thinks you might be able to help Sean fulfill both his dream and his full potential, he would be delighted to hear from you. Please call him on: 400067 or his Mum, Mary Doyle, on: 415322 to find out more and discuss the options.

Ah, Corporate Social Responsibility. I was grateful when Wikipedia also came up with: A common approach to CSR is corporate philanthropy. This includes monetary donations and aid given to local and non-local non- profit organisations and communities, including donations in areas such as the arts, education, housing, health, social welfare, the environment …’

Besides helping a young man achieve his dream, Sean will be an ambassador for the company, plus there will be lots of PR and corporate social responsibility kudos. He can also be e-mailed on: doyleiom@manx.net

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

110 Sean Doyle USA Dream

I guess that’s what I have been trying to engage with all these years without one jot of success. Maybe trying to solicit funding for a motorsport project is too narrow a field to attract attention and support.

111

But there are one of two examples, however, of firms employing CSR when it comes to the likes of Manx riders in the TT and even the event itself. My grandson, Cal Cooper, 17, who lives in Ramsey, admires those that do the TT and MGP but would never attempt the races himself. Instead his focus is on circuit racing, an area of racing in which he has carved out a highly regarded name for himself on the adjacent shores and he can produce a portfolio of articles, reports, videos and other coverage to illustrate that he is one of the sport’s hottest young adherents. Fair to say at this junction, that Cal has had some modest but welcome support for several years from IoM Sport Aid and he is also most grateful to the Island’s leading

motorcycle outlet, Paul Dedman Performance in Ramsey, for help in supplying very costly leathers and helmets. However, in a sport where cash is seemingly more important than capability, the struggle to maintain forward motion is becoming increasingly difficult. He has the talent and does not want to end up on the scrapheap as so many others have, whether it is on the trail of a top car racing berth or motorcycle career in MotoGP or World Superbikes. He simply wants to ultimately earn a crust in a sport he loves and is totally devoted to. With his talent, if he was foreign, say Spanish, French or Italian, there would almost be a red carpet ride to the necessary resources.

Spain commands pole position when it comes to this type of activity and its riders are synonymous with past and current success. Young hopefuls, many without a great deal of results behind them, secure the funding to take them on to the tracks you see on television most weekends. Britain lags so far behind in this direction, it is out of sight. Just one business, insurance giant Bennetts, supports a British rider on the world stage. To its credit, it recently decided to assist a British youngster to get to the top and Cal was one of those who so nearly made the final consideration. Racing Steps Foundation in the UK, backed by a mutli-millionaire, is the only philanthropic organisation offering a conduit to the top, but it focuses mainly on car racing and supports just two riders, providing the

funding to go with necessary talent to try and obtain a seat with a professional team. A recent budget reduction has restricted further opportunities to join the setup. We’ve spared no efforts in trying to get the message across that motorcycle racing in the likes of the British Superbike championships - in which Cal compete - really is a top attraction. Crowds of 50,000 are usual, TV coverage is live and lengthy, and the media coverage abundant. He pulled on his leathers for the first time this season at Brands Hatch during the Easter weekend, and his supersport class runs second only to the principal superbike action, with 22 races on the cards this year.

What is now desperately needed is a budget to help keep making things happen. A brochure has been produced, with magnificent free-of-charge assistance by Craig Wolstencroft and his team at Mainstream Media, and Steve Brown at Mannin Media, detailing Cal’s story so far. It also explains the opportunities available to a would-be supporter, either a business or an individual. These can be supplied on request by contacting me on: 304660, or 463494 or by e-mail on: lionelcowin@manx.net

116 Cal Cooper - British Superbikes 116

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

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BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

CONTENTS UPFRONT Edito.........................................................................................................................................3 Wilkins Watch of The Month.............................................4 Listings...............................................................................................................................6 Giving To The Little Guys............................................8 What’s On...............................................................................................10 News in Numbers......................................................................12 Rant...................................................................................................................14 Current Affairs................................................................................................16 How To Give.......................................................................................................18 Isle of Man Bank - Community Giving........20 Give......................................................................................................................................22 Gallery Pet Selfie.........................................................................................24 Me & My Pet.......................................................................................26 Do Good Feel Great..............................................................28 EVENTS Wish Upon A Dream....................................................................30 TT Launch 2014.....................................................................................................32 Laura & John’s Wedding Day.........................................34 CULTURE Culture Vulture..........................................................................................36 Culture News..................................................................................................38 Rock And New Role............................................................................40 Upload...........................................................................................................................42 Christy DeHaven...................................................................................44 Erika Kelly.............................................................................................46

6

FASHION & BEAUTY High Street Fashion Trends.......................................48 Spend A Little...........................................................................................50 Westwoods Climate Revolution........................52 APPETITE Family Meal Times........................................................................54 Wine Talk.............................................................................................................56 TRAVEL Istanbul NOT Constantinople..................................58 ACTIVE Sports News..............................................................................................108 TT 2013 In pictures...................................................................112 Sean Doyle USA Dream......................................................110 Cal Cooper British Superbikes...............................116 All Things Equestrian..............................................................118 HARDWARE Gadgets.................................................................................................................120 Phone Home............................................................................................122 PAPARAZZI The Courthouse.....................................................................................122 Nexus..........................................................................................................................122 Jar Bar......................................................................................................................123 Tahiko......................................................................................................................124 The Outback................................................................................................128

Isle of Man | Home & Interiors | May 2014

inside:

TRAVEL

s family home s ertie premier prop house & home ... and more

The best place to find a new place in the Isle of Man

THE BEST PLACE TO FIND A NEW PLACE IN THE ISLE OF MAN 61

OFFSHORE BUSINESS

OFFSHORE BUSINESS NEWS, VIEWS & COMMENTS

NEWS

EVENTS

COMMENTS

Issue 6

May/June 2014

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY A RECIPE FOR RELOCATION BANKING - MOBILE BANKING TECHNOLOGY - A CURE FOR DATA JET LAG PLUS - MOVERS & SHAKERS, A-LIST EVENTS, ISLAND SPORTING STARS

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


Online and Mobile Banking. Safe and secure. Online and Mobile Banking, making things easier Security is at the heart of our Online and Mobile Banking facilities. We are regularly testing, monitoring and updating our security process to give you increased peace of mind.

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UPFRONT

WW F: WO R L D W R E ST L E R FU ND

WORDS Grant Runyon ILLUSTRATION Will Bertram

To live in the Isle of Man is to be lucky enough to live in one of the safest, cleanest and wealthiest societies in the world. 

Before 2002 it was tricky to tell whether the initials WWF symbolised a love of pandas or piledrivers, a confusion which lead to much embarrassment when a mix-up on Blue Peter led to Hulk Hogan being served a basket of Viagra-spiked bamboo whilst Brutus ‘the Barber’ Beefcake was set upon by starving tigers - Jake ‘the Snake’ Roberts wisely maintained a foot in both camps and was later knighted for rescuing John Noakes from Hulkamania running wild on his bottom.  The upshot of this diplomatic bodyslam was that WWF wrestling became the WWE, the World Wildlife Fund carried on keeping an eye on the rhinos, and the world forgot about the plight of those gigantic men too old or sick to continue doing steroids and beating each other with folding chairs. Today, the confusingly-named World Wrestler Fund solicits donations of cash and miss-spelled cardboard signs to help these retired grapplers in their hour of need. A donation of just £5 can buy enough facepaint for Legion of Doom to go to the shops, £10 funds a new kilt for Rowdy Roddy Piper and £35 can rent a video camera so The Iron Sheik can record a rambling threat to break The Ultimate Warrior’s legs. 

Despite what you might read in the UK’s inkier papers, we don’t all hide gold-plated suitcases full of Chris Moyles’ money, but we certainly do alright when compared to a lot of other places. We have rich people and poor people like anywhere else, but I can’t remember the last time we were annexed by Russia, plagued by honey badgers or buried underneath an eruption of molten lava. The most stressful thing that’s happened to us in the last twelve months is some unusually gusty weather causing M&S to run out of ready meals.  As luck would have it we pulled together as a community, the tide went down and 3-for-2 Spaghetti Carbonara was restocked before the Red Cross needed to get involved.   Our fortunate position makes us a charitable community, from the hardworking families donating their clothes to the Oxfam shop all the way up to the Bentley-driving lords of finance, who selflessly write off hefty donations to donkey sanctuaries against multimillion tax liabilities in Monaco and Antigua.  Charities are so wellpublicised in dress-down days, sponsored walks and wacky facial hair challenges that it can be a real challenge to work out in which bucket you should chuck your coins next.  Most people plump for animals (cute and unthreatening), underprivileged children (sympathetic until they grow up) or disease research (hedging your bets), but this has the unfortunate side-effect of diverting attention away from issues that might be less glamorous, but are equally deserving of the £4 you would have otherwise spent on another cup of hot, sugary milk.  Why not alleviate a little more of your first world guilt and throw a few pounds to one of these lesser-known charities?     

8

NIC E NE WS : W E ANI NG G R ANDPAR EN TS O FF T H E DAI LY M AIL

For generations society has assumed that becoming mean about single parents, paranoid about the EU and racist towards gypsies was an inevitable side effect of ageing, alongside an interest in beige nylon trousers and cruise holidays.  Recent scientific breakthroughs have dramatically proven that this is not the case, and for the first time established a correlation between developing cartoonish right-wing views and the regular consumption of a newspaper that endorsed the British Union of Fascists and thinks that gay marriage caused the global recession.  The dedicated volunteers at NiceNews painstakingly replace the illicit buzz of the Mail’s hysterical articles about social workers and muslims with gentle Radio Times profiles of Anthea Turner, before slowly introducing National Geographic and eventually full-scale substitution with The Guardian. With your support, their success rate in preventing gran from becoming a frothing reactionary is as high as 75%; unfortunately scientific consensus remains that any pensioner already hooked on The Daily Express is beyond hope.  ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


UPFRONT

THE KRANKIE SOCIETY (RAISING AWARENESS OF KRANKIEISM)

ROYAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO D LIST CELEBRITIES

SAVE THE MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN   Across the world, in areas of war and famine, it is always the innocent children who suffer most.  This is no less true in Britain’s slightlydeprived middle class communities, where children like Alfie (6) and Charlotte (3) have gone without (organic) food for weeks because Mummy lost her job copywriting part-time for an online marketing startup.  Until she contacts another schoolfriend on LinkedIn and finds work, Alfie, Charlotte and Mummy will have to survive on just Daddy’s salary as a fund manager.  This will mean no family outings to Bestival, no yoga classes and the horrible possibility that Alfie will have to catch the bus to the local comprehensive.  Have a heart don’t let Charlotte grow up in a world where she has to use Microsoft Windows and fly economy class.

CAMPAIGN TO SEND BONO TO MARS

How would you feel if you were a fully-grown woman, afflicted with a genetic condition that made you resemble a small Scottish boy? There’s no punchline to this joke, because it’s the true story of people who grow up with the rare and incurable condition of Krankieism, caused by a terrible mutation of the Fandabidozi gene.  The work of the Krankie society carries out medical research into this little-known disorder, as well as related light entertainment conditions such as Mallet’s Mallet, Crinkly Bottom and Chegwin Syndrome.  Give generously, because these people deserve better than to be shunned and jeered at when they walk the streets.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

The western world’s insatiable demand for reality television has enabled our society to gorge itself on junk entertainment, with the tragic hidden cost that unwanted celebrities are multiplying faster than homes can be found for them. The RSPCD campaigns to remind people that a celebrity is for life, not just for one series of The Apprentice.  It offers free education to TV commissioners at Channel 4 and provides a neutering service to prevent any more of Kerry Katona’s unwanted children being found abandoned in the bins behind the tattoo parlour.  Your small donation could provide for a loving home for Craig from Big Brother, take the entire cast of Geordie Shore to the STD clinic or arrange for Katie Hopkins to be humanely destroyed.

Thanks to NASA, we believe that at some point in its long history the planet Mars may have supported basic cellular life. A full-scale manned mission is still decades away, but a consortium of megaphilanthropists has banded together with the bold vision to send a human ambassador to the red planet.  The consensus amongst experts is that only one man is suitable for this task: Bono, lead singer of U2 and coincidentally someone that both Bill Gates and Ban Ki Moon try and avoid sitting next to at dinner.  Your donations will fund an experimental, one way rocket and the campaign required to convince Bono that Martian civilisation exists and wants to be lectured about charity by a multi-millionaire tax dodger.  The journey will take at least five years, but the rocket will be fitted with a fail-safe detonator in case scientists later discover that Martians really do exist, have already heard Bono’s last album and would perceive Earth’s mission as an act of war.

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UPFRONT

WHAT’S ON

WHAT’S ON MAY 2014

27/30.05.14 AVENUE Q

//VILLA GAIETY//

11/16.05.14

NATIONAL MILLS WEEKEND //KENTRAUGH MILL, COLBY//

Open days at Kentraugh Mill, Colby. Guided Tour of the building by trained volunteers. The Mill dates from c 1500 with machinery in working order. Saturday from 10am until 5pm and Sunday from 11am until 5pm. Admission free, donations welcome. Entry at own risk.

This quirky comedy set to an adult version of The Muppets and Sesame Street follow Princeton, a college graduate trying to find his purpose in life. Along the way he meets some fantastic friends with issues of their own. Please be aware that even though the show contains puppets, it is of an adult nature and is NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN . Tickets from £21.50 www.villagaiety.com

Information: (01624) 832406

11/16.05.14 WALKING FESTIVAL //ISLAND WIDE//

Take in the richness of the Isle of Man’s landscape and heritage guided by experienced walk leaders, combined with an exciting entertainment programme. Information: (01624) 644644

24.05.14/06.06.14

29.05.14/08.06.14

//ISLAND WIDE//

//LOCH PROM, DOUGLAS//

TT 2014

Qualifying and racing on the Mountain Circuit for the 2014 TT Races.

TT FUN FAIR

All the excitement, sound, light and buzz of the TT Funfair returns for TT 2014.

31.05.14/08.06.14 16/17.05.14

MURDER AT THE MONASTERY //ST PAUL’S CHURCH, RAMSEY//

A Medieval Murder Mystery Dinner evening. 7pm Come and help solve the murder, period dress very welcome, Hog roast! Feel free to bring your own wine, ale or mead. Tickets £22.50

TT HELICOPTER FLIGHTS //DOUGLAS//

Elite Helicopters pleasure flights during the TT 2014 . Departing from Cooil Road near B&Q . A choice of flights , fly around Douglas bay, the southern half of the Island or Peel and the west coast. Also a 30 minute flight around the TT course . Please note that there will be certain restrictions from air traffic control when they can not fly the TT course whilst racing is on . Bookings can be made on-line elitehelicoperflights.co.uk/flight-tickets-atevents/isle-of-tt-ticket.

Information: (01624) 814011 www.elitehelicopterflights.co.uk

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


UPFRONT

in NUMBERS NEWS

3

Three of the island’s beaches have failed to meet water quality standards.The beaches at Peel, Kirk Michael and Ramsey have each failed to meet the minimum EU standard according to the latest edition of the Good Beach Guide.

1

A woman received hospital treatment after being bitten on the hand by a false widow spider while rummaging through a box at the Eastern Civic Amenity Site, in Douglas.

844 A coffee morning in St Patrick’s Church Peel raised £844 for the Manx Breast Cancer Support Group.

12

10

St George’s moved one step closer to Manx football’s Grand Slam, with a convincing 10-2 win over Ramsey in Easter Monday’s Paddy Power FA Cup final.

£2m

A government department has secured £2m of extra funding over three years to help drive economic growth. The extra money for the Department of Economic Development will be focused on five key areas including strategies to attract more wealthy entrepreneurs to the island.

5

ITV has agreed a new five-year deal to screen 15 one-hour TT Races highlights programmes, which will be screened on ITV4, with many of the shows featuring same day highlights from the Isle of Man.

English is a second language to some 613 island school children. Ballakermeen has the highest number at 139. Of the primary schools, St Mary’s has the largest number with 51.

613 ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


tysons_may_galleryadvert_Layout 1 13/03/2014 13:03 Page 1

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With the three adjustable velcro straps, this sandal gives extreme comfort. The shock absorber in the heel, reduces the impact of walking on the joints, back and legs. Available in black, grey and white, in size range 36 - 42. £79.95

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UPFRONT

rant Words: Clare Bowie illustration: Adam Berry

S

o, I went out last Friday for an ostensible night of fun and inadvertently came home with a big bag of closure. But then, it was no ordinary night, it was the night of my school reunion. Ahh, those halcyon school days, a teenage prison that is both great and grim, a breeding ground for insecurity and insubordination, a hotbed for spots and self esteem woes, as you grapple for your place in the class peerage. Yes, life was less complicated back then; there was no Facebook or mobile phones and no-one in your class was “depressed”, but the level of teenage angst and sense of worth was still intense, and largely dependent on what your mates thought, because it hadn’t yet occurred to you to trust yourself. The stakes were seriously high as I headed out that night. It was imperative that I looked absolutely tip top, downright dewyfaced fabulous, in an extremely nonchalant, cool yet edgy, subtle yet glossy kind of way. This was no normal night, this had judgement stamped all over it. 20-years on and my peers would be circling, assessing, sizing up and possibly spitting out what had become of me. Was I thin enough? Rich enough? Married enough?

decided, during an inordinate number of vigorous text messages, that we should have a few Dutch snifters to ease us gently back in time. The fact that this early kick off would also score us a bedtime reprieve; a hiatus from the inevitable dinner, jammies and teeth brushing skirmish at home was an added bonus, a mere coincidence! Anyway, despite an almost palpable frisson of excitement, the reunion turned out to be a little bit average, as the reality of seeing a bunch of partial strangers wasn’t that great after all. As the night wore on and nostalgia ebbed away, we lucidly remembered why we had chosen not to stay in touch with each other and naturally dispersed into subgroups: The conventional ones live in the same old area and see each other at the school gates, approximately 10-times a week. Many of us had previously ventured to exotic locations like Dublin, Glasgow and Potter’s Bar, only to scuttle back home ten-years later to be near Granny and Grandad. The no-shows: Annoyingly, they were the ones I had been most looking forward to seeing, but they bottled it. The ones I never really knew: Bit late to start the small talk now.

The “mad” alternative ones: Strangely, still rocking a mid-nineties vibe. The ones formerly known as friends: A few who, in hindsight, did not really fulfil the brief of friend - “a person with whom one has a bond of mutual affection” - but were fantastic at making you feel a little less interesting than them. Surprisingly, acquisitions and affluence were pushed aside as the question of the night was “are you fertile enough?” It was like a Mum’s-R-Us convention, as we scrolled frantically through our phones, comparing offspring. The catchphrase of the night was; “you look EXACTLY the same!” We didn’t; the same youthful skin tone would be nice, but what’s the point of eyebrow threading, GHDs, elixir serums and facial tanning mist if you still look the same as the 18-year old with the unruly hair, double train track braces and trainee mono-brow? As I hobbled home, in my understated elegance, I felt glad that it was over, pleased I had seen a few great friends and elated that I no longer cared what my former “friends” thought of me. Education complete!

The night began early with a pre-reunion tryst. My core alumni possy and I had

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


UPFRONT

CURRENT AFFAIRS PAUL DAVIS,

Managing Director, Counting House

ROBERT ROTHERHAM, Senior Tax Manager, KPMG LLC

SANDRA TAYLOR,

Personal Insurances Manager, Rossborough Insurance

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

Welcome, dear reader, to Current Affairs; your chance to pose any number of questions to the Island’s business community.

MARK WILSON,

Managing Director, Sleepwell Hotels

LAUREN O’NEILL,

Business Development, Boston

15


THE CURRENT AFFAIRS PANEL

UPFRONT

CURRENT

COUNTING HOUSE

Do you think government has a sound strategy for attracting businesses to the Isle of Man? This is something of a broad question, and the Devil - as they say - is in the detail. So, I’ll add an ominous ‘to be continued’ for next month’s edition.

I believe one hundred per cent that the government has a sound policy. The targets are correctly identified and the areas of concentration are well chosen. As an Island we can not be all things to all people. Our government correctly perceives that eCommerce, highly specialised manufacturing, global registration business and niche financial services are key to our future. The policy is right; the execution worries me. You only get one chance to make a first impression. So, we invite high net-worth individuals and serious entrepreneurs to come take a look. Dead on! The most likely person to invest here is someone who has visited and liked what he saw. Why, then, are we so sloppy about our initial impact? Next time you step out of Ronaldsway, consider the taxi rank before you and imagine how it stands up against Singapore, say. Admittedly, though, we are way ahead of Malta, where the drivers still try not to turn on the meter and charge double. How government, both local and national, spends its limited resources worries me. We have a real paucity of high-quality accommodation in the Island, yet reserves were spent on propping up a failing hotel chain. Tourism is on the back foot, yet we dwell on nostalgia and consider investing millions in moving horse trams, whilst the ICT University project struggles to attract investment of a fraction of that amount. All this and more to come; to be continued!

www.rossborough.co.uk

KPMG

THE CLAREMONT HOTEL

There have been some changes to the taxation of pensions in the UK, should these be mirrored in the Isle of Man?

This year’s UK Budget contained a major change to the taxation of “defined contribution” pensions in the UK. As from April 2015, people reaching “retirement age” (currently 55) will have freedom to do as they wish with their pension pots without having to pay a punitively high (55 per cent) rate of tax on large withdrawals, albeit income tax will still be payable at the recipients’ marginal rate. On the one hand, it may be argued that people ought to be able to decide for themselves how their pension pot should be used, after all, they have spent their working lives contributing towards it and so should be trusted to spend it how they wish, so long as they pay tax on it. If they want to blow it all on a fancy car (Steve Webb, the UK Pensions Minister was quoted as saying “you can buy a Lamborghini”), surely they have earned that right! On the other hand, such “self regulation” brings with it the risk of people entering into arrangements which ultimately fail to meet their needs, with the end result being a total reliance on the state pension. The underlying concern here is that the prospect of an increased reliance by pensioners on state benefits would create a ticking time bomb of adverse social and financial repercussions. So, whilst developments in UK social policy are often mirrored here in the Isle of Man, would the government be right to in this case, or would it be considered a risk not worth taking?

I read that the Claremont now features in the Michelin Guide; what did it have to do to achieve this?

The Michelin Guide for Hotels & Restaurants in Great Britain and Ireland is a 100 year-old annual series that provides a directory of distinguished establishments. Each year, full-time Michelin Inspectors examine hotels and restaurants using a very refined set of criteria, whilst remaining anonymous throughout the duration of their stay. This includes evaluating the quality of the overnight visit, the welcome, the hotel surroundings, every aspect of service, cleanliness, mastery of cuisine, and a whole host of other tiny details that set a great hotel apart from a good one. For the Claremont to earn its place, we firstly requested a Michelin inspection, so we had to be confident from the outset. Inspectors will only visit hotels that enjoy a certain pedigree, but luckily we already hold an IoM Tourism 4-Star Silver Award (the second highest possible), a UK Hotel Award for interior design, Awards for Excellence Company of the Year 2012, and a finalists for the same in 2013. No establishment is ever told when an inspection may take place, or who might be visiting, but with the wonderful team we have in place, as well as the standard of the recent multi-million pound refurbishment we were confident of earning the prestigious Michelin recognition. We plan to begin the final phase of renovations to include our conference facilities over winter 2015, so we’re naturally hoping for many more accolades to come.

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AFFAIRS ROSSBOROUGH INSURANCE

BOSTON GROUP

What is the Insurance Fraud Bureau and what can you do to help them prevent fraud?

The Insurance Fraud Bureau (IFB) was launched in 2006 and is a not-for-profit organisation funded by the insurance industry, specifically focussed on detecting and preventing organised, cross-industry insurance fraud. The IFB recently issued its 2013 annual report, estimating the total cost of fraudulent organised motor insurance claims alone to be worth £329 million each year. In addition, the Association of British Insurers (ABI) estimates that undetected general insurance claims fraud totals £2.1 billion a year, and adds around £50 to the annual cost of household insurances. The IFB also reported that one in seven personal injury claims are connected to a suspected ‘crash for cash’ scam. This is when an innocent motorist is forced to crash into the back of a fraudster’s vehicle, often involving accounts of fictitious injuries from gang members and resulting in huge claims made against the victim. In 2013, the IFB received more than 6000 reports of insurance fraud from the general public - that’s an average of one every 90 minutes. This resulted in 145 police arrests across the country and provided vital information to insurers looking to identify fraudulent claims and avoid unnecessary compensation payments. Insurance fraud is far from a victimless crime. Ultimately it is we, the consumers, who end up paying for it through raised premiums. Scams such as the ‘crash for cash’ also puts innocent road users at huge physical and financial risk, making it even more important for the public to report any suspected wrongdoings to the IFB. For more information and advice, please visit: www. insurancefraudbureau.org.

I keep hearing about EBACE.  What is it and how does it relate to the Isle of Man?

The European Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (EBACE) will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, between the 20th and the 22nd of May in 2014. EBACE is the foremost business aviation event in Europe. It is jointly hosted each year by the European Business Aviation Association (EBAA), the leading association for business aviation in Europe, and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), the leading voice for the industry in the US. Now in its 14th edition, it has become an annual meeting place for the European business aviation community. The Isle of Man is a well renowned global centre of excellence for business and private aviation. EBACE provides an ideal platform for industry professionals in the aviation ecosystem to network with intermediaries and clients to discuss the latest developments and bring business back to the Island. I will be representing Boston at EBACE along with my colleague Shauna Kennaugh this year. The Isle of Man Aircraft Registry was established to provide a customer-focussed service for the registration of high-quality private and corporate jets and helicopters. The register, prefixed by the letter M, has grown substantially since it was launched in May 2007, and there are now over 650 aircraft registered, making it the fastest growing offshore register in the world. Due to the uniqueness of the ‘M’ Registry, a number of fun registration marks can be seen, for example M-00SE, M-ONEY, M-INER – look out for a Manx registered aircraft the next time you are sat in departures!

For next month’s Current Affairs, we invite you to ask our expers on the topics that matter most. Simply send your questions to editorial@gallery.co.im

Relationships count. Knowledge pays. Ignorance costs. Share the benefits of our expertise. Contact us to find out more: info@countinghouseltd.com countinghouseltd.com ECOMMERCE | IGAMING | COMMUNICATIONS | RESEARCH | FINANCE | MORE

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WORDS Grace Ryan ILLUSTRATION Sarah Gabison


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My dear departed mother was fond of the proverb that tells us that “it is better to give than receive.” Dearest Mummy, she was so sweet and kind (after her sixth drink), but this did not extend to her last will and testament, composed after I had her banged up in a home for the crotchety. She may be gone, but her thoughtful bequest in my name will never be forgotten - because she donated my inheritance to radical Islamists and I am reminded of her wishes any time I attempt to go through an airport without being given a cavity search.  I’ve never got the hang of giving anything away that I might want back later, whether you’re asking me for money for orphans or for any of my 600 pairs of shoes. I cheered when naked selfi shness became fashionable during the 80s, but according to the judge “greed is good” is not a legitimate defence for stealing those Basil Brush coin collectors from the airport and blowing the money on gin.

STEP 1. GIVING TO PEOPLE CLOSE TO YOU

I spent some time weighing up the pros and cons of whether it is better to start the path of giving with those close to us (“friends”) or with total strangers. On the one hand, when you give a present to a friend they are expected to tell other people about your generosity, on the other if you give something to an unknown poor you won’t have to be upset by seeing them enjoy it.  You should probably start with people close to you, because unlike the poor they might feel obliged to give you something back.     It’s appropriate to give something to a friend, relative or co-worker when something nice happens to them (birthdays, weddings) but confusingly also when something bad happens (funerals, road accidents).  Be careful not to get the two mixed up, as no matter what you know about the groom a condolence card is as inappropriate for a wedding as a bunch of balloon animals is for a funeral.  It’s good to give a gift that you think is something the other person would like, but a bottle of whiskey is not appropriate when they are unhappy because they ran over a pedestrian. If this happens, remember to look sad even if they avoid going to prison.

STEP 2. GIVING TO PEOPLE YOU DON’T KNOW THAT WELL

This is very hard, because you’re not allowed to ask people what they would like, and it’s risky to ask their partner if you should get cake for a present because they are already overweight.  Don’t think you can get around this by listening in on their phone conversations, or by going through their handbag when they are in the toilet.  People get upset when this happens and will not stop crying just because you tell them you feel obliged to buy them a birthday present and don’t want to waste

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

My best advice, if you’re ever required to convince the doctors that you’re not an “amoral sociopath” (just an example I made up), is to imagine a few schemes that might convince the public you’re kind and charitable. You may never need to actually do them (sorry, children of Romania) but talking about them to enough people may do the trick of making you seem more like Mother Teresa than the sort of person that would be arrested for stealing the battery out of a mobility scooter.  Again, just an example that never actually happened.  Read on for advice on every giving situation, unless you’re my probation officer.

money you could spend on yourself. Play it safe and get them a voucher, but make sure you first ask somebody in the shop if they have things that a Jewish / diabetic / disabled (delete as applicable) person would like. Weddings are less work, as people will try and trick you into buying things like iPads and motorbikes by putting them at the top of a list with spoons at the bottom. Ignore this and get them spoons (one each).

of people by constantly asking for money on their behalf.  If you do this consistently enough, you won’t have to give up any of your own cash, although you might be expected to spend some time with them. It’s alright to take a cut of the money (“for administration purposes”) but don’t post poolside selfies from Spain if you begged thousands to buy the local OAPs a minibus and only got them a “second-hand” mobility scooter battery.

STEP 3. GIVING TO PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO PRETEND TO LIKE (CHILDREN)

STEP 5. GIVING TO PEOPLE YOU’LL NEVER MEET

Children are very hard to give to, because they haven’t learned to fake being grateful yet.  You could give them something worthless or an object you’d like to see broken anyway, but you will look bad if a toddler gets tetanus from your bag of old lightbulbs or the rusty hacksaws that were cluttering up your garage.  You also can’t give a child money, alcohol or slutty clothes, even if you suspect that’s what they’d really like after spying on their Facebook pictures.  It’s probably best to try and remember that you’re giving the child something you think the parents would give it if they were you, and if you were the sort of person who liked giving things to children because you like children. Confused? Me too. Get them a voucher or some spoons.   

STEP 4. GIVING TO PEOPLE YOU DON’T KNOW AT ALL, BUT WHO LIVE NEAR YOU You can give many presents to people you know, but there’s a limit to how nice this will make you look to a panel of psychiatrists. If you get these people a present, it will usually be dismissed as a bribe, and they will only remember your birthday if it’s the anniversary of the day you allegedly killed somebody and buried them in the woods don’t expect cake!  What is good is to find a way of making sure that everybody knows how much you care about a specific group

People from Africa are always super grateful if you give them things, even if they come from one of the parts of Africa that aren’t shown on Sky News because they’re not having a civil war. People from those parts are too polite to tell you they know perfectly well what Christmas is, or that they invented civilisation whilst European man was eating poisonous mushrooms and living under a pile of sticks.  They’re definitely too polite to say anything if you pretend to be super-religious, so start by telling everybody on Facebook you’re giving up chocolate for lent, move onto piously rattling a bucket in King Street and eventually you’ll be fronting a mission to Timbuktu whilst putting downpayments on a second yacht.  If you can’t stand the idea of helping either local or foreign poors, then there’s always the option of post-dating your generosity by telling everybody you’re an organ donor.  You’ve only got two of most things though, so be careful to avoid the faux pas of triple-booking your lungs. Also, take it from me it’s incredibly awkward to realise you don’t actually have to be dead to give up a kidney.  Sorry kids, but my spare is on hire-purchase from a Bangkok butcher until the market for Basil Brush statues picks up.

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ISLE OF MAN BANK is at the heart of Manx sport says Bill Shimmins, Managing Director

Community banking sits at the heart of how we at Isle of Man Bank conduct our business. An important element of community banking is our commitment to be a model for how a bank can contribute to society by supporting the communities in which we live and work, not only through ethical banking, but through partnerships, local initiatives and assisting the charitable efforts of our employees. Our sponsorships do far more than drive brand awareness; they offer true benefits to our customers, communities and society as a whole. With a broad sponsorship programme focused on arts, education, enterprise management, conservation and environment and sport, we engage in a range of activities that we hope will make a real difference. Of the five key areas of our sponsorship activity, sport drives individuals to improve both themselves and their results, to perform a little better than others through their skill, power and focus. The Isle of Man Bank Sports Awards is a flagship event in both the Manx sporting calendar and in the Bank’s community programme. This year Tour de France legend Mark Cavendish was named Isle of Man Bank Sportsman of the Year and 16-year-old equestrian rider Yasmin Ingham the Isle of Man Bank Sportswoman of the Year at the glittering awards ceremony, held at the Villa Marina in April. That ceremony also welcomed a very special guest of honour: double Olympic gold medallist Rebecca Adlington, OBE. Her visit also gave the opportunity to demonstrate the grass roots level at which Isle of Man Bank supports the sporting community. We arranged for Becky, as she asked to be called, to attend an informal lunch at Ballakermeen High School in Douglas, where she met and talked to aspiring young swimmers, sharing her invaluable knowledge and experience and clearly inspiring those lucky enough to meet her. Becky revealed that she always enjoyed the

opportunity to meet young athletes and give advice. ‘For me, going on the Olympic team, I felt like I had a responsibility as an athlete to pass on that legacy,’ she said. At Isle of Man Bank, we are always keen to play our part in encouraging the up and coming athletes, as well as recognising and supporting established competitors and events. It is incredible to think that a nation the size of ours has produced the greatest sprinter in Tour de France history in Mark Cavendish, as well as a current Olympic cycling gold medallist in Peter Kennaugh. Earlier this year, snowboardcross star Zoe Gillings was cruelly denied a place in the final of the Winter Olympics by the narrowest of margins. As this year’s Isle of Man Bank Sports Awards demonstrated, there is a new generation of talent ready to fly the flag. When the Isle of Man Sport Aid Scholarships for 2013/14 were announced, Isle of Man Bank will sponsor Anna Christian (cycling) and our RBS International support goes to Andrew Nash (Triathlon). The role we at the bank can play in helping sport is crucial, as recognised by Chris Quine, Sports Performance Co-ordinator at Isle of Man Sport Aid/Isle of Man Sport Institute. He said: ‘Sport on the Isle of Man is fortunate to receive lots of help and support from companies in the private sector and also from individuals too. Without this many events and initiatives could not take place. ‘One of the longest established sponsors of Manx sport is the Isle of Man Bank, who support sport at all levels, from grass roots through to sponsoring the prestigious Isle of Man Bank Sports Awards, which recognises sporting excellence. I am sure that so many people in the sporting community are grateful for the contribution that the bank has made to local sport.’

Isle of Man Bank Charity Santa Dash

Tennis Championships, Junior Boys Isle of Man Golf Championships, Isle of Man Bowling Association and Manx Fell Runners Junior League – even the annual Isle of Man Bank Charity Santa Dash has a very competitive sporting element to it! That’s in addition to the Tour des Branches 100 mile cycle ride which calls in at the Bank’s branches across RBS International, Isle of Man Bank and NatWest brands in aid of various local charities. Some of our stars – including Cavendish and Kennaugh – will hope to compete for medals at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow this year. Others are looking ahead to the NatWest Island Games in Jersey next year.

The NatWest Island Games has a special place in Manx sport. The inaugural games took place here in 1985 and at the last Games, in Bermuda in 2013; the Isle of Man team topped the medals table with an incredible 36 gold, 36 silver and 25 bronze medals. We recognise that those partaking in sport act as ambassadors for achieving excellence and at every level, Manx sport is thriving. We at Isle of Man Bank are very proud to be part of that and integrate our business fully into local life.

There are many other events with which Isle of Man Bank is involved, including the Douglas and District Primary Schools Football tournament, the Junior Lawn

PHOTOGRAPHY | Brian Mitchell

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Tour des Branches Charity Cycle Ride

Double Olympic gold medallist Rebecca Adlington talks to young swimmers at a lunch arranged by Isle of Man Bank

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

Sportsman of the Year winner Mark Cavendish and Sportswoman of the Year winner Yasmin Ingham with Isle of Man Bank Senior Manager Deniese Smith, left, and Managing Director Bill Shimmins

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OUR COMMUNITY

GIVE

COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

£2,610 RAISED FROM LIVERPOOL HALF MARATHON RUNNER NEIL FOR HOSPICE Pictured is Mary Doyle, PR and Marketing Manager for Hospice with Carole Whitfield from the fundraising team with Neil Withers. Neil presented a cheque for £2,610, being the proceeds of him running the Liverpool Half Marathon in memory of his friend Ken Williams. Since the cheque presentation another £80 has been donated.   Neil added: “I chose Hospice having visited my friend Ken and seeing and sensing the value of the help he got from Hospice and all their staff. Sadly he passed away following a short illness. I knew Ken through Crown Green Bowls, which has a real family community feel to it in the Island. I feel quite overwhelmed by the amount of people that donated and the support from Barclays. It really showed how good a cause Hospice is and how well Ken was liked.”  Mary thanked Neil for all his efforts for Hospice.

Volunteer beach cleaning charity Beach Buddies has linked up with SITA, the company which runs the Isle of Man’s Energy From Waste plant, in a programme to help expand the group’s activities around the Island. SITA has made a donation to Beach Buddies - which it says has given the organisation a “significant first stepping stone” towards increasing the work around the Island in the future.

DONATION TO BEACH BUDDIES WILL EXPAND CHARITY’S WORK

The link between Beach Buddies and SITA gives the volunteers the opportunity to dispose of hazardous materials and chemicals, which are occasionally discovered during the beach cleaning sessions. Large sealed canisters containing mystery chemicals, used oils and potentially harmful unknown liquids are regularly found on beaches around the Island, and the EFW plant has the expertise and facilities to deal with any such items, and will take delivery of these from Beach Buddies in the future. Beach Buddies runs regular weekend beach cleaning sessions with teams of volunteers tackling problem areas all over the Island, and only recently broke the record for the number of bags of rubbish collected in one session.

BOREHOLE BRINGS CLEAN WATER AND JOY TO A VILLAGE IN THE GAMBIA

Having successfully bid for funding from the International Development Committee, Kirk Michael resident Fams Camara and family went out to ensure a borehole was drilled for the village in which he grew up, replacing the now inadequate well his mother installed 40-years ago. While he was there, Fams was able to distribute a number of mobile phones - which had been donated by Manx Telecom.  As a direct result, vehicle transport to a doctor was summoned in time to help a lady giving birth (instead of using a donkey and cart that would take around 5 hours) - and her child has been given the memorable name of Lamin “Nokia” Jobe after the 3310 version that was used to call for the transport! Without the phone, the child is unlikely to have lived. Also whilst at the village, Fams was able to distribute home and away football shirts and 2 footballs donated by Charles Turner from Intersport, and t-shirts and pens donated by RL360°. Fams would like to say a big thank you to all of the sponsors for their extremely kind donations and also to the One World Centre for their help and guidance.  

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100 SUPER HEROS FOR HOSPICE PARISH WALK Douglas town centre was invaded in April when lots of super heros and one Oskar bear hit Regent Street! This invasion was all in a good cause, as the super heros will be walking the walk for Hospice dressed as super heros! Main super hero, Dave Horisk and his team want 100 walkers to take part in the Manx Telecom Parish Walk on Saturday 21st June. Last year, Dave, 31, of Ramsey, Paul Kennish, 30, of Douglas and Matt Cannell, 31, of Douglas carried their home-made bobsleigh – weighing more than two stone to Peel in the Parish Walk. The Team Cool Ny Runnings wore yellow, green and black spandex, reflecting the Jamaican colours. The guys also dressed up and carried their pink bob sleigh around Hospice’s Midnight Walk last September.

JUMP TO IT! CHARITY’S TANDEM SKYDIVE PLACES GOING FAST Places on an 11,000 feet tandem skydive event taking place at Jurby in June are going fast. The Children’s Centre has a limited number of places left for what will be rare opportunity to skydive in the Island. Tandem skydiving gives novices to parachuting the opportunity to experience one of the best adrenaline fuelled extreme sports available, an amazing 60-seconds or so of ‘free fall’ reaching speeds of up to 120mph. . Each participant will be assigned to a fully qualified and experienced instructor from the Black Knights Parachute Centre, who will give full training on the day. Experts from the centre, which is based near Lancaster, will be visiting the Island to run the event at Jurby Airfield on 1 June, in conjunction with Motofest. All proceeds go to The Children’s Centre’s charitable projects including Mobex, Out2Play, Child Contact Centre, Community Development and the Community Farm. To secure your place you just need to pay a £99 deposit and pledge to raise a minimum of £250. The cost of the skydive will come out of the money you raise.   Full event details can be found at: www.thechildrenscentre.org. im/adventure-events/ which also allows you to register online. If you have any queries phone: 676076 or e-mail: fundraising@ thechildrenscentre.org.im

RUNNERS RAISE OVER £2,000 FOR DIANA PRINCESS OF WALES CARE AT HOME TRUST

Their challenge this year for Hospice is to get 100 people to dress up and walk the walk as super heros. To register as a super hero please contact Hospice’s fundraising team on: 647433 or e-mail: fundraising@hospice.org.im.

A team of 10 amateur runners from the Isle of Man have raised £2,170 for the Diana Princess of Wales Care at Home Trust by completing the ASICS Greater Manchester Marathon - which took place in early April. The team – Dasa Mojzis, Terri McCullough, Charmaine Armitage Mitchell, Sue Preskey, Sandra Cardwell, Rachel Lee, Jennifer Houghton, Jade Allcock, Dyana Carrins and Claire Keys all completed the 26.22-mile relay course around Trafford in good time, including five first-time runners. Chairman of the Trust, Ron Spencer, said: “I and all the trustees are deeply grateful for the support of this fundraising effort and every member of the marathon team has our utmost admiration for completing the race. Well done and thank you!” The Diana Princess of Wales Care at Home Trust was created in 1998 by Don & Ali Westacott in fond memory of the Princess to provide hospice at home services in the Isle of Man. The aim of Diana Princess of Wales Care at Home Trust is to provide high-quality nursing care and support the individual patient, the family, friends and carers, when the patient has chosen to remain at home. www.hospiceathome.im

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me& mypet

JAMIE TALBOT Breed: Short haired domesticated hubby. Age: 30 Likes: Teasing Martin with Catnip and Dreamies.. Also love my wife, my family, my job, the sitcom ‘Modern Family’, chilling in front of Discovery Channel and DIY! Dislikes: When Martin makes me bribe him with Dreamies to come home!! Where do you live on the island? Douglas. Where are you originally from? Born in Staffordshire, lived in Guernsey then moved to the stunning Isle of Man. What do you do for a living? I’m a Systems Support Engineer for Nedbank Private Wealth. What animal would you be...? Probably an Anteater (not sure why)?

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Why did you choose a rescue pet? Firstly I’d like to take this opportunity to say what a great job the MSPCA do in looking after and re-homing our little furry friends, secondly I think there’s nothing better in the world than to give a loving home and a future to a rescue moggy. Do you have any more pets? Not to my knowledge, although I suspect there might be something living under our bed. Would you have any more pets? I’m thinking of adopting a female cat, I suspect our pussy cat Martin would agree. The best and worst thing about having a pet is..?  Well the best thing would be the noise of Martin’s little furry feet walking into our bedroom in the morning just before he pounces on the bed and demands we get up and feed him... The worst part would be Martin waking us up and not giving in, which usually results in him scratching the following; bedside tables/bed/ duvet/flesh, etc until we comply!

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me&mypet JAMIE, LYN & MARTIN

Give an animal

A HOME Kya

Kya is stunning, a beautiful cream Akita who would be a wonderful companion. She’s pretty, she’s happy, she’s clever – what more could you ask? She’s nine years old but she’s lively and playful and loves human company. Kya loves her treats and is really keen to learn and will be a credit and a good friend to the lucky person who gives her the chance of a new and happy life.

MARTIN Breed: “Slightly” rotund black domestic short haired feline, but you can call me Panther. Age: Around 4 Likes: Waking slave (aka human) up early in the morning to demand treats and chicken slices! Lots of them (Hence the rotund part). Oh I also love laying on my back with my paws in the air whilst my silly slave takes pictures and attempts to stroke my tummy (this usually results in him yelping for some strange reason, I was simply giving him a high five!). Dislikes: When the fridge door closes and when I see empty Dreamies/chicken slices packets. If human what would you be?  Definitely be of the couch potato variety. Why do you love your human? He’s not my human, he’s my slave, he just doesn’t realise it yet! He also loves me, gives me treats and protects me when there’s loud noises such as thunder and fireworks. If you had one wish what would you wish for? Endless supplies of chicken slices (mixed with Dreamies)!

Sandy & Scotch Why hasn’t anyone fallen in love with Sandy and Scotch? They are such a pretty pair of gingernuts – well, Scotch is more of a champagne colour if you like to mix your drinks! They’re not yet a year old, lovely lads who just want to be loved. We really can’t understand why they haven’t been snapped up as they’re such friendly boys who love human company and enjoy cuddles. Sandy is a little less outgoing than Scotch and can be shy when he first meets you but he soon gains confidence and these lovely lads will give you so much love and happiness – they’re barely out of kittenhood so they have years of fun and friendship to offer you.

ManxSPCA ARD JERKYLL, EAST FOXDALE • TEL: 851672

www.manxspca.com BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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DO GOOD

FEEL GREAT There is a true value to feeling great. We all want to get rich quick but there is a new type of wealth, to live a life rich in experience and good deeds.

It is something money cannot buy; it is sincere, transparent, unselfish, sustainable and intrinsic. Charity means giving help to those who are in need and being kind and tolerant to others, it is human kindness. It is also the name we give to an organisation set up to help others. By giving to charity you can connect with other people, build future opportunities and make change happen.

GIVE MONEY: YOU CAN AFFORD TO GIVE BIG OR CAN GIVE LITTLE AND OFTEN

There have always been those occasions when you empty your pockets of coins, we are happy to part with our small change as if the weight burdens us. If you really can afford to give funds to a cause you believe in, your donation gives the greatest flexibility to invest in the future of the charity. You are giving your trust and belief to the organisation and in turn providing the opportunity to develop.

GIVE YOUR SKILLS: YOU HAVE A TALENT YOU CAN SHARE TO HELP OTHERS, YOU ARE COMMITTED TO THE CAUSE AND WANT TO HAVE THE CHOICE OF WHEN AND WHAT YOU GIVE

Every project requires skilled and experienced people to operate effectively and save costs. All skills have a value and you can apply the skills you have learnt to help others. Perhaps you sit behind an office desk but have a creative flair for design, you are a carpenter but play in a band. You can build on your experience, refine your knowledge and add to your repertoire. You can choose to give in a way suitable to you, work from home, and choose when and where you can help.

GIVE TIME: YOU WANT TO HELP OTHERS, MEET NEW PEOPLE AND CAN COMMIT TO GIVING UP YOUR TIME REGULARLY

Heard the expression time is money? Time is precious to everyone and especially to charities with limited funding. Charities value a community of volunteers willing to contribute to support their aims and objectives. Roles can vary vastly in commitment and responsibility. This is great work experience and often the most rewarding. You can be working hands on and directly for the cause. You get to see the difference you are making directly to the organisation

GIVE YOURSELF: YOU WANT A LIFE EXPERIENCE, ADVENTURE OR CHALLENGE YOU CAN COMMIT TO

We all know people who give themselves to fundraising for the cause by taking on a challenge. You could be running a marathon, cycling across Africa, walking the cliff paths of the island, parachute jumping or not letting alcohol pass your lips for a month. Facing a challenge is your commitment to finding a goal and reaching it. You are proud to talk about your challenge to your friends and are committed to making yourself better whilst supporting a cause you believe in. It is the ultimate unselfish act to improve yourself.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT: THE RESULTS

It’s official, helping others makes you happy! Researchers from the London School of Economics found that the more people volunteered, the happier they are. Volunteering increases self-confidence, combats depression, helps you stay physically fit, can advance your career and brings fun and fulfillment to life. Giving improves your sense of wellbeing and can also help you become educated about the causes and organizations you have researched. It is rewarding to understand how you are making a difference and measure the positive impact. Donations are also tax deductable.

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EVENTS


EVENTS

WISH UPON A DREAM - WISH UPON A STAR Venue - Claremont Hotel | 5th April 2013

Seventy guests joined Idoui on Saturday 5th April to raise funds for two children’s charities, Wish Upon A Dream and Wish Upon A Star. Held at the Claremont in Douglas, gathering many companies from around the Island as well as friends of both charities. A raffle & auction and were held with many prizes generously donated by both local and UK companies including Sure, Magic Carpets,

Newsbeat, Naked Butlers and many more. The night raised £6,000 to be split between the charities and further funds have been raised when organiser Emma Cummings completed a Sky Dive on Saturday 19th April. For more information on Wish Upon a Dream contact Lesley Turnbull on 07624 229229 or: wishuponadream@manx.net PHOTOGRAPHER - PETE R KWIECINSKI - WWW.DOLSFACTORY.NET

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EVENTS

TT 2014 PRESS LAUNCH Location -Jurby Racecourse & The Villa Marina, Douglas

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PHOTOGRAPHER - PETE R KWIECINSKI - WWW.DOLSFACTORY.NET

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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EVENTS

LAURA AND JOHN FARAGHER WEDDING DAY Ceremony - Douglas Regerstry Office | Reception - Bradda Glen, Port Erin

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PHOTOGRAPHER - PETE R KWIECINSKI - WWW.DOLSFACTORY.NET ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


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WHAT’S ON

CULTURE VULTURE What’s on... Now - 17.05.14

04.05.14 3pm

BRIGID STOWELL AND SHANE LUCAS

IT’S MAGIC

//HODGSON LOOM GALLERY, LAXEY//

A full show from the Young Musicians of Mann.

An exhibition of new paintings and sculptures from two well-known Manx artists. Brigid has taken a break from her Douglas street scenes to include stunningly colourful paintings of flowers in this exhibition. Shane will be exhibiting a variety of clay and wood sculptures. Admission is free.

//ERIN ARTS CENTRE, PORT ERIN//

Tickets and information are available from: www.erinartscentre.com

(Douglas), Shakti Man (Ramsey), Celtic Gold (Peel), Thompson Travel (Port Erin) or online from www.etickets.im/cc www.centenarycentre.com

10.05.14 7.30pm A TAPESTRY OF TRIO MUSIC //ERIN ARTS CENTRE, PORT ERIN//

03.05.14 – 05.05.14 WESTERN OPEN STUDIOS ART TRAIL (WOSAT)

Scherzando String Quartet performs work from the 18th to the 20th century. Tickets £12 (£1 for under 18s)

www.theislegallery.com

//PEEL, PATRICK, DALBY, ST JOHNS AND KIRK MICHAEL//

Tickets and information available from: www.erinartscentre.com

01.05.14 7pm

Artists open their homes and studios to the general public.

11.05.14 7.30pm

KING LEAR (NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE SCREENING) //STUDIO THEATRE, BALLAKERMEEN HIGH SCHOOL, DOUGLAS// Live screening direct from the National Theatre in London of the acclaimed production of King Lear, starring Simon Russell Beale. Tickets £15 (adults), £12.50 (concessions) from www.villagaiety.com or the Welcome Centre on: 600555.

02.05.14 - 27.06.14 MANOS KALAMENIOS AND JIMMY DUGGAN //STUDIO 42, PORT ST MARY// Exquiste, delicate ceramics from Manos and intriguing painted vintage tins, suitcases and sculptures from Jimmy.

£2 adults and under 18s are free. Event guides, stickers and maps are available from Peel Cathedral, Corrin Hall and some of the venues during the weekend. Organised by The Creative Network: www.creativenetwork.im

07.05.4 – 30.05.14 ODE TO MANX MARITME //ERIN ARTS CENTRE, PORT ERIN// An exhibition of work by maritime painter John Halsall. More info on: www.erinartscentre.com

10.05.14 ISLE OF MAN ORGANISTS’ RECITALS: ORGAN CRAWL

www.studio42gallery.co.uk

//NORTHERN CHURCHES//

www.madedymanos.com

11am: Bride Methodist Church

www.jimmyduggan.com

12 noon: Andreas parish church 2.30pm: Kirk Michael Methodist Church.

12.05.14 - 24.05.14 A NEW EXPOSURE //SAYLE GALLERY/ An exhibition of photographs by Ruth Gale, Clare Fox Schreuder and Ruth Sayle. www.saylegallery.com

4TISSIMO //PEEL CENTENARY CENTRE// An atmospheric candlelit evening, featuring popular and light classics from this leading string quartet. Formerly Beautiful Music String Quartet, all the musicians were brought up in the IoM and have studied to a high standard. They include a member of the IoM symphony orchestra and a graduate of the Royal Scottish Academy of Music. Tickets £10 from Peter Norris Music (Douglas), Shakti Man (Ramsey), Celtic Gold (Peel), Thompson Travel (Port Erin) or online from www.etickets.im/cc www.centenarycentre.com

11.05.14 2pm YOUNG SINGER OF MANN //ERIN ARTS CENTRE, PORT ERIN// The first stage of this annual competition. Tickets and information are avilable from: www.erinartscentre.com

More information from Alex Tawney on: 07624462221 or e-mail: alextawney@ icloud.com

10.05.14 RETROSPECT //PEEL CENTENARY CENTRE// An evening of soul, blues and Motown with this fantastic 12-piece band, where dancing is compulsory. Tickets £14 from Peter Norris Music

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17.05.14 ISLE OF MAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND GUESTS //VILLA MARINA, DOUGLAS// The IoM Symphony Orchestra is joined by the Slaithwaite Orchestra, Yorkshire to perform The Planets by Gustav Holst and two world premières by Manx-born composers; J E Quayle’s Fantasy-Overture On Maughold Head and a new work by Charles Guard, Song of the Southern Hills. Supported by the Isle of Man Arts Council. Tickets £16 from cfvg.gov.im

18.05.14 2.30pm CREATION by JOSEPH HAYDN //ST GEORGE’S CHURCH, DOUGLAS// The Manx Festival Chorus will be joined by members of the Oldham and Sale Choral Societies, the Lindow Singers and members of the North West Festival Choir. Soloists: Karen Johnson (soprano), Richard Pollock (tenor) and Andrew Greenham (bass), with Russell Medley (organ) and conductor John Bethell. Admission £12. Tickets from Celtic Gold (Peel), Shakti Man (Ramsey), Thompson Travel (Port Erin) and the Erin Arts Centre. www.manxfestivalchorus.com

25.05.14 8pm

Genesis Gallery SAM ELLIS Samantha Ellis’ fun and funky pictures feature intricate designs, vivid colours and a strong sense of energy and movement. Working mainly from a combination of photographic reference and her own vivid imagination, she may create a representation of a real place on occasion, while another image may combine scenes and play around with the composition; she herself describes this process as “letting loose and having fun”. Young and brimming with inspiration and energy, Samantha has forged a highly individual approach which has grown and changed into a loose, dynamic and recognisable style. Using acrylics gives her the vibrancy that is key to her bolder work. She also chooses a cooler palette at times to give a more detached feel to the finished image. “I tend to layer the paint on quite thick as I love the texture this produces and I feel it also makes the painting more visually interesting. I love being able to make each building and place look different every time I paint them.” Gemma and Rachel at Genesis Gallery are proud to announce the arrival of five specially commissioned vibrant paintings by Sam which are on display in the gallery now.

A CELEBRATION OF LOCAL SINGERSONGWRITER-GUITARISTS

Three of these images will be published into collectable limited editions of only 49 and will be available from May 2014.

//JABBERWOCKY, DOUGLAS//

Please contact the gallery on 622070 or info@genesisgallery.im for further information, or call in to 39 Victoria Street, Douglas.

An opportunity to hear local musicians Barry Nelson, Clara Barker and Jeff Jepson in the latest ‘Sunday Night Special’ from promoter Jonno Productions. Tickets £10 from Jabberwocky and online from www.etickets.im/JP www.jonnopromotions.com

28.05.14 7.30pm KEEPING MUM //ERIN ARTS CENTRE, PORT ERIN//The latest in the Erin Arts Centre Isle of Film series of films (dir. Niall Johnson certificate 15). Tickets and information from: www.erinartscentre.com

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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CULTURE NEWS FROM BALLROOM TO BLOOD BROTHERS As a young teenager Perry O’Dea took up ballroom dancing, encouraged by his mother, Mary. Four years later, the former St Ninian’s High School student from Onchan began to acquire a taste for musical theatre after he was selected for a part in Manx Operatic Society’s Back to the 80s production, and he’s never looked back. Now 21 and understudying the part of Mickey in the UK tour of Willy Russell’s Blood Brothers, Perry said: “With Back to the 80s it’s fair to say I found my voice and, while I enjoyed ballroom, I knew then that musical theatre was what I really wanted to do.” “‘Right from the start, my Mum has been phenomenal, as has my Dad, Paul, in all the support and encouragement they’ve given me. And St Ninian’s was great, too, giving me lots of opportunities to progress my ambition to appear on the stage. Performing in a school production of Grease helped give me confidence to perform in front of a live audience. Then I was in an eight-week summer season of Guys and Dolls at the Gaiety Theatre. It was then that I felt that I had a “real” job. It felt natural to me to be on stage singing and dancing.” Perry received funding from the Isle of Man Arts Council whilst he was at Arts Educational (ArtsEd) musical theatre school in London, a period in his life that shaped his future career. Five years after combining working for his ‘A’ levels with ArtsEd training and studying, he emerged a graduate with a 2:1 degree in musical theatre. He says: “The Blood Brothers tour ends in May, then it’ll be back to auditioning. That’s the thing about being in musical theatre, it’s totally unpredictable. One day you can be on stage, the next you can be working front of house.” Perry has some sound advice for aspiring young singers and dancers. He told us: “Never say no. Give everything you’re offered a try. It’s all good training. When I first started I was doing everything; training, doing two shows and studying for my exams. And in this business you need to get thick-skinned really quickly. Don’t worry about what people say; there was a time early on when I used to get a lot of stick for just saying I wanted to be in musical theatre…but not any more.”

DOUGLAS COUNCIL CREATES LASTING MEMORIALS TO WW1 The sound of a chainsaw in Derby Square recently heralded the start of work on carved poppy seeds and reaching hands in two dead chestnut trees. Well-known local wood carver Gavin Carter has been hard at work creating what is an imaginative lasting war memorial. Poppies are, of course, an instantly recognisable symbol and once the initial chainsawing was done, Gavin reverted to his more usual method of chisel and mallet to create rough hewen flowers, poppy seeds and buds in the larger of the two trees. The second tree, which was about to be cut down for safety reasons, is being transformed into a series of hands. Gavin carved these into what remained of the pollarded branches - a poignant representation of dying soldiers reaching out for help. And up on Douglas Head, gardeners from the Borough parks department have been creating their own memorial - which can seen from as far away as Summerland, as the boat comes in or goes out of the harbour. The idea for a ‘poppy bed’ came from the gardeners themselves who wanted to commemorate the centenary of the start of WW1, and once the plan was approved, they started digging just below Manx Radio earlier this spring. A giant poppy-shaped flowerbed has been cut into the turf and is to be planted with red geraniums for the summer (in good time for the centenary of the beginning of WW1 in August) and then poppies later in the year.

3RD BARBIROLLI INTERNATIONAL OBOE FESTIVAL AND COMPETITION An international music festival held in the Isle of Man has been praised by its artistic director. Mr Neil Black OBE was commenting following the conclusion of the 3rd Barbirolli International Oboe Festival and Competition here on Island following 10-years on the Isle of Wight. More than 20 of the finest young oboe players in the world travelled the globe to reach the Erin Arts Centre for the festival which is renowned as the most prestigious oboe competition in the world. First prize is the Evelyn Rothwell Memorial Prize of £4,000, donated by Jim Mellon. It went to Hannah Morgan, who studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London. Second prize is The Neil Black Prize of £2,000, donated anonymously, awarded to Samuel Bastos (Portugal) and the third prize, The Jim Mellon Prize of £1,000 went to Nermis Meises (America).

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The festival, which drew an initial entry of 30 competitors from 19 different countries, including entries from the Far East, Europe, North and South America, also saw a recital by the Barbirolli Trio. Artistic director Neil Black has played in most the world’s great musical centres as a soloist and Prof. Caird has combined a career as an oboist with one as a music educationalist. The festival was welcomed to the Isle of Man by the Port Erin Commissioners. The Isle of Man Arts Council and Year of Culture also contributed while the test piece was funded by Friends Provident International. He hoped that oboe players young and old in the Island would visit the festival and that it would bring Port Erin alive with music for the week. ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


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CENTURY-OLD PORTRAITS SOUGHT AS PART OF CULTURAL CELEBRATIONS The Island’s oldest schools are being urged to dig out portraits gifted to them a century ago to celebrate the work of Manx national poet T.E. Brown.   Brown was born in Douglas in 1830, attended King William’s College and gained a double first at Christ Church in Oxford. He then entered teaching, retiring as master of Clifton College in Bristol in 1892, dying five years later. His most noted collection, of 12 poems, is F’o’c’sle Yarns, 10 of which are tales told in the forecastle of a ship by Tom Baynes, a steadily ageing mariner. The first yarn, Betsy Lee, told by Tom when he is in his mid-20s, is probably Brown’s best-known dialect work. In May 1914, to commemorate the centenary of the poet’s birth, the Manx Society, now long defunct, gifted a portrait of Brown to every Island school to encourage pupils to read his works. Manx National Heritage has the original newspaper article about the donation in the iMusuem in Douglas. Now, a century later, the Department of Education and Children is asking schools to dust off the portraits and put them back in pride of place on their walls to mark Island of Culture 2014. It’s inviting schools to look back through log book entries of 1914 to see how the presentation was marked. For further information contact Jo Callister, advisory teacher for the Manx Curriculum – 686281/686399 or 482023

2014 DOUGLAS POETRY TRAIL NOW OPEN FOR ENTRIES Isle of Man Poetry Society, in conjunction with Manx Litfest, has launched the 2014 Douglas Poetry Trail. Entries are invited for inclusion in the trail, which will take the form of 20 poems printed on posters and displayed at venues around Douglas town centre in the lead up to and during Manx Litfest 2014. The Poetry Trail, which is kindly sponsored by Isle of Man Bank Ltd., will be in place in Douglas between 12 September and 5 October. Last year’s trail generated a lot of interest from poets across the Island, attracting a total of 82 entries. All poems included in the trail will be published in an accompanying booklet and entrant will receive a copy. Entries will be judged by a committee from Isle of Man Poetry Society. To submit for the trail, poets need to send their work in to the Isle of Man Poetry Society office with an entry form, together with £3.50 per poem, by Friday 13 June. The entry form can be downloaded at Isle of Man Poetry Society’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ isleofmanpoetrysociety, or you can pick up a copy at the Henry Bloom Noble Library in Douglas. BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

RISING STAR OF THE FUTURE MAE CHALLIS Mae Challis is having a whirlwind start to 2014! She won the ‘Next Big Thing’ competition at the Gaiety Theatre in January, and performed a solo slot at the Villa Marina for J-Fest the following weekend. Earlier in January, she completed a studio and outdoor location photographic shoot with award-winning photographer Phil Kneen. Two of Mae’s especially recorded songs have been featured on Christy D’s 3FM Saturday afternoon radio show; she has completed the recording of a five-track EP of her own songs; and has been booked to sing two songs by Isle of Man based band The Embassy. She will also feature in Phil Kneen’s ‘Portraits’ Photographic Exhibition at the Noa Bakehouse in Douglas on 20th March. Mae says “Winning the ‘Next Big Thing’ was a dream start to 2014, and it’s definitely given me the motivation to develop and grow as a musician and a singer/songwriter.” Mae was born in Kent and moved to the Isle of Man at the age of seven, already a precocious singer and guitar player. She later added keyboards and drums to her musical capabilities; listening to and drawing influence from an eclectic mix of artists, such as Queen, Oasis, Coldplay, Skrillex, and more. Mae began writing her own songs, along with her Mum, Sharon, as co-writer, by the time she was 12 years of age. She said: “Mum originally came up with ideas for songs and I started to have more and more input until now each song is a mixture of both our ideas. We love working together on songs, but I do all the music. It’s my strong point.” Mae has been a regular attendee and contributor to the government funded youth project ‘Soundcheck’ and is keen to endorse the program as a foundation for her development as a serious musician. Mae is undoubtedly one of the leading lights of the vast array of exceptional and diverse musical talents currently being unearthed and nurtured here on our own Island’s doorstep. One can hazard a guess as to where all the hard work and dedication will lead her.

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ROCK AND NEW ROLE FOR DAVY KNOWLES

DAVY KNOWLES WAS ALWAYS INTERESTED IN ROCK; HE JUST DIDN’T KNOW FOR A WHILE THAT THE ROCK HE WAS INTERESTED IN WAS OF THE MUSICAL AND NOT THE GEOLOGICAL KIND. As a child, and long before he took up the guitar, he took up the chisel. He said: “I wanted to be a paleontologist and would often be out chiseling away at pieces of rock.” But that was before he heard Dire Straits’ ‘Sultans of Swing’ on the car radio while out with his father, Tony. From that moment the 11-year-old from Port St Mary decided he wanted to play the guitar. “My dad first taught me the guitar, but I didn’t really want to know about the theory, I just wanted to be able to play like Mark Knopfler or Eric Clapton I sort of fell into becoming a musician. At first I was just fiddling about, playing by ear for a hobby. I never craved fame; I just wanted instant ability.” He was taught not only by his father but, also by Peter Lumb. “Peter and my dad were great but, as an 11-year-old, I didn’t want to learn the boring stuff, like chords.” Inbetween his studies at Castle Rushen High School, he continued to drift into music circles. “In the Isle of Man, it’s so easy to meet other like-minded people.” By the age of 17, he’d met Bob Miller, who became and still is his manager. After gaining what he admits were less than impressive A-levels, he went to see his careers adviser. “I had an opportunity to

move the UK and pursue a career in music, but Mum and Dad wanted me to go to university. My careers adviser, though, looked at my results and said I’d be better off taking a gap year and seeing the world.” But instead of seeing the world, he saw Newark in Nottingham, where he moved to and started his career as blues rock artist in earnest. “When I reached about 19, though, I realised it was time I started to learn more about the practical side, so studied theory and harmony which opened up more creative possibilities, and began to bring an extra layer to my work.” Now an accomplished singer/songwriter, he released his first solo album ‘Coming Up For Air’, in 2009. “When I’m writing a song the lyrics and the music come at the same time, but separately, sort of in parallel. I might hear something someone’s said that I could use in a song and note it down or see something and take a shot of it on my phone, then later I’ll put the two together. For me, the best songs are conversational, because then they take on that extra, human element.” Celtic influences play a big part in his work. He says Manx Celtic music “is blossoming and blooming” and he’s proud that through his work he can promote elements of Manx culture and heritage in the US. The Isle of Man has played a big part in his and the band’s career. “We cut our teeth in the Isle of Man, playing – and getting paid – in pubs, which was great. It was a shock, though, when I started playing at jam nights in London and found that you actually had to pay to play.”

“Pubs in the Isle of Man are very supportive of musicians and are incredibly useful training grounds for bands. When I was younger and still living in the Island I found it a very safe and encouraging environment to be in, so I’m really pleased to have been chosen to be a youth cultural ambassador for Island of Culture 2014 and to have an opportunity to give something back to the Isle of Man.” Davy is based in Chicago, where he lives with his fiancée Amber. He says: “She’s got a proper job; she’s a radiologist” - much of his life is taken up with touring (“as we’ve gained some recognition over the years the tour busses have got better”) and he’s just two states left where he has yet to perform, Alaska and Hawaii. ”Although I’ve been a professional musician since I was 19, the fact that people actually buy our records (he’s a big vinyl fan) and pay to come and see us perform is still utterly baffling to me.” He says it’s equally baffling – and flattering – that he was invited to be the keynote speaker at the recent employability conference, aimed at helping young people make the transition from school to the workplace. “The help and advice I received from people in my early days was incredibly valuable, so for the conference I wanted to make the point that it’s really important to listen to your mentors and absorb like a sponge everything they say.” He’s seen big changes in the music industry since he started out.”‘There was a time when you’d never have seen Mark Knopfler or Peter Frampton on Twitter. Now people buy into you as a person as well as an artist. Social media is really useful for finding out where your fan base is; also, with people able to comment so easily on you and your music, there’s an added pressure to reaffirm their faith in you and do good work.” “What’s been one of the nicest and most rewarding things for me is when I hear from Manx ex-pats who’ve heard Roll Away (from his debut album of the same name with Back Door Slam and includes the line: “Maybe I’ll return to this island some day”) and they say how it reminds them of home.” www.davyknowles.com Photographer: Phil Kneen

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PHOTO UPLOAD

THE MONTHLY UPLOAD Want to win £50? All you have to do is email your entry with the subject ‘upload’ to: upload@gallery.co.im. Try to follow a time of the year theme, make the files nice and big though, about

2MB is a good size to aim for. We do try to print every photo following the guide but we can’t get them ALL on the page fullsize unfortunately - they just wouldn’t fit!

£50 r

winne

Onur Benke

Mary Vereker Paul Smyth

Andy Traviss

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Andrew Bell

Ruth Gale Paul Smyth

Sean Davidson

Jeff Kirby

Andy Traviss

Andrew Janette Phair Sarah Collins

Tim Henderson

Alan Clague

jo Swift Lonan Oldham

Charlotte Cowell

Kelly Collard

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

Felix Galbraith

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IS... E M A MY N

Christy DeHaven MY JOB IS… Editor and Producer at DAM Productions, Co-Founder of MannIN Shorts film training scheme, Director of Isle of Man Film Festival and Presenter on 3FM. THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD WOULD BE… All of the above! But also would love to do some TV presenting, that would be great fun. MY WORST HABIT IS… Bad time management! IF I COULD CHANGE ONE THING IN MY LIFE IT WOULD BE…Would like to be able to spend more social time with friends and family, and have more time for music (I gig with a few bands and play my own music). IF I HAD TO ONLY EAT ONE KIND OF FOOD FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE IT WOULD BE…That’s unfair! I love all kinds of food too much! Maybe Thai food. THIS IS A BIT MORE ABOUT MYSELF... I’m actually half American - my father is from Tennessee, but I was born here and am a very patriotic Manxie. I’ve spent a fair bit of time in the States, not least because I went to uni in Idaho as one of the Ella Oleson scholars, but I also lived in San Francisco for six-months. Was glad to come back here, though. My Great-Grandfather was EC Quayle, the artist, who was very good friends with Archibald Knox. He painted the portrait of Knox that hangs in the museum and is currently being used as an image for a lot of the Knox 150th Anniversary events. Knox also painted a portrait of EC Quayle, and attributes some of his watercolour training to him. Dave and I don’t have children, but are very close to nephews Finn and Luca and niece Kailyn. One of our favourite past times - and something that keeps us sane amidst the madness - is walking with our black lab, Milo the mediahound, who was actually featured in a previous issue of Gallery. I have an album, called “Girl Undone”, written by me and recorded by Dave with stunning artwork by our good friend Bruno Cavellec. So far, it has only so far been released in a very limited run for a gig with Scott Matthews. I’d love to have time to do a proper release of it this year. IF I COULD BE A CELEBRITY FOR A DAY, IT WOULD BE…Guy Garvey! So, I could be in the band Elbow for a day, present his Sunday show on 6 music, and meet all the amazing people he knows and works with. Would also be interesting to be a man for a day. THE BEST TIME OF YEAR IS… Spring. THE BEST ADVICE I’VE EVER BEEN GIVEN IS… “Accentuate the Positive” - Johnny Mercer sang it, but my family - and friends - pretty much live by that mantra, and it makes for a much happier life. IF I COULD HAVE ONE QUESTION ANSWERED IN THE WORLD IT WOULD BE… How to stop humankind resorting to violence and destruction in our determination to progress and proceed (that’s a bit heavy, sorry!). THE 3 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN LIFE ARE… Love, laughter, peace. Sounds oh so-corny, but oh so-true. MY DREAM HOUSE WOULD BE… Out in the wilds somewhere, near a river, in the thick of nature. Not too far from the sea. But with a few modcons too - I can’t live without music and film ;) Plenty room for my man, my hound and my friends and family to visit, and a couple of horses in a big field out the back. WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR 2014… Making ‘Island Bound’ music documentary with Davy Knowles for Island of Culture. Excited that we’re off to Nashville to interview Peter Frampton this month! Working on a new all-female music project with Christine Collister and friends, also for Island of Culture; making movies with MannIN Shorts; loads of exciting events planned for IoM Film Fest with very special guests; hopefully lots more gigs with our new latin/jazz/swing band ‘Lava El Elefante’; being part of the release of Truman Falls glorious new album later in year; and we have our first ever big family reunion for the Quayles there’s a LOT of us! A holiday would be nice too.

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Editor The best advice Producer I’ve ever been given is... “Accentuate the Pos Director itive” Presenter Singer Song writer

Milo the Media Hound

CULTURE

Me with one of my musical heroes, Scott Matthews, who I was lucky enough to support last year at the Centenary Centre

BACKGROUND IMAGE

Album artwork for ‘Girl Undone’ by Bruno Cavellec

With Christine Collister, Jo Callister and Katherine Crowe in the DAM Studio, being filmed for piece about Christine on BBC Songs of Praise in March. (Credit: Dave Armstrong)

With Dave Armstrong working on MannIN Shorts film ‘I Do’

ARTIST AND ILLUSTRATORS Would you like to see your work featured in Gallery Magazine? Simply get in contact with us mynameis@gallery.co.im BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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Manx singer and harpist, Erika Kelly, is delighted to announce the release of her eagerly anticipated debut single “Better I Try” available now. Described as “a shining young star in the making” who is “undoubtedly going places” by Macs London magazine, Erika has teamed up with Island-based guitarist, Malcolm Stitt [Boys of the Lough, Deaf Shepherd, Kate Rusby] and London musician Joshua Rumble [Proxies, Faro] to co-write this catchy, upbeat song about “striving for your dreams, no matter what, through making continuous efforts even if you receive nothing in return”. Erika recorded the single in London with James Flannigan who produces music for the X-Factor and has worked with Snow Patrol, Lucy Spraggan, Rebecca Ferguson and many others.

“ ”

21-year old Erika’s musical beginnings stem from performing traditional music at school in Ramsey. Singing old Manx Gaelic songs and playing Celtic music on the harp - which have undoubtedly given a distinctive quality to her covers of contemporary pop songs, and to her original songs. Currently studying A-levels at Isle of Man College, Erika is also a keen lover of race walking and last year won the Midnight 20-Mile Stroll! “Better I Try” is the first song from her forthcoming EP, and the single will be available to download from iTunes from Tuesday 18 March. Erika Kelly is grateful for the generous support of the Isle of Man Arts Council in making this recording possible, plus assistance from the Malcolm-Scott Dickinson Trust and Culture Vannin. Erika and the band plan to tour and perform at festivals in the UK this summer.

I have attained a beautiful fan-base, who are the loveliest, most encouraging people! They make me feel consistently determined to achieve!

Accompanying the release of the single is a stunning video, filmed in the Gaiety Theatre by young film-maker and free-runner Will Sutton - www.youtube.com/user/dasloverly video available to view now.

Erika’s debut single “Better I Try”

Already well known for her unique spin on pop songs by the likes of Lady Gaga, Ed Sheeran, Mumford & Sons and Florence & the Machine, Erika is rapidly making a name for herself online, particularly through her YouTube channel, DasLoverly, where she has nearly 4000 followers and has had over 500,000 views. Talking about her loyal followers, Erika explains: “I have attained a beautiful fanbase, who are the loveliest, most encouraging people! They make me feel consistently determined to achieve!”

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FASHION & BEAUTY


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FASHION TRENDS

WORDS & LAYOUT : JORJA HELMOT

7 1 2 FLORALS

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GIVE way to the new season trends! With the end of March marking the beginning of Spring, it’s time to indulge in those hot new looks. WIith so many to choose from, we’ve collated just some of the top picks on the highstreet now. From neutral shades to whacky prints, there’s a style for you.

1. New Look - £19 2. Warehouse - £40 3. New Look - £24 4. Miss Selfridge - £30 5. Next - £24 6. Miss Selfridge - £25 7. Warehouse - £48 8. Miss Selfridge - £16.50 9.Next - £65 10. Clarks @ Asos - £89 11.Asos - £39 12. New Look - £17.99 13. Asos - £45 14. New Look - £3 15. New Look - £9 16. Asos - £25 17. Monsoon - £99

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3 MEN The new trends go for you guys too! The sun is out, which means a wardrobe upgrade for those cloudless afternoons. If Hawaiian florals aren’t for you then let stripes be your print of choice. Failing that, opt for neutral tones of all over white and of course any shade of the high street’s most popular new hue.... Pink!

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1. New Look - £34.99 2. Asos - £14 3. New Look - £19 4. YMC @ Asos - £75 5. New Look - £4.99 6. M & S - £22.50 7. New Look - £9.99 8. New Look - £14.99 9. New Look - £12.99 10. River Island - £20 11. Burton - £25 12. River Island - £22 13. Asos (pack of 7) - £30 14.Next - £40 15. Burton - £14 16. New Look - £9.99 17. Nike @ Asos - £97

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BEAUTY

BEAUTY BUZZ

Spend a little, give a little. Words | Nichole Sweetsur

This month Gallery uncovers the caring side of our favourite feel-good products. Beauty is more than skin deep and many brands are giving back to communities around the globe with fair trade schemes and charity projects that make a difference every time you spend.

C

orporate social responsibility in the beauty trade isn’t new, but it is growing momentum. Most new brands launching make giving back part of their mission and the big names have put their not inconsiderable weight behind causes such as AIDS and breast cancer awareness.

Back in the eighties, the Body Shop blazed a fair trade trail through the industry with their use of ingredients that support community projects. Today, the brand currently has 25 fair trade partners around the world and they do so much more than just help small producers. Since 1994 they have raised over £4 million to help victims of domestic abuse, staff volunteering is one of their core values and staff members receive five

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volunteering days a year. The Body Shop Foundation supports animal protection, environmental protection and human rights and they’ve tackled a wide range of issues from sex trafficking to animal testing. The new scrumptious smelling limited edition Raspberry Collection launches this month and uses community fair trade honey from the UNESCO Sheka Forest Biosphere Reserve. The ‘bee whisperers’ of Beza Mar in Ethiopia collect the honey and the beekeepers spend what they earn on their children’s education and healthcare. Raspberry Shower Gel. £4.00. Another brand with an impressive history of community minded business is Aveda. As well as their programme to save packaging from landfill they also help breast cancer charities and support a life-changing project in Nepal. Their annual commitment to Earth Month sees them launch a limited edition Light The Way Candle and give

100% of the retail price to the Global Greengrants Fund. They aim to raise $1.6 million for clean water projects around the world. Light The Way Candle. £16.00. Green People’s eco credentials are seriously good and they have recently linked up with the Marine Society to help tackle the problem of water contamination from UV filters in sunscreen. Research shows that an estimated 10,000 tons of UV filters are produced annually. On average, 25% of the sunscreen ingredients applied to skin end up in the water over the course of a 20-minute swim. Some of the ingredients in sun protection have a negative effect on aquatic life and Green People are championing organic sun lotion. In addition, Green People donate 30 pence from every sale of their organic Scent-Free SPF25 Sun Lotion to the Marine Society to help raise awareness of marine life issues. Scent-Free SPF25 Sun Lotion. £17.95.

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BEAUTY

Beauty isn’t just about airbrushed celebrities or catwalk trends. It’s an industry that does have a heart and we as consumers can vote with our wallets and seek out those brands that give a little every time we spend a little.

Another natural brand, Organic Surge, has turned its attention to working with Africa’s most vulnerable children. The brand has even sent people from their own team to take a hands-on approach in troubled areas. They also sponsor the Baby Care Unit in the Kenya Children’s Home, Nairobi, which cares for 48 sick or abandoned children. Look out for their new Hot Cloth Cleanser, which launches in May. £12.50. Naked has a ‘giving gifts’ policy of supporting humanitarian and environmental charities including the Rainforest Foundation, Women’s Aid and the Woodland Trust. Like the Body Shop, Naked is a well-priced brand that has put ethical trading and giving back at the heart of its company values. Gallery loves their best selling Naked Little Miracle Leavein Conditioner, which protects hair from heated styling tools and smells delish! £4.99

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

It’s not just the organic and natural brands that have a heart. In 1992 Mrs. Evelyn H. Lauder launched The Estée Lauder Companies’ Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign to raise awareness of the disease. Over 70 countries participate and after 21 years it’s stronger than ever. The focus is on education and research and the pink ribbon has become a global symbol in the fight against breast cancer. October will see special products on sale with a portion of proceeds funding their on-going work. Boots Extracts collection of bath and body goodies was created with fair trade in mind and uses ingredients from around the world. Numerous community projects are supported from Chile to Burkina Faso in

Africa. The Honey Body Butter will see off dry winter skin and contains fairtrade honey from South America. £8.00. Whilst it’s not available on the island, no round up of charitable beauty brands would be complete without mentioning MAC. The brand set up their Aids Fund in 1994 to serve people of all races who are affected by the disease. The whole selling price of their VIVA GLAM lipsticks goes to the Aids Fund and the brand is best-known for it’s celebrity support. The current shades are a must for lovers of red lippie and the campaign features Rihanna. VIVA GLAM Lipstick. £15.00. So, there it is. Beauty isn’t just about airbrushed celebrities or catwalk trends. It’s an industry that does have a heart and we as consumers can vote with our wallets and seek out those brands that give a little every time we spend a little.

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FASHION

WESTWOOD’S CLIMATE REVOLUTION Words: Jenny Parkes

In an era of throwaway ‘fastfashion’ - thanks to budgetfriendly stores such as Primark - it is all too easy to ignore the effects that our ‘more is more’ attitude have on our environment. But icon of British fashion design, Dame Vivienne Westwood, is on a mission to change this with her SS14 collection. Westwood acknowledges: “I just use fashion as an excuse to talk about politics ... I’m a fashion designer, it gives me a voice’” and she certainly made her point clear with slogan ‘Climate Revolution’ t-shirts teamed with green floral prints, emphasising the beauty of nature and the damage that our shopping habits are causing. The political and ecological inspirations behind this collection have seen Westwood coin the political slogan ‘Buy Less, Choose Well’; a motto that most of us could do with bearing in mind. According to DoSomething.org, a not-forprofit organisation for social change, the following points sum up the devastating impact of fast-fashion on our environment:

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led to a sharp increase in air pollution. 3. It depletes our water resources: A study by Cambridge University found that the fast-fashion industry uses around 70-million tons of water - water that could have otherwise been used for more essential things such as drinking, bathing and growing crops.

I JUST USE FASHION AS AN EXCUSE TO TALK ABOUT POLITICS ... I’M A FASHION DESIGNER, IT GIVES ME A VOICE

1. It’s wasteful: Fast-fashion products are cheap because they’re poorly made and aren’t meant to last for long – consequentially, these clothes quickly end up in the bin.

4. It increases the use of harmful chemicals: In 2012, a Greenpeace report revealed that companies like Zara and H&M were selling products that contained hazardous chemicals that were contaminating waterways and vegetation, as well as some cancer-causing and hormone-disrupting chemicals.

2. It causes air pollution: As the demand for fast-fashion grows, so does the need for more large factories in places with cheap labour, such as China and Bangladesh, where little to no emission regulations have

5. It increases our oil use: Many fast-fashion clothes are made with some percentage of polyester, which is made from petroleum. The extraction of oil and production of polyester are extremely detrimental to the

environment, on top of the amount of oil reserves we use in our cars and other technology. But what can we do to actively change our shopping habits, and to give something back to our environment? It can be tempting to just buy something for the sake of it when out shopping on a Saturday, or to impulse buy and end up never wearing the damn thing. Sound familiar? Then why not sell your unwanted purchases – old or new – on sites such as eBay, where you can make some or all of your money back, or consider clothes swapping websites and mobile apps? Better yet, organise your own clothes swap with friends, at school, or at work – it could be a fantastic fundraising initiative! For a look that is both individual and ethical, check out the dozens of charity shops across the Island for some gorgeous pre-loved pieces, local vintage fairs, or stores such as Urban Outfitters that have their own dedicated vintage or ‘renewal’ sections stocking upcycled and reworked garments – you might even find some bargain Westwood-esque slogan tees and sweatshirts! Consider customising the clothes you already own; turn that old t-shirt into a crop top, slash the neckline of your sweater or, with summer just around the corner, those worn-out jeans can become a pair of classic cut-off shorts. So get creative! Give your fashion habits an overhaul, and give the planet a helping hand.

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


APPETITE


MASTERING FAMILY MEALTIMES The secret to stress-free family cooking is crafting meals everyone enjoys, says cookery writer Annabel Karmel. She tells Lisa Salmon about her new book, and shares three recipes to please kids and grown-ups alike.

With chapter headings like Quick And Easy, Everyday Meals and Prepare Ahead, featuring recipes such as vegetable fusilli and posh fish fingers, this is a cookbook for busy Mums and Dads, rather than a cordon bleu tome, packed with time-consuming, fiddly dishes.

The children’s food guru, who has previously written 37 books about feeding toddlers and babies, has branched out with Annabel’s Family Cookbook, which features 100 easy-to-follow recipes that will appeal to tots, teens and time-stretched parents alike.

Nevertheless, it’s by no means a homage to children’s cooking either; grown-up dishes include moroccan lamb tagine, baked sea bass, and vanilla cheesecake. Here are three recipes from her new book to get you going...

POSH FISH FINGERS (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS • 400g lemon sole, cod, plaice or hake fillets, skinned • 85g cornflakes • 30g freshly grated Parmesan cheese • 100g plain flour • 2 medium eggs, lightly beaten • 4tbsp sunflower oil, for frying • Salt and black pepper

1.Cut the fish into strips. Put the cornflakes into a food processor and blitz, then pour into a bowl and mix together with the parmesan.

4.Heat two tablespoons of the oil in a large frying pan. Fry half the fish for four to five-minutes, turning them regularly until they’re cooked. Drain on kitchen paper.

2.Put the flour into a bowl and

5. Add the remaining two tablespoons of oil to the pan and cook the second batch of fish. Drain as before, then serve with chips or salad and lemon wedges, if you like.

season with salt and pepper. Beat the eggs in another bowl.

3.Now dip each piece of fish in the flour, then the eggs and finally the cornflake and parmesan mixture. 54

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


APPETITE

APPETIT

SWEETCORN & BROCCOLI FRITTERS (Makes 12)

INGREDIENTS • 150g broccoli, cut into florets • 150g can sweetcorn, drained • 150g self-raising flour • 1 medium egg, beaten • 2tbsp milk • 2tbsp chopped fresh basil leaves • 2tbsp sweet chilli sauce • 75g cheddar cheese, grated • 2tbsp finely chopped spring onion • Sunflower oil, for frying • Salt and black pepper

1 Steam the broccoli florets for about eight minutes, then chop into small pieces. 2 Blitz the sweetcorn in a food processor. Mix all the ingredients together, except the oil, and season to taste.

3. Heat the oil in a large frying pan. Drop spoonfuls of the mixture into the pan and fry for about two-minutes on each side, or until golden. 4. When cooked, transfer to a plate lined with kitchen paper. Serve warm with tzatziki, if you like.

VANILLA CHEESECAKE (Serves 8)

INGREDIENTS • 200g digestive biscuits • 100g unsalted butter • 1tbsp caster sugar • 600g full-fat cream cheese • 2 medium eggs • 125g caster sugar • 1tsp vanilla extract • 300ml soured cream • 3tbsp seedless raspberry jam • 250g mix of raspberries and strawberries (halved)

1.Preheat the oven to

180C/350F/Gas 4. Base-line a loose-bottomed springform tin and grease the sides.

2.Crush the biscuits until they resemble fine crumbs (place in a larger freezer bag and crush with a rolling pin).

:: Annabel’s Family Cookbook by Annabel Karmel is published by Ebury Press, priced £20. BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

3.Melt the butter in a large saucepan and stir in the crushed biscuits and sugar. Push into the base of the prepared tin and set aside in the fridge to chill while you make the filling.

4.Whisk the cream cheese in

a bowl. Add the eggs, sugar, vanilla and soured cream and whisk until smooth. Pour into the tin and level the surface.

5.Bake in the oven for 40-45 minutes until puffed up and set around the edges, but with a slight wobble in the centre. Leave to cool in the tin, then place on a serving plate. 6.Warm the raspberry jam

in a saucepan. Arrange the strawberries and raspberries on top of the cheesecake and drizzle with the slightly warm raspberry jam.

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APPETITE

WORDS | Anne Berry | The Wine Cellar

TO GIVE S

ome of the world’s finest wines are produced in Burgundy, but it is a region that can be very difficult to understand. Despite the fact that all red Burgundy is from Pinot Noir and all white Burgundy is from Chardonnay, the diversity of the wines is enormous. It ranges from the light ‘Bourgogne Rouge’ or ‘Bourgogne Blanc’ up to the Grand Crus of Meursault, Batard Montrachet and Gevrey Chambertin - which can be long lived and complex wines.

range. A good introduction to white Burgundy is the Clos de Loyse Bourgogne Blanc; this comes from Jadot’s Chateau des Jacques estate in the south of the region, where they have nine hectares of Chardonnay. Lightly oaked, it is well balanced and rounded on the palate with hints of vanilla. It is a versatile wine that works well with white meat, fish, goat’s cheese and vegetarian dishes, and at £13.75, represents tremendous value for money. Louis Latour owns an estate in Aloxe Corton, where they have 40-year old Pinot Noir vines in the top-quality Grand Cru vineyard of Corton, perched on a marlstone hill above the village. The Corton Grancey at £70 is a serious wine, with more tannin and weight than most red Burgundy. The vineyard is so steep in places that growers frequently have to carry soil back from the bottom to the top of the slopes.

Before the French revolution in 1789, the vineyards were almost all owned by the Church, but these were sold and since then Napoleonic laws of inheritance have applied, meaning that on the death of a vineyard owner, the estate is divided equally between all the children. Over the years, this has led to fragmentation of the vineyards and subsequently quality and style can vary enormously even in one small vineyard. Villages, or communes as they are called, are surrounded by vineyards and wines from those vineyards are named after the communes. Within those vineyards, there can be plots owned by many different growers. The label will say the name of the village, but it does not tell you about the quality, so it is important to recognise the producer’s name. Many of the growers are too small to be able to make their own wine and this is where the negociants become relevant. A negociant is a merchant who buys grapes or wine from small growers and label it under their own name. They are able to buy from several small growers in the same commune, enabling them to produce marketable volumes of wine. The reputations of negotiants also vary but among the most reliable are Louis Jadot and Louis Latour, both of whom also own vineyards. Louis Jadot buy and make wine from many communes, from Chablis in the far north of Burgundy to Beaujolais in the south. The quality is consistent and reliable across the

An example of a small family producer is Domaine Jaeger-Defaix, who is based in the village of Rully, in the Cote Chalonnaise, located just to the south of the more famous Cote de Beaune vineyards. The vineyards have been in the same family since the 16th Century and current owner, Helene Jaeger-Defaix, inherited the vineyards from her great-aunt in 2002. It is her desire to continue the family’s winemaking traditions in Rully, and since then she has acquired a second plot, giving her family 4.5 hectares of Premier Cru vineyard. Although wines from Rully do not quite reach the same quality as Puligny Montrachet or Chassagne, the best ones can impress without the price tag of their more famous neighbours. At £22.95, the white Premier Cru Rully is a fine and elegant wine, with peach and melon characteristics and a delicate mineral finish. The red at £24.95 is from a single walled vineyard plot next to the house. It is produced from carefully selected grapes, aged in partly new French oak to add

complexity and the resulting wine is well structured with good ageing potential. Problems can occur if there is no clear line of inheritance. Further north in Chablis, Herve Azo was a small producer with no natural successors. Herve sold his estate to Jean-Marc Brocard, the fourth generation of a family with land in many Grand Cru and Premier Cru vineyards in Chablis, and who was looking to expand. The Brocard family has, however, kept the Herve Azo name and are maintaining the style that Herve worked hard to create. Herve Azo Bourgogne Pinot Noir comes from the north of the region, close to Chablis, and has a distinctive style. Medium in body, with a lively acidity and bright summer fruit flavours, it is a perfect partner to duck or with a plate of charcuterie. At £13.25, it is a great introduction to red Burgundy. Likewise, the Petit Chablis is superb value at £13.75, and in a blind tasting, would certainly beat many a ‘classic’ Chablis. It is crisp and steely dry, with a stony minerality coming from the limestone soil. Petit Chablis is often overlooked and regarded as a poor second to Chablis. The vineyards are just outside the classic Chablis vineyard area, but many are on the tops of the hills that have Chablis Grand Cru vineyards on their slopes. A good producer is more than capable of making great wine, but with grape prices lower than in Chablis itself, they offer that little extra value for money, and this one is certainly worth a try! The Napoleonic Law of Succession makes Burgundy complicated in many ways. With all the different terroirs, many producers with the same surnames and various styles. It is worth investigating and tasting, because you will come across some real treats. At The Wine Cellar, we have something for every palate and wallet, so come in and have a browse!

THE WINE CELLAR • TENNIS ROAD • DOUGLAS • IM2 3QW TELEPHONE: 01624 611793 • EMAIL: anne@thewinecellar.im

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


TRAVEL


TRAVEL

WORDS | Nadia Alkahzrajie

( N OT C O N S T A N T I N O P L E )

Nadia Alkahzrajie takes a tour of Turkish gastronomy in one of the world’s oldest cities. Like no other jilted capital, Istanbul engulfs visitors with its razzled charms, the musk of rose petal, tinged with rancid fish-heads; the prelude to your renewed affections. Important things have happened in this city of minarets. Here, the past isn’t so much a passive resident but a restless dervish whirling down the backstreets off Taksim square, where men smoke the hookah and sip coffee as thick and loamy as compost.

ISTANBUL IS A CITY THAT SPEAKS TO THE INDIVIDUAL; SOME WILL REMEMBER THE TRANQUIL BEAUTY OF THE BLUE MOSQUE, OTHERS THE GRAND BAZAAR, WITH ITS FIENDISH TRADERS WHO BARTER WITH GUILLOTINE PRECISION, NEVER MISSING THEIR MARK...

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moke from a hundred-thousand car exhausts breathes a black patina over Ottoman porticos, stiffening the coats of street-urchin cats, so that they look permanently electrified; backlit by sunlight it hangs in a shimmering miasma above the Bosporus, Black Sea Strait, gateway to the East and home to tribes of cannibal jellyfish. Strung out along the Galata Bridge, fishermen pack their catch in glass bell-jars, layer upon silvery layer circled by marauding seagulls. Under the arches, horse mackerel, mullet, and turbot are blistered under a hot grill and served with plump grains of sticky, milky rice and a lemony salad. The people of Istanbul enjoy seafood so much they have a popular saying: “If I caught my father in the sea, I’d eat him.” Sweet and juicy mussels are a popular street food, stuffed with herby tomato rice it’s an inverted kind of paella served in the shell. Another street vendor will sell sweet

corncobs, caramelised over hot coals or chewy discs of sesame-topped bread. Bread is close to a Turks heart; they will inhale the scent from a bakery as if it were the sweetest perfume. Sometimes a little salty, feta is pressed into the dense, cackey crumb; sometimes chopped black olives or chilli. Istanbul smells vital and ancient – a good burnished smell like the sepia pages of wellthumbed books – and the sky, a vast screen of perpetual special effects, shows a beautiful apricot lustre at dawn tinged with rose pink at dusk when the city is aglow with residual warmth. Breakfast involves eggs of some variety, from simple hard-boiled to more elaborate concoctions like menemen, scrambled eggs cooked with peppers, chilli and oil. Olives, cucumber and tomato will also be on offer, as will sheep’s or goat’s milk cheeses and sweet rose-petal syrup for spreading on fresh bread. Fassoulia is a popular breakfast dish made from sliced green beans stewed until silky soft with olive oil, tomato and garlic. It is usually served cold while a hot version, made with creamy cannellini beans, is served throughout the day. Like Venice and Naples, Istanbul is a city that speaks to the individual; some will remember

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


TRAVEL

the tranquil beauty of the Blue Mosque, others the Grand Bazaar, with its fiendish traders, who barter with guillotine precision, never missing their mark, but for me Istanbul is at its most evocative, when approached by water. Each daily crossing of the Bosporus on a shaky ferry brings a closer, territorial intimacy, as you imagine an alternative existence moving about the vast city as a native, at home with the striking exoticism. When I think of the customary rituals of a city where it’s possible to feel fully occupied while doing nothing much. I think of the call to prayer, that archaic swell that seems to come from the mouth of the city itself, a floating layer of sound that levels everyone to listeners. I think of miniature glasses of hot, sweet tea grasped between forefinger and thumb and tumblers of anise flavoured raki turned cloud-coloured with a splash of water. The wide shopping avenues off Taksim square are lined with designer shops, but wander down the side streets into a network of vintage stores piled high with typewriters, leather trunks, birdcages and retro ephemera. Turks have a sharp eye for fashions, and the days of picking up a real bargain are no more, but the narrow, ornamented buildings falling into gentle dilapidation come close to the heart of old Istanbul. Here, you can listen to live gypsy fasil music, while Arabic cafes serve food with a Moorish twist; such as spiced and cured meats sujuk and pastirma; salt-roasted pumpkin seeds and lupini beans; and a molten mixture of stringy cheese mixed with cornmeal that’s eaten like a fondue. Istanbul also has a well-established tradition of European-style coffeehouses, many

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

specialising in wobbly milk puddings and the famous baklava – a ground paste of nuts sandwiched between layers of butter-brushed filo and drenched in rose syrup. My favourite baklava is baked in a flat sausage spiral, the creamed pistachio showing bud-green through the thinnest layer of translucent pastry. Another speciality dessert is kunefe, served from a hot pan it has a crunchy texture like shredded wheat with a filling of sweetened cream cheese, the dessert is finished with hot syrup and chopped nuts. Fruits platters feature apricots, green plumbs, figs, cherries and doote (white mulberry), while chunks of watermelon are traditionally served with cheese. The city has its own version of fast-food restaurants, dishing up traditional food from school-dinner style canteens. These restaurants specialise in stews, stuffed vegetables, such as artichoke and aubergine, and the Turkish soup known as chorba, made from stock and lentils and served with a squirt of lemon. Dolma – rice-stuffed vine leaves – is very popular, and manti; tiny meat-filled dumplings covered in a yoghurt sauce, are another local favourite.

OVER 10,000,000 PEOPLE PULSATE THROUGHOUT THIS MEGACITY AND THE UNHURRIED BUSTLE IS NEITHER THREATENING NOR ENTIRELY BENIGN...


TRAVEL

Unlike the clods of suspiciously perspiring meat, common to the UK, the doner kebab is a Turkish speciality and is usually eaten from large oval plates in seated restaurants; thin slices of spit-roast chicken or beef are placed atop chopped bread and covered in spicy tomato sauce, fresh yoghurt and olive oil. Because kebabs are usually served with hot pickles, Ayran is sold to counter the chilli burn. Ayran is a natural yoghurt drink thinned with water and a pinch of salt; it is to Turks what gazpacho is to the Spanish.

Four times an imperial capital (Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman) the city retains an aura of great power, its ancient palaces and mosques set amongst parks landscaped with tropical flowers and neoclassical fountains. Despite the awesome antiquity Istanbul is a very hip city, not least because of its hybrid Eurasian character - which puts it at the forefront of internationalism. New money is much in evidence and the city hosts many international events such as the star-studded Istanbul’74 festival, now in its fifth year. Never the less, Istanbul doesn’t easily concede to commercial tourism. This is a complex metropolis and the sometimes grimy patina is as much a part of its romance as the Topkapi palace. The city’s irreverent character can express itself in wily ways; in a rancid gust from an ancient drain or in the gold-toothed smile that invites you to browse without buying. Even the mosques reflecting white sunlight off their space-age aluminium domes can catch you off-guard. Over 10,000,000 people pulsate throughout this megacity and the unhurried bustle is neither threatening nor entirely benign, creating

an atmosphere of imminent possibility and a feeling of having arrived right at the very centre of things. For stuffed mussels and fish, walk along the Bosporus and under the arches of the Galata Bridge. For fassoulia and hot cheese, walk along the river road to the Dolmabahce Palace To smoke the hookah (water pipe), drink Turkish coffee and listen to live fasil music, head to the backstreets off Taksim square; Arabic style café Mitanni Istiklal Cadessi For European coffee houses and baklava, Taksim Beyoglu For European style restaurants and rooftop views of the city, Galata district Istanbul’74 runs 6th- 9th June www.istanbul’74.com

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Isle of Man | Home & Interiors | May 2014

inside: s

The best place to find a new place in the Isle of Man

me family ho perties o r p r e i m pre ome house & h ... and more


Look again... ... there’s more to Sure than mobiles! Thousands of islanders have already chosen Sure for great value mobile, broadband, home phone and TV. Move today. It’s simple with our new Easy Switch service. Come and visit the Sure stores in Strand Street Douglas, Parliament Street Ramsey or Orchard Walk Port Erin.

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PLACES

Welcome to Places, are you looking to find a place in the Isle of Man? Isle of Man | Home & Interiors | May 2014

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The best place to find a new place in the Isle of Man

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es family hom erties premier prop e house & hom and more...

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INVOLVED IN PROPERTY? PLACES IS THE PLACE FOR YOU Places is the Isle of Man’s only publication dedicated to multi - agent, high quality property related listings and features. Places offers ultra competitive rates for high impact premium property goods and services marketing. If you’re an agent, developer, or supply products and services to the home owner, get in touch. Places is published monthly in Gallery magazine and online at: www.gallery.co.im

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PROPERTY & FEATURES Howe Road, Onchan ......................................................................................64 Ballacriy Park, Colby......................................................................................66 Carrick Park, Sulby.........................................................................................66 Glen Rushen Road, Glen Maye ......................................................68

The Promenade, Port St Mary.................................................68 Brookfield Main Road, Ballaugh ........................................70 Ballacotch Cottage, Rheast Lane, Peel.................72 Hollybank, The Crescent West, Ramsey..........74

PUBLICATION

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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HOWE ROAD, ONCHAN

2

5

3

ÂŁ975,000

4

This impressive detached coastal residence not only offers spectacular sea and coastal views over Onchan and Douglas, but also expansive accommodation throughout - which is finished to an extremely high standard.

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PLACES

Situated within two miles of the commercial centre of Douglas, this property has been superbly maintained and would be an ideal choice for the discerning buyer who favours style and character in a sought after location. The property offers a 24-foot lounge, along with further reception rooms; including a dining room, study and conservatory. The property also boasts a superbly fitted dining kitchen and utility room.

“Situated within two miles of the commercial centre of Douglas, this property has been superbly maintained and would be an ideal choice for the discerning buyer who favours style and character in a sought after location” There are five generously sized bedrooms and three en-suites, plus an additional large first floor storeroom, which offers potential for re-development as an additional reception or cinema room. At basement level, this property has two double garages with automatic entrance doors, two workshops, a storeroom and a ‘gardeners’ toilet. Outside, the property is finished with a large sun terrace and stone balustrades, the perfect place to enjoy the beautiful views. There are generously sized and well-tended lawned gardens at the front and rear, as well as an impressive driveway and forecourt area. For additional information, or to arrange a viewing, contact Harmony Homes on: 01624 616200. www.harmonyhomes.co.im

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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PLACES

BALLACRIY PARK, COLBY ÂŁ315,000 Conservatory -

2

3

2

4

This detached true bungalow has a spacious lounge with a bow fronted window and French doors leading into the large Victorian style conservatory. The modern breakfast kitchen enjoys plenty of natural light with double aspect windows and uPVC double glazed door to the side of the property. There are three bedrooms (one en-suite) and a family bathroom. The gardens are well maintained with mature hedges and shrubs to borders. The driveway offers parking for two vehicles. HARMONY HOMES, PORT ERIN OFFICE 835252 www.harmonyhomes.co.im

CARRICK PARK, SULBY ÂŁ420,000 Double Garage -

2

3

2

4

This is a beautifully presented detached bungalow. The large L shaped entrance hall leads to the other rooms including the bright and spacious living room with feature bay window, two beautiful stained glass windows and a Scandinavian stone feature fireplace with Manx Stone insert and gas coal effect burner. The large breakfast kitchen has an extensive range of wall, base and drawer units and there is also a good sized utility room. There are three double bedrooms (one en-suite bathroom) and a family bathroom with sauna. There is also a separate dining room / fourth bedroom. Outside there is a double garage and off street parking. As with the rest of the property the gardens have been beautifully maintained with well cared for lawns to the front and rear. HARMONY HOMES, RAMSEY OFFICE T:818222 www.harmonyhomes.co.im

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T T W N EN O E TM SH TM OIN AR APP AP BY

N PE O

Luxury 2 Bed

Apartments NORTH QUAY, DOUGLAS LAST FEW REMAINING

from ÂŁ335,000 Prices Include:

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Superb waterfront location Balcony with river view Luxury German kitchen & appliances Fitted wardrobes Carpets & flooring Luxury tiled bathroom Secure underground parking

Call 01624 615000 Visit quaywest.im Sales Suite, 22-24 Victoria St, Douglas OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK To scan the code, download a QR code reader app for your mobile device. Full details available on request. Prices and details correct at time of going to print. Images indicative only.


PLACES

GLEN RUSHEN ROAD, GLEN MAYE ÂŁ895,000 Stunning views of Valley-

3

5

3

4

This modern country home set in the picturesque village of Glen Maye enjoys extensive accommodation and grounds extending to approximately 2 acres. The lounge takes advantage of the views with a large corner window overlooking the valley. There is a large sun room which wraps around the front of the property and a breakfast kitchen with triple aspect windows and stone floor. The property has five bedrooms (one en-suite), a family bathroom and two shower rooms. Outside there is a triple garage with a large studio and balcony above. The grounds take full advantage of the elevated position and wooded setting with meandering gardens through the trees down to the river. This property needs to be viewed to fully appreciate the extensive accommodation, sheltered position and views across the valley. HARMONY HOMES, PEEL OFFICE T: 845252 www.harmonyhomes.co.im

THE PROMENADE, PORT ST MARY ÂŁ550,000 4 5 2 2 Great views This deceptively spacious town house enjoys uninterrupted panoramic sea and coastal views and is within just a few minutes walking distance to all village amenities. The property has a large lounge and a spacious light dining room, both with marble open fireplaces. The modern breakfast kitchen enjoys views overlooking the garden, and there is also a separate utility room. There are five bedrooms, two attic rooms and two bathrooms. The property also has the added benefit of a self-contained lower ground floor apartment. Outside there are gardens to the front and rear and a concrete parking area for two vehicles. HARMONY HOMES, PORT ERIN T: 835252 www.harmonyhomes.co.im

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THE NEW BARLEY RANGE FROM ANDRENA HAS ARRIVED

This beautiful British made range of dinning and occasional pieces is available in over 100* Farrow & Ball colours, six wood finishes, with eight handle types and can be made in dimensions to suit your requirements using Andrena’s bespoke service.

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...helping you move

BROOKFIELD MAIN ROAD, BALLAUGH ÂŁ249,995 (No chain)

A four bedroom townhouse in Ballaugh for sale FULLY FURNISHED and recently renovated throughout. The property comprises of a high quality Magnet fitted kitchen, 2 luxurious bathrooms, half glazed oak panelled interior doors and new high quality carpets throughout.

T: 01624 812823

The property has panoramic windows, high ceilings and many period features. The property is available fully furnished and just some of the highlights include: a red SMEG fridge freezer, solid oak furniture throughout, John Lewis chandeliers throughout, two leather sofas and made to measure blinds are also included in the price.

E: mcanty@cowleygroves.com


PLACES

Finishing Touches

BBQ & FESTIVAL READY The little things that make a big difference in making your summer festival or home BBQ the best it can be. Everything you see here is available at Shoprite Living.

2. 4.

1.

5.

8.

10.

9.

6.

7.

11.

12.

3.

10. Dome Camping Tent  2 Person                1. Family Cooler 22 litre                                      4. Plastic Picnic Pitcher                                        7. Portable Gas Stove                                         £11 £6 £11 £17 2. Picnic Rug                                                            5. Plastic Picnic Tumbler                                     8. Charcoal Briquettes 5kg                                                11. Mummy Sleeping Bag 200gsm £11 £1.75 £5.50 £11 3. Polar Gear Water Bottle                                                6. Thermal Flask 1 litre                                        9. Charcoal Barbecue 44cm £2.25 £5.50 £30 £23*

12. Folding Camping Chair £10

*Offer price valid 5th May – 8th June 2014.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE FROM SHOPRITE LIVING, CHESTER STREET, DOUGLAS AND MARINA LANE, PORT ERIN. BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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PLACES

BALLACOTCH COTTAGE, RHEAST LANE, PEEL £347,000 Unique 400 year old Manx cottage with great charm and character secluded location, close to Peel golf club & other amenities. Property features entrance porch, side porch, hallway and downstairs cloakroom dining room (with MiniOffice), ‘snug’ and breakfast kitchen 2 double bedrooms, dressing room and family bathroom. The house has uPVC double glazing and gas fired central heating, a detached garage, patio with water feature, raised flower bed & rockery beautiful mature ‘secret’ garden, offering great privacy and seclusion. PRIME REAL ESTATE T: 616717 E: property@primerealestate4u.com www.primerealestate4u.com

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Mortgages? We’ve got it all Helpful banking, making things easier Whether you are an existing mortgage holder, a first time buyer, looking for a buy to let or equity release, pop in and talk to our Personal Mortgage Advisers who will help you every step of the way.

We’re making banking easier... ask us how! Call in to any branch iombank.com/helpfulbanking Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @iombank

YOUR HOME OR PROPERTY MAY BE REPOSSESSED IF YOU DO NOT KEEP UP REPAYMENTS ON YOUR MORTGAGE.

Isle of Man Bank Limited (IOMB). Registered Company Number: 1 Isle of Man. Registered Office: 2 Athol Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM99 1AN. Licensed by the Financial Supervision Commission of the Isle of Man and registered with the Insurance and Pensions Authority in respect of general business. Over 18’s only. Security required. Calls may be recorded.


PLACES

HOLLYBANK, THE CRESCENT WEST, RAMSEY £575,000 Desirable and spacious modern home on the outskirts of Ramsey. A large elevated plot, with panoramic views over Ramsey Bay and town. This property has a 21’ lounge, dining room, large study/ bedroom 5, breakfast kitchen & utility, 4/5 double bedrooms (master en suite) and family bathroom. It is oil fired central heating and has hardwood double glazing. Outside there is large integral double garage and off road parking for up to 6 behicles. The house is surrounded by beautiful front and back gardens, deciduous woodland and comes with a greenhouse and shed. Realistically priced to sell and with no forward chain. PRIME REAL ESTATE T: 616717 E: property@primerealestate4u.com www.primerealestate4u.com

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OFFSHORE BUSINESS

NEWS

EVENTS

COMMENTS

Issue 6

May/June 2014

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY A RECIPE FOR RELOCATION BANKING - MOBILE BANKING TECHNOLOGY - A CURE FOR DATA JET LAG PLUS - MOVERS & SHAKERS, A-LIST EVENTS, ISLAND SPORTING STARS


F33l th3 l0v3

A bit neglected? Not really getting a satisfactory service? Make a date with us, and soon everything will be rosy. www.rl360.com You’ve got our number.

RL360 Insurance Company Limited. Registered Offi ce: RL360 House, Cooil Road, Douglas, Isle of Man IM2 2SP, British Isles. RL360 Insurance Company Limited is authorised by the Isle of Man Government Insurance and Pensions Authority. Registered in the Isle of Man Number 053002C. A Member of the Association of International Life Offi ces.


On the Agenda... 78

84

KEY CONTACTS EDITORIAL & DESIGN Steve Redford DD : (+44) 7624 249249 steve@gallery.co.im

ADVERTISING SALES Jane Hunter DD: (+44) 7624 209726 jane@gallery.co.im

In The News

The Rise of Corporate Social Responsibility

CONTENTS

CLIENT RELATIONS Laura Macgregor DD: (+44) 7624 249249 Laura@gallery.co.im Disclaimer: All rights reserved. Any form of reproduction of Agenda Isle of Man Magazine, in part or whole is strictly prohibited without the written consent of the publisher. Any views expressed by advertisers or contributors may not be those of the publisher. Unsolicited artwork, manuscripts and copy are accepted by Agenda Magazine, but the publisher cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage. All material, copy and artwork supplied is assumed to be copyright free unless otherwise advised.

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In The News ................................................... 74

Island Sporting Stars ................................ 94

The Rise of CSR ........................................... 84

A List Events ................................................... 96

Boston Community Support ............. . 88

Movers & Shakers ........................................ 98

A Different Prospective ......................... 90

A Cure For Data Jet Lag ...................... .. 102

Sure - Community ..................................... 92

Food, Fun & Friendship.........................104

92

104

Sure ... we invest in our community

94

Mobile Banking

A Recipe For Relocation

102

88

Apps For Unfocused Minds Boston Community Support

A CureEvents For Data Jet Lag A-List

Business Travel Tips by: Island Simon PackSporting RL360 Stars 77


IN THE NEWS

RL360° records 24% new business growth in 2013 RL360° recorded an exceptional 24% growth in new business (PVNBP*) last year. Year end results show £451m was written across the life assurance company’s single and regular premium products. There was 33% growth in single premium new business, with £332m written in 2013, up from 2012’s £250m. And the figures show £119m of new regular premium (“RP”) business was written during 2013, up from £112m in 2012.

Counting House announces Lottery Messenger Forum in Israel Global payment solutions consultancy Counting House has confirmed details of its Global Lottery Messenger Forum in Tel Aviv, Israel; the first ever worldwide forum for the industry, and the first major event of its kind for the Isle of Man in a nation of growing international renown for eCommerce. Due to take place on 20th May 2014, the free one day event will be attended by representatives of the Isle of Man Department of Economic Development and Gambling Supervision Commission, banking and hosting sectors and leading CSPs. The keynote welcoming speech will be given by Leonard Singer, MHK, political representative for the e-Gaming sector. Speakers and delegates will tackle topics as diverse as the legal and regulatory issues surrounding lottery messenger services, the business case for jackpot insurance, alternative approaches such as betting on lotteries, banking and hosting facilities for lottery messenger, and payment processing. Counting House is delighted with the planned attendance of island resident Gloria Evans, CEO of the European Lottery Guild, who will chair an open discussion on fighting lottery fraud and the launch of the Global Lottery Messenger Association. Networking opportunities at the venue bar will conclude what will no doubt prove to be crucial event for the Isle of Man in Tel Aviv, one that builds upon past successes in 2013 following the  “Creative eGaming, Binary Options & Ecommerce Solutions: Israel and Isle of Man” conference, which took place in December. Over 70 Israeli business persons were in attendance, which resulted in several local leads for banking on the Isle of Man, as well as engagement opportunities with a number of high net worth individuals and an Isle of Man licence application from binary options industry giant Tradologic. Commenting on the forthcoming forum, Paul Davis, CEO of Counting House stated: “The Isle of Man clearly has a proactive approach to business development and the pursuit of inward investment, pursued on several fronts and in several geographies.” The Global Lottery Messenger Forum will take place at the Hilton Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel on Tuesday 20th May 2014. Registration begins at 8:45am for a 9:30am start, with the day’s proceedings closing at 4:15pm. Attendance is free but by invitation only.

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The largest share of RL360°’s RP business came from the Far East, followed by the Middle East. The latter part of 2013 saw huge change for RL360° with a management-led buyout, backed by private equity firm Vitruvian Partners, going through in mid-November. The move saw Royal London 360° break away from the Royal London Group and re-brand as RL360°. It has allowed the company to expand into new markets in early 2014, such as Latin America. Independent actuaries AKG eyed the buyout positively, referring to RL360° as “a financially strong standalone operation with very strong operational characteristics and positive development potential”. AKG also made reference to the fact that notable in the change in RL360°’s ownership has been the retention of existing senior management, led by Chief Executive David Kneeshaw, all of whom have significant experience within the operation. Director of Marketing Natalie Hall said: “2013 was a fantastic year for RL360° on so many levels. It was pleasing to achieve excellent new business growth in all key regions during the year. Becoming a part-owner in the business in November was a privilege, and a move that has been supported and viewed really positively by our distributors and partners. The entire management team is excited about shaping our future plans, whilst making sure we maintain our focus on listening to customers and adapting our products and technology to enhance their overall experience of working with RL360°. It is crucial that what makes RL360° special stays intact.”


Check your balance and statements anytime Online and Mobile Banking, making things easier With Online and Mobile Banking, you can check your current balance at any time of day or night and view statements for up to the last 7 years.

We’re making banking easier... ask us how! Call in to any branch iombank.com/helpfulbanking Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @iombank

Isle of Man Bank Limited (IOMB). Registered Company Number: 1 Isle of Man. Registered Office: 2 Athol Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM99 1AN. Licensed by the Financial Supervision Commission of the Isle of Man and registered with the Insurance and Pensions Authority in respect of general business. Customers of Isle of Man Bank are advised that The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (“RBS plc”) provide technology support to Isle of Man Bank’s Internet Banking service and this will enable RBS plc in the UK to access your account data. In subscribing for this service, you consent to and authorise this access. Customers of Isle of Man Bank are advised that National Westminster Bank plc (“NatWest plc”) provide technology support to Isle of Man Bank’s online banking service and this will enable NatWest plc in the UK to access your account data. In subscribing for this service, you consent to and authorise this access. Network charges may apply for Mobile Banking.


IN THE NEWS

Update on Manx Educational Foundation’s proposed International Centre for Technology Since the agreement with Government to sell the Nunnery in October 2013, the Manx Educational Foundation (MEF) has made substantial progress with its proposals to develop the International Centre for Technology, a private educational facility providing leading Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and business skills. To date, the MEF has raised millions of pounds in funding from private sources both on the Island and internationally. As a result of this progress, the Government has agreed to extend its agreement to sell the Nunnery to 30th June 2014.

Leading financial journalist shares her views on the true shape of the global economy More than 100 Isle of Man business leaders were given a detailed insight into the true global economic position at a breakfast briefing organised by Ramsey Crookall. Respected financial journalist Merryn Somerset Webb addressed the briefing at the Mount Murray Hotel, offering her assessment of what the future holds for investments, inflation and growth. The Editor-in-Chief of MoneyWeek, the UK’s best-selling financial magazine, explained how the policy of Quantitative Easing had resulted in inflated asset values, making the wealthy even richer and widening the social divide. Merryn said this had already caused social inequality and may lead to extreme social conditions in the long term, as money is not being invested into the innovations which will drive true economic growth which will benefit all. She also added that the inflated asset values and the benefits of the reported economic recovery were not being shared by all. Contrary to the low official inflation data, prices in essentials like utilities and transport were rising much faster and in some cases 25% higher than at the start of the financial crisis. Merryn warned asset values will dramatically fall once QE enters its adjustment phase, adding the Bank of England had warned what the impact of QE would be, but that advice had gone largely unheeded. Merryn closed by offering her advice on where to invest and, importantly, where to avoid. She highlighted the ‘manipulated market’ in the United States as one not to invest in, warning valuations were far too high, driven by QE, favourable taxation and results-driven bonuses for executives. She said the values could not be sustained in the long term, and things are already changing, which will bring prices down. She surprised many when she recommended investors look East instead and consider investing in Russia. It is deemed by many to be too risky, due to social and political instability, but Merryn said stock prices were discounting the risk and even discounting a return to communism. This means the possibility of a good return over 10 years was much higher in Russia than the US.

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Minister for Economic Development John Shimmin MHK commented: ‘I’m delighted to announce that the Council of Ministers has agreed a three month extension to the exclusivity arrangement with the MEF for the purchase of the Nunnery site. ‘This scheme is now progressing at such a significant rate that I am now confident the scheme will be realised and the many benefits can be achieved. I would like to thank those who have believed in the project and who have now backed this up with financial contributions.’ ‘This extension allows a little more time for the MEF to finalise its fundraising efforts. As a result, it is expected that the MEF will shortly be submitting plans which will allow everyone to see how this ambitious project will be implemented and how it can make a very real difference to the DED efforts to grow our economy. ‘The MEF is a social enterprise supported by many leading local firms, several very generous individuals and also foreign investment funding from China which cements our growing relationships with that country. ‘This project offers all the ingredients we are looking for to help establish the Isle of Man’s ‘Tech Isle’ strategy as outlined in Vision2020, which is our ambitious vision for growth in our economy developed with the private sector. Vision2020 highlights that the e-business sector offers the Isle of Man more growth potential than any other sector. The single biggest challenge we face in realising this potential is achieving excellent ICT skills. MEF’s proposals will therefore make a very substantial contribution to achieving Vision2020.


Isle of Man forms Manx Digital Currency Association

Isle of Man Bank and NatWest record more than two million transactions since launch Isle of Man Bank and NatWest are experiencing massive growth in the use of mobile banking, reflecting a similar trend reported in the UK this week. Locally Isle of Man Bank and NatWest were the first banks to provide mobile banking for smartphones and have introduced apps for both personal and business customers. Latest figures reveal that usage has grown by 100 per cent in the twelve months to the end of 2013 and the bank expects a similar level of growth in 2014. The Isle of Man Bank and NatWest apps have been used by customers in over 160 countries and have had over 460,000 logins in the last 30 days. Since the launch of the first mobile app in 2011, there have been two million transactions made using mobile devices. Since then, the bank has continued to lead with innovations providing customers with choice and flexibility and today remains the only bank providing clients with a multicurrency app. In a report by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA) published this week, mobile phone banking transactions made by British customers have nearly doubled in a single year. Customers are now making more than 5.7 million transactions a day using smartphones and other internet-enabled technology. At RBS Group in the UK the busiest branch is now the ‘virtual’ one with over £30 million transferred every day through the mobile banking app. Bill Shimmins, Managing Director, Isle of Man Bank, commented: ‘Our experience in the Isle of Man reflects the trends evidenced in the UK also. By placing the power to manage their money in their hands, our mobile banking service is transforming the way our customers do their banking. At the touch of a button personal and business customers can check their balance, transfer money between accounts, view their transaction history or pay their contacts.’ Among the latest app features for personal customers is ‘Get Cash’ which enables customers to withdraw money without using their bank card at an ATM. The customer chooses the amount they wish to withdraw from the app and a secure cash code is sent to their phone, which is then valid for three hours at any RBS Group cash machine. Another new facility is the ‘Pay Your Contacts’ service which enables a customer to pay anyone with a Visa debit, credit or prepaid card using just their mobile number. This will be fully launched in the Isle of Man in May. A revolutionary way of paying someone, it has countless uses; one of the more obvious is a quick and easy way of sending the money owed when splitting a bill with friends at a restaurant.

Over 40 industry participants attended an inaugural meeting on April 1st to form the Manx Digital Currency Association, MDCA. Chaired by barrister Paul Davis, the meeting moved quickly to approve formation of the Association and get to business. Among the attendees were representatives of miners, exchanges, banks, gaming companies, CSPs, lawyers, web designers and programmers, hosting providers, payment processors and telecoms. All members will be listed on the Association’s website as it is set up. Following a report on the recent ruling of the Financial Supervision Commission to the effect that licences are not required for BitCoin Exchange activities, an important statement was made by Peter Greenhill, CEO of eGaming Development with the Isle of Man Government Department of Economic Development. Peter advised the meeting that there is presently no Department of Economic Development policy on eCurrency, however a paper is being prepared internally within government with a view to forming such a policy. He welcomed the formation of the Association and underlined the need to protect the Island’s reputation and economy going forward. He indicated he would provide an update from the government side as soon as possible. While not in attendance, the FSC has expressed itself glad of the creation of the Association and confirmed its intention to consult with the Association as matters move forward with respect to possible legislation or regulation of digital currency activities. Paul Davis expressed his strong appreciation of the Commission’s pro-active and collaborative stance with respect to developments in this area. The meeting agreed on the appointment of Charlie Woolnough as secretary of the Association and Miles Benham as legal counsel. The position of President was left open pending further discussions, as was the issue of membership fees. Domicilium offered complementary hosting of the Association’s website (to be constructed www.mdca.im) while Arts-Interactive offered to build the site free of charge. Commenting on the inaugural meeting, Paul Davis said: “To those not immersed in the world of computers and the internet, cryptocurrencies are not easy to understand. Even so, very few can deny that they represent a groundbreaking and exciting addition to the world of global transactions, and all that that entails. There are hotbeds of developmental work all over the world, and I believe that the Isle of Man has the potential to play a key part.” Paul Davis also took the opportunity to announce the Isle of Man’s trade mission to Israel, scheduled for September, to target digital currency developers and businesses interested in placing part of their operations or development on the Isle of Man, which appears to be an ideal base for such activities. The meeting finally agreed to accept an invitation from the UKDCA to create a formal co-operation, and this will be negotiated between the respective Presidents in the weeks to come. For further information or to express an interest in joining the Association, please contact in first instance: paul@countinghouseltd.com.

Bill added: ‘There will always be a place for traditional banking, where branch and telephony teams and relationship managers are on hand to meet with customers and discuss their specific needs. However, for everyday transactions, banking has changed beyond recognition and technology is driving this trend.’

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IN THE NEWS

Manx Radio to be given recognition in primary legislation Fifty years after Manx Radio first launched, the station is to be recognised in primary legislation as the National Public Service Broadcaster of the Isle of Man. Following the publication of a Select Committee report in early March, where the Committee were tasked with ‘examining the matter of the policy, delivery, cost and scope of Public Service Broadcasting on the Isle of Man and report with recommendations’, Tynwald, the Manx Parliament, have debated the report and endorsed Manx Radio as the National Public Service Broadcaster on a permanent basis. Following the three hour debate, Tynwald agreed to accept the recommendations of the Council of Europe on public service media governance, which have been widely accepted by European public service broadcasters, and to endorse the recommendations of the John Myers report that was completed in 2013. John Myers, who has recently carried out reports for the BBC on Radio 1 and 2 and on BBC Local Radio, was commissioned by the Committee to take a close look at the station and to report back on the value of a public service broadcasting service on the Isle of Man and to determine how it should be financed to deliver the terms of the licence. In his report Mr Myers said:  “Few can argue Manx Radio is not a popular service. Indeed it is worth highlighting that the figures are just not good, they are exceptional.....critiquing Manx Radio may therefore appear churlish in the extreme.” In addition Tynwald agreed to adopt a funding formula for the station that would see the station receive a minimum funding of £850,000 each year, to disband the Purpose Trust that had been set up to keep the station at arm’s length from Government, and for the Island’s Communications Commission to provide a licence for the station to include a requirement for a particular percentage of locally produced and presented speech.

Manx Telecom opens its third data centre Manx Telecom’s brand new Greenhill Data Centre (GDC) is now open for business as the company announced completion of the £10million project’s first phase. Department of Economic Development Minister Hon John Shimmin MHK was the guest of honour at an event to mark the opening held on March 27. GDC is located at the Isle of Man Business Park, near to Manx Telecom’s headquarters, and is the company’s third data centre in addition to Douglas North and Douglas Central. GDC is constructed to the same Tier 3 world class specification, and has the same industry accreditations, as Douglas North which already provides hosting services for many leading private sector companies. A Tier 3 data centre means it is built and operated to world class standards of resilience, security and reliability. Stuart Paul, Manx Telecom Data Centres Director, said: “The completion of phase one is a significant step for Manx Telecom as it means we now have the only twin Tier 3 data centre set-up with direct connectivity on the Island, providing a uniquely resilient data hosting proposition. When combined with our world class global connectivity, GDC will significantly increase our capacity to provide hosting and managed services solutions in the eGaming, big data and cloud sectors – all of which are important for the continued growth of the Island’s economy.” To illustrate the incredible technology involved in data hosting, Mr Paul said that in any second of any day Manx Telecom’s data centres would be processing around 500,000 hands of poker for its eGaming clients. And in the few minutes it took for him to give his speech the company’s data centres would process transactions worth US$7million. He illustrated the speed of global data transfer by saying that individual ‘packets’ of data could be sent from the Isle of Man to Macau – a distance of just over 6,000 miles – in just 300milliseconds. Mr Shimmin welcomed the investment by Manx Telecom and said GDC was the type of project which illustrated how the private sector was supporting Government’s efforts to grow the Island’s economy in a dynamic and sustainable way. GDC is being constructed in three phases. The completion of the £3.5million first phase involved alterations to the existing structure of the building and the installation of mechanical and electrical infrastructure including security and fire prevention systems, air conditioning, and back-up power generators. Phase two will see the installation of an additional 120 data hosting racks at a cost of £1.5million. Phase three will see the construction of a new purpose-built data centre costing an additional £5.0 million to further increase space by 320 racks to meet the Island’s growing demands for data hosting capacity. For more information about Manx Telecom’s data hosting solutions go to www.manxtelecom.com/hosting

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Agenda


CSR FEATURE

WORDS

MICHELLE P. TONNESEN

The Rise

of Corporate Social Responsibility The concept of the conscious consumer demanding that business is carried out in an ethical and socially responsible manner is so wellestablished today that we almost take it for granted. With globalisation, the internet and the ever-present social media, it is close to impossible for companies, governments or even NGOs to put a foot wrong without the whole world knowing. But this was not always the case.

Here is a bit of background to understand the evolution of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) movement. The main principles of CSR involve economic, legal, ethical and discretionary aspects. A corporation needs to generate profits, while operating within the laws of the state. The corporation also needs to be ethical, but has the right to be discretional about the decisions it makes. CSR and corporate sustainability represent the way companies achieve enhanced ethical standards and a balance of economic, environmental and social imperatives, addressing the concerns and expectations of their stakeholders. The phrase Corporate Social Responsibility was coined in 1953 - with the publication of Howard Bowen’s “Social Responsibility of Businessmen”, which posed the question of “what responsibilities to society can business people be reasonably expected to assume?” Thus, in the 1950s, the primary focus was on businesses doing good deeds for society. During the 1960s, key events, people and ideas were instrumental in characterising the social changes ushered in during this decade. Examples of corporate social responsibility began to emerge, and the civil rights movement, consumerism, and environmentalism greatly changed the way society expected the business world to behave. Writing and budding research on the subject expanded the definition, suggesting that beyond legal obligations companies had certain responsibilities to society. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) – a group of 34 powerful industrialised countries – was also created during this decade to promote policies improving the economic and social well-being of people around the world. With the 70s, came the common use of

the term CSR, along with many attempts to officially define the phrase. For example, the UN conference of 1972 in Stockholm considered the ever-growing need to find a common ground between both communities and businesses across the globe to preserve the human environment. At that time, both the OECD and the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations (UNCTC) began developing codes of conduct in an attempt to control different aspects of corporate globalisation. In 1976, the OECD, recognising the complications associated with companies operating across borders, established a set of guidelines to ease the workings of globalisation; setting the “rules of the game” for foreign direct investment, and creating an atmosphere of confidence predictability in overseas corporations. The OECD’s “Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises” covered areas such as accounting, tax payments, and operating in accordance with local laws. The rise in anti-corporate activism over environmental and human rights issues made a shift in corporate attitudes towards social and environmental issues essential. The 70s and 80s saw major international boycotts of companies investing in South Africa. This period was characterised by confrontational campaigning that forced change from companies by attacking their brand. In the 1980s, business and social interest came closer and firms became more responsive to their stakeholders. In 1987, the concept of sustainable development was introduced and finally defined in the ground breaking report; “Our Common Future” was delivered by The World Commission on the Environment and Development, under Chair Gro Harlem

Brundtland to the United Nations. In the 1990s, corporate lobbying challenged attempts to regulate their activities at a global level. Instead it achieved an extension of corporate power both logistically, through improved transport and communications, and legally, through international agreements; such as the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), and the Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) - which extended rights for corporations. Nevertheless, the anti-corporate backlash reached a climax in 1995, as the spotlight turned on Royal Dutch Shell. That year, the company stood accused of complicity in the execution of nine activists in Nigeria, as well as being hounded by Greenpeace over the decision to sink the Brent Spar oil platform. Shell temporarily lost the confidence of investors and the public. Shell’s ‘annus horribilis’ was a sign of things to come and woke up many in the business world to the importance of their public reputations and the ability of campaigners to damage them. Capitalism had to be given a human face. Step forward CSR. Shell spent millions on its PR offensive to rebuild its reputation and published a statement of business principles outlining its core values of “‘honesty, integrity and respect for people”. The company’s strategy focussed on “openness and dialogue”, pioneering the practice of producing CSR reports and triple bottom-line reporting – that is, a business model centred on People, Planet and Profit - which was introduced at the UN Earth Summit in Rio De Janeiro in 1992. Indisputably, Shell’s strategy was successful in rebuilding the company’s reputation amongst key opinion formers and decision makers at the time.

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The Rise of Corporate Social Responsibility So, one could argue that the ultimate rise of the CSR movement came as a direct response by corporations to anti-corporate activism and the reputational damage campaigns were able to cause. During the 1990s, the idea of CSR became almost universally approved. The movement became an established industry with major companies such as PricewaterhouseCoopers and KPMG entering the CSR service provision market. New consultancies solely focussed on the concept also sprang up over this period, as did specialist university research centres and the CSR conferencing circuit. Similarly, CSR evolved beyond simple codes of conduct and reporting to include more extensive dialogue and “multi-stakeholder” initiatives such as the Ethical Trading Initiative (1993) and the Forest Stewardship Council (1998), bringing together companies, NGOs, and in some cases governments, also trade unions began negotiating and signing global framework agreements. The following years saw a plethora of voluntary initiatives and codes of conduct being developed by individual companies as well as sectoral codes and international frameworks, like the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) looking to build standards around CSR. The most high-profile of these is the UN’s Global Compact developed in 1999. It was designed by the office of the Secretary General, Kofi Annan, with considerable input from the International Chamber of Commerce. The Compact is a set of nine principles on human and labour rights, as well as environmental sustainability, which has now been expanded to 10 - with the inclusion of a principle on corruption. However, many NGOs have been highly critical of the Compact as it has no monitoring or enforcement mechanism, and so according to critics, it allows companies to appropriate the name of the United Nations to reinforce their reputations without requiring them to change any aspect of their activities. The year 2000 saw more mergers and acquisitions than any other year in history. In November, the international “Partners for Progress” OECD conference was held in Paris. It stressed the importance for businesses to adopt socially responsible behaviour, in an effort to move forward towards sustainable local development.

CSR and corporate sustainability represent the way companies achieve enhanced ethical standards and a balance of economic, environmental and social imperatives, addressing the concerns and expectations of their stakeholders.

In 2001, the collapse of Enron, once a paragon of CSR, showed just how deeply a corporation’s claims of social responsibility can differ from the reality. The mistrust of corporations - which this scandal evoked in the public consciousness, led to some soul-searching within the CSR movement. However, much of the public discussion centred on protecting investors, rather that the issue of wider social impacts, and the main concrete change brought about by the episode was the introduction of the Sarbanes Oxley Act in the USA. This has tightened up accounting regulations and introduced new reporting standards - which include some aspects of non-financial risk reporting. The UK government went down a similar line with the Operating Financial Review (OFR), in which all stock market listed companies would be required by law to produce a yearly review of their business operations and future developments and risks. This was to include information on environmental matters, employees and social and community issues. However, in December 2005, then Chancellor, Gordon Brown, announced that the OFR would be abolished – a decision which was later challenged by Friends of the Earth in the High Court. Nevertheless, in the 2000s, CSR definitively became an important strategic issue. Though great progress has been made by many companies operating responsibly in highly-regulated countries, there remains challenges in less developed regions. Only recently have countries started including CSR policies in government legislature. Common types of countries who have implemented legislation and CSR laws generally consist of socio-economic and politically sophisticated countries. The level of political stability and effectiveness is inextricably linked to a country’s capacity

to ensure national CSR policies. Some of the strongest supporters of CSR are in Europe, with countries like France and Denmark having actual laws enforcing triple bottom line reporting, and the EU Commission’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee promotes CSR as a way to support growth and job creation, as well as social stability. Some critics believe that CSR programmes are undertaken by companies, such as British American Tobacco and McDonald’s to distract the public from ethical questions posed by their core operations. They argue that some corporations start CSR programs for the commercial benefit, they enjoy through raising their reputation with the public or with government, and suggest that corporations which exist solely to maximise profits are unable to advance the interests of society as a whole. One of the most prominent figures opposing CSR is Milton Friedman, who took the position that CSR subverts the role of government and “harms the foundations of a free society.” To return to the example of Shell, its muchpublicised CSR policy did not prevent the 2004 scandal concerning its misreporting of oil reserves, which seriously damaged its reputation and led to charges of hypocrisy. Critics concerned with the insincerity of corporations generally suggest that better governmental and international regulation and enforcement, rather than voluntary measures, are necessary to ensure that companies behave in a socially responsible manner. We’ll leave that judgement entirely up to you for now…

Sources | Howard Bowen: “Social Responsibility of the Businessmen”, Harper & Rowe, New York, 1953 | CSR Quest: www.csrquest.net | OECD: www.oecd.org | UN: “Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future”, http://www.un-documents.net/wced-ocf.htm | UN Global Compact: “The Ten Principles”, www.unglobalcompact.org | Shell: “Profit and Principles - Does there have to be a choice? The Shell Report”, 1998 | The Economist: “Triple Bottom Line”, 17 November 2009 | Financial Reporting Council: www.frc.org.uk | Milton Friedman: “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits”, The New York Times Magazine, 13 September 1970

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IN THE NEWS

Isle of Man Credit Union on the way

Boston Group’s support for the community

There is an enthusiastic group of Isle of Man residents taking forward the idea of forming a Manx Credit Union.

Supporting local charities and causes is part of the DNA of Boston Group, the Isle of Man based professional services firm. In the past year the company has donated over 200 hours of its staff time to volunteering in addition to about £50,000 of donations and financial support over the past three years.

Around the world there are 200 million members of credit unions in 105 countries. In Ireland 74% of economically active people are members. The Island has a Credit Union Act but it urgently needs updating. This is already in hand but we need to convince our legislators that there is a demand for a community savings and loan initiative. To achieve our objective we need you to fill in an ‘expression of interest’ form on our website www.mcu.im or pick up a leaflet from Nadine House, 13 North Quay, Douglas You can also leave a message on 619459 and a leaflet will be sent to you. Credit unions have been successful around the world by creating a savings culture and facilitating loans to its members. There will also be opportunity to explore and develop financial skills by using the best available tools to keep you in control of your finances rather than the other way round. A credit union is essentially run by its members on a voluntary basis, having first had the appropriate training from the trade association we are part of. The steering group, driving this forward, have experience in a variety of relevant areas including mutual organisations, regulatory involvement, web technology, accountancy, teaching and running commercial credit organisations. If you would like to become part of an ethical and democratically run organisation, where the members share in the surplus it generates, this is for you. You can become a member by saving as little as £1 a week when we open our doors for business. We also need people who are able to donate seed money to purchase equipment and software. Already we have a number of pledges in place from individuals and commercial organisations who want to see this happen, including the use of an office. If you want to have the opportunity off developing your skills or simply giving back to the community, you could volunteer your services from as little as two hours a week. If you would like to be part of our steering group or would like a representative to come and give a presentation to your organisation or charity please contact David Talbot on 490640 for a chat on how you can make a real difference to the financial life of your household and our Island.

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Group Chief Executive Officer Greg Ellison says “We’re a privately owned business where our staff really matter to us. Throughout the year our people get involved in all sorts of activities to raise money for local charities from climbing mountains, running marathons, the Parish Walk to dress down days, cake bakes and other fundraising events. It’s a really important part of our culture that we get involved to support our local communities. ”To that end, the Boston Charitable Foundation was set up in 2008 with the aim of supporting local charities. One such charity is Junior Achievement Isle of Man (JAIOM), which has benefitted from the Foundation’s commitment since 2012 to the tune of £10,000 per year as lead sponsor of the Company Programme. Through Junior Achievement, Boston aims to directly contribute to the young people of the island, helping them develop their life skills, confidence, self-esteem and entrepreneurial skills. Recently British Lions rugby star and Boston’s Brand Ambassador, Scott Gibbs, spoke to the students of two local schools on the subject of goalsetting and developing positive beliefs drawing on the experiences from his impressive international rugby career. Greg, who is also Chairman of Junior Achievement Isle of Man, says: “Fostering innovation and entrepreneurial spirit in today’s school leavers is more important than ever. One of Boston’s main values is to support the communities in which we work and our support of Junior Achievement is a vital part of that. Put simply, we do it because it’s good to do, it’s good for you, it’s good for others and it’s good for the greater good.”


The Chartered Institute of Marketing to host free marketing master class and advice surgery for Island’s small businesses The Isle of Man region of The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) is inviting Manx small businesses along to a free marketing master class and advice surgery on Thursday, 15 May. The master class, for up to 20 representatives from small businesses, will be hosted by Heather Smallwood, Fellow of the Chartered Institute, giving a brief overview of the importance of marketing and quick wins for small businesses. A marketing surgery for small businesses will follow the master class, hosted by a group of some of the Island’s 25 Chartered Marketers, run on a first come, first served basis. This unique opportunity will give small business the chance to seek guidance and advice from some of the Island’s top marketers, in complete confidence. Chair of The Chartered Institute of Marketing Isle of Man committee, Daren Ward, said:

simplest form. Given the importance small businesses play in our local economy and the need to continue to drive economic growth on the Island, members of the local CIM Committee and the Island’s Chartered Marketers are keen to engage with and support local businesses. We held an extremely successful marketing surgery in 2010, which was oversubscribed, and felt that the time was right to hold a second one. “The surgery means that professional senior Island-based marketers will be available for small businesses to talk to on a oneto-one basis for free and confidential advice and support. When you work by yourself or in a small team which may not have any professional marketing knowledge, it can be very beneficial to have an experienced professional to talk to and perhaps just bounce ideas off. “I would encourage those running small businesses who may be interested to get in touch as soon as possible, as availability is limited.” Both the master class and surgery take place on 15 May at Manx Professional and Educational Services on 41-45 Duke Street, Douglas. Registration for the master class is 11am and will include lunch and time to network with other delegates. The surgery will run between 1pm and 4pm. Places are limited and those wishing to attend either the master class, the surgery, or both, should register by emailing cimevents@cim.co.uk or telephoning 01628 427340. Full information is available online at www.cim.co.uk/ Events/EventDetails.aspx?crid=63254.

“Marketing is an integral part of succeeding in business. Small businesses are the workhorses of any economy, but they seldom have the resources to think about or indeed adopt marketing in its

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TAXATION CSR FEATURE

Ask not what you can do for charity...

...but what a charity can do for you? A different perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility in the not-for-profit charitable sector Hospice is the biggest charity in the Isle of Man needing to raise £3.6 million each year to provide their essential healthcare services. In fact, last month the local charity issued a statement outlining that they will need to utilise some of their financial reserves for 2014 to continue this service. The charity was set up in 1983, and last year marked 30-years of care to the Manx community. But like so many businesses and charities here, Hospice is facing tougher times in this economic climate. Corporate Social Responsibility is a key issue for the charity like many other charities. In fact, Hospice is in the process of developing its own CSR policy, where it looks at its own carbon footprint and its ‘social’ obligations to the Island. A key question for both charities and businesses to ask is not what you can do

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for charity but what that charity can do for you? There are huge benefits getting involved with a charity, particularly one as focussed as Hospice. There are 700 registered charities here. Corporate Social Responsibility is a key issue for them, and definitely without the support of the business sector on the Island, these charities could not continue to do their job, or continue to provide essential services. CSR can take many forms; donations, attending events, manpower to help at events or at Hospice, gardening etc., or volunteering. Some companies give their staff half a day a year to ‘give back to the community.’ Volunteering at Hospice saves the charity just over £1 million each year, and with over 500 volunteers who work at Hospice or in their six Island-wide shops, their time and efforts are crucial to the running of our organisation

Potential business benefits The scale and nature of the benefits of CSR for an organisation can vary, depending on the nature of the company, and are difficult to quantify, though there is a large body of literature exhorting business to adopt

measures beyond financial ones.

Human resources A CSR program can be an aid to recruitment and retention, particularly within the competitive graduate student market. Potential recruits often ask about a firm’s CSR policy during an interview, and having a comprehensive policy can give an advantage. CSR can also help improve the perception of a company among its staff, particularly when staff can become involved through payroll giving, fundraising activities or community volunteering. CSR has been found to encourage customer orientation among frontline employees. Indeed, Hospice has recruited many volunteers through getting involved with the company via being named as ‘Charity of the Year’.

Risk management Managing risk is a central part of many corporate strategies. Reputations that take decades to build up can be ruined in hours, through incidents such as corruption scandals or environmental accidents. These can also draw unwanted attention from regulators, courts, governments and media. Building a genuine culture of ‘doing the right thing’ within a corporation can offset these risks. Even on a small island, this aspect should not be under-estimated.

Branding In crowded marketplaces, companies strive for a unique selling proposition that can separate them from the competition in the minds of consumers. CSR can play a role in building customer loyalty-based on distinctive ethical values. Several major brands, such as The Co-operative Group, The Body Shop and American Apparel are built on such ethical values. Business service organisations can benefit too, from building a reputation for integrity and best practice. Again, Hospice can play a significant supporter of re-enforcing how good a company is through PR and aligned


branding.

Licence to operate Corporations are keen to avoid interference in their business through taxation or regulations. By taking substantive voluntary steps, they can persuade governments and the wider public that they are taking issues such as health and safety, diversity, or the environment seriously as good corporate citizens with respect to labour standards and impacts on the environment.

Criticisms and concerns Critics of CSR as well as proponents debate a number of concerns related to it. These include CSR’s relationship to the fundamental purpose and nature of business and questionable motives for engaging in CSR, including concerns about insincerity and hypocrisy. Many CSR proponents point out that CSR can significantly improve long-term corporate profitability, because it reduces risks and inefficiencies while offering a host of potential benefits such as enhanced brand reputation and employee engagement. Hospice itself has definitely benefitted from such partnerships with local companies.

Motives Critics concerned with corporate hypocrisy and insincerity generally suggest that better governmental and international regulation and enforcement, rather than voluntary measures, are necessary to ensure that companies behave in a socially responsible manner. This could include personal value; for the five and half years I have been involved with Hospice, we have worked to capitalise on this and work with every company to educate and encourage fundraising partnership concerning Hospice.

Consumers are becoming more aware of the environmental and social implications of their day-to-day consumer decisions and are therefore beginning to make purchasing decisions related to their environmental and ethical concerns. However, this practice is far from consistent or universal. It is worth noting on 16 December 2008, the Danish parliament adopted a bill making it mandatory for the 1,100 largest Danish companies, investors and stateowned companies to include information on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in their annual financial reports. The reporting requirements became effective on 1 January 2009. Why get involved? I think it’s paramount that the ‘movers and shakers’ on the Island recognise that ticking their CSR box with the right ‘cause’ can be seen as crucial as to how they are seen. Hospice is a unique partner, with a commercial and independent approach. We know that every company is unique too, so we work closely with our partners to tailor lasting partnerships that deliver impressive results. Some of our partners over the years have included Equiom, Friends Provident, Callin Wild, Quinn Legal, Nedbank, Barclays Wealth, SMP Partners, Lloyds TSB, the Financial Supervision Commission, Citywing, Celton Manx, Nationwide, KPMG, Deloitte, to name a few. We worked with over 20 companies.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT We have worked with lots of retailers such as Shoprite, the Co-op, Tynwald Mills to name a few. A lot of Island residents will work with us through social lives too whether it be their sports club, WI, Young Farmers Club etc. If you choose Hospice for your CSR, you become a partner. We will work with you to develop activities to involve and motivate your staff and customers. As Hospice Isle of Man is a high-profile charity, with a very positive story to tell. Working with us on a cause-related marketing (CRM) campaign is a simple and effective way of differentiating your product and increasing sales and customer loyalty. Big, innovative fundraising events are our speciality and prime opportunities for working in association with Hospice. 85p of every £1 donated to Hospice is spent on patient care. We are very fortunate that the Department of Health supports our services with a £600,000 cash grant - made up to approximately another £100,000, with additional support. This kind support represents 19% of the £3.6m we need to raise each year. CSR is a crucial fundraising tool, and we hope a positive experience for everyone that chooses to engage with our charity

With my background in the finance sector, the partnership being of a professional high-standard is paramount to good working together.

Ethical consumerism The rise in popularity of ethical consumerism over the last two decades can be linked to the rise of CSR. As global population increases, so does the pressure on limited natural resources required to meet rising consumer demand.

Should you wish to work with Hospice and want to know ‘what can we actually do for you?’, contact Mary Doyle, PR and Marketing Manager, Hospice Isle of Man on: 647431, or e-mail: mary.doyle@hospice.org.im

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CSR FEATURE

Sure…we invest in our community As a leading supplier of telecommunications services in the Isle of Man, Sure delivers mobile, broadband, fixed line, data centre and enterprise solutions to consumers, corporate and public sector clients. However, Sure is about much more than that, as our investment in the Island’s community shows.

Sure believes that dedication to the communities in which we operate is an essential part of our business; as such, when engaging with Sure, you’ll find that community involvement is close to the heart of our staff. The strength of the Island’s community is dependent on us all being involved and that goes for individuals as well as companies like Sure. Every year, we spend thousands of pounds on community initiatives. The type of work we are involved in includes investment in support of local projects, the donation of funds or products and services to support charities in need, investment in clean technology to lower our environmental footprint and engaging employees in charity work. Among the highest profile initiatives are Sure’s partnership with the TT races, Sure Strike bowling in Ramsey and Sure ApeMann in South Barrule. There are, however, other community projects which we support – the Queenie Festival, the Reel Life film project, Kenyon’s Youth Café, the Primary Sports programme, Manx LitFest and Vagabonds RUFC, to name a few. To give you a better idea of the work we are involved in and the effect it has in the Island, here is a selection of comments from some of the projects that have received support from Sure. Perhaps the most high-profile event of our community involvement is the TT Races: “Sure has been an integral partner in delivering the TT races since its 2007 centenary, when the company first became a sponsor,” says TT Press Officer, Simon Crellin. “As well as their financial commitment - which is used to offset

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some of the cost of running the races - the company also provides expertise and equipment, including smart phones and tablets, which enables race officials to communicate.” On behalf all three Rushen MHKs and co-Queenie Festival directors, Laurence Skelly says that: “The Queenie Festival attracts over 5000 visitors each year. Educating people about the rich cultural past and future protection of our natural resources within the Irish Sea are equal objectives of this festival, and would not be possible without the kind sponsorship of Sure.” It is not only community events and projects that benefit from Sure’s involvement. Sure also engages with businesses that have particularly community-oriented aims, as Steve Salter, MD of Sure Ape Mann Adventure Park, says: “Being a new start up business, we were really pleased to attract the support we have had from Sure. Sure is an established brand, and not only has Sure helped us with marketing and advertising, it has helped to promote the park to Sure customers in the Island. With Sure’s support so far, we have also taken two young people off benefits, trained them and hopefully given them a future.” Our involvement with the Manx Language App has also given us an opportunity to combine the latest technology with the Island’s heritage: “The Sure support for the Manx Language App - Learn Manx - has been one of the most significant examples of business support for Manx in recent years,” says


Manx Language Development Officer at Culture Vannin, Adrian Cain: “The App has been a real success with over 4000 downloads, enabling us to reach a whole new generation of learners of the language. It’s been a real pleasure to work with Sure on this project. Their commitment to the language community is something that I know they are genuinely proud off. Gura mie eu!” Our cultural engagement has not been limited to support of Manx language learning projects; we have also helped the Reel Life Education Project and the Manx Literary Festival reach out to the younger community, as Bev Lawley, the person responsible for the sponsorship of RLEP films, and John Quirk, Manx Lit Fest Director, explain: “Sure have been very generous in helping with sponsorship towards the Reel Life Education Project. It is also helps a great deal to have on board a company which young people can relate to and we are extremely grateful for all the support they have given to the project. We wanted to make entry to the ‘Winnie the Pooh and Friends Day’ at The Arboretum in St John’s free for everyone, as we know how expensive it can be for families to attend and take part in all the events the Isle of Man has to offer,” says John Quirk. “The significant sponsorship from Sure allowed us to deliver a fun day for youngsters. We are indebted to Sure for its support of this year’s festival.” We believe that our community work should reflect the rich breadth of the Island’s community. One of the best ways to reach out to Islanders is through sport:

The type of work we are involved in includes investment in support of local projects, the donation of funds or products and services to support charities in need, investment in clean technology to lower our environmental footprint and engaging employees in charity work. “The Department of Community, Culture and Leisure’s Sport Development Unit (SDU) are very lucky to have continued support from Sure in one of its major initiatives,” says Eastern Community Sport Development Officer, Trevor Christian. He adds: “The Sure Sport Primary School Programme offers all primary schools in the island the opportunity to engage in a variety of sports festivals throughout the year. With Sure’s sponsorship, the SDU have been able to provide sports equipment for schools as well as coaching education for teachers, sports leaders and parent helpers - which enables schools to deliver quality sports sessions to their pupils”. SureStrike director, Julie Corteen, was pleased to have Sure’s help in relaunching the bowling alley: “Sure’s involvement was key to getting the bowling alley opened in 2011 and turning the dreams of its founders into reality,” she says: “Since the new management team took over in 2012, our continued

partnership with Sure has been a vital foundation as we have developed SureStrike into a high-quality, familyoriented leisure facility – right at the heart of the Island community and accessible to all.” Sure is also the proud sponsor of the Vagabonds Women’s rugby team. “Sponsorship from Sure means a lot to us as a team”, explains team captain, Alana McCaughan. She adds:“It has allowed us to get a shiny new kit so we no longer have to play in our ‘old faithful’ tightie whities - whilst also helping to raise our profile in the Island.” Sure’s involvement in the Manx community is extensive and wideranging. As we continue to invest in our telecoms network, so we will also continue to invest in the Island itself, ensuring that we are able to help improve the lives of all Islanders in a variety of meaningful ways.

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CSR Feature

The business behind the

Island’s sporting stars Creechurch Capital – the boutique discretionary fund manager – has invested nearly £250,000 in its Sports Academy to give promising young sports stars a muchneeded head start in their careers.

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his announcement comes hot-on-the-heels of the news that Yasmin Ingham scooped the main honours at the Isle of Man Bank Sports Awards ceremony at the Villa Marina last week. Without the sponsorship support of Creechurch Capital, achieving this accolade would not have been possible. Creechurch Capital is an award-winning discretionary fund manager regulated by the Isle of Man Financial Supervision Comission. Creechurch Capital funded the equestrian prodigy’s gallop to success last year when she won both the British and European Pony Championships in a major breakthrough for her career. The business has just announced the fact it has signed the deal to sponsor Yasmin Ingham for the forthcoming year, as she takes the next steps on her promising career. Yasmin will be based in Cheshire for the season as she competes in this year’s British Championships. Yasmin also has the opportunity to win further gold medals

at this year’s European Championships, which are being held in Yorkshire in August. In addition to Yasmin, Creechurch Capital has pledged its support to Commonwealth and Olympic Taekwondo hopeful, Aaron Cook. Aaron regained his number one world ranking at the end of 2013, when the under-80kg Isle of Man fighter made the podium in nine competitions out of 11, including five golds. His first fight for the Island was in the Swedish Open in February, where he clinched gold and finished the year with silver in the French Open. The World Taekwondo Federation gives ranking points to top international competitions and the top six in each weight category in December 2015, automatically obtaining a place in their national team for the Rio Olympics. Aaron is based in the Island, and splits his time between mentoring local students, training, and competing internationally. He will be flying the three legs competing all over the world this year. He will defend his double European title in Azerbaijan in May and compete against the top 32 in the world at three Grand Prix this year. John Greenwood, CEO at Creechurch Capital said: “Business and sport are very closely linked. We set out as a startup business just over three years ago and needed the support of loyal clients, our investors and even the Isle of Man Government to give us the confidence and backing to compete on an international stage. In the same way, we set up the Sports Academy to pledge our funding of these extremely promising young sports stars to give them the push off the start line

that they need, when they really need it. We’ve been astounded at the level of success individuals like Yasmin have gone on to achieve – it has far surpassed our expectations. There’s a lot people in business can learn from sportspeople like our Sports Academy members. While they’ve enjoyed a number of triumphs, we’ve also seen the grit and steely determination of those who have faced knock-backs, and how they’ve recovered by coming back stronger and more focussed than ever.” Sports Academy sponsorship recipient, Yasmin, said: “Winning the award last week was an immense honour, especially alongside a sportsman of the calibre of Mark Cavendish. I am so grateful to Creechurch for their continued support. Without their assistance, we wouldn’t be able to have enjoyed the success that we’ve had. I look forward working with the team again this year and have set my sights on more wins and awards in the future.” As well as Yasmin and Aaron, Creechurch Capital has previously sponsored Jonny Bellis, who is now challenging for track medals at this year’s Commonwealth Games. It has also provided support for Yorkshire-based Porsche driver, Daniel Lloyd, whose Grandfather lived in the Island, and is now in a partnership with Beechdean Aston Martin Racing to contest selected rounds of the Blancpain Endurance Series. Creechurch Capital has also played a pivotal role in backing the Kelly Holmes Sporting Excellence Programme and is a Team Isle of Man Champion supporting the Isle of Man Commonwealth Games Association in the countdown to Glasgow 2014.

Creechurch Capital Limited is licensed by the Isle of Man Financial Supervision Commission. Registered Address: Knox House, 16-18 Finch Road, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2PT.

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Yasmin Ingham I am so grateful to Creechurch for their continued support and without their assistance we wouldn’t be able to have enjoyed the success that we’ve had. I look forward working with the team again this year and have set my sights on more wins and awards in the future.

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3FM and Quinn Legal teamed up with Liverpool’s Second Skin Events Ltd. to organise a networking event on the 9th April at the Palace Hotel. With the full backing of the Isle of Man Chamber of Commerce, over  50 professionals and senior business figures headed over from the UK to take part in the event.  AGENDA

A-LIST EVENTS

Island delegates mingled with doorstep business connections and set about determining how the Island’s business community can play a part in North West business development. The Isle of Man has long-established links with the North West in general, but Liverpudlian people know where we are, and many have childhood holiday memories of the Island - so there was plenty to talk about. Over the last few years, Merseyside has seen a substantial regeneration programme. Investment into the city of Liverpool has continued past its European Capital of Culture year in 2008 - which was a springboard for the city to generate development and business opportunities both at home and in surrounding areas.

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APPOINTMENTS

A TRIO OF PROMOTIONS FOR STANDARD BANK ISLE OF MAN Three staff at Standard Bank in the Isle of Man have been celebrating career progression success. Neill Grimley is now Senior Manager, Business Development, Victoria Scales has been promoted to Digital Marketing Manager and Lisa Cooke to Assistant Manager, Product Control. As a Business Development Manager Neill Grimley was very successful in developing new clients from Standard Bank’s Independent Financial Advisor (IFA) contacts in the Far East. In the last year he has taken on additional staff management responsibilities and successfully participated in the Bank’s talent development programme. He has been promoted to Senior Manager, Business Development. Victoria Scales was formerly working in Sales and Marketing Support but will now be concentrating on digital projects. As Digital Marketing Manager her primary responsibility will be to lead the day to day development, management and maintenance of all digital campaigns, as well as the Personal and Business Banking International website. Lisa Cooke has been working towards her new role of Assistant Manager, Product Control for the past two years. As Finance Assistant she has been gaining the experience and undertaking the training needed to take on the managerial role and succeeded in professional examinations. Lisa is currently also a participant in this year’s Manx Executive Challenge, which Standard Bank has supported over many years. 98

APPLEBY ANNOUNCES ISLE OF MAN PARTNER & COUNSEL APPOINTMENTS Appleby Isle of Man is pleased to announce the appointment of Caren Pegg as Partner and Juan Thornley to the position of Counsel. Experienced advocate Caren (née Hyde), is a member of the Isle of Man litigation and insolvency practice group. She deals with a broad range of civil and commercial disputes, including freezing injunctions, enforcement of judgments, asset tracing, Norwich Pharmacal applications, public law issues and director/shareholder disputes. Caren also specialises in employment law. She has extensive experience in dealing with both non-contentious and contentious matters, including redundancy, employment issues related to mergers & acquisitions, restructuring, unfair dismissal, sex discrimination and contracts of employment. Her clients range from leading global and local corporate entities to high net worth individuals. Caren has recently been appointed as Chairman of the Employment and Training Committee for the Isle of Man Chamber of Commerce. She joined Appleby in 2001. Juan Thornley is a member of the corporate and commercial practice group based in the Isle of Man. He advises on a broad range of corporate matters including mergers and acquisitions, capital markets, private equity and joint ventures. He has extensive experience of advising financial services businesses and insurers on a range of matters from restructuring to ongoing compliance and he acts for fiduciary service providers and companies within the e-business sector. He joined Appleby in 2003.

NEW APPOINTMENTS FOR STANDARD BANK IOM Standard Bank, Isle of Man’s IFA distribution team is expanding with the appointment of two new Business Development Managers. The move follows the local bank’s continued growth and the success of the IFA team in building business relationships worldwide. The Standard Bank IFA team manage the relationship between Standard Bank and independent financial advisers around the world, by providing products tailor made for the IFA market. John Kilgour has been appointed Business Development Manager for Europe, and David Patterson Business Development Manager for the Middle East and India. John was formerly at Royal Skandia where he worked for eight years, most recently as a Sales Consultant for Europe. He takes over from Sheena Maddrell who will now concentrate on IFAs introducing seafarer accounts. David is replacing Simon Buckerfield who left the bank in December 2013. He was formerly at Lloyds Bank International as a Business Relationship Manager looking after a portfolio of Premier Banking clients. Both men will report to John Hall, Head of IFA distribution: ‘These two appointments will be a welcome boost to our team at a time of growth within our business. John already has relationships with IFAs in Europe from his previous role at Royal Skandia and I know will hit the ground running. David will concentrate not only on managing the existing relationships in the Middle East, but also in developing new business in India which is an opportunity we started to explore last year. ’


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BANKING

Deniese Smith, Senior Bank Manager at Isle of Man Bank and NatWest, discusses the growth of mobile and online banking and the role of the High Street – ‘the best of both worlds’.

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f you think back to how you did your banking 20 years ago and compare it to the present day, it’s likely it has changed beyond all recognition. As technology has developed over time so Isle of Man Bank and NatWest have responded to the needs of customers to develop new and convenient ways of banking.

At the core of this focus, we make sure our teams are in the right place at the right time and doing the right things to improve the customer experience. This means that whilst, customers are increasingly choosing to manage their finances on the go; the traditional high street branch network continues to play a significant role.

Digital In a report by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA) , mobile phone banking transactions made by British customers have nearly doubled in a single year, new industry figures compiled by the BBA show today. Customers are now making more than 5.7 million transactions a day using smart phones and other internet enabled technology. At RBS Group in the UK, the busiest branch is now the ‘virtual’ one with over £30 million transferred every day through the mobile banking app. By placing the power to manage their money in their hands, mobile banking service is transforming the way our customers do their banking. At the touch of a button personal and business customers can check their balance, transfer money between accounts, view their transaction history or pay their contacts. Offshore Isle of Man Bank and NatWest were the first banks to provide mobile banking for smartphones. Since introducing an app for both personal and business customers, the Bank has continued to lead with innovations providing customers with choice and flexibility and today remains

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the only bank providing clients with a multi-currency app. Among the latest app features for personal customers is ‘Get Cash’ which enables customers to withdraw money without using their bank card at an ATM. The customer chooses the amount they wish to withdraw from the app and a secure cash code is sent to their phone which is then valid for three hours at any RBS Group cash machine. Another new facility is the ‘Pay Your Contacts’ service which enables a customer to pay anyone with a Visa debit, credit or prepaid card using just their mobile number, even if they are not a bank customer. A revolutionary way of paying someone, it has countless uses; one of the more obvious is a quick and easy way of sending the money owed when splitting a bill with friends at a restaurant. The Isle of Man Bank and NatWest offshore app, which is available to customers with accounts held in the Crown Dependencies and Gibraltar, has been used in over 160 countries and had over 460,000 log ins in the last 30 days. Since the launch of the first mobile app in 2011, there have been two million transactions made using mobile devices. Since then, the bank has continued to lead with innovations providing customers with choice and flexibility and today remains the only bank providing clients with a multi-currency app. Complementing mobile, is a preference towards social engagement. A dedicated team answer customer queries through the webchat service offered within online banking and answer customer queries received through the Bank’s dedicated Facebook and Twitter pages. Social media provides a proactive role of providing feedback quickly. Across our social media accounts we engage with approximately 7,000 followers, focusing on their needs and providing excellent service. Over 77.5% of our most popular tweets relate to Helpful Banking advice for money management, how to bank on-the-go, security and saving tips. With technology evolving the customer experience, how do these developments fit with branch based banking?

Traditional The most important advantage of the digital revolution for the branch is that it has freed staff up so they can spend more time with customers when they need it in branch. Deloitte recently found elderly

and retired people were the fastest adopters of digital services, bucking a perception that younger customers are fuelling the appetite for online banking platforms. By contrast younger people are increasingly meeting branch staff to discuss their financial needs. For business customers, the iPhone app enables them to easily access and manage their finances on the move. Their relationship manager is on hand when they need to talk through development plans and lending requirements and provide support through difficult decisions but the app gives them greater control of their money so they can focus their attention on running their business and serving customers.

Balance & Choice It is this balance between mobile and traditional that is designed to give the customer the best of both worlds. There will always be a place for traditional banking, where branch and telephony teams and relationship managers are on hand to meet with customers and discuss their specific needs, for example whether may relate to a mortgage or account application or just a general question. However, for everyday transactions, banking has changed beyond recognition and technology is driving this trend. Our commitment will remain to serve customers through a wide range of channels and we will continue to invest in leading edge developments to enhance our proposition and our established branch network. This year the bank is supporting customers on this journey with live demonstrations available in larger branches to walk through its mobile service proposition, providing customers with opportunities to learn about the mobile revolution and how the new services can be used, in combination with the branch to help our customers bank with us in the way most convenient to them. Pop in to branch to find out how we are making banking easier!


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INTERNET FEATURE WORDS

PHIL ADCOCK, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, DOMICILIUM

A cure for

data jet lag I have just arrived home after an extended trip to Asia. Nothing unusual about that you might say, we do it all the time in the Internet industry. What was different for me on this particular trip is that I spent the weekend in the fetal position with one of the worst cases of jet lag of my life. I don’t mean your average wide-awakeat-3am experience, I’m talking the full-on mindcrushing, energy-sapping, think-through-cotton-wool experience; three days of it.

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y good friend Wikipedia tells me that my circadian rhythm is wonky. “The body’s natural pattern is upset, as the rhythms that dictate times for eating, sleeping, hormone regulation and body temperature variations no longer correspond to the environment nor to each other in some cases.” Thank you, I’d figured that bit out. What it is less clear on is a way to fix it. Many travellers I talk to swear by melatonin, a hormone that is part of the system that regulates the sleep wake cycle. For those of you that have read Asterix books as a child, it appears to have an effect equivalent of the magic potion made by the village druid Panoramix. Take one before bed and all is good. Unfortunately, whilst melatonin is widely available over the counter in many countries such as the United States, not so in the Isle of Man. So why an article about my jet lag? Well the reality of any global business is that you will be working with business partners and clients in multiple time-zones, languages and cultures. The distance certainly has an effect with an online business too, particularly in terms of the time it takes for information to travel across the Internet from one continent to another. Whilst we measure this in fractions of a second, the reality is that even a modest increase in

Meet the Account Managers Elissa and Kelly have been with Domicilium for over two years and bring a wealth of experience to Domicilium from other sectors; they manage a large portfolio of local and international clients. David is a Senior Account Manager and has 14 years’ experience in the IT sector. He travels extensively to drive inward investment to the Isle of Man and to personally manage his clients where ever they may be in the world. At Domicilium all of the Account Management team are committed to building close relationships and are driven to deliver excellent customer service.

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David Artus, Elissa Morris and Kelly Nicol

delay can affect the user experience in an online system. The result is that innovative solutions are required to deliver a pleasing user experience. To quote a favourite engineer of mine, whilst “ye cannae change the laws of physics”, as an infrastructure provider, you learn how to bend the rules a little, and so we have developed a range of solutions over the nineteen years, we have been involved in the Internet industry to help operators meet these challenges. Online platforms are becoming increasingly sophisticated yearon-year, with the result that more and more is expected of the underlying infrastructure that delivers the revenues. We have evolved our products to meet the exact needs of our clients and therefore the Domicilium strapline “No Problems Just Solutions” means just that. It is a model that has worked well for our clients and has driven our expansion from the Isle of Man across more than thirty jurisdictions. Its 8am (or 4pm depending on your perspective), and I’ve reached the end of this article after my third cup of coffee. I’m not quite sure whether I’ll be a functioning human being today or just grumpy. Time will tell. So what about my jet lag? I guess I’ll just have to man up and deal with it.


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RELOCATION FEATURE

WORDS

MICHELLE P. TONNESEN

Food, Fun & Friendship Moving to the Isle of Man can be a daunting challenge – especially if you arrive as an “accompanying spouse”. You have no natural network or approach angle to getting settled into local life. Making a new home and connecting to a foreign environment are almost always chaotic and stressful. A social network will help you settle in faster than anything else; but starting one from scratch can be a terrifying prospect.

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A Recipe for Relocation This is not an attempt to discriminate.

This particular group up of women decided to break this pattern and do something about it, rather than spiral into despair: They started the CoStars dinners – a monthly get-together for partners of relocated PokerStars employees. “We are a “grassroots” group started over six years ago as an informal way of networking,” explains Susanne, a Swede who is one of the few “original” members left, as the network has grown and altered over the years. “The dinners truly helped me start my life on the Island – I made my first, and now best, friends through this group.” The voluntary constellation is organised by a fixed coordinator, who keeps the momentum and continuity going via group e-mails, as well as has the honour (and challenge!) of picking a different restaurant each month. The baton is passed on once every 12-18 months to whomever of the participants is keen to go next. The make-up of the diners differs from month-to-month, depending on who can make it, and who has recently moved on or off the Island. The numbers vary from two to 20, but usually around six to eight ladies join in the fun at each dinner. It’s in no way an elitist or exclusive club – its participants are a diverse crowd of both working women and stay-at-home mums; artists and accountants; teachers and IT consultants; and of nationalities ranging from North American, Eastern European and Scandinavian to Chinese, Korean and Israeli – “come-overs” in all kinds of guises. The only criteria of attendance is being an accompanying partner of a PokerStars employee or even an employee themselves; yet all women

The 2013 Brookfields’ Global Relocation Trend Report showed that 79% of overseas assigners were accompanied by a spouse or partner, and 43% accompanied by children. While the number of women being sent on international assignments reached a high of 21% in 2012, the fact of the matter is that the vast majority of accompanying spouses are still female. While many families move for adventure or cross-cultural experiences, the mainstream move for career advancement. In an international relocation survey conducted by expat expert Robin Pascoe, 63.1% of the respondents stated that they relocated because of a partner’s career and only 5.6% because of both careers. In an age where business is conducted on an international scale and employees are anxious to spread their wings, more companies are adopting comprehensive relocation policies, as a mobile workforce is becoming an essential competitive differentiator. Thus, having a policy to address crucial relocation issues can positively impact the company’s bottom line.

other than showing up and taking part in the fun – it’s a social network on a plate!” enthuses Lucia, a Slovak who only recently moved to the Island from London.

“I find it really refreshing that everyone is at the same level when at the dinner table – no matter what our status in life is, or what our husbands do. We are all in the same boat, and we can relate to each other and share information about anything from children’s sleeping problems to finding a good local dentist,” shares Kirsti, who moved here three years ago from Australia via Sweden with her family of four.

Given that the number one reason generally cited for relocation success is the thriving of the relocated person’s partner or family, this particular social gathering makes even more sense. “We are very fortunate that the company does so much to help its employees and their families relocate successfully to the Island. But this is our own thing – independent from our husbands. Our dinners do not receive support from PokerStars as such, other than spreading the “word of mouth” when newcomers arrive. It’s our golden chance to get out there, build our social network and have a bit of fun too,” says Lian who moved with her family from Ireland to the Island two years ago, when her husband got a job here at the company headquarters. The benefits are obvious when you watch the merry crowd gathered around the table this casual Wednesday evening.

It is clear that the dinners represent a welcome support network for both newcomers searching for key information, and the more established ladies who get to catch up with “old” friends – as well as vent any inevitable frustrations about Island life. “And then you’re sure to know someone at the company Christmas party!” laughs Linda, another established expat Scandinavian, and the party joins in with unreserved glee. Looks like these women have found the recipe for a successful relocation!

“It’s a great opportunity for making new friends. It takes very little effort

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GOLF FEATURE

MBL Financial to sponsor KHG Funds Senior Open golf tournament The popular KHG Funds Senior Open golf tournament will be sponsored by MBL Financial Services Limited this year. One of the largest Independent Financial Services providers in the Isle of Man, MBL is this year celebrating 28 years in business on the Island. The three round tournament will begin at Douglas Golf Course on July 3, with round two at Rowany on August 7, and the final round at Ramsey on September 4. The 2014 format has changed from last year and, following feedback from participants, will be reverting back to four ball tees times between 8.30am and 2.30pm. Registration will be open on each day from 8am. As in the 2014 tournament, categories will be split into two – Seniors (aged 50-64) and Super Seniors (65+). Prizes will be awarded for best individual score in both the Senior and Super Seniors categories. An addition this year is a separate prize for the best overall ladies’ score. Thanks to the generosity of MBL Financial Services Limited the price to enter this year’s tournament remains £60 per head which includes green fees, refreshments at each event, and a buffet after the final round. There will be a chance to win some excellent prizes and stylish gifts will be presented to all the players that take part. Matty Evans, MBL Financial Sales Director, said: “The KHG Funds Senior Open is now firmly established in the Island’s golfing calendar, and we are proud to be supporting this increasingly popular event. Over the years the tournament has seen some great competition and we’re sure that this year will be no exception. We look forward to welcoming back

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players to the tournament whose loyal support has helped to establish it as one of the best on the Island – but we are always happy to see new participants too.” KHG Funds is an Isle of Man innovative fund range investment managed by Creechurch Capital – the boutique discretionary fund manager based in Douglas. Stewart Quayle, Senior Business Development Manager at Creechurch Capital, commented: “We’re delighted that MBL Financial is supporting the KHG Funds Senior Open. The event has gone from strength to strength since the inaugural competition in 2010 which was held to celebrate the launch that year of KHG Funds. Thanks to MBL Financial’s backing, this year’s tournament will be even bigger and better.” Around 60 golfers have already signed-up to take part in the Senior Open, but there’s still time to enter by phoning Christine Novak on 01624 653800. The closing date is May 30.


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Ahead of the world famous International Isle of Man TT, Actor, Adventurer and Bremont Ambassador Charley Boorman will be joining Bremont’s Co Founder Giles English for an exclusive event at Wilkins Jewellers on 4th June from 6.30pm onwards. For more details please contact:

76 Strand St, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2EW Tel: 01624 690 450 Email: gabrielle@wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk


ACTIVE


ACTIVE

SPORTS NEWS 2014 SURE SPORTS PRIMARY SCHOOLS’ NETBALL FESTIVALS Teamwork between the public and private sectors has led to hundreds of primary school children aiming high in an all-Island netball tournament. The Sure-sponsored Primary Schools’ Netball Festivals concluded when The Buchan School took the main trophy, beating off stiff competition from second placed Laxey Primary in a round robin tournament held at St Ninian’s Lower School. The festivals, run in partnership with the Manx Netball Association, form part of the Sure Sports Primary Schools’ Programme, which is run by the Department of Education and Children’s Sports Development Unit and generously supported by the telecoms firm. The programme allows thousands of pupils to participate – many for the first time – in six sports, opening the way for them to continue to play the sports out of school via the many junior clubs and schemes on offer. The hard work for the netball players began in January when 27 primaries began training for their respective regional festivals. Schools were eligible to enter provided they’d already run netball sessions for six weeks. An impressive 48 squads were entered, resulting in 480 children participating. The top two teams from each region progressed through to this week’s final.

SURE SUPPORTS YOUNG MOUNTAIN BIKER TO REACH THE TOP Sure has announced its support for Nick Corlett, the local mountain biker who is aiming for the very top in his sport. Nick, aged 18 and from Glen Vine, had decided to go professional after several successful years in the junior category and he approached Sure for sponsorship. Nick comments: “Sure stood out to me as a brand which is heavily committed to supporting local arts, charity and sport initiatives. They have a fresh young feel to their brand - which I thought would be the ideal fit for me. I am very grateful for the sponsorship from Sure as it allows me to travel off-Island to attend the British rounds and national championship races; the more experience I have of racing at that level

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These schools were Laxey, Ballaugh, St John’s, Bunscoill Ghaelgagh, Arbory, The Buchan, Ballacottier and Cronk-y-Berry. The Buchan was presented with the National Netball Trophy by Sarah Jarvis, Marketing and PR Manager for Sure, who said: “As ever, I was blown away by the quality of play, the sportsmanship of the teams and the energy of all who took part. The primary sports programme encapsulates so much that Sure is proud to support: it’s Island-wide, it’s inclusive, it gets kids out playing sport and, above all, it’s loads of fun.” Running alongside the national final was a fun festival for teams that didn’t make it through. No results were recorded but prizes were given out for the best fancy dress (won by another Ballacottier team) and the best acceptance walk (Rushen). xMarie Skillicorn, Isle of Man Netball Development Officer, said: “Once again, the Manx Netball Association is delighted

with the standard of netballers coming out of the primary schools’ festivals. The level of ability is getting closer and this was demonstrated in the tight scorelines. Players and coaches alike put in so much effort and the enthusiasm for netball is growing stronger. We have seen a high increase in juniors playing netball over the past 12-months and we are changing our junior leagues next year to accommodate this. It is a pleasure to be involved in these festivals and I particularly enjoy the noncompetitive element attached to the fun festival.” To learn more about community netball, contact Marie on: 456634 or e-mail: mnadevelopment@gmail.com

of competition, the more I learn and the stronger I become physically. I am pleased that I am holding my own in this class, with recent first, second and third placements. I am also hoping to better my fourth place in this year’s End-toEnd race.” Sure’s marketing and PR manager, Sarah Jarvis, adds: “I was very impressed with Nick when he came in to talk to me. He had an inner strength and resolve which will stand him in excellent stead as he makes his bid for the Commonwealth Games team and as he pushes for success in the British championships. Sure is delighted to support him – a local young man who will

follow in the tyre tracks of established road and track athletes such as Mark Cavendish and Peter Kennaugh... and he’ll help to keep the Isle of Man on the cycling map!”

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


ACTIVE

MANX TELECOM LAUNCHES RAMSEY ROCKET SPONSORSHIP FOR 2014 Manx Telecom is sponsoring TT star Conor Cummins for the third successive season. The ‘Ramsey Rocket’, who holds the TT Mountain Course lap record from a standing start and is the fastest Manxman ever to race the legendary 37.75 mile circuit, is competing with the Honda Racing team this season alongside 20 time TT winner John McGuinness. Conor will be on board a 2014 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade in the in the TT and North West 200 in the Superbike and Senior classes. He will also contest the Superstock 1000 class with RAF Reserves Honda. Fans will see Conor wearing the Manx Telecom logo on his leathers and it will also appear on his official website www.conorcummins.com He said: “Being a local lad sponsored by a local company is a perfect combination for me. Manx Telecom have shown a lot of faith in me over the years and I hope to reward their commitment and loyalty with some good results this season.” Conor’s racing success, and in particular his courageous and inspiring return to the sport following a serious crash in the 2010 Senior TT, have won him fans around the world and made him one of the Island’s most popular sportsmen. Voirrey Barron, Manx Telecom’s Marketing Communications Manager, said: “Conor has always been a fantastic ambassador for us and we’re delighted to sponsor him again this season. He represents all that is great about the TT, and the fact that he is a local rider means there is even more reason for us to support his racing ambitions. We wish Conor every success and look forward to giving our customers the chance to win some fantastic prizes.” Both Conor and Manx Telecom have roles supporting the Island’s national team in the build-up to this year’s Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. Conor is a Team Isle of Man Ambassador which involves him helping to encourage public support for the Island’s national team. Manx Telecom became a Team Isle of Man Champion as part of a fundraising initiative for the Island’s team preparing to go for gold in Glasgow this summer.

WALKERS STEPPING OUT TO HELP SAVE LIVES Right now 14 patients in the Isle of Man are waiting for organ transplants. The more people who register to be donors, the greater the chances there are for these patients to live longer and more fulfilling lives. To promote awareness of this issue members of the Organ Donation Committee at Noble’s Hospital will be at both signing on events for the Manx Telecom Parish Walk. They will also be running a water station on the day of the race handing out bottles to walkers with details on labels about organ donation. Some committee members will be taking part in the walk to raise funds to create a memorial at Noble’s Hospital in memory of all those in the Island who have donated organs. The committee is made up of co-ordinators from the UK, and staff from the Noble’s Hospital’s operating theatre, A&E and ICU departments, and mortuary staff. One of the committee members is Diane Taylor whose 15-year-old son Daniel died in a car accident in 2007. After Daniel’s parents agreed to allow his organs to be donated, four patients suffering serious illnesses received lifechanging transplants. She says: “Last year I took part in the Parish Walk with my best friend Shona Shade. We both walked in memory of our children [Diane’s son Daniel, and Shona’s daughter McKenzie] and also to raise awareness of organ donation in the Isle of Man. This year, I will be working with the committee from Noble’s Hospital and there will be a team taking part in the Parish Walk.” From April 2009 to February 2014 a total of 17 patients in the Island received a life-saving organ transplants from a deceased donor. There are donor registers both here and in the UK. The greater the number there are who sign-up for these registers, then the greater the chances of organs being available which match the tissue-types of patients needing transplants. Campaigners are also aiming to promote discussion of the subject so that bereaved families know the wishes of relatives. This is important as only a very small number of people die in circumstances where they are able to donate their organs. Usually organs come from people who are certified dead while on a ventilator in a hospital intensive care unit – and in cases such as this it is the relatives of the deceased who are asked by doctors to make a decision about whether their loved one would have wished their organs to be used for transplants. For more information go to the ‘Organ Donation Isle of Man - The Gift of Life’ Facebook page, or www. organdonation.nhs.uk where you can join the NHS Organ Donor Register.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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PHOTOGRAPHY | Steve Babb | www.babbphotography.com

BASKETBALL STAR

SEAN DOYLE A young Isle of Man basketball star has been offered a two-year placement at a prestigious American College in Seattle, and is seeking sponsorship to follow his USA dream. SIX FOOT FIVE INCH SEAN DOYLE, AGED 19, OF DOUGLAS IS HOPING TO FOLLOW IN HIS FOOTBALLER BROTHER CONOR’S FOOTSTEPS, AFTER HE SUCCESSFULLY GRADUATED FROM A COLLEGE IN BOSTON, USA LAST YEAR. As basketball is a national sport in America to be offered a place at college is a significant honour. However, scholarships are hard to come by in the basketball arena, as in some cases, colleges are not permitted to offer international students a scholarship. Sean has been working hard to save funds and has already sat the American college entry exams – SATs - and achieved the necessary grades to get into the college. The cost will be in the region of £15,000 to £20,000 a year, to include fees and accommodation. This is a two-year offer. Sean has applied to many sporting support schemes, such as Isle of Man Basketball Association, Sports Aid and Chase Your Dream, but so far has not been successful. Due to A-level grades, he is also not eligible for funding from the Department of Education and Children. He has emailed and written to many companies, but without any success. Sean is realistic that funding may be hard to get in the Isle of Man, but what an honour it would be for him to play basketball at college in America. Sean is Manx-born, and if successful in going to the USA to play basketball will be one of a very small group

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from the Island to play this sport state-side. In a bid to attract sponsors, Sean has produced a short video of him in action, which can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=s3LAPKPZpRE Sean is a left-handed player and stands at six foot, five inches with a wingspan of six foot nine inches. He has already represented the Isle of Man national team and has competed in the UK National Founders Cup (an amateur basketball tournament). Sean plays locally for Microgaming Cavaliers, who have won the main basketball league for the past five years. “Having represented the Isle of Man on numerous occasions, i’m now looking to step up by gaining a place at a college in the USA,” he told Gallery. “I am an athletic small forward, who can vary in all positions due to my height and pace. I have also attended NBC basketball camps for the last four years,” added Sean. If you or your company thinks you might be able to help Sean fulfill both his dream and his full potential, he would be delighted to hear from you. Please call him on: 400067 or his Mum, Mary Doyle, on: 415322 to find out more and discuss the options. Besides helping a young man achieve his dream, Sean will be an ambassador for the company, plus there will be lots of PR and corporate social responsibility kudos. He can also be e-mailed on: doyleiom@manx.net

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I am an athletic small forward who can vary in all positions due to my height and pace. I have also attended NBC basketball camps for the last four years.

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TT2013 IN PICTURES

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ALL IMAGES AVAILABLE ON CANVAS OR POSTER PRINTS FROM CANVASMANN.

WWW.CANVASMANN.COM E: PRINT@CANVASMANN.COM T: 07624-212150 BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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TT

The

‘S

most memorable faces RL360° is the longest running sponsor of the TT. Every June, we lend our name to the TT Superstock Race, which produces some of the closest and most memorable racing of the week. This started us thinking about the most memorable TT racers of all time. Here we pick our top 10, in alphabetical order. If you disagree, let us know your choices by e-mailing: top10@rl360.com

Giacomo Agostini Agostini may well lay the claim to being the coolest motorcycle racer of all time. With a brilliant 10 wins on the TT course, as he is known to generations of fans and has also won 15 world titles. The famous Ago’s Leap at the bottom of Bray Hill is named after this Italian legend.

Geoff Duke The six time TT winner and six time world champion is without question one of the all time greats. Like Joey Dunlop, Mike Hailwood, Ago, McGuinness and Dave Molyneux (see below), the highly popular Isle of Man-based two-wheeled hero has a spot on the course named after him.

Joey Dunlop The quiet man from Ballymoney holds the all-time record for most number of wins at the TT – 26. His death at a race in Estonia in 2000 shocked the world but the family name is still synonymous with the dangerous and thrilling sport of road racing.

Mike Hailwood Mike the Bike is not just a TT, but a worldwide legendary motorsport icon. Winner of 14 TTs, he will be forever remembered for making the greatest comeback ever on the Mountain Course, winning a further two races after having been retired from TT racing for several years.

Steve Hislop The Flying Haggis - as he was sometimes known - won a fantastic 11 TT races during a career - which 116

also saw him win British titles on short circuits. His life was tragically cut short when he died in a helicopter accident in 2003. A statue of the Scot, who lived in the Isle of Man, looks out across Douglas Bay from Onchan Head.

Ian Hutchinson In 2010, Ian Hutchinson did the seemingly impossible – he won five solo TT races in one week. Later that year, he suffered an horrific injury during a short circuit race. With strength and determination he has battled back to fitness and will be a contender once again this year.

Guy Martin TV favourite Guy has the dubious honour of being the only rider on our list to have not yet won a TT. However, it’s not through lack of trying. A passionate and skilled racer, is also one of the greatest characters the sport has ever produced.

John McGuinness The Morecambe Missile has won a staggering 20 TTs, and is aiming to add to his tally this year. A popular rider, McGuinness was the first to break the 130mph lap barrier at the Centenary event in 2007.

Dave Molyneux Manxman Molyneux has had a spectacular career on the Mountain Course, having collected more TT wins than any other sidecar racer. As long as he’s on the start line, few would bet against him notching up yet another win to add to his already impressive 16.

Richard ‘Milky’ Quayle Manxman Milky won his first and only TT - the Lightweight 400 - in 2002, fulfilling a life-long dream and becoming a local hero in the process. After the end of his racing career, he became heavily involved in the event behind the scenes. ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


Ian Hutchinson

Steve Hislop

Guy Martin

John McGuinness

Mike Hailwood

Joey Dunlop

Dave Molyneux

Richard ‘Milky’ Quayle

Geoff Duke

Giacomo Agostini

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Words: Lionel Cowin

Cal Cooper British Superbikes

I

did not suspect for a moment that there would be a positive response to my e-mail to The Boss of gallery.

I had asked him to GIVE me a bit of room in his excellent magazine, so I could pitch for some financial assistance for my motorcycle racing grandson. Rejection slips and the lack of even ‘thanks but no thanks’ replies to my latest fund-raising attempts at home and further afield had left me decidedly frustrated, and not the least bit hopeful that gallery would accommodate me.

B

ut the editor did reply, God bless him, and yes, he would be happy to DONATE to the cause, and he put space for 800 words and images at my disposal. The editorial theme for the May issue of gallery was “GIVE, talking around CSR activity”, he told me. How lucky was that? Too good an opportunity to miss; a chance to expand the cause in front of a different audience. I understood the word GIVE, it is something I have been attempting businesses and individuals to do on my grandson’s behalf for the past four years. But CSR spooked me, and I confess to asking Wikipedia for some assistance. Ah, Corporate Social Responsibility. I was grateful when Wikipedia also came up with: A common approach to CSR is corporate philanthropy. This includes monetary donations and aid given to local and non-local non- profit organisations and communities, including donations in areas such as the arts, education, housing, health, social welfare, the environment …’ I guess that’s what I have been trying to engage with all these years without one jot of success. Maybe trying to solicit funding for a motorsport project is too narrow a field to attract attention and support.

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But there are one of two examples, however, of firms employing CSR when it comes to the likes of Manx riders in the TT and even the event itself. My grandson, Cal Cooper, 17, who lives in Ramsey, admires those that do the TT and MGP but would never attempt the races himself. Instead his focus is on circuit racing, an area of racing in which he has carved out a highly regarded name for himself on the adjacent shores and he can produce a portfolio of articles, reports, videos and other coverage to illustrate that he is one of the sport’s hottest young adherents. Fair to say at this junction, that Cal has had some modest but welcome support for several years from IoM Sport Aid and he is also most grateful to the Island’s leading

motorcycle outlet, Paul Dedman Performance in Ramsey, for help in supplying very costly leathers and helmets. However, in a sport where cash is seemingly more important than capability, the struggle to maintain forward motion is becoming increasingly difficult. He has the talent and does not want to end up on the scrapheap as so many others have, whether it is on the trail of a top car racing berth or motorcycle career in MotoGP or World Superbikes. He simply wants to ultimately earn a crust in a sport he loves and is totally devoted to. With his talent, if he was foreign, say Spanish, French or Italian, there would almost be a red carpet ride to the necessary resources.

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HE SIMPLY WANTS TO ULTIMATELY EARN A CRUST IN A SPORT HE LOVES AND IS TOTALLY DEVOTED TO.

Spain commands pole position when it comes to this type of activity and its riders are synonymous with past and current success. Young hopefuls, many without a great deal of results behind them, secure the funding to take them on to the tracks you see on television most weekends. Britain lags so far behind in this direction, it is out of sight. Just one business, insurance giant Bennetts, supports a British rider on the world stage. To its credit, it recently decided to assist a British youngster to get to the top and Cal was one of those who so nearly made the final consideration. Racing Steps Foundation in the UK, backed by a mutli-millionaire, is the only philanthropic organisation offering a conduit to the top, but it focuses mainly on car racing and supports just two riders, providing the

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funding to go with necessary talent to try and obtain a seat with a professional team. A recent budget reduction has restricted further opportunities to join the setup. We’ve spared no efforts in trying to get the message across that motorcycle racing in the likes of the British Superbike championships - in which Cal compete - really is a top attraction. Crowds of 50,000 are usual, TV coverage is live and lengthy, and the media coverage abundant. He pulled on his leathers for the first time this season at Brands Hatch during the Easter weekend, and his supersport class runs second only to the principal superbike action, with 22 races on the cards this year.

What is now desperately needed is a budget to help keep making things happen. A brochure has been produced, with magnificent free-of-charge assistance by Craig Wolstencroft and his team at Mainstream Media, and Steve Brown at Mannin Media, detailing Cal’s story so far. It also explains the opportunities available to a would-be supporter, either a business or an individual. These can be supplied on request by contacting me on: 304660, or 463494 or by e-mail on: lionelcowin@manx.net

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WORDS | Hannah Goodby – H.G. Equestrian

ALL THINGS EQUESTRIAN A LITTLE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE TO ENJOY...

H

ave you ever been sitting in traffic behind a horsebox? Sorry! And have you wondered where it’s going to or coming from? No… well I’m going to tell you anyway, as it’s important I get you up to speed on some of the disciplines of horse riding before I start reporting on them. If riding for fun doesn’t get your adrenalin pumping, and you love the thrill of competition, then the Island has plenty to offer across the various disciplines. Whether you are competing, or sucking up the atmosphere as a spectator, you won’t be short of opportunities to get your ‘fix’. There is something for everyone to get involved with, so why not take your pick from the following:

SHOW JUMPING Show Jumping takes place both indoors and outdoors and can be enjoyed all year round. Horse and rider combinations are expected to jump a course of coloured fences within an allotted period of time. If a competitor manages to jump over all the fences without knocking any down (‘clear round’), they go through to a ‘jump-off’. This is a shortened course which they must also aim to jump clear and in as fast a time as they can. Competitors receive faults if they knock a fence down, stop at a fence (‘refuse’) or run around a fence (‘run out’). There are also time faults which can apply. The winner is the horse and rider with the least faults and the fastest time in the jump-off. The courses have become increasingly more technical over the years, not to mention

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If riding for fun doesn’t get your adrenalin pumping, and you love the thrill of competition, then the Island has plenty to offer across the various disciplines.

colourful, and riders have to be far more accurate to go clear. The fence poles are super-light and sit on flat collapsible cups, predominantly for safety, but this also means that the horse must be careful and listening to the rider too.

DRESSAGE The word ‘dressage’ is a French term, meaning training. Dressage is the art of striving for a harmonious and barely perceptible communication between horse and rider. Said to originate from battle riding, dressage has come a long way and is now an elegant and refined Olympic sport. Harmonious performance is only possible when the rider has a correct and well-balanced body position, moves with the horse’s motion and times the commands (‘aids’) correctly. In competition, riders perform a series of choreographed movements known as a ‘dressage test’. Horse and rider are given a mark out of ten for each movement they perform, plus additional marks for the way the horse moves (‘paces’), its desire to work actively (‘impulsion’), willingness and the rider’s position. The average of these scores provides the final mark. You could think of this as ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ for horses, especially when watching the ‘Kur’. This is dressage to music when the horse appears to dance to the beat of a song.

EVENTING Eventing is perhaps the ultimate test of a horse and rider. It comprises of three disciplines; dressage, cross country and show jumping. The scores from each combine to produce an overall total.

Eventing (sometimes known as horse trials) take place over one, two and three days depending on the level of competition. It evolved from the training of cavalry horses, and is rather like a pentathlon in that it combines different disciplines in one competition and is run on cumulative penalty basis. The third phase is cross country, where a course of natural obstacles, normally over several miles, has to be jumped within an allowed time. Being over the time incurs penalties as do stops and falls. However, being well under the time is of no benefit as it will often tire a horse unnecessarily. A good cross country horse must be bold and athletic, as well as fast.

SHOWING This is a competition judged on how the horse looks, behaves, how well it moves and its condition. The rider must be smart and correctly attired with the horse’s mane plaited. There are categories for certain types and breeds, and works in a similar way to Crufts. Working Hunter is judged in a similar way. This is where the horse and rider are expected to jump a course of rustic natural fences clearly and easily, and are given marks for style, performance and clearing each obstacle. There you have it, four different disciplines each with their own distinct requirements. So the next time you are behind a horsebox, you’ll have a fair idea of what its occupants are likely to be doing. Don’t forget, if you have an event you would like me to cover, please get in touch and let me know about it.

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GADGETS

The word “bargain” has somewhat lost its meaning of late. With constant sales on the high street and competitive prices online, it’s no longer a surprise to find expensive items at Thai-market prices. In a world where we can find Gucci, or the nearest passable Guchi imitation, for a fraction of the original retail price, we have to question where the price cutting will stop, and whether these companies can really be turning over a profit. Technology is arguably the market where this

YE!! ENERGY BAR BPS66 We’ve all been there. You’re all prepared for the long journey ahead, whether it be by plane, train or automible, everything is charged, you’re ready to blast Katy Perry at full volume guilt-free on the road or through the very, very noise-cancelling headphones. However, in a moment of shock, horror and extreme self-loathing, you realize that you forgot to charge the iPod. Dreams of listening to Harry Nilsson whilst driving through country hills are quickly shattered, and all hope of a fun journey is lost. You tell the family the trip is cancelled and unpack the suitcases, until you stumble across the Ye!! Energy Bar BPS66. Of course! How could you have forgotten? You planned for this eventuality. The Energy Bar BPS66 is a mobile charger, using a an Li-ion battery to charge your devices for up to nine hours.

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competition has had the most effect, with knockoff and secondhand products simply a click away online, and on every other street vendor’s stool wherever you walk, just as long as you don’t mind the unshakeable smell of chip grease every time you put it to your ear. However, here at Gallery, we know

There are tears of joy, hugs all round and an emotional repacking of the suitcases, and finally the trip can begin, all thanks to the Energy Bar. Now it’s only a 6 hour drive ahead, just you, the road, your carefully selected driving playlist and finally, the kids. With prices starting from only £42, you don’t even have to fork out the ridiculous amount of money these thing usually cost, which means you can bribe the family to be quiet with the extra money saved whilst you blast through your guilty pleasures list.

our audience aren’t after the good deals. You’re after the exceptional ones. The prices that make you truly question the company’s business strategy. Those that the shops or sites may as well be giving away (I had to get it in there somehow). This month is a celebration of those gadgets that, whilst not big, fancy, or in some cases even electronic, won’t break the bank. In fact, they’ll barely even put a dent in your walle

NOOK SIMPLE TOUCH GLOW LIGHT If the Kindle revolutionized the affordable e-reader market, Nook, the Barnes and Noble competition, have perfected it. Unlike the original Kindle, the Nook comes with a backlit page, making it possible to read in the dark without a blinding bedside lamp (does anybody else feel Amazon missed out on a key point with that one?). The Nook, although though not the most well known, still boasts the better value for money, the original Nook Glowlight now costing only £49.00, compared the £69.00 of the original Kindle. The Nook’s finest victory over the Kindle has to be their dedication to the e-reader name. Unlike the Kindle Fire, Barnes and Noble have chosen to keep only a small number of features other than the ability to read and download books, rather than making it more difficult to find the clear iBook application rip-off than to start a game of Angry Birds on an unsuccessful attempt to break the tablet market.

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INCIPIO STOWAWAY IPHONE CASES A wise young Hobbit once said “it’s a dangerous business, Frodo, walking out your front door”. He could not have been more right. These days, whether it be a night out or simply a trip to the co-op, it seems things go missing everywhere we go. It happens to all of us, the dreaded panic of looking for an ID the morning after that you know quite well you left in your lift. It’s the fact there are too many things, there’s too much clutter in your pockets. Who can be trusted with a wallet, a phone AND keys. No one deserves that much responsibility. However, Incipio have ingeniously come up with a solution to our problems. Reduce the clutter by putting everything together. That’s right, now there’s no way your possessions can be separated without your knowing in mysterious, extremely forgettable places. The handy storage on the Stowaway Cases means that you can keep up to three cards, including an ID, in the back of your phone, perfect for those who feel weighed down by the immensity of their bulging wallet. This product does raise the question, however, of what would happen if you dropped the phone. This really creates an all or nothing situation with your most important possessions, and personally I’d rather jus take the risk and use the traditional, evenly spread method, due to the inevitable constant checking to see if the phone is still there from paranoia. At just £8.00 though, it seems rude not to try it at least once.

FAIRGROUND CANDY GRABBER Some would argue that this is the greatest gadget of all time. With a reminiscent feel harking back to childhood memories of “the claw”, this perfectly crafted sweet dispenser is the perfect way to end a section on Giving. Starting at only £20.00, this ideal gift is not only a giveaway, but a giving gadget by its very definition. As long as you’re willing to provide the sweets for the game, there are endless hours of fun to be had with this machine. This thing is also perfect for those who suffered torment at the hands of the toygrabbing machines that taunted us from the corner of every arcade and games room. Justice if finally served, as you can never lose, and it also provides perfect practice so that you can go out there and hook yourself the coveted iPod in every game.

LOMOGRAPHY SMARTPHONE FILM SCANNER Hipsters everywhere will shed silent tears of joy at the sight of this machine, and anyone with common sense, and old camera and a wallet that’s a bit too thin will join them. Since the dawn of the digital camera, picture film has become predominantly linked to festival-bound disposables and man draws. However, with the digital age being relatively young, it is generally true that the best childhood memories of the mid-to-late teen population were captured on film. However, that same mid-to-late teen population are now obsessed with the new phase of #TBT (Throwback Thursday), using their smartphones to upload pictures of themselves as children. But alas, those perfect memories can’t be transferred to our phones, no matter how smart they become. Or so we thought. Lomography have heard the cries of the desperate adolescent mob, and they have answered with the inventively titled Smartphone Film Scanner, allowing you to simply run the film through the smart, mobile machine straight onto your phone. No more will depressed, morose teenagers wonder the streets thanks to the torment from only being able to upload a pre-teen “throwback”.

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PHONE HOME

Sony Xperia Z2 Taking your mobile phone anywhere near water can be a dangerous business but not anymore! Among its many qualities, the Sony Xperia Z2 is completely waterproof, making it the ideal phone for both a rainy Isle of Man winter and a sunshine-filled summer on the beach!

Sony’s thinnest, sleekest handset to date also boasts a 20.7 megapixel camera that is capable of capturing stunning images of those moments you never want to forget, under or out of the water. Not only that, the new 4K video capture opens up a whole new world of remarkable detail that gives you video as you’ve never seen it before.

You’ll also have the best seat in the house, as the Z2 comes packed with over £80 worth of content from Sony; including six great movies, a selection of Playstation games and Michael Jackson’s posthumously released new album, Xscape. Free on the £46/m Sure Smart Ultimate plan.

The Z2’s photo editing features add fun to taking pics. Timeshift sends your videos into slow motion at a rate of 120fps whilst another new feature is background de-focus - which brings the subject of your photo into sharp detail and softens the busy background, a neat trick which makes for great shots. When it comes to imagery, this handset really does have a camera for every occasion! 4G ready and running on Android 4.4, syncing your data has never been easier and if you’re moving from another OS, you won’t need to worry about switching your files from your old handset. It also has an extremely powerful 2.3Ghz Snapdragon quad-core processor, meaning content will stream faster than it ever has before and looks incredible on the 5.2-inch full HD tri-luminous display.

HTC One (M8) Shiny, speedy and an altogether sexy proposition from HTC; the new HTC One (M8) has a very flattering and durable aluminium outer casing and a Super LCD 3 panel that is slightly larger than the screen on last year’s model, measuring in at 5” of 1080p full HD wonder. Colours are vivid, contrast is sharp and the overall performance of the phone is very impressive. Also, the scratch-resistant display screen automatically adjusts to ambient light for optimised viewing.

COME AND VISIT US IN ONE OF THE ISLE OF MAN SURE STORES TODAY. 35 STRAND STREET, DOUGLAS 4 ORCHARD WALK, PORT ERIN 10 PARLIMENT STREET, RAMSEY

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With the visual aspect of the phone covered, we now move on to the audio, an area where HTC have always covered themselves in glory. Their BoomSound dual speaker system has been improved from last year and the volume has been amplified by 25%. The sound is louder, deeper and altogether better. Also, HTC appreciate how their customers use their phones and, once again, have placed their speakers on the front of the phone so when you’re watching video all the sound is directed straight at you. Furthermore, if all that wasn’t enough, the speakers have a temperature-sensing control that automatically lowers power to protect against speaker damage from long-lasting use. Next up, we take a look at the HTC One (M8)’s camera and camera functions. Pan 360 gives users the ability to capture 180° x 360° panoramic photos, allowing you to capture the whole view. Another cool feature which the HTC One (M8) has is UFocus which allows you to bring blurry objects into focus before or after you take the photo! The HTC One (M8) features UltraPixels twice the average size to capture over 300% more light. Perfect photos in even the darkest of IoM nightclubs! The quad-core processor allows for some seriously quick speeds and smooth performance, even when multi-tasking, and the Android OS (KitKat) is the most up-to-date Android OS on the market. All of this means that the HTC One (M8) is quick, well supported, and as shiny on the inside as it is on the outside. FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO: WWW.MANXTELECOM.COM/SHOP, CALL 624 624, OR POP INTO THE STORE IN STRAND STREET.

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Bank when you want, day or night! Online and Mobile Banking, making things easier Wherever you are and whenever you need it, our Online and Mobile Banking is the secure way of taking control of your finances.

We’re making banking easier... ask us how! Call in to any branch iombank.com/helpfulbanking Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @iombank

Isle of Man Bank Limited (IOMB). Registered Company Number: 1 Isle of Man. Registered Office: 2 Athol Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM99 1AN. Licensed by the Financial Supervision Commission of the Isle of Man and registered with the Insurance and Pensions Authority in respect of general business. Customers of Isle of Man Bank are advised that The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (“RBS plc”) provide technology support to Isle of Man Bank’s Internet Banking service and this will enable RBS plc in the UK to access your account data. In subscribing for this service, you consent to and authorise this access. Customers of Isle of Man Bank are advised that National Westminster Bank plc (“NatWest plc”) provide technology support to Isle of Man Bank’s online banking service and this will enable NatWest plc in the UK to access your account data. In subscribing for this service, you consent to and authorise this access. Network charges may apply for Mobile Banking.


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choose

manx

the fastest mobile network

win

a limited edition Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

a Sony Xperia

Z1 compact

every day

worth

during TT 2014

£15,000

worth

£449

Make a call, use data or send a text on the manx network during the TT for a chance to win these great prizes. • open mobile settings • select network settings • scan for available networks • choose

manx

Conor Cummins, fastest Manxman around the TT course chooses Manx Telecom

Terms & conditions apply. All calls, data sessions and texts on the Manx Telecom network between 6th May 2014 to 5th June 2014, inclusive will be entered into the draw for a Honda Fireblade SP and one of ten Sony Xperia Z1 compacts. The winning numbers will be selected at random from all entries and the winners will be notified no longer than two weeks after the competition has closed. No purchase necessary; For one entry to the draw, send your name and day time telephone number to TT Competition, Manx Telecom Ltd, PO BOX 100, IM99 1HX. Promoter: Manx Telecom Ltd, Isle of Man Business Park, Cooil Road, Braddan, Isle of Man, IM99 1HX. See full terms and conditions at www.manxtelecom.com/ttcomp


G I O I E L L I

76 Strand Street, Douglas Isle of Man IM1 2EW

Tel 01624 690450

enquiries@wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk

www.wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk


Gallery | May 2014 | the GIVE issue