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Isle of Man Premier Magazine | no 50 | February 2016 | the [SOLO] issue

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Gallery is published eleven times a year as a fresh yet discerning guide to all that happens on the Island and beyond. Not too arty farty superior or too serious, written by you and enjoyed by people everywhere.

CONTRIBUTORS

WHO WE ARE

EDITORIAL

PUBLISHER

Clare Bowie Hannah Goodby Michelle Tonnesen Linda Huxley Anne Berry Jennifer Parkes Jessica Ledger Grant Runyon Les Able Suzy Holland Rebecca Lawrence Rachel Green Theo Leworthy Anne Moorhouse Leon Flemming Richard Evans Martin Fox

Steve Redford T: 07624 249249 steve@gallery.co.im ADVERTISING SALES

Bev Lawley T: 07624 415096 bev@gallery.co.im

AD SPACE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ACCOUNTS

accs@gallery.co.im T: 01624 619540 laura@gallery.co.im DESIGN STUDIO

design@gallery.co.im

ILLUSTRATIONS

Russ Atkinson Jon Moore Adam Berry Alex Probst

PAPARAZZI

T: 01624 619540 paparazzi@gallery.co.im DISTRIBUTION

T: 01624 619540 www.gallery.co.im/distribution distro@gallery.co.im GALLERY MAGAZINE

DESIGN STUDIO

Emma Cooke Steve Redford Russ Atikinson Alex Probst

PHOTOGRAPHY

Quay House, South Quay, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 5AR Tel: 01624 619540 www.gallery.co.im

Peter Kwiecinski Julian Simmonds Matt Mosur Brian Mitchell Phil Kneen

Recycle.

Gallery recycles all its storage and packing materials, boxes and any old magazines that are returned. We don’t get that many fortunately. We love to know our readers hang on to previous copies but when they take up too much space, drop them down to the recycling bins. If you want to find out more about recycling - call: 01624 686540. Don’t forget you cn view all previous issues on our website.

CALL 619540 TO FILL IT

Disclaimer. All rights reserved. Any form of reproduction of Gallery Magazine, in part or whole is strictly prohibited without the written consent of the publisher. Any views expressed by advertisers or contributors may not be those of the publisher. Unsolicited artwork, manuscripts and copy are accepted by Gallery Magazine, but the publisher cannot be held responsible for any loss or damage. All material, copy and artwork supplied is assumed to be copyright free unless otherwise advised. Contributions for Gallery should be emailed to editorial@gallery.co.im. Names have been changed to protect the innocent and no penguins were harmed in the manufacture of this magazine, you can’t prove nuffing. Why are you still reading the small print? How about researching what really makes the best paper aeroplane? Test them with your friends or colleagues, add a picture to our Facebook and we’ll send you some doughnuts.


EDITO

UPFRONT

#50 [SOLO] Isle of Man Premier Magazine | no 50 | February 2016 | the [SOLO] issue

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W E A LT H BUSINESS T E C H N O LO G Y

agenda

n

O N T H E AG E N DA n N O 17 n F E B R UA RY 2016

WORLD NEWS - WHY GLOBAL ECONOMIC DISASTER IS A N U N L I K E LY EVENT

W E A LT H - H O W T O INVEST LIKE JD ROCKEFELLER, THE RICHEST MAN wHO EVER LIVED

TECHNOLOGY - TEN DEVELOPMENTS I N D I G I TA L F I N A N C E

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hilst some of the Gallery staff are away travelling at the moment, the rest of the team have been rekindling our passion for creating magazines in time for this, the first edition of 2016.

Like it or lump it, there’s a day smack in the middle of this month that is widely and commonly devoted to devoting time to that one ‘special person’ you love (or people, if your religion and/or social circles allow), and that’s what our SOLO issue is all about.

TO LET

After December’s festivities and a cold miserable January, February is calculated to push lonely people over the edge through the most awful ‘special day’ of them all. Even if you steer clear of the gift shops Valentine’s Day is spaffed all over your social media experience in the form of a thousand Facebook posts from oversharing couples. This year is of course a leap year, are you thinking of popping the big question to your man? February 29th is the traditional day that women propose to men. But if you’re the type of woman to take over the proposal, you’re unlikely to be the type to be bound by convention, so really the whole year’s your oyster. So, you’ve made that restaurant reservation and written a pseudo-anonymous card already, right?

ARE YOU IN? You can also view paparazzi photos on our facebook page.

Don’t say we didn’t warn you. SR

FACEBOOK.COM/ GALLERYIOM

PUBLISHED WITH GUSTO IN THE ISLE OF MAN BY

Gallery, Agenda, Places, and Paparazzi are trading styles of 221 Media. Registered in the Isle of Man no. 125981C.

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WILKINS GEMSTONES of the MONTH With Valentine’s Day fast approaching thoughts turn to finding the perfect way to say “I love you”. We give thanks to Marylyn Monroe for her infamous phrase “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend” but what is there was another gemstone as equally deserving of this accolade?

Over the last few years the

Gemstone Morganite has seen an increase in popularity and demand; the soft pink hues pull at our romantic heart strings and when coupled with soft rose gold and sparkling diamonds there is little that we Ladies can say no to.

www.wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk

Discover something a little different when choosing the perfect gift; show the one you love just how much, with a piece of Morganite jewellery ...


La vie en rose... Although this pretty gemstone came into being millions of years ago, the name ‘Morganite’ is a relatively recent development. Before 1911 this gemstone was simply known as ‘pink beryl’ and not a gemstone in its own right. It was only in 1911, and on the suggestion of the New York Gemmologist G.F. Kunz, that the pink variety of beryl was promoted to the status of ‘Gemstone’ in its own right and named after the banker and mineral collection John Pierpont Morgan; thus ‘Morganite’ came into being. Morganite gemstones can now be found across the world with deposits in Brazil, Madagascar, Afghanistan and California, yet the stone still remains a rare find. The growing popularity of the stone has made it more readily available but fine quality Morganite jewellery still remains extremely exclusive. The most popular colour of Morganite used in fine jewellery is a pale, pastel pink colour but the gemstones range from deep orange to pink, to lilac or light violet.

This vast spectrum of colours ensures there is a colour to suit any skin tone and preference, and with a hardness of 7.5 to 8 on the Mohs scale the stone is extremely wearable for every day. At Wilkins the Jeweller we carefully hand pick our Morganite stones to ensure the very best in colour, cut and setting. We tend to choose pieces that have been set into 18ct rose gold as we feel that the soft colour of the gold really allows the colour of the gemstone to shine. Our pieces are beautifully finished with halos of sparkling diamonds, or diamond shoulders, creating unique pieces unlike any other on the Isle of Man. So this Valentine’s Day discover something a little different when choosing the perfect gift; show the one you love just how much with a piece of Morganite jewellery from Wilkins the Jeweller.

For more information on these beautiful pieces, or to try them on for yourself please contact our team in store. Or view our collection online at www. wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk

76 Strand Street, Douglas Isle of Man IM1 2EW T: 01624 690450 E: enquiries@wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk www.wilkinsthejeweller.co.uk

/Wilkinsjewellers


UPFRONT

CONTENTS FEATURE

TRAVEL

CULTURE

TRAVEL

CULTURE

BEST FOR CULTURE

Multiply this by 100 if you aren’t a drinker but have the apparently unreasonable desire to spend your downtime away from what I must diplomatically describe as “the distinctive sound of children having fun”. Your kids are great, and I really look forward to them wiping my bottom when I’m in a retirement home, but there are times when their natural exuberance could be toned down a little, and by a little I mean completely. That time is most of my weekend, and I know there are many parents who would also like to spend some time in the mystical Neverland where nobody is shrieking, fighting or making toilet in their underpants.

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ven after several centuries, Shakespeare’s plays continue to impress and entertain audiences worldwide with his works translated into more than 75 languages. This year though, attention will be firmly focused on his birthplace Stratford-upon-Avon, marking the 400th anniversary of his death on April 23 with a series of new openings and special exhibitions. Learn about Shakespeare’s personal life through artefacts on display at a re-imagining of his former family home, New Place, where he lived for the last 19 years of his life and wrote 26 major works. The new attraction has been billed as the single most significant project to commemorate the playwright’s legacy.

one eye on their squabbling offspring. Motivation from the man in the mirror You can also feel free to eat whatever you want, as another benefit of enjoying your own company is that you have plenty of time to burn off the calories by becoming an antisocial fitness obsessive. Tea, sport is a great way to meet other people, but it doesn’t really deliver the intense results of going to the gym any time the mood strikes you, and silently lifting weights like a ripped serial killer. If you don’t feel like looking at yourself in a mirror for hours then the gym might not be for you, so perhaps you can get yourself an expensive bicycle and drink deep on the lovely endorphins that your body will manufacture after five hours of climbing hills on your own, in the dark.

HANG SOLO WORDS Grant Runyon ILLUSTRATION Hermione Benest

The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) will be staging productions throughout the year, along with a new discovery tour, Page To Stage, giving a behind the scenes look at the famous playhouse and an opportunity to look inside the RSC’s store of 30,000 costumes. Visit: www.shakespeares-england.co.uk/ shakespeare-2016 for more information.

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t was in September last year, when driving past the ‘Jungle’ on his way back to the Calais ferry terminal from a European assignment, that Phil decided out of plain nosiness he wanted to find out more about this infamous camp, based on sand dunes in an area about three-quarters of a kilometre long and half a kilometre wide.

WORDS | Les Able

IN THE

Every new year brings a host of reasons to choose a destination. Here’s some ideas for you to consider...

JUNGLE

BEST FOR SAFARI BOTSWANA

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xcellent wildlife sightings, a commitment to conservation and a good range of luxury accommodation options make Botswana a top safari destination. Next year, on September 30, the country will celebrate 50 years of independence, prompting Lonely Planet to declare it the number one destination to visit in 2016.

BEST FOR ADVENTURE PERU

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eru has always been a bestseller in South America, and bookings are set to further soar when British Airways launch a new direct flight from Gatwick to Lima on May 4, from £561 return.

Discover the Okavango Delta, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, from the comfort of the newly renovated 12 tent Belmond Eagle Island Lodge, where activities include game drives and boat trips through the ever-changing waterways. The Okavango’s unusual topography has resulted in various animal adaptations, such as swimming lions. Stay at private concession Duba Plains, where film-makers Dereck and Beverly Joubert famously documented the resident pride who hunt buffalo in broad daylight.

Capital city Lima has a lively gourmet scene and boasts some of the continent’s top restaurants; experiment with flavours at award winning Central (centralrestaurante. com.pe/en/), where the menu is based on ingredients foraged from Peru’s different altitudes, or sample national dish ceviche (raw fish cured in citrus juice) at lunch only restaurant Chez Wong (facebook.com/ ChezJavierWong).

Botswana also has one of the highest populations of endangered wild dog and Belmond’s Khwai River Lodge, on the border of the Moremi Wildlife Reserve, is currently a good place to track them.

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Africa specialist, The Ultimate Travel Company (www. theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) tailor-make a one-week luxury safari from £7,515pp, with three nights at Duba Plains, followed by two nights at Khwai River Lodge and two nights at Eagle Island River Lodge. Includes meals, activities, transfers and flights from London.

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BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

“I’ve been told I’m a Left Winger because I am helping migrants, but there is nothing political or religious in my motivation, I just wanted to know more, it’s as simple as that.”

Then delve further into his past by visiting Shakespeare’s Schoolroom & Guildhall at King Edward VI School, where the Bard honed his writing skills. Following a major restoration, the 15th century building is open to the public for the first time.

WHERE TO GO IN 2016

“Your kids are great, and I really Businesses are in a tricky position, in that it makes better economic look forward to them wiping my sense to cater to the captive bottom when I’m in a retirement family market, and regardless of your position on the younger home, but there are times when No need to restrict yourself to local hills generation I think we can all either; one of the greatest benefits of their natural exuberance could be having agree that people who can keep total control over your free time toned down a little, and by a little I is that you aren’t restricted to staying children entertained deserve to be rewarded for the social benefit in the Island if you don’t feel like it. mean completely” they provide. The problem is You definitely have fewer weekend that the Island is so small that commitments, and probably have a there isn’t much room left to cater to Master pizza for one higher disposable income, so why not independently-minded people, or if you’re Cooking, oddly enough, is an activity that wander around somewhere new? Even if describing me behind my back, “the creepy really benefits from extended periods of hotels are out of your budget, you are still antisocial loner market”. The solution is solitude. This is useful if you live alone more easily accommodated by friends to take some advice which is, ironically, but like to eat well, because there’s only who can afford a couch rather than a spare most often handed out to bored youngsters so many dinner parties you can host, and bedroom, so travel the world as a couch by people who are tired of entertaining eating solo at fancy restaurants can be a bit surfer, or at the very least visit people them. Like grandad said, you have to make depressing. The lone gourmet might have who live in a part of the UK where fewer your own fun, and learn to enjoy your own nobody to share their culinary creations strangers turn out to be a blood relative. company - but where to start?  with at first, but stick to it and you’ll soon realise that this grants you the freedom You might not actually have friends abroad, Take up a hobby that requires to experiment in ways that you might which is perfectly fine, as you will simply extended concentration not consider if you had to worry about have more time available to hang out There are inspiring, dedicated people out not appalling or poisoning your dinner with interesting strangers. You can have there who manage to maintain a complex guests. You can cook weird things, and it long conversations about all the things hobby despite the demands of a family, but won’t matter how many times you botch you’ve learned in your unusual amount of for the most part getting properly stuck into complicated pastries. You will learn the free time, and show off the skills you’ve a hobby is something that is best enjoyed exact science of preparing small portions, mastered along the way. You might even if you have a very low level of interpersonal and the economy of leftovers. You can find that you find a set of strangers so commitments. The list is of things that savour each meal in quiet, meditative interesting that you don’t feel like coming are better when you don’t have to include contemplation, mindfully sampling each back, and as sole master of your destiny other people is extremely broad: writing, taste and texture like a zen master, or that decision is your to make. The only jigsaws, painting, jogging, video games, alternatively stuff yourself like a carefree guidelines are that you should probably sculpture, dressing your cat up as a character piggy. By the time you decide you feel like avoid joining a cult, an army, or a group of from a Jane Austen novel. What they all unleashing your culinary skills on other cannibals you met on the internet. There are have in common is that they blossom in people, you will have learned things that are many places I will go to to avoid a Sunday those extended periods of silence where probably beyond the majority of cooks who afternoon full of children screaming, but you are happily cut off from the world. need to keep one eye on a bubbling pot and Guantanamo Bay isn’t one of them. Yet.

THE BENEFITS O F E NJ OY ING YO UR OW N CO M PANY

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You don’t even need to spend your time actively creating anything, because you can rediscover the pleasure of learning about the world, quietly, from books, instead of having facts fired into your brain at a velocity great enough to break through the background noise of everyday life. There is a reason that so many scientific and artistic discoveries were made by intense, antisocial people, and if you have time to yourself you should relish the possibility that inspiration might fall onto your head from above. At the very least you might end up like me - devoid of real talent but having achieved a rare virtuosity in the field of toasted cheese sandwiches.

PHOTOGRAPHS (SHOT IN FILM) | Phil Kneen

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, WARWICKSHIRE

People with children often tell me how much they struggle to keep the whole family entertained. If you don’t want to vegetate together in front of a TV screen it can be nearimpossible to agree an alternative that will satisfy young and old alike. I do feel sorry for them, but what parents forget is that the Island is hardly overflowing with activities to satisfy the growing segment of society who don’t have kids or a partner to tag along this demographic might earn enough money to pay for themselves, but if you’re not in the mood for booze, sport or going on the pull your options can be severely limited.

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HOME

Inca citadel Machu Picchu is undoubtedly one of Peru’s highlights, ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

FEATURED PROPERTY

PHIL KNEEN’S “FANTASTIC” CHRISTMAS DAY COURTESY OF THE ‘JUNGLE’S’ AFGHAN KITCHEN

with passes for the popular Inca Trail selling out months in advance. Tourists now have more comfortable options for a stay in the Sacred Valley, allowing them time to acclimatise to higher altitudes and enjoy the scenery. Last year, Inkaterra opened the Hacienda Urubamba and in August Explora will launch new property Valle Sagrado on the site of an ancient corn plantation. Both can be reached by road from Cusco.

The squalid, unsanitary surroundings of the Calais ‘Jungle’, home to around 7,000 refugees and economic migrants, desperate to make it to Britain, would not be a location where most of us would choose to spend Christmas. But for Isle of Man-based documentary photographer Phil Kneen it proved to be the most memorable, although perhaps not the best festive experience!

The Ultimate Travel Company (www. theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) offers a 10-day private Highlights Of Peru tour visiting Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley from £3,125pp - saving £1,540 per couple if booked by February 29. Includes direct BA flights from London.

“As I drove past I couldn’t believe just how busy it was, some 200 people are continuing to arrive there each day, I wanted to know more,” said Phil. “I’m just stimulated by the whole migrant/refugee debate. I’ve been told I’m a Left Winger because I am helping migrants, but there is nothing political or religious in my motivation, I just wanted to know more, it’s as simple as that.” He added: “People say it’s mainly refugees in the camp, but it’s not, most are economic migrants who want to get to the UK to work with many admitting they want to get there for the ‘benefits’. Because of tightened security at the ferry port, however, it’s virtually impossible for them to now reach the UK.” On December 11 he arrived at the ‘Jungle’, along with a load of warm winter clothes for those living in the camp, donated locally as a result of an appeal once he had made up his mind to spend Christmas amid the inhospitable shacks and tents of the camp. He had, however, told his teenage daughter and two sons what he was planning for Christmas and if they weren’t happy he wouldn’t go but stay at home. “The reaction from all three was ‘you’ve got to go’.” Phil took as his assistant Geneva-based Calum Stewart who, after seeing Phil’s blog on what he was planning to do, asked if he could help him out at the ‘Jungle’. Their base was Phil’s motor home and all its mod cons of shower and toilet, parked on the outskirts of the camp, with mud making it impossible to take it any further.  “It’s the best piece of equipment I’ve ever bought, saved me a fortune,” said Phil.

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HARDWARE

HARDWARE

MOTORING NEWS RICHMOND HOUSE | 15 RICHMOND GROVE | DOUGLAS | £POA

technology

PORSCHE HAS CONFIRMED THAT THE 2016 BOXSTER WILL, FOR THE FIRST TIME, BE MORE EXPENSIVE THAN THE CAYMAN SISTER CAR, AS THE DUO RECEIVE A SIGNIFICANT MID-LIFE UPDATE AND NEW FOUR-CYLINDER TURBOCHARGED ENGINES

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he new ranges, dubbed 718 versus the outgoing model’s 918 designation, will be realigned to mirror the 911’s, where convertible models are more expensive by default. Previously, the more performance-focused Cayman was the pricier.

The Worlds Tech firms have high hopes for 2016 MERCEDES HAS KILLED OFF THE MUCH-LIKED SLK MODEL AND REPLACED IT WITH A REVISED CAR THE SLC.

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As part of the Stuttgart-based firm’s new naming structure, the SLC aligns with the C-Class in terms of size and architecture.

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his impressive 3/5 bedrooms, high quality property, has been lovingly renovated by the current owner. The property is located in a quite end of cul-de-sac position with private off road parking.

What’s more, the fabulous V8-powered SLK 55 AMG is no more, having been replaced with a bi-turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 with the name SLC 43.

The property is for-sale-by-owner, call (01624) 661992 to arrange a viewing.

Words: Richard Evans

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expectations of eye-catching technologies can be ahead of reality. Even if virtual and augmented reality do not flop they will have trouble living up to expectations. High prices — the company has said the headset will cost “up to $400”, though a bigger cost will be buying a PC capable of running the software — a shortage of content and applications, and uncertain consumer adoption of such a different technology cloud short-term prospects. Companies such as Facebook have been doing their best to talk down expectations, but 2016 will at least bring the first real glimpse of a computing platform with profound implications for entertainment, social interaction and work. Another future computing platform is likely to see a burst of innovation after a disappointing first wave. “Wearables” such as smartwatches were meant to extend mobile computing beyond smartphones and tablets to other, even more convenient, products. However, the two flagship

wearables of 2015 have not lived up to the hype surrounding them. The performance of the Apple Watch has been cloaked in uncertainty as the company has not provided firm sales numbers and Google’s Glass has gone back to the drawing board. Both are likely to appear in their second iterations in 2016. Optimists will point to the fact that the iPod and iPhone had only modest sales before hitting their stride in year two. But wearables have yet to develop must-have apps and the advances are now needed in the uses to which they can be put rather than in developing the hardware itself. If delivering a breakthrough product is hard to plan, the technological forces that make them possible are easier to trace. In the same way that cheap sensors, powerefficient processors and higher-bandwidth mobile networks made the iPhone possible, a number of factors are pushing what is likely to be one of the defining technologies of 2016 and beyond: artificial intelligence. The largely invisible nature of AI

ON THE AGENDA

means predicting how it will affect popular consciousness is as much a sociological as a technological challenge. Two years ago, a wave of anxiety spread that intelligent machines would put humans out of work. The same concerns were rife in the 1960s, but AI technologies are now advancing quickly. Cloud computing power and new approaches to machine learning, with the “big data” that act as the raw material for AI systems to “learn” from, have combined to bring a leap forward in machine intelligence. Some of the planet’s richest, most ambitious companies have hired top academic talent — such as Facebook, which in 2013 hired Yann LeCun, a computer scientist who founded the Center for Data Science at New York University — signalling something of an AI race is under way. The results of this competition will be largely hidden from view. Many AI advances will come in the form of improved performance of existing systems or in

TECHNOLOGY

more effective man-machine interactions, rather than new products or services. Voice activation is likely to feature on more devices, along with more intelligent forms of interaction. Businesses that learn how to use the technology should create more effective advertising, enjoy a higher conversion of leads into sales, and have happier customers. However, the last thing most of these businesses will do is brag. Results will be seen in the gulf between the performance of companies that harness this technology and those that do not. The tendency with technology is to always look forward to the next big thing, so it is easy to forget the big thing that is already here. As we enter 2016 the smartphone age has reached a turning point. About 2bn of us have them, making these devices far more pervasive than personal computers ever were. Their popularity has put tablets and wearables in the shade. The smartphone revolution is likely to continue. Room for growth in the

developed world and China — which have driven expansion — is running out. The focus is moving to India and other developing markets, forcing a shift in the basis of competition. Low-cost handsets and subsidised data plans are becoming the norm, along with networking technologies to help businesses reach the next few billion customers. Google’s Project Loon — a necklace of highaltitude, globe-circling balloons acting as satellites — will be tested, with three mobile networks in Indonesia planning to use them for internet access. China’s slowing domestic economy, meanwhile, means its few leading internet companies could consider moving aggressively beyond their borders for the first time. These forces will make 2016 a year of changing international perspectives. In 12 months’ time, the technologies may still look familiar, but the markets for them and the providers of them may well be very different.

agenda

There will be two turbocharged 2.0-litre petrol versions with 181bhp and 241bhp respectively, diesel fans a 2.1-litre 201bhp unit.

The property comprises… n Spacious, double fronted period townhouse over 4 floors n Completely renovated and modernised by current owner to a very high standard n Centrally located - minutes from town centre, schools, bus routes etc

Only the 181bhp SLC 200 will have a manual gearbox. The SLC 300, 250d and 43 AMG will use a nine-speed automatic as standard.

n Roof top sun terrace overlooking Douglas bay n Enclosed, gated rear yard with vehicular access

conservation initiative in Meru National Park, Kenya.

Mercedes has moved the SLC away from outright performance and sportiness to focus more on infotainment and safety. Automatic emergency braking has been introduced, with a five-mode LED headlight system optional. Mapping for the COMAND Online infotainment system is now topographical, while with a compatible smartphone connected it can access internet radio, online apps and more. Text messages can be read aloud and there are two USB ports for charging phones or connecting music devices. The electrically folding hard top roof can now be opened or closed at up to 25mph or so, and in a stroke of genius the boot

divider, which prevents the mechanism fouling any luggage and has always been a manually-operated chore, has now been automated. With the roof up there is an impressive 335 litres of boot space.

The Defender 2,000,000 has a number of distinctive features including an engraved map of Red Wharf Bay - where the design for the original Land Rover was first drawn in the sand, and a unique ‘no 2,000,000’ badge, with both elements repeated inside. A bespoke aluminium plaque, signed by everyone who helped to assemble the vehicle is fitted to the driver’s seat. It also wears S90 HUE registration plates, referencing the first ever pre-production Land Rover, registration ‘HUE 166’.

Prices are expected to be confirmed closer to spring, but will move upwards from the outgoing SLK’s current entry price of £33,020, which buys a diesel in base trim.

Porsche has set no date for the arrival of downsized engines but says they are definitely coming, with ‘equally powerful’ versions for both cars. The choice of 718 for the new car is linked to the success of the 718 from the late 1950s, which was a multiple racewinning four-cylinder machine that took the honours in two Targa Florio races, numerous hill climbs and even the Sebring 12-hour race in 1960. The German firm also makes reference to the current 919 Hybrid World Endurance Championship-winning car, which uses a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbocharged engine. This technology, Porsche says, directly influenced the development of the 718 series. Both the Boxster and the Cayman are to be introduced through 2016, with a likely global début at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

n Solid oak kitchen with French doors to balcony n Luxury master bedroom and en-suite with double Jacuzzi bath and large shower

n Ideal for working from home with top floor studio/office space

n Oil fired central heating with Megaflo hot water system

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n Additional external storeroom (double garage sized)

n Quiet, end of cul-de-sac position with private, off road parking for up to 3 vehicles and residents permit parking on street as well

n Huge lower ground floor with double doors and natural light, suitable for games room, gym, workshop, storage etc

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UPFRONT Edito..........................................................................5 Wilkins Watch of The Month..............6 The Joy of self love............................10 What’s On................................................12 Hang SOLO.............................................14 News in Numbers................................16 Give.........................................................................17

THERE’S GOOD NEWS FOR ANYONE WHO LIKES THEIR CONVERTIBLE CARS WITH AN ADDED HELPING OF TINY, BECAUSE SMART HAS CONFIRMED AN OPEN-TOP FORTWO

For further information or to arrange a viewing please telephone (01624) 661992

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

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he minuscule 2.69-metre ForTwo Cabrio is destined for showrooms anytime now, complete with a triplelayer fabric roof that can be electrically lowered or raised in 12 seconds, at any vehicle speed.

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It keeps the same amazing 6.95-metre turning circle thanks to thin tyres and a rearmounted engine, making it more manoeuvrable in town than a traffic warden on a bike.

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

APPETITE Recipes...............................................................40 Wine Talk..........................................................42 AGENDA.......................................................43

CULTURE PAPARAZZI Culture Vulture...........................................28 Are you in?...................................................102 Culture News................................................29

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Monthly Upload........................................30 Phil Kneen - In The Jungle.............34 My Name is.....................................................38

EVENTS 50th Birthday Party....................................24 PLACES..........................................................79 Jane Andrasi’s Wedding Day............25 HARDWARE Motoring News............................................96 TRAVEL Where to go in 2016..................................24 Gadgets..............................................................98

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THE BEST PLACE TO FIND A NEW PLACE IN THE ISLE OF MAN TO LET

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agenda BUSINESS NEWS, VIEWS AND COMMENTS

W E A LT H BUSINESS T E C H N O LO G Y

agenda

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O N T H E AG E N DA n N O 17 n F E B R UA RY 2016

WORLD NEWS - WHY GLOBAL ECONOMIC DISASTER IS A N U N L I K E LY EVENT

W E A LT H - H O W T O INVEST LIKE JD ROCKEFELLER, THE RICHEST MAN wHO EVER LIVED

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Sold to a bidder from Qatar, all proceeds from the sale are being donated to Land Rover charity partners, including the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Born Free Foundation, who plan to use the funds to support the ‘Project Lion Rover’ wildlife

he special version, called ‘Defender 2,000,000’ was built in May 2015 by a number of brand ambassadors and notable people from the history of Land Rover, including Bear Grylls, Virginia McKenna OBE and Stephen and Nick Wilks, sons of the founders of Land Rover.

It is worth remembering that big technological leaps do not happen quickly. Nokia’s 9000 Communicator packed email, web browsing and fax into a phone in the mid-1990s, while the iPhone, launched in 2007, came after more than a decade of developments.

ith hindsight, such breakthroughs seem to have been inevitable. But false dawns abound — and 2016 is likely to have more than its fair share of them. In a period of abundant experimentation, the challenge will be telling which are harbingers of shifts in work and personal life and which are deadends in technology evolution. This year may begin with a bang, with the mass-market launch of a staple of science fiction, virtual reality (VR) headsets. Facebook’s Oculus Rift will finally hit the market in the first quarter, following Samsung’s introduction of its own VR headsets, also using Oculus technology, this year. Before the end of 2016, augmentedreality goggles from Magic Leap and Microsoft, which overlay virtual images on to a view of the real world, could also become available. The much-hyped arrival of 3D television three years ago is a reminder of how

It’s not clear yet whether the Boxster will simply become much more expensive or whether the two models will swap price points, with the Cayman becoming cheaper.

A UNIQUE VERSION OF THE ICONIC LAND ROVER DEFENDER, AND THE 2,000,000TH EXAMPLE EVER BUILT HAS SOLD AT AUCTION FOR £400,000

TECHNOLOGY - TEN DEVELOPMENTS I N D I G I TA L F I N A N C E

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


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WORDS Grace Ryan ILLUSTRATION Josh Bale


FEATURE

It’s at this time of year, when I’m done tweezing smashed baubles out of my feet and the garden reeks of dead Minions and rotting pine needles, that I can take the time to reflect on what Christmas means to me. The dog is no longer dressed as a reindeer, the post-NYE court summons are on their way and I’m temporarily low enough on gin that I can reflect on the reason for the season. Christmas isn’t just about mince pie bloat or hoverboard injuries, sexual harassment at the office party and getting punched by a drunk aunt, but about friends, family and lovers. Specifically, it’s about encouraging people who have those things to spend loads of money on them and making those people who don’t feel like they’ve failed at life. “What’s wrong with you?” we say with a passive-aggressive pity face “you haven’t got anybody to enjoy the X Factor final with. Even Adele has a partner, and she can’t stop bellowing about the last one.” Poor singletons, says society, you are missing out. But is that really the case? After December’s festivities and a cold miserable January, February is calculated to push lonely people over the edge through the most awful ‘special day’ of them all. Even if you steer clear of the gift shops Valentine’s Day is spaffed all over your social media experience in the form of a thousand Facebook posts from oversharing couples. Well, my single friends, before you get too slighted by these public displays of affection, take a minute to think to yourself why anybody feels the need to remind you how happy they are. Consider why Christmas is often about spending money you don’t have and enduring the company of people you’d rather stuff with sausage meat and roast in the oven. Look deep into the eyes of that smiling couple with their selfie stick in Venice, Paris or Port Erin - can you see that tiny glint of desperation? Humanity’s squalid little secret is that most people can barely tolerate each other. We’re often just afraid of being alone, and if oversharing couples were honest they’d snap the selfie stick, take back their kooky wedding vows and run to opposite ends of the earth whilst the children are in the soft play. Misery loves company Now, before a raging Valentine’s mob BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

storms my house with satin pitchforks and does something unspeakable with an Anne Summers goodie bag, I should make it clear that I’m not saying this about all couples. I’m happily married to another hater, so there’s no reason for me not to believe that your Kylie and Tyson 4 Eva car sticker and matching neck tattoos spell true love (even if you can’t personally spell it). You might even have pushed out a few babies, which is totally a sign that you are soul-mates and has nothing to do with biological imperative or the unreliability of contraception. No, I’m just talking about those other couples, the annoying ones. The ones who don’t stop going on about it. Not you. Put down the strawberry lube and get out of my garden. I’ll concede it’s unfailingly impressive that anybody manages to spend all their free

before you find one you don’t want to kill. I’ve spent enough time minding my own business to remember how much it can stink, but unless you are Beyonce-level sexy you might as well get used to the odd stretch where the phrase ‘significant other’ refers to your texting hand. I’d go as far as to say you’re a fool if you don’t try and enjoy the benefits offered by single life. Use the toilet with the door open, drink beer in the shower and break wind wherever you feel like it. Eat and sleep any time it feels appropriate, go out whenever the opportunity presents itself and go home with whoever you want. Even if you aren’t successful on that front there’s this wonderful thing called the internet that will keep you ‘entertained’ for hours, doesn’t care when you don’t feel like making conversation afterwards and won’t expect you to cook breakfast for anybody other

“After December’s festivities and a cold miserable January, February is calculated to push lonely people over the edge through the most awful ‘special day’ of them all.” time with another human without murdering them in their sleep, but what smug couples don’t realise is that it’s equally admirable being able to enjoy your own company and to have a meaningful existence without it revolving around another person. This might come as a shock to people in TRUE LOVE but many people can enjoy films, beaches and art galleries without needing to exchange saliva every five minutes. They can have conversations with friends without texting or referring to their partner/ children nonstop, and with practice can even experience a normal range of human emotions without yoyoing between total adoration and that special shouty rage that only people in a long-term relationship can truly summon. Obviously the ideal mental state is somewhere between the thighs of obsessive coupledom and utter self-reliance, but there’s a conspiracy to convince us that it’s an all-or-nothing proposition. Either marry somebody, pump out 2.4 kids and learn to adore their morning breath and hairy back, or die alone and sexually frustrated, unmourned in a filthy hovel full of vodka and cats. Happiness is somewhere in the middle Being bonded to another human undeniably has its good points, but if you’re halfway normal there will be long periods in your life where you aren’t. Just remember it probably isn’t a reflection on you, because people are terrible idiots and you have to burn through a lot of them

than yourself. Just keep it legal and clear your browser history if Mum comes round to check you haven’t drowned in your own dirty laundry. The most important thing you need to remember is that you need to try hard enough to get what you want, but not hard enough that you lose all sense of yourself. This advice is true when you’re on your own, but lots of people quickly forget that it’s still true when you’ve been married sixty years and know your partner inside out in gross ways that you probably didn’t anticipate when you still had all your own teeth. If I’ve learned anything about enjoying the company of other humans it has nothing to do with mawkish Christmas feely-fests and Valentine’s day schmaltz, it’s more likely I passed out in front of the telly and picked up some subliminal wisdom from RuPaul’s Drag Race or Peep Show. Breathe deep and tell yourself - you too can be happy. As long as you ignore social propaganda and come to accept that, like me, your definition of true love might be as simple as finding a person who you can hear chewing a steak without wanting to ram them in the eye with a fork. Happy Valentine’s Day.

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UPFRONT

WHAT’S ON

LOCAL WHAT’S ON

FEBRUARY FEBRUARY

now – 19.03.2016

DUKE OF EDINBURGH AWARDS 60TH ANNIVERSARY

//HOUSE OF MANNAN// A community-led exhibition marking the 60th anniversary of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, sharing photos, memorabilia and stories from past and present participants. Daily 10am – 5pm www.manxnationalheritage.im    

23.04.16 - 18.09.2016

HOPE IN THE GREAT WAR

//HOUSE OF MANANNAN, PEEL// This exhibition celebrates timeless courage during the First World War, telling the story of six heroic RNLI rescues, with family friendly interactive displays. Find out about the eff ects of ward on Manx RNLI crews and how the Isle of Man managed to crew and maintain six RNLI lifeboat stations in the middle of the war zone that was the Irish Sea. A touring exhibition from Royal National Lifeboat Institution, funded by Arts Council England. www.manxnationalheritage.im

27.02.2016 now – 16.4.2016

HEROES

//MANX MUSEUM, DOUGLAS// Discover the stories of nine Vikings who were legends of their time in this touring exhibition from York. Monday – Saturday, 10am-5pm www.manxnationalheritage.im

SKANCO 5km FUN RUN/ WALK

//DOUGLAS PROM// If your new year’s resolution was to get fit and start running, this is for you - the second of this year’s fun runs organised by SKANCO and Up & Running. Everyone welcome, from complete beginners to seasoned competitors.  Sign on up until 26 February at: http://my6.raceresult. com/46184/registration?lang=en

06.02.2016 – 10.04.2016

THEY CAME FROM THE DEEP BLUE SEA

//HOUSE OF MANANNAN, PEEL// Vikings are the theme of Danish artist Susanne Thea’s exhibition of prints featuring the Balltle of Clontarf in Ireland in AD1014 when thousands of Vikings were killed and the Irish lost a king, murdered by the leader of the Manx Vikings. Early manuscripts and sagas provide the basis for Susanne’s work which makes use of 400-year-old graphic and printing techniques. www.manxnationalheritage.im

20.02.2016

THE NEXT BIG THING

//GAIETY THEATRE, DOUGLAS// Junior Achievement presents their annual talent competition ‘The Next Big Thing’, sponsored by Paragon Recruitment, Energy FM and Zurich International Life. Previous winners include singers Jenny Hill and Mae Challis, and gymnastic troupe Asteria. www.thenextbigthing.im

26.02.2016 – 27.02.2016

MOSCOW STATE CIRCUS //GAIETY THEATRE, DOUGLAS// An awe inspiring new show from what is billed the ‘World’s most famous circus’. A place where dreams become reality. Matinee and evening performances. www.villagaiety.com

Culture Vulture See p28

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


UPFRONT

I WANT TO BE ALONE! The 14 painful struggles of being an introvert Words: Clare Bowie.

1 The words, “team” and “building”, in the same sentence make your blood run instantly cold. 2 Small talk is not your thing! It usually goes; “How’s things?” Good, you? Good thanks. Good... *silence* 3. You get the sweats when a leaving card is passed round work and you have to think of something witty, interesting, personal and snappy, yet charming, to say... “Good Luck” it is then.

7. In your world “ice-breakers” should be re-labelled as “heart, body, spirit and soul breakers”. If only you were being melodramatic, sigh.

spend so long fretting over the feasibility of excuses and possible escape scenarios that it would have been easier to just say “yes, meet you at 8”.

8. You get mad when people interrupt your solo time. Is it not obvious that reading a book or listening to music is the equivalent of a “Do not disturb” sign, not a conversation starter?? Kindly re-direct your small talk elsewhere!

12. You don’t really care which discs you’d take to the desert island. The solitude of the island, with or without music, is good enough for you.

4. Virginia Woolf had it sussed when she talked about having a “room of one’s own” but you’d settle for even an hour of one’s own. Just one hour to escape the incessant chatting!

9. People sometimes think you’re shy, boring, a moody people hater or a pushover just because you don’t feel the need to fill the room with your personality and life story. Your world is more of a small platform in the corner than a stage thank you very much.

5. The trappings of winter time can be handy. You’re secretly pleased when you get a sore throat.., “I would talk to you but..” *points dramatically to throat*. Plus, all those big scarves and hats provide great armour. If you can’t really see out maybe people can’t really see in. Right?

10. School run, Christmas Fairs and Sports Days are exhausting for you, so many opportunities for pleasantries and not a drop of alcohol to ease the pain. Your discomfort in group situations is so bad that you’d rather perform Karaoke naked than join the PTA.

6. The Lord Grantham projectile blood incident from Downton Abbey still makes you feel panicky. So much attention focused on one person, oh the shame, the horror!

11. You love spending time with friends in small groups but too many invitations can send your mind into excuse overdrive. You

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

13. You’re probably the only person in the airport who loves the new automated checkin desks. It’s an oasis in the agony of the airport arena. So many people everywhere; and there’s “people-patting” in security which almost makes you want to puke blood yourself. 14. The relief when you shut your front door at the end of the day is even greater than the relief you felt the day you discovered online banking and self service check-outs. Now back off everyone and stop asking if I’m ok. Ok?!  

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HANG SOLO THE B ENEFI TS OF ENJ OY I N G YO U R OW N CO M PAN Y WORDS Grant Runyon ILLUSTRATION Hermione Benest


FEATURE

People with children often tell me how much they struggle to keep the whole family entertained. If you don’t want to vegetate together in front of a TV screen it can be nearimpossible to agree an alternative that will satisfy young and old alike. I do feel sorry for them, but what parents forget is that the Island is hardly overflowing with activities to satisfy the growing segment of society who don’t have kids or a partner to tag along this demographic might earn enough money to pay for themselves, but if you’re not in the mood for booze, sport or going on the pull your options can be severely limited. Multiply this by 100 if you aren’t a drinker but have the apparently unreasonable desire to spend your downtime away from what I must diplomatically describe as “the distinctive sound of children having fun”. Your kids are great, and I really look forward to them wiping my bottom when I’m in a retirement home, but there are times when their natural exuberance could be toned down a little, and by a little I mean completely. That time is most of my weekend, and I know there are many parents who would also like to spend some time in the mystical Neverland where nobody is shrieking, fighting or making toilet in their underpants.

You don’t even need to spend your time actively creating anything, because you can rediscover the pleasure of learning about the world, quietly, from books, instead of having facts fired into your brain at a velocity great enough to break through the background noise of everyday life. There is a reason that so many scientific and artistic discoveries were made by intense, antisocial people, and if you have time to yourself you should relish the possibility that inspiration might fall onto your head from above. At the very least you might end up like me - devoid of real talent but having achieved a rare virtuosity in the field of toasted cheese sandwiches.

one eye on their squabbling offspring. Motivation from the man in the mirror You can also feel free to eat whatever you want, as another benefit of enjoying your own company is that you have plenty of time to burn off the calories by becoming an antisocial fitness obsessive. Tea, sport is a great way to meet other people, but it doesn’t really deliver the intense results of going to the gym any time the mood strikes you, and silently lifting weights like a ripped serial killer. If you don’t feel like looking at yourself in a mirror for hours then the gym might not be for you, so perhaps you can get yourself an expensive bicycle and drink deep on the lovely endorphins that your body will manufacture after five hours of climbing hills on your own, in the dark.

“Your kids are great, and I really Businesses are in a tricky position, in that it makes better economic look forward to them wiping my sense to cater to the captive bottom when I’m in a retirement family market, and regardless of your position on the younger home, but there are times when No need to restrict yourself to local hills generation I think we can all one of the greatest benefits of their natural exuberance could be either; agree that people who can keep having total control over your free time toned down a little, and by a little I is that you aren’t restricted to staying children entertained deserve to be rewarded for the social benefit in the Island if you don’t feel like it. mean completely” they provide. The problem is You definitely have fewer weekend that the Island is so small that commitments, and probably have a there isn’t much room left to cater to Master pizza for one higher disposable income, so why not independently-minded people, or if you’re Cooking, oddly enough, is an activity that wander around somewhere new? Even if describing me behind my back, “the creepy really benefits from extended periods of hotels are out of your budget, you are still antisocial loner market”. The solution is solitude. This is useful if you live alone more easily accommodated by friends to take some advice which is, ironically, but like to eat well, because there’s only who can afford a couch rather than a spare most often handed out to bored youngsters so many dinner parties you can host, and bedroom, so travel the world as a couch by people who are tired of entertaining eating solo at fancy restaurants can be a bit surfer, or at the very least visit people them. Like grandad said, you have to make depressing. The lone gourmet might have who live in a part of the UK where fewer your own fun, and learn to enjoy your own nobody to share their culinary creations strangers turn out to be a blood relative. company - but where to start?  with at first, but stick to it and you’ll soon realise that this grants you the freedom You might not actually have friends abroad, Take up a hobby that requires to experiment in ways that you might which is perfectly fine, as you will simply extended concentration not consider if you had to worry about have more time available to hang out There are inspiring, dedicated people out not appalling or poisoning your dinner with interesting strangers. You can have there who manage to maintain a complex guests. You can cook weird things, and it long conversations about all the things hobby despite the demands of a family, but won’t matter how many times you botch you’ve learned in your unusual amount of for the most part getting properly stuck into complicated pastries. You will learn the free time, and show off the skills you’ve a hobby is something that is best enjoyed exact science of preparing small portions, mastered along the way. You might even if you have a very low level of interpersonal and the economy of leftovers. You can find that you find a set of strangers so commitments. The list is of things that savour each meal in quiet, meditative interesting that you don’t feel like coming are better when you don’t have to include contemplation, mindfully sampling each back, and as sole master of your destiny other people is extremely broad: writing, taste and texture like a zen master, or that decision is your to make. The only jigsaws, painting, jogging, video games, alternatively stuff yourself like a carefree guidelines are that you should probably sculpture, dressing your cat up as a character piggy. By the time you decide you feel like avoid joining a cult, an army, or a group of from a Jane Austen novel. What they all unleashing your culinary skills on other cannibals you met on the internet. There are have in common is that they blossom in people, you will have learned things that are many places I will go to to avoid a Sunday those extended periods of silence where probably beyond the majority of cooks who afternoon full of children screaming, but you are happily cut off from the world. need to keep one eye on a bubbling pot and Guantanamo Bay isn’t one of them. Yet.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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UPFRONT

NEWS

in

NUMBERS

75

New government figures show unemployment rose sharply in December jumping 75 from 786 to 861.

29th February - the date it is traditional for women to propose marriage to their boyfriends.

2

incomplete adult skeletons were uncovered during archaeological fieldwork at Creggans Hill on December 11th.

9.5%

is the amount fuel and lighting costs fell in the twelve months to December 2015 according to the Government’s Retail Prices Index. However, the cost of beef went up by 6.5% in the same period. (Consumer Price Index)

500 16

A masked offender threatened a female shop assistant with a knife at the SPAR store in Willaston before fleeing with £500 in cash.

80 6

The government is looking to reduce the drink/drive limit from the maximum blood alcohol level of 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood to 50mg. If the plans are approved it means the Island will follow the lead of Scotland and many European countries.

970

February Castle Rushen and Rushen Abbey open to the public (weekends only) until Easter when all seasonal Manx National Heritage Sites will then open for the summer.

970mm of rain fell in 2015, 48.4mm of it on 3 December. It was also the windiest year since 1994 but the 5th sunniest year on record. (Isle of Man Met Office)

£750,000 the cost of a new road bridge in Laxey to replace the one damaged then dismantled in the December storm. If planning is agreed, and there are no objections, the new bridge should be in place by TT.

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


OUR COMMUNITY

UPFRONT

GIVE

Fancy a ride in a Purple Rolls Royce for charity?

Sure competition winner pays it forward

The children’s hospice Rebecca House is a member of a UK-based organisation called Together for Short Lives. As part of this membership they will take part in a fundraising and awareness campaign called Ready To Roll which involves the use of a purple Rolls Royce being on the Island for a week between 14th21st March 2016. The car comes complete with a local driver who will be a chauffeur for trips out. So we are asking you what you would like to do with this beautiful vehicle? Is it someone special’s birthday? Do you fancy getting dropped off at the airport or picked up? Are you going to see Oklahoma at the Gaiety? Why not ring us up and make a reservation which will include a lovely donation to Rebecca House. Half of the final amount raised goes to Together for Short Lives. www. readytoroll.org.uk. To make your reservation during tel: 647433 or email: amy. davenport@ hospice.org.im

A local man was treated to an early Christmas gift from Sure when he won a brand new 40” smart TV, but he decided to gift the TV instead of keeping it. Steve Crowther won the 40” Samsung curved TV after entering Sure’s Christmas competition and being drawn at random as the winner. Instead of keeping the TV for himself Steve decided it would make the perfect Christmas gift for his mother, Nadene Crowther MBE. Mrs Crowther is a well-known figure in the island having co-founded Hospice Care Isle of Man and worked for the organisation for many years.  The competition was run in Sure’s shops throughout December and required entrants to fill in a form to be in with a chance of winning.

Andy Fairweather Low and the Low Riders to return with Steam Packet company support Respected musician Andy Fairweather Low and his band the Low Riders will make a hotly-anticipated return to the Isle of Man with support from the Steam Packet Company.

Andy, who enjoyed chart success with hits like If Paradise Is (Half as Nice) and Wide Eyed and Legless, played to a packed Centenary Centre in Peel in 2013.

Sarah Jarvis, marketing and PR manager for Sure, said: “In-store competitions always generate a bit of excitement and we’d like to thank all those who took part. “Steve and his family gifting the TV to his mother is a fantastic story and we’d like to congratulate them on winning and having the generosity to pass on their good fortune.”

Organiser David McLean said the show was so popular that there had been huge demand for a return. He explained: ‘Rarely in the 12 years that the centre has been running has there been a band that garnered so much praise and requests for a return performance. ‘If you want an evening guaranteed to bring you the best in blues, R&B and pop don’t miss this gig.’ The concert takes place on 2nd July, and the Steam Packet Company is assisting with the cost of travel for the band. Steam Packet Company Chief Executive Mark Woodward said: ‘The Centenary Centre is a registered charity which works hard to bring a wide variety of world-class performers to the Isle of Man, ensuring local fans can enjoy intimate shows by exceptional talents. ‘It is a great venue for the west of the Island, and we’re pleased to be able help them welcome Andy Fairweather Low back to the Centenary Centre.’ www.centenarycentre.com

Celton Manx sponsors Easter Festival of Running

Celton Manx is to sponsor the Easter Festival of Running for the fourth year in succession. The three-day festival opens on Good Friday March 25 in Port Erin, moves to Peel on the Saturday and to Douglas promenade on Easter Sunday. Entries in 2015 were the highest in the 53-year history of the event, which attracted some 300 visitors to the Island. www.easterfestival.info Closing date for www.easterfestival.info. entries is March 13.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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UPFRONT

OUR COMMUNITY

HELEN TAKES THE HELM AT ONE WORLD CHARITY CHALLENGE

COULD YOU SPARE A FEW HOURS TO HELP MANX BLIND WELFARE SOCIETY? Manx Blind Welfare Society is looking for people who have a few hours to spare to volunteer at its new shop, The VIP Store. The shop in Strand Street, Douglas, opened in November and has proved a great success. The Society is now hoping more volunteers will come forward to support the small team who ran the store over the festive season. The Office Manager at Manx Blind Welfare Society, Kerry Macduffie, who is co-ordinating the shop project, said: ‘We have some exciting plans for The VIP Store in 2016 and would love to hear from anyone who could spare the time to get involved. ‘The aim of the shop is to provide a sustainable source of income which can support the Society’s work with blind and visually impaired people here in the Isle of Man. By volunteering a few hours of your time at The VIP Store you will be directly contributing to helping us continue to deliver the free services and support that many people rely on. ‘Even if you only have a little time to spare, just a few hours could make all the difference.’ There are a range of volunteering opportunities including serving at the till, putting out stock, sorting through donations and transporting items to the shop from the Society’s headquarters, Corrin Court in Onchan. Volunteers are also needed to pick up clothing donations from collection points at Onchan Commissions and in Onchan Park. You don’t need any experience as full training will be given, but it would be helpful if you can work independently or with limited supervision. To find out more call 674727 or visit The VIP Store in Strand Street, Douglas. The VIP Store sells good quality pre-owned clothes, books, ornaments and small items of furniture. The name has been chosen as VIP not only means Very Important Person, but is also shorthand used for Visually Impaired Person. To find out more about the work of MBWS, visit www.facebook. com/manxblindwelfaresociety

This year’s One World Charity Challenge steps up a gear this month as the students involved return to school and start working in earnest on their presentations. The high profile competition for Year 12 students aims to give youngsters an understanding of international development issues as they work with a chosen charity that operates overseas. Although the competition is now in its ninth year, this is the first year at the helm for Charity Challenge Co-ordinator Helen Kneale who recently took over from the previous co-ordinator Jenni Kneale (no relation!). Helen, who lives in Regaby with her husband and two teenage sons, has a long-standing interest in international development issues which dates back to the time she spent as a student herself at the UWC Atlantic College in Wales, courtesy of an Isle of Man Government scholarship. “Being with students from so many different cultures made me understand much more about the differences but more importantly the similarities between people from different backgrounds,” says Helen. “While I was at the College, I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to travel to Sri Lanka, where I undertook some voluntary work in an orphanage, clearing drainage ditches and helping with a medical clinic. “Seeing another, very different, culture at first hand when I was 16 - the same age as the students undertaking the One World Charity Challenge - had a great effect on me, particularly seeing the contrast in living standards between people in the Isle of Man and those in the developing world. “It made me more aware that things we take for granted, such as clean drinking water, are not automatically available everywhere in the world.” Helen believes the One World Charity Challenge competition offers other valuable lessons for the participating students: “The youngsters involved learn many transferable skills, including time management, research, team-work and presentation skills. It is great for the students to include on their CVs and University applications, as this scheme is unique in the British Isles and will therefore be a really good talking point for anyone wishing to go on to further education or get a job off-island.” “I will also be organising the Charity Challenge final at the Manx Museum in March and I am looking forward to seeing the finished presentations!” The One World Charity Challenge is run by the One World Centre with funding from the H&S Davidson Trust. Each student team which takes part has the opportunity to win a cash prize for their chosen charity, the actual amount being dependent on the standard of their presentations. In recent years the Isle of Man Government’s International Development Committee has also supported the event and provided matched funding.

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


events


EVENTS

JANE ANDRASI 50TH BIRTHDAY PARTY CELEBRATIONS

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ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


Location: Vagabonds Rugby Club

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

dollsfactory.net

EVENTS

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EVENTS

PETER & ADELE HUDSON’S WEDDING DAY

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Location: Christ Church & The Palace Hotel Photos: dollsfactory.net

ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


travel


TRAVEL

WHERE TO GO IN 2016

Every new year brings a host of reasons to choose a destination. Here’s some ideas for you to consider...

BEST FOR SAFARI BOTSWANA

E

xcellent wildlife sightings, a commitment to conservation and a good range of luxury accommodation options make Botswana a top safari destination. Next year, on September 30, the country will celebrate 50 years of independence, prompting Lonely Planet to declare it the number one destination to visit in 2016. Discover the Okavango Delta, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, from the comfort of the newly renovated 12 tent Belmond Eagle Island Lodge, where activities include game drives and boat trips through the ever-changing waterways. The Okavango’s unusual topography has resulted in various animal adaptations, such as swimming lions. Stay at private concession Duba Plains, where film-makers Dereck and Beverly Joubert famously documented the resident pride who hunt buffalo in broad daylight. Botswana also has one of the highest populations of endangered wild dog and Belmond’s Khwai River Lodge, on the border of the Moremi Wildlife Reserve, is currently a good place to track them. Africa specialist, The Ultimate Travel Company (www. theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) tailor-make a one-week luxury safari from £7,515pp, with three nights at Duba Plains, followed by two nights at Khwai River Lodge and two nights at Eagle Island River Lodge. Includes meals, activities, transfers and flights from London.

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BEST FOR CULTURE STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, WARWICKSHIRE

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ven after several centuries, Shakespeare’s plays continue to impress and entertain audiences worldwide with his works translated into more than 75 languages. This year though, attention will be firmly focused on his birthplace Stratford-upon-Avon, marking the 400th anniversary of his death on April 23 with a series of new openings and special exhibitions. Learn about Shakespeare’s personal life through artefacts on display at a re-imagining of his former family home, New Place, where he lived for the last 19 years of his life and wrote 26 major works. The new attraction has been billed as the single most significant project to commemorate the playwright’s legacy.

Then delve further into his past by visiting Shakespeare’s Schoolroom & Guildhall at King Edward VI School, where the Bard honed his writing skills. Following a major restoration, the 15th century building is open to the public for the first time. The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) will be staging productions throughout the year, along with a new discovery tour, Page To Stage, giving a behind the scenes look at the famous playhouse and an opportunity to look inside the RSC’s store of 30,000 costumes. Visit: www.shakespeares-england.co.uk/ shakespeare-2016 for more information.

BEST FOR ADVENTURE PERU

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eru has always been a bestseller in South America, and bookings are set to further soar when British Airways launch a new direct flight from Gatwick to Lima on May 4, from £561 return. Capital city Lima has a lively gourmet scene and boasts some of the continent’s top restaurants; experiment with flavours at award winning Central (centralrestaurante. com.pe/en/), where the menu is based on ingredients foraged from Peru’s different altitudes, or sample national dish ceviche (raw fish cured in citrus juice) at lunch only restaurant Chez Wong (facebook.com/ ChezJavierWong). Inca citadel Machu Picchu is undoubtedly one of Peru’s highlights, BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

with passes for the popular Inca Trail selling out months in advance. Tourists now have more comfortable options for a stay in the Sacred Valley, allowing them time to acclimatise to higher altitudes and enjoy the scenery. Last year, Inkaterra opened the Hacienda Urubamba and in August Explora will launch new property Valle Sagrado on the site of an ancient corn plantation. Both can be reached by road from Cusco. The Ultimate Travel Company (www. theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) offers a 10-day private Highlights Of Peru tour visiting Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley from £3,125pp - saving £1,540 per couple if booked by February 29. Includes direct BA flights from London.

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TRAVEL

BEST FOR SCENERY UTAH, USA

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his year, America’s National Park service celebrates its 100th anniversary, providing a good excuse to visit some of the country’s most pristine and protected areas. The state of Utah is home to a ‘Mighty 5’ parks, and with Delta’s new daily direct flight from Heathrow to

Salt Lake City operating from May 2 (from £754 return), it’s even easier to reach. Marvel at the wind-sculpted sandstone structures in Arches National Park, explore the towering hoodoos in Bryce Canyon, or discover a 100-mile warp in the Earth’s crust at Capitol Reef. After dark, the sightseeing continues at several designated International Dark Sky Parks. Photograph the Milky Way

above the famous Mesa Arch landform in Canyonlands, or wander through ancient Puebloan ruins at the Natural Bridges National Monument. During the winter season, Utah is a favourite destination for skiers and snowboarders. The recently opened Cherry Peak Resort, near Logan in northern Utah, features three triple chairlifts and a 1.25mile run. Visit www.visitutah.com

BEST FOR WILDLIFE INDIA

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he cinema release of Disney’s The Jungle Book in April will put the spotlight on India and its most famous animal resident - the Bengal tiger. These highly endangered creatures are notoriously difficult to spot, but Exodus (www.exodus. co.uk) will be giving it their best shot on a 16-day escorted Land of the Tiger tour exploring classic Kipling country, with various departures between October and April. Bengal tiger safaris are a key focus of the trip, with considerable time spent in three of the key national parks - Pench, Kanha and Bandhavgarh. The trip costs from £2429pp (two sharing), including accommodation, most meals, guides, 15 game drives and flights. Rudyard Kipling set his classic novel in the region now known as Madhya Pradesh, which is home to some of the country’s greatest jungles. Village Ways (villageways. com) offer a 10-night trip through the area, following in the footsteps on 19th century travel pioneer James Forsyth. Visit the teak forest of the Satpura tiger reserve, the hill station of Pachmarhi and stay in Sakata in the migratory corridor between Pench and Kanha tiger reserves. The trip costs from £1,352pp (two sharing), including full board accommodation and activities. Flights extra.

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BEST FOR FOODIES

SAN SEBASTIAN, SPAIN

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s the European Capital of Culture 2016, this city in northern Spain will host a series of talks, exhibitions and events throughout the year. (See dss2016. eu/en/ for a full programme.) But the main draw continues to be the fantastic range of restaurants and bars available, many of which regularly appear in The World’s Best 50 Restaurants list. Spend a weekend sampling some of the 200 pinxto bars in the Old Town, serving the Basque version of tapas, or incorporate the city into a wider itinerary. Pura Aventura (pura-aventura.com) is

running a new 10-night Basque Foodie Adventure, visiting producers and sampling products from the coast to the highlands. Highlights include a visit to millenniaold saltpans, where harvesters collect salt for Michelin-starred chefs, a pintxo making class in Pamplona, and a visit to the hallowed San Sebastian supper club, the Gastronomic Society. Prices start from £1,995pp (two sharing) including several meals, guides and excursions. Flights to Bilbao are extra. ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


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CULTURE

CULTURE VULTURE

CULTURE NEWS

What’s on

February now – 06.02.2016 AIR

//HODGSON LOOM GALLERY, LAXEY// This year’s open competition for local artists has the theme ‘Air’. Entries include paintings, sculptures, photographs and mixed media pieces, many of which are for sale. www.facebook.com/ HodgsonLoomGallery

02.02.2016 & every Tuesday LIFE DRAWING SESSIONS //SAYLE GALLERY, DOUGLAS// The Sayle Gallery is running life drawing sessions every Tuesday evening from 6-7.30pm. £10 per session, £8 students. All abilities welcome. Please phone the Gallery to book your place Tel: 674557

04.02.2016 – 29.02.2016 MAURITZ VER ELST – A RETROSPECTIVE

//THE SAYLE GALLERY, DOUGLAS// Portraits, still lifes and landscapes from a private collection of paintings by this 20th Century Flemish master. Shane Lucas’s ‘Mining’ exhibition will run concurrently in the shop area. www.sayle.gallery www.facebook.com/saylegallery

05.02.2016 & every Friday FRIDAY ART CINEMA

//SAYLE GALLERY, DOUGLAS// An eclectic selection of art films and films about art every Friday at 7.30pm. See website for details. www.sayle.gallery

06.02.2016

PRINT WORKSHOP WITH SUSANNE THEA

//HOUSE OF MANANNAN, PEEL// A print workshop taught by internationally acknowledged artist Susanne Thea in conjunction with the visiting exhibition of her work ‘They Came From the Deep Blue Sea’ Suitable for artists over the age of 12, but numbers are limited. Tickets £6 from the House of Manannan and online. www.manxnationalheritage.im

07.02.2016 – 28.02.2016 MANN IN LANDSCAPE

//ISLE GALLERY, TYNWALD MILLS// Striking and colourful paintings by local artist Howard Shimmin, influenced by the landscape of the Isle of Man. www.theislegallery.com www.facebook.com/theislegallery

13.02.2016 – 12.03.2016 IOM PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY EXHIBITION

//HODGSON LOOM GALLERY, LAXEY// As always this exhibition includes the very best of still life, portrait and landscape images from the Island’s photographers.

ENTRIES INVITED FOR MANX FOLK AWARDS

Entries are invited for awards that encourage young people to maintain the strong traditions of Manx folk music. The Manx Folk Awards are for young people aged four to 18 and include dance, singing, recitation and instrumental classes. The syllabus can be viewed via a new website, www.manxfolkawards.weebly.com. Entries close on Friday 19th February. The awards, organised by the Department of Education and Children (DEC), Culture Vannin and Manx National Heritage, take place from Sunday 20th to Wednesday 23rd March at the Youth Arts Centre and Trinity Methodist Church, Douglas.  ‘The awards are also good preparation for young people entering the Manx Music Festival (22nd to 30th April) and are a lead in to Shennaghys Jiu (25th to 28th March), a non-competitive youth folk festival.’

www.facebook.com/ HodgsonLoomGallery LIVE STREAMING/ENCORE There is a full programme of live and encore streaming of significant theatre and opera from the National Theatre, the Donmar and The Royal Opera House this month. Full details can be found on www.villagaiety.com (for screenings at The Studio Theatre, Ballakermeen High School, Douglas) and at www.kwc.im/kings-courttheatre-live-streaming for screenings at the Kings Court Theatre at King Williams College. Highlights of the February programmes are La Traviata, Les Liaisons Dangereuses and As You Like It.

GUILD ENTRY DEADLINE APPROACHING

Budding singers, musicians, orators, actors and dancers are being reminded to submit their entries for the 2016 Manx Music Speech and Dance Festival by Saturday 6th February. The festival, in association with awardwinning property developer Dandara, will take place over nine days from 22nd to the 30th April. Entries can be submitted by post or, for the first time ever, online at www.manxmusicfestival.org. ‘The Guild’ will also feature a number of new classes this year. Dancers have more opportunities to grace the stage in the Ballet, Modern and Character classes, while Rock and Pop bands will take part in ‘Battle of Bands’ on Tuesday 26th April.

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2015’s group at the Temples of Angkor

CAMBODIA 2016

Every year in February the IoM Youth Motor Project, in partnership with the Manx charity, Friend’s of the Cambodian Children’s Refuge Centre (CRC), take a group of young people from the Island on an expedition to Cambodia. CRC’s School is funded through voluntary contributions and provides free education in English and IT for Khmer young people in a disadvantaged rural suburb of Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh. They spend up to 14 days at the school and, when the school is closed, seeing Cambodia and learning about the country’s history, culture and people. In school, the Manx party can be found presenting lessons in English language, swapping cultural stories, and noting and comparing similarities and differences in expectations and experiences with the students and teachers. CRC’s school’s classes are for Khmer young people aged from kindergarten to 19 from the Kintouk Village area and our expedition group of high school students always report back having had an amazing life-changing experience.

Photos: 2015’s participants with the Headteacher (Mr Seyha) and class teacher of CRC School’s kindergarten. 2015’s group (in green shirts) with the middle and junior classes and teachers.

KANEEN BURSARY SCHEME FOR YOUNG FLUENT SPEAKERS OF MANX GAELIC Culture Vannin is delighted to announce the launch of a bursary scheme for young fluent speakers of Manx between the ages of 18 and 25 that will enable them to attend a summer school in Irish language and culture run by Oideas Gael in Donegal during the summer of 2016. Two bursaries will be available which will cover BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

travel and accommodation costs to the selected summer school. For further details about the scheme and how to apply contact Adrian Cain at: adrian@culturevannin.im 07624 451098. www.learnmanx.com

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UPLOAD

THE MONTHLY UPLOAD YOUR PHOTOS £50

Winner

1 Simon Arnold 2 Damian Bird 3 Matthew Clague 4 Lee Notman

1 3 2

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5 Craig Alexander 6 Amanda Chacksfield 7 Audrey Guniava 8 Liz Pinnell 9 Chris Kilpatrick 10 Jim Gibson 11 Krysia Boruch

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UPLOAD

12 13

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12 Steve Sieling 13 William Galbraith 14 Kathryn Mcnally 15 Susie Mackensie 16 Simon Maddrell 17 Janette Phair

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18 Suzanne McKnight 19 David Dixon 20 Pauline Guest 21 Alastair Caley Man 22 Alison Watterson 23 Chris Arrowsmith 24 Alex Cain

Want to win £50? All you have to do is email your entry with the subject ‘upload’ to: upload@gallery.co.im. This year we have made more space available and now dedicate 4 pages to YOUR PHOTOS. Make the files nice and big though, 4MB is a good size to aim for. We do try to print every photo following the guide but we can’t get them ALL on the pages full-size unfortunately they just wouldn’t fit!

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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PHOTOGRAPHS (SHOT IN FILM) | Phil Kneen

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t was in September last year, when driving past the ‘Jungle’ on his way back to the Calais ferry terminal from a European assignment, that Phil decided out of plain nosiness he wanted to find out more about this infamous camp, based on sand dunes in an area about three-quarters of a kilometre long and half a kilometre wide.

WORDS | Les Able

IN THE

JUNGLE PHIL KNEEN’S “FANTASTIC” CHRISTMAS DAY COURTESY OF THE ‘JUNGLE’S’ AFGHAN KITCHEN The squalid, unsanitary surroundings of the Calais ‘Jungle’, home to around 7,000 refugees and economic migrants, desperate to make it to Britain, would not be a location where most of us would choose to spend Christmas. But for Isle of Man-based documentary photographer Phil Kneen it proved to be the most memorable, although perhaps not the best festive experience!

“As I drove past I couldn’t believe just how busy it was, some 200 people are continuing to arrive there each day, I wanted to know more,” said Phil. “I’m just stimulated by the whole migrant/refugee debate. I’ve been told I’m a Left Winger because I am helping migrants, but there is nothing political or religious in my motivation, I just wanted to know more, it’s as simple as that.” He added: “People say it’s mainly refugees in the camp, but it’s not, most are economic migrants who want to get to the UK to work with many admitting they want to get there for the ‘benefits’. Because of tightened security at the ferry port, however, it’s virtually impossible for them to now reach the UK.” On December 11 he arrived at the ‘Jungle’, along with a load of warm winter clothes for those living in the camp, donated locally as a result of an appeal once he had made up his mind to spend Christmas amid the inhospitable shacks and tents of the camp. He had, however, told his teenage daughter and two sons what he was planning for Christmas and if they weren’t happy he wouldn’t go but stay at home. “The reaction from all three was ‘you’ve got to go’.” Phil took as his assistant Geneva-based Calum Stewart who, after seeing Phil’s blog on what he was planning to do, asked if he could help him out at the ‘Jungle’. Their base was Phil’s motor home and all its mod cons of shower and toilet, parked on the outskirts of the camp, with mud making it impossible to take it any further.  “It’s the best piece of equipment I’ve ever bought, saved me a fortune,” said Phil.

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“I’ve been told I’m a Left Winger because I am helping migrants, but there is nothing political or religious in my motivation, I just wanted to know more, it’s as simple as that.”

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“On Christmas Day we arrived at the camp at about 8.00 am, no one was up, most lead a nocturnal life by attempting to get on the trains and lorries at night.”

He went on: “I wouldn’t say there is a ‘Welcome Centre’ to the camp, imagine the worst music festival you have been to, a sea of mud, filthy toilets etc. There is, however, something of a community spirit, even a main street with shops set up by Afghans, legal refugees from France.

Laughing, he added: “We spent a fair amount of time in the Afghan Kitchen but there is definitely no Health & Safety so I made sure everything I had was deep fried! You can’t just walk around taking photographs so for the first few days we just wandered about, got to know people, so our faces were seen, and I slowly began to take photographs. “In the week running up to Christmas it became something of a media circus there, the place was rammed with TV crews but come Christmas Day that was all gone, no one was about. Sky News filmed a piece two days earlier and then put it out as ‘live’ on Christmas Day. The charity workers had also gone home for Christmas, many I think are only there just so they can say ‘I’ve done the Jungle’ and put it on their CV.

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“I had to explain what I was doing and that I was documenting what was happening, there were those willing to be photographed while from others it was a very straight No. And ‘No’ meant ‘No’. Having cigarettes on me was an ice breaker, I was getting through three packs of cigarettes a day.  I also had a Polaroid camera with me, which meant there was instant film which I could give them to keep. I never paid any cash. When three youths asked for cash, I explained I couldn’t do that, what they wanted was money to buy food, they had nothing, so I took them to the Afghan Kitchen and bought them meals and a can of Coke each. “On Christmas Day we arrived at the camp at about 8.00 am, no one was up, most lead a nocturnal life by attempting to get on the trains and lorries at night. My start to the day was to greet the riot police who always ignored my Hello’s on arrival. On Christmas morning I wished them ‘Merry Christmas’ in French, one of them nodded and another said ‘Happy Christmas’ in English.  “Muslims of course don’t celebrate Christmas and Orthodox Christians don’t celebrate it until January 7. We sat in the Afghan Kitchen for a couple of hours, photographed a few people and  were invited into a shack by a group of guys from

Kuwait, all of them Bedouins. Because they are Bedouins they have no papers, which means no health care and they can’t work. They are Arabs born without any identity.

lot of Muslims do drink alcohol. What was interesting is that on Christmas Day 3,000 people attempted to storm the Tunnel but there were no ferries and no lorries and not one single person got through. “Looking back, in one sense it was all an enjoyable experience and we encountered trouble on only one occasion; in any place there is always a small minority of trouble makers. Yes, I believe we should be helping refugees who are escaping from war torn countries but then how do you differentiate between them and economic migrants? “The ‘Jungle’ will undoubtedly get bigger, it won’t go away. I think there is a real possibility of a conurbation of migrant/ refugee camps along that coast. People will continue to come. I think there is a danger that something will happen in the ‘Jungle’ with violence breaking out, Right Wing groups are already throwing petrol bombs in there.”

“We spent the afternoon with them, took along cans of lager and a five litre flagon of wine and played cards. It was a fantastic day, we got invited into so many tents, we were wary at first but it was a case of ‘please come in’ and they would make tea or coffee and just sit and chat. Contrary to belief, a

He added: “I see what I did over those two weeks as a long-term project which will form part of my final year in studying for a Master’s Degree in Photo Journalism and Documentary Photography. My next assignment is to go to Lesbos to photograph refugees arriving from war torn Syria.”

IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS AN EXHIBITION OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY PHIL AT THE ‘JUNGLE’ CAN BE SEEN AT THE NOA BAKEHOUSE IN DOUGLAS. BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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DANISH ARTIST SUSANNE THEA BRINGS ‘THEY CAME FROM THE DEEP BLUE SEA..’ TO THE HOUSE OF MANANNAN. Manx National Heritage has turn to the Vikings for 2016, with exhibitions, seminars and workshops at both museums. This includes a visiting exhibition from York, ‘Heroes’ at the Manx Museum, but bringing a completely different perspective is Danish artist Susanne Thea, with her exhibition of prints, ‘They came from the deep blue sea..’ at the House of Manannan.  This depicts the Battle of Clontarf in Ireland in 1014, described in many early manuscripts and sagas, which saw the death of thousands of Vikings and the murder of High King of Ireland Brian Boru by the leader of the Manx Vikings, King Brodir. Susanne makes use of 400-year-old graphic and printing techniques creating copper etchings, wood cuts and monotypes, and her uniquely personal figurative language has attracted attention from museums and galleries around the world.  She uses her work to tell a story, and visitors to the House of Manannan will find the fourteen prints which make up ‘They came from the deep blue sea..’ a very detailed and witty telling of a part of Viking history which is particularly relevant to the Isle of Man. Her other work includes a 72 metre ‘Paraphrase of the Bayeux Tapestry’ which last year was exhibited alongside the original embroidered tapestry in Normandy.  Susanne lectures and provides introductions to her own print making all over the world and will be leading a half-day workshop at the House of Manannan on 6 February for artists over 12 years of age.  Tickets (£6) can be bought online at www. manxnationalheritage.im or at the museum shops.

IS... E M A MY N MY JOB IS… artist, songwriter, singer, mother and wife. THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD WOULD BE… invited to exhibit my work ‘On the trail of Hans Christian Andersen’ at the Tate Gallery MY WORST HABIT IS… pouring a nice cup of tea, leaving it for inspiration. IF I COULD CHANGE ONE THING IN MY LIFE IT WOULD BE… giving my white Persian female cat Tootsie away. IF I HAD TO ONLY EAT ONE KIND OF FOOD FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE IT WOULD BE… 72% dark chocolate.

Susanne Thea

THIS IS A BIT MORE ABOUT MYSELF: I’m still dusting off my sax and cello.

IF I COULD BE A CELEBRITY FOR A DAY, IT WOULD BE… Queen Elizabeth II, walking dogs. THE BEST TIME OF YEAR IS… waking up every morning. THE BEST ADVICE I’VE EVER BEEN GIVEN IS… set your goals, then choose husband. IF I COULD HAVE ONE QUESTION ANSWERED IN THE WORLD IT

WOULD BE… why?

THE 3 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN LIFE ARE… inspiration, motivation and strength. MY DREAM HOUSE WOULD BE… on a quiet, green island with an observatory, an art studio and gallery, recording and music rooms, guest and family rooms, a walk-in closet, shoe holders and parking all within walking distance of the world’s capital cities. WHAT PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR 2016?… Work, work, exhibitions, concerts, work, work, exhibitions, concerts, work…

ARTIST AND ILLUSTRATORS - would you like to see your work featured in Gallery Magazine? Simply get in contact with us mynameis@gallery.co.im

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HAWORTHS RESTAURANT

THE REGENCY HOTEL

The best kept secret on the promenade

A FINE DINING RESTAURANT IN PERFECT AMBIENT SURROUNDINGS

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APPETITE

RECIPES

Year of the monkey RECIPES TO GET YOUR IN THE SPIRIT TO CELEBRATE THE CHINESE NEW YEAR ON FEBRUARY 8TH

STEAMED FISH CANTONESE STYLE

(Serves 4) n 450g firm white fish fillets, such as cod, sole or salmon fillets, or a whole fish, such as sole or turbot n 1tsp coarse sea salt or plain salt n 11/2tbsp fresh ginger, finely shredded n For the garnish: n 3tbsp spring onions, finely shredded n 2tbsp soy sauce n 1tbsp groundnut oil n 2tsp sesame oil n Fresh coriander sprigs If you are using a whole fish, remove the gills. Pat the fish or fish fillets dry with kitchen paper. Rub with the salt on both sides, and then set aside for 30 minutes. This helps the flesh to firm up and draws out any excess moisture. Next, set up a steamer, or put a rack into a wok or deep pan and fill it with 5cm of water. Bring the water to the boil over a high heat. Put the fish on a heatproof plate and scatter the ginger evenly over the top. Put the plate of fish into the steamer or onto the rack.

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Cover the pan tightly and gently steam the fish until it is just cooked. Flat fish will take about five minutes to cook. Thicker fish or fillets such as sea bass will take 12-14 minutes. Remove the plate of cooked fish and sprinkle on the spring onions and soy sauce. Heat the two oils together in a small saucepan. When they are hot and smoking, pour the hot oil on top of the fish, garnish with the coriander sprigs and serve at once.

CHINESE-STYLE SPICY CRISPY BEEF (Serves 4) n 250-400g roast beef, the rarer the better n Vegetable or groundnut oil, for frying n 3tbsp cornflour n 1tsp Chinese five-spice powder (optional) n A little very finely grated orange zest n Pinch of flaky sea salt FOR THE SAUCE: n 3tbsp sweet chilli sauce n 2tbsp soy sauce n 1 garlic clove, grated n 1/4tsp finely grated ginger n Juice of 1/2 an orange FOR THE SALAD: n A few crisp lettuce leaves, such as romaine (or even the much-maligned iceberg), finely shredded n 1 carrot, julienned or grated n 1/2 small cucumber, seeds scooped out, then cut into thin batons n 3 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced, slightly on the bias n 1tbsp rice wine vinegar ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE


APPETITE

CRACKLING CHINESE ROAST PORK First make the sauce. Put all the ingredients into a small pan, simmer for a couple of minutes until thickened, then set aside. Cut the beef into strips, 3-4mm thick. Heat a 2-3cm depth of oil in a wok or a deep saucepan - the fat will bubble up when you add the beef, so don’t use a shallow pan. Heat the oil to 180C, or until a cube of dry white bread dropped in turns golden in just under a minute.

(Serves 4-6) n 1.5kg Boneless pork belly, with rind n For the marinade: n 2tbsp coarse sea salt n 1tbsp ground roasted Sichuan peppercorns n 2tsp five spice powder n 1tsp freshly ground black pepper n 2tsp sugar Pierce the rind side of pork with a sharp fork or knife until the skin is covered with fine holes. Insert a meat hook into the meat to secure it.

Sift the cornflour and five-spice powder, if using, onto a plate. Toss the beef strips in the cornflour until well coated on all sides.

Bring a pot of water to a boil, and using a large ladle, pour the hot water over the rind side of the pork several times. Set the pork belly aside.

Fry the beef in a couple of batches to avoid crowding the pan. Lower into the hot oil and fry until golden and crisp, which should only take a couple of minutes. Scoop out with a slotted spoon and place on kitchen paper to drain. Let the oil come back up to temperature before adding the second batch of meat to the pan.

Heat a wok until it is hot, then add the salt, peppercorns, five spice powder, pepper and sugar and stir-fry the mixture for three minutes until it is hot and well mixed. Allow the mixture to cool slightly.

Mix the orange zest with the flaky sea salt and sprinkle over the beef. For the salad, toss the vegetables together with the rice wine vinegar. Pile the salad and crispy beef onto individual plates. Trickle on the sauce and add a scattering of sesame seeds. Garnish with coriander if you have some to hand. TO FINISH: Handful of sesame seeds, lightly toasted if preferred. Sprigs of coriander (optional).

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When it is warm enough to handle, rub this mixture onto the flesh side of the pork. Hang the meat to dry for eight hours or overnight in a cool place or in front of a fan. Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 6/400F/200C. Place the pork on a rack, rind side up over a tray of water. Roast for 15 minutes. Then reduce the heat to gas mark 4/350F/180C and continue to roast for two hours. Then turn up to gas mark 8/450F/230C for 15 minutes. Remove and allow the pork to cool. Then carve it into bite-size pieces, arrange on a platter, and serve.

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WORDS | Anne Berry | The Wine Cellar Next Big Thing Chardonnay £10.45 With the faintest whiff of biscuit oak, this is a bright, tangy Barossa Chardonnay. It has elegance and charm, with plenty of flavour and shows how good Aussie Chardonnay can be! Anima de Raimat Blanco £8.95

WINES PRODUCED FROM 100% OF ONE GRAPE VARIETY ARE KNOWN AS SINGLE VARIETALS. WITHIN THE WINE WORLD, THERE IS MUCH DEBATE ABOUT WHETHER A SINGLE VARIETAL WINE IS BETTER THAN A BLEND OR VICE VERSA. AS WITH MOST ASPECTS OF WINE TASTING, IT IS VERY MUCH A MATTER OF PERSONAL TASTE. OVER THE YEARS, THE WORD ‘BLEND’ HAS BEEN REGARDED AS A NEGATIVE WAY TO DESCRIBE A WINE, IMPLYING THAT IT MAY LACK CHARACTER. ON THE OTHER HAND, MANY WINEMAKERS SEE A BLEND OF SEVERAL VARIETIES AS A WAY TO GAIN COMPLEXITY IN THEIR WINE.

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nder European Law a wine can still be labelled as a single varietal if it contains 85% of one grape variety. The other 15% can be made up of any other varieties. Unless it is mentioned on the back label, it is impossible to tell from looking at it, whether a wine labelled as a varietal is produced from 100% or just 85% of that grape variety. On tasting it may be possible to detect but that comes with experience. One question that springs to mind is does it matter? If you find a wine that you enjoy and it is a blend, then continue to drink it. However, if you wish to extend your wine knowledge and thus enhance your wine experience it would be wise to try varietal wines to develop a greater understanding of the flavours and characteristics of each one and then see how they work together. Traditional old world wines are labelled by region (Burgundy, Loire, Rhone) or producer (Bordeaux) with the aim of making a wine that shows the characteristics of the ‘terroir’ of that village or vineyard. Burgundy wines will always be single varietals (Chardonnay for white and Pinot Noir for red), whereas wines from Bordeaux will normally be a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot with a few other varieties added in smaller quantities. Does this affect the quality? Clearly not, as many Clarets (red wines from Bordeaux) feature amongst the most expensive and sought after wines in the world alongside red and white Burgundy. It can be easier to tell exactly what is inside

a bottle of wine from the new world as they are often labelled by grape variety or varieties. Seeing a wine labelled Cabernet Merlot will tell you that, if not 50/50, it will have more Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend as this is the first named variety. If it is labelled Merlot, you can be sure that at least 85% is Merlot. It is up to you as the wine drinker to decide which wine you prefer, whether it is a blend of grapes or 100% varietal. The ultimate goal, of course, is your enjoyment and the only way to find out is to try a selection of each! If you would like to experiment, get a few friends together and have a tasting of the following pairs of wines. I can guarantee lots of enjoyment and lively debate! Circumstance Sauvignon Blanc : £10.75 Produced using organic and biodynamic methods from grapes grown in the windswept vineyards of the Cape. It is an elegant wine with peach, lime and gooseberry character, a refreshing acidity and lingering minerality. Chateau Anniche Blanc £10.25 A blend of 75% Semillon and 25% Sauvignon Blanc, this Bordeaux white is made to accompany food. Well balanced with citrus and tropical fruit flavours and a lively zingy finish. Enjoy on its own as an aperitif as well but try with lighter fish and chicken dishes, salads and vegetarian dishes.

This Spanish blend of Chardonnay, with Xarel-lo and Albarino is lightly aromatic with flavours of peach, apricot and pineapple. With its creamy texture, it works well with tapas, creamy chicken dishes and any seafood. Wolftrap Red - South Africa : £8.95 is becoming known for producing great blends. Wolftrap is made up of 82% Syrah with 16% Mourvedre and 2% Viognier. It has flavours of blackberries and spicy pepper from the Shiraz, earthy notes from the Mourvedre and a hint of perfume coming from the Viognier. Domaine Belles Granges Syrah : £9.45 from the Northern Rhone, this is an easy drinking, juicy 100% Syrah. Aromas of raspberries and other red fruits followed by warm, sweet red fruit flavours and a smoky peppery character. Callejon del Crimen Cabernet Sauvignon Gran Seleccion : £16.45 This fabulous Argentine 100% Cabernet Sauvignon was recently awarded ‘Best in Show’ at the Decanter World Wine Awards and was awarded the Regional Trophy for Argentina. From high up in the foothills of the Andes, it has concentrated aromas of fig, raisins, blackcurrants and damsons with hints of leather and tobacco. A complex wine with great depth of flavour, structure and very long lasting on the palate. Unanime Gran Vino Tinto : £16.95 This Argentine blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Malbec and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon has appealing aromas of blackberry and toast. It is concentrated and full on the palate with flavours of blueberry, plum, cassis, coffee and chocolate. CHEERS!

THE WINE CELLAR • TENNIS ROAD • DOUGLAS • IM2 3QW TELEPHONE: 01624 611793 • EMAIL: anne@thewinecellar.im

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W E A LT H BUSINESS T E C H N O LO G Y

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WORLD NEWS - WHY GLOBAL ECONOMIC DISASTER IS A N U N L I K E LY EVENT

W E A LT H - H O W T O INVEST LIKE JD ROCKEFELLER, THE RICHEST MAN wHO EVER LIVED

TECHNOLOGY - TEN DEVELOPMENTS I N D I G I TA L F I N A N C E


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ON THE AGENDA WORLD NEWS | WEALTH | IN-BUSINESS | EVENTS | TECHNOLOGY

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here is a great deal of ruin in a nation. Thus did the wise Adam Smith rebuke a correspondent’s worry that ruin was bound to follow reversals in the war against the North American colonists. If there is a great deal of ruin in an individual country, there is even more ruin in the world economy. Somehow, it keeps on going. Measured at purchasing power parity, the world economy has grown in every year since 1946, even (albeit barely) in 2009, in the wake of the global financial crisis. The period between 1900 and 1946 was more unstable than the era of managed capitalism that succeeded it. Even so, the world economy grew in all but nine of those years. The innovation-driven economy that emerged in the late 18th and 19th centuries and spread across the globe in the 20th and 21st just grows. That is the most important fact about it. It does not grow across the world at all evenly — far from it. It does not share its benefits among people at all equally — again, far from it. But it grows. It grew last year. Much the most plausible assumption is that it will grow again this year.  The world economy will not grow forever. But it will only stop when the economics of Thomas Malthus overwhelm those of Joseph Schumpeter — that is, when resource constraints offset innovation. We are certainly not there yet. Since 1900, the world’s output has grown at a rate of just over 3 per cent a year. Such is the power of compound interest that world output has expanded more than 30-fold over this period. Output grew relatively slowly in the early part of the 20th century and relatively fast between 1947 and the early 1970s. Intriguingly, it grew a bit faster under postwar Keynesian economics than under the conservative revival launched by Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. Now consider the pattern of volatility. The marked volatility between 1914 and 1919 was due to the first world war; that of the 1930s to the Great Depression; and that of the 1940s to the second world war. The instability of the 1970s and early 1980s was due to the oil shocks, triggered (or augmented) by war (the Yom Kippur war of 1973 and Iraq’s 1980 invasion of Iran). Inflationary financing of the Vietnam war generated the inflationary backdrop to the instability. Ultimately, that led to disinflation by the Federal Reserve, under Paul Volcker.  The slowdown in 1990 and 1991 was again due to disinflation and the first Gulf war, which followed Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait. The slowdown in 1998 was triggered

by the Asian financial crisis, that in 2001 by the bursting of a huge stock market bubble and that in 2009 by the western financial crisis. This picture of the past indicates the kind of events one should worry about. In brief, there seem to be three: wars; inflation shocks (perhaps linked to wars or jumps in commodity prices); and financial crises. These phenomena can be linked: wars will trigger inflation if their finance is by inflationary means. In this light, let us consider current risks. Some analysts have been convinced for years that high inflation must result from the expansion of central-bank balance sheets. They are wrong. It is quite possible for central banks to control the effects of their policies upon the expansion in credit and money. A second set of risks, again ceaselessly promoted, is that of financial crisis. The biggest risks seem to be in emerging economies. But these risks are likely to be contained or prove manageable at the global level. If the worst came to the worst, the results are likely to be more like those of 1998 than of 2009. The third set of risks is that of geopolitical upheaval and conflict. We can identify a daunting list of worries: the massive overloading of the EU’s capacity to act; the possible exit of the UK from the EU; the hollowing out of the western alliance; the rise of populist pressures in high-income countries, shown in the success of Marine Le Pen and the rise of “Trumpism”; uncertainty about China’s economic and even political future; the rise of global jihadism, and particularly of Isis, the “world’s most powerful terrorist organisation”; Russian revanchism; disputes among great powers, notably between Russia and the US and China and the US; friction in the Middle East, notably between Iran and Saudi Arabia; state failure; floods of refugees; and US retreat from its hegemonic role. Beyond this is a decline in the legitimacy and effectiveness of many high-income democracies, the fragile self-importance of many other powers and the chaos in large parts of the world. Yet all this comes at the same time as a need for effective global governance in an integrated and interdependent world. If one wants to worry, there is plenty to worry about. Yet, from the economic viewpoint, what matters is not so much whether the world will be well managed: it will not be. What matters more is whether a disaster will be avoided. What would such an event look like? A war among great powers could be one. Election of a bellicose ignoramus to the US presidency could be another. A war between Iran and Saudi Arabia would be a disaster. The replacement of the Saudi regime by Isis would be another. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan would be another. Collapse of the EU could prove yet another. The cumulative chance that at least one of all such disasters will occur is greater than the chance that any one of them will do so. Nevertheless, the likelihood that none of them will occur is surely bigger. Remember: there is a great deal of ruin in the world economy.

Why global economic disaster is an unlikely event Words: Martin Fox

What matters is not whether the world will be well managed but whether calamity will be avoided.

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ON THE AGENDA

WEALTH FINANCEMATTERS BECAUSE&QUALITY

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in-business

Words: Les Able Photo: dollsfactory.net

RELATIVE VALUES Sean Quaye, the son dubbed a ‘grafter’ by his father John whose own business ethos behind the success of Manx Independent Carriers is hard work and diligence “Nobody tries harder than us, and that’s not just bulls**t,” declares Sean Quaye, operations director of Manx Independent Carriers.  It’s a philosophy he has inherited from his father, John, who just happens to be chairman of the company and a ‘member’ of the island’s elite club of entrepreneurs whose businesses are celebrating their 30th anniversaries.

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ON THE AGENDA

The Worlds Tech firms have high hopes for 2016

“The demands of the job often meant him doing a 12-hour day but he never quibbled about that and not once did I have to pull him up for bad time-keeping. He never took advantage of being my son”

IN-BUSINESS

It is worth remembering that big technological leaps do not happen quickly. Nokia’s 9000 Communicator packed email, web browsing and fax into a phone in the mid-1990s, while the iPhone, launched in 2007, came after more than a decade of developments. Words: Richard Evans

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ith hindsight, such breakthroughs seem to have been inevitable. But false dawns abound — and 2016 is likely to have more than its fair share of them. In a period of abundant experimentation, the challenge will be telling which are harbingers of shifts in work and personal life and which are deadends in technology evolution. This year may begin with a bang, with the mass-market launch of a staple of science fiction, virtual reality (VR) headsets. Facebook’s Oculus Rift will finally hit the market in the first quarter, following Samsung’s introduction of its own VR headsets, also using Oculus technology, this year. Before the end of 2016, augmentedreality goggles from Magic Leap and Microsoft, which overlay virtual images on to a view of the real world, could also become available. The much-hyped arrival of 3D television three years ago is a reminder of how

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expectations of eye-catching technologies can be ahead of reality. Even if virtual and augmented reality do not flop they will have trouble living up to expectations. High prices — the company has said the headset will cost “up to $400”, though a bigger cost will be buying a PC capable of running the software — a shortage of content and applications, and uncertain consumer adoption of such a different technology cloud short-term prospects. Companies such as Facebook have been doing their best to talk down expectations, but 2016 will at least bring the first real glimpse of a computing platform with profound implications for entertainment, social interaction and work. Another future computing platform is likely to see a burst of innovation after a disappointing first wave. “Wearables” such as smartwatches were meant to extend mobile computing beyond smartphones and tablets to other, even more convenient, products. However, the two flagship

wearables of 2015 have not lived up to the hype surrounding them. The performance of the Apple Watch has been cloaked in uncertainty as the company has not provided firm sales numbers and Google’s Glass has gone back to the drawing board. Both are likely to appear in their second iterations in 2016. Optimists will point to the fact that the iPod and iPhone had only modest sales before hitting their stride in year two. But wearables have yet to develop must-have apps and the advances are now needed in the uses to which they can be put rather than in developing the hardware itself. If delivering a breakthrough product is hard to plan, the technological forces that make them possible are easier to trace. In the same way that cheap sensors, powerefficient processors and higher-bandwidth mobile networks made the iPhone possible, a number of factors are pushing what is likely to be one of the defining technologies of 2016 and beyond: artificial intelligence. The largely invisible nature of AI

ON THE AGENDA

means predicting how it will affect popular consciousness is as much a sociological as a technological challenge. Two years ago, a wave of anxiety spread that intelligent machines would put humans out of work. The same concerns were rife in the 1960s, but AI technologies are now advancing quickly. Cloud computing power and new approaches to machine learning, with the “big data” that act as the raw material for AI systems to “learn” from, have combined to bring a leap forward in machine intelligence. Some of the planet’s richest, most ambitious companies have hired top academic talent — such as Facebook, which in 2013 hired Yann LeCun, a computer scientist who founded the Center for Data Science at New York University — signalling something of an AI race is under way. The results of this competition will be largely hidden from view. Many AI advances will come in the form of improved performance of existing systems or in

TECHNOLOGY

more effective man-machine interactions, rather than new products or services. Voice activation is likely to feature on more devices, along with more intelligent forms of interaction. Businesses that learn how to use the technology should create more effective advertising, enjoy a higher conversion of leads into sales, and have happier customers. However, the last thing most of these businesses will do is brag. Results will be seen in the gulf between the performance of companies that harness this technology and those that do not. The tendency with technology is to always look forward to the next big thing, so it is easy to forget the big thing that is already here. As we enter 2016 the smartphone age has reached a turning point. About 2bn of us have them, making these devices far more pervasive than personal computers ever were. Their popularity has put tablets and wearables in the shade. The smartphone revolution is likely to continue. Room for growth in the

developed world and China — which have driven expansion — is running out. The focus is moving to India and other developing markets, forcing a shift in the basis of competition. Low-cost handsets and subsidised data plans are becoming the norm, along with networking technologies to help businesses reach the next few billion customers. Google’s Project Loon — a necklace of highaltitude, globe-circling balloons acting as satellites — will be tested, with three mobile networks in Indonesia planning to use them for internet access. China’s slowing domestic economy, meanwhile, means its few leading internet companies could consider moving aggressively beyond their borders for the first time. These forces will make 2016 a year of changing international perspectives. In 12 months’ time, the technologies may still look familiar, but the markets for them and the providers of them may well be very different.

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In the news

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Appleby Academy

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Relative Values

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Movers & Shakers

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IoD - IoM Branch - Dick Welsh

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Business Events

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Current Affairs

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Keystone Law - The Interview

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Wealth & Finance

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ean, 31, got his first taste of working in the business at the age of 12. “You could say I’ve always been around transport and logistics,” he says.  When he finished his A-Levels Sean flirted with the idea of university but it wasn’t for him nor was being cooped up in the company’s office when he joined the business at the age of 20. “For me at that time it was all about driving the vans and meeting customers,” adds Sean who readily admits there was no special treatment for him as the son of the boss.  A silver spoon there most definitely wasn’t. “I probably gave Sean a harder time than I would have given other staff,” admits John.  “What amazed me is that when Sean got the warehouse supervisor’s job, which meant he had to be first member of staff there to open up by 7.00am or even earlier he never once let me down, he was always there on time.  “The demands of the job often meant him doing a 12-hour day but he never quibbled about that and not once did I have to pull him up for bad time-keeping.  He never took advantage of being my son.  Sean is a grafter, a bit like myself, he’s also a good problem solver, he sees past the problem and rapidly arrives at the solution.” John, who comes from farming stock and whose father was a farmer all his life, initially worked in banking when he left school but when he left school his first job was in banking (and when he moved on from the Isle of Man Bank it was to the income tax office.  “But like Sean, I didn’t enjoy being cooped up in an office so I got a job as a van driver with Ashworth Transport,” recalls John.  In 1985 he and Chris Workman, who is a director of Manx Independent Carriers, decided to start up their own company along with one driver and based from a small warehouse on Douglas Head. By then John was married with three young children so it was a major step for him and not without its risks.  He had given up a well paid, comfortable job as general manager with Island Express, ploughed all his savings and money borrowed from his father into starting up the business.  In its first year, however, the company made a profit and was employing around 10 staff.  He recalls that the company’s first month’s bill from the Isle of Man Steam Packet was £14,000 a month, the figure is now a mighty £400,000 a month. The company now has 130  employees spread across three depots, an annual turnover of around £12m and a Who’s Who of blue chip companies.

John & Sean Quaye

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Why global economic disaster is unlikely

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Ten developments in digital finance

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The world tech firms have high hopes

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How to Invest Like JD Rockefeller

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8 tech trends changing how we work

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ON THE AGENDA


in the news

Europe resolute for New Year as US optimism wobbles according to Grant Thornton report

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CITYWING SOARS ABOVE COMPETITION IN PUNCTUALITY RANKINGS

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itywing is celebrating having once again beaten its on-Island competition to be ranked 27th worldwide for flight punctuality. According to FlightView’s ‘Global Airlines On-Time’ report for November 2015, 89.5% of Citywing flights arrived at their destination on time. Neither of Citywing’s main competitors, EasyJet and FlyBe, were noted within the top 60 airlines ranked in the report. Island-serving airlines British Airways and Aer Lingus also failed to appear within the top 60. Managing Director at Citywing, David Buck, said: ‘We are absolutely thrilled to have had Citywing’s punctual service acknowledged in this report from FlightView. Citywing consistently performs well in terms of punctuality, and we strive to maximise customer satisfaction and provide passengers with a reliable service. ‘Being Island-based is a great advantage for Citywing; as well having aircraft and pilots based in the Isle of Man, there is 24-hour maintenance support available in Citywing’s Ronaldsway hangar, all of which contributes to our outstanding levels of arrival punctuality.’

David added: ‘It is particularly beneficial to be based in the Isle of Man during periods of adverse weather. Even taking into account instances in which Citywing has had to delay flights due to bad weather conditions, we still comfortably beat performances from the likes of EasyJet and Flybe.’

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U businesses remain surprisingly resilient in their outlook despite risks posed by the migrant crisis, terrorism and a possible referendum on the UK’s European Union membership, according to new research from Grant Thornton. The latest International Business Report (IBR), which focuses on the final quarter of 2015, finds the optimism of European firms has remained stable heading in 2016. This could be good news for the Manx economy according to Michael Crowe, a director at Grant Thornton in the Isle of Man. He explained: ‘The EU is a vital trading partner for the Isle of Man and after a sustained period of instability, the fact the outlook is positive for 2016 could mean more business is generated in Europe and more opportunities are created for the Isle of Man. ‘Also important is that confidence in other major economies has slipped; for example the report shows the confidence of US firms has been dented amid concerns over export markets and the strength of the Dollar. Uncertainty in other countries could see more international business focusing on the more confident EU, strengthening the European economy and potentially creating further business opportunities for Isle of Man firms.’ The new IBR says that global business optimism heading into this year stands at net 36%, slightly down from Quarter 3 of 2015 and just above the 35% recorded a year ago. For the first time since the financial crisis, it is the EU which provides the bedrock of stability; net 38% of EU businesses are optimistic about their economy over the next 12 months, exactly the same as in Q3 and Q1. The report reveals that Ireland (88%), the UK (73%) and the Netherlands (68%) are the EU’s most optimistic economies at the start of 2016. UK firms in particular have reported big increases in their expectations for exports and profitability over the year ahead. Germany, the region’s biggest economy, remains optimistic but is down from 46% to 35% in Q4. This is partly due to profitability expectations falling from 50% six months ago to just 5% today. The US has seen optimism fall from 74% to 50% in Q4, the biggest fall of any of the 36 countries surveyed. This year also looks much brighter for businesses in Asia Pacific and Latin America as both report big quarterly increases in optimism. ON THE AGENDA


Isle of Man Funds Association Annual General Meeting & Luncheon

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he Isle of Man Funds Association hosted its Annual General Meeting and Luncheon at the Sefton Hotel on 3rd December. Outgoing Chairman, David McGarry, opened the meeting and welcomed those present.  He thanked the Committee, Member Firms and various other contributors for their continued hard work and dedication to the Isle of Man Funds Association during his one year tenure as Chairman. Reports were provided by The Treasurer, Peter Craig, and the outgoing chair’s of the Association’s three Sub-Committee’s, Elizabeth Tansell for the Regulatory Sub-Committee, Mark Holligon for the Marketing SubCommittee and Vincent Campbell for the Membership Sub-Committee. Overall it had been a busy year for the Association during which it had provided responses to a number of local industry consultations, arranged local training, CPD events and networking opportunities for Member Firms on the Island and carried out various Roadshow visits to cities across the UK and into the Middle East, attending events, conferences and hosting events, including the annual London luncheon at Clothworkers Hall.  Nominations were accepted for the new Committee for the forthcoming year and the  Committee members were confirmed as: Carolyn Gelling (Chairman), Vincent Campbell, Peter Craig, Monica Dixie, Claira Elliott, Angus Gilmore, Andrew Harding, Martin Heaney, Mark Holligon, Kristan King, Ita McArdle, Steve McCafferty, Barry Monks, Andrew Rouse, Carly Stratton and Stuart Watson.  Incoming Chairman, Carolyn Gelling, thanked David McGarry for his hard work and contribution to the Association over a period of many years, including more than one term as Chairman and extended the Committee’s best wishes for his retirement.  Carolyn explained that the new Committee would be finalising its planning for 2016 within the coming weeks and highlighted the opportunity for Member Firms to get involved in the program of on and off-island activity. The formalities were followed by a Christmas Lunch served by the Sefton Hotel staff.  Over dessert, Mr John Garland, Head of Corporate Financial Services at the Department of Economic Development provided an update on his department’s regional development program and the Funds Association’s developing relationship with the BVCA (British Venture Capital Association) and the Island’s new Enterprise Development Scheme. 

IN THE NEWS

(L-R) Peter Craig, John Garland, David McGarry, Ian Morley, Carolyn Gelling

AWARD-WINNING DEVELOPER DANDARA ALIGNS OPERATIONS UNDER SINGLE CORPORATE IDENTITY

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he Dandara Group has announced it will bring the Isle of Man into line with the rest of the British Isles under a single corporate identity from 2016. From January, the property development company will operate under the Dandara brand in the UK, Channel Islands and Isle of Man. The move will see the Heritage Homes name replaced. Dandara Managing Director Seamus Nugent said: ‘Over the last three decades, the Dandara Group has established a reputation as one of the leading independent property developers in the British Isles, with award-winning projects in Scotland, England, Jersey and the Isle of Man. The Dandara name has strong brand recognition, so the time is right to align all our operations under one title. ‘The Heritage Homes name has served us well in the Island, becoming a byword for high quality design and construction and excellent customer service. However, as we move towards unifying everything we do across the British Isles under a single brand, Heritage Homes will be replaced to bring the Isle of Man into line with the rest of the Group.’ He added: ‘Our commitment to the Isle of Man remains as strong as ever. We will maintain our high standards of work and service, and continue our investment in the local community. Aligning our operations under one brand will allow us to further build on the hard-earned reputation developed over almost 30 years of delivering quality homes and places of work for our many thousands of loyal customers, and we see this as the next logical step in our Group’s growth.’

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in the news

Business opportunity at popular campsite

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ormer Ramsey Grammar School student Hollie Jaques is the winner of the 2016 Ella Olesen Scholarship. Hollie will follow a long line of local students in spending nine months at the University of Idaho in the USA. The scholarship is named after a former registrar of the university who died in 1985. Forming the interview panel for this year’s scholarship were Tim Crookall MLC, Minister for Education and Children, and Andrew Shipley, Manager of Legal and Administrative Services. They interviewed five applicants before selecting Hollie to travel to Idaho next August. Hollie, 21, is studying politics and geography at the University of Glasgow and graduates next summer. She plays an active part in many aspects of university life, not least sharing her passion for Manx dancing with fellow students. A Young Dancer of Mann runner-up and member of the Manx dance group Ny Fennee, founded by her mum, SueLing, Hollie presides over the university’s student dance company and teaches Manx dancing to learners. She has represented the Island at numerous Celtic festivals, including the Festival Interceltique de Lorient, where, in 2015, she participated in events for dignitaries and was interviewed for French TV. She helps run Shennaghys Jiu, held in the Island each Easter. She has won two North American Manx Awards for her contribution to culture. In her spare time, Hollie works as a social media marketer for a Glasgow PR company. She said: ‘I am keen to continue to endorse Manx culture abroad and promote the Island internationally. I am also keen to see more of the world and meet new people. The scholarship, which brings with it the opportunity to fly the Manx flag, is the perfect next step in my life.’ The current Ella Olesen scholars are Cathy Breed, of Pooil Vaaish, and Bethany Quayle, of Colby, who are studying in Idaho until May 2016.

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he lease of Glen Wyllin is being offered as a business opportunity. The Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture (DEFA) owns the glen, which Michael Commissioners operate as a campsite. However, that arrangement ends in May 2016. The site boasts tent pitches, toilet/ washroom blocks, an administration block /reception, a shop, laundry and TV rooms and wardens’ accommodation. DEFA consulted the public over the future of the site, which is popular with locals and visitors alike. The results favoured enhancing and modernising the existing facilities, potentially expanding to incorporate cabins or camping pods. DEFA is advertising a 20-year lease for the site – with the possibility of a further 15-year extension if the bidder can demonstrate its proposals would bring it and DEFA commercial benefits and boost the economy as a whole.  David Cretney MLC, Member of DEFA responsible for Forestry, Amenity and Land, said: ‘The campsite is important to the leisure market, providing valuable accommodation to visitors and locals. ‘Its location means it is particularly valuable during the TT and Festival of Motorcycling, when it attracts many loyal visitors. ‘This represents an exciting business opportunity for someone willing to develop and run the site for the benefit of the Island as a whole.’ The information pack can be viewed at www.gov.im/defa. The opportunity will also be advertised by estate agent Chrystals, with a deadline for bids of 10th February.

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movers & shakers

Martin Hall joins the Board

Mike Phillips promoted to chief executive at Sure

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ure has appointed Mike Phillips to the role of chief executive in the Isle of Man as the business looks forward to continued success in 2016. Mike has over 20 years’ experience in both the IT and telecommunication sectors. He joined Sure as head of fixed and data services in 2009 and was promoted to chief operating officer in July 2014. In his new role Mike will focus on the continued growth and evolution of the Isle of Man business. He will ensure that its existing products and services continue to exceed customer’s requirements and that new innovative products and services are developed, providing excellent value and choice to Sure customers on a daily basis. During his time at Sure he has led several important developments including the creation of Sure’s own off-island data network and services, launch of its fixed line service following the introduction of Wholesale Line Rental, the upgrade of the existing 2G and 3G mobile networks and the introduction of the 4G network and the diversification of the portfolio of services available to local businesses. Eddie Saints, group chief executive of Sure in the Channel Islands and Isle of Man, said: “Mike’s contribution to the Isle of Man business has been excellent and he has played a key role in reaching important milestones and developing strong relationships with our customers and key stakeholders in the island. “He has certainly proven his ability to lead the Isle of Man business as its new chief executive and I wish him continued success in this new role.”

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artin appointed as Director for Optimus Pensions Administrators Limited. Optimus Pension Administrators Limited (OPAL) are pleased to invite Martin Hall onto the Board. Martin, who has been with Optimus since 2007 had focused on the fiduciary side of the business until 2013 where he took a prominent role in establishing the pension business.  “Martin is a great addition to the board of OPAL” said Mark Schofield, Director of Optimus, “He has demonstrated his leadership qualities, desire to succeed and strategic planning throughout the creation of our pension business”.  Martin is a member of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners and commenced his career in 1993 with the Isle of Man Company Registry before moving into the private sector. He now leads an ever growing team who administrator a range of pension schemes including QROPS, QNUPS, SIPPs and international pensions.  “The way our business has grown over the past 12 months has been significant” said Martin, “With over 20 staff just on the pension side of the business, it is an exciting time to be part of Optimus. I am looking forward to progressing new avenues this year which is enabling us to develop business across the Middle East and Africa” 

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(L-R) Debbie Clague,Phaedra Bird, Diane Clarke, and John Cowan

CCW Trust Limited appoints senior manager

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CW Trust Limited is delighted to announce the appointment of Diane Clarke as fiduciary lead of its trust, corporate and family office division. Diane is a Chartered Secretary and brings more than 25 years’ experience of the Manx trust and corporate sector to the firm, the fiduciary services arm of accountancy firm Crowe Clark Whitehill, after working for some of the island’s leaders in the field, including Barclays, HSBC and First Names Group. Of her new post, which she took up in early December, she said: ‘I am excited to have become part of a trusted and respected firm that has a strong sense of team spirit, values its clients and is looking to expand. Together with my team of experienced professionals, I am looking forward to making my contribution to that expansion.’ ON THE AGENDA


PwC ISLE OF MAN CELEBRATES EXAM SUCCESS FOR SEVEN ASSOCIATES

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wC Isle of Man has congratulated seven associates on successfully completing their Associate Chartered Accountant (ACA) exams. Andrew Barrowman, Ashley Chadwick, Voirrey Cubbon, Charlie Freeman, Sumeet Pai, Stephen Renshaw and William Welsh all joined the firm as graduates and, after undertaking 15 exams each in total, all have gained first time passes on their final three exams. The ACA qualification is one of the most advanced learning and professional development programmes available. It is gained through the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW), Europe’s largest professional accountancy body, and is valued around the world in business, practice and the public sector. Ian Clague, Senior Partner at PwC Isle of Man, said: ‘We are delighted with this fantastic news, and I want to congratulate each of them on completing their exams. Embarking on a professional qualification alongside work is no mean feat, and I commend them for the self-discipline and motivation they have applied to achieve their qualifications. ‘With the firm’s support, continued professional and career development, and the power of our global network, I look forward to seeing how they will each drive their career forward to reach their full potential.’ MOVERS & SHAKERS

(L-R) William Welsh, Charlie Freeman, Ashley Chadwick, Voirrey Cubbon, Nicola Shepstone (Partner), Stephen Renshaw, Andrew Barrowman, Summet Pai.

Nicola Shepstone, People Partner at PwC Isle of Man, added: ‘The quality of our people is at the heart of the firm’s growth strategy, and is key to ensuring we provide the highest possible quality of services to meet the future needs of our clients with confidence. ‘I am very proud of their success, and would like to thank Manx Professional & Educational Services Ltd (MPES) for its high standards of quality training.’ PwC Isle of Man’s three-year ACA professional training contract allows candidates to gain exceptional technical skills, and also a good balance of business and personal skills. All seven of the associates will now go on to further develop their skills and knowledge, as they progress in their careers within the audit and assurance practice. PwC Isle of Man employs more than 115 people across its three lines of service; Audit, Tax and Advisory. It is trusted as a leading firm in the local business market, with the strength of a global network of expertise and resources to ensure it delivers exceptional client service. Recruitment for PwC Isle of Man’s 2016 professional training programme is open now, with opportunities for school leavers, graduates and experienced professionals, as well as summer internships. Further information is available under the Careers section at www.pwc.com/im/careers.

New Appointment For Miquando

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iquando has appointed Sarah Klaffenbock as Business Development Manager to join their expanding team. Sarah joins the team bringing with her nearly 20 years of Sales and Marketing experience having previously held roles with Mannin Media Group and Keith Uren Publishing. Miquando is an online service that allows any Isle of Man business to promote itself totally free of charge, with the added bonus of a unique online booking facility.  This means every business can open its doors online to customers, all day and every day.  Miquando quickly and easily connects local businesses with new and existing customers, who can also leave and share reviews of their own experiences. Sarah commented “ I am delighted to be joining the Miquando team. The Miquando brand has grown and grown over the last couple of years making it the first choice for many customers when booking local restaurants and many other services. Miquando is definitely the best way to find a recommended service and book it online in “the Isle of Man. ” Find it- Click it- Book it www.miquando.com  agenda

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Specialist Appointment Plays Important Part in Abacus Growth Strategy

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Three new hires as Sure continues growth

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ure has appointed three new members of staff to the team in the Isle of Man. Jason Spooner, Paul Cowell and Andrew White have joined the company as it continues to meet the ever-evolving needs of its Isle of Man customer base. Mr Spooner joins the company as its data centre solutions service manager, a new role created to ensure that Sure’s corporate customers can take advantage of the complex services provided through Sure’s data centre. Mr White has been appointed as Sure’s commercial finance manager and will be responsible for the long-term financial planning of the company. With over 10 years of experience in financial management roles in the Isle of Man Mr White’s knowledge of the financial and business landscape of

(L-R) Jason Spooner, Paul Cowell and Andrew White

the island will be vital in guaranteeing that Sure’s financial practices remain solid and reliable. Raised and educated in the island, Mr Cowell joins the company as an account director. A varied career in the telecoms sector has given him a broad knowledge of the industry and strong relationships with key suppliers and providers. Mike Phillips, chief executive officer of Sure Isle of Man, said: “All three of these appointments strengthen our team significantly and ensure that we can continue to service our business companies to the high standards that they expect. “Andrew, Jason and Paul have a huge amount of experience between them and their appointments are a great fit with our strategy of hiring leading industry experts who can enhance our product and service offerings.”

bacus, locally based fiduciary and fund services group with an office in Malta, has appointed Samantha Snow to VAT Specialist in its Malta office as part of its ongoing plans to strengthen the group’s yacht proposition and its expansion in Malta. Ms. Snow has over 15 years’ experience specialising in VAT and Indirect Tax matters, having worked with domestic and international clients across a diverse range of sectors including the Yachting, Remote Gaming, Financial Services and Property and Construction industries. Her role will be to lead the Abacus group’s VAT proposition across the Isle of Man and Malta, working closely with the Abacus Yachts and Aviation teams.  She will also lead the Malta team in terms of the development of client relationships and enhancement of their technical skills. Commenting on her appointment, she said: “I am very excited to be joining a dynamic and proactive business such as Abacus. With an experienced team of people based in both our Isle of Man and Malta offices and our ability to offer a comprehensive range of corporate services, I’m really looking forward to building on our existing client portfolio and making Abacus the number one for outstanding customer service.” Samantha has a wealth of experience working for major organisations in both Malta and the UK. She initially began her career as a VAT Assurance Officer with HM Revenue & Customs in the UK, carrying out VAT inspections, before moving on to work with two of the Big 4 accountancy firms.

Manx Telecom appoints new Chief Financial Officer

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anx Telecom has appointed Danny Bakhshi as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) with effect from 1st February 2016. He has 25 years’ experience in the telecoms industry and joins the Island’s leading communications company from Virgin Media where he has been Executive Commercial Director since 2013. Danny held a CFO role at Vodafone Global Enterprise Services for five years, before becoming Managing Director of

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Vodafone Global Enterprise Africa. He has also spent a number of years working in various finance roles at British Telecom. Commenting on his appointment, Danny said he is delighted to be joining Manx Telecom and added: “The company already benefits from well invested, reliable existing infrastructure, a highly experienced workforce and a really strong management team. Their reputation for service and innovation is well known in the sector but what is also clear to me is the real potential for

growth inside the business, both on and off-Island. I believe this is an exciting time for the business and I very much look forward to working with CEO Gary Lamb and his senior team to help take the company to the next level.” Gary Lamb stepped down as the company’s Finance Director to become CEO in July 2015. An Interim Chief Financial Officer – Paul Tierney – was appointed in June 2015, and Mr Bakhshi will take over as a permanent appointment in the role of CFO.

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(L-R) Sean Dowling, Rhian O’Leary, Charles Farrell and Faye Moffett

TWO WINNERS ANNOUNCED FOR Appleby Academy 2015 Appleby and Junior Achievement Isle of Man team up for fourth year of annual programme

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wo sixth-form students have been announced as winners of the fourth Appleby Academy, run by Appleby in partnership with Junior Achievement Isle of Man. For 2015, the Appleby Academy expanded to offer placements to two students – one with leading law firm Appleby, and the recently bought out Appleby Fiduciary Business (AFB). Rhian O’Leary from Queen Elizabeth II High School and Charles Farrell from Castle Rushen High School were declared the winners at the Academy final on 4 December 2015, having each presented a potential marketing solution to a judging panel, focusing on attracting and maintaining key clients. Fellow finalists were Katherine Sharman from Ballakermeen High School, Lucy Wall from Ramsey Grammar School, and Edward Hedley from St. Ninian’s High School. Each finalist delivered a five-minute presentation

MOVERS & SHAKERS

on a solution to a particular business challenge before taking questions from judges, including Minister Laurence Skelly, Department of Economic Development, James Collier, Relationship Manager at Barclays, Sean Dowling, Group Director at AFB, and Faye Moffett, Managing Partner at Appleby. Faye said: ‘The judges had a difficult time choosing our winners this year; all five finalists delivered presentations of exceptional quality and the amount of effort and hard work that they put in was evident. I would like to congratulate all of the students that took part, and we look forward to having Charles join us at Appleby this summer.’ Sean added: ‘It is hugely challenging to present an idea to a room full of people, but the students were clearly unfazed which made choosing the winners an exceptionally tough task. Congratulations to all of this year’s finalists, and we look forward to welcoming Rhian to AFB on her summer placement.’ Sue Cook, Chief Executive at Junior Achievement Isle of Man, said: ‘It is extremely important for students to combine work experience with their studies, to better their chances of securing employment once they leave education. The Appleby Academy aims to give sixth form students in the Isle of Man real life experience of working with an international organisation, and participating in the programme gives students the opportunity to develop skills that are highly valued by employers. ‘Junior Achievement is extremely grateful for the continued support of Appleby and their staff, which is crucial to the Appleby Academy’s growth and success year on year.’

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Photography - Matt Mosur

business events

“The Cosmopolitan Islander” Book Launch Party at The Tickethall

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ocal writer, Michelle P. Tonnesen, celebrated the launch of her debut novel “The Cosmopolitan Islander” at a party at The Tickethall on Thursday 10th December. The great turnout also raised funds of £85 for the Family Library, which the author doubled to a total of £170. Manx Independent Carriers saved the day by delivering the books, which had been stuck in a container across, just as the guests arrived. “I am forever grateful to all who joined in the fun and supported me – from courier to cover designer. It has been an exciting journey to publication, and I can’t wait to see what the future brings,” stated the author. “The Cosmopolitan Islander” is available as paperback at local bookshops, as well as e-book and paperback on Amazon. Its alluring book cover is designed by local artist, Bruno Cavellec. Read more about the inspiring new novel on www.facebook.com/ thecosmopolitanislander

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Photography - dollsfactory.net

Sure Corporate Clients & Staff Christmas Drinks

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ocal telecoms company Sure celebrated a successful year with its annual Christmas drinks at Bath & Bottle in December. Sure had a bumper year in 2015 with the introduction of true competition to the Isle of Man’s telecoms market for the first time thanks to the implementation of Wholesale Line Rental and the upgrade of the existing 2G and 3G mobile networks and the introduction of the 4G network. The event was hosted by Sure Isle of Man chief executive Mike Phillips. Among the guests invited to toast Sure’s success were local business customers, staff and members of the government. Sure would like to thanks all its customers and business partners for their support in 2015 and is looking forward to an exciting 2016.

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Business events

Equiom sponsored ladies lunch raises thousands for Manx Breast Cancer Support Group

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heila Dean, Global Chief Executive Officer of Equiom and Patron of the Manx Breast Cancer Support Group, recently hosted a fund raising lunch for 100 ladies at Portofino in order to raise funds for the charity. The lunch, which has become an annual event raised over ÂŁ20,000.00 on the day following a raffle and auction for some fabulous prizes very generously donated by over 20 local individuals and businesses.

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The money will go towards purchasing specialist equipment needed for the new dedicated breast unit at Nobles Hospital which is due to open on 1st February. As well as providing an excellent facility for the women on the Island suffering from breast cancer, this equipment will enable the Unit to become involved in Breast Cancer Trials with a Unit in the UK. Guests enjoyed a two-course meal and a fantastic fashion show by Claire Christian Couture featuring the Autumn/Winter 2015 Ready to Wear Collection. ON THE AGENDA


Photography - dollsfactory.net

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wealth & finance

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here is a great deal of ruin in a nation. Thus did the wise Adam Smith rebuke a correspondent’s worry that ruin was bound to follow reversals in the war against the North American colonists. If there is a great deal of ruin in an individual country, there is even more ruin in the world economy. Somehow, it keeps on going. Measured at purchasing power parity, the world economy has grown in every year since 1946, even (albeit barely) in 2009, in the wake of the global financial crisis. The period between 1900 and 1946 was more unstable than the era of managed capitalism that succeeded it. Even so, the world economy grew in all but nine of those years. The innovation-driven economy that emerged in the late 18th and 19th centuries and spread across the globe in the 20th and 21st just grows. That is the most important fact about it. It does not grow across the world at all evenly — far from it. It does not share its benefits among people at all equally — again, far from it. But it grows. It grew last year. Much the most plausible assumption is that it will grow again this year.  The world economy will not grow forever. But it will only stop when the economics of Thomas Malthus overwhelm those of Joseph Schumpeter — that is, when resource constraints offset innovation. We are certainly not there yet. Since 1900, the world’s output has grown at a rate of just over 3 per cent a year. Such is the power of compound interest that world output has expanded more than 30-fold over this period. Output grew relatively slowly in the early part of the 20th century and relatively fast between 1947 and the early 1970s. Intriguingly, it grew a bit faster under postwar Keynesian economics than under the conservative revival launched by Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. Now consider the pattern of volatility. The marked volatility between 1914 and 1919 was due to the first world war; that of the 1930s to the Great Depression; and that of the 1940s to the second world war. The instability of the 1970s and early 1980s was due to the oil shocks, triggered (or augmented) by war (the Yom Kippur war of 1973 and Iraq’s 1980 invasion of Iran). Inflationary financing of the Vietnam war generated the inflationary backdrop to the instability. Ultimately, that led to disinflation by the Federal Reserve, under Paul Volcker.  The slowdown in 1990 and 1991 was again due to disinflation and the first Gulf war, which followed Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait. The slowdown in 1998 was triggered

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Why global economic disaster is an unlikely event Words: Martin Shaw

What matters is not whether the world will be well managed but whether calamity will be avoided.

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by the Asian financial crisis, that in 2001 by the bursting of a huge stock market bubble and that in 2009 by the western financial crisis. This picture of the past indicates the kind of events one should worry about. In brief, there seem to be three: wars; inflation shocks (perhaps linked to wars or jumps in commodity prices); and financial crises. These phenomena can be linked: wars will trigger inflation if their finance is by inflationary means. In this light, let us consider current risks. Some analysts have been convinced for years that high inflation must result from the expansion of central-bank balance sheets. They are wrong. It is quite possible for central banks to control the effects of their policies upon the expansion in credit and money. A second set of risks, again ceaselessly promoted, is that of financial crisis. The biggest risks seem to be in emerging economies. But these risks are likely to be contained or prove manageable at the global level. If the worst came to the worst, the results are likely to be more like those of 1998 than of 2009. The third set of risks is that of geopolitical upheaval and conflict. We can identify a daunting list of worries: the massive overloading of the EU’s capacity to act; the possible exit of the UK from the EU; the hollowing out of the western alliance; the rise of populist pressures in high-income countries, shown in the success of Marine Le Pen and the rise of “Trumpism”; uncertainty about China’s economic and even political future; the rise of global jihadism, and particularly of Isis, the “world’s most powerful terrorist organisation”; Russian revanchism; disputes among great powers, notably between Russia and the US and China and the US; friction in the Middle East, notably between Iran and Saudi Arabia; state failure; floods of refugees; and US retreat from its hegemonic role. Beyond this is a decline in the legitimacy and effectiveness of many high-income democracies, the fragile self-importance of many other powers and the chaos in large parts of the world. Yet all this comes at the same time as a need for effective global governance in an integrated and interdependent world. If one wants to worry, there is plenty to worry about. Yet, from the economic viewpoint, what matters is not so much whether the world will be well managed: it will not be. What matters more is whether a disaster will be avoided. What would such an event look like? A war among great powers could be one. Election of a bellicose ignoramus to the US presidency could be another. A war between Iran and Saudi Arabia would be a disaster. The replacement of the Saudi regime by Isis would be another. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan would be another. Collapse of the EU could prove yet another. The cumulative chance that at least one of all such disasters will occur is greater than the chance that any one of them will do so. Nevertheless, the likelihood that none of them will occur is surely bigger. Remember: there is a great deal of ruin in the world economy. WEALTH & FINANCE

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wealth & finance

Ten developments in digital finance Words: Emma Dunkley

Digital technology has changed the face of banking. “But innovation for innovation’s sake is a waste; it must have a genuine customer benefit. Useful or not, here is a round-up of the latest developments

1. Investment in digital banks A number of traditional high street lenders are taking stakes in more nimble digital banks. BBVA in Spain, for example, has acquired a stake in digitalonly Atom Bank in the UK and Simple in the US.

5. Video links for services

Banks are increasingly focused on ways to provide a digital service, including use of video, rather than simply concentrating on product sales, in order to retain customers.

8. Monetising data

New banks are seeking to help customers monetise data. Secco Bank, set to launch soon in the UK, is focused on this area.

9. Biometrics 2. Blockchain

Blockchain, the technology predicated on a shared database that underpins the cryptocurrency bitcoin, is being adapted for banking. It could speed up settlements and bolster security.

6. Wearables

Wearables are the next mobile payment frontier. Barclays launched a bPay product range in the UK, which consists of a digital wallet linked to one of three devices — a wristband, fob or sticker — that can be used to pay at more than 300,000 locations across the UK.

RBS in the UK recently enabled Touch ID on its banking app as a way for customers to more easily log on using their fingerprint. Barclays Wealth unveiled voice recognition to identify its customers.

10. Internal data teams 3. Collaboration with marketplace lenders

Banks are teaming up with peer-topeer platforms, with a recent example being Metro Bank’s partnership with P2P lender Zopa in the UK.

7. Social media

Banks are adopting social media, from Snapchat to Twitter and Facebook, both for internal use and to interact with customers. Royal Bank of Scotland recently partnered with Facebook to provide employees with an internal communication site.

Traditional lenders are starting to create in-house specialist teams. Capital One, for example, last year hired Daniel Makoski from Google for its digital design team.

4. Digital payments

The launch of Apple Pay heralds the move of digital payments into the mainstream. A number of banks in the US and UK have signed up to Apple Pay.

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wealth & finance

How to invest like ... JD Rockefeller, the richest man who ever lived Words: Richard Evans

The oil tycoon amassed a fortune equivalent to $340bn – but he learnt his first lesson about investing at the age of 14. 62

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ohn D Rockefeller: ‘I had a peculiar training in my home. I cannot remember when hard work was new or strange to me. We were taught to work, to save and to give’ John D Rockefeller Snr had modest origins but, as the driving force behind the spectacular growth of the Standard Oil company, became the world’s first billionaire and by the time of his death in 1937 his assets worth about 1.5pc of America’s total economic output. The equivalent in today’s money would be about $340bn, many times the wealth of Warren Buffett or Bill Gates. His first taste of business came at the age of seven, as he recounted later in his book Random Reminiscences of Men and Events: “I engaged in my first business enterprise with the assistance of my mother. I owned some turkeys, and she presented me with the curds from the milk to feed them. I took care of the birds myself and sold them all in businesslike fashion. My receipts were all profits, as I had nothing to do with the expense account, and my receipts were kept as carefully as I knew how.”  He learnt another lesson – the value of putting his money to work by investing it – at the age of just 14. By that time he had saved $50 (equivalent to roughly $1,500 today) from his turkey sales and from carrying out chores for his family and neighbours. At his mother’s suggestion he lent this money to a local farmer for a one-year term at 7pc interest. When the year had passed he duly received his $50 back plus $3.50 in interest.  At about the same time he received $1.12 in payment for three days of digging potatoes for a neighbour. “On entering the two transactions in his ledger,” The New York Times recorded in his obituary, “he realised that his pay for this hard work was less than one-third the annual interest on his $50 and resolved to make as much money work for him as he could.”  Rockefeller said in later life: “I had a peculiar training in my home. I cannot remember when hard work was new or strange to me. We were taught to work, to save and to give [he was to become a hugely generous philanthropist]. Ours seemed to be a business training from the beginning.” But he didn’t embark on an entrepreneurial career right away. After secondary school, where he excelled at maths – especially mental arithmetic – and debating, he spent 10 weeks at a commercial college where he learnt about book-keeping, business customs and banking.  He then gained practical experience of business at Hewitt & Tuttle, an agricultural produce brokerage. He impressed his bosses by his hard work and determination, and soon arranged complex deals on the company’s behalf. However, he left a couple of years later when he was refused the pay rise he felt he deserved. It was at this point, at the age of 19, that he went into business for himself, in partnership with an Englishman named Maurice Clark. “We were prosperous from the beginning,” Rockefeller said later.  “We did business of $450,000 the first year. Our profit was not large – I think about $4,400.” The firm grew rapidly, but Rockefeller began WEALTH & FINANCE

to fear it would fall prey to one of the great changes in the American economy – the rise of the railways. His firm flourished partly because of its location in Cleveland, on the shores of Lake Erie, ideal for transporting produce by a combination of ship and cart. But other cities were better placed in an agricultural transport system dominated by the railways. Rockefeller began to look for other opportunities – and found them in oil.  Oil was discovered in Pennsylvania in 1859 and Rockefeller went into the oil business in 1862, again in partnership with Clark. This venture was not a success and the partnership was dissolved. But Rockefeller bought its plant at auction for $72,500, borrowing most of the money.  This business, via a long series of mergers and acquisitions, eventually become the giant Standard Oil, which had operations not only across America but across the globe. Rockefeller believed in efficiency and avoiding waste. He devised processes and products to ensure that every part of crude oil, when refined, had a useful purpose. He also believed in economies of scale, and bought up competitors to the point that Standard Oil became a virtual monopoly (it was later broken up by the authorities on those grounds, spawning an array of smaller companies including Chevron and ExxonMobil; the original company of the Standard Oil empire is now part of BP).  To fund this extraordinary expansion, Rockefeller reinvested the firm’s profits but also had to borrow – in fact he described himself as “a great borrower”. The New York Times obituary noted: “He kept expanding his business and borrowed large sums to finance it. His reputation for work and economy, as well as his regular habits and church attendance, gave his credit a high rating at the banks.  “Once a bank president warned him that he had borrowed almost all the money in the bank and that the directors wished to see him right away. ‘All right,’ he replied. ‘I’ll go right over to see them. I want to borrow a great deal more.’” Rockefeller’s life sounds like the ultimate proof of the theory that the only way to get seriously wealthy is to start your own business. The purpose of this section, by contrast, is to help you grow your wealth by investing in shares and funds, leaving others to run the businesses concerned.  But there are some aspects of Rockefeller’s approach that hold lessons for ordinary investors. It goes without saying that he was a “buy and hold” investor in the companies he bought, using them to strengthen his own firm rather than selling on for a quick profit. His determination to make Standard Oil the pre-eminent – or even the only – business in its sector also finds an echo in the strategy of some fund managers who buy shares only in companies that dominate their markets.  Another of Rockefeller’s rules was always to invest profits back into his business. Firms that can reinvest profits and continue to make high returns on the reinvested money are able to deliver strong compounded gains to investors.

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in-business

John & Sean Quaye Words: Les Able Photo: dollsfactory.net

RELATIVE VALUES Sean Quaye, the son dubbed a ‘grafter’ by his father John whose own business ethos behind the success of Manx Independent Carriers is hard work and diligence, “Nobody tries harder than us, and that’s not just bulls**t,” declares Sean, operations director of the company. It’s a philosophy he has inherited from his father, who just happens to be chairman of the company and a ‘member’ of the island’s elite club of entrepreneurs whose businesses are celebrating their 30th anniversaries. 64

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ean, 31, got his first taste of working in the business at the age of 12. “You could say I’ve always been around transport and logistics,” he says.  When he finished his A-Levels Sean flirted with the idea of university but it wasn’t for him nor was being cooped up in the company’s office when he joined the business at the age of 20. “For me at that time it was all about driving the vans and meeting customers,” adds Sean who readily admits there was no special treatment for him as the son of the boss.  A silver spoon there most definitely wasn’t. “I probably gave Sean a harder time than I would have given other staff,” admits John.  “What amazed me is that when Sean got the warehouse supervisor’s job, which meant he had to be first member of staff there to open up by 7.00am or even earlier he never once let me down, he was always there on time.  “The demands of the job often meant him doing a 12-hour day but he never quibbled about that and not once did I have to pull him up for bad time-keeping.  He never took advantage of being my son.  Sean is a grafter, a bit like myself, he’s also a good problem solver, he sees past the problem and rapidly arrives at the solution.” John, who comes from farming stock and whose father was a farmer all his life, initially worked in banking when he left school and when he moved on from the Isle of Man Bank it was to the income tax office.  “But like Sean, I didn’t enjoy being cooped up in an office so I got a job as a van driver with Ashworth Transport,” recalls John.  In 1985 he and Chris Workman, who is a director of Manx Independent Carriers, decided to start up their own company along with one driver and based from a small warehouse on Douglas Head. By then John was married with three young children so it was a major step for him and not without its risks.  He had given up a well paid, comfortable job as general manager with Island Express, ploughed all his savings and money borrowed from his father into starting up the business.  In its first year, however, the company made a profit and was employing around 10 staff.  He recalls that the company’s first month’s bill from the Isle of Man Steam Packet was £14,000 a month, the figure is now a mighty £400,000 a month. The company now has 130  employees spread across three depots, an annual turnover of around £12m and a Who’s Who of blue chip companies.

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“The demands of the job often meant him doing a 12-hour day but he never quibbled about that and not once did I have to pull him up for bad time-keeping. He never took advantage of being my son”

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Relative Values

“In those early days every day was something of a struggle, it was tough at the time,” says John. “Our first big contract was fertilisers for farms but as a business we expanded organically and through acquisitions. Our success has been achieved through hard work and diligence. We have diversified from delivering packages and pallets to bulk tippers and tankers but our main business is next day parcel delivery for the main players in the market.  When we get a new client in on board in what is a highly competitive market it still gives me a real buzz.” On changes in recent years he adds:  “We’ve noticed a decline in public sector spending and the building trade, however internet shopping has increased and we have seen growth in the home delivery market.  Fuel has gone from being a minor cost to one of our major costs alongside salaries and shipping costs.” Sean, former captain of St George’s Football Club Team and who has also captained the Isle of Man National Football Team, admits that as operations manager he is still learning the ropes but from an early age confesses he was always hungry to succeed.  “I picked up the hard work ethos from my Dad and Grandad.  My job involves a lot of day to day organisation along with staff issues, speaking to customers and fire fighting issues when they arise.  A demanding role is something I enjoy.  The

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“In those early days every day was something of a struggle, it was tough at the time,”

fast-paced nature of the business requires problem solving skills and meeting the demands of customers is a priority.” Married, with a one-year-old son Henry, he goes on: “There are lots of things I admire about my Dad. Setting up the company the way he did and growing it to where it is now is a major achievement and he has given me some great opportunities.  He has taught me that nothing comes free, you get out of it what you put into it.  That’s something he’s always done and has passed that on to me.  Like him, I wouldn’t ask someone to do something I couldn’t and wouldn’t do myself.” It’s here that John, now 63 and semiretired, joins in.  “When I started the business I swept floors and cleaned the toilets.  Neither Sean nor I shy from doing anything.  It’s not the approach that some youngsters starting out have.  They sometimes do need a kick up the backside, all too often thinking the world owes them a living.” It’s clear that that John and Sean are not just father and son but also good friends.  “The relationship works, Sean isn’t afraid to ask when he comes up against an obstacle,” says John Both share a love of motor bikes and while Sean is a keen trials rider, John is something of a collector with some 45 bikes, the oldest a 1953 BS “My indulgence,” he declares.

ON THE AGENDA


iod-director

INSTITUTE OF DIRECTORS ISLE OF MAN BRANCH

IoD Company Direction Preview With ‘Know How’ from Dick Welsh Words: Les Able

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ick Welsh, director of the Isle of Man Ship Registry, readily admits he now has the confidence to walk into any company boardroom with the full knowledge and understanding of what is required of a non-executive director. He is planning to share this “know how” at a marketing event on February 18 at the Sefton Hotel, Douglas, organised by the Institute of Directors to publicise its Company Direction programme for 2016/17, Mr Welsh, who two years ago made up his mind to sign up for the comprehensive course, is now the holder of both the IoD’s Certificate in Company Direction and more recently the prestigious Diploma in Company Direction which he gained with distinction in the November 2015  examination . “When I embarked on the course it had been a long time since I had sat down and done anything like it,” said Mr Welsh, who started his working life as an engineering officer cadet in the Merchant Navy and, in his words, worked his way up the ranks to overseeing the building of ships round the world. “It is a course which puts things in perspective and explains what is required Dick Welsh under the Corporate Governance Code.      Director of Isle of Man Ship Registry More is now expected of directors as a result of legislation which has come about in recent years.  What is achieved from the course is an accredited qualification and

“It is a course which puts things in perspective and explains what is required under the Corporate Governance Code”

IN-BUSINESS

the knowledge acquired is all important in understanding the financial health and strategic direction of an organisation when becoming a director of it.” Mr Welsh, a member of the Isle of Man branch of the IoD, added: “It was something I had long wanted to do and the networking evening I attended two years ago tipped the balance for me.   The course is in two or three-day modules, adding up to 13 days over a period of 12-18 months. I also took time off for studying at home prior to the exams.  Course members all met up as fresh faced IoD students from all walks of life, so it was a matter of shared experiences and networking.  As a group we continue to meet every two or three months for a chat, it’s also something of a support network.” The programme covers the role of a director, corporate governance, the legal requirements, strategy and marketing, finance and leadership.  “Together, they are a powerful set of instruments,” he added. “The tutors, who are engaged by the University of Salford, outline real life problems they have experienced and had to deal with in business and industry.” Holders of the Diploma in Company Direction are eligible to become ‘Chartered Directors’ and use the designation CDir. This designation is increasingly recognised as the professional qualification for directors, being recognised by bodies such as the Financial Reporting Council (FRC) and Financial Services Authority on the Island.   IoD programme director Alison Kennedy said: “The benefits are far greater than an examination pass. The Government’s Department of Economic Development is keen to support this programme to upskill the Island’s workforce and, although applications are considered on a case by case basis, has provided support towards the programme cost for many recent participants.” The preview for the programme is at the Sefton Hotel, Douglas on February 18 from 6.00pm to 7.30pm.  For further information and to reserve a place contact Claire Veale at admin@iod.im or Alison Kennedy at  j.a.kennedy@salford.ac.uk. agenda

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current affairs

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elcome, dear reader, to Current Affairs; your chance to pose any number of questions to the Island’s business community. We invite you to ask our experts on the topics that matter to you. Simply send your questions to: editorial@gallery.co.im

Rossborough Q A

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Sandra Taylor

Personal Insurance Manager Rossborough Insurance

What are the key things I need to consider when taking out a travel insurance policy?

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t’s the New Year and many of you will be thinking about holiday destinations. Whatever your plans are this year there’s one thing you need to consider bringing with you – a comprehensive and tailored travel insurance policy. To help you get the appropriate cover for your trip, we have come up with a list of key points to consider when speaking to your broker or doing an online search. 1. First decide if you are travelling in Europe or further afield. Once you’ve got a destination speak to your broker, as there are some countries that you wouldn’t consider being part of Europe, that do in fact come under Europe for travel insurance - Egypt being a good example. 2. Are you considering going on more than one trip this year? If so there are a number of options available for multi-trip policies, which can save you money and cover you for a range of different activities. 3. Have you declared all medical conditions that have the potential to cause problems? Anything that isn’t declared could result in medical cover being excluded in the event of a claim. 4. Do you have personal possessions cover on your household policy? If so there’s a good chance you won’t need this cover on travel and can get a discount. Our advice would be to speak to your broker to make sure you are getting the best deal for your holiday destination and individual requirements.

Annexio

Jennifer Houghton Managing Director Annexio

Q

What is your outlook for compliance in the gaming sector in 2016?

A

C

ompliance is a surprisingly complex challenge for those of us that operate in the online gaming sector. 2016, while it will certainly bring change, is unlikely to eliminate the complexity we currently face. The first key issue for companies that operate in more than one jurisdiction is that compliance varies greatly country to country. The differences in compliance regulations mean that we need to invest a great deal of time ensuring that we are operating legally so that we can guarantee the protection of our customers, investors and employees. However, these regulations extend beyond monetary protection and actually encompass a number of business sectors. 2016 will also see the Island play host to monitoring body Moneyval, who will conduct an audit of local operators that advertise online. They will be assessing online payment models for potential money laundering and the risk of illicit payments to criminal or terrorist organisations. Moneyval’s work on a regional compliance standard is crucial to protecting the integrity of the industry in the long term, and to easing the current barriers presented by compliance differences between jurisdictions. Compliance is an area where change is the only constant and we don’t think for a second we know everything to expect from the coming year. We don’t simply tick boxes when it comes to compliance; we ensure that we put all the safeguards in place to protect our customers, investors and staff.

ON THE AGENDA


Chrystals Q A

Shane Magee

Chairman Chrystals Estate Agents

What is being done locally to help stimulate the housing market?

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overnment policy has launched a £50m Enterprise Development Fund to invest in new businesses and jobs for the Island. This bold initiative will help stimulate the economy and attract entrepreneurial minds to the Island. It’s all about increasing jobs, where the local spend remains in the economy and stimulates local trade. This will ultimately filter into the housing market but it will take time for the benefits to be seen. New enterprise is to be welcomed and the push for new economically active residents must be stepped up and heavily promoted both on and off-island if this initiative is to gain traction. The Estate Agency world is a highly competitive one, with more high street and online firms competing for business. The beauty of the high street model is that applicants and vendors walk in to talk to us. Our online presence is as prominent as the internet only agents and we are the first Estate Agent on the Isle of Man to be signed up with On The Market.com. This will give Chrystals clients and applicants the opportunity to search for Isle of Man property without intrusive adverts, spam or distractions. You will be able to give yourself the edge by creating a property alert and view relevant properties as soon as they come on the market. We will also tie up with Country Life magazine property website, which will help promote our higher value residential properties to an international audience.

harding lewis Q A

Phil Butler

Advisor Harding Lewis Limited

What is the best advice for budgeting for the year ahead?

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he amount of debt (business and personal) in the economy is significant and although unexpected events do occur to cause this, the extent of debt clearly indicates that people and entities do not budget sufficiently. So where do you start? The start is where it often falls over, this due to the task appearing to be overwhelming. So let’s break it down: In very brief summary, the plan is to set-out (by month or week using a spreadsheet or equivalent) income sources and expenditure by category over a period of time (for example 12 months or more), the objective being to find out if you have sufficient income to cover expected outgoings. Hopefully there is an expected surplus which you can then plan to invest or spend, but the reality for many is that outgoings are forecast to exceed income. Being able to forecast this means that action can be taken in advance e.g. try and earn more income or else cut outgoings. Borrowing should only be used where there is a plan to repay it. Expenses can sometimes be difficult to estimate and a good starting point can be to review last year’s expenditure and to adapt accordingly. A book can be written on this topic but the key is to keep it simple and also include a contingency for unexpected events which will inevitably occur.

Play the World’s biggest jackpots www.annexio.com IN-BUSINESS

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keystone law

Keystone Law Looks to Legal Domination on Launching in the Isle of Man

James Knight (centre) with the Keystone Law Isle  left: Ben Hughes, Gillian Christian, Stephen Rodd.

Words: Les Able

An ambitious entrepreneur within the legal profession is something of a rarity but James Knight, founder and managing director of fast-growing London-based Keystone Law, is behind the first City law firm to establish a presence in the Isle of Man in more than 20 years.

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ON THE AGENDA


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evolutionary firm Keystone Law launches in the Isle of Man’, shouts the headline on the press release announcing the arrival of the business and yes,  as far as James Knight is concerned,  a ‘business’ is what a law firm is.  This is a new law firm which is unequivocally setting its sights on Manx domination in what amounts to a new age for the profession. A firm, which according to James Knight has already brought “significant business” to the island, is one of the fastest growing law firms in the UK and going forward at an increasing rate.  He believes a crucial factor in launching the brand in the island is that the team in all have strong Manx connections coupled with high profiles and will be active in the business community. Keystone’s ethos is to provide domestic and international clients with the “superior service standards and support of an award-winning UK law firm”.  The concept, however, is the dispersed law firm with Keystone a central hub with no expensive offices or teams of juniors. Keystone’s lawyers work through the brand from their own homes or from serviced offices and an IT platform connects them to one another.   Essentially, says Knight, a small central office and a staff of 30 administrators co-ordinate the work of more than 170 lawyers.  He is at pains to emphasise that Keystone combines all the benefits of a leading, fullservice law firm with low-cost efficiency. Entrepreneurs can conjure up the image of ‘recklessness’ but Knight, whose family home is Laureston Manor in Douglas, is most definitely not that.    “You have to structure your business so that it always follows the rules,” he declares. He came up with the Keystone Law model in 2002 when working as a consulting lawyer.  “Sometimes I’d run out of work and I thought there must be an agency that caters to people like myself, but there wasn’t.”  So he conceived a model where lawyers could get on with what they enjoy – law – while outsourcing all the tedious and time-consuming paperwork to the central administrators.   The model would combine the benefits of a full-service law firm with low-cost efficiency. “The result is that lawyers like to work for us, it’s a very realistic alternative to a conventional law firm,” says Knight who sees his talents as picking the right people and making deals. “We’re about a fresh approach, not just to law but to business too.  We are free to work around the individual needs of our clients and it makes for a liberating experience for our lawyers too.  Clients benefit from the undivided attention of lawyers who are from running a busy law practice and meeting onerous billing targets. “Our lawyers are free to think independently and creatively and to focus upon our clients’ requirements. They are free to find the perfect work-life balance which fuels an insatiable passion for the job in hand.  Yes, we provide an agile and flexible alternative to the traditional law firm.  We use technology to bring clients closer to our world and to drive more intimate relationships.  Our unique model promotes first class service and our lawyers forge straightforward and meaningful partnerships.” While January saw what might be described as the ‘soft launch’ of Keystone IOM, with the charismatic James Knight arriving to freezing IN-BUSINESS

“The Isle of Man needs more law firms not less. The idea is to increase the inward flow business and within as well.”

temperatures direct from the heat of Cape Town and a tan to prove it, described by one admiring female as having ‘film star looks’,  the celebration launch party for some 150 guests will be in March at Laureston Manor where the champagne will flow amid a fireworks spectacular.  “It’s not been easy to set up a new law firm on the island, it’s not a closed shop but it has its separate regulatory structure,” confesses Knight. “It is a unique place with its own mindset, my background made it easier but it all only became possible on meeting the founders of Keystone IOM.. To achieve all this has taken two-and-a-half years of planning to get to this stage.    There is also the reticence on the part of individuals moving from a conventional law firm to take a new path, people need to be convinced that ‘new path’ is a wise one to take.”  Knight adds:  “The Isle of Man needs more law firms not less.  The idea is to increase the inward flow business and within as well.  We hope to become a growing, exciting and well respected law firm giving a high level of confidence.  The real driving force is to provide domestic and offshore clients with the service and support of an award-winning UK national law firm, paired with knowledge of leading lawyers who understand the market.  In turn, by bolstering collaboration between London and the Isle of Man, nurturing and facilitating growth in both locations.” The Isle of Man Keystone Law team is: Managing director and Manx man Geoff Kermeen, who has a long-standing family history on the island.  His expertise includes a wide range of corporate and structured finance work, with particular experience in advising lenders, investors and developers in the UK and European commercial real estate sector.   Corporate and commercial consultant solicitor is Isle of Man resident Stephen Rodd who has spent several years living and practicing in the Middle East.  He has extensive experience advising multi-national and local trading firm clients across a wide range of industries. Director is Manx woman Gillian Christian, whose practice is concentrated on commercial and trust litigation.  A keen sports woman, who has competed in the NatWest Island Games several times, she is also secretary to the Isle of Man Law Society. Insurance and pension consultant solicitor and resident Ben Hughes, is a member of the Association of Pensions Lawyers.  His areas of practice include domestic and international pension schemes, employee share and performance plans and trust matters. Director and again an islander is director Charlie Whipp, who advises on a wide range of corporate and commercial matters, both inhouse and in private practice.  Heavily involved in sport, he has represented the Isle of Man in cricket and is an active member of the Manx Fell Runners Club.   All the existing UK firm’s partner-level lawyers will be made available to Isle of Man clients when they need general or specialist English law advice.  In addition, a number of Keystone lawyers, specialising in the provision of aviation, real estate, regulatory, employment, intellectual property and property tax will also become Isle of Man registered legal practitioners. 

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technology

The Worlds Tech firms have high hopes for 2016 It is worth remembering that big technological leaps do not happen quickly. Nokia’s 9000 Communicator packed email, web browsing and fax into a phone in the mid-1990s, while the iPhone, launched in 2007, came after more than a decade of developments. Words: Richard Evans

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ith hindsight, such breakthroughs seem to have been inevitable. But false dawns abound — and 2016 is likely to have more than its fair share of them. In a period of abundant experimentation, the challenge will be telling which are harbingers of shifts in work and personal life and which are deadends in technology evolution. This year may begin with a bang, with the mass-market launch of a staple of science fiction, virtual reality (VR) headsets. Facebook’s Oculus Rift will finally hit the market in the first quarter, following Samsung’s introduction of its own VR headsets, also using Oculus technology, this year. Before the end of 2016, augmentedreality goggles from Magic Leap and Microsoft, which overlay virtual images on to a view of the real world, could also become available. The much-hyped arrival of 3D television three years ago is a reminder of how

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expectations of eye-catching technologies can be ahead of reality. Even if virtual and augmented reality do not flop they will have trouble living up to expectations. High prices — the company has said the headset will cost “up to $400”, though a bigger cost will be buying a PC capable of running the software — a shortage of content and applications, and uncertain consumer adoption of such a different technology cloud short-term prospects. Companies such as Facebook have been doing their best to talk down expectations, but 2016 will at least bring the first real glimpse of a computing platform with profound implications for entertainment, social interaction and work. Another future computing platform is likely to see a burst of innovation after a disappointing first wave. “Wearables” such as smartwatches were meant to extend mobile computing beyond smartphones and tablets to other, even more convenient, products. However, the two flagship

wearables of 2015 have not lived up to the hype surrounding them. The performance of the Apple Watch has been cloaked in uncertainty as the company has not provided firm sales numbers and Google’s Glass has gone back to the drawing board. Both are likely to appear in their second iterations in 2016. Optimists will point to the fact that the iPod and iPhone had only modest sales before hitting their stride in year two. But wearables have yet to develop must-have apps and the advances are now needed in the uses to which they can be put rather than in developing the hardware itself. If delivering a breakthrough product is hard to plan, the technological forces that make them possible are easier to trace. In the same way that cheap sensors, powerefficient processors and higher-bandwidth mobile networks made the iPhone possible, a number of factors are pushing what is likely to be one of the defining technologies of 2016 and beyond: artificial intelligence. The largely invisible nature of AI

ON THE AGENDA


means predicting how it will affect popular consciousness is as much a sociological as a technological challenge. Two years ago, a wave of anxiety spread that intelligent machines would put humans out of work. The same concerns were rife in the 1960s, but AI technologies are now advancing quickly. Cloud computing power and new approaches to machine learning, with the “big data” that act as the raw material for AI systems to “learn” from, have combined to bring a leap forward in machine intelligence. Some of the planet’s richest, most ambitious companies have hired top academic talent — such as Facebook, which in 2013 hired Yann LeCun, a computer scientist who founded the Center for Data Science at New York University — signalling something of an AI race is under way. The results of this competition will be largely hidden from view. Many AI advances will come in the form of improved performance of existing systems or in

TECHNOLOGY

more effective man-machine interactions, rather than new products or services. Voice activation is likely to feature on more devices, along with more intelligent forms of interaction. Businesses that learn how to use the technology should create more effective advertising, enjoy a higher conversion of leads into sales, and have happier customers. However, the last thing most of these businesses will do is brag. Results will be seen in the gulf between the performance of companies that harness this technology and those that do not. The tendency with technology is to always look forward to the next big thing, so it is easy to forget the big thing that is already here. As we enter 2016 the smartphone age has reached a turning point. About 2bn of us have them, making these devices far more pervasive than personal computers ever were. Their popularity has put tablets and wearables in the shade. The smartphone revolution is likely to continue. Room for growth in the

developed world and China — which have driven expansion — is running out. The focus is moving to India and other developing markets, forcing a shift in the basis of competition. Low-cost handsets and subsidised data plans are becoming the norm, along with networking technologies to help businesses reach the next few billion customers. Google’s Project Loon — a necklace of highaltitude, globe-circling balloons acting as satellites — will be tested, with three mobile networks in Indonesia planning to use them for internet access. China’s slowing domestic economy, meanwhile, means its few leading internet companies could consider moving aggressively beyond their borders for the first time. These forces will make 2016 a year of changing international perspectives. In 12 months’ time, the technologies may still look familiar, but the markets for them and the providers of them may well be very different.

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technology

8 Tech Trends Changing How We Work In 2016 Words: Richard Evans

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We have witnessed a tremendous change in the way people everywhere use technology to complete their daily tasks. Today’s workforce books plane tickets, hails taxis, collects payments, pays bills and even controls their home from their smartphone or wearable device. Innovations from our personal lives are converging into our careers and people expect it more than ever. People value the flexibility to work from anywhere, any time, on any device, and have come to expect this user experience. What does this mean for the business? Greater complexity to support the end user experience in a secure way. However, the benefits to the business when they support mobile workspaces and workplace of the future are typically substantial.

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hile this all might seem a fad or frivolous to older generations, it is an expectation for the Millennials and is having a trickle effect to most people in the workplace. As much as companies now understand the need to create innovative new ways to interact with clients in meaningful ways in order to attract and retain their business, the same is true for your workforce. Employers who want to attract and retain top talent have to offer the same quality user experience to their workforce before the competition does (this is key). What follows are some key trends that organisations need to consider and prepare for as the workforce of the future is at their doorsteps today. ON THE AGENDA


1. The Ability To Work From Anywhere, Anytime And On Any Device Simply put, work is no longer a place you go, it is something you do and Millennials have fully embraced that concept. According to research by KenanFlagler Business School, “one in three Millennials said would prioritize device flexibility, social media freedom and work mobility over salary in accepting a job offer.” The ability to work from places like home, hotels, coffee shops, airports and even airplanes from devices that are familiar to the end-users offer the type of flexibility sought without compromising productivity. 2. Video Content Management Businesses have been using video for training and marketing for some time and are increasingly integrating it with their communication systems. Use of video content in the workplace will increase with applications such as remote diagnostic assistance for field tech and access to howto video feeds for service. As the number and size of video files grows, so will the need for the ability to search for specific content, optimize streaming based on access device and analyze usage analysis. Video Content Management Systems (VCMS) provide this capability much like the more familiar document management systems. 3. Smart Machines And Automation Arguably one of the most disruptive transformations that is taking place is the introduction of smart machines and automation in everyday business tasks. Traditional robotics that has been used in the manufacturing sector involved machines programmed to execute repetitive or dangerous tasks. In the context of this discussion smart machines are those that verbally interact with people using natural language. Unlike common voice activated menu based systems we know well, cognitive agents process what is being said, learn and adapt to the situation, can detect the emotional state of the person they are interacting with and direct users to the next steps or level.  Technologies such as IPsoft’s Amelia are built on cognitive agent capabilities that allow interaction with humans in applications such as level 1 call-center or service desk support. This technology will impact the workforce on many aspects. It can rapidly scale capacity, handle level 1 after-hours help desk calls or supplement positions often outsourced offshore. TECHNOLOGY

4. Mobile Computing And EndUser Computing (EUC) Initiatives Merging Virtual desktops are no longer exclusively available on laptop or desktop type devices and are now accessible from mobile devices. Technology such as VMware Workspace Suite, allows end-users to access a virtual workspace from the major mobile device operating systems. This means organizations can leverage a single technology to provide local and remote users with a seamless, consistent experience regardless for the device used. In fact, based on 2015 research, Forrester predicts that “48% of employee-facing IT investments will be mobile focused” and Gartner estimates that “70% of enterprises see providing more mobile support to employees over the next 12 months as high or critical priority.” 5. Mobile Cloud Computing Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) will become the dominant architecture for mobile initiatives and mobile productivity enhancement. In order to provide realtime access to company resources from anywhere and any device, complexity, data storage and computing is removed from the mobile device and handled by the cloud provider. According to a recent KPMG cloud survey report, “the top 3 value drivers from mobile cloud workforce enablement are increased productivity, higher employee satisfaction and improved field service operations.” 6. Wearable Devices Will Become The Next BYO Endpoint Wearable devices (wrist wear and others) have seen much greater adoption in the consumer market than for business use. This is mostly due to current functionality limitations. However, as features and integration with other systems are added, demand for integration with work will increase. In 2015 research, “IDCprojects five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 45.1% for wearables”.  Some initial business integration include scheduling, communication, Quick Response (QR) code, security access, payment, timecards.

7. The Digital Enterprise In this context, the digital enterprise is not about converting existing processes from analog to digital. It has to do with new ways to operate the business and how products and services are delivered. Transforming to a digital business is the enabler for all the technologies that will empower the workforce of the future. 8. Build Individual Work Style Preferences Into Your Mobile Strategy How do your people want to work? What is the gap from their current day-to day? Work is no longer a place we go. Workplace of the future is here; work from anywhere, anytime on any device to be most productive for your organization. Technology is no longer the barrier. There are now sophisticated tools like WorkFit that can help profile individual workplace preferences in order to tailor their needs in corporate mobile programs. Getting a company assessment is the first step in developing a mobile workplace strategy and roadmap. Organizations who have supported mobile enablement are realizing significant benefits from employee satisfaction, retention and attraction of talent, increased productivity, but more importantly, better ways to accomplish business objectives that drive the company forward. Management will also be interested in the financial and environmental impact these tools predict, both office space and transportation expenses are major contributors to an organizations environmental footprint. Plus the human capital implications of not adapting to a consumer user centric approach will have long tail effects on retention and employee engagement. agenda

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OUR BUSINESS IS YOUR BUSINESS agenda THE BUSINESS SUPPLEMENT IN GALLERY WORLD BUSINESS NEWS | WEALTH | IN-BUSINESS | EVENTS |TECHNOLOGY


Isle of Man | Home & Interiors | February 2016


HOME

FEATURED PROPERTY

RICHMOND HOUSE | 15 RICHMOND GROVE | DOUGLAS | ÂŁPOA

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his impressive 3/5 bedrooms, high quality property, has been lovingly renovated by the current owner. The property is located in a quite end of cul-de-sac position with private off road parking.

The property is for-sale-by-owner, call (01624) 661992 to arrange a viewing.

The property comprises‌ n Spacious, double fronted period townhouse over 4 floors

n Additional external storeroom (double garage sized)

n Completely renovated and modernised by current owner to a very high standard

n Roof top sun terrace overlooking Douglas bay

n Centrally located - minutes from town centre, schools, bus routes etc

n Solid oak kitchen with French doors to balcony

n Quiet, end of cul-de-sac position with private, off road parking for up to 3 vehicles and residents permit parking on street as well

n Luxury master bedroom and en-suite with double Jacuzzi bath and large shower

n Ideal for working from home with top floor studio/office space

n Oil fired central heating with Megaflo hot water system

n Huge lower ground floor with double doors and natural light, suitable for games room, gym, workshop, storage etc

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n Enclosed, gated rear yard with vehicular access

For further information or to arrange a viewing please telephone (01624) 661992

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PROPERTY NEWS

PROPERTY NEWS Manxmove Estate Agents are pleased to announce that another valued member of the close knit team is now fully qualified in Estate Agency. Agency.

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amie Lloyd joined the company 2 years ago and for the last 12 months has been studying hard towards this National Association of Estate Agents qualification.

This internationally recognised NVQ qualification is split into 4 sections with separate examinations after each section. Jamie is now a qualified Estate Agent having passed exams in Practice Relating to Residential Sales, Property Appraisal & Building Construction, Health, Safety, Security and General Law and Law Relating to Residential Sales. Graham Wilson, Director, commented “Manxmove are absolutely delighted Jamie has passed his Estate Agency exams as this will further improve the professional service that we provide to our clients.  Every Manxmove Agent is now suitably qualified with The National Association of Estate Agents, the governing body for our profession.  Since joining us Jamie has undergone a lengthy, specific and detailed training programme and in my view he is already one of the most effective Estate Agents on the Island.   Jamie already makes a huge contribution to our company and is a key member of the hardworking Manxmove team. His qualification is as a result of finding the extra time to study in addition to having a very busy full time job, which is commendable.”

Dandara Group wins architecture title at International Property Awards

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he Dandara Group has won a prestigious architecture prize at the International Property Awards. Recognised as one of the largest awards for developers in the world, the 2015 finals received more than 2,000 entries from more than 100 countries. Dandara was named Best in the UK in the Single Residence Architecture category for The Spruce, at its Hazelwood development in Aberdeen. The Spruce had earlier achieved a 5 Star rating at the UK Property Awards, where Dandara secured 14 category wins including three Isle of Man projects receiving 5 Star ratings and two more Island developments being highly commended.

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The presentation was made at the International Property Award’s ceremony in Grosvenor Square, London.

‘Thousands of entries are subjected to rigorous scrutiny by industry experts, and just being nominated is gratifying. To win is a significant recognition and something everyone at Dandara should be very proud of.’

Dandara Managing Director Seamus Nugent said: ‘This is one of the most keenly-contested and well-regarded property awards in the world, so securing this title is a major endorsement of the high quality of Dandara’s work.

He added: ‘It has been a strong end to 2015, with this recognition coming so soon after winning 14 titles at the UK Property Awards. We are looking forward to delivering more standard-setting projects in 2016 and beyond.’

The International Property Awards were judged by an independent panel of 70 experts representing construction, architecture, planning and interior design. Judging focused on design, quality, service, innovation, originality and commitment to sustainability, with the panel applying a strict set of criteria when assessing each entrant.

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iombank.com/mortgages Call us today 01624 637000 Like Isle of Man Bank on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @iombank Isle of Man Bank Limited (IOMB). Registered Company Number: 1 Isle of Man. Registered Office: 2 Athol Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM99 1AN. Licensed by the Isle of Man Financial Services Authority. APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate and is an interest rate which takes account of the full amount of interest on any money borrowed plus the timing of repayments and any other charges that you have to pay. It may not take into account any reduction in interest rate following the maturity of the initial product. The frequency of the interest payments, for example monthly or quarterly, affects the calculation. Rates correct as at (02.01.2016). Subject to availability. Lifestyle mortgage also referred to as Foundations. Over 18’s only. Security required. Calls may be recorded.


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The Balladoole Estate, Balladoole, Castletown | £6,250,000

BALLADOOLE

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51 Victoria Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2LD

01624 645555

T

he origins of the name Balladoole date back to the fourteenth century, when it was owned by a Galloway Chieftain named Lord Duncan MacDowell.

The present Balladoole House was built in the region of Queen Anne (1714) by Mr John Stevenson, the first recorded speaker of the House of Keys. Since then the property has been carefully restored by successive owners and a fine feature of this period house is the beautiful pitch pine woodwork panelling, skirting, architraves, * * * * *

coving and exquisite 4’ staircase which forms a central show piece to the property. Balladoole is one of the largest and most historic estates on the Island still in private ownership. Standing in a commanding position with parkland views from the front, back towards Castletown and from the

Imposing Queen Anne Mansion House set in private parkland Entrance porch, impressive Reception Hall, panelled Study Grandiose Drawing Room, elegant Dining Room Morning Room, Kitchen, Laundry Room, upstairs Sitting Room Master Bedroom, Dressing Room and Bathroom

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* * * *

upper floors at the rear directly south-west towards Port St Mary and the Calf of Man. The immediate parkland setting including a walled garden and the impressive Balladoole Granary has grounds extending to approximately 18 acres.

6 further Bedrooms, Bathroom, En-Suite and Dressing Room Lift to first floor level, Integral garage 2 Bedroom Staff Flat Walled Gardens

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HILL VIEW, GLEN AULDYN, LEZAYRE £499,000

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beautifully presented 3 bedroom house situated in a sought after and stunning location towards the top of the Glen Auldyn Road. The property is set in approximately 1 acre of mature gardens and has permitted planning permission for further extension. Key Features

* Detached House * Set in approxamutly 1 acre of mature gardens * 3 Bedrooms (3 en-suite bathrooms)

* 24' Sitting room, * Open plan dining/kitchen * Separate utility, ground floor shower room and detached garage

GARFORTH GRAY T - (0) 1624 667788 E – hello@garforthgray.im W – www.garforthgray.im

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Sydney Street, Douglas 2

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* 4 Double Bedrooms * Gas Fired Central Heating (18 Month Old Combi Boiler)

Mid Terraced Town House with Many Original Features Offering Spacious Family Sized Accommodation Set Over 3 Floors Open Plan Lounge/Diner, Breakfast Kitchen Family Bathroom, Second Toilet

* uPVC Double Glazed * Block Paved Front Garden & Rear Courtyard with Parking Space HARMONY HOMES, DOUGLAS www.harmonyhomes.co.im ISLE OF MAN PREMIER MAGAZINE

Local RIBA chartered practice, Hugh Logan Architects, can help to provide a unique solution in order to realise your needs, desires and aspirations for your property. H U G H L O G A N A R C H I T E C T S

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A one hour initial consultation is free of charge. Solutions vary and can include — • Property Extension • Property Replacement • Remodelling to improve functionality • Remodelling to improve appearance

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Services and advice are also provided for — • Development potential • Energy Conservation • Planning Consent • Building Regulations

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Your property will look its best in Gallery’s property section. Ask your agent to include it next month!

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hardware


HARDWARE

MOTORING NEWS

MERCEDES HAS KILLED OFF THE MUCH-LIKED SLK MODEL AND REPLACED IT WITH A REVISED CAR THE SLC. As part of the Stuttgart-based firm’s new naming structure, the SLC aligns with the C-Class in terms of size and architecture. What’s more, the fabulous V8-powered SLK 55 AMG is no more, having been replaced with a bi-turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 with the name SLC 43. There will be two turbocharged 2.0-litre petrol versions with 181bhp and 241bhp respectively, diesel fans a 2.1-litre 201bhp unit.  Only the 181bhp SLC 200 will have a manual gearbox. The SLC 300, 250d and 43 AMG will use a nine-speed automatic as standard.

Mercedes has moved the SLC away from outright performance and sportiness to focus more on infotainment and safety. Automatic emergency braking has been introduced, with a five-mode LED headlight system optional. Mapping for the COMAND Online infotainment system is now topographical, while with a compatible smartphone connected it can access internet radio, online apps and more. Text messages can be read aloud and there are two USB ports for charging phones or connecting music devices. The electrically folding hard top roof can now be opened or closed at up to 25mph or so, and in a stroke of genius the boot

divider, which prevents the mechanism fouling any luggage and has always been a manually-operated chore, has now been automated. With the roof up there is an impressive 335 litres of boot space. Prices are expected to be confirmed closer to spring, but will move upwards from the outgoing SLK’s current entry price of £33,020, which buys a diesel in base trim.

THERE’S GOOD NEWS FOR ANYONE WHO LIKES THEIR CONVERTIBLE CARS WITH AN ADDED HELPING OF TINY, BECAUSE SMART HAS CONFIRMED AN OPEN-TOP FORTWO

T

he minuscule 2.69-metre ForTwo Cabrio is destined for showrooms anytime now, complete with a triplelayer fabric roof that can be electrically lowered or raised in 12 seconds, at any vehicle speed.

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It keeps the same amazing 6.95-metre turning circle thanks to thin tyres and a rearmounted engine, making it more manoeuvrable in town than a traffic warden on a bike.

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PORSCHE HAS CONFIRMED THAT THE 2016 BOXSTER WILL, FOR THE FIRST TIME, BE MORE EXPENSIVE THAN THE CAYMAN SISTER CAR, AS THE DUO RECEIVE A SIGNIFICANT MID-LIFE UPDATE AND NEW FOUR-CYLINDER TURBOCHARGED ENGINES

T

he new ranges, dubbed 718 versus the outgoing model’s 918 designation, will be realigned to mirror the 911’s, where convertible models are more expensive by default. Previously, the more performance-focused Cayman was the pricier.

A UNIQUE VERSION OF THE ICONIC LAND ROVER DEFENDER, AND THE 2,000,000TH EXAMPLE EVER BUILT HAS SOLD AT AUCTION FOR £400,000

T

conservation initiative in Meru National Park, Kenya.

Sold to a bidder from Qatar, all proceeds from the sale are being donated to Land Rover charity partners, including the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Born Free Foundation, who plan to use the funds to support the ‘Project Lion Rover’ wildlife

The Defender 2,000,000 has a number of distinctive features including an engraved map of Red Wharf Bay - where the design for the original Land Rover was first drawn in the sand, and a unique ‘no 2,000,000’ badge, with both elements repeated inside. A bespoke aluminium plaque, signed by everyone who helped to assemble the vehicle is fitted to the driver’s seat. It also wears S90 HUE registration plates, referencing the first ever pre-production Land Rover, registration ‘HUE 166’.

he special version, called ‘Defender 2,000,000’ was built in May 2015 by a number of brand ambassadors and notable people from the history of Land Rover, including Bear Grylls, Virginia McKenna OBE and Stephen and Nick Wilks, sons of the founders of Land Rover.

It’s not clear yet whether the Boxster will simply become much more expensive or whether the two models will swap price points, with the Cayman becoming cheaper. Porsche has set no date for the arrival of downsized engines but says they are definitely coming, with ‘equally powerful’ versions for both cars. The choice of 718 for the new car is linked to the success of the 718 from the late 1950s, which was a multiple racewinning four-cylinder machine that took the honours in two Targa Florio races, numerous hill climbs and even the Sebring 12-hour race in 1960. The German firm also makes reference to the current 919 Hybrid World Endurance Championship-winning car, which uses a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbocharged engine. This technology, Porsche says, directly influenced the development of the 718 series. Both the Boxster and the Cayman are to be introduced through 2016, with a likely global début at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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HARDWARE

GADGETS

SOLO I will spare you the superfluous conceit welcoming you all back to the pages of this fine magazine in 2016, simply because I’m sure by the time you’ve reached this article and inevitably glanced at the pretty pictures before moving on to find evidence of either your friends’ embarrassing clubbing moments or your child’s underage debauchery in the Paparazzi section, you’ve seen the same stock sentences evoking memories of inebriated mishaps from Christmas and New Year from every contributor within these pages. That is not to take away from my excellent colleagues, who I’m sure have stoked the embers of a festive cheer that the January weather has done its best to quell. The purpose of my lack of well-wishing is twofold. Firstly, I don’t want to bore you with repetition more than a month after the holidays have ended. It is now February, and rather than dwelling on what was a great end to 2015, I’m sure you’d rather just be getting on peacefully with the year’s worst month, counting down the days to Valentine’s Day (a personal favourite as the avid reader may remember. For the non-avid reader, see last year’s magazine) and persisting with the self-assuring notion that winter isn’t that bad, and that tomorrow you’ll wake up to an Avenue-shutting snow storm. Secondly, a lack of Christmas cheer leads a perfectly into this month’s theme: SOLO.

The problem of evasion this month reared its ugly head in a way that it rarely has in the past, but I hope that I’ve found a way to keep this one clean, fun, and family friendly.

“The most difficult themes, however, are those that require me to bypass a glaringly obvious group of gadgets.”

This month, we are looking at gadgets for the solitary being. These are for those who, like the great George Gordon Byron, only go out to get a fresh appetite for being alone. Now, I see and write about 11 themes a year. The solitary human is a misunderstood Some are easy, sparking ideas for leftfield being. Many mistake their lifestyle for one gadgets as soon as I read the title of our of loneliness and sadness, which is easy to editor’s email. Some are more diffi c u lt; I assume when you seek validation through have to spend an inordinate amount of the length of your list of Twitter followers. uncomfortable time scratching my head Despite the fact some people can’t seem to before inspiration comes to write an article comprehend that life isn’t all about “loving so tenuously linked to the theme that it and exploring”, a little bit of solitary time can warrants employee dissent. be great, especially when you have gadgets like these to help you through. Because who The most difficult themes, however, are better to have as a friend than a robot flower those that require me to bypass a glaringly that quite literally can’t disagree with you? obvious group of gadgets. Hopefully I’ve worded that in a way that will allow older readers to understand and will force younger readers to question what I mean.

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GADGETS

HARDWARE

SPEECH JAMMING GUN Some people are just intolerable. It’s a fact. The sound of their voice, their intonation, their vocabulary, everything. It all comes together to create one completely abhorrent amalgam of exaggerated enthusiasm that cannot, and will not, be tamed. If only there a product that could silence these people. One that could allay their incessant need to paint every detail of every one of their seemingly endless stories with a finer brush than was required for A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jette.

EXPECTED CURTAIN (PROTOTYPE)

Everybody has had the experience of being asked what their plans are for the weekend. It’s very common amongst those who interact with people and are willing to engage in forced small talk. The reply, however, differs immensely depending on the subject of the question. For those who enjoy the company of loud and slightly incoherent crowds, the answer is usually “I might go to town, I’ll see who’s interested”. For others, it may be a simple dinner with friends or a movie with their partner. For the solitary being, however, the answer is an unfaltering “nothing really, might nip to B&Q”. It’s not the answer the person asking the question wants to hear, and deep down it’s not the answer the person wants to give week in, week out. Sometimes it would be nice for people to think you’re at least partly busy socialising, even if it means they’ll just stop thinking you’re plotting something evil in the private confines of your home. That’s why this, the Expected Curtain, is the perfect gift to yourself. It gives the illusion that you are entertaining guests, and who’s to know that you haven’t got today’s greatest minds standing around your living room with wine? I realise there are flaws to this product, however I won’t go into them simply because I like the idea of it. That’s how this works you see, I have control over what is made to look good and bad. Impartiality be damned.

Short of causing physical harm, it seems that the problem is without a solution. Well, to that I say NO MORE! Once again Japan has come to the aid of everyone who has ever enjoyed their own company more than that of others. They have saved our ears from the bombardment of the energetic. They have created…the Speech Jamming Gun! Now, it’s not quite what it sounds like, there unfortunately isn’t a way to completely block the sound of speech (practically, not politically), however what this Men In Black-looking contraption does do is reverberate the sound back towards the speaker, creating a kind of echo in their head. From what I can tell, this just annoys them until they stop speaking, which is more than good enough for me. You may look slightly strange carrying this thing around, but when you’re trying to stop people talking to you, do you really care if they’re not walking near you? Once again I’ve done my job well and used a prototype that is unavailable to buy, but what you can do is hope and pray to every God in the Japanese canon that these

“I have a feeling that if they can get a giant fighting robot to function, they can do this for the loners.” engineers will make it work. I have a feeling that if they can get a giant fighting robot to function, they can do this for the loners.

Now, as this is a prototype, I don’t have much information on how it actually works, how much it costs or where you can buy it from. Oh what a stellar return to gadget game I’m making in 2016.

BECAUSE QUALITY MATTERS

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HARDWARE

GADGETS

...CONTINUED

HELL IS OTHER PEOPLE (APP) Jean-Paul Sartre was not a man well-known for his humour and breezy demeanour. In fact, one could go as far as to say that he was, at in his most light-hearted moments, a bit of a drag.

HANAPA NODDING FLOWER ROBOT Sometimes all we need from a friend is for them to be on our side. A simple nod of agreement can be sufficient to lift the spirits and solidify a bond between two people that can last a lifetime. But alas, what do you do when the group of people that surround you is, in the nicest way possible, an asshole casserole? You buy a nodding robot flower of course.

“The app requires your friends to use Foursquare. Now, most of you are probably, understandably, shaking your heads in confusion, questioning what this word means. It’s OK, so would most people if they ever saw the word written down.” That’s why the name of this app, a quote from his book No Exit, should deter anyone that is searching for an app that connects you and your friends, or promotes any kind of civility between you and the rest of the population. In fact, this App was developed by a New York University student who made it to help him with his “severe social anxiety”. Need I say more? The app locates your friends and provides a map showing their locations, changing the colour of the dot representing them depending on how in danger you are of running into them. Genius? Absolutely. Practical? Absolutely not. Whilst this app works perfectly in theory, and is probably the closest thing to a divine miracle for the introvert or solitary being, there is one major drawback. The app requires your friends to use Foursquare. Now, most of you are probably, understandably, shaking your heads in confusion, questioning what this word means. It’s OK, so would most people if they ever saw the word written down.

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All you need to know is that Foursquare was launched to enable you to find and electronically check in to the best places for you to go with friends. It took off, and it did well, but then Facebook added the check in feature and Foursquare, like so many other apps and businesses that have fallen at the hand of the mighty Zuckerberg, crumbled into dust, with said dust being scattered in the most remote part of the Pacific Ocean. But that, if nothing else, is the perfect gleaming example of social Darwinism. Adapt and survive, and if you can take out a few competitors along the way you’re only making your job easier. Anyway, I digress. The Hell Is Other People app, whilst a perfectly viable idea for anyone that wants to escape the all-encompassing pit of awkwardness that is a random street meeting with a half-acquaintance/halffriend, will never take off whilst it relies on what is now fossilised technology. It’s a shame, but life is rarely fair.

This invention, unsurprisingly the work of a Japanese genius (is that racist?), quite literally cannot disagree with you. It works using a voice sensor, which triggers the nodding motion, meaning you can quite literally never be wrong (disclaimer: you can still be very, very wrong). Of course, there are certain ways this could go wrong, say if your solitude is the result of crippling loneliness, but really who doesn’t benefit from a good stem to cry on every now and then? One that will tell you you’re right by saying nothing at all? As good as this product is, and don’t get me wrong I very much enjoy the simplicity in its art, I can’t help thinking I may have jumped at it a little too quickly. I had figured that I could write a small epic on the wonders of Japanese manufacturing and the positive affects of agreement, but now I sit here and realise that this product doesn’t go much deeper than the surface level. It’s a nodding flower, that’s about it. Still, you should buy it. One thing this product has taught me is just how much the Japanese Yen is worth. The answer? Not very much. This product can be found online for a 2,700 JPY, and whilst that may seem like a staggering figure, that only works out at £16.30. Thank god for global economics.

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The best kept secret on the promenade

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DIRECTORY

AT YOUR SERVICE DIRECTORY

FULL COLOUR ANNUAL ADVERTISING FROM £49.00 PER MONTH CALL GALLERY ON 415096/249249

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Little Diamonds is a small nursery based right in the heart of Douglas. Children are cared for by a highly motivated team in a stimulating learning environment in which they are encouraged to explore, investigate and learn.

Warehouse Fitness

Warehouse Fitness offers top of the range cardio equipment; a wide range of strength training equipment including weights machines, dumbbells and barbells; a spin studio; up to 40 classes per week and a relaxing spa area ALL included in your membership and ALL in a unique LADIES ONLY setting.

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• We have available the island’s largest selection of greenhouses in a choice of 10 colours with a manufacturers 10 year frame guarantee. • We provide a complete service of supply and installation of Elite Greenhouses with free quotations and friendly advice.

The Wine Cellar

The Islands premier supplier of timber buildings and artificial grass.

VISIT OUR NEW DISPLAY GARDEN

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Did you know that you can now order from the Islands favourite furniture store from the comfort of your own home? Check out our new website for furniture to suit all tastes and budgets.

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• View our display greenhouses and pick up a free catalogue at Greeba Plant Centre. T: 201333/877951 thegreenhousecompanyiom@gmail.com

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The Greenhouse Company •

Manx Paving & Slate

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Old farm Buildings Derbyhaven T: 824211 E: manxpaving@manx.net www.manxpaving.com

Unit 1 Gladstone Park Ramsey IM8 2LA T: 877757 www.groundcare.com

Diamond House Demesne Road Douglas T: 625835 E: info@littlediamonds-iom.net

We stock and supply natural stone paving in Granite, Slate, Limestone and Sandstone in a wide variety of colours, we also carry the full range of Tier Stone panels and our own pre cast concrete paving copings and walling.

Diamond House, Westmoreland Road, Douglas T: 679419 E: info@warehousefitness.co.uk

Groundcare Little Diamonds Nursery

Manx Paving & Slate

T: (01624) 677577 E: riversidefurniture@hotmail.co.uk

The Wine Cellar is a well established local business, set up 23 years ago in the same location as we are today. We are all passionate about wine and our aim is to have a wide range of good quality wines that offer good value at every price point.

The Wine Cellar

Tennis Road, Douglas IM2 3QW T: 611793 E: sales@thewinecellar.im

Get your business included in 2016 From just £49.00 per month CALL GALLERY ON 415096/249249

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February 2016 | the SOLO issue  

The Joy of Self Love, hang SOLO, Where to go in 2016, Phil Kneen - In The Jungle, Wine Talk, Motoring News, Agenda World News, Property, Pap...

February 2016 | the SOLO issue  

The Joy of Self Love, hang SOLO, Where to go in 2016, Phil Kneen - In The Jungle, Wine Talk, Motoring News, Agenda World News, Property, Pap...