Page 1

Gabriela Fiorentino

PORTFOLIO


08

28

BROOKLYN, NY

NEW YORK, NY

PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE


TABLE OF CONTENTS

44 SAN FRANCISCO, CA THESIS: INTO THE FOG


70

90

BRONX, NY

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

FULL S.T.E.A.M


108 AMMAN, JORDAN NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS


130

142

MALIBU, CA

VARIOUS LOCATIONS

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

HAND DRAWINGS


150 WEB-WIDE THE DREAM DOER


Project Type: Colleges & Universities - Student Work Educational Institution: Pratt Institute Partner: Reneé Cohen Location: 81 Grand Avenue – Brooklyn, NY


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY BROOKLYN, NY


BUILDING DESIGN

The building’s design is a careful and calculated balance between privacy and community. It provides Pratt’s students with a healthy environment to study and learn. Each unit includes a private balconies that increases their appeal and provides shading to help manage solar gain.

PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

Based on Pratt’s creative majors and environment, the recreational areas, located in the lobby and top floor, are made to enhance their education. The recreational areas include a lounge/work area, gallery space, outdoor space and cafeteria.

BROOKLYN, NY


ARCH 11


FACADE SYSTEM

The project’s facade is composed to maximize the views and light within the apartments to decrease the use of electricity during the day. Sustainable strategies includes a highly insulated and airtight building envelope, low-energy Prefabricated concrete components, of natural cross-ventilation and lighting, and heat recovery from exhaust air, waste-water and showers.

PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

The building entrance is accessed through a ramp, next to the sidewalk, that leads to the lobby located below the street level. There you will find a lounge area with atriums above. The elevators are located in the center, next to the mailboxes. The gallery and cafeteria are located half-floor up, at street level, which leads to the outdoor spaces.

BROOKLYN, NY


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

THE LOBBY

BROOKLYN, NY


ARCH 15


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

THE PUBLIC AREAS

BROOKLYN, NY


ARCH 17


THE FLOOR PLANS

PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

The building floor plans is made up by three two-bedroom luxury unit configurations ; two single and a duplex unit create the building layout. The floor layout is consistent except for two floors, one located at the setback, which includes an exterior lounge terrace and the floors above that.

BROOKLYN, NY


Level: 00 // Basement

Level: 02 & 04

Level: 06

Level: 08

Level: 01 // Lobby

Level: 03 & 05

Level: 07 // Rooftop Lounge

Level: 09 // Roof

ARCH 19


THE UNITS

The unit arrangement of a typical floor is mainly configured so that each have access to an exterior area. The units comprise of a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and a small living room area so the students would want to go to the larger communal areas.

PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

Unit 01 // Duplex

BROOKLYN, NY


Duplex Kitchen

Duplex Living Room

ARCH 21


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

Unit 02

Unit 03

BROOKLYN, NY


Unit 02 & 03 Kitchen

Unit 02 & 03 Living Room

ARCH 23


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

DETAILS

BROOKLYN, NY


Unit Bedroom

Unit Bathroom

ARCH 25


PRATT INSTITUTE’S STUDENT DORMITORY

BROOKLYN, NY


ARCH 27


Project Type: Colleges & Universities - Student Work Educational Institution: Pratt Institute Partner: Yara Kawar Location: 3579 Harlem River Drive – New York, NY // Next to Inwood Park


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE NEW YORK, NY


THE BUILDING DESIGN

The project’s approach was largely inspired by the concept of water and its manipulation, in terms of speed and form. We focused on applying the concept to create a balance of efficiency, recreation and innovation. As a result, the building has an interconnected circulation and preforms to optimize the path of the boats to the water as well as develop the student’s physical and mental fitness.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

The main entrance is through the bottom of the building , where one can access the waterfront as well. The interior circulation is based on a circular pattern, which surround the central core. The training gym and locker rooms are next to the boat sheds on the first floor. While the second floor is composed of the multi-purpose area, classrooms and the administration.

NEW YORK, NY


ARCH 31


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

SECTIONS

NEW YORK, NY


North West Section

North East Section ARCH 33


THE FLOOR PLANS The building is composed of four major structural walls that support an habitable ceiling that connects across the site leading into Inwood park. The ramps in the roof change in steepness according to the pace we people to walk through the building. Shallow paths allowed moments of rest and enjoyment of the view. Whereas the ‘keep moving’ spaces are defined by stairs and narrow paths.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

Structural Plan

First Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

NEW YORK, NY


Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Roof Plan

ARCH 35


THE STRUCTURE

The structural weight is distributed by the use of trusses within the wall, keeping the porosity of the building. The boat shed is composed of trusses and columns. The ramps structure is composed of a series of steel beams and girders.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

The building circulation plays on the speed as well as the person’s views as they walk through it. The ramps braids into the interior spaces, located in between the boatsheds, but in some areas people are only able to peek inside the building. There are times when you can see the conditioned interior spaces while still being outside.

NEW YORK, NY


ARCH 37


THE CIRCULATION

The building circulation plays on the speed as well as the person’s views as they walk through it. The ramps braids into the interior spaces, located in between the boatsheds, but in some areas people are only able to peek inside the building. There are times when you can see the conditioned interior spaces while still being outside.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

The varsity boats are located on one side and the community boats on another. In order to enhance the efficiency of getting the boats to the water, the Varsity boat shed is position at and optimal angle, giving them a direct and effortlessly traveled path. Whereas the community boats, though still efficient, they have a less direct path to the water, since this shed is less frequented. This path they would have to turn the boats towards the water, but without difficulty.

NEW YORK, NY


ARCH 39


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

THE PROGRAM

Boatshed & Gym

NEW YORK, NY


Main Area

Boatshed, Deck & Main Area

ARCH 41


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S BOATHOUSE

NEW YORK, NY


ARCH 43


Project Type: Architecture & Urban Design - Student Work (THESIS) Educational Institution: Pratt Institute Partner: Yara Kawar Location: San Francisco, CA - Various Locations Award: Distinguished Thesis Project Nomination


THESIS: INTO THE FOG SAN FRANCISCO, CA


THE BUILDING DESIGN

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

We exist within the environment, we are engulfed by it, we are the environment. It affects us and we affect it. The hyperobject, an entity which blends time and space, imposes an “asymmetrical confrontation” between the people and the hyperobject that can frustrate the assumption of humans implied power over nature through the built world. This confrontation, raises the question of coexistence. Can architecture be meaningfully enmeshed in a hyperobject—in this case, fog— in order to renegotiate the relationship between the built world and its ecological context? We reimagine the association with fog, we localize it within its vast system, bridging a communication between the people, fog and space. Fog dwells in many forms, creating different layers of legibility within the occupied terrain. As the terrain is modified the fog inhabits and moves differently around it. Fog induces a somber emotion and fear, giving power to our primal instincts as we are weakened by our dependability on sight, connotations reinforced by the media. Its grandeur is misunderstood. Has power to change people’s perspective and experience of an ordinary place. In San Francisco, the presence of fog, as a hyperobject, has a destabilizing effect on the citizens, forcing them to recognize it as part of the character or essence of the city. What they have yet to do is to understand how to inhabit the fog and its different volumes. The notion of the hyperobject is beginning to “infiltrated human social and philosophical space.”

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 47


THE PROPOSAL

Our proposal is to create a bridge of communication between the people and the fog through architecture. Fog then becomes a type of building material, reshaping our usual understanding of the “typical� building materials. We choreograph movement through the space for the ability to experience different experiences of fog, whether it relates to density, the sectional difference, or even the physical levels of interaction. The whole journey becomes a balance between scripted and unscripted choreography. The meandering paths begin to offer tranquil resting spots, through niches embedded within the site. The three varying space sizes begin to allow for specific amounts of people within each pathway or in the breathing spaces. These ranges of design opportunities slow down movement they allow for the constant reveal and concealing of our surroundings.

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

The alliance of existing and built fog carves a path for play within the architecture. It heightens the dialogue between the built world and the environment by the play of scales that act together at a vast system. Achieving a small scale of constructed fog, gives way to the initial crossover as it re-introduces fog to the built world, frustrating their preconceptions of fog as an everyday impairing nuisance and culturally feared hyperobject.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


The scripted distribution of fog in the city exploits on fog’s ability constantly change the spaces though obscuring and revealing. Fog surges through controlled apertures that serve as a marker of when fog becomes an object that morphs the existing space, giving a sense of privacy and directionality. Fog begins to take serve as a temporary architectural material forming implied enclosures, up to the point when it fails as an object, dematerializing the structure allowing for light to act as a guide.

ARCH & UD 49


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

SITE ANALYSIS

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 51


SITE SELECTION

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

We have identified a constellation of spaces between places formed by the grid matrix that results from the nine different grids that compose San Francisco and the overlapping moments of the street hierarchy. This constellation of sites brings forth an implied connective tissue that transforms the experience of each space according to its location. Fog veils over San Francisco at different densities. It arrives from the West slowly dematerializing the city as it makes its way to the East side of the city, but it rarely approaches it. We emphasize this contrast by creating an ambiguity between the role of our architecture and fog as one transitions through the constellations of interventions.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 53


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

THE RESEARCH EXPERIMENTS: FOG MATERIALIZATION

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 55


FOG STRIP SECTIONS

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

The West side is empowered by the morphing avalanche of fog that drapes over it, allowing the architecture to act as an agent to move through the fog. The circulatory path is altered to achieve different levels of occupancy within the fog, letting it conceal the paths and city grid relative to your position in time and space.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 57


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

FOG STRIP // BOULEVARD

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 59


BUILT FOG: RESIDUAL SPACES INTERVENTION

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

The eastern side of San Francisco is less affected by fog giving architecture the opportunity to distribute and manipulate the morphology, pressure and directionality at which fog begins to engulf the residual spaces, allowing it to then follow its own path. Fog inhabits the area and erases the outside world of the city and limits the view of the surrounding pillars, revealing it at certain times. The paths create a narrative of experiential space. The residual spaces within the city are activated by the built fog enhancing the multiple qualities of fog and magnifying its scale throughout the city. The scripted system of fog sheds light to the grandeur of the fog as an hyperobject. The existing fog and built fog are choreographed to magnify the grandeur of the hyperobject. The urban fog system is activated by the increasing moments of flux when the locals and tourist are filling the street.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 61


BUILT FOG: MARKET ST. AND BUSH ST.

THESIS: INTO THE FOG

The interventions are illuminated with low-beam light that guides the user through the fog, the light takes on its identity within the fog. Light becomes the fog. A vagueness comes over everything. There becomes an interplay, a question of control between all the variables at play, whether it becomes the light, the people, the fog or the architecture. All this can either raise curiosity or drive us back to somber fog effect that is usually represented when thinking of fog. As we take it down to human scale, we choreograph its effects through architecture on the people that inhibiting it. As we begin to produce fog we begin to play with the notion of a hyperobject, controlling the time and space where it distributes upon. However only for a certain amount of time. Fog as a scientific entity, is elusive and ethereal, defying our attempts at easy prediction.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 63


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

BUILT FOG: MARKET ST. AND BUSH ST.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 65


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

BUILT FOG: MARKET ST. AND KEARNY ST.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 67


THESIS: INTO THE FOG

BUILT FOG: YACHT RD, AND MARINA BLVD.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA


ARCH & UD 69


Project Type: Architecture & Urban Design - Student Work Educational Institution: Columbia University Partner: Kristen Reardon, Haochen Yang, Ping Yin Location: Port Morris, Bronx, NY


THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST BRONX, NY


THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

BRONX, NY


If Port Morris is left without a flood protection system, the community will be vulnerable to major devastation from storms. Creating a flood barrier through a natural levee along the waterfront will protect the area from rising sea level and the increased frequency of floods. For this to be successful, susceptible businesses will form together to create a collective strategy to fund the levee. The levee offers a public waterfront park that adds environmental and social value to the community.

UD 73


FLOOD RISK

Within the flood zone, there is a diverse amount of industries. As well as, local businesses, such as the Port Morris Distillery and Miss Gimble’s Bakery. Industrial infrastructures with a wider market like the NY Post and Coca Cola, are located along the edge where there is an increase in flooding risk. Currently, some Informal community activities have been occurring around the area demonstrating the want for reclaiming the waterfront by the community.

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

If major infrastructure is not created, the risk of flood is imminent. Over the next 35 years, the amount of properties within the flood zone is expected in increase. With the rate of flood insurance increasing at a rate of 18% annually, many will no longer be able to afford. With every increase in flood insurance, the property value decreases, forcing small businesses who are unable to afford these high prices out. This leaves room for only large chain industry.

BRONX, NY


UD 75


LEVEE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION

To prevent the reliability on flood insurance, the Levee Board can be created to privately fund this levee development. The Levee board would consist of major stakeholders in the area such as Silvercup, FedEx, and NY Post and could invest large funds upfront. Any other smaller businesses could choose to invest in the creation of the corporation. If they chose to invest they would become stakeholders of the Levee Board that would collect a levee tax. If they do not invest they must pay the levee tax. As new developments come in they would pay a levee tax. Over time once the initial invest is paid off, opportunity for members of the Board to earn profit can occur. In contrast to the recent mixed use residential zoning on the west side. We Hope to preserve the manufacture district on the eastern side, while promoting new clean businesses to develop.

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

The current land use is composed of manufacturers and industrial businesses. Various storage facilities and warehouses as well as a sample of small local businesses in the area. Through the creation of the sustainable Levee park can allow possible creative programming to develops such as private and collaborative fabrication spaces. Interdisciplinary creative studios, rentable workspaces among many others The creation of the Levee would provide sustainable public spaces and preserve the industrial waterfront As a whole, we aim to create a green industrial park that can grow over time because of its flood protection system that provides a vibrant public space.

BRONX, NY


UD 77


PLAN DEVELOPMENT

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

To create an active waterfront, we proposed three major interventions: development of clean manufacturing buildings along the water, the levee park along the water to protect the area from flooding, and green infrastructure along the streetscape to create connect to the water and provide stormwater capture. The Levee Park contains accessible pathways, opportunities for recreation, and ways to clean polluted water. The streetscape includes a pedestrian only greenway, green streets as a way-finding technique, and makes use of an abandoned railway.

BRONX, NY


UD 79


THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

STREETSCAPE

BRONX, NY


The levee is built to an elevation of 18 to prevent the future inundation of 100 year storm with the expected sea level rise of 2050. This protects the land and provides opportunity for a large public space. This area includes a viewing platform that encourages community gathering, a saltwater marsh to help clean polluted water, recreation space activates the historic gantries. Three large stormwater tanks are proposed below the berms to collect run-off. Green infrastructure practices are employed along St. Anne’s which could be transformed into a pedestrian. Areas through the manufacturing zone utilize bioswales along the main bus routes and walkable connection to the subway connection to create way-finding to the water. The abandoned rail below grade is also activated with drainage swales and spaces for community gathering.

UD 81


THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

BRONX, NY


UD 83


SYSTEM ANALYSIS

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

The individual swales, permeable paving, and rain gardens can collect water and re-charge the ground. Any overflow in these areas will be sent to the storage tanks. Here the water can be re-used as greywater recycling in the new developed buildings and to irrigate the levee park. Any overflow here can be sent to the water treatment plant. By collecting so much water, the use of CSOs would be less frequent and help to clean the water.

BRONX, NY


The green infrastructure is vital to the success of the levee to prevent water from pooling in the lower inland. To prevent this, the run-off of impermeable surfaces has showed the need for stormwater tanks that collect overflow from these systems. By using concrete tanks below the berm and allowing the abandoned rail to become an overflow tank, the volume of all of the run-off can be collected.

UD 85


SPACE VISUALIZATION

THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

Along the bus routes the green infrastructures acts as a way-finding system that directs you to the Levee park at the waterfront. Water can be collected in the bioswales located within widen sidewalks. There is also spaces for seating along the route to allow leisure for both residents and workers.

BRONX, NY


UD 87


THE EDGE: AN URBAN CATALYST

SPACE VISUALIZATION

BRONX, NY


UD 89


Project Type: Architecture & Urban Design - Student Work Educational Institution: Columbia University Partner: Bridgett Cruz, Jessica Adiwijaya Location: Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY


FULL S.T.E.A.M POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


FULL STEAM

Innovation has been a founding part of Poughkeepsie’s economic landscape. Much of this is attributable to IBM, the leader of received American patents for 23 consecutive years. Once the dominant employer of the area, IBM is now one of many technology forward companies in New York State. Because of NYS initiatives, the high concentration of technology in the Hudson valley, as well Poughkeepsie’s central location along the tech corridor, Poughkeepsie has the potential to become the heart of New York TECH.

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 93


FULL STEAM

CURRENT TECHNOLOGY ASSETS

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 95


CURRENT ECONOMY AND PERCEPTION

FULL STEAM

Learning from IBM’s failure as a centralized company model, our strategy for Poughkeepsie is economic development through revitalization, diversification, and accessibility of the technology and manufacturing industries. This will be implemented through cooperative and community based development.

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 97


TECH CENTER DEVELOPMENT

We propose a strategy of economic revitalization through the concentration and expansion of S.T.E.A.M. Industries on Main St. Pulling from numerous resources: • •

FULL STEAM

• •

Existing technology and manufacturing infrastructures, Robust investments from the National, State, and Private sectors aimed at technology industry development near SUNY/ CUNY schools, High concentration of quality vacant buildings and lots, Local amenities, and Easy accessibility by the highway and metro north systems we offer a strategy that creates an epicenter of dense, diverse technologies rather than isolated developments.

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 99


FULL STEAM

TECH CAMPUS SYSTEM GUIDE

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 101


FULL STEAM

CENTER TECH CORRIDOR

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 103


STREETSCAPE AND TRANSPORTATION

FULL STEAM

This will provide a sharing of resources and knowledge, intercollegiate collaboration, friendly competition, job creation and accessibility of S.T.E.A.M. to the local population. In addition, this plan offers the local Universities an opportunity to invest in Poughkeepsie City. Full S.T.E.A.M. establishes a new technology forward civic infrastructure that is designed to provide the necessary conduit for local youth to participate in and eventually enter the S.T.E.A.M. workforce

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 105


FULL STEAM

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY


UD 107


Project Type: Architecture & Urban Design - Student Work Educational Institution: Columbia University Partner: Ahmed Jawdat, Mayra Mahmood, Yang Liao, Zarith Pineda Location: No Man’s Land, Jordan


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS AMMAN, JORDAN


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

No Man’s Land: A Water Commons is a commentary to the humanitarian crisis in the informal camps in the North-Eastern border zone between the Syrian and Jordanian berms, where over 80,000 refugees are stranded. Rather than viewing the zone as a holding area, this project proposes to reimagine the berm as an inhabitable productive landscape.

AMMAN, JORDAN


By using fog harvesting, waste water management, permaculture and landscaping techniques, the project creates the possibility of an autonomous No Man’s Land. Through the harvesting of this scarce resource not only is a humanitarian crisis mitigated but it proposes to create a different strategy for organizing emergency migration and a long term ecological solution for Jordan’s water infrastructure.

UD 111


AID AND HUMANITARIAN EFFORTS

3

1

4 13

6 11

5 2

NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

9 12 8

7

10

11

10 9 12

1. Ottoman Empire 2. Arabi a 3. Syria 4. Lebanon 5. Trans-Jorda n 6. Ira q 7. Egypt 8. Saudi Arabi a 9. Israe l 10. West Ban k 11. Gaza 12. Jordan 13. No Man’s Land

The once permeable borders of the Middle East have hardened more and more dividing people, ecologies, and resources. This has created a series of forced exiles across the region. Jordan has housed refugees throughout the history of the Modern Middle East and faces strain on its resources, particularly water. A border once drawn with a ruler has now been delineated as a zone through the construction of eastern berms by the Syrian and Jordanian Governments. This zone became a “No Man’s Land.”

AMMAN, JORDAN


OIL

lentils | chick peas | white beans

1-5 people

30 kg

10 k g1

6+ peopl e

60 kg

20 kg

k g2

2 kg

k g3

4 kg

L

6 L4

2 kg x 3

kg x 3

UD 113


THE BERM

NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

Since 2011, The Jordan-Syria border has become the point of entry of a mass exodus of Syrian refugees. As the situation in Syria worsened, hundreds of thousands of people emigrated to Jordan by land. As the North-western border crossings began to close, refugees were forced to cross through the desert on the Eastern section of the Jordan-Syria border. Having transformed from an informal crossing to a militarized formal crossing point, the passage of Syrians fleeing through No Man’s Land was eventually blocked, turning it into a de-facto refugee camp within the border. The berms began to swell with refugees at two main points, Rukban (with around 77,500 refugees) and Hadalat (with around 7,500 refugees). Currently, there are two berms along the edges of the 1916 Sykes Picot Jordan-Syria border line - a line flanked by the aforementioned berms creating a seven kilometer wide “No Man’s Land.” The southern berm delineates the official point of entry into Jordan.

AMMAN, JORDAN


UD 115


CURRENT CLIMATIC ADVANTAGE

We analyzed fog patterns across the region to see where the greatest amount of fog could be harvested. Fog is produced when the heat absorbed by the earth during the day is released into the atmosphere during night, mixing with cool wind. The greater the temperature difference, the greater the amount of fog. This inversion makes arid climates optimal for fog harvesting.

NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

To ameliorate the current conditions facing refugees at the berm, the existing placement and congregations of tents were analyzed then compared with the UNHCR Emergency Guidelines for refugee camps community standards. Constructed sand berms serviced with facilities are proposed as an infrastructure to cluster refugees and service them as a clustering unit. Each berm cluster will consist approximately of 40 families, roughly 200 people. A range that is serviced by combinations of fog towers that can collect 800-2000 liters daily and shaded fog wells that can collect around 500 liters a day.

AMMAN, JORDAN


POSSIBILITY OF FOG

MORE FOG

LESS FOG

UD 117


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

SITE TRANSFORMATION

The site is transformed through a phasing strategy: 1. The puncturing of the berm using on site tractors to allow resources entrance. 2. Humanitarian aid trucks drop off resources to construct the shaded fog collector. 3. Installation and assembly of the shaded fog collectors and solar panels. 4. Refugees begin to cluster around fog collector. 5. Additional resources trucked to the site to build fog towers and the backbone sanitation service infrastructure. AMMAN, JORDAN


6. Cut & Fill topography: Tractors begin creating a keyline from berm to plant, allowing water to channel from the cluster into the permaculture. Permaculture begins. 7. Repetition of phases 1-6, accounting for aeolian processes to strengthen berm integrity and mass to create a “berm cluster.� 8. Once the permaculture systems have matured, harvesting of food and resources such as date trees can begin to self sustain communities.

UD 119


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

BERM CLUSTER

AMMAN, JORDAN


UD 121


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

WATER SYSTEM CYCLE

The shaded fog structure can be constructed by refugees from on site material. The structure is built out of palm wood while the mesh is knitted from ration sacks used to transport aid. This structure harvests enough drinking water while providing shade and congregational spaces. Some configurations have been designed to harvest solar power for electricity. The large fog tower is built similarly but has the ability to harvest more water.

AMMAN, JORDAN


The spiral structure carries the water collected from fog into an underground reservoir tank. The water collected is then channeled into the service spaces, permaculture and shaded fog catchers. Clean water from the fog collectors is channeled into the showers and greywater into the latrines. The black water is channeled through the back of a berm into a constructed wetland to filter the water so it can be used for irrigation in the permaculture landscape.

UD 123


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

WATER SYSTEM CYCLE

AMMAN, JORDAN


UD 125


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

AMMAN, JORDAN


The Jordan Response Plan for the Syrian Crisis has received aid from organizations such as UNICEF, UNHCR, Red cross and other NGO’s to provide resources to Syrian Refugees. The plan has allotted 2.6 billion dollars’ worth of aid, while our initially proposed intervention in Hadalat would cost roughly $110,000.

UD 127


NO MAN’S LAND: A WATER COMMONS

FUTURE SCENARIOS

The project seeks to respond to a humanitarian conflict created by a political conflict. However, the conflict may remain keeping people in holding for the foreseeable future, a scenario that begs the question - if the conflict subsides and refugees are able to return home - will this area become a ruin? Perhaps, a memorial of a precarious moment in time. Ecological scenario embraces a future once the borders open and the refugees leave to be with their family. The fog catchers would continue to collect water and the permaculture would continue to grow, forming a wild ecological landscape.

AMMAN, JORDAN


Could No Man’s Land turn into a future Megacity? Megacity scenario embraces a future if the borders take longer than expected to open and this become populated as a self-sustainable city.

UD 129


Project Type: Construction Documents - Student Work Educational Institution: Pratt Institute Location: Malibu, CA


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS Malibu, CA


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

MALIBU, CA


ARCH 133


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

MALIBU, CA


ARCH 135


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

MALIBU, CA


ARCH 137


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

MALIBU, CA


ARCH 139


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

MALIBU, CA


ARCH 141


Project Type: Personal - Student Work Educational Institution: Pratt Institute Location: Various


HAND DRAWINGS Various Locations


HAND DRAWINGS

HAND DRAWINGS

The following are a few of the hand-drawings I have done during my time as a student at Pratt. Space, light and form were explored through a series of representational techniques. The human body is one of the most complex forms where light and space interacts in interesting ways. Once this interaction and the creation of space was captured and understood, one was able to create their own complex space where the play between form and light exists. Below the perspective drawings there is an axon and section study of a sub-sequential cube design. Each component is critical in opening the box, and it is analyzed as three interlocking moments.

VARIOUS LOCATIONS


ARCH 145


HAND DRAWINGS

Pratt’s Library Perspective

VARIOUS LOCATIONS


Pratt’s Engine Room Perspective

ARCH 147


HAND DRAWINGS

Wooden Puzzle Box with Sequence Opening

VARIOUS LOCATIONS


Larger Wooden Puzzle Box with Sequence Opening

ARCH 149


Project Type: Website Design, Graphic Design & Branding Business Type: Online Business - Blog Website URL: thedreamdoer.com


THE DREAM DOER WEB-WIDE


WEB DESIGN

The Dream Doer is a project that required the application of branding and coding techniques on Squarespace to create a cohesive, clean website and user interface. The branding colors and icons give the website the intended personality display with a bit of character. The logo icon is composed of a lightbulb that is combined with a pen. It symbolizes the conceptual ideas becoming tangible as they are sketched and planned through pen and paper. The pen is normally the means by which people begin developing ideas. It acts as the agent to transforms your ideas into a tangible inked reality, helping you clarify your vision so you can make it happen. This is the emphasis go the website, the journey or going from a dreamer to a doer.

THE DREAM DOER

The graphics were made to seem like sketches or hand drawn images. The icons are simple line sketches, whereas the main pages introductions, such as the contact page, about page and the newsletter subscription page, have a sketch linework with highlighted colorings. The image templates aid in the creation of blog posts graphics ready for social media marketing.

WEB-WIDE


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GRAPHICS

THE DREAM DOER

Contact Page

About Page

WEB-WIDE


Newsletter Subscription Page

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THE DREAM DOER

HOMEPAGE

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THE DREAM DOER

INFOGRAPHICS

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THE DREAM DOER

TRAVEL MAPS

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GF

Gabriela Fiorentino Complete Portfolio  
Gabriela Fiorentino Complete Portfolio