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gair rhydd Monday November 22 2010 | freeword – Est. 1972 | Issue 937

Students pay more Additional fees for certain University courses are revealed Ben Price News Editor A gair rhydd investigation into additional costs on certain courses has revealed that students can find themselves paying hundreds of pounds each year. The investigation primarily focused on courses in which fieldwork is seen as an essential part of the course. It included a study of the extra costs placed on students studying Architecture, Engineering and Earth and Ocean Sciences. Students on these courses were approached and asked about the fees they pay in addition to the standard tuition fees, which currently stands at £3,290. A third year Architecture student reported a compulsory week of study abroad at a cost of £300 in the final year. Trips to Copenhagen in the first year and Barcelona in the second year also come at a price for students. A spokesperson from the Welsh School of Architecture told gair rhydd: “The School places emphasis on the value of overseas study visits and fieldwork trips in providing opportunities to study world-class architecture and broaden cultural experiences. “The School is aware of the costs associated with these trips and does what it can to minimise the financial burden on students. It contributes to the travel and accommodation costs where possible and strives to keep costs low, for example, by arranging group bookings in low-budget hostels, which have selfcatering facilities.” Apart from the cost of fieldwork, it was also highlighted that students are expected to pay out for materials, which often cost over £100 per

project. A further £15 per week is also spent on paper and printing. The School will continue to monitor its study visit and fieldwork programmes and recognises that it may need to review these components of its courses “in the light of the increasing financial burden on students,” added the school’s spokesperson. A third year architecture student commented: “I think Architecture expects a lot of the individual in all regards. “For me cost ends up being the least stressful of these demands. But if you are really tight for cash there is literally no time for a job. One girl in my year has one and her work suffers for it.” The School of Earth & Ocean Sciences (EARTH) runs three and four year degree courses in Geology, Exploration & Resource Geology, Environmental Geoscience, Marine Geography, Marine Geoscience and Earth Sciences. A second year Marine Geographer explained how he was expected to pay £150 in additional costs over one year of study. He also stated that the cost increases between first year and the final year of study. He expects to pay around £200 in this final year for fieldtrips. Despite the fact some students recognise that £150 for a week of intensive field study abroad in countries such as Greece is a reasonable price to pay, it was suggested that the government’s proposal to increase tuition fees might intensify a debate on the issue of students having to pay additional fees at all. A spokesperson from the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences said: “Field courses range from local day trips, to time on the School’s

research vessel, to overseas venues currently as far afield as Greece, the Canaries or Cyprus. Whereas we utilise local resources as much as possible, 60 day-trips to Barry Island do not a good (or employable) geoscientist make. It is essential that we venture further afield as well. The overseas trips, to regions of global significance to the specific subject being studied, are the highlights of the degree programmes.” The students who study the Geology course also find themselves having to pay in excess of £100 for compulsory trips on an annual basis, with costs gradually rising each year. Even though EARTH covers as much of the cost of these trips as possible, students still find themselves paying around £120 per year for compulsory field trips from their second year onwards. An EARTH spokesperson responded to this situation, saying: “EARTH currently endeavours to meet 75% of the cost of a student’s trips. The amount requested of each student depends upon their degree scheme, so that all students get as similar a subsidy as possible: it currently varies from £60 to £285 per year, ranging up to £585 in total over three years for the most field-intensive, most expensive course” Questioned over whether the cost of field trips should be made clear on the University’s website for the benefit of prospective students, the School said: “Few universities publicise the figures they require students to pay, but our investigations suggest that Cardiff is at least comparable to most others, and considerably cheaper than many.”

Continued on page 3

For the full story turn to Politics, page 14

Complete rubbish

Movember

Techno-lover

Stephen Jones

IMG Roundup

gair rhydd reveals that students in Cathays could face fines for improper waste disposal, find out more inside. News, page 2

Our Opinion writer discusses the relative merits of growing a ‘tasche in the name of charity Opinion, page 9

A self-confessed Techno-holic tries to go cold turkey for a week. Features let you know how he gets on... Features, page 16

Alex Bywater bags an exclusive interview with the Wales fly half, Stephen Jones. Sport, page 28

Sport gives you the full rundown of all the latest IMG victories, and lets you know all the coming fixtures. Sport, page 31

In defence of the Millbank protest: “Students need to stand up and be counted”


02News

gr EDITOR Sarah Powell

CO-ORDINATOR Elaine Morgan DEPUTY EDITOR Dom Kehat SUB-EDITORS Anna Redbond Isabelle Roberts Hannah van den Bergh NEWS Morgan Applegarth Miranda Atty Pippa Lewis Ben Price Hannah Pendleton FEATURES Zoe Bridger Laura Brunt OPINION Holly Howe Chris Williams POLITICS James Dunn Oliver Smith COLUMNIST Henry Burton

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • news@gairrhydd.com

What a load of rubbish Jenny Lambourne Reporter Cardiff Council has introduced on the spot fines of £100 for Cathays residents who fail to comply with waste regulations under Section 46 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Under the new measures all residents will be subject to on the spot fines if they fail to abide by waste disposal rules, including putting bins out on the wrong day, contaminating green recycling bags or misusing wheelie bins. The current system requires green bags to be used for dry recyclable waste and black bags for that which cannot be recycled or composted which is to be placed in the black bins. White bags of organic waste are intended to be collected in the green bins provided by the council. Bins and bags should be put out by 6am on the day of collection but no earlier than 4.30pm on the day before. Bins must additionally be brought back within property

boundaries no later than 9am the day after collection. A council spokes person informed gair rhydd that residents were provided with a calendar and a formal waste notice of the Environmental Protection Act giving details of recycling practices and collection times at the start of term. In addition, the Recycling Education Team has been said to have visited all properties within the area offering advice on minimising their household waste. They were additionally present at the Freshers’ Fayre on September 27 and have continued to hold advice points in the Union on the first Tuesday of the month. Despite these actions many students remain unclear on the new measures introduced by the council. Faye Bevans, a third year English Literature student, expressed concern over the ability to issue on the spot fines when residents were unclear of the new council measures to tackle those who do not follow guidelines: “I don’t think that it is fair that the council will be able

to issue on the spot fines when it’s not been widely publicised. It’s unfair to issue fines without a warning first.” Matt Hussey, a third year Ancient History student, echoed these concerns by telling gair rhydd that members of the Recycling Education team had not informed him of the changes: “It’s a bit unfair to start fining people when most people have no idea what they’re being fined for. The council clearly need to start better informing people of the rules.” He continued to say however: “It’s not difficult to put bins outside a house. If the council are clear to residents about what counts as an offence and residence don’t follow these then perhaps they deserve to be fined.” The decision to introduce on the spot fines has been criticised as it contradicts approaches of schemes such as ‘Get it out of Cardiff’ which aims to educate students instead of punishing them. Rose Savage, Welfare, Campaigns and Communications Officer, told gair rhydd: “I think it is

the perception of the council that a Section 46 will mean the eradication of a waste 'problem', however, I believe it will lead to an exacerbated situation where students are still uneducated about their waste and social responsibility. Waste needs to be approached from an educational stance not through law enforcement, especially when notification of the Section 46 has been through letters ‘to the occupiers’, an ill consideration of multiple students living in houses.” Enforcement techniques have additionally been questioned due to the decision to fine residents who contaminate their green bag recycling. Collection times and dates can be found on www.cardiff.gov.uk/ recycling. Green recycling bags are available free from the Union and from various other locations, more details of which can be found on the website. Students can additionally sign up to the text service to receive weekly reminders on waste collection by texting ‘Tidy’ followed by their house number and postcode to 60066.

Cardiff Council's Waste Proposal: Your Thoughts

SOCIETIES Bianca London LISTINGS Sarah Powell SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT Tom Clarke Jack Parker SPORT Alex Bywater Lucy Morgan Alex Winter CONTRIBUTORS Emily Billington Marlyn Fowler Matt Jones Jake Galea Bara Ashi Caroline Dadd Ceri Whitley Laura Dunn Adviya Kahn Jenny Lambourne Celeb Woodbridge Philip Kenny Alanna Tregear Will Poley Matthew Courtney-Smith Nathaniel Smith Laura Amey Guy Kelly Lloyd Griffiths Chris Andrews Zenia Diwan Luke Slade PROOFREADERS Emma Feloy Emily Kneale Catriona Camacho Joanna Cawley Georgie Gratten Naomi Mantin Jenni Gardner Caleb Woodbridge

Lee Marchant Medicine, 2nd year

Steph Hubert History, 2nd year

Adam Feltham History, 2nd year

Carrie Dadd History, 2nd year

We’ve got a timetable to say which things have to go out and at what time. Our bins always go out but the fine is a bit excessive because everyone makes mistakes.

The literature isn’t always clear. We received two different documents with two different collection dates on. Though, the system does make it very easy to recycle.

I wouldn’t say the Council have massively advertised what to do. For the first few weeks of term, we thought the green bags were for the green bin for recycling...

We’ve never had a problem with taking the bins out. The fine will probably only make a difference to people who care and the people who care already do it.

Student band in UK top ten Morgan Applegarth News Editor Eight Cardiff University students have received acclaim after their band King Louis Collective has been voted as one of the ‘top ten student bands in the UK’. In an on-going online competition hosted by student website studentbeans.com, the band have raised their profile after receiving

high numbers of ‘likes’ on social networking website Facebook. The three bands with the most ‘likes’ by November 29 will then perform in front of a live audience at a venue in London, with music industry experts making the decision who will be the eventual winners. The ‘seven man, one woman groove machine’ formed in early 2009 after the members met while studying at the University.


News03

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • news@gairrhydd.com

Students face 'challenging circumstances' Continued from front Students studying Civil Engineering also face the burden of additional fees, with modules that include field trips in the first and second year totaling at a joint cost of around £250. Both trips are highlighted as being compulsory. Consequently, absence on these trips results in the student failing the module. A third year Civil Engineering student commented: “Whilst the extra cost does not sound like a huge amount, it does place a certain amount of financial burden on some students, particularly those who have to pay for their entire

time in University out of their own pocket.” A University spokesperson commented on the additional fees situation many students face by stating: "The University also wants to ensure that any student with the ability to succeed is not barred from coming to the University. This however, comes with significant cost attached - currently greatly in excess of current levels of student fees - which means if public funding is cut to a level that no longer bridges that gap between student fee and the real cost of provision, then maintaining a quality university experience will only be possible with additional contributions from other sources.”

With tuition fees set to rise and higher education facing severe cuts, it is unclear how the issue of additional fees will develop. The Welsh Assembly Government will, however, make its own decisions on levels of graduate contributions and a fair system of support for students in Wales. A University spokesperson assured students that: “As more details become available of the Welsh Assembly Government’s position we will be evaluating the implications of these challenging circumstances for both students and the institution. "The University will ensure that Student Union representatives are involved in those discussions.”

Above: Cardiff University's Main Building

Netball calendar girls Miranda Atty News Editor Cardiff University Netball Club has created a naked calendar in an attempt to raise money for charity. The Club will donate all of the proceeds from the calendar to the Teenage Cancer Trust. They were inspired to raise money after their coach’s daughter was diagnosed with cancer of the lymph glands The calendar, which is sponsored by The Vulcan Lounge Pub in Cathays, features black and white images of the Netball team. The Club will charge £5 per calendar, and all of the money raised will go to the cancer charity. The calendar is different from the annual AU naked calendar, because it only features the Netball Club rather than all sports societies. The Netball Club has created a Facebook page to help promote

the calendar and are focusing on getting male clubs to ‘like’ the page and post it to their friends. They have released a few of the photos on their Facebook page in order to encourage students to purchase the calendar. The Club is also hoping to get coverage from ITV Wales in order to further promote the calendar. A member of the Club said: “I know the AU are doing a similar calendar. We didn't know that this was going to go ahead for definite when we started so obviously we want to be completely separate from that as we have organised this whole thing off our own back, and obviously want it to succeed.” "We aren't taking anything for ourselves so this really is all for charity, but obviously it does raise the profile of the netball club and the AU," she commented. If the calendar sells well, the Netball Club is likely to raise £2,500 for charity.

Photo: Jake Yorath

Islamic society raises cash for charity Krispy Kreme doughnuts prove to be the big sellers in ISoc's week long fundraising campaign Charles Dodgson Reporter Students from Cardiff University’s Islamic Society (ISoc) have raised over £12,000 for charity, following a week-long fundraising campaign held at the Students’ Union. Throughout the week, Cardiff students were involved in a number of fundraising activities, which included a food fayre held in Solus. The biggest seller proved to be Krispy Kreme doughnuts, of with hundreds sold throughout the week.

Bara Ashi, President of Cardiff University Islamic Society commented on the week: “It was very encouraging to see so many students from all faiths and all walksof-life participating in Charity Week. “The money raised will go towards helping the poorest children who have been orphaned across the globe. A big thank you to everyone helped volunteer and raise this fantastic amount of money.” In total, ISoc raised £12,345, which is to be channelled through Islamic Relief, a global and wellrecognised charity who reach

vulnerable children all across the world. Many other universities took part in Charity Week, including Swansea and Glamorgan University. Societies, Events and Activities Officer Cosimo Monatgu spoke on the week’s success, revealing: “I am extremely proud of ISoc and what they have managed to accomplish, especially the professional and innovative way in which they raise this huge amount. “I want to thank the staff in the Union, who helped facilitate ISoc in accomplishing this record sum. [It’s] an amazing achievement.”

Ashi added: “It is very encouraging to see young students helping those who are less fortunate than themselves. “Even though it is really tough for students, everyone helped to make this year the most successful Charity Week held to date in Cardiff University”. Charity Week was a concept that began back in 2004 by a group of students in London, and has now spread throughout the UK, Ireland and Australia. All proceeds raised from the fundraising activities are donated to various local and international charities.

Fire Hazard Miranda Atty News Editor

Students and staff who attempted to evacuate the University’s Aberconway building during a fire alarm on Thursday November 11 had to walk back through the building after one fire exit failed to open. Twenty students attending a business lecture on the top floor descended three flights of stairs to the nearest fire exit. The steward on duty was unable to break the glass tube that would enable him to open the alarmed door so the students had to walk back through the building to another fire exit. This added an additional five minutes to their evacuation procedure. The fire alarm has been attributed to near-by contractors’ work. One student said of the incident: “If this had been a real fire it could have been a lot worse. It makes me question the fire policy of the whole University.” Another business student also commented: "I was shocked, who knows what it could have meant if it was a real fire?" A Cardiff University spokesperson has responded to the incident, stating: “Neither University Security or Estates were informed at the time of a specific problem arising during the evacuation. “However, as a precautionary measure, final exit doors have been checked in the building and found to be in good order.” The University explained: “A number of final exit fire doors in the building are protected by a glass tube which has to be broken to effect escape, and following investigation it appears on this occasion that rather than break the glass tube persons made use of another nearby escape route.” "We will continue to raise awareness of the presence of these type of bolts at our regular fire awareness training sessions," the spokesperson said.


04News

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • news@gairrhydd.com

University to increase sustainability Caroline Dadd Reporter Cardiff University has recently released a set of principles that will help it achieve its aim of becoming a more sustainable institution. The Cardiff University Sustainable Development Strategy, published during the University’s Sustainability Week, outlines the sustainable development principles that cover the three intertwined areas of economy, society and the environment.

It will also allow us to maximise our contribution to an improving quality of life for our staff and students The University says that ‘the framework will guide its decisionmaking across the institution and the development of policies regarding energy, travel, purchasing, waste and water’. The guidelines are said to help the University use its academic expertise to promote sustainable de-

velopment in order to benefit future generations. Professor Hywel Thomas, Cardiff University’s Chair of the Sustainability Group, stated: “At the University, we believe that rather than doing the minimum in order to fulfil our obligations, sustainable development should be integral to the our values, and be embedded in our operations. "This framework enables us to formally align our strategies and operations with the key sustainable development principles of longterm social justice and environmental protection. It will also allow us to maximise our contribution to improving quality of life for our staff and students and communities in Cardiff, Wales and internationally," he continued. The framework is a formal part of the University’s commitment to the Welsh Assembly Government’s Sustainable Development Charter, which was signed in May 2010, making Cardiff the first Welsh university to make a landmark commitment to future proofing lives and communities across Wales

Girls living in poverty face greater threat of violence Pippa Lewis News Editor

A Cardiff University study has shown that teenage girls living in poverty face a greater threat of violence. The study conducted by the Violence and Society Research Group highlights a link between living in deprived areas and an increased threat from violence, particularly among girls. Examining former industrial areas, the new results suggest that the

The risk of injury increased at a faster rate for girls than boys as deprivation increased

risk of violence increases more for girls than boys. Inspecting 700 cases of young people (11-17 years) who attended casualty departments throughout South Wales with injuries from violence, the researchers matched patients against the levels of deprivation in their home neighbourhoods. Professor Jonathan Shepherd, Director of the Violence and Society Research Group, said that the report ‘clearly showed poverty raised the risk of violence "dramatically more" for girls than boys’. "The facts linking deprived neighbourhoods to violence are complex and include social cohe-

sion, substance abuse and family stress," he said. "It is not clear why the risk to girls should be so much more sensitive to deprivation but the reason may be linked to the different ways girls of different backgrounds resolve disputes. "There is already concern about the violent risk to young women. "Our findings show that adverse economic conditions could make the problem even worse." Overall, boys were more at risk of violence than girls but the risk of injury increased at a faster rate for girls than boys as deprivation increased. In one deprived area, girls faced a risk of violence six times greater than in affluent areas. The report concluded that violence prevention efforts should focus more on tackling neighbourhood inequalities, particularly those related to material deprivation in adolescent girls. Earlier this year, the research group received the Queen's Anniversary Award at Buckingham Palace for their work in understanding and trying to prevent community violence. Their previous work has included trying to cut drunken crime and injuries in Cardiff city centre using innovative methods such as encouraging pubs and clubs to use plastic glasses.

Lecturers support student protest Ceri Whitley Reporter The President of the University and College Union (UCU) has signed a statement that refuses to condemn the violence of student protesters in London last week. President Alan Whitaker has signed in support of those members of the protest who smashed windows and broke into the Conservative Party Headquarters on Wednesday November 10, calling their actions ‘the most vibrant and exciting [protest] for a decade.’ Twenty-four members of the UCU, which seeks to protect the rights of lecturers, have signed the statement, calling on university and college staff to ‘stand with those students who were arrested.’ However, an official spokesperson of the UCU has said that the statement is not representative of the Union’s official policy regarding the protest, and was only signed by lecturers in a ‘personal capacity.’ A spokesperson from Cardiff University has stated that, currently, no Cardiff lecturers are known to have signed the agreement. “We are not aware of lecturers

having signed any such agreement. Any member of staff is free within the terms of their employment to sign petitions and such matters would not be monitored.

“The University condemns the violence that took place at the demonstration while recognising that the vast majority of students pro-

tested peacefully.” The scale of the support that the statement has received from within the UCU is indicative of the divided reactions towards the violence during the protest, with many students and lecturers rejecting NUS’s more conservative stance regarding the riots. There has also been widespread criticism from lecturers who have condemned the violence. The UCU statement says: “We will not side with those who condemn the violence against windows and property but will not condemn or even name the long-term violence of cuts that will scar the lives of hundreds of thousands by denying them access to the education of their choice.” University of Brighton Lecturer Tom Hickey has stated that he ‘expects the UCU to back any future campaign that defends those who were arrested during the demonstration.’ In follow-up to the co-organised NUS and UCU demonstration, campaign organisation Youth Fight for Jobs have organised a second protest, taking place this Wednesday.


Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • news@gairrhydd.com

JOMEC professor set to lead review for Prime Minister David Cameron Caleb Woodbridge Reporter A Cardiff University Professor will lead an independent review as part of David Cameron’s plans to shake up intellectual property law, the Government has announced. Professor Ian Hargreaves, who took up the Chair of Digital Economy in October, will lead the review into how the intellectual property (IP) system can better drive growth and innovation. “The founders of Google have said they could never have started their company in Britain,” said David Cameron, as he announced the review. Speaking on November 4, he laid out the Government’s vision for an “East London tech city,” saying that he wanted to make UK’s IP laws “fit for the Internet age.” He also wanted to “encourage the sort of creative innovation that exists in America.” UK copyright law has been criticised for not keeping up with mod-

ern technology. In 2009, Consumer Focus attacked British laws for “needlessly criminalising” music fans. In the UK, it is currently a copyright violation to rip CDs to a computer or mp3 player. One of the proposals to be considered is the introduction of US-style ‘fair use’ provisions. Intellectual Property Minister Baroness Wilcox has stated: “Professor Hargreaves is a distinguished academic, journalist and public servant. I am delighted someone of his calibre will lead this important piece of work.” “The internet has fundamentally changed the business landscape. Some sectors, such as the creative industries, have been transformed by the internet. The intellectual property framework must keep pace. “An IP system created in the era of paper and pen may not fit the age of broadband and satellites. We must ensure it meets the needs of the digital age. The future of the economy lies in the highly skilled

technology sectors. For many of those companies their intellectual property is their most valuable asset. We must ensure the intellectual property system helps, not hinders, those companies. “This review will look at what changes can be made to our intellectual property system to ensure it helps firms grow.” Professor Hargreaves said: “I am honored to be asked to lead this important review. Intellectual property is the DNA of the knowledge economy upon which the prosperity of Wales and the UK depends. It is essential that the UK and intellectual legal regime keeps pace with business needs, whilst protecting legitimate ownership interests.” Professor Hargreaves has been a Professor of Journalism at Cardiff for over a decade, and has held senior positions at the BBC, Financial Times, The Independent and New Statesman. The review is expected to report in April next year.

News05 New module takes focus on eating disorders Philip Kenny Reporter This week Cardiff University announced the addition of a new postgraduate module which deals with the treatment of eating disorders. Run by the school of Nursing and Midwifery, the Collaborative Working in Eating Disorders module is the first of its kind in Wales. It is taking an interdisciplinary approach to teaching with collaboration between sufferers, carers, leading clinicians and academic staff. It will focus on four key areas: assessment and engagement, formulation, treatment plans and risk management The School's professional Head for Mental Health, Linda Cooper, partnered with Lead Clinical Specialists in Eating Disorders, Cwn Taf Health board and Joy Jones, helped to lead the development. Eating disorders such as bulemia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are serious mental health disorders which affect the sufferers social and

psychological well-being. Over 1000 new cases of the disorder are diagnosed each year in Wales alone. The new module aims to play a critical role in aiding those who wish to develop an applied knowledge and advanced practice skills besides playing a crucial role in establishing a collaborative working ethos with the recently implemented Welsh Assembly Government’s ‘Eating Disorders: A Framework for Wales’. A representative from the Eating Disorders Module Planning Team has stated: “It has been very exciting to participate in the development of this unique course. As a long-term sufferer of an eating disorder I am really pleased to see clinicians, academics, students, sufferers and carers all working together in order to promote a true understanding of eating disorders. It is only with this kind of collaborative effort that we can think progressively and together develop a successful way to help and provide appropriate care for people with eating disorders."


06 World News Top of the pops Laura Amey Reporter In Germany, a former Hawaiian pop star’s rendition of the Judy Garland classic 'Over The Rainbow' has been sitting at Number One in the music charts for eight consecutive weeks. Israel Kamakawiwo’ole recorded his ukulele-accompanied single in 1993 but died four years later due to a weight-related illness. Since being released in Germany back in September the song is said to be “going platinum” as it has sold more than 300,000 records. Upon hearing the single a German record producer became so

moved that he negotiated for the rights of the song from a small Hawaiian record company. In addition to high record sales, the single has also led to an increase of ukulele sales throughout the country.

Quidditch world cup Miranda Atty News Editor The fourth Quidditch World Cup tournament has taken place in New York City ahead of the release of the latest Harry Potter movie. Seven hundred and fifty seven athletes, making up 46 Quidditch teams from the USA and Canada, took part in the two-day competition. A student from Middlesbury College created the competition, known as Muggles’ Quidditch, in 2005. In the Harry Potter books, Quidditch is played while flying in the air on broomsticks, but the non-

magical version stays firmly on the ground. Seekers chase a ‘Snitch runner’ who has the snitch in a sock down their shorts. Middlesbury College were crowned Quidditch champions.

Stiff rise in sales

Birds of gay

Guy Kelly Reporter

Lloyd Griffiths Reporter

The Tokyo porn industry has announced a stiff growth in elderly adult films. Reports released last week revealed that production of over-60’s adult films have doubled over the last decade. It is now said that 20% of all adult films produced in Japan feature at least one ‘senior’ actor. Seventy-six-year-old Shigeo Tukuda, who has featured in over 350 films, revealed: “I am having fun and making money.”

A same-sex vulture couple have controversially been forcibly separated in a German zoo. What with the absence of the pitter patter of tiny vultures, a spokesman said one of the male vultures would be taken to a zoo in the Czech Republic to try to boost the ailing population. The 14-year-old couple had been enjoying their middle-aged 'friendship' by building a nest together over the last few months, and were happy in their newly constructed home.

Mini me Chris Andrews Reporter A 21-year-old Turkish woman has recently been named the world’s- smallest woman. Hatice Kocaman, who measures in at 71cm, has shot to fame after winning the title earlier this year. "I always hoped that one day the world would recognise me," said Miss Kocaman, who weighs just 6.8kg. "It was hard when I was a child because all my classmates used to tease me for being small. But now I am famous because of my size. So it makes me feel like I am much taller," she said.

The decision taken by the Alwetter Zoo in Muenster has apparently caused Gay Rights uproar. Controversially, research last year actually suggested that homosexuality in the animal kingdom is not only universal but also beneficial as it allows group bonding and addresses population imbalances. It remains to be seen whether officials take this into consideration when separating the seemingly doomed lovers. It's unknown whether the couple will dispute visiting rights.

Promotion triggers sales Heather Arnold Reporter A used-car dealership in Sanford, Florida, has launched a controversial promotional scheme in a bid to boost sales. Nations Trucks are promising an AK-47 assault rifle for anyone who buys one their used trucks. Commenting on the offer, dealership owner Nick Ginetta said: “I don’t think it sends the wrong message. You don’t need to buy a truck to go and buy an AK-47.” However, everyone who purchases one of the dealerships used trucks will receive a

$400

$400 voucher, redeemable at a local firearms shop. One customer, a Vietnam War veteran, said: “I have had them shot at me but I need a truck so that’s why I’m here.” Since announcing the offer, Nations Trucks’ sales are said to have ‘more than doubled’.


Opinion08 Millbank: Riot Or Protest? Violence Beats Silence Chris Williams Opinion Editor The problem with being peaceful all the time is that people start to lose interest. People stop noticing you if you don’t jump up and shout every now and then - breaking the peace to get your voice heard. It is with this mentality that I looked at the so called ‘Millbank riots’. The fact of the matter is that we’re controlled by media industries and corporations, that’s how we get our view of what’s going on in the world. So when you protest and want to make your voice heard you need to make sure the media hears as well. Inevitably, with 50, 000 students taking to the streets and protesting, there will be some sort of controversy - someone will do something idiotic and noticeable for the journalists around. Yet this time, it all went a bit mental... to say the least. I was at the protests and I was watching the violence and the ‘rioting’ from quite close to the action - it was impressive. The students with the loudest anti-Tory / anti-cuts voices were the first ones to start breaking things and to be kicking through the windows: this wasn’t just acts of mindless vandalism, it

was pure passion. Those who began destroying the reception before making their way upstairs to the Tory offices weren’t just mindless fools, they were angst-ridden students who wanted their opinions to be heard. I’ve taken a lot of peoples words with a pinch of salt. One girl I spoke to at the protest claimed that “it really takes a lot away from the message”. This is a common argument among many newspapers, but I don’t think it does. If you’re willing to kick through a window and scream until you lose your voice about your hatred and anger at a situation, then you’re proving how much that message really means to you. Of course, I’m not condoning violent protests, but with the right people doing it - not just mindless vandals - it works and it sends a strong message to the government. There was just one point where I thought certain people had gone too far - one student threw a fire extinguisher from the roof of the building. It could’ve and would’ve seriously injured someone had it hit anyone, fortunately it didn’t., As slaves to the media, the violent protests were the difference between headline, page one news and a short paragraph on page 33, with

no pictures or mainstream news coverage. The students who broke through the building and destroyed everything in sight were doing so out of anger and hatred, and I believe they helped the cause by pushing this message right to the forefront of any politicians' mind. Us students have no representation through legal means. We have the NUS, but it’s just a union - there is no-one in parliament who represents us directly, so we have to sit outside convention and make our voices heard another way. If they won’t listen to us after students have smashed up one building, then we should smash another, and another, and another - then the powers that be will have to listen. The government is accountable to us. We voted them in, and we’ll decide if they’ve got a job again in four years time - they need to remember that. The government is supposed to represent our own best interests in any way that they can: students have sent a strong and clear message that we won’t tolerate cuts to education. With this in mind, they have no right and no legitimacy to implement this policy.

Above: The National Demo in front of Millbank Towers

Above: A discarded sign after the national demonstration

Violence is not effective Holly Howe Opinion Editor Last week’s tuition fee riots have proved to be extremely controversial. It seemed that everyone immediately took a side, and on Wednesday evening my Facebook news feed was littered with phrases such as ‘ruined it for the rest of us’ or ‘that’s how a revolution gets started!’ The people that have condemned the violence have taken different stances on why Wednesday's events were the wrong form of action. Politicians have focused on the cost of the damage to public property, a clever move in order to show up the hypocrisy of the small minority that broke away from the peaceful protest. Union leaders have called the violence ‘disgraceful’ and ‘condemnable’. It is obvious why such aggressive behaviour should be condemned when there was the chance of people getting seriously hurt or killed, yet that is not the only reason why many people see the riots as counter-productive. Ultimately, the storm on Millbank towers caused the media coverage to shift from the message of the protest, the unjust rise in tuition fees, to the drama of the day. When the story was covered, it was the images of the broken windows and burning photographs of David Cameron that were seen again and again, rather than any form of productive or powerful debate. The proposed rise in tuition fees will change the shape of education in the UK, therefore to actually question whether or not the violence was justified is a more complex question. It has been suggested that the impact of the violence and damage to public property is miniscule compared to the injustice and harm that will be caused by the government spending cuts, and lecturers at Goldsmiths college in London have pointed out that the "real violence in this situation relates to the

destructive impact of the cuts". However, to hijack the voices of 50,000 protesters in behaviour that was unquestionably controversial is completely unfair. It is suspected that the majority of the rioting group were not even students, and simply saw the demonstration as an opportunity to attack the current government. One of the most infamous figures of the protest, the man who threw a fire extinguisher from the roof of Millbank tower, was arrested last Tuesday with attempted murder. Unsurprisingly, he was not a student. One protestor has described the violence as ‘spontaneous’ and suggests that the attack was not carried out by left wing activists. Yet even if it was a ‘spontaneous’ act, it was, by definition, a thoughtless and unstructured act in which the fuller consequences of violent behaviour were not thought through. A demonstration alone is not going to change government policy. But the force of 50,000 people working together for a common cause is a powerful thing, and a force that should have been noted. However, the division of the protesters into peaceful and non-peaceful has showed up the inherent weakness within large groups of people, and politicians are not going to let the public forget it. What could have been a powerful, peaceful and effective demonstration, ended as a display of the ineptitude within large groups of people, and their inability come together to fight for one cause. Instead of proving to the government just how seriously the public see the issue of education, the rioters undermined the whole day, as well as the other 50,000 people that managed not to get caught up in the excitement of skipping school.


Opinion09

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • opinion@gairrhydd.com

Cameron must choose between human rights and economic interest Zenia Diwan Opinion Writer China is the latest target in David Cameron’s hit list for business trade with Asian economies. The PM has emphasised that strengthening the economic relationships and accommodating lofty cultural and business interaction between these two countries will prove highly beneficial for the British economy. However, Cameron’s emancipated goals are hardly free from controversy. His actions are largely being criticised as conjunctive to human rights. Radically, the PM was expected to contemplate the issue of human rights with Mr. Wen Jiabao (the Chinese Prime Minister) in the public domain. However, he only told the BBC: “We have a really high level dialogue with China on all sorts of issues from trade to human rights.” In fact, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who was under house arrest, accused Cameron of putting vested trade interests before human rights. If Cameron is dodging the issue of human rights by focusing on trade links, then he is acting in the economic interests of Britain. Considering that the unprecedented economic growth rate in China has put the country on the forefront of global trading Britain’s new delegation will seemingly help pump billions of pounds into the economy. France is also eyeing China with President Sarkozy having looked at $20 billion worth of aviation and energy contracts between the countries. However, the question is whether Britain is ready to engage at such a level with a country whose economic and social policies are remarkably different to her own? George

Osborne argued that British and Chinese economies will complement each other, because China is the largest exporter of manufactured goods and Britain is the second largest exporter of services. Moreover, this agreement will result in the highest Chinese immigrant ratio ever experienced by this country. This is because groups of school teachers and university vice chancellors, accompanied by Mr. Michael Gove, are aiming at facilitating better interaction between British and Chinese schools and universities. I am not saying that this is a negative aspect of the agreement, but the influx of students will drastically increase the number of international job-seekers and Cameron’s government has permanently declared that caps will be imposed on international students seeking to obtain jobs in the country from next year. International students pay ridiculous amounts of money to study in this country. However, they are barred from gaining any practical skills offered by graduate employers. The Home Office has already introduced a temporary cap for work visas being allotted to non EU students in June. This agreement will surely lead to disappointment among prospective Chinese students who would want to find work after finishing their course in this country. Furthermore, Cameron’s policy has proposed to give China a preferable stance in European markets providing it opens its market to Britain. Seemingly, Cameron’s policy also aims at a strong alliance between China and the EU. Cameron is, in fact, being alarmingly adamant in his attempts to restore the economy especially with

Above: David Cameron and the President of China, Hu Jintao this policy alongside cuts on various social budgets. The question I want to raise is this: is Britain going to make a drastic shift towards a highly structural capitalist agenda in the years to come? Intricate details of this economic pact include Vince Cable, Business Secretary, signing an agreement wherein the Chinese will refer to Scotch Whisky as produced only in Scotland. The Scotch Whisky Association is expected to gain billions from this deal with China. Furthermore, another agreement has been signed to trade pigs. Britain will export breeding pigs to China; these pigs are expected to produce 6,000 piglets a year through

artificial insemination processes. The British pig industry is hoping that the deal will be worth £45 million by next year. Only the future holds the answer to the actual success of these deals; due to their towering nature they can in fact have dire consequences. I am not, however, neglecting the issue of human rights. Media firms throughout the country have been questioning Cameron’s diplomatic assertion on human rights, but no clear answer has been given. Officials stated that, “having trade as the focus of your foreign policy does not mean it is the exclusive focus. Human rights are part of the dialogue.” However, Cameron

has maintained a diplomatic stance on the matter. Human rights are arguably an underlying matter that may have taken a back seat in the light of economic interests. Nothing much can be said about it because there is no clear information being put in the public forum for constructive debate. This makes it clear that the question of human rights is a condescending matter. Only the future can determine how this agenda altogether will impact the British relationship with China. I do hope though that the issue is subject to substantial debate for constant reassurance of its validity.

Is there more to Movember? Heather Arnold Opinion Writer There are plenty of good reasons to grow a moustache: to appear more intelligent, to make it more convincing when doing your Freddie Mercury impression or to prove that you’re a man enough to grow facial hair to name just a few. The list could go on and on, but perhaps the most noble of all reasons to grow a lip tickler is to do it to raise money and awareness for Prostate Cancer charities. The idea for ‘Movember’ (which, for anyone who didn’t catch it, is, a clever amalgamation of the ‘Mo’ and the word ‘November’) was created in 2003 by a couple of Aussies catching a few beers and, much like the facial hair of many of its participants, has been growing ever since – its now an international campaign taking place in over 11 countries. The proposal is simple: Get clean

shaven for the start of November and then allow your whiskers to grow free for the next 30 days! You can get sponsored to do so, or simply just join in for the fun of it and make people aware of an important cause. It is a phenomenon that has captured the imagination, and the upper lips, of almost every male I know and it has resulted in many stupid looking soup catchers. I will be the first to admit that moustaches can look good. Charlie Chaplin, Salvador Dali and Mario are all fine examples, but it usually takes a very special man to pull off the face fuzz. Looking around many of those taking the Movemeber challenge, they look more like Hulk Hogan wannabes than admirable examples of manhood. But don’t be disheartened, facial haired fellows, it's all for a good cause! And this is not the first time, by a long shot, that someone has done something stupid for charity.

I’m sure we can all think about some of the fundraisers that our old schools had to raise money for the staffroom wine collection; my school loved it! With several people begging for gap year money, or setting up a fundraising team so that they finally have something to butch out their university applications, there was a fundraiser almost every week. Two years ago I tried to organise a ‘fools’ themed non-uniform day for April 1. This ended up with everyone of the sixth form students dressed normally apart from me. (I was pulling off a stylish neon rabbit shirt, size XXL, and curlers in my hair). My maths teacher said I looked like a ‘crazed washer woman who went swimming in a glow stick’. A yearly tradition at my school was also the ‘Male Teacher Leg Wax’ for which one particularly hairy member of staff found himself in the very unenviable position of not being able to grow his leg hair back.

This meant for the rest of the year three rectangles of bare skin could be seen on his otherwise perfectly furry right leg. And let’s not forget the work of the most famous ‘do stupid stuff for the humanity’s sake’ charity – Comic Relief. The campaign I remember most was their 2001 ‘Pants to Poverty’ campaign, not just because it was the only day my mum allowed me to go to school with a pair of knickers on my head, but because of the once in a lifetime event of Billy Connolly streaking through Piccadilly Circus in the middle of the day. Apparently it was requested several times over by members of the public that Johnny Depp should take his place. Combining two favourite fundraising ideas (sport and silliness) and keeping along the lines of nudity, there is the Bra Run for breast cancer awareness, and London’s naked bike ride for bike safety. All of these examples (and the countless more that there’s simply not

enough room for here) prove that fundraisers are no longer fancy parties where the rich try to outdo each other by throwing more and more money at a cause, but instead they are a bit of fun for everybody. It’s obvious that nowadays it is impossible to say that ridiculousness and charity don’t go hand in hand! All in all I can sympathise with the number of people (boys and girls alike) complaining about how their boyfriend/brother/cousin/whole damn flat look downright stupid in their attempts to grow a nose neighbour. But we have to be honest - it’ll be a shame when December comes round and all that friendly face fur gets shaved out of all our lives...at least until next year.


Opinion10 Muslim extremists fanning the flames of hate?

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • opinion@gairrhydd.com

Cari Davies

Opinion Writer Britain proudly boasts about its democratic system; a nation where the people have a voice, a ‘developed’ state in which protest is not quashed but broadcast. The problem lies in the abuse of such rights to protest, all too often people blindly point the finger of blame, and in doing so fuel misplaced aggression. This, to put it bluntly, makes the “protesters” in question look like raving idiots. The recent protest outside the Jami Mosque in Southsea, Portsmouth, demonstrates this all too well. A poppy was painted on the front of the mosque. This was not, as members of the English Defence League named it, ‘decoration’ but actually a purposeful act of vandalism and therefore a criminal offence. Over 100 people gathered in front of the Mosque at lunchtime and in the evening in response to the burning of a poppy by an Islamic group, Muslims Against Crusades, in London on Remembrance Day. Although this was, indeed, a spiteful act, as long as protest remains peaceful it does not break any British laws. However, spraypainting a giant poppy on a building without permission does: well done EDL. So, do all Muslims have absolutely no respect for British soldiers? Do they all pray that service personnel fighting for the UK will come to a treacherous end, facing eternal suffering, and on Remembrance Day spit words of hatred during the Armistice Day silence? No, of course not. In reality, a very small number of Muslims with

extreme anti-western views gathered in west London and burned a model of a poppy whilst chanting, “British soldiers burn in hell”. I will accept that this was extremely disrespectful, and yes, it is especially upsetting for the military personnel (and their families) who risk their lives in times of war. However, such a tiny minority were involved that any assumptions about British Islamic views cannot possibly be made from the event. The trouble is that assumptions and accusations were exactly what followed. Cue the blind finger pointing; not only was a Mosque targeted almost two hours away from Kensington, where the Islamic protest took place, but the Imam also said that the Mosque had taken an active role in supporting the poppy appeal. Muhammad Muhi Uddin said, “It deeply hurts me. If they [protestors] talked to us then we would explain where we stand.” As can now sadly be expected, the racist ‘round’em up and ship’ em out’, bandwagon was also brimming within hours of the burning. Facebook groups such as “Poppy Burning Filth-Leave Our Shores”, “Burn our Poppies on Remembrance day. . .wait until Ramadam” (the spelling mistake says it all) and “Let’s show these poppy burning b****rds how many people want them deported”, have been supported in the form of hundreds of ‘Likes’, thereby drumming up resentment and hate. What must be remembered is that plenty of Muslims have fought alongside non-Islamic British soldiers in times of conflict. They have proudly served the UK, and those that haven’t have often

shown their support in other ways. Tarring all Muslims with the same brush is a frustrating, and frankly shameful, act. In doing so, people like the English Defence League (EDL), who are said to be involved with the response protests, simply highlight their own ignorance and ability to be easily brainwashed. There are always going to be those who have opinions and ideas that cause distress among others, in all areas of interest, all cultures and in social groups from all walks of life. Surely though, the best way for objectors to deal with such issues is to grant them as little attention as possible. It is always a reaction that such protests hope to gain, therefore the bigger the reaction, the more suc-

cessful a protest can be considered. The Southsea response to the poppy burning was not only completely misguided, but also drew a new wave of attention to the actions of Muslims Against Crusades, that otherwise may have had less ongoing coverage. It is clear that the actions of the extremist Islamic protestors were designed to do exactly what they achieved. That is, wind up the rest of the British public. Misinformed, highly strung individuals, who, in honesty, probably don’t have anything better to do, are all too happy to join the brigade that hurl naïve abuse and spit racial venom at undeserving scapegoats. For some reason, it is forgotten that the Islamic population in

Britain did not choose their representatives; a few hot-blooded, anger-filled fanatics decided they would take up the role whether they had the support or not. Unfortunately the few who disrupted the two-minute silence did a great job of contributing to the growing ‘Islamophobia’, providing the perfect photo-opportunity for those with a blade to sharpen. Just as most Christians do not choose Nick Griffin or the BNP to represent their views, the Muslim community did not vote for Anjem Choudary or any of his followers as their official spokesperson. It would do some people a lot of good to remember that.

Bush’s excuses are torture Caleb Woodbridge OpinionWriter George W Bush used to top the charts of politicians that students love to hate. Now with his admission that he authorised waterboarding, a form of torture, sorry, "an enhanced interrogation technique", it seems he’s making a comeback attempt. Not long ago, students were up in arms about the war in Iraq. Posters of Bushisms, listing the US President’s mangled malapropisms and bizarre quotations were a staple of (or stapled to) the walls of student bedrooms. Now, of course, right-on students have fresh figures of hate. We’ve come to gawp at Sarah Palin, the kooky Tea Party figurehead and terrifying prospective candidate for the 2012 presidential race (surely a sign of the end of the world). We’ve laughed at her wannabe imitator, Christine “I’m not a witch”

O’Donnell. Closer to home, Nick Clegg has shot to number one in Students’ Most Hated charts after abandoning his opposition to tuition fees, leaving students feeling betrayed. Faced with the realities of actually, you know, governing, Clegg’s promises have been shown up as being as empty as students’ bank accounts soon will be. Now Bush’s memoirs, Decision Points, have helped relaunch his infamy, a bit like a misguided greatest hits album Now That’s What I Call Human Rights Abuses. But as fun as it might be to mock “Dubya”, he was not and is not a cartoon buffoon. Satire and joking have their place, but must give way to serious consideration of what politicians say and do. Torture is no joke. We mustn’t let Bush’s image as a comedy Texan – what I believe is considered in some parts of America to be “folksy charm” – distract us from his moral responsibility. By Bush’s own admission, he is guilty of authorising the torture of pris-

oners. Of course, Bush denies that waterboarding is torture. But simulated drowning doesn’t fall under most people’s definition of “gentle persuasion”. The British Government classes the practice as torture, and it is absolutely prohibited under international law. If you weren’t angry with Bush already, you should be now. The use of torture undermines every claim of the West to stand for freedom and justice. Interviewed in The Times, Bush said: “One of the controversial things I believe is that freedom is universal. I happen to believe there is an Almighty, which might make this statement even doubly controversial, but the gift of that Almighty is freedom.” Believing that freedom is for everyone is great; the problem is that Bush can’t see the contradiction between this and the use of torture. For someone claiming the moral highground, it is striking that he asked his advisors, “what options are available and legal?”

and not, “what options are wise and moral?” Torture is violent coercion in its most direct form, the very opposite of freedom. And if freedom is a universal value, then the immorality of torture isn’t something that can be put to one side in particular circumstances. It is always wrong in all circumstances. Bush claims that lives were saved by waterboarding, averting attacks on America and the UK. Freedom is dangerous, of course. It opens us up to the possibility of harm. But to set aside freedom when convenient, in the name of protecting freedom, is in fact to destroy it. The real test of a society is not the freedoms it grants to its own people, but the way it treats its outsiders, its enemies and prisoners. The road to tyranny is paved with promises of protection. But even on a pragmatic level, torture doesn’t make sense. It is simply unreliable: under the pressure of torture, people won’t tell you the truth necessarily, but what

they think you want to know. Using torture also risks driving more people into the arms of terrorists. In fighting any battle, we run the risk of becoming like those that we are fighting against. In the Second World War, Churchill responded to the Blitz in kind, with the bombing of German civilian populations. This was wrong. The carpet bombing of Dresden by the Allies was a war-crime and atrocity by any reasonable standard, except that we won. We shouldn’t stoop to the level of our enemies, even if in the short term, it might save a few of “us” and kill some more of “them”. In the bigger picture, it only ever makes things worse, perpetuating and escalating the cycle of violence. Our only chance of winning over those who would attack us, is by fighting fairly even when our enemies fight unfairly, and by being prepared to sacrifice our own lives before we sacrifice our principles. There is no victory without selfsacrifice, and no right to victory without principle.


Columnist

11

We are in debt, etc... N ow, I am self-educated when it comes to politics. I’ve never studied it formally. Yet I take in as much information as I can, from as many sources as I can. I have opinions on things. And, just because I haven’t got all the buzzwords, figures or a degree in PPE (unlike many people who rule or ‘assist’ in ruling us and they’ve really done things impeccably, haven’t they), that doesn’t mean I can’t talk about political things and give my opinion on them. The patronising assumption that I can’t is one peddled by many politicians, of course. In any case, how many political people really have all the facts? How many traditional Tories have ever ridden a service bus through a council estate? How many so-called ‘socialists’ have read even one percent of Marx or Bevan? A lot fewer than are blowing their hot air around to this day, that’s for sure. And so, in my crude and simple terms, I see things like this. Britain is massively in debt. We could stay in debt – it’s not harming anyone, is it? We could keep borrowing. But because we live in a big ol’ money-driven world (whether you like it or not), the loan-sharks that are whatever banks and countries we borrow from would eventually send the heavies round, symbolically breaking our legs in the form of sanctions and higher interest, and of course the stock markets would then probably screw us silly. So. We can’t have all that money anymore.

Cuts it is. I don’t like it at all, but if you don’t have the money to spend, you can’t spend it without getting into trouble. That’s how it is for real people and so, to a much greater extent, how people are finally realising it has to be for governments. I expect many of you went along to support the protest about cuts and fees. I thought hard about going myself, but in the end decided against it. My reasons? I think it would have made me a terrible hypocrite. Saying this leaves me open to criticism but that’s how I feel. The way I see it, people want to have their cake and eat it. In this case, wanting the same or better standards but not wanting to pay for them. Whether or not you support cuts, some are going to be made. They need to be. Going to university is a choice, in a way that going to school, or needing an old age pension or healthcare isn’t, and therefore I can’t argue too hard against universities being hit harder by cuts than other services. People don’t want cuts and I accept that – I don’t want them. I find the idea of there being less of everything abhorrent. I’m writing this for Cardiff ’s student media, which is one of the areas that would undoubtedly be hit hardest. And some teaching might suffer, of course. It is absolutely atrocious. But there is going to be less money. And people don’t seem to see the fact that if there isn’t enough money, you can’t spend as much as you could, or should, if there was more

Above: Money. Something we have little of. money. Which brings me to fees. Universities should stop clamouring and not charge exorbitant sums for a degree: they could cut many costs without impeding on teaching standards. I’ve no doubt that most universities have bloated budgets that could be trimmed, but I don’t see people protesting to have every flash new item of ‘approved’ equipment bought more cheaply at IKEA, or for the highest earners to take wage cuts. But if the government aren’t going to pay the bulk of fees, then who should? Relatives? Charities? Or you, the student? I probably wouldn’t have come to university if it cost even five thousand pounds a year, but that’s my choice. If it’s your choice to go, it’s also your choice to pay. A fair value, obviously: universities should never charge more than the degree actually costs which almost certainly isn’t nine thousand pounds a year (that figure smacks of profiteering). The wider question that needs answering is the UK’s view on university education. Either it becomes free – even compulsory – for all, paid for by tax, though then degrees would only be worth as much as GCSEs and nobody would have a full-time job until they’re 21 (though if we’re all going to live until 100-odd, there’s plenty of time to put the hours in later, eh?). Or it goes the way it seems headed – expensive. Expensive is bad, yes. But if you want to buy a house, you pay the price. You may think that

you’re paying more than it’s worth, it could lose value later on, but if you want it badly enough, you pay. That’s just as bad, but people seem to accept it. And you’d be surprised how many students, let alone old, disgruntled Express readers, think there are too many people going to university at the moment. Maybe less people going would be a better thing. Certainly jobs competition would be reduced, so those who do pay exorbitant fees would be more likely to reap the benefits of a degree earlier on. Yes, the way things are is shite. I agree. Ideally there would be cuts now, with subsidies returning when the money is flowing again, but I can’t see that happening (which, as far as I’m concerned, is the only thing worth getting angry about here). But very few students whilst at university will know great suffering because of university cuts; the sort of suffering that means people can’t afford to clothe and house their children because they’ve lost their job. At this time, when many people are really suffering financially (some much worse than we students), perhaps you need to rethink your priorities. There are things that should be angering students but get overlooked. Like some of these new social policies. This proposal to make the long-term unemployed do unpaid work, for one. That’s unpaid manual labour, also known as community service - a punishment for a criminal act. Now, there are clearly dole

hounds who are terminally lazy. That’s obvious. Though since when is being lazy (in most cases) criminal behaviour? It may be disgusting to be a permanent scrounger, especially in a time of recession. But it is not illegal (unless it’s fraud, in which case they’ll probably be doing community service anyway, though probably less of it). The suggestion of 120 hours+ of this ‘work’ just for being on the dole long-term is vile. And the notion of ‘getting the jobless into a mindset for work’ is even more sickeningly patronising than current workfinding set ups. Many ‘long-term jobless’ have lost good jobs and can’t get another: they aren’t all Frank Gallagher-style feckless louts. The best way you could punish a proper lifelong scrounger is to get them employed and then see the amazement on their faces when they see a third of their wages disappear on tax and NI. As for the people who are genuinely jobless through circumstances: they should be given personal apologies by bankers and the last Labour government, not a punishment. I don’t think that the entire government is out to get the poor. I honestly don’t. But if some of them had spent one month living in poverty under the past/current system, never mind a year, they’d have gone out of their sheltered little minds. No politics next time, I promise. Katie Waissel for the win.


Politics14

Stand up and be counted

Matt Jones dispells the media's perception that the recent student protests were a failure, and calls for students to make their voices heard in future action

O

n Wednesday November 10, over 50,000 like-minded students gathered at Whitehall to protest against the devastating cuts proposed by the coalition government. The general mood of the crowd was very cheerful as the demonstration passed the houses of parliament (to a huge chorus of booing) and on down the embankment towards the Tate Modern. Banners were everywhere, along with a brass band, beating drums and a few deformed effigies of Nick Clegg and David Cameron. There were many placards reminding everyone that students can get involved with politics without losing their sense of humour, including the wistful ‘I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your cuts’, the practical ‘how am I going to afford beer now?’ and the literary ‘this shit wouldn’t happen at Hogwarts’. It would be fair to say that throughout the crowd there was a strong optimism that we could actually force the government to change its decision on something. But you probably won’t know any of this. What you will know, because of the exaggerated media coverage, is that less than 200 people managed to break into Tory HQ and build a

fire outside. What you will also know is that David Cameron thinks the police didn’t make a great job of it, and that Nick Clegg…well no one really knows what he thinks anymore. It has also given the right-wing press a field day, talking about the wacky leftie students whose education the tax payer contributes to. It would be easy to see all of this as rendering the efforts of the peaceful protesters pointless. After all, in the direct aftermath of the demo it has given the Tories and their media the opportunity to sidestep the 50,000 person demonstration and talk about policing instead. But I believe it would be very short sighted and defeatist to take our demonstration as a failure. The reason for this is that the coalition cannot ignore the fact that one out of every 1200 people in the UK made the trip to London to show their opposition to a government which has been in power for merely six months. There is also the rather important fact that there is a certain hero of the coalition, the deputy Prime Minister, who is looking very uncomfortable at the moment. Nick Clegg, champion of students, has discovered that the best way to help them is to offer an extra £18,000 worth of debt at the end of a three-

year degree. No, he’s no Christopher Colombus. And watching him on Prime Minister’s questions (he has been standing in while Mr Cameron is probably discussing student control methods with the Chinese) was really quite embarrassing. Among a flurry of muddled sentences, the phrase ‘we have stuck to our ambitions’, stands out as the one which managed to get the most laughs. Why is this important? Mr Clegg knows that his sudden change of heart on tuition fees is likely going to cost him the student vote which both he, (in his Sheffield Hallam constituency) and the Lib Dems in general, rely on so heavily. He is, unfortunately for him, stuck between a rock and a hard place. A break from Tory policy on tuition fees will cost him his job as deputy PM, but by endorsing it he risks losing his job as MP in four years time. And this is why the demo is so important. There are 57 Liberal Democrat MPs who have signed a pledge that they will oppose a rise in tuition fees. They have to be persuaded to not just abstain from voting on the Tories’ bill, but to actually vote against it, to keep their promise.

Nick Clegg…well no one really knows what he thinks anymore

That is the only way that the bill will be prevented from going through parliament. Fifty thousand people have begun this persuasion. They have shown that they will not stand for university cuts. If the pressure is continued, by letters being sent, more demonstrations being organised, threats of lost votes, these MPs will be left with little choice. And it really is worth fighting for. The increase in tuition fees is of course to compensate for the cuts that the Tories want to make to our courses. They argue that we should have to pay for a much higher proportion of our education. But they conveniently forget that there was no cost for theirs. To put people off going to university is, apart from being morally wrong, economically perverse. As industry declines, as a country we must trade in minds and by decreasing the number who are offered the chance of H.E. the government is harming not just ours but the country’s future prospects. On November 10, students showed the government that they are not willing to stand by as the university system is ruined. They also showed the country that if the government are going to be stopped in their attack on the welfare state, we have to make our voices heard.


Politics15

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • politics@gairrhydd.com

Women in politics: Edwina Hart Laura Dunn Politics Writer Edwina Hart MBE is an established member of the National Assembly for Wales. First elected to represent her constituency of the Gower in 1999, she has since been re-elected in 2003 and 2007. Hart began her professional career working in banking. It was here that she became active in the trade union movement, and was elected the first female President of the banking union BIFU. Her family were also involved in the trade unions, and her interest in the wider world naturally led her towards elected office. “I was always interested in the process of devolution for Wales,” Mrs Hart tells me from her Assembly ministerial office. Her background contributed towards her tenure as the first Finance and Local Government Minister in the early days of the Assembly. Her ministerial post continued in the role of Minister for Social Justice and Regeneration from 2003. Her re-election in 2007 earned her the prestigious portfolio of Health and Social Services, a role which she has undertaken with great success. Alongside this, Mrs Hart has also retained the responsibility of being the Cabinet’s armed forces liaison in Wales. During our meeting, Edwina Hart tells me that she was inspired by her involvement in the trade union movement to enter the world of Welsh politics. One individual, Margaret Prosser, struck her as an important example of women in leadership. “She was extremely focused and had tremendous belief in the important issues during her time as President of the TUC,” the influential AM recalls. Margaret Prosser, now a Baroness, serves as

the Deputy Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission. “Nelson Mandela continues to inspire me, and I was privileged to meet him when he visited Wales several years ago. I particularly admire him for his nature of forgiveness and his commitment to nation building,” she recalls fondly. One of her key interests is the subject of equal opportunities. She believes that it is one of the key issues facing women, particularly under the rule of the coalition in Westminster. “The pay gap between men and women is still too wide, and that is not acceptable.” Due to this, Edwina Hart feels that women are still under-represented in politics, despite the National Assembly having one of the more balanced ratios between men and women in the entire United Kingdom. “Changes in government policy as well as the proposed slashing of Welsh MPs will continue to under-represent women,” she insists. In terms of health, she believes that threats to the ‘family unit’ regarding budget and service cuts will increase both pressure and the risk of mental illness across Wales. “I feel there is an awakening in the student movement across Wales and the UK as a whole,” she confides. “The controversy surrounding the Lord Browne report on increasing university tuition fees has encouraged more students to become active in the political sphere. Students have always been interested in the environment and other important issues such as the prevention of violence against women, highlighting the youth’s desire to participate in debate and persuade changes to legislation,” the AM asserted. She is confident that Labour’s socialist values and its commitment to helping the underdog in policy are just two of the

many reasons why students should actively support the Labour Party. “I believe that students today feel they are a generation that will be betrayed by the Tory/Lib Dem coalition, and they want to stand up and take action.” She is passionate that more women should become involved in politics. “I am unsure as to why so few women are coming forward as potential candidates. I believe better targeting is required, as well as a mentoring scheme by local female politicians to encourage new members and candidates. The scrapping of all female candidate lists will raise problems and we have the right to be worried as a party with the indications of less female representatives in the chamber.” Edwina Hart has found that approaching

law making with a strategy of cooperation has achieved results. “Women provide a consensus of collaboration, making cross party relations stronger and more effective.” Her approach to bipartisanship is a testament to the successes she has had in introducing health and social policy legislation. She feels that the perception of branch meetings being ‘boring’ discourages females from becoming involved. “Perhaps political education schools and training for female candidates would be beneficial?” Only time will tell if these measures are ever introduced. Our conversation turns to the topic of health, and what she feels are her biggest achievements as Minister. “Reforming the NHS in Wales has been our principal

achievement, but I stress that it has been a team effort. It highlights the Socialist roots of our party and how we are not prepared to put the National Health Service to market as has happened in England. Our achievements have improved services across Wales, as well as importantly saving money in the long term. In particular, free prescriptions and free hospital car parking are a product of this reform, and are valued by patients and families across the country.” She is a strong example of a successful woman in Welsh politics, her achievements affecting individuals throughout the country. With the numbers of women representatives predicted to decrease in May’s election, one thing is certain: Edwina Hart will continue to fight.

Yemen, the new buzz word in the War on Terror theatrics Adviya Khan Politics Writer I first heard about the news when I was in a taxi on the way back to university from a night out. The taxi driver turned the radio on full blast, uttering annoyance under his breath at the clearly unwelcome news of yet another alleged plot to blow up planes. In fact, once we struck up a conversation, he admitted that he was fearful for his future. "I don’t know who’s going to get in my taxi next", he claimed, "what if they blame me for these events and I get attacked?" It is needless to say that his worries are echoed by a majority of the British Muslim population and beyond, many of whom who are sick and tired of seeing the words ‘Muslim’ and ‘Terror’ in the same sentence yet again. Indeed, when I came to learn of

the plot I thought it was an incredible shame.Yet the pessimist inside me thought it was only timely that the fear factor of al-Qaeda (which by the way, works to the benefit of both sides) was reinforced. The only difference now, is that since the UCL bomber and the current cargo plot, Yemen is the new buzz word in the War on Terror theatrics. It begs the question why would the nation that gave us coffee and subsequently the art of chilling in cafes want to blow us up? Something that people most probably don’t know about Yemen, is that it is the poorest country in the Middle East and consequently has some of the worst socio-economic conditions in the world. In fact just over 12% of the Yemeni population don’t have enough to eat and a recent Oxfam report stated that almost 35% of the population live below the poverty line.

What if they blame me for these events and I get attacked?

As if things couldn’t get worse, the country has recently been on the brink of a civil war and on the verge of a humanitarian crisis. Hence, it is not surprising that the vulnerable population is easy to radicalise and turn to extremism in an attempt to express their discontent at the political situations they feel powerless to change. But what exactly are their grievances? Analysts have suggested that the main target of the al-Qaeda factions in the Arabian Peninsula including Yemen, is actually the state of Saudi Arabia, and this is exemplified in the failed assassination attempt of its top anti-terrorism chief last year. America and the UK are widely regarded in the Middle East as being close to the Saudi state. This relationship is shown in the sharing of intelligence relating to the cargo plot between the countries. Needless to say these close alliances

makes them obvious targets, in addition to the imperialist threat that al-Qaeda generally feels towards the west. However what does demand more answers is the reason why did Anwar al-Awlaki, the US born cleric who is accused of providing inspiration for the cargo plot, turn to inciting violent extremism after being such an opponent of such methods in the past and a respected member of the Muslim community? Also if Yemen, along with Somalia, is now the new ‘hotbed’ of terrorism does this mean an admission of the fact that the war on terror is not working and that its only real success lies in creating more terror? Importantly, will Yemen become another Afghanistan or Iraq? I sincerely hope this is not the case since, as usual, it will be at the peril of the ordinary law abiding citizen whether they be a tribesman in Yemen or a taxi driver in Cardiff.


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Weak without technology No laptop, no phone, no television. Could you cope a week without technology? Self-confessed geek and clued-up techno whizz Jake Galea attempts to go cold turkey.

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am a self-confessed nerd, not the anaemic, stay up till five am playing fantasy games nerd, but the tech savvy, gadget obsessed geek type. I have a premium Spotify account, more than one computer, a magpielike penchant for shiny objects and I (sadly) know the difference between NTFS and FAT32. I can safely say that technology is my life, I live on a diet of microchips, apples and blackberries; Windows is undoubtedly the way to my soul. This week gair rhydd challenged me to ditch all my gadgetry and go for a full seven days without any technology. This meant losing the laptop(s), weaning off the websites, sacking off the social networks and ifinishing with my iPhone (sorry I ran out of alliteration, but ithink you can put I in front of almost anything these idays). This is my digital loner’s diary... Day One Right then, Funday-Monday, a fresh new week in the dark ages. Things started off badly; this morning I was startled into consciousness by a terrifying noise. After a few hazy moments stumbling about I remembered that I had swapped my tecchie alarmphone-hi-fi system for an old-skool alarm clock, which had fallen down behind my bed. Very annoying. Usually I am gently roused by the velvety tones of Groove Armada, Eva Cassidy or Rage against the Machine, but sadly not this week. First thoughts of the day; alarm clock is almost a perfect anagram of llama c*ck and why do people say my alarm ‘went off ’ when it’s most definitely turning on. Anyway most definitely technology 1, luddites 0, I have only been in the

land of the living 30 seconds without technology and I’m already startled and a little bit scared. After some Marmitey goodness, I’m ready to tackle Monday’s first challenge; lectures. Generally, being a good boy, I would check black bored (intended) for any lecture announcements, assignments or handouts. However, today I waltzed straight out the door with an irritating sense of optimism and straight to the wrong lecture. (It is only week two, my timetable changed, it’s forgivable.) Of course I didn’t know it was the wrong lecture until I had sat through ten minutes of third year resource geology, which seems tragically awful. Usually, of course, I would phone a course-mate and find out what’s going on. Sadly I can’t because my phone is in the gair rhydd office. Instead I was forced to go and actually speak to someone face-to-face, not the forte of the nerd. By the time I had discovered the hiding place of my lecturer, I decided enough time had been wasted and that the lecture was a write-off. (A problem that a bit of technology could have definitely solved.) To waste time, I often see what the weird and wonderful have been ranting about on Twitter. I didn’t have that luxury, instead I chose to invest in a paper, which was almost as good as reading news online except no videos and no way to find out the crossword answers. What is a 13 lettered synonym for ‘prognosticator’? I guess I’ll never know. Do I actually need to know what Stephen Fry tweets? Should I care what Al Gore thinks? Does news stand for north, east, west, south? As Dan leSac says, ‘thou shalt not question Stephen Fry’. I silently apologised to the great

Stephen for doubting his infinite wisdom. I then have a sudden urge to watch QI. Go home and can’t watch TV so read a book. It’s actually quite worthwhile, tomorrow I might try one that’s not about a famished pratapillar. Day Two Tuesday, this means a morning off for me. Even without tweet or myface I’m feeling pretty sociable. I decided to pop round to my friend’s house for a cup of tea. Sadly she wasn’t in, I realise why online statuses are rather useful. On MSN messenger it would at least tell me she’s ‘busy’. End up at my old housemates place; have a good old catch-up chat accompanied by tea and cakes. I’ve decided this method of social contact is much better than a BBM, Whatsapp message, text, email, skype or Facebooking; as long as you like tea. My spontaneous socialising was going so well I agreed to go out for lunch with her and her medic friends. I’ve come to realise that an ignore friend request button is actually very useful. To carry on my literary revolution, I started reading 1984 for my course. Technology suddenly seems scary and oppressive, but it is refreshingly different to read something that isn’t surrounded by adverts or that has a space for comments at the end, á la the internet. Went to the cinema, paid a lot, a very lot for the privilege of 112 minutes of ‘Life as we know it’. Watching free films on the internet is much, much better than this. Is it illegal? Hmmm... Is it stealing? I feel like I’ve just had two hours of my life stolen so I’m guilt free.

Top: Third-year Sociology student Jake Galea. Below: Stephen Fry loves to tweet.


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gair rhydd • Monday November 22 2010 • features@gairrhydd.com

I can’t help feeling concerned that some of my precious student loan is going towards convincing these ‘actors’ to pursue a career. Spent most of the film daydreaming; can orphans watch PGs? Why are phones named after fruits? Day 3 Shakespeare said ‘music be the fruit of love’. It probably is. Anyway life’s certainly dull without it. (Personally I thought the fruit of love would be a passion fruit). Anyway, no Spotify, no Last.fm, no iTunes, no YouTube, not even a CD player. Undeterred, my quest for music led me to learn Frère Jacques on the harmonica. It turned out to be actually quite rewarding. To satisfy my musical lust, I persuaded my housemate to play guitar. After a splendid rendition of ‘Fast Car’ by Tracy Chapman a heated argument ensued about Tracy Chapman’s gender alignment. My housemate swears she’s a man, which is weird, because he’s seen her live. Such a debate can usually be solved with Google; sadly I can’t today, so I am still left wondering. Technology definitely wins here, all the music and information in the world for free,

anytime, online, what’s not to like? Had a brief wonder about whether I miss Facebook. I don’t, but how did anything get organised before it became an ‘event’, and what did one do with digital photos before Facebook? Then I also remembered Farmville, Poking and 'relationship statuses' and realised Facebook is actually pretty annoying. Day 4 Today I gave up; a week is far too long for a nerd to be without gadgets. Without the birthday reminders of Facebook I have missed my sister's eighteenth, without BBC news I don’t know what those Chilean miners are up (or down) to. I want to listen to podcasts and internet radio. I want to watch The Apprentice on iPlayer. I want to Google something, anything. I want to play Doodlejump, I want to watch people falling over on YouTube and I sort of want to know what Jeff did last night. No, wait, I don’t. Have I learned anything...erm, well, the internet is a glorious timewaster, free music is great, Facebook chat, BBM, etc. is not as good as a proper chinwag. Blackboard or Learning Central or whatever is very useful but

I want to listen to podcasts. I want to watch iPlayer. I want to Google something, anything.

it doesn’t replace actual lectures and writing a diary in a notebook feels important. Basically, technology is great, really, really great. It makes life easier, and it makes life better. However, we are a little bit too dependant on technology. For media and entertainment it's fantabolous, as an alternative to socialising it’s risky. As I haven’t really concluded anything useful, here are a few tech tips to ensure this article isn’t a complete waste of time/paper/emergency arse wipe... Always use protection: Get some virus software. If yours has expired or you haven’t got any, get online and go to www.avg.com/gb-en/free-antivirus to get the absolutely free virus protection. You might have to look around for it, as they try to make you buy the expensive ones, but it’s definitely there for no charge. Don’t pay for music: Use YouTube, Spotify or Last.fm (similar to Spotify, no adverts, but more random) to get music. If you want a file for your iPod, use a YouTube to MP3 ripper (www.dvdvideosoft.com). It’s less illegal than downloading as the YouTube user is actually doing the distributing. Freedom of Speech: Don’t pay for

calls or texts. Use Blackberry or Whatsapp Messenger to text for free between iPhones, Blackberries and Android phones. For free calls get a Skype account, essential for international students. Speed Up Your Computer: Have a look in the tray in the bottom left of your screen, by the clock. Close any programs in there that you’re not using as they are all slooooowing down your computer. Save batteries for no charge: If you want to preserve the life of your laptop/phone/iPod/anything with a rechargeable battery, let it drain all the way before you recharge it. Constantly topping up the battery without letting it go flat quickly decreases battery life. Free your TV: For a few quids you can buy a wire that plugs your laptop into your TV. You can then watch, iPlayer, YouTube, 4od, etc. on your TV without paying for a TV licence; as long as you’re not watching it live, it’s not actually being broadcasted to you. F*ck Office: If you think you need to pay lots for Word, Excel, PowerPoint etc, think again. Open Office (available at: www.openoffice.org) is almost identical to MS Office in every way, but is absolutely free. It’s compatible with all formats of work you will require for university.


18Features

gair rhydd • Monday November 22 2010 • features@gairrhydd.com

Your Space. We want to hear your stories: anything goes. Just drop us a line on features@gairrhydd.com. This week Emily Billington tells us to stop being so prudish and just talk about sex.

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fter reading in gair rhydd about us Brits not talking about things which make us uncomfortable (regarding alcohol), and the recent news about a porn star testing positive for HIV, I thought I’d write a brief article about another taboo subject. Following the wise words of Salt ‘N’ Pepa, let’s talk about sex. We all have it. But why don’t we talk about it? We don’t even have to talk about it, but we should at least acknowledge it and take precautions. And not just to prevent sprogs and sprogettes, although that’s reason enough for me. Not enough people know about sexual health, which is a shame since many STIs don’t often have obvious symptoms but can lead to infertility. In fact, for 70% of women and 50% of men who have STI's, there are no symptoms at all. If safe sex isn’t practiced, we are spreading a lot of nasties out there! Now, the safest way to have sex is, well, to not have it at all - but where’s the fun in that?!

Above: Warning - kissing can often lead to sex. Especially since a good session in the bedroom burns an average of 350 calories an hour! Just don’t be silly, wrap up your willy... and with one in ten young people carrying an STI (and that's just the figures we know about), surely that’s incentive enough. Many people don’t know that you can get extra large condoms if you’re a bit of a big chap, which would prevent the likelihood of splitting regular condoms. There are also many other condoms including ribbed, for your extra pleasure, latex free rubbers (condoms not erasers), and a cocktail of various flavours. All condoms are available from the ShAg office on the third floor of the Union, and the Drop-In Centre has now started (12 - 4 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday), so feel free to pop along for free and confidential advice and free condoms! And don’t think it’s just the male condom we have on offer! We cater for men and women, so we also provide femidoms for free, as well as oral dams, because you can catch sexually transmitted diseases during oral sex as well.

The safest way to have sex is, well, to not have it at all - but where's the fun in that?

We believe that safe sex shouldn’t be expensive, and now you know that you can get them for free there really is no excuse. Plus, don’t forget to visit the University’s Sexual Health Clinic if you are sexually active, have a new sexual partner or if you just want to make sure – they’re currently piloting the scheme and it’s vital it’s kept on, so please make use of this free service available to you. As the old saying goes, rather safe than sorry! Also, if you’re interested in volunteering with ShAg, whether it’s spending an hour at our Drop-In clinic or helping out on condom drops, just join on Facebook and send us a message. Ignorance, right here right now, is not bliss, and I really hope none of you aspire to be as happy to contract an STI as Neil was in the final episode of The Inbetweeners (please just leave that to the actors). It is worrying that one in ten men think Chlamydia is a flower (quick word of advice guys, I’d stick to lilies and roses as your lovely lasses will no doubt appreciate those much more). It is commonly believed that hav-

ing sex in a swimming pool, due to the chlorine, will kill STI-causing bacteria and viruses. Sorry to break it to you, but this is just not true. The long and short of it is: chlorine is not a condom, condoms are condoms. I understand that not everyone is happy to wrap their lover with a cover, but for your sake don’t put your health on the backburner. If you’re in a monogamous relationship and both of you have been checked out and have the all clear then sure, why not let loose. But if you’re unsure (bear in mind most STIs are not visible to the naked eye) then do not take the risk. So, whether you talk about it, boast about it, or shy away from it, there really is nothing to be embarrassed about. No matter how you like it or where you like it, it’s still sex and it should still be safe.


Science 20 Escape for the scienists

Luke Slade Science Correspondent

Before the spending review, there were fears that science, as a department, would be deprived in order for the country to face up to its dire economic stance. However, there was great support from British researchers, all backing the validity of science as a driver of economic growth. This was the mantra that prompted the government to realise the pivotal role that science, and its research, has played, and indeed should play, in this country. Many university researchers were fearful for future development due to funding. However, after the rally in October it is clear that it is the government who should be scared. The fear is that scientists will just go elsewhere – the little funding available in this country is not a stimulus to stay here to conduct research. The spending for science in other countries such as USA, Germany, Singapore, Australia etc, is significantly more than in the UK. It would be too easy for these scientists to leave, so starving our economy and the removing the high quality of scientific research that appears in our universities. Fortunately, however, severe cuts did not appear in the spending review. After consideration from the government an agreement was made to freeze to scientific research spending at £4.1bn, which equals a

freewords EDITORIAL est.1972 Tomos Clarke Science Editor

Above: A final year Cardiff University student hard at work ten per cent cut (after inflation). So still a cut, but one far less severe than expected. This kind of compromise does not come without hesitation; many scientists have been left wondering about the lack of career progression for future scientists that this will cause. Fundamentally, universities are left with a funding hole which must be filled. Efficiency savings have been put together by Sir Bill Wakeham, former vice-chancellor of Southampton University, in a report earlier this year. This will allow universities to save in certain areas, meaning that they can spend in others. Fears have been expressed that areas where universities are attempting to save money will be left short of capital, relative to more glamorous departments. However, in his budget speech, George Osborne said, "Britain is a world leader in scientific research, and that is vital to our economic success." This is clearly highlighting the fact that the government are aware of the impact that science has on the economy. This, in my eyes, makes some of the statements such as, ‘Osborne! Leave our labs alone’, slightly redundant. Then again, it could all be political rhetoric, because are all politicians not liars? There is still the worry that even with a ten per cent cut, the economy and scientific advancement in Britain will be hindered, while

other countries will soar ahead. Professor Peter Weissberg, medical director of the British Heart Foundation, said: "Immediate reaction? Relief that science has been spared the deepest of cuts. Followed swiftly by the realisation that even at about ten per cent down, we'll be playing catch-up in an international field which could see UK science left behind." It is clear that other forms of subsidy, such as charities, will be under pressure to provide further funding. A cautious statement from the Russell Group Director, General Dr Wendy Piatt, further highlighted concerns "about the size of cuts to the higher eduction budget. If the UK’s world-class universities are to perform their vital role as the engine room of economic recovery, the Government must allow universities to ask for higher graduate contributions as recommended by Lord Browne". The Russel Group of Universities (of which Cardiff is a leading member) represents the interests of the top 20 research institutions in the country, and is a powerful voice in higher education debates. Cardiff University, however, were more positive about the news, and are confident in their ability to attract funding despite the cuts. As they pointed out in their recent statement: "Research funding is awarded by the UK's Research Councils on a competitive basis" mean-

ing that the effects will be variable between universities. They also noted: "Last year, Cardiff secured a record amount of research funding of almost £150M in new awards, including a record £35.2M from the Research Council, despite the tighter economic background. This was achieved through co-ordinated action to increase our success rate with bids to the Research Councils and this process will continue this year. The university is aware of the pressures on many sources of science funding, but is confident the action it has taken will ensure funding bodies to continue to invest in Cardiff's world-leading research." The distribution of funds will cause tough decisions that are simply necessary. The science budget is dispersed via seven research councils, who in turn provide grants to deserving institutions; so it does not just go to the universities on a formulaic basis. It is likely that the ‘shaking of the superflux’, so to say, will support areas anticipated to provide economic growth while stimulating a low-carbon economy. Hopefully, considering the fact that the extent to which the budget has been cut is less than predicted, scientists will continue to carry out their research in the UK. It is clear they are an essential driving force in our economy, and our universities.

The Higher Education budget has been a rather contentious issue in recent weeks. London has seen massive protests and fiery exchanges across the dispatch box in Westminster. Slightly lost in the furore over fees has been David Willets’ remarkable achievement of saving the science budget from George Osborne’s keen chopping axe. Freezing the science budget is a victory for the Minister of State for Universities, and for science itself, as many feared decimation in the budget. But, unfortunately it is rather a hollow victory. Scientific investment is a major driver of growth and our international competitors have realised this, so rather than cutting their scientific investment as we move towards economic recovery they have continued to increase it. My fear is that top scientists will flock abroad to greener pastures in a new incarnation of our old enemy: "The Brain Drain". It's happened before; Indian scientists have long flocked to Britain in search of research cheques. In the 1980's the best British scientists flocked to the American research powerhouses in MIT and CALTech. You can hardly blame them, research is an expensive business these days with even trivial items of equipment costing thousands of pounds. Not to mention how competitive the area is, if you want to be a world leader in your field, only the best equipment, men and materials will do. This is why freezing the science budget (a ten per cent cut in reality) along with the freeze in capital spending is such a mistake. We will be missing out on the spoils of our scientists’ hard work, scientific patents draw billions of pounds into the economy. It may dismay arts and humanities students and scholars that science has escaped cuts, while their budgets have been decimated. But it is hard to refute that, economically at least, science is set apart from the humanities in its direct economic significance. In facing of some of the biggest challenges to humanity: climate change, food shortages, the coming global energy crisis and control of infectious diseases, science is the only answer. Our international partners have recognised this, and it's a real shame that we have not.


Taf-od

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Priodas Brenhinol - A gawn ni wahoddiad? Llyr Gwyn Lewis Taf-Od Drwy gyfrwng Twitter y cefais i’r newyddion diweddaraf, fel y byddaf i’n dod i ddarllen am gyfran helaeth o’r newyddion y dyddiau hyn a dweud y gwir, am ddyweddïad ein hannwyl dywysog William a’i gariad hir-dymor, Kate Middleton. Ymateb go wahanol a gafwyd ar wefan y BBC a chan y trydarwyr. Mae nifer o’m ‘dilynwyr’ ar y wefan honno’n Gymry, a rhai go gryf eu barn at hynny gan amlaf, ac yn fuan roedd fy ffrwd newyddion yn llith o ebychiadau candryll am y fath anlladrwydd. Wrth gwrs roedd yr ymateb gan rai yn uniongyrchol a digyfaddawd - ‘ffiaidd ac anfoesol’ oedd y briodas arfaethedig hon yn ôl un. Roedd eraill wedi cymryd safbwynt ychydig ysgafnach a thafod-mewnboch ac mae’r jôcs, sy’n amrywio o ran chwaeth, eisoes yn dechrau lledaenu ynghylch y fodrwy ddyweddïo a’i pherchennog blaenorol. Gwrthbwynt amheuthun oedd hyn oll i’r ymateb cwbl sebonaidd a ddaeth o du ffynonellau mwy swyddogol. Neidiodd Carwyn Jones, ein prif weinidog, i guro David Cameron i fod y cyntaf i longyfarch y pâr hapus, ac roedd y newyddion Cymraeg ar y teledu wrthi’n adrodd yn braf fod ‘pawb’ wrth eu boddau â’r cyhoeddiad. Ar wefan y BBC cafwyd y gormodedd arferol o ddeunydd hefyd; o blith dewis o chwech neu saith o ‘comments’, ‘analysis’ a ‘special reports’, pwy ar wyneb daear fyddai’n dymuno clicio ar ‘As it happened: royal engagement’? Pam y llith o adroddiadau gan y cyfryngau ar un ochr, a’r ymateb croch a milain wedyn o du’r rhithfyd Cymraeg? Roeddwn i wedi hen feddwl ein bod ni’n fwy aeddfed na hynny; nad oedd yr hyn yr oedd dau o grachach Lloegr yn penderfynu’i wneud yn fusnes i ni o gwbl bellach - nad oedd yn fater i lawenhau a gorfoleddu drosto, fel y gwnaeth nifer o Gymry dros yr arwisgiad neu briodas Charles a Diana, bid si_r - ond nad oedd chwaith yn fater i golli’n limpin drosto, a chynddeiriogi am

ormes brenhiniaeth Lloegr dros Gymru ac yn y blaen ac yn y blaen. Onid oedden ni, â’n camre wedi’u cyfeirio (yn ddigon araf a phetrus) tuag at hunan-lywodraeth, yn ddigon aeddfed bellach i glywed y newyddion, mynd ‘o wel, pob lwc iddyn nhw’, a dal ati efo’n bywydau? Ond maen nhw wedi sicrhau ei fod o o ddiddordeb i ni, ei fod o’n fusnes i ni. Yn gyntaf peth, maen nhw wedi penderfynu dechrau ar eu bywyd priodasol yng ngogledd Cymru. Digon posibl ei fod yn ddewis cwbl diniwed; allwn i ddim beio neb am syrthio mewn cariad â harddwch Eryri! Ac eto, mae’n weithred haerllug, yn wyneb dirywiad cymunedau Cymreig Gwynedd a’r mewnlifiad Saesneg ei iaith i’r ardal. Fe fyddai’n ddiddorol gwybod a oes unrhyw fwriad gan William Wales ddysgu rhywfaint o Gymraeg tra’i fod yn y cyffiniau, neu anfon unrhyw blant a allai fod ar eu ffordd i ysgol Gymraeg. Rhyw dybio y mae rhywun bod hyn yn ymgais at feddalu sentiment lleol a pharatoi’r ffordd at arwisgiad arall, o bosibl. Clywais rywun arall, wedyn, yn haeru mai trigolion yr ardal a fydd yn talu’r pris wrth i’w hyswiriant godi oherwydd y bygythiad cynyddol o ymosodiad terfysgol. Ond nid lleisiau Cymraeg yw’r unig rai sy’n gweiddi y tro hwn. Yr hyn a wnaeth adroddiadau diflino’r BBC mewn gwirionedd oedd tynnu sylw at yr holl straeon cymaint pwysicach nas cofiwyd ynghanol y gorfoleddu. Ni allai amseru’r cyhoeddiad hwn fod yn waeth; nid yw toriadau Osborne yn atgof o bell ffordd eto, ac mae rhwystredigaeth amlwg y myfyrwyr a dorrodd ffenestri Millbank yn dal yn effro iawn yn y cof. Yn Iwerddon a Phortiwgal, mae’r economi ar ddibyn peryglus, ac Ewrop gyfan yn gorfod ystyried talu’r bil. Rydym ni yma hefyd yn wynebu’r posibilrwydd o ddifodi, neu o leiaf leihau’n sylweddol, ein gwasanaeth teledu ein hunain ac un o brif gyfryngau diwylliant yn y Gymraeg. Pa berthnasedd, meddwch, sydd gan hyn oll i briodas Will a Kate? Mae dau berson ifanc mewn cariad;

Above: Will a Kate yn ymlacio yng Nghaernarfon llawenhau yw’r nod, neu o leiaf adael llonydd iddyn nhw. Does dim bai arnyn nhw eu bod wedi penderfynu datgan eu cariad yn ystod adeg mor gythryblus. Ond drwy sicrhau mai’r trethdalwyr fydd yn talu am y briodas, maen nhw wedi sicrhau ein sylw. Drwy sicrhau mai yng ngogledd Cymru y byddan nhw’n byw, maen nhw wedi sicrhau

ein sylw. Wrth i Cameron a’i griw orfoleddu gan obeithio y bydd y ‘genedl’ gyfan yn unedig y tu ôl i’r cwpwl ac yn gallu anghofio’u holl broblemau, y cyfan y gall y fath ddathliad digywilydd o’r teulu brenhinol ei wneud, yn yr hinsawdd sydd ohoni, yw tynnu’n sylw ni yng Nghymru, ac eraill drwy Brydain, at ba mor wastraffus yw cadw’r

giwed hon mewn moeth a chyfoeth mewn gwirionedd. All hynny ddim ond bod yn beth da a chlodwiw; gan hynny, all y briodas hon ddim ond bod yn gyfrwng llawenhau a gorfoleddu.

Want to write for Taf-Od? We're always looking for contributors so come to our meetings every Monday at 5pm on the fourth floor of the Students' Union


Letters 22 Comments from the week’s news, opinion, features and sport at www.gairrhydd.com Kissed off with Solus Luke --I have only just discovered this thread, but I hope the discussion is still on-going, or that the conclusions of any investigations will be published in some form soon. I have attached a copy of an email I sent to Miranda who wrote the article, and Sarah, the editor of gair rhydd. Perhaps this will promote discussion and reaction… Dear Miranda/Sarah I have just read this week’s front cover story and feel compelled to write in. I too remember a similar article from my first year at Cardiff in 2007 and I am shocked and saddened that events like this are still happening in our University Students’ Union in 2010. Cardiff is supposed to be a tolerant, diverse, and forward thinking institution. The University works hard to promote an environment in which people can live and study with Dignity. Incidents like this downgrade that environment. The people in the article were not breaking the law and they were not behaving in an inappropriate or dangerous manner. They were simply gay couples, kissing. Shock. Horror. It is therefore unacceptable that they were separated by staff and harmed by other students. If these incidents continue to happen and the staff and students in question are not reproached and educated about the unnecessary and outdated nature of their actions then we can never hope to create an environment in which people co-operate with Dignity. I hope this is not the end of the debate, and that your

article encourages discussion. And mostly I hope there isn’t the need for similar articles to be still being written in three more years time. I appreciated your treatment of the topic and its priority as front page news – it is essential that Equality and fair treatment for everybody regardless of individual differences are topics at the centre of discussion in an academic instituition in which the people present can really make a difference to social policy and attitudes in the future. Thanks again Luke Sahota I am pleased to see the discussion has continued. I wonder though if the discussion only takes place amongst gay people and union exec members with a vested interest in the debate. I like the idea of a demonstration on the 5th February – I agree Mark that the LGBT community needs to make sure we don’t alienate ourselves – but certain nonLGBT members of our community are clearly quite capable of doing that by themselves. And sometimes quiet resentment or shutting up and putting up just won’t do. The Middle East's neighbourly relations

society’, as you persuade us to believe, is an ‘incredibly influential force in terms of religion’, whose ‘shadow of power and influence’ casts a ‘hidden agenda’ across the middle east with it’s grave threats of nuclear apocalypse. How, then, should we uncomfortably-sat western onlookers deal with such an obviously untrustworthy nation?

of weaponry and those who are actively trying to get it, and use it as soon as possible. (i Doubt that they will use it, but it will be used for the purpose of blackmail (same thing Saddam tried to do and the same thing that north Korea has done))

It would perhaps be productive, firstly, to cease describing a complex nation with 74 million inhabitans as if it were Disney’s Agrabah. Your orientalist conception of Iran, as evidenced by your language-particularly the references to darkness, obfuscation and western spectatorship-are unhelpful in any serious analysis of any population, country or region.

Dan, I can’t help but feel that you haven’t entirely grasped the concept of this article. At no point has Luke actually claimed the things you have put in quotations – all of those are interpretations from other people. Indeed, not all of these are coming from the uncomfortable Western perspective you seem to think Luke is writing from. They come from the Prince of Jordan, and from an internationally renowned scholar on the situation. The article itself is not outlining Western conceptions – although that is always going to be a huge area of contention when it comes to Iran. It is looking at the international implications of the potential for a nuclear Iran – the worries that the Jordan Prince feels are certainly not coming from a Western viewpoint.

Secondly, and rather frankly, it would also be helpful if you stopped making things up. Iran currently poses no credible threat with regards to the attainment of nuclear weapons (a privilege reserved for ‘western onlookers’, i presume) as evidenced by the latest IAEA report of Feb 2009. The ‘Iranian Influence’ is an attractive imperialist myth and your final handwringing over Iran’s selfdetermination is its unfortunate logical end-point.

Dan --Regards, Dan Hi Luke, Rhys --As this is the second in what may be a series of articles on Iran, I feel compelled to offer my own solution to the problem of the ‘Iranian Influence’. Iran, ‘an alternative to civil

All of Irans activities in the last several years have pointed to one thing, the construction on a nuclear weapon. There is a big difference as well between countries who have inherited this sort

James Dunn ---

With regards to your second comment – Luke claims at no point that Iran has yet reached nuclear capacity. As for any threat that they may pose, statistics are not everything. Just look back to Ahmadinejad at the UN Conference a few months back, when he claimed that America potential responsible for 9/11. In the same speech, he also claimed that Iran were close to a nuclear future – not necessarily as a weapon, but a fuel source.

Surely, the intentions and revelations of the leader of the country is bound to have a significant impact upon worries any other country may have? Luke has analysed the problem by actually looking at interpretations that are not strictly Western. We published this article because it is balanced, well written and because it looks at a number of different interpretations. He does not make up figures – the ones he quotes are official – and he outlines why such figures would cause worries for the international community. And it should be said – with their leader consistently asserting his intention to turn nuclear, who has suggested weapons in the past, can you really blame people for being worried? This article is based on very real threats that Ahmadinejad himself has made. Kindest, James United we stand Johnathon--Sam Coates (Green party) said“The occupation of Millbank was a totally understandable response to pent-up anger of young people who feel they are being jilted at every turn. “[The rioting] is what you get when you condemn a whole generation to a lifetime of debt, unaffordable housing and a lack of decent jobs.” does this excuse cover the attempted murder of a Police officer with a fire extingusher!?

www.gairrhydd.com NEWS, LIVE DEBATE, FEATURES, SPORT, QUENCH, EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AND MORE

Away on a placement? Heading abroad? In bed with a hangover?


Societies 24

One Mission to success

Bianca London Societies Editor

Cardiff University music-specialist society, One Mission, are celebrating the success of three of their DJ’s this year. One Mission are a society dedicated to underground dance music, drum & bass, dubstep, jungle, old skool, breakbeat and electro. The society is emerging in the forefront of Cardiff ’s underground music scene and provides a platform for aspiring DJs and MCs to showcase their skills through local nights around the Cardiff area. The society can celebrate their efforts with the exciting signings of three of their DJ’s to established record labels around the UK. This news is extraordinary for the society especially in the underground music scene where there are so many budding DJ's vying with each other for residency slots. Jamie Evans and Sophie Falcon got in touch with the three upcoming artists to find out their success stories and plans for the future. Resident One Mission DJ Tom ‘Warcharm’ Davey has been djing for three years and producing for the past year and a half. As well as being a One Mission resident, Warcharm has become well known for his contribution to local, underground nights including Frequency Domain, Neuropol and Bass Invaders. Tom has played alongside huge industry names like Danny Byrd, Chase and Status, DJ Zinc and Rusko; to name but a few. Warcharm’s reputation has grown so enthusiastically over the past years that he now even holds DJ master classes every Monday and Wednesday evening in Cardiff ’s 10 feet tall, teaching budding artists his passion. There is a lot more to come from this Welsh lad who has been working with producers in both London and Cardiff. Look out for his signed track titled "Unwritten", made in collaboration with fellow one mission DJ ‘Substance’ will be released in early 2011. You can catch Warcharm in action throughout the coming months with regular appearances in Clwb Ifor Bach, 10 feet tall and the Millennium Music Hall. James ‘Lung’ Ellaway is a 20 year old Dubstep and Drum & Bass producer from Cardiff. As well as studying music technology at the University of Glamorgan, the last two years have seen him grow from bedroom producer to local Cardiff resident DJ for One Mission and a local DJ at the respected Aperture and Neuropol nights. Lung has seen DJ support from the likes of Skream, TRG, Flight & High Contrast. With airplay on Mary Anne Hobbs’ Radio 1 Experimental Show, James is set for DJ stardom. His debut, entitled “Afterlife”, has been signed by Kokeshi record label and is out now. Look out for his upcoming remix featuring remixes by Kryptic Minds and Irrelevant – two established dubstep producers. The third of the successful trio is Lawrence ‘Tolerance’ Whitehead, a talented all-rounder

Monday Nov 22 Ancient history society: Research Seminar -4.45 Humms, 5-6pm

Timothy Bible Study Group: Weekly Meeting -Nelson Mandela Room, SU, 7-9pm

DJ and musician from Cardiff. The former copresident of One Mission is now fully focussing his efforts on honing his production and DJ skills. Tolerance's unique drum & bass/ dubstep tracks seamlessly blend synthesised and orchestral elements and feature distinct melodies which are emphasised by punchy beats and rolling basslines. Things began snowballing in the right direction for Tolerance when he made the final of the Bedlam competition and later did a set on the main stage at Hospitality in April this year. Tolerance’s tracks have caught the attention of various high profile DJs, particularly the multi-award-winning N-Type who has signed up several of his tracks for release on his label "Wheel & Deal Records". Look out for his debut release will feature tracks; "Timeship", “Dejection” and "Chamber of Secrets" and will make up a limited 12" vinyl pressing and digital release. One Mission celebrated its 10th anniversary last year and has gone from strength to strength as a society, representing a fresh new scene within the City. Congratulations to the three signed DJ’s and the hard work of one of Cardiff ’s coolest societies. You can listen to their Utah Jazz album launch for yourselves this Friday 26 at Buffalo Bar from 10pm. Next week I will be speaking to Student Action For Refugees (STAR) society about their innovative ways of raising awareness of refugee issues in the local community and their volunteering campaigns.

People and Planet: Weekly Meeting -7.30-9pm Location online

Tuesday Nov 23 Big Band Society: WMC Lunchtime Concert -Wales Millennium Centre, 1pm

Maths Society: Maths vs Physics University Challenge -Trevithick Building, 6pm

Duke of Edinburgh Society: Training and Cinema -Room 1.25 Main Building, 7.30pm

Wednesday Nov 24 Islamic Society: Charity Week Street Collections -Queen Street, 9am

Student Guide and Scout Society: Costume Making -25th Cardiff Scout Hut, 7pm

Nigerian Society: Meeting -Vaughan Room, Graduate Centre, 6pm

Thursday Nov 25 Engin Soc: Grad Scheme Drop-in Session -Trevithick, 10.30am Arch Soc: Research Seminar 4.45 Humms, 5.10pm

English Lit Soc: Measure to Measure Theatre Trip -Provincial Theatre, 6.30pm

Friday Nov 26 D of E: Pen-Y-Fan Weekend -Pen-Y-Fan, 6pm

One Mission: Utah Jazz Album Launch -Buffalo Bar, 10pm

Saturday Nov 27 Art Soc: Bath Trip -Bath, 9.30am

Slash: HipHop Workshop -Vitality Gym, 11am

Sunday Nov 28 Big Band Society: National Concert Band Festival -Monmouth School, 9am

Student Action for Refugees: 'The Yacoubian Building ' Film Showing -The Vulcan Lounge, 6pm

To feature an event or article email societies @gairrhydd.com One Mission Photo:Jonas Photography

If you would like to join a Society, or see a full list of opportunities, visit: http://groups.cardiffstudents.com/societies/home


Puzzles

25 EASY

sudoku.

crossword.

competition. Over the next couple of weeks Xpress radio are giving you the chance to win an all expenses paid houseparty! We bring the drinks, the DJ, broadcast live from your house and even clear up the next morning! All you have to do is invite the guests... To be in with a chance of winning we want you to tell us what you would do with an unlimited budget and a free house. When you have dreamed up your perfect party send in your answers to: **TEXT: STUDIO followed by your message to 82010; OR **EMAIL: studio@xpressradio.co.uk with your answer.

Found on Facebook:

Across

Down

6. A breed of dog (7) 7. Bay window (5) 9. After-bath powder (4) 10. Eye-popping (10) 11. Sunshine (8) 13. Guarantee (6) 15. A very troublesome child (4) 17. Fertile area in a desert (5) 18. Charge per unit (4) 19. Stellar (6) 20. Atmosphere (8) 23. Ominously prophetic (10) 26. Desire (4) 27. Cheer up (5) 28. Of recognized authority or excellence (7)

1. Adding machine (10) 2. Norse warrior (6) 3. Somersault (4) 4. Unloved (8) 5. Ancient Hebrew units of liquid measure (4) 6. Disorganized (5) 8. A young hare (7) 12. Electrical pioneer Nikola (5) 14. Street smart (10) 16. Fix up (7) 17. Witness (8) 21. Pauper (6) 22. Faultfinder (5) 24. Jacob's brother (4) 25. Narrow margin (4)

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Support the Movember movement and send pictures your fine moustachery to editor@gairrhydd.com Happy growing.


Listings

Monday

Tuesday

27 Wednesday Thursday

22nd Nov

23rd Nov

24th Nov

25th Nov

THE LASH, Solus, £3.50, 9.30pm The Lash promises 'all the best in chart and cheese', which doesn't really sound all that tempting, to be honest. But if you're a sporting LAD then it's most definitely the place to be.

LIVE MUSIC, The Taf, FREE, 8pm Pretty much what it says on the tin really. Live music. In the Taf. They had a pretty good line-up last week, so expect great things from this night.

FUN FACT TREE, Solus, FREE, 9pm Fun Factory is an institution among Cardiff students and therefore you simply must check it out. Playing the very best alternative music, and with various cheap drinks p romotions, you're sure to have the best night of the week here - and I'm not even biased. It's a staple. Tonight is a special Quench live, LMS and Xpress Radio collaboration featuring performances from Three Pairs of Shoes, Studio Arcade Xpress DJ's, with more to be confirmed. LATE NIGHT LIVE, Ten Feet Tall, FREE, 9pm Every week, 10 Feet Tall selects the finest in local, new and up-and-coming bands to perform in the Rock Room, with 50s and 60s garage rock in the bar. INTERFAITH OPEN DAY, The Chaplaincy (62 Park Place), 11am-4pm

Interfaith open day marks the start of Interfaith Week. Come and experience the main world religions – eat food, see displays, and meet members of different faiths

JUST DANCE, Clwb, £3, 10pm Just Dance returns every Tuesday night at Clwb Ifor Bach with one simple mission...to get you dancing all night long. A mixture of modern day pop, rock and R&B, thrown together with some cracking blasts from the past...cheap entry, cheap drinks prices and great, GREAT tunes.

COMEDY CLUB, CF10, £2, 8pm It's Tuesday night, and what could be better than getting together with some friends and watching live comedy? Comedy Club selects the finest young talent on the comedy circuit and brings them directly to your union for a stupidly cheap ticket price. This week the line-up looks amazing as usual, with performances from Dave Hall and Stevey See. Steve Hall joined the standup circuit in 2002, where he made the final of the Daily Telegraph Open Mic Award. He is now acclaimed for his self-concious performances which regail the more embarrassing moments in life that we can all relate to. You're guaranteed a good night at Comedy Club, see you there.

LISTEN UP, Clwb, £3, 9pm Listen Up has become an institution within an institution. Everybody loves Clwb. Everybody loves Listen Up. Playing a mix of motown, funk, indie and pop among three floors of cheap bars and trendy kids, this is the place to be every Wednesday. THE FAITH PANEL, The Chaplaincy (62 Park Place), 1pm Representatives from Christianity, Islam, and Judaism answer questions on their faith’s beliefs as part of Interfaith Week. JAZZ AT DEMPSEYS, Dempseys, £5, 9pm Music ranges from piano or guitar trio, saxophone or trumpet quartet, quartet with vocals to big band. Hear jazz standards made famous by the likes of Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald, and Nina Simone, as well as original tunes.

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

26th Nov

27th Nov

28th Nov

BOOMBOX, Solus £3, 10pm Playing an eclectic mix of electro, funk, drum 'n' bass, hip hop, dubstep and breaks with a turntablist twist. Featuring dance classics, chart remixes and old school classics. Expect to hear Pendulum, Calvin Harris, Dr Dre, David Guetta, Major Lazor, A Skillz, High Contrast, Prodigy and much more. To be fair, it's the cheapest Friday night this side of the bridge, fulfilling all your student needs and perfect for bringing those visiting mates too. Go ahead kids, BOOM YOUR BOX. MAMMA MIA - THE MUSICAL, Wales Millennium Centre, £Various, 7.30pm Who can resist the cheesy, Abba-filled goodness of Mamma Mia? Certainly not I. This smash-hit musical, featuring the songs of Abba woven around the heart-warming tale of Donna and her daughter Sophie, is a feel-good favourite which can be enjoyed by all ages. If you haven't got anything better to do with your Friday night, why not get some cheap tickets and head on down to the Bay to sing your little heart out? For ticket prices and more information see http://www.mamma-mia.com for further information.

COME PLAY, Solus, £3, 10pm A safe bet for a Saturday night. If none of the other events do it for you, head to the Union for guaranteed good music and cheap drinks. Not the most imaginative of nights out, but you'll be sure to have a good time. And who said that being able to predict the playlist down to the very last minute was a bad thing? SCROOGE, New Theatre, £9-32, 7.30pm Have a cultured evening with everyone's favourite Dickens classic. The perfect winter treat, Scrooge is a heartwarming family story with stunning sets and costumes, specially created illusions by magician Paul Kieve (acclaimed for the magic effects in the Harry Potter films), and a fantastic musical score. Your holiday season wouldn't be complete without this family favourite. And who can resist the wintery charm of Ebenezer and his ghosts. So get ready to embark on a magical theatrical experience unlike any other in the international smash-hit musical sensation Scrooge!

HAVE A SUNDAY ROAST The Taf does a wicked, and cheap Sunday roast - as do the CAI. Have a lie in, and then get some classic comfort food to help beat Saturday night's hangover or stave off the end of the weekend blues. 10 FEET TALL SUNDAY SOCIAL, 10 Feet Tall, FREE, 8pm A brand new night featuring Greg Ramshackle and Steve French, whoever the hell they are. However, if you have nothing better to do on a Sunday night and fancy heading out for two-for-one cocktails, perhaps give this a go. THE BIG SUNDAY RECOVERY PROJECT, CAI, FREE, 12pm What’s the Sunday project ? It’s a regular’s social gathering to end the week. You get together over a late Sunday Roast or just laze around with fellow hung-over friends on the Sofas. Enjoy a Sunday ‘Institution’, weekly - Squeaky Hill Pub Quiz are back. The only quiz that provides you with a general all round work out, utilising the physical, mental and creative parts of your brain that other pub quizzes just can’t reach! It's free to play, and there's loads of exciting prizes to be won.

BOUNCE, Walkabout, £4, 9pm If you really, honestly, have nothing better to do... actually, no, even that isn't a valid excuse. No reason for going to Walkabout is acceptable in my eyes. Okay, so perhaps you have to go once in your university career, but I know that the debauchery and filth will put you off going again, if you have any personal morals, that is. C.Y.N.T, Clwb, £4, 10pm Expect big queues as ravers descend for their dose of electro, techno, dubstep and drum 'n' bass. Advance queue-jump tickets from c-y-n-t.com. This is the only legitimate thing to do on your Thursday night. THE FAITH PANEL II, The Chaplaincy (62 Park Place), 1pm Representatives from Hinduism, Buddhism, Baha’i and Sikhism answer questions on their faith's beliefs.

Venues Students’ Union, Park Place, 02920 814456 www.cardiffstudents.com ◆ IV Lounge, Neuadd Meirionydd, Heath Park 02920 744948 ◆ Clwb Ifor Bach, 11 Womanby Street 02920 232199 www.clwb.net ◆ Barfly, Kingsway, Tickets: 08709070999 www. barflyclub.com/cardiff ◆ Metros, Bakers Row www.clubmetropolitan.com ◆ CAI, Park Place 02920 412190 ◆ Buffalo Bar, 11 Windsor Place www.myspace. com/wearebuffalobar ◆ Chapter Arts Centre, Market Road, Canton 02920 304400 www. chapter.org ◆ Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff Bay 0870 0402000 www.wmc.org.uk ◆ The New Theatre, Park Place 02920 878889 www.newtheatrecardiff. co.uk ◆ The Sherman Theatre, Senghennydd Road 02920 646900 www.shermantheatre.co.uk ◆ Cardiff International Arena, Mary Ann Street 02920 224488 ◆


Sport 28

Tough Autumn Series has Jones looking to future

Speaking exclusively to gair rhydd Sport, fly half Stephen Jones tells Alex Bywater how Wales are progressing with the World Cup less than a year away

S

tephen Jones has a greater level of responsibility on his shoulders in this season's autumn internationals than ever before. Wales entered the Invesco Perpetual Series with a number of key players injured. Captain Ryan Jones, centre Jamie Roberts, full back Lee Byrne and wing Leigh Halfpenny have all suffered. With a number of youngsters being introduced into the squad, the onus has fallen on the more experienced players, such as fly half Jones to guide the team. Despite falling to narrow defeats against Australia and South Africa, the 94 cap Llanelli Scarlet is optimistic about where the team is heading. Speaking exclusively to gair rhydd Sport at the Cardiff Arms Café on Westgate Street, British Lion Jones spoke of his desire to build on this Autumn’s fixtures and the upcoming Six Nations, leading to the World Cup in New Zealand next Autumn. "I think we’ve got better as the campaign has gone on,” says Jones. “Our performance against South Africa was much improved compared to the Australian performance and the key for us now is to make sure we build positively up to the last game.” Speaking ahead of the Fiji game, Jones was confident that Wales could achieve a victory against the “very physical” South Sea Islanders. Finishing with a tough game against the All Blacks, it is a very real possibility that Wales could head into the Six Nations on the back of just one victory from this series of matches. So, what state are Wales in with the World Cup approaching? Coach Warren Gatland, having recently signed a new four year contract has, to some surprise, stated that the current side is better than the one which claimed the historic Grand Slam in 2008. It is difficult to judge the Welsh performances this November as the side is missing a number of key players. At full strength, Wales are undoubtedly a match for anyone. The

Above: Stephen Jones' experience is vital in guiding a young Welsh side into the future introduction of youngsters such as George North, Sam Warburton and Dan Lydiate into the squad can only benefit the squad in the long term. Jones agrees: “It’s great and the thing is we’re creating an open environment where everyone wants to do well and better themselves.” The fly half cited winger North, a team mate at Llanelli, as a future star. “We challenge each other to make sure we all improve as a squad and are comfortable with each other.” The two narrow defeats to the southern hemisphere giants suggest Wales are not far away from being capable of regularly registering victories against the top sides in world rugby. Arguably, Wales lack the tough mentality and character necessary to make them into a top side. Gatland has been critical

of the squad for failing to close out wins, especially having outscored the South Africans by three tries to two. "You start to wonder if you're ever going to get over that line," said Gatland after the latest South Africa defeat. "I kicked a few tables over in the changing room. Once a win comes it will get easier, but until you actually do it it's pretty frustrating." When asked why Wales have only managed three wins in Tri-Nations since the game went professional, Jones spoke of his desire for Wales to be dining at rugby’s top table. “South Africa are a great side, you have to give them a lot of credit for the way they played, especially in the second half,” he said, “we’re ambitious and we set high stan-

dards within the squad. "We’ve spoken about certain aspects that we would like and need to improve on to make sure when we get a lead in a game, we can win those games. That’s the next step for us.” When pressed about what these "aspects" are, Jones was tight lipped. Indeed, it’s difficult to put a finger on what exactly it is that Wales need to do to take them to the next level. “Well, without going into too much depth and talking about certain moves, the composure in our game will be the key for us” said Jones. So then, what do Wales need to change to end this cycle of near misses? The facts speak for themselves. Going into the the Fiji Test, Wales had lost their previous five

matches and nine of their last eleven. They are not far off, but how long are fans prepared to wait for success? Jones is confident that the side is nearly there. Jones sees the Six Nations as key. "We need to get really healthy for the World Cup and be able to take a fit competitive squad. "We need to improve on our style of play, that aspect is crucial for us,” said Jones. Only time will tell; Gatland now has time to work, having recently signed a new contract taking him up to the end of the 2015 World Cup. Wales have time on their side to plan for future success, something Jones will be integral to.


Sport29

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • sport@gairrhydd.com

England favourites to bring home the urn, says Alex Bywater...

P

re 2005, Ashes contests were not hard to call: it was merely a question of how many tests Australia would win by. Nowadays, predictions are far from easy to make. Having lost some of the greats of the game - Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath, Matthew Hayden, Justin Langer, Adam Gilchrist - Australia are undoubtedly nowhere near their previous formidable best. Since the euphoria of 2005, England have lurched from a 5:0 humiliation last time they were Down Under to regaining the Ashes at the Oval in 2009. So what of this series? The statistics are against England. They have not won in Australia since Mike Gatting’s side triumphed in 1986/87 and have not won in Brisbane, the venue for the important first test, for 24 years. Despite this, England are favourites to retain the Ashes. Australia have had a patchy record in recent times, drawing the two-Test series against Pakistan in England and being defeated two-nil on the subcontinent by India. They also lost their home one-day series against Sri Lanka. Australia's squad announcement for the first test at the Gabba also shows a lack of certainty in their XI for the first Test in Brisbane. Naming 17 players, more than England’s entire touring party, means experienced players such as Captain Ricky Ponting, Simon Katich and Mike Hussey will have to guide some of the younger members of the squad. Shane Watson has a major responsibility to continue to do well at the top of the order.

Glamorgan Cricket in Crisis Alex Winter Sports Editor

Andrew Strauss (right) hopes to make history and regain the Ashes from Ricky Ponting

England in Australia 2010/11 THE ASHES 1st Test Nov 24-28, Brisbane, 0000 GMT 2nd Test Dec 3-7, Adelaide, 0000 GMT 3rd Test Dec 16-20, Perth, 0230 GMT 4th Test Dec 26-30, Melbourne, 2330 GMT 5th Test Jan 3-7, Sydney, 2330 GMT T20 INTERNATIONALS Jan 12, Adelaide (d/n), 0835 GMT Jan 14, Melbourne (d/n), 0835 GMT COMMONWEALTH BANK SERIES 1st ODI, Melbourne (d/n), 0320 GMT 2nd ODI, Hobart (d/n), 0320 GMT 3rd ODI, Sydney (d/n), 0320 GMT 4th ODI, Adelaide (d/n), 0320 GMT 5th ODI, Brisbane (d/n), 0320 GMT 6th ODI, Sydney (d/n), 0320 GMT 7th ODI, Perth, 0320 GMT Coverage: Live on Sky Sports and Test Match Special - BBC Radio 4 LW & 5 Live Sports Extra Highlights on ITV4

England, under the leadership of head coach Andy Flower and the pragmatic captaincy of Andrew Strauss, have enjoyed a fantastic run over the last 18 months, including winning every series last summer. Looking at the batting, the top six pick themselves. Alastair Cook still has technical issues, though his real strength is between the ears. Cook has the ability to grind out the runs England need to create scoreboard pressure. Strauss, Jonathan Trott, Paul Collingwood and Kevin Pietersen will all play in the first test at Brisbane. Despite having a poor summer and being dropped for the one-day series, Pietersen, a man who thrives on the big occasion, will be key. Ian Bell may also deliver something special for the side, if and when he is shoehorned in, possibly at the expense of Pietersen, or Morgan, who, along with Cook and perhaps Pietersen, may be targeted by the Australians as a route into the England batting order. If England are to retain the urn, the success of their bowlers could

be the deciding factor. England’s pace attack, led by James Anderson, will be looking to take advantage of the bouncy pitches. As National Selector Geoff Miller put it “size does matter... there are plans ahead”. As a result, Chris Tremlett joins Stuart Broad and Steven Finn in a tall bowling attack that has the ability to trouble the Australian batsmen. Much is made of the use of the Kookaburra ball, but this is exaggerated. "You could be bowling with an apple: you’ve still got to land it on a good length,” said Finn. As the best spin bowler in the world, Graeme Swann will be a vital cog in England’s attack. With only four bowlers, he will be required to bowl a lot of overs. He bowls especially well at left handers and Australia have plenty. The first test at Brisbane is vital. If England avoid defeat at the Gabba, they will buck the trend of recent tours and have a platform to go on and retain the Ashes. But they can expect a revived Australia to pull their socks up for this series.

Glamorgan have been plunged into crisis after several key figures at the club resigned. Director of Cricket Matthew Maynard, last season's captain Jamie Dalrymple and club President Peter Walker have all left the club. Maynard said his position had become untenable after the club committee appointed South African international batsman Alviro Petersen as captain for next season. Petersen admitted in an interview he had not spoken to Maynard before he was offered the role. Maynard told BBC Sport he had been publically humiliated. Colin Metson, who played for Glamorgan between 1987 and 1997 has been appointed the new Managing Director of Cricket. After being unceremoniously replaced as captain, Dalrymple resigned with one year remaining on his contract. The former England international all-rounder said he had been effectively dismissed. Peter Walker, who helped Glamorgan to the 1969 County Championship title, also walked out of the club where he has been President for two seasons. He highlighted "serious concerns" with the running of the team. The Glamorgan committee, led by Chairman Paul Russell and Chief Executive Alan Hamer, conducted a strategic review following last season's poor performance in one-day competitions. Hamer had asked the team to prioritise one-day tournaments for commercial reasons but Glamorgan failed to qualify for the Twenty20 quarter-finals and finished bottom of their Clydesdale Bank 40 League Group, below the ECB Unicorns. The committee issued a statement saying they could no longer accept the poor standards of the past five seasons, despite last year missing out on promotion back to Division One of the LV= County Championship on the last day of the season. The appointment of Alviro Petersen as overseas player means Australian Mark Cosgrove has only been offered a Twenty20 contract for 2011. Cosgrove was named Player of the Season in 2010, scoring 1,187 first-class runs at an average of 49, and 397 one-day runs at 50. Supporters have reacted angrily to the changes, calling for an Emergency General Meeting.


Sport30

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • sport@gairrhydd.com

London serves up feast of tennis

Nathaniel Smith previews the end-of-season ATP World Tour Finals

S

unday November 21 marks the return of the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals to London’s magnificent indoor O2 Arena. The event, which brings together the top eight players in the world, is being held in the British capital for the second consecutive year and will be staged at the O2 until 2012. The first time London hosted the end-of-season event, in 2009, it proved to be an astounding success. It smashed record after record during its week-long run. A total of 256,830 spectators attended the tournament (an all-time indoor tournament attendance record) to watch Nikolay Davydenko storm to an unlikely victory and collect a not so insignificant cheque for £2,227,500. Tournament organisers have promised to improve theircommunication after Andy Murray was knocked out 12 months ago in farcical circumstances. Murray actually posted on Twitter asking if anyone could work out whether he had qualified from the group stage. Since its creation in 1970, many great names have taken the illustrious World Tour title, such as Bjorn Borg, Pete Sampras, Boris Becker and Roger Federer. Despite undergoing numerous changes in name and format, the prestige and standard of tennis associated with the tournament have never been higher. Born out of the idea of bringing together the very best players in the world to play each other in a season-ending event, only the top eight players in the world rankings qualify for the tournament. The considerable incentives of up to 1500 world ranking points and a prospective cheque await the winner. However, what will motivate the players most of all is the potential to end the season knowing that they have beaten the best in the world and to take fresh impetus and confidence into the opening Grand Slam of 2011, the Australian Open. With the reigning champion Davydenko failing to qualify for the tournament this year after a poor season, we are promised a new winner. All eight men to have qualified can put forward very strong cases for why they should take the title on the hard courts of London in 2010. Rafael Nadal enters the tournament as the world number one after another historic year, in which he has given himself the opportunity, depending on a win at the Australian Open, to be the first man since 1969 to hold all four Grand Slam titles at the same time. The Spaniard is the best athlete in the game and possesses a vicious forehand. However he openly admits that hard courts are his weak-

est surface recently. Nadal has struggled with a shoulder injury, but goes into London full of motivation to atone for a poor showing here last year. Unsurprisingly, Roger Federer has dominated the tournament since the turn of the century, finishing second in the overall titles list, with four tournament wins between 2003 and 2007. This is only the second time in seven years that Federer has entered the tournament not ranked as number one in the world, a statistic representative of the fact that Federer is maybe not quite the player he once was. His deceptive forehand has been increasingly prone to breaking down in recent times. Yet at his best, his tennis is still good enough to outclass the rest of the field. Third seed and 2008 winner Novak Djokovic has flattered to deceive over the last few years. His talent is unquestionable, but it is perhaps his mentality that lets him down. Djokovic’s attractive style of play is always welcome in big tournaments, as is his Dad’s remarkable T-shirt which has a picture of his son emblazoned across it. He should at least make the semi-finals. Robin Soderling arrives at the tournament brimming with confidence having won his first masters tournament only last week, and vreaking into the top four for the first time in his career. His game is well suited to fast, indoor hard courts and his indoor record proves as much. Soderling is very much

Above: Nikolay Davydenko on the way to winning last year's tournament at the O2 Arena

Andy Murray plays the best game around

the dark horse for the tournament and could well provide a few surprises. Britain’s finest, Andy Murray has had an inconsistent year on the tour, so it’s hard to know what to expect from him going into London. He possesses the best all-round game of all of the participating players, and will be able to draw on the support of a partisan home crowd. Federer, in particular, has often struggled against Murray with the Scot holding the superior head to head record. Despite being drawn in a tough group, Murray has a great chance to take the title. Murray is particularly looking forward to the tournament. "It's an incredible atmosphere, a huge arena and it's one of the biggest competitions in tennis behind the Grand Slams, so I'm really looking forward to it" the world number five said. Tomas Berdych is the sole debutant in the field this year and qualifies mainly on the back of strong performances at Wimbledon and the French Open earlier in the year. His recent form has been poor however, and despite a huge forehand and booming serve, Berdych will have a tough time getting out of a very challenging group. David Ferrer is one of the lesser known players in the tournament. Although something of a clay court specialist, his win amongst a tough field on the hard courts of Valencia recently proved that he can beat the best. Like Berdych though, he will

have a tough time qualifying for the semi-finals. Andy Roddick has qualified for the tournament for an impressive eight year stretch. Roddick has had a quiet year, but his serve remains a fearsome weapon and means that he will be a difficult opponent to beat. The American may well cause an upset or two. The players are divided into two groups and will play once against each player in the group. The top two from each group qualify for the semi-finals. Group A consists of Nadal, Djokovic, Berdych and Roddick. Group B contains fellow rivals Federer, Soderling, home favourite Murray and Ferrer. Both groups look hard to call and an exceptionally high level of tennis is a given. It says a lot for the competitiveness in the game of men’s tennis that it is so hard to pick a clear favourite for the title this year. Federer has been in superb form over the last couple of months and with Nadal struggling, I think the Swiss has the best chance of winning the title. If successful, he will equal Ivan Lendl and Pete Sampras's record of five ATP tour titles. An outsider may well be Soderling though,who many opponents will find to be a very dangerous player this week. The tournament kicks off with Andy Murray taking on Soderling. The tournament is very accessible for supporters, with BBC2 screening every Andy Murray match plus one other singles contest on the red button.


Sport31

Monday November 22 2010 • gair rhydd • sport@gairrhydd.com

Tough victory for Law A Pope gives CHAOS baptism of fire diff 7. The second half brought on two subs for Law: Lucie Troop as GA and Soph Daw as WD. Law again started strongly with the new shooting partnership working equally as well. Strong defence from Maddie Blanks and Anna Tomlinson meant that the final score was Law 25 Cardiff 16. The 'player's player' for Cardiff was deservedly Georgie Pick. The GS shot brilliantly and had great movement within the circle. The 'player's player' for Law was Becky Jones whose pace and interceptions contributed significantly to the final score. Both teams played to a consistently high standard to sustain a victory; Law A pitting Cardiff A at the post.

Alanna Tregear IMG Netball Law A 25 - 16 Cardiff A This was without a doubt the toughest match of the season so far for Law A. Law started strongly with excellent movement between the centre court players Alanna Tregear, Sarah Hilton and Becky Jones. Perfect shooting from Liane Cardle-Baio and Ffion Wyn Hughes led to a quick succession of goals. Cardiff quickly responded, and using their centre court's pace, closed the gap midway through the first half. The play evened out towards the end of the first half with teams scoring alternatively, leaving the half time score at Law 13 and Car-

Group A

IMG FOOTBALL KLAW FC

3

3

0

0

+13

9

2

Engin Locomotive

3

2

1

0

+13

7

3

Pharm AC

3

1

1

1

-2

4

4

AFC Cathays

3

1

1

1

-6

4

5

SAWSA

2

0

1

1

-1

1

6

SOCSI

2

0

0

2

-6

0

7

Kay FC

2

0

0

2

-11

0

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

IMG FOOTBALL

Group B P

1

Sub-Standard Liege

3

3

0

0

+13

9

2

CARBS FC

2

2

0

0

+10

6

3

Psycho Athletico

2

1

0

1

+3

3

4

Gym Gym

3

1

0

2

+1

3

5

Inter Menan

2

1

0

1

0

3

6

Fenerbache

3

1

0

2

-3

3

7

CHAOS

3

0

0

3

-23

0

8

Jomec

0

0

0

0

0

0

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

IMG FOOTBALL

Group C P

1

AFC History

3

3

0

0

+14

9

2

Economics

2

2

0

0

+21

6

3

Your Mum's Athletic

3

2

0

1

-1

6

4

Law A

3

1

1

1

-9

4

AFC Time Team

2

1

0

1

-3

3

1

0

2

-8

3

0

1

2

-1

1

0

0

3

-25

0

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

5

Real Ale Madrid

3

7

Myg Myg

3

8

Opus 11

3

6

Group D

IMG FOOTBALL P

1

Earth Soc

3

3

0

0

+18

9

2

FC Euros

3

2

1

0

+10

7

3

Port Fail

3

1

1

1

+2

4

4

MOMED AFC

2

0

2

0

0

2

5

Engin Auto

3

0

2

1

-8

2

6

Law B

2

0

0

2

-9

0

7

Chemistry

2

0

0

2

-14

0

Will Poley IMG Football Fenerbahce 6 - 0 CHAOS Welsh hotshot Michael Pope bagged a five-goal haul in the hotly anticipated clash between IMG rookies Fenerbahce and CHAOS, as the boys in yellow condemned their fellow Group B strugglers to a third consecutive loss. The chemistry between the Fenerbahce attackers repeatedly made a mockery of the hapless physicists as their vulnerable backline was penetrated time and time again, something Fenerbahce Captain and Manager Peter Michallat had himself experienced in the last couple of weeks (allegedly the photos were never published). The opening goal was scored after a sustained period of pressure midway through the first half. Pope slammed the ball home after good

work from Will Poley and the assistance from a convenient puddle in the goalmouth. Michallat refused to confirm post-game rumours that the pool of stagnant water would be signed on a long-term basis. The floodgates opened after the first strike and CHAOS were almost constantly on the back foot. Fenerbahce wingers Poley and Dave Hooson terrorising the opposition full-backs with a scintillating display of pace and trickery. Hooson at one stage sold a dummy so effective his marker had to pay to get back into the ground; a feat made even more impressive that the match was taking place in a field next to the Blackweir, with no apparent entrance fee at any point. New Fenerbahce recruit Jon Bending was pulling the strings in midfield, spraying passes, throwing himself into tackles and shooting from range, like a slightly overweight and hungover Steven Gerrard. Meanwhile, his midfield

partner Tom Bradfield produced an all-action display that resembled his lookalike Owen Wilson’s gunslinging in Shanghai Noon, a marked improvement from recent matches where he had been more Wedding Crashers. Kieron Casey bagged Fenerbahce’s fourth after half-time, before Pope added a spectacular fifth, weaving past several static defenders before crashing a shot home at the near post. Fenerbahce were not hindered by the controversial substitutions of Poley and Bending, and continued to press for a higher scoreline until the final whistle. Goal junkie Pope scored his fifth "fix" of the day in the final minutes. All in all, it was an exhibition of football that will send shivers down the spines of Fenerbahce’s IMG rivals, and will surely live long in the memory of the solitary fan who came to watch

Pharm AC back to winning ways Matthew Courtney-Smith IMG Football Pharm AC 3 - 1 Kay FC The Pharmacy boys got back to winning ways with a well-deserved victory over Kay FC, leaving them placed in a respectable league position midway through the Autumn IMG season. An essay-related virus left Captain Andrew Kings with a depleted squad. Tom "Action" Hardy was also missing due to professional commitments. The skipper was run at centre back alongside the returning Dan “Sick Note” Hay, with Dai “CrossShot” Jackson filling in on the right. Kicking off at the earlier time of 2pm, Pharm AC caught their weary opponents off guard in the opening stages, carving out the first chances of the game. With just eight minutes on the clock, Pharmacy won a corner. The selfless Andy Jenkins stepped up to flight the ball into the box, prompting a goalmouth scramble after a well timed near-post flick from an advancing attacker. The ball eventually fell to Ian “Commitment” Rees-Evans, who struck the ball at goal with surprisingly mediocre pace. Striking five defenders and a teammate on the way, the ball clearly crossed the line, and the referee duly awarded the goal. The dubious goals panel are set to meet on Friday to discuss the goalscorer. Initial speculation suggests that Rees-Evans will keep the goal, if only in charity to get him off the

mark for the season. The dispensers doubled their lead before the 20 minute mark, as Abdi Ali released Courtney-Smith with a perfectly crafted throughball. The attacker composed himself before looping the ball with his first touch over the helpless goalkeeper. 2-0. He would have been disappointed not to double his tally just moments later, heading over from six yards after some good work from Karrar. It started to look like Pharm AC would run away with the tie, but they were disappointed to concede a penalty courtesy of a crude challenge from Mr. Hay. Martin Gaston played his notorious mind games with the Kentucky-born striker, who duly struck the foot of the post with a feeble attempt. The home team took full advantage on 36 minutes. Gaston claimed a first assist of the season as he powered the ball clear to bounce over the man-mountain Kay FC defender, allowing Fresher to finish past a confused goalkeeper into the empty net. The second half proved a tougher task for the Pharmacists and they needed all their defensive solidarity to dig in and hold onto their well-earned lead. Kings was putting in a fine performance at the back, making the sweeper role his own, and Rubin was at his crunch-tackling best. There was nothing they could do about the solitary Kay FC strike, which was finished in sublime fashion by their speedy Welsh talisman around the hour mark. Pharm AC hung onto their lead as the match

turned into a stalemate at the finish. A first league win for Kings’ promising side, who go into the mid-season interval full of confidence for the rest of the campaign.


Sport

Stephen Jones Interview << Inside

Photo: Katharina Joite

Cardiff top of the league CURFC beat Oxford Brookes to reach top of the Premier South League Martyn Fowler Rugby Cardiff University reach top of the Premier South league, beating Oxford Brookes 25 – 5 in terrible conditions. On top of to the conditions, the match was played on a much-used university pitch, which consistently broke up throughout the afternoon, making it extremely difficult for both teams to score points. That said, it is testament to

the expertise of the Llanrumney ground staff that the game took place at all, given the many fixtures that have been called off up and down the country. Cardiff have now reached the top of the league, with impressive performances against; UWIC: 68 – 8, Gloucester: 98 – 0, Imperial Medics: 74 – 7, Cardiff University Medics: 33 – 6, and Oxford Brookes 25 – 5, so far. Cardiff have scored an average of 48 points per game, conceding less than five points per game.

The challenge for the first team is now to match these statistics on the road, with a fixture against St Mary's up next.

Ashes Preview << Inside

Cardiff University Rugby Club (CURFC) have never beaten St Mary's before, and are hoping to ad-

dress this balance next Wednesday. Despite success for the firsts, CURFC seconds are still searching for that elusive first win in Division 1A. Being the side promoted is proving a tough task to date, but Captain and Prop, Ryan Murray, is very confident that the second team can turn many of the results around with added commitment from the second team players at training. A late kick off at Treforest saw Kyle Prices' third team beat Glamorgan thirds in a hard fought con-

test. Meanwhile, Morgan Brownes' Freshmen team beat Cardiff University Medics 12 – 11 at a boggy Llanrumney. The battle of division 3B is hotting up with the three Cardiff University teams in first, second and third positions. All in all, the futures looks bright for Cardiff University Rugby Club.

GAIR RHYDD AND QUENCH MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY UNIVERSITY UNION CARDIFF, PARK PLACE, CARDIFF CF10 3QN • REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER AT THE POST OFFICE • GAIR RHYDD RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL CONTRIBUTIONS • THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF THE PUBLISHERS • GAIR RHYDD IS WRITTEN, DESIGNED, TYPESET AND OUTPUT BY STUDENTS OF CARDIFF UNIVERSITY • BEN PRICE'S MUSICAL DEBUT HAS OFFICE IN STITCHES • BYWATER LEAVES TEAM IN THE SHIT, AGAIN • NEWS RIDICULE OLLY SMITH • WHO DO THEY THINK THEY ARE? • "SLOPPY BYWATER" • WINTER LIKES TO THINK HE'S SAVED THE DAY • WINTER COMPARES THE RELATIVE MERITS OF CENTRE PARCS • SNOOZEFEST • A LOT OF TEAM BYWATER BASHING TONIGHT •


gair rhydd - Issue 937