Page 1

SOONJA HAN


SOONJA HAN

Enchanted Destiny

a cura di / curated by commissaire d’exposition

Soojung Hyun


SOONJA HAN

Enchanted Destiny a cura di / curated by commissaire d’exposition

Soojung Hyun GALLERIA IL PONTE - FIRENZE 15 maggio - 07 luglio 2017

Ufficio stampa / Press office Bureau de presse

Susanna Fabiani Crediti Fotografici / Credits Credits photographiques

Torquato Perissi Redazione editoriale / Editorial team Équipe éditoriale

Enrica Ravenni Traduzione in italiano / Italian traslation Traduction italienne

Susanna Fabiani Traduzione in francese French translation / Traduction française

Caroline Sordia Grafica / Page setting and graphics Conception graphique

Alessio Marolda Allestimento / Installation Montage de l’exposition

Alberto Bemer Impianti e stampa / Plates and printing Imprimerie

Tipografia Bandecchi & Vivaldi, Pontedera (PI)

© copyright 2017

per l’edizione Gli Ori 51100 Pistoia - Via L. Ghiberti, 6 tel +39 057322607 www.gliori.it info@gliori.it Galleria Il Ponte 50121 Firenze - Via di Mezzo, 42/b tel +39 055240617 fax +39 0555609892 www.galleriailponte.com info@galleriailponte.com ISBN 978-88-7336-662-1


Sommario / Contents / Sommaire

9

Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny

13

Il destino incantato di Soonja Han

17

La destinée enchantée de Soonja Han

Soojung Hyun Soojung Hyun

Soojung Hyun

79

Biography

81

Biografia

83

Biographie

85

Indice delle tavole / index of works / index des tables


SOONJA HAN’S ENCHANTED DESTINY Soojung Hyun

Soonja Han’s sense of place is fundamental to her creative energy. By acknowledging the meaning of the place where her work is being shown, Han grasps the physical, emotional, and spiritual connection that inhabits her circular forms. As an artist, she explores these conditions in considerable depth, deciphering and uncovering various forms of energy. Upon discovering an archival photograph of Florence, taken in the early twentieth century, she slowly began to cultivate an idea for her exhibition. The image suggested a view of the city as a cultural and ancestral place where numerous layers of energetic inscription have accumulated and disappeared over time. Han would laminate a transparent red circular template with two smaller cutout circles side-by-side over this ordinary black and white photograph. It gave this resplendent image a heightened resonance and taut visual structure. The collaged template both altered and enhanced our view of this cultural mecca of the Arno Valley. As a result of Han’s modest transformation, the photograph no longer appeared relegated to the past. Within these circles we observe Florence as a city of beaming light, a place where artists – inspired by images from the past – propel themselves into the futuristic space of today. Han’s unique collage gives this early modernist view of Florence a broader sense of wholeness and an abundant sense of expressive unity. Her photo-collage might be compared to the American abstract expressionist Barnet Newman, who, in 1948, brushed a streak of light cadmium down through the center of a vertical field painted in red oxide. Rather than dividing the surface, Newman’s line transformed the painting into a unified color field. Similarly, Han’s intervention unifies our vision of Florence to embrace the magnetic intimacy of the place. Her sublime approach to art rests on the artist’s sense of enchanted destiny. The first work that conveys the artist’s impression of Florence is installed on the floor at the entrance of the gallery. The work titled Firenze (2017) is composed of two half circles with bright and brilliant colors on a luminous alloy surface. This floor installation defers the distance between herself and Florence as it indirectly and constitutes one circle as a whole. This work implicitly expresses the essential core of Han’s work at the outset of the exhibition. Her essential impression or intention is related to the “brilliant light” that falls from the ocular atrium in the dome of the Pantheon in Rome into the rounded space of the interior. The light coming through this aperture where the sky shows clear is being transmitted to a visual form that visitors may intuit upon entering the space of Il Ponte in Florence. Titled Firenze (2017), this work symbolically reveals its pure light and, in doing so, visualizes the rich artistic passion this city has had. The light falling on the inside space of the Pantheon is completed in one circle that reflects the form of the opened window. But the work, Firenze, is a circle divided into two parts. This separation suggests the imaginary space where the artist can freely reinterpret the sensation of fallen light. Han’s creative energy resonates in the space between the two semicircles. This suggests that viewers should feel from interacting with this work according to their own emotions, memories, and desire for communication. By reinterpreting the fallen light into a human dimension, viewers may come closer to a sense of being in the space of a vibrant and historical cultural center. The light of the Pantheon that Han has brought to Il Ponte opens up the breadth of the meaning the artist understands in relation to the circle. The artist ‘s circle is given a place beyond painterly conventions and, in doing so, reveals a more direct experience of light, color, and space in a wide range of media. Rather it may be expressed as drawing, painting, collage, and sculpture, even through digital animation. Each of these mediumistic forms is viable and each is meant to converge toward the goal of a more extensive concept of form and light. Another work that captures our attention titled Energy Ball (2017), made from highly polished aluminum. The light that illuminates this work emanates from the floor so as to enhance its

9


appearance. As a spherical shape, it can be moved anywhere in the exhibition space. Thus, Energy Ball profoundly represents the sense of freedom the artist continues to pursue in her work. It is a movable sculpture that can be reinterpreted through various forms of placement or displacement, in each case, signifying the human energy that propels it from one space to another. The work of Han has an intrinsic sense of space; she intends to connect the dynamism between two-dimensional flat work and three-dimensional installations that function in reference to space and light. Most of her early work upon settling in Paris consisted of flat two-dimensional paintings and drawings. During the period, she was investigating various possibilities for the “circle” while searching for philosophical and aesthetic meaning. In the process, the circle had become her primary visual form, the images continued to juxtapose relativist formations of circles in both two and three dimensions. Her thoughts were visualized freely without limiting herself to definitions of painting and sculpture. In this context, her work, Blue Flowers (2015), combines both flatness and dimensionality. It functions as a kind of sculptural painting, but is neither sculpture nor painting. Han is interested in translating the effects of light. Through the use of synthetic Altuglas, the work reveals a brightness of color combined with a unique texture and delicacy that contains an architectural solidity. Her materials suggest something more than painting. They appear to possess weight. its? Han draws a large circle made from the smaller circles contained within it. Thus each circle sustains a massive overlap of illusory fragments. The shadowy spaces randomly emerge through this circular connectedness are giving the work its stirring architectural presence. The surface is composed of a dense repetition where a singular element is perceived in the context of its profoundly poetic subject matter. Han’s Blue Flowers emerges from being a simple shape into a complex aggregate of light. There are two elements in Soonja Han’s circular forms: an empty circle and a filled one. They are contrasted according to the way she uses the space. Each circle is the reverse of the other. The first circle in the work of Han was drawn in 1983. In this work, she simply sketched with a pencil her face with a circle on one side of her eye. This circle was intended as an intermediary between herself and the world. This opened the beginning of her aesthetic and visual language. More than twenty years later, the artist presented a large empty circle in the Museum of Modern Art in Saint-Etienne (2007). The circle was placed in the middle of a/the? wall, which allowed the viewer to see the other side through the open space. These two paradoxical associations, an empty circle and a filled one, are not as opposites but as alternatives, they are merged together as a single phenomenon in space. In recent years, she has further developed this idea by painting a large circle using a series of smaller ones, each with three cutout circles inside. Each of these circles are densely united by a single large-scale circle placed on a neutral background. The three monochrome variations include Green City, Purple Universe, and Blue Indigo Universe (all 2017). These circular compositions, each created from a smaller perforated circle, resonate with a particular color. The colors – green, purple, and blue – reveal three manifestations of an identical form that could be seen as an overall aesthetic sentiment in response to the Romantic feeling of old Florentine masterpieces. These optically pulsating works have the potential to move our visual sensibility from the past into the present. Han’s process is based on her individual inspiration through her subtle sense of color as a connecting point between time and space. In addition, The Sun (2017), is painted with the same modular cutout circles in a variety of primary and secondary colors that reflect invisible colors of the sun. .Finally, there is an earlier painting in a similar format, titled Pink Flower (2013), painted on a bright green background. This is perhaps the most clearly expressed figure- to-ground relationship at the outset of this series. The intermediary complexities found in The Sun are more simplified in order to emphasize the directness of the large interior form in Pink Flower, which gives prominence to the gestural contours in the details that give the earlier painting its identity. In either case, whether Pink Flower (2013) or The Sun (2017), the emptiness of the circular form becomes a full circle. In painting these circles, the artist avoids gestural expressiveness.

10


Rather the modular disinterested circles repeat over and against one another until they literally fill the space of the picture plane. Thus, the absolute feeling of the work is determined between the painted and empty spaces. This is what gives the surface a feeling of a depth. Here, the margins allow space to emerge outward from the center, this giving the large interior of the circular density an optical sensation of endlessly flowing. The emptiness within the circle is given a firmness and softness, which are both harmoniously juxtaposed; each quality implicates the other, evoking the constant negotiation of void and fullness, which is the yin-yang balance in traditional Asian philosophy. Han was born in South Korea and was raised with a deep affinity for nature. The sense of space that Asians understand is different from that of Western science. Yet her work should not be confined or limited to either hemisphere. Rather she works between her Eastern sensibility and her adaptation to Western culture. Upon moving to Paris in the early 1980s, Han ‘s strategy was to avoid being overrun by the West, and, at the same time, not to defend herself as being an Asian artist. It could be said that Soonja Han matured as an artist through her cultural transplantation. By absorbing the cultural traits in her new environment, she developed an alternative understanding of art. Only an artist capable of mentally completing the incomplete could discover true beauty as Han has achieved in these paintings. In essence, the artist’s recent oeuvre has systemically revolved around the fundamental premise that a variety of dimensions exists in her paintings that seem to cancel out one another, thereby creating the kind of spatial emptiness consistent with her cultural understanding. This further puts the artist in the position of constantly searching for contemporary models based on non-invasive intervention. It is through this process that Han discovers the concrete realities that constitute a transglobal environment of circular temporality, which appears the point of transcultural embarkation on which the artist is working today. Reflecting on the work of Soonja Han, she is recognized as an artist who deals with the essentials and who interprets Asian values within the context of Western culture. It is a fundamental approach to making art, even if she may not perceive it intentionally. Han’s point of reference is her essential energy, thereby allowing her to move through the boundaries of modernism into the twenty-first century. She has never felt limited by her identity in relation to a particular place or country. Her language as an artist is one that strives for universal communication. She has discovered the moment of being within time as she proceeds to develop the infinite dimensionality of space. New York, March 2017

11


IL DESTINO INCANTATO DI SOONJA HAN Soojung Hyun

La percezione dei luoghi di Soonja Han è fondamentale per la sua energia creativa. Attraverso il riconoscimento del significato del luogo in cui il suo lavoro sarà presentato, Han coglie la connessione fisica, emotiva, e spirituale che abita le sue forme circolari. Come artista, esplora questi contesti in grande profondità, decifrando e scoprendo varie forme di energia. Attraverso il ritrovamento di una foto d’archivio di Firenze, scattata agli inizi del XX secolo, lentamente comincia a coltivare un’idea per la sua mostra. L’immagine suggeriva una vista della città come un luogo culturale e ancestrale dove numerose stratificazioni di vitali memorie si erano accumulate ed erano scomparse nel corso del tempo. Han ha sovrapposto a questa consueta fotografia in bianco e nero una lamina circolare rossa trasparente con due cerchi più piccoli ritagliati fianco a fianco, che ha dato a questa splendida immagine un’accresciuta risonanza e una struttura visiva tesa, alterando e allo stesso tempo valorizzando la nostra visione di questa mecca culturale della Valle dell’Arno. Il risultato della semplice trasformazione di Han è che la fotografia non appare più confinata nel passato. Attraverso questi oculi vediamo Firenze come una città splendente, un luogo dove gli artisti - ispirati dalle immagini del passato - si spingono nello spazio avveniristico del presente. Questo singolare collage di Han conferisce a tale visione di Firenze del primo modernismo un più ampio senso di interezza e grande unità espressiva. Il suo fotocollage può essere paragonato all’espressionista astratto americano Barnet Newman, che, nel 1948, dipinse una striscia di giallo di cadmio giù attraverso il centro di un campo verticale dipinto di ossido rosso. Piuttosto che dividere la superficie, la linea di Newman trasformava il dipinto in un spazio di colore unificato. Similarmente, l’intervento di Han unifica la nostra visione di Firenze ad abbracciare la magnetica intimità del luogo. Il suo sublime approccio all’arte si fonda sul sentimento dell’artista di un destino incantato. La prima opera che trasmette l’impressione che l’artista ha di Firenze è Firenze (2017): istallata sul pavimento all’entrata della galleria è composta di due semicerchi con colori luminosi e brillanti su una superficie di lega specchiante. Questa installazione a pavimento, anche se indirettamente pospone la distanza tra l’artista e Firenze e costituisce un cerchio come un intero, implicitamente esprime l’essenza centrale del lavoro di Han fin dall’inizio della mostra. La sua impressione o intento è fondamentalmente legato alla “splendida luce” che dall’oculo dell’atrio nella cupola del Pantheon a Roma cade nello spazio circolare dell’interno. La luce che passa attraverso tale apertura, dove il cielo si mostra cristallino, viene trasmessa a una forma visiva che i visitatori possono intuire entrando nello spazio della galleria Il Ponte di Firenze. Intitolata Firenze (2017), questa opera simbolicamente rivela la sua pura luce e, nel fare questo, visualizza l’intensa passione artistica che questa città ha avuto. La luce cadendo nello spazio interno del Pantheon si conchiude in un unico circolo che riflette la forma della finestra aperta. Ma l’opera Firenze è un cerchio diviso in due parti. Tale separazione suggerisce lo spazio immaginario dove l’artista può liberamente reinterpretare la sensazione della caduta di luce. L’energia creativa di Han risuona nello spazio tra i due semicerchi, che suggerisce quello che gli spettatori dovrebbero sentire dall’interagire con questa opera, in base alle loro proprie emozioni, memorie, e al loro desiderio di dialogo. Reinterpretando la caduta di luce, all’interno di un’umana dimensione, gli spettatori possono avvicinarsi alla percezione di essere nello spazio vibrante di uno storico centro di cultura. La luce del Pantheon che Han porta a Il Ponte evidenzia l’importante significato che l’artista attribuisce al cerchio, cui viene data una collocazione al di là delle convenzioni pittoriche e, nel fare questo, rivela una più diretta esperienza di luce, colore e spazio in un ampio utilizzo di media: può essere infatti espresso come disegno, pittura, collage, scultura e anche

13


attraverso l’animazione digitale. Ognuno di questi media è valido e ognuno è destinato a convergere verso il raggiungimento di una più ampia visione di forma e luce. Un’altra opera che cattura la nostra attenzione in questa mostra, intitolata Energy Ball (2017), è fatta di alluminio estremamente polito e la luce che la illumina si diffonde dal pavimento fortemente arricchita nella sua parvenza. Quale forma sferica può essere mossa dovunque nello spazio della mostra ed esprime il profondo senso di libertà che l’artista continuamente persegue nel suo lavoro. È una scultura mobile che, reinterpretata nelle più diverse posizioni di collocamento o spostamento, rivela sempre la determinazione umana che la sposta da un luogo all’altro. Il suo lavoro ha un intrinseco senso dello spazio e intende connettere il dinamismo presente nelle sue opere bidimensionali e le installazioni tridimensionali, che agiscono in relazione allo spazio e alla luce. La maggior parte dei suoi primi lavori, dopo essersi stabilita a Parigi, consisteva in dipinti bidimensionali e disegni. In quel periodo, Han indagava sulle varie possibilità del “cerchio”, ricercandovi un significato filosofico ed estetico. In questo processo, il cerchio è diventato la sua forma visiva primaria, le immagini continuavano a giustapporre formazioni di cerchi in relazione l’uno con l’altro, sia in due che in tre dimensioni. I suoi pensieri si visualizzavano liberamente senza limitarsi alle definizioni di pittura e scultura. In questo contesto, la sua opera, Blue Flowers (2015), combina sia la struttura piana che la dimensionalità, funzionando come una sorta di dipinto scultoreo, ma non è né scultura né dipinto: Han è interessata a tradurre gli effetti della luce. Attraverso l’uso dell’Altuglas (polimetilmetacrilato), l’opera rivela una brillantezza di colore combinata con un’unicità di trama e una delicatezza, che racchiude un’architettonica solidità. I suoi materiali suggeriscono qualcosa in più della pittura: appaiono possedere peso. Han disegna un grande cerchio composto dai cerchi più piccoli in esso contenuti, quindi ogni cerchio sostiene una significativa sovrapposizione di illusori frammenti. Gli spazi in ombra emergono casualmente attraverso questa connessione circolare dando all’opera la sua emozionante personalità architettonica. La superficie è composta da una densa reiterazione, dove un singolo elemento è percepito nel contesto della sua sostanza profondamente poetica. Blue Flowers di Han si espande da semplice forma a un complesso aggregato di luce. Ci sono due elementi nelle forme circolari di Soonja Han: un cerchio vuoto e uno pieno. Essi si contrappongono secondo le modalità in cui lei utilizza lo spazio. Ogni cerchio è il contrario dell’altro. Il primo cerchio Han lo ha disegnato nel 1983: in quest’opera, ritrae semplicemente con una matita il suo volto con un cerchio su un lato dell’occhio. Questo cerchio era concepito come un intermediario tra se stessa e il mondo ed ha segnato l’inizio del suo linguaggio estetico e visivo. Dopo oltre venti anni, l’artista ha presentato un grande cerchio vuoto nel Musée d’Art Moderne Saint-Étienne Métropole (2007). Il cerchio, collocato nel mezzo del muro, permetteva allo spettatore di vedere l’altro lato attraverso lo spazio aperto. Queste due associazioni paradossali, un cerchio vuoto e uno pieno, non sono così opposte ma alternative, sono fuse insieme come un singolo fenomeno nello spazio. In anni recenti, Han ha ulteriormente sviluppato questa idea dipingendo un grande cerchio attraverso l’utilizzo di una serie di cerchi più piccoli, ognuno con tre cerchi ritagliati all’interno, che sono fittamente uniti in un unico grande cerchio collocato su un fondo neutro. Le tre variazioni monocrome che includono Green City, Purple Universe, e Blue Indigo Universe (tutti del 2017), sono composizioni circolari, ognuna creata da un cerchio più piccolo perforato, che vibra di un particolare colore. I colori - verde, viola e blu - appaiono tre manifestazioni di un’identica forma, che può essere compresa come un’unitario sentimento estetico in risposta all’impressione sognante degli antichi capolavori fiorentini. Queste opere otticamente pulsanti hanno la capacità di spostare la nostra sensibilità visiva dal passato al presente. Il processo di Han si basa sulla sua personale ispirazione, attraverso il suo sottile senso del colore quale punto di connessione tra il tempo e lo spazio. Un’ altra opera in mostra, sempre del 2017, è The Sun, dipinto con gli stessi cerchi modulari ritagliati, ma con una varietà di colori primari e secondari, che riflettono gli invisibili colori del

14


sole. In ultimo, un lavoro precedente con una struttura similare, intitolato Pink Flower, dipinto su uno fondo verde brillante, che, all’inizio di questa serie, ha forse il rapporto forma-fondo più chiaramente enunciato. Le complessità intermedie riscontrate in The Sun sono fortemente semplificate in Pink Flower, per enfatizzare l’immediatezza della grande forma interna, dando preminenza nei dettagli ai contorni gestuali, che assegnano a questo dipinto del 2013 la sua identità. In ogni caso, sia in Pink Flower (2013) che in The Sun (2017), il vuoto della forma circolare diventa un cerchio pieno. Nel dipingere questi cerchi, l’artista evita espressività gestuale. Gli oggettivi moduli dei cerchi si ripetono piuttosto l’uno sull’altro fino a riempire letteralmente lo spazio del piano pittorico. Così l’emozione assoluta dell’opera si determina tra gli spazi dipinti e risparmiati ed è ciò che dà alla superficie un senso di profondità. Qui i margini permettono allo spazio di emergere dal centro verso l’esterno, dando così al grande interno dalla densità circolare la sensazione ottica di uno scorrere senza fine. Al vuoto all’interno del cerchio viene data fermezza e morbidezza, entrambe armoniosamente giustapposte; ognuna di queste qualità implica l’altra, evocando la costante contrapposizione di vuoto e pieno, che è l’equilibrio dello yin e dello yang nella tradizionale filosofia asiatica. Han è nata nella Corea del Sud ed è cresciuta in profonda affinità con la natura. Il senso dello spazio che gli asiatici concepiscono è diverso da quello della scienza occidentale. Il suo lavoro comunque non dovrebbe essere confinato o limitato a uno dei due emisferi, si muove piuttosto tra la sua sensibilità orientale e il suo adattamento alla cultura occidentale. Dal trasferimento a Parigi nei primi anni ‘80, la sua strategia è stata di evitare di essere sommersa dall’Occidente, e, allo stesso tempo, di accettarsi quale artista asiatica. Si potrebbe dire che Soonja Han è maturata come artista attraverso il suo trapianto culturale e, assorbendo i tratti formativi del nuovo ambiente, ha sviluppato una comprensione alternativa dell’arte. Solo un’artista mentalmente capace di completare l’incompleto potrebbe scoprire la vera bellezza che Han ha raggiunto in questi dipinti. L’essenza delle opere più recenti dell’artista è sistematicamente incentrata sulla fondamentale premessa della varietà di dimensioni esistente nei suoi dipinti, che sembrano annullarsi l’una nell’altra, creando in questo modo quel peculiare vuoto spaziale coerente con la sua prospettiva culturale e per di più mette l’artista nella posizione di cercare costantemente motivi contemporanei basati su un intervento non-invasivo. Attraverso questo processo Han scopre le realtà concrete che costituiscono un ambiente transglobale di temporalità circolare, che appare il punto di imbarco transculturale sul quale l’artista sta adesso lavorando. Soonja Han è riconosciuta come un’artista che si occupa di elementi essenziali e interpreta i valori asiatici nel contesto della cultura occidentale: approccio fondamentale per fare arte, anche se per lei non intenzionale. È la sua energia, così essenziale, il punto di riferimento che le permette di attraversare i confini del modernismo per arrivare nel XXI secolo. In qualunque luogo o paese, non si è mai sentita limitata dalla sua identità. Il suo linguaggio di artista è un linguaggio che tende verso una comunicazione universale. Ha scoperto l’importanza di essere dentro il tempo mentre procede a sviluppare le infinite dimensioni dello spazio. New York, marzo 2017

15


LA DESTINÉE ENCHANTÉE DE SOONJA HAN Soojung Hyun

Le sens de l’espace de Soonja Han est essentiel à son énergie créative. En reconnaissant l’importance et la signification du lieu où son travail est exposé, elle saisit la connexion physique, émotionnelle et spirituelle qui habite ses formes circulaires. En tant qu’artiste, elle explore en profondeur ces conditions, déchiffrant et révélant différentes formes d’énergie. Lorsqu’elle découvre une photographie d’archive de Florence, prise au début du vingtième siècle, elle se met peu à peu à caresser une idée pour son exposition. L’image suggère une vision de la ville comme lieu culturel et ancestral où de nombreuses couches d’inscription énergétique se sont accumulées et ont disparu au fil du temps. Soonja Han plaque un motif transparent rouge de forme circulaire, dans lequel se découpent deux disques de plus petite taille côte à côte, sur cette photographie ordinaire en noir et blanc. L’image devient resplendissante, elle acquiert une résonance plus profonde, une structure visuelle en tension. Le motif en collage modifie et amplifie à la fois notre vision de Florence, Mecque culturelle de la vallée de l’Arno. Résultat de la modeste transformation opérée par l’artiste : la photographie n’apparaît plus reléguée dans le passé. À l’intérieur de ces cercles, nous contemplons Florence comme une ville rayonnante de lumière, un endroit où les artistes – inspiré.e.s par les images d’autrefois – se propulsent vers l’espace futuriste d’aujourd’hui. Le collage singulier de Soonja Han donne à cette vision proto-moderniste de Florence une plus large dimension d’ensemble et une généreuse unité expressive. Son photo-collage peut être comparé aux travaux de l’expressionniste abstrait américain Barnett Newman; en 1948, ce dernier avait barré de haut en bas, d’une fine traînée de rouge cadmium, le centre d’un champ vertical peint à l’oxyde de fer rouge. Plutôt que de diviser la surface, la ligne tracée par l’artiste avait transformé la peinture en un champ d’une couleur unifiée. De la même façon, le geste de Soonja Han unifie notre vision de Florence pour embrasser l’intimité magnétique de cet endroit. Une approche sublime de l’art repose sur l’intuition de l’artiste d’une destinée enchantée. La première œuvre traduisant son impression de Florence est installée au sol, à l’entrée de la galerie. Intitulée Firenze (2017), elle se compose de deux demi-cercles aux couleur vives sur une surface d’un alliage lumineux. Cette installation au sol défie la distance entre elle-même et Florence, puisqu’elle constitue – indirectement – un seul et même cercle. Cette œuvre exprime d’entrée de jeu, de manière implicite, l’essence du travail de Soonja Han. L’impression ou l’intention fondamentale de l’artiste est liée à la «lumière éclatante» qui rayonne de l’oculus, l’ovale au sommet de la coupole du Panthéon de Rome, dans l’espace de la rotonde. La lumière qui jaillit de cette ouverture par laquelle on aperçoit le ciel devient une forme visuelle que les visiteurs et visiteuses peuvent intuitivement reconnaître en pénétrant dans l’espace de la galerie Il Ponte de Florence. Firenze révèle symboliquement la lumière pure de la ville et, par là même, la riche passion de l’art qui lui est associée. La lumière qui illumine l’intérieur du Panthéon est complétée par un cercle qui reflète la forme de la fenêtre ouverte. Mais l’œuvre est un cercle divisé en deux. Cette séparation suggère l’espace imaginaire au sein duquel l’artiste peut librement réinterpréter la sensation de ces rayons de lumière. L’énergie créatrice de Soonja Han se déploie dans l’espace entre les deux demi-cercles. Cela indique que le ressenti des spectateurs et spectatrices, dans leur interaction avec l’œuvre, sera en résonance avec leurs propres émotions, souvenirs et désir de communiquer. En réinscrivant cette coulée de lumière dans une dimension humaine, ils et elles peuvent approcher la sensation de se trouver dans l’espace d’un centre culturel historique et plein de vie. La lumière du Panthéon, amenée par Soonja Han à la galerie Il Ponte, dévoile la profondeur d’interprétation de ce que l’artiste entend signifier. Au cercle est attribué un espace au-delà des conventions picturales, et de la sorte, il révèle une expérience plus directe de la lumière,

17


de la couleur et de l’espace via toutes sortes de techniques. Il peut être exprimé sous forme de dessin, de peinture, de collage, de sculpture, et même d’animation numérique. Chacun de ces médias est viable et chacun doit être mis au service d’une conception plus vaste de la forme et de la lumière. Une autre œuvre particulière remarquable, appelée Energy Ball (2017), est composée d’aluminium poli. La lumière qui l’illumine provient du sol comme pour magnifier son apparence. De forme sphérique, elle peut être déplacée à travers l’espace d’exposition. Energy Ball exprime ainsi un profond sens de la liberté perpétuellement recherchée par l’artiste dans son travail. C’est une sculpture mobile qui peut être réinterprétée au fil des manières de la placer ou de la déplacer, signifiant à chaque fois l’énergie humaine qui la propulse d’un espace à l’autre. Le travail de Soonja Han possède une dimension intrinsèque d’espace; elle cherche à relier le dynamisme des œuvres en deux dimensions, à plat, et les installations tridimensionnelles qui se réfèrent à l’espace et à la lumière. La plupart de ses premières œuvres après son installation à Paris ont été des peintures et dessins bidimensionnels. À cette époque, elle cherchait à explorer plusieurs possibilités pour le «cercle», tout en étudiant sa signification philosophique et esthétique. Au fil du temps, le cercle est devenue sa principale forme visuelle, les images ont continué à juxtaposer des formations circulaires relativistes tant bidimensionnelles que tridimensionnelles. Ses pensées ont pu librement trouver une traduction visuelle, sans devoir se limiter à des définitions de la peinture ou de la sculpture. Dans ce contexte, son œuvre Blue Flowers (2015) allie à la fois l’aspect plat et dimensionnel. Elle fonctionne comme une sorte de peinture sculpturale, tout en n’étant ni une sculpture ni un tableau. Ce qui intéresse Soonja Han, c’est d’exprimer les effets de la lumière. L’utilisation d’une plaque de Plexiglas synthétique permet de révéler des couleurs vives, associées à une délicatesse et une texture uniques qui renferment une forme de solidité architecturale. Les matériaux utilisés suggèrent davantage qu’un tableau. Ils semblent posséder un poids propre. Soonja Han trace un grand cercle fait de cercles plus petits qu’il contient tous. Ainsi, chaque cercle alimente un recoupement massif de fragments illusoires. Les espaces d’ombres émergent de manière aléatoire à travers cette connexion circulaire, ce qui donne à l’œuvre une émouvante présence architecturale. La surface se compose d’une dense répétition dans laquelle un élément singulier est perçu dans le contexte de son objet profondément poétique. Blue Flowers, d’une simple forme, se transforme en une complexe agrégation de lumière. Il y a deux éléments dans les formes circulaires de Soonja Han: un cercle vide et un autre plein. Ils sont contrastés en fonction de la manière dont elle utilise l’espace. Chaque cercle est l’inverse de l’autre. Le premier cercle de l’œuvre de Soonja Han date de 1983. Dans cette œuvre, elle a simplement dessiné au crayon son visage, avec un cercle d’un côté de l’œil. Ce cercle était conçu comme un intermédiaire entre le monde et elle-même. Cela a été le commencement de son langage esthétique et visuel. Plus de vingt ans plus tard, l’artiste a présenté un grand cercle vide au Musée d’art moderne de Saint-Étienne (2007). Ce cercle était placé au milieu du mur, permettant ainsi aux spectatrices et spectateurs de voir l’autre côté par la brèche ouverte. Ces deux associations paradoxales, cercle vide et cercle plein, ne sont pas des contraires mais des alternatives, qui se trouvent fusionnées en un seul et même phénomène dans l’espace. Ces dernières années, elle a poussé plus loin cette idée en peignant un grand cercle à l’aide d’une série de plus petits cercles, dont chacun contenait trois disques découpés à l’intérieur. Chacun de ces cercles était densément uni aux autres par un seul et même énorme cercle placé sur un fond neutre. Les trois variations monochromes s’intitulent Green City, Purple Universe et Blue Indigo Universe (toutes de 2017). Ces compositions circulaires, dont chacune a été créée à partir d’un plus petit cercle perforé, sont associées à une couleur particulière. Les couleurs – vert, mauve et bleu – révèlent trois manifestations d’une forme identique, que l’on pourrait voir comme un sentiment esthétique général en réponse au sentiment romantique que confèrent les anciens chefs-d’œuvre florentins. Ces

18


œuvres offrent une forme de pulsation visuelle, et sont capables de déplacer notre sensibilité visuelle du passé vers le présent. Le processus de travail de Soonja Han est fondé sur son inspiration individuelle, grâce à son subtil sens de la couleur comme point de rencontre du temps et de l’espace. En complément, The Sun (2017) est peint avec les mêmes cercles découpés modulaires, dans une série de tons primaires et secondaires qui reflètent d’invisibles couleurs du soleil. Enfin, il existe un tableau antérieur, de format similaire, intitulé Pink Flower (2013), peint sur un fond vert vif. C’est peut-être là que s’exprime le plus clairement la relation figure-fond au fondement de cette série. Les complexités intermédiaires que l’on trouve dans The Sun sont ici simplifiées pour mettre en relief l’aspect direct de la large forme intérieure de Pink Flower, ce qui met en exergue les contours gestuels des détails qui signent l’identité de ce tableau fondateur. Dans le cas de Pink Flower (2013) comme de The Sun (2017), le vide de la forme circulaire devient un cercle plein. En peignant ces cercles, l’artiste évite toute expressivité gestuelle. Au contraire, des cercles modulaires et désintéressés se répètent sans cesse l’un contre l’autre jusqu’à remplir littéralement l’espace plane de l’image. Ainsi, le sentiment absolu et profond de l’œuvre est déterminé entre espaces peints et espaces vides. C’est ce qui confère à la surface une sensation de profondeur. Ici, les marges permettent à l’espace de déborder vers l’extérieur à partir du centre, ce qui donne au vaste intérieur de la densité circulaire la sensation optique d’un écoulement infini. Ce vide à l’intérieur du cercle en devient ferme et doux; chacune de ces deux qualités harmonieusement juxtaposées appelle l’autre, rappelant la négociation constante du plein et du vide – l’équilibre yin-yang de la philosophie asiatique traditionnelle. Soonja Han est née en Corée du Sud et a été élevée dans un rapport étroit à la nature. Le sens de l’espace tel que l’entendent les Asiatiques est différent de celui de la science occidentale. Cependant, il ne faudrait pas confiner ni limiter son œuvre à l’un ou l’autre hémisphère. Elle travaille entre sa sensibilité asiatique et son adaptation à la culture occidentale. Lorsqu’elle a déménagé à Paris au début des années 1980, la stratégie de Soonja Han a été d’éviter d’être avalée par l’Occident, et tout à la fois, de ne pas revendiquer une position d’artiste asiatique. On peut dire que sa transplantation culturelle l’a fait mûrir en tant qu’artiste. En absorbant les traits culturels de son nouvel environnement, elle a développé une compréhension alternative de l’art. Seule une artiste capable de compléter mentalement l’incomplet peut découvrir la beauté véritable, comme Soonja Han y est parvenue dans ses tableaux. Essentiellement, l’œuvre récente de l’artiste a systématiquement tourné autour d’une prémisse fondamentale: il existe dans ses tableaux une variété de dimensions qui semblent s’annuler les unes les autres, créant ainsi une sorte de vide spatial cohérent avec son univers culturel. Cela place l’artiste encore davantage dans une position de recherche constante de modèles contemporains fondés sur une intervention non invasive. C’est par le biais de ce processus que Soonja Han découvre les réalités concrètes qui constituent un environnement transglobal de temporalité circulaire – qui semble être le point d’embarquement transcuturel sur lequel elle travaille aujourd’hui. Lorsque l’on se penche sur le travail de Soonja Han, elle est reconnue comme une artiste qui traite de l’essentiel et qui interprète les valeurs asiatiques dans le contexte de la culture occidentale. Il s’agit d’une approche fondamentale dans la manière de faire de l’art, même si elle ne le perçoit peut-être pas intentionnellement. Le point de référence de Soonja Han est son énergie essentielle, ce qui lui permet de traverser les frontières du modernisme pour s’aventurer dans le vingt-et-unième siècle. Elle ne s’est jamais sentie limitée, dans son identité, à sa relation avec un endroit ou un pays particulier. Son langage, en tant qu’artiste, s’attache à la communication universelle. Elle accède à une modalité temporelle d’être-aumonde en s’attachant à développer l’infinie dimensionnalité de l’espace. New York, mars 2017

19


1. Firenze, 2017, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sÊrigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, ø 175x0,5 cm (2 pieces)


2. Continue Forever, 2012, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, ø 100x3 cm


3. Blue flower, 2015, Altuglas, 80x66x2 cm


4. Purple universe, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x4 cm

32


5. Smelling pink flower, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x5 cm


6. Indigo blue universe, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 155x155x4 cm

36


37


7. Cosmic Bell, 2015, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio e cavo d’acciaio inossidabile sérigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir et câble d’acier inoxydable / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium and stainless steel cable on three elements, ø 50x0,5 cm ognuno / chacun / each


8. Energy Ball, 2017, stampa numerica su poliestere adesivo specchiante / Impression numÊrique sur polyester adhÊsif mirroir / numeric printing on mirror polyester adhesive, ø 60 cm


9. The sun, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x4 cm


10. Mirror Flower, 2014, alluminio lucidato a specchio / aluminium polie au miroir / mirror polished aluminium, ø 120x2 cm


11. The world, 2017, ritagli su carta stampata e collage su carta vintage / coupe on papier imprimé et décupage on vintage papier imprimé / cutting on printed paper and collage on vintage printed paper, 20,15x28,2 cm 12. Firenze!!, 2000-2017, film trasparente colorato, ritagli, fotografia e collage su carta / film coloré transparent, coupe, photographie et décupage on papier / colored transparent film, cutting, photography and collage on paper, 24,3x31,8 cm 13. Echos..., 2017, matita, carta stampata, ritagli e collage su carta/ crayon, papier imprimé, et décupage on papier / Pencil, printed paper, cutting and collage on paper, 20,5x30 cm 14. 3 circles, 2010, matita colorata, ritagli e collage su carta / crayon de coleur et décupage on papier / colored pencil, cutting and collage on paper, 30x42 cm 15. Energy!!!, 2017, penna a sfera, ritagli di carta stampata e collage su carta / stylo à bille, coupe sur papier imprimé, et décupage on papier / ballpoint pen, cutting on printed paper and collage on paper, 42,5x30 cm 16. Green universe, 2016, penna a sfera su carta / stylo à bille sur papier / ballpoint pen on paper, 24x30 cm


17. Green City, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 146x114x4 cm


18. Italia, 2017, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sÊrigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, ø 99,5x0,5 cm


19. Before the sun, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 130x130x2 cm 20. Wave, 2015, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sĂŠrigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, 19,5x174x80 cm 21. Hommage to Michel-Ange, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 200x135 cm


22. Pink flower, 2012-2013, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 100x81x2 cm


BIOGRAPHY

Soonja Han was born in Seoul, South Korea in 1952 to intellectual parents who encouraged her creative pursuits. Han took a particular interest in music, dance, and the visual arts in her youth, eventually deciding to study painting at Hongik University from 1972 to 1978. During this period, however, the South Korean art world was dominated by a version of strict academism in art schools and institutions. Han found this situation intolerable that limited the freedom of expression of young artists. Han left South Korea for Paris in 1983 and found herself in an energetic city with a dynamic and open artistic environment. She decided to stay and continue her studies at l’Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts-Décoratifs. After that, she went travelling all over Europe to soak up the thrilling variety of colors, flavors, and textures of other aspects of local cultures. These journeys helped to shape her understanding of formal composition and provided her with a richer chromatic vocabulary. Han was given her first solo exhibition at Jean-Claude Richard Gallery in Paris in 1988. The paintings she presented featured thick surfaces with muted tones reminiscent of the abstract Art Informel paintings, in sharp contrast to the figurative work that was in vogue in Paris at the time. The show was a success, and she was given a second show at JeanClaude Richard just a year later. By the early 90s Han had shifted from her abstract impasto paintings to experimenting with more spare compositions with thinner applications and smoother surfaces. These minimalist paintings and drawings attracted a new series of European galleries, including Leila Mordoch Gallery in Paris (1990 and 1992), Czecho in Prague (1991), Municipal Gallery in Hungary (1994), and Mathieu Gallery in Lyon (1992, 1995, 1998, 2000). At this point in her career Han became increasingly fascinated with Brancusi’s work. She was drawn to its spiritual quality and formal simplicity. The beauty of his elegant forms motivated her to create a more powerful symbolic visual language and to explore the space beyond the canvas. Her personal friendships with the artists Aurélie Nemours and François Morellet also had a profound influence on her. Among their moments together, Han recalls one conversation in particular, with Nemours, that made a lasting impression on her. Nemours said: “Oriental art contained everything one needed to paint, everything I didn’t have.”1 This led Han to reflect own formation as an Asian artist, and to a renewed appreciation of the circle as a rich spiritual source. At the dawn of the new century Han was participating in the global art scene as a confident, self-styled conceptualist, showing regularly in Europe, the United States, Japan, and Korea. The “Circles” exhibition at the Vismara Gallery in Milan in 2002, featured her now emblematic circular forms in bright and vivid hues, and marked a significant turning point in her career. These optimistic and energetic paintings drew serious attention and praise, earning her two more shows at Vismara Gallery in 2004 and 2006. The 2004 exhibition travelled to Hundai Gallery (South Korea), Tokyo Gallery (Japan), and Galleries Hoffman (Germany). The Vismara shows also paved the way to an important exhibition as Palazzo Crispi in Napoli 2007. Throughout this period Han continued to develop greater movement, dynamism, vitality, and chromaticity in her paintings.

1. Interview. Soonja Han by Pierre Tillet, Aug. 4. 2007, Exhibition Catalog, Museum of Modern Art, Saint- Etienne, p. 46-

77


Museums also began to take notice, affording Han the opportunity to present larger works and to explore the relationships between paintings and space. At the Total Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul in 2004, Han projected animations of her emblematic circles onto several of her circle paintings, creating a whole new dimension of movement and color. And at the Shanghai Art Museum (2006), the Busan Metropolitan Art Museum (2007), and the Soma Museum of Art in Seoul (2009) she presented several series of drawings that explored the relationships of her circular forms to the exhibition spaces. The Museum of Modern Art in Saint-Etienne gave Han her first retrospective exhibition in 2007 and two years later included her in a group show titled “Micro-Narratives”. Han’s installations in all of these museums were specifically adapted to the exhibition spaces in order to encourage viewers to form intimate personal impressions in their interactions with the work. In 2015 Han was commissioned to design the second Swatch Club watch. It was her first foray into commercial art. The design was inspired by a mixed media work of hers titled This is my world (2015) in which she superimposed her characteristic circles on an old map of the world, representing people’s desire to travel the world. The watch work resonated with mass audiences as genuinely as her fine art did in the art world. In recent years, Han has participated in important international exhibitions including “Dislocation” at Deagu Art Museum in Korea (2012), “35 x 35 Art Project” at Copelouzos Art Museum in Athens (2014), “Moving circles” at Johyun Gallery in Busan, South Korea (2015), “Inhabiting the World” at the Busan Biennial (2014), and the important geometric abstraction exhibition, “Rythme & Geometrie”, at the Musée de Châteauroux in France (2016), Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny, Galleria Il Ponte, Firenze (2017). Soonja Han continues to live and work in Paris.

78


BIOGRAFIA

Soonja Han nasce a Seoul, Sud Corea, nel 1952 da genitori colti che incoraggiano le sue attitudini creative e dal suo giovanile interesse per la musica, la danza e le arti visive, alla fine decide di studiare pittura alla Hongik University dal 1972 al 1978. In questo periodo il mondo dell’arte sudcoreano, nelle scuole d’arte e nelle istituzioni, è dominato da un modello di stretto accademismo e Han trova questa situazione intollerabile in quanto limita la libertà di espressione dei giovani artisti. Han lascia la Corea del Sud per Parigi nel 1983 e riscopre se stessa in una città piena di energia, con un ambiente artistico dinamico e aperto. Decide di restare e continuare i suoi studi all’Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts-Décoratifs. In seguito viaggia in tutta Europa, per assorbire la sorprendente varietà di colori, sapori e trame degli altri aspetti delle culture locali. Questi viaggi l’aiutano a formare la sua concezione di composizione formale e dotarla di un vocabolario cromatico più ricco. Han tiene la sua prima personale alla Jean-Claude Richard Gallery a Parigi nel 1988. I dipinti che presenta mostrano superfici spesse con toni smorzati che rievocano i dipinti astratti dell’Art Informel, in netto contrasto con la pittura figurativa allora in voga a Parigi. La mostra è un successo e l’anno successivo tiene una seconda personale alla Jean-Claude Richard. All’inizio degli anni ‘90 Han passa dai suoi dipinti dallo spesso impasto di colore astratto alla sperimentazione di composizioni risparmiate con sottili applicazioni di colore e superfici più levigate. Questi dipinti e disegni minimalisti attraggono l’attenzione di una serie di nuove gallerie europee, quali Leila Mordoch Gallery a Parigi (1990 e 1992), Czecho a Praga (1991), Municipal Gallery in Ungheria (1994) e Mathieu Gallery a Lione (1992, 1995, 1998, 2000). In questo fase Han è sempre più affascinata dal lavoro di Brancusi, attratta dalla sua essenza spirituale e semplicità formale. La bellezza delle sue forme eleganti la motiva a creare un linguaggio visivo simbolico più potente e a esplorare lo spazio oltre la tela. Anche la sua personale amicizia con gli artisti Aurélie Nemours e François Morellet ha una profonda influenza su di lei. Tra i momenti passati insieme, Han ricorda in particolare una conversazione con Nemours che l’ha l’ha particolarmente impressionata. Nemours diceva: “l’arte orientale contiene tutto ciò che è necessario per dipingere, tutto ciò che io non ho avuto1.” Questo porta Han a riflettere sulla propria formazione come artista asiatica, e a un rinnovato credito dato alla forma circolare come una ricca fonte spirituale. All’alba del nuovo secolo Han partecipa alla scena artistica mondiale con una propria e sicura posizione concettuale e tiene regolarmente esposizioni in Europa, Stati Uniti, Giappone e Corea. La mostra Cerchi alla Galleria Vismara a Milano nel 2002, presenta ora le sue emblematiche forme circolari in tonalità luminose e vivide e segna un significativo punto di svolta nella sua carriera. Questi dipinti dai toni positivi ed energici riscuoto grande attenzione e successo e la Galleria Vismara le organizza nel 2004 e 2006 altre due nuove mostre a Milano. Quella del 2004 viene poi presentata alla Hundai Gallery (Corea del Sud), alla Tokyo Gallery a Tokyo (Giappone), alla galleria Hoffmann, Friedberg (Gerrmania). Le esposizioni alla galleria Vismara aprono la strada anche a un’importante mostra a Palazzo Crispi a Napoli nel 2007. Durante questo periodo Han continua a sviluppare nei suoi dipinti maggior movimento, dinamismo, vitalità e cromaticità. Anche i Musei cominciano a prendere atto del suo lavoro e le offrono la possibilità di presentare opere di maggiori dimensioni e di esplorare più a fondo le relazioni tra dipinti e spazio. Al Total Museum of Contemporary Art, a Seoul nel 2004, Han progetta animazioni 1. Intervista a Soonja Han di Pierre Tillet, 4 agosto, 2007, catalogo della mostra al Musée d’Art Moderne Saint-Étienne Métropole, p. 46

79


dei suoi caratteristici cerchi su alcuni dei suoi dipinti rotondi, dando vita a un dimensione di movimento e colore completamente nuova. E nello Shanghai Art Museum (2006), nel Busan Metropolitan Art Museum (2007) e nel Soma Museum of Art a Seoul (2009) presenta alcune serie di disegni che esplorano le relazioni delle sue forme circolari con gli spazi stessi della mostra. Il Musée d’Art Moderne Saint-Étienne Métropole tiene la sua prima retrospettiva nel 2007 e due anni dopo la include in una collettiva “Micro-Narratives”. In questi musei le installazioni di Han vengono specificatamente adattate agli spazi espositivi per spingere i visitatori a formulare intime personali impressioni delle loro interazioni con l’opera. Nel 2015 a Han viene commissionato di disegnare il secondo orologio dello Swatch Club. È la sua prima incursione nell’arte commerciale. Il design è inspirato dai suoi lavori a tecnica mista intitolati This is my world (2015) nei quali Han sovrappone i suoi caratteristici cerchi su una vecchia mappa del mondo che allude al desiderio di viaggiare delle persone. Quest’orologio-opera ha una risonanza tra il pubblico di massa così autentica quanto la sua arte l’ha avuta nel mondo. Recentemente, Han partecipa a importanti mostre internazionali, quali Dislocation, Deagu Art Museum in Corea (2012); 35x35 Art Project, Copelouzos Art Museum in Atene (2014); Inhabiting the World, Biennale di Busan (2014); Moving circles, Johyun Gallery in Busan, Sud Corea (2015); l’importante mostra sull’astrazione geometrica Rythme & Geometrie, Musée de Châteauroux in France (2016); Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny, Galleria Il Ponte, Firenze (2017). Soonja Han vive e lavora a Parigi.

80


BIOGRAPHIE

Soonja Han naît à Séoul, en Corée du Sud, en 1952, de parents intellectuels qui l’encouragent à développer sa créativité. Soonja Han manifeste dès son plus jeune âge un intérêt particulier pour la musique, la danse et les arts visuels, se décidant finalement à étudier la peinture à l’Université Hongik entre 1972 et 1978. Néanmoins, à cette époque, une forme d’académisme strict prédomine dans l’art sud-coréen, relayée par les écoles d’art et les institutions. Pour Soonja Han, cette situation est intolérable et limite la liberté d’expression des jeunes artistes. Soonja Han quitte la Corée du Sud pour Paris en 1983 et découvre alors une ville pleine d’énergie, offrant un environnement artistique libre et dynamique. Elle décide de rester et de poursuivre ses études à l’École nationale supérieure des arts décoratifs. Par la suite, elle voyage dans toute l’Europe pour absorber la formidable variété de couleurs, de parfums et de textures qui sont autant d’aspects des cultures locales. Ces voyages l’aident à se forger une compréhension de la composition formelle et lui fournissent un vocabulaire chromatique plus riche. La première exposition personnelle de Soonja Han a lieu en 1988 à la galerie Jean-Claude Richard, à Paris. Les peintures exposées présentent des surfaces épaisses aux tonalités feutrées, rappelant l’abstraction des peintures d’art informel, et offrant un saisissant contraste avec les travaux figuratifs alors en vogue à Paris. L’exposition est un succès, et l’artiste est nouveau exposée à la galerie Jean-Claude Richard l’année suivante. Au début des années 1990, Soonja Han est passée de peintures abstraites riches en empâtements à l’expérimentation de compositions plus dépouillées, d’applications plus fines et de surfaces plus lisses. Ces peintures et dessins minimalistes attirent une nouvelle série de galeries européennes, parmi lesquelles Leila Mordoch à Paris (1990 et 1992), Czecho à Prague (1991), la Municipal Gallery en Hongrie (1994) et la galerie Mathieu à Lyon (1992, 1995, 1998 et 2000). C’est à ce moment de sa carrière que Soonja Han se découvre une fascination grandissante pour le travail de Brancusi. Elle est attirée par sa dimension spirituelle et sa simplicité formelle. La beauté de ses formes élégantes l’encourage à créer un langage visuel à la symbolique plus puissante, et à explorer l’espace au-delà de la toile. Son amitié personnelle avec les artistes Aurélie Nemours et François Morellet a également une profonde influence sur elle. Parmi les moments qu’ils ont passés ensemble, Soonja Han se souvient notamment d’une conversation avec Aurélie Nemours qui l’a durablement marquée. Cette dernière disait : «L’art oriental contient tout ce qu’il faut pour peindre, tout ce que je ne possède pas».1 Cette remarque conduit Soonja Han à réfléchir à sa propre formation en tant qu’artiste asiatique, et à réévaluer le cercle comme une riche source d’inspiration spirituelle. Au tournant du siècle, Soonja Han prend pleinement sa place sur la scène artistique mondiale, celle d’une artiste conceptualiste audacieuse et originale, exposant régulièrement en Europe, aux États-Unis, au Japon et en Corée. L’exposition «Cercles», qui se tient à la galerie Vismara de Milan en 2002, présente ses formes circulaires de couleur vive, désormais emblématiques, et marque un tournant dans sa carrière. Ces peintures qui respirent l’optimisme et l’énergie sont très remarquées et offrent à l’artiste une reconnaissance qui se traduit par l’obtention de deux expositions supplémentaires à la galerie Vismara, en 2004 et 2006. L’exposition de 2004 part en itinérance dans les galeries Hundai (Corée du Sud), la 1. «Il faut éprouver le cercle » / entretien de Soonja Han et Pierre Tillet, réalisé à Paris, dans l’atelier de Soonja Han, le 4 août 2007. Catalogue de l’exposition au Musée d’art moderne de Saint-Étienne métropole, 15 septembre-18 novembre 2007, p. 46.

81


Tokyo Gallery (Japon) et les galeries Hoffman (Allemagne). Les expositions à la galerie Vismara lui ouvrent aussi la voie vers une exposition d’envergure au Palazzo Crispi à Naples, en 2007. Durant toute cette période, Soonja Han continue de développer des mouvements de plus en plus amples, mais aussi le dynamisme, la vitalité et la richesse chromatique de ses peintures. Des musées commencent à s’y intéresser et permettent à l’artiste de présenter des œuvres plus imposantes et d’explorer la relation entre la peinture et l’espace. En 2004, au Musée Total d’art contemporain de Séoul, Soonja Han projette des animations de ses cercles emblématiques sur plusieurs disques peints, apportant ainsi une dimension nouvelle de mouvement et de couleur. Au Musée d’art de Shangaï (2006), au Metropolitan Art Museum de Busan (2007) et au Soma Musem of Art de Séoul (2009), elle présente plusieurs séries de dessins qui explorent les relations entre ses formes circulaires et les espaces d’exposition. Le Musée d’art moderne de Saint-Étienne offre à Soonja Han sa première rétrospective en 2007, et deux ans plus tard, l’inclut dans une exposition collective intitulée «Micro-Narratives, Tentation des petites réalités». Ses installations dans tous ces musées se sont spécifiquement adaptées aux espaces d’exposition afin d’encourager les visiteurs à se forger une impression personnelle et intime dans leur interaction avec son œuvre. En 2015, Soonja Han est chargée de dessiner la deuxième montre du Swatch Club. C’est sa première incursion dans l’art commercial. Le design s’inspire de l’une de ses œuvres de techniques mixtes intitulée This is my world (2015), pour laquelle elle a placé ses cercles caractéristiques en surimpression sur une ancienne carte du monde, et qui représente le désir des gens de voyager à travers le monde. Le travail qu’elle effectué pour cette montre a eu autant d’écho auprès du grand public que ses œuvres plastiques dans le monde de l’art. Ces dernières années, Soonja Han a participé à plusieurs expositions internationales majeures, parmi lesquelles « Dislocation» au Deagu Art Museum en Corée (2012), « 35 x 35 Art Project » au musée d’art Copelouzos d’Athènes (2014), «Moving Circles» à la galerie Johyun de Busan, en Corée du Sud (2015), «Inhabiting the World» à la Biennale de Busan (2014), ainsi que l’importante exposition d’abstraction géométrique «Rythme & Géométrie» au Musée de Châteauroux, en France (2016); Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny, Galleria Il Ponte, Firenze (2017). Soonja Han vit et travaille toujours à Paris.

82


Mostre personali / Solo Shows / Exposition personelles 2017 Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny, Galleria Il Ponte, Firenze, Italia* 2016 Soonja Han, Maison de l’Université, Rouen University, Rouen, France* 2015 Moving circles, Johyun Gallery, Busan, South Korea* 2013 The Space of Art, The Art of Space, Debuck Gallery, New York *

1996 Bercy Warehouse, Paris 1995, 93, 92 Mathieu Gallery, Besançon, France * 1992, 90 Leila Mordoch Gallery, Paris, France * 1991 Opatov Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic 1989, 88 Jean-Claude Richard Gallery, Paris, France *

2012-11 Circles, Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France * 2009 Re-discovery Soonja Han & Shin Sung Hee, Soma Museum of Art, Seoul, South Korea * Johyun Gallery, Seoul, South Korea * Round Ground, Bund 18 Creative Center, Shangai, China 2008 Capricorno Gallery, Capri, Italy Johyun Gallery, Busan, South Korea * 2007 Museum of Modern Art, Saint-Etienne, France * Circles Palazzo Crispi, Napoli, Italia * 2006 Vismara Gallery, Milan, Italia 2005 Circles, Johyun Gallery, Busan, South Korea * Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France 2004 Vismara Gallery, Milan, Italia * Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France * Circles, Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea * Circles, Hyundai Gallery, Seoul, South Korea * Tokyo Gallery, Tokyo, Japan * 2002 Circles, Vismara Gallery, Milan * 2000, 1998 Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France *

Mostre collettive (selezione) / Selected Group Exhibitions / Exposition Collectives (sélection) 2016 One, two, three and… 7, La passerelle, Rouen University, Rouen, France* Galerie ALB, Paris, France Rythme et géométrie, Châteauroux Museum, Châteauroux, France* 2014 35 x 35, Art Project, Copelouzos Art Museum, Athens, Greece* Inhabiting the world , Busan Biennale 2014, Busan Metropolitan Art Museum, Busan, South Korea * 2012 Dislocation, Daegu Art Museum, Daegu, South Korea * Rock, paper, scissors, curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, Leila Heller Gallery, New York * 2011 Notre vallée, Musée du château des ducs de Wurtemberg, Montbéliard, France 2010 Art@library, The National Digital Library of Korea, Seoul, South Korea * 2009 Micro-Narratives, Accademia d’Ungheria, Rome, Italia

83


2008 Perfect circles, Johyun Gallery, Seoul, South Korea Micro-Narratives, Museum of Modern Art, Saint-Etienne, France * 2007 Blue, Johyun Gallery, Seoul, South Korea At the Groove of Time, Busan Metropolitan Art Museum, Busan, South Korea * The Optical Edge, Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York * Long live the Childhood!, Johyun Gallery, Busan, South Korea 2006 Fiction@Love, Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China * The 40th Anniversary Exhibition Gallery, Vismara Gallery, Milan, Italia * Suites Coréennes, Passage de Retz, Paris, France * 2005 Maximum 500, Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France Seven Painters’ Vision, Astrée Cultural Center, Lyon, France * Constructive Concepts, Montbéliard Museum, Montbéliard, France Hangzhou West Lake Expo Museum, Hangzhou Millennium Museum Beijing, Beijing, China 2004 Echos, Amiens Cultural Center, Amiens, France * 2003 Homage to the Square, Hoffmann Gallery, Friedberg, Germany * 100 Years’ History of Korean Artists in France, Gana–Beaubourg Gallery, Paris, France * Balls, Bossuet Museum, Meaux, France * 2002 Wall Works, Laon Cultural Center, Laon, France * After White, Vismara Gallery, Milan, Italia 2001 Vismara Gallery, Milan, Italia 1999 Women Artist’ Festival 99, Seoul Art Center, Seoul, South Korea * Ein-Blick, Hoffmann Gallery, Friedberg, Germany * 1998, 96 Mathieu Gallery, Lyon, France Municipal Gallery, Pecs, Hungary * Leila Mordoch Gallery, Paris 1991 Oeuvres Intimes, Mathieu Gallery, Besançon, France

84

1989, 88 Jean-Claude Richard Gallery, Paris, France Maison des Beaux-Arts gallery, Paris, France 1988 La sérigraphie, ENSAD de Belfort, Belfort, France * Bossuet Museum, Meaux, France

* catalogo / catalog / catalogue


INDICE DELLE TAVOLE / INDEX OF WORKS / INDEX DES TABLES 1. Firenze, 2017, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sérigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, ø 175x0,5 cm 2. Continue Forever, 2012, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, ø 100x3 cm 3. Blue flower, 2015, Altuglas, 80x66x2 cm 4. Purple universe, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x4 cm 5. Smelling pink flower, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x5 cm 6. Indigo blue universe, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 155x155x4 cm 7. Cosmic Bell, 2015, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio e cavo d’acciaio inossidabile su tre pezzi / sérigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir et câble d’acier inoxydable / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium and stainless steel cable on three elements, ø 50x0,5 cm ognuno / chacun / each 8. Energy Ball, 2017, stampa numerica su poliestere adesivo specchiante / Impression numérique sur polyester adhésif mirroir numeric printing on mirror polyester adhesive, ø 60 cm 9. The sun, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 140x140x4 cm 10. Mirror Flower, 2014, alluminio lucidato a specchio / aluminium polie au miroir / mirror polished aluminium, ø 120x2 cm 11. The world, 2017, ritagli su carta stampata e collage su carta vintage / coupe on papier imprimé et décupage on vintage papier imprimé / cutting on printed paper and collage on vintage printed paper, 20,15x28,2 cm 12. Firenze!!, 2000-2017, film trasparente colorato, ritagli, fotografia e collage su carta / film coloré transparent, coupe, photographie et décupage on papier / colored transparent film, cutting, photography and collage on paper, 24,3x31,8 cm 13. Echos..., 2017, matita, carta stampata, ritagli e collage su carta / crayon, papier imprimé, et décupage on papier / Pencil, printed paper, cutting and collage on paper, 20,5x30 cm 14. 3 circles, 2010, matita colorata, ritagli e collage su carta / crayon de coleur et décupage on papier / colored pencil, cutting and collage on paper, 30x42 cm 15. Energy!!!, 2017, penna a sfera, ritagli di carta stampata e collage su carta / stylo à bille, coupe sur papier imprimé, et décupage on papier / ballpoint pen, cutting on printed paper and collage on paper, 42,5x30 cm 16. Green universe, 2016, penna a sfera su carta / stylo à bille sur papier / ballpoint pen on paper, 24x30 cm 17. Green City, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 146x114x4 cm 18. Italia, 2017, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sérigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, ø 99,5x0,5 cm 19. Before the sun, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 130x130x2 cm 20. Wave, 2015, serigrafia su alluminio lucidato a specchio / sérigraphie sur aluminium polie au miroir / serigraphy on mirror polished aluminium, 19,5x174x80 cm 21. Hommage to Michel-Ange, 2017, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 200x135 cm 22. Pink flower, 2012-2013, acrilico su tela / acrylique sur toile / acrylic on canvas, 100x81x2 cm IMMAGINI NEL TESTO p. 8 Pantheon, Roma, © fotosearch.fr p.12 Self-portrait, 1983, inchiostro, etichetta e matita su carta / encre, label et crayon sur papier / Ink, label and pencil on paper,
21 x 29,5 cm p.16 Firenze!!, 2000-2017, film trasparente colorato, ritagli, fotografia e collage su carta / film coloré transparent, coupe, photographie et décupage on papier / colored transparent film, cutting, photography and collage on paper, 24,3x31,8 cm pp. 20-21 Soonja Han nel suo studio a Parigi, 2015 / dans son étude à Parigi / in her studio in Paris, 2015 p.75 Soonja Han prepara un’installazione per la sua esibizione al Musée d’Art Moderne Saint-Étienne Métropole / preparé une installation pour son exposition au Musée d’Art Moderne Saint-Étienne Métropole / setting an installation for her Saint-Etienne Modern Art Museum exhibition, 2007

85


Finito di stampare nel maggio duemiladiciassette dalla tipografia Bandecchi & Vivaldi di Pontedera per i tipi de Gli Ori di Pistoia in occasione della mostra Soonja Han’s Enchanted Destiny organizzata dalla Galleria Il Ponte, Firenze


Soonja Han, Enchanted Destiny  

SOONJA HAN Enchanted Destiny Testo di Soojun Hyun 88 pp., formato cm 24x30 30 tavole a colori e 5 bianco/nero Rilegato in brossura Edizion...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you