Page 1

Sustainability


Founded over 39 years ago, FXCollaborative is an architectural, interior design, planning, and urban design firm committed to design excellence, social responsibility, and sustainability. With offices in New York and Washington, DC, our projects have been internationally recognized with numerous design and sustainability awards and press coverage each year. Our diverse portfolio of projects includes work of all types and scales throughout the world, and is based on our core commitment to enriching the built environment by creating projects with social, environmental, and aesthetic integrity. Our approach is inherent in all of our projects, serving as a guiding principle for achieving goals of design excellence, innovation, and civic responsibility. We recognize that each project has a unique ecosystem, yet we strive to integrate project objectives within broader social and

environmental missions. We employ an energetic, collaborative design process supported by effective leadership and open communication. This approach establishes a working environment of trust that enables clients to make fullyinformed decisions prior to and throughout the design process, reach consensus, move forward to the successful completion of the project, and beyond into post-occupancy. FXCollaborative believes that collaboration within the greater community is essential to the restoration of our planet. Members of the firm routinely provide leadership in civic, sociological, and sustainability initiatives. This commitment allows us to bring a unique

perspective to every project that fosters innovation, relevance, and timelessness in the work. By embracing this broader view, our projects achieve harmony between client, user, site, community, and the natural environment. FXCollaborative is structured around design studios, which allows us to master a variety of typologies including Planning/ Urban Design; Infrastructure/ Transportation; Office Buildings; Mixed-Use; Retail; Multi-Family Residential; Cultural Facilities; K-12 and Higher Education Institutions; Corporate; Not-forProfits; and Interiors projects. Partners direct each project and our teams collaborate to best meet our diverse projects’ needs.


Table of Contents About Us

Why Sustainability Matters Our History of Sustainability How We Achieve Environmental Responsibility An Integrated Project Approach Research and Innovation Environmental Analysis Resilient Design Sustainable Design Experts

Select Sustainable Projects Green Building Concerns

Green Roofs Sustainability Guidelines Pre- & Post-Occupancy Evaluation Services

Pre- & Post-Occupancy Surveys Pre- & Post-Occupancy Benchmarking

References

LEED Projects Recent Sustainable Design Awards Our Sustainability Services Leadership Glossary of Sustainable Terms


Why Sustainability Matters During the last half-century, the world’s population has collectively become more prosperous and grown exponentially, placing unprecedented strains on the environment that challenge the ability of the earth to sustain itself. Current demands for natural resources exceed the earth’s regenerative capacity and are predicted to rise dramatically in the coming years. Greenhouse gas emissions are steadily increasing as the result of human activity, and have reached levels that are measurably changing the earth’s climate. Uncontrolled sprawl has contributed to significant reductions of the world’s forests and other natural environments—compromising climate, air quality, and biodiversity.

Our cities, homes, places of business and leisure, and the infrastructure that surrounds them have a profound impact on our planet. In the United States, the built environment accounts for over 30% of greenhouse gas emissions, 65% of waste output, and 74% of electricity consumption. At FXCollaborative, we stress the designer’s obligation to repair and restore the state of the environment. As the largest contributor of greenhouse gases, and as a major consumer of materials, buildings are an important part of the solution. By rethinking how we design, from individual structures to entire communities, we can have a significant impact.

Green buildings and walkable high-density communities linked by mass transit and public green spaces emit fewer greenhouse gases, are less polluting, and use substantially fewer natural resources than their conventional low-density counterparts. Sustainable design impacts our health and well-being. Increased natural light, clean water, improved air quality, and greater connections to the natural world improve productivity, reduce healthcare costs, and contribute to the longterm welfare of our society.


FXCollaborative projects continue to set new standards in environmentally-responsible design. Our project teams are currently working towards achieving goals of carbon neutrality, the 2030 Challenge, the Passivhaus standard, and tenets of the Living Building Challenge.

PROJECTS FXCollaborative has built upon the knowledge of Founding Principal Emeritus Bruce Fowle, whose early experience designing solarresponsive, naturally-ventilated homes led FXCollaborative to become a pioneer in the green building movement. These early explorations led to an innovative approach rooted in conservationist values. FXCollaborative soon became known for taking sustainable design to new heights with the first green high-rise in Shanghai, the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (1992); and in New York, the Condé Nast Building at 4 Times Square (1999). As the first green skyscraper in the United States, 4 Times Square’s

unprecedented integration of sustainable design principles and technologies—all implemented for the first time at this scale— galvanized the green building movement and was a catalyst for the development of the USGBC’s LEED rating system. The firm’s pioneering Battery Park City Sustainable Guidelines propelled sustainable development in New York City. These founding values continue to inspire the firm to advance sustainable design to help improve the state of the planet. FXCollaborative projects represent the assimilation of years of knowledge and technical expertise building sustainable environments congruous with clients’ values.

Our work has a distinguished record of achieving performance metrics of sustainability and energy-efficiency, including LEED, ENERGY STAR, the 2030 Challenge, and other international rating systems. We have an extensive sustainable building portfolio, with more than 11 million square feet of LEED Registered or Certified space, including seven Platinum Certified and eight Gold Certified projects. These projects range in typology from historic buildings to city masterplans, and in scale from commercial interiors to urban skyscrapers.


COMMUNITY Civic engagement is a core value of FXCollaborative. The firm supports organizations dedicated to environmental stewardship, social responsibility, and design excellence. We are a long standing supporter of the US Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on the Environment (AIA COTE), and a founding member of the ASHRAE-NY Sustainability

Committee. Members of the firm hold key leadership positions in professional organizations and regularly participate as advisors, such as on Mayor Bloomberg’s Green Codes Task Force and the Urban Green Council’s Building Resiliency Task Force. Firm Leaders are regular speakers on sustainability. Presentations include IBM’s Smart Buildings Conference, the World Sustainable Building Conference, USGBC’s

Greenbuild, USGBC NY’s Urban Green Conference, the Living Future unConference, Fortune Brainstorm Green, and national, state, and local AIA conferences. Teaching is an important part of our practice; we share our knowledge of sustainable design as adjunct faculty and guest lecturers at several universities including Cornell, New York University, and Columbia University.

also provides secure bicycle racks and access to showers to encourage cycling to work, as well as tax deductible mass transit benefits and a car service that supplies hybrid vehicles. FXCollaborative is committed to minimizing our environmental impact, both in office operations and travel. Office renovations have improved overall energy efficiency, earning us recognition

as a winner of the EPA’s ENERGY STAR Small Business Award 2008, the first ever awarded to an architecture firm. We are currently undergoing a lighting retrofit that we anticipate will save 15-20% of our electricity use. As well, we are participating in a plug load study in order to reduce energy consumption from computers and other equipment.

WORKPLACE Our workplace reflects our commitment to sustainable design. We endeavor to continually improve our office practices though our sustainable operations plan. Elimination of bottled water and disposable dishware, recycling, and a full composting program are some of the ways that we enable employees to contribute to a better environment. The firm


FXCollaborative’s Green October: Plastic Bag Exhibition


OUR CARBON NEUTRAL OFFICE FXCollaborative is the first architectural firm to participate in the EPA’s Climate Leaders Program. We have been calculating our office carbon footprint annually, including

50 CO2-E

100 CO2-E

150 CO2-E

electricity use, refrigerant recharge, employee commuting and business travel. In addition to promoting energy-efficient strategies, we purchase Renewable Energy Certificates

and Carbon Offsets to account for our annual carbon footprint. As of 2008, we are a carbon neutral company.

200 CO2-E

400 CO2-E

250 CO2-E

300 CO2-E

350 CO2-E

450 CO2-E

500 CO2-E

CO2-E

Per Employee

2008

2.7

2009

2.8

2010

3.7

2011

3.8

2012

4.2

2013

3.8

2014

2.8

2015

2.6

2016

2.9

2017

2.6 Refrigerants

Commuting

Car Services

Train

Air Travel

Electricity


How We Achieve Environmental Responsibility

The New York Times Building


FXCollaborative has cultivated an ethos of environmental responsibility throughout the firm’s history. 80% of our professional staff is LEED AP or GA, including 100% of the firm’s partnership, and every project is developed through a sustainable framework.

Before the terms “green” and LEED became commonplace, FXCollaborative began designing environmentally-responsible benchmark projects. We perceive sustainability as an inherent component of successful design and technical innovation. Our values attract staff who are committed to these concerns and do not regard them as an afterthought. Similarly, we collaborate with clients and consultants who work toward these ideals.

Our employees are our most valuable sustainable design resource. We cultivate their knowledge and passion through on-going educational seminars, in-house workgroups, and by participating in conferences and competitions that stretch their ideas beyond the status-quo. Led by our Director of Sustainability, FXCollaborative’s in-house “Team Green” serves as the firm’s research group on sustainability. The workgroup has members within each studio, from junior staff to senior partnership. Team Green members develop and share project research and lessons learned across the studios. Employees are also actively involved with organizations such as the USGBC, AIA COTE, ASHRAE, and Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC), and the Passivhaus Institute, keeping abreast of the latest innovations and sharing knowledge throughout the firm and the greater design community.

The firm has developed several in-house resources to ensure the highest level of sustainability possible. Products in our resource library are labeled as per the FXCollaborative Sustainability Materials Index, evaluating environmental product criteria to facilitate informed choices of materials. We have developed base green specifications that eliminate the use of certain products and require contractors to undertake environmentally-responsible construction practices. Staff track initiatives from schematic design to postconstruction through our project Green QA/QC Checklist, and collect environmental performance data through our centralized database. Our Director of Sustainability conducts regular project reviews to ensure sustainability is ongoing from pre-concept through post-occupancy.


An Integrated Project Approach

Design Charette


Our holistic design approach relies on professionals with both broad and specialized expertise, working in an open and inclusive process.

At the onset of each project, we facilitate a series of sustainability workshops with the owner, engineers, interior designer, landscape architect, construction manager, and other key team members. The workshops enable this diverse group to work collaboratively in establishing sustainable project goals, and to develop a framework and roadmap for realizing them. Because of this collaborative approach, our teams are founded on relationships of experience, creativity, cooperation, and communication. Our role is to guide and orchestrate the realization of these environmental objectives within the greater context of aesthetic, programmatic, economic, and technical requirements.

We begins each design process with a comprehensive environmental analysis. Using building performance modeling software, we develop an early understanding of the environmental conditions of a project site, including temperature, humidity, daylight hours, insolation, precipitation, cloud cover, wind, and other seasonal variations. This preliminary analysis informs our concept development, enabling us to integrate environmentallyresponsive passive strategies from a project’s inception. As the project evolves, we continue to use these tools to evaluate thermal performance of building envelope details and to understand the impact of specifying selected products. Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a natural fit for FXCollaborative’s integrated approach, providing a powerful tool to interweave sustainable and tectonic design strategies.

BIM assists the team in evaluating how design decisions relate to environmental conditions, and enables us to optimize building performance. The results of these analyses help us achieve more ambitious sustainability goals. For us, a sustainable building does not end at project completion. Following construction, we have developed in-house post-occupancy analysis surveys and reports, evaluating building performance and occupant comfort. We frequently develop sustainable guidelines, manuals, and educational programs for occupants and facility managers to ensure that a project remains as environmentally-responsible as possible throughout its lifetime.


Research and Innovation

Research initiatives are key to the advancement of sustainable innovation at FXCollaborative.

Research initiatives are key to the advancement of sustainable innovation at FXCollaborative. From our early collaborations with the Rocky Mountain Institute on the CondĂŠ Nast Building, more recent work with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories on the New York Times Building, to current collaborations with multiple universities, we seek to advance knowledge in order to provide higher performance projects and contribute to the greater body of sustainable design knowledge. Some of our current and ongoing research initiatives include:

Innovations in Building Enclosure Design Innovative strategies for highperformance building enclosures are an inherent component of our design investigations. Using parametric tools, energy analysis, physical modeling, and through collaborations with manufacturers, we have developed customized facade systems that optimize daylight and views while reducing radiant solar loads and internal heat loss. We have incorporated elements such as planted walls and building integrated photovoltaics into the facade system. Careful integration of these components and collaboration with engineers and fabricators have led to successful innovations on several of our projects.

Bird Safe Buildings FXCollaborative has been a pioneer in research and development regarding Bird Safe Buildings. In collaboration with the National Audubon Society and the American Bird Conservancy, we have been testing bird safe glazing and other strategies on projects such as the Center for Global Conservation and the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. As well, we are working with various glazing manufacturers to beta-test solutions involving specialized coatings and frit pattern configurations. Members of the firm served as contributing authors to the New York City Bird Safe Building guidelines and lecture extensively on the subject.


Enclosure Design—Daylight Study: The New York Times Building

Bird Safe Buildings: Sample Glass Pattern

Green Roof Performance: Jacob K Javits Convention Center Renovation

Green Roof Performance FXCollaborative is collaborating with Drexel University on a climate study that utilizes the new green roof at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. The 6.7 acre roof, the second largest in the country, will serve as a subject for investigations into the urban heat island effect, stormwater management, and energy efficiency. Phasing of the green roof installation will permit simultaneous study of before and after roof conditions. Due to the exceptionally large scale of the roof, the team hopes to gather more accurate information on the impacts of green roofs within urban environments. The data collected on the Javits roof will contribute to a greater body of information Drexel is compiling and analyzing from multiple Green Infrastructure monitoring sites throughout New York City.

Receptacle Loads The firm participated in a plug load energy efficiency study carried out by ThinkEco, Inc. Modlets, monitoring devices that track energy consumption, have been installed in select outlets in FXCollaborative’s offices. These devices are tracking energy consumption of workstations and other devices such as printers, copiers, and coffee machines. The study will help contribute to a better understanding of workstation energy consumption and human behavior patterns regarding energy efficiency.

University Collaborations We believe that a strong interface with the university community is critical to the continuing evolution of sustainable design. Members of the firm teach lecture and serve as critics at various universities—including Columbia, Cornell, UPenn and New York University—focusing on topics ranging from innovative approaches to high-performance retrofits to sustainable real estate development. We also collaborated with Tulane University and IBM on the Smart Buildings Initiative for the renovation of Richardson Memorial Hall, which will engage students as active participants in optimizing the building’s performance.


Environmental Analysis

Environmental analysis is an inherent part of our design process. FXCollaborative uses a range of early analysis tools to support our Performance Informed Design approach.

We employ a variety of software programs to evaluate daylight, glare, solar heat gain, shading, building energy use and thermal conductivity, amongst others. These tools serve as an integrated part of our design process—we use them iteratively to inform building orientation, percentage and position of glazing, integration of appropriate shading devices, and exterior wall design. As we develop various design options, we apply analytics to test their performance and refine specific strategies.

Critical to our process is evaluating which tools are most effective in understanding and optimizing a specific environmental condition. At the onset of a project, our Director of Sustainability and Director of Design Technology work with the design team to determine what types of analysis are needed and how to best undertake them. For example, when evaluating sustainable materials, a simple spreadsheet tool can at times be most effective.

Our Director of Design Technology and Sustainability Coordinator regularly betatest new analysis tools in development. Currently, we have been investigating software that provides energy and daylight analytics at the Urban Design scale. We have also been employing parametric design software to solve more complex problems, such as providing solar shading devices while preserving key views.

Alexandra Pollock, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Director of Design Technology intersection and overlap of Alexandra has been instrumental disciplines and how they inform in development methodologies each other. She feels that ranging from generative design technology plays an important using computation and analysis, role in these relationships, and to overall project collaboration has the ability to create a more and delivery using Building informed and integrated process. Information Modeling. She has a particular interest in the


SAMPLE DIVA ILLUMINANCE STUDIES March 21

June 21

September 21

December 21

9am

73.4% of area between 25-300 fc 7.6% of are >300 fc

72.4% of area between 25-300 fc 7% of are >300 fc

73.4% of area between 25-300 fc 7.6% of are >300 fc

65.1% of area between 25-300 fc 15.3% of are >300 fc

3pm

76.7% of area between 25-300 fc 14.2% of are >300 fc

76.9% of area between 25-300 fc 8.9% of are >300 fc

76.7% of area between 25-300 fc 14.2% of are >300 fc

75.8% of area between 25-300 fc 21.3% of are >300 fc

25 Illuminance, fc 71 117

Usable 162 Daylight Range 208 254 300 < 25 too dark > 300 glare

SAMPLE SEFAIRA ENERGY ANALYSIS Baseline

Annual Energy Consumption (kBTU)

2,364,014 55 1,231,300 35,763 148

EUI (kBTU/ft 2) Annual Space Cooling (kBTU) Annual Space Heating (kBTU) Peak Space Cooling (ton)

Detailed Results: Graphs from Baseline

Current Ripple with E/W fins 6” longer

(between baseline E/W fins longer)

Current Ripple with S fins 6” longer

2,286,914

 3.3%

53

 3.6%

1,150,981

 6.5%

39,763

 9.1%

140

 5.3%

Monthly Consumption (kBTU) 250000

Hot Water Space Heating Electric Heating

kBTU

Cooling

2,285,007

 3.3%

2,284,063

 3.4%

53

 3.6%

53

 3.6%

1,149,053

 6.7%

1,148,638

 6.7%

39,043

 9.1%

39,043

 9.2%

140

 5.3%

139

 5.6%

Infiltration Ventilation Conduction Solar

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Month

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

0

Equipment Lighting

600000

Occupant

40000

(between baseline and all fins longer)

700000

Lighting

60000

Delta

Monthly Heat Gain (kBTU) Equipment

Occupant Infiltration

500000

Ventilation

400000

Conduction Solar

300000 200000

20000

50000 0

Current Ripple with all fins 6” longer

80000

Fan

100000

Delta

Monthly Heat Loss (kBTU) Lighting

150000

(between baseline and S fins longer)

100000

Appliances

200000

kBTU

Typical results for all cases. The values vary, but the distribution of the variables are very similar.

Delta

kBTU

FIN MODIFICATIONS

100000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Month

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

0

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Month

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec


Resilient Design

The recent extreme weather events of Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy have brought the issue of building resiliency to the foreground in the Northeast region.

Designing or renovating a building for climate change resiliency can have significant impacts on the architecture, building systems and surrounding urban context. Building codes and the building owner together determine the degree to which a building remains resilient. Location of critical mechanical and electrical equipment, provision for additional on site power generation, elevating the ground floor, temporary barriers, a higher performance envelope, and dedicated areas of refuge are strategies to be addressed, amongst others. We have been at the forefront of climate change adaptation and resilient design and advocacy.

In 2008, Founding Principal Emeritus Bruce Fowle and Director of Sustainability Ilana Judah served on NYC Mayor Bloomberg’s Green Codes Task Force on the Climate Change Adaptation Committee. This committee put forth recommendations such as using updated flood maps and incorporating strategies for adaptation during blackouts. Following Superstorm Sandy, Bruce Fowle served on the Urban Green Council’s Building Resiliency Task Force which produced 33 recommendations to be legislated. As well, Ilana Judah served on AIA NY’s Resiliency Task Force, coauthoring the White Paper entitled “Where Mitigation Meets Adaptation: An Integrated Approach to Addressing Climate Change in New York City.” Ilana also served as an organizer and jury member in the recent

resilient housing competition, FAR ROC [For a Resilient Rockaway]. We are part of a multidisciplinary team currently evaluating the feasibility of constructing a multi-purpose levee along the East River in Lower Manhattan to protect the city against storm surges and rising sea levels. Known as “Seaport City,” the concept was one of the preliminary recommendations made in Mayor Bloomberg’s “A Stronger, More Resilient New York” report following Hurricane Sandy. By integrating development along the levee and extending the area with new development opportunities, the project aims to pay for itself and for other resiliency measures around the city.


+3L House Urban Green Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Emerging Professionals Competition, 3rd Place


Sustainable Design Experts

Our holistic design approach relies on professionals with both broad and specialized expertise, working in an open and inclusive process.

We have a longstanding and robust expertise in sustainable design, demonstrated in our 80% LEED AP or LEED GA staff, as well as the specialized knowledge of our in-house “Team Green” and sustainable design experts. Team Green meets bi-weekly to review projects, discuss the latest green strategies and technologies, and establish priorities to further our culture of environmental responsibility and how it manifests in the projects we design. Sustainability touches on almost all aspects of design and construction. As key members of Team Green, our in-house sustainable design experts provide deeper knowledge

on particular areas, serving as a resource to all projects within the firm, and in some instances as experts within the broader design community. Daniel Piselli, AIA, LEED, CPHD Director of Sustainability Dan leads the Exterior Wall Workgroup at FXCollaborative. He is a Certified Passive House Designer (CPHD) of the German Passive House standard, which has a focus on high performance exterior walls. Dan is developing strategies to scale Passive House up from its house-scale origins in Europe to large scale buildings in the US. Dan is also an industry leader on bird-friendly building design. He is a board member of the Bird-Safe Glass Foundation and contributed to New York City Audubon’s BirdSafe Building Guidelines.

Michael Buesing, AIA, LEED AP, CPHD Systems Integration Michael concentrates on research in the area of integration of architecture and building systems. The goal is to transform the design process to consider building system and energy efficiency earlier, ultimately resulting in better and more sustainably designed buildings. His current initiatives include research on the Integrated Design Process, research on innovative mechanical systems, and compiling a systems integration database for office wide reference.


Daniel Piselli

Michael Buesing

Bob Cuk, AIA, LEED AP Pre- & Post-Occupancy Evaluations Bob’s experience in program intensive user-focused projects was a natural segue to help develop the firm’s process for pre- and post-occupancy evaluations. Bob has developed and implemented projectspecific program and indoor environmental quality surveys that have improved the user experience for several of the firm’s cultural, education, and interiors projects. These evaluations have not only helped address project issues, but have helped refine our design process for future work.

Bob Cuk

Peter E. Olney, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, GRP Green Construction and Specifications Peter is the Chair of our Standards/Quality Assurance Work Group. Recognizing the critical role that specifications play in the design of sustainable buildings, Peter works with project teams to produce effective and comprehensive green specifications. Peter also provides Construction Phase Services to ensure that sustainable design strategies and technologies are effectively implemented.

Peter E. Olney


Select Sustainable Projects


Green Building Concerns Beyond carbon emissions and reduction, buildings play a key role in most significant environmental issues, both in their contribution to the problem—and to the solution. SITE Development of previously undeveloped sites consumes land and potentially encroaches on wetlands and water bodies, or disrupts existing ecosystems and habitats. Environmental damage caused by construction may take years of work to remedy. Suburban sprawl is a significant contributor to deforestation and takeover of smaller farmsteads. Furthermore, sprawl increases fossil-fuel consumption and

carbon emissions due to larger home sizes, primary reliance on single occupant vehicles, high infrastructure ratios, and farther distances for transportation of goods and services. Paving roadways and surface parking lots on these areas creates stormwater runoff problems, contributing to soil erosion and water contamination. The non-vegetated asphalt surfaces absorb heat and

change the temperature and microclimate, causing the “heat island effect.” Building and planning practices can help curb these problems by developing on previously constructed sites in dense urban environments, locating projects near efficient public transportation, creating walkable and cyclable communities, designing green spaces and roofs, and promoting a culture of quality over quantity.

emit harmful pollutants that contribute to air, land, and water pollution, and are linked to health problems such as asthma, lung cancer, and heart attacks. A major consequence of energy consumption from fossil fuels is the release of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. Melting of the polar ice caps, increased temperatures, intensity and frequency of storms, and sea

level rise have created droughts and food shortages, displaced communities, and caused billions of dollars of related damage. Buildings can affect a major change towards stabilizing current environmental conditions by optimizing their efficiency and reducing energy consumption, and favoring use of non-polluting renewable sources.

ENERGY Buildings consume about 39% of the energy and 74% of the electricity produced annually in the US, the largest consumer of energy in the world. The negative impacts of excessive energy production diminish nonrenewable resources, degrade land and natural habitats, devastate ecosystems, and contribute to global conflicts. Coal-fired electrical plants

MATERIALS & RESOURCES Building and construction activities worldwide consume 3 billion tons of raw materials each year or 40% of total global use. Primary resource extraction is responsible for disruption of ecosystems, species extinction, erosion of mineral-rich top soil, water pollution, and displacement of humans. Destruction of first– growth forests for construction and finish wood reduces their important role as regulators of the earth’s temperature,

and as significant carbon sinks. As well, extraction and manufacturing at great distances from the construction site results in increased fossil fuel use for transportation and overall embodied energy. Demolition and construction waste account for 40% of the solid waste stream in the United States, creating unnecessary landfill, and inciting unwarranted extraction of additional resources when existing ones could be

reused or recycled. Proper reclamation and recycling in buildings can reduce solid waste by as much as 70%. Practices such as right-sizing buildings, reuse of existing facilities and materials, and specifying products that are local, recycled, rapidly-renewable, or sustainably harvested will minimize the strain of natural resource extraction and reduce embodied energy.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY In the US, we spend over 90% of our time indoors. Indoor pollutant levels in buildings can run from 2-5 times higher than outdoor levels, and the majority of human exposure to pollutants comes from indoor air. Health related consequences of poor air quality such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;sick-building syndromeâ&#x20AC;? have been a major concern and cause of significant healthcare, legal, and building expenditures. Children, who

have increased susceptibility to respiratory illness and asthma, are especially vulnerable to poor indoor air quality. Exposure to harmful chemicals can also lead to learning disabilities, cancer, and nervous system damage. Improved indoor environments are also tied to increased occupant comfort and productivity. With salaries being the most significant cost to most organizations, increasing

efficiency and reducing absenteeism is important to any establishment. Exposure to natural light and views has been proven to elevate performance, increase retail sales, and contribute to overall employee satisfaction. User control of ventilation, temperature, and artificial lighting adds to productivity gains, as well as reducing operations and maintenance costs.

for almost 14% of potable water consumption, contributing to reductions of water levels of aquifers by as much as 150 feet. Water pollution and diminishing availability of clean sources is already a widespread and dire problem in many parts of the world. Discharged water carries contaminants such as nitrogen, toxic metals, hormones, and bacteria that have caused 1/3

of US lakes, streams, and rivers to be unsafe for swimming or fishing. Water pollutants have infiltrated the food chain and are linked to various health problems and diseases along the food chain. Reducing water consumption in buildings and ensuring its proper purification will ease the burden on both demand and decontamination concerns.

WATER Population growth and demand for higher standards of living have significantly increased consumption of potable water, placing pressure on aquifers and other supply sources, as well as energy and infrastructure for purification and conveyance. In the US, water consumption between 1990 and 2000 increased 12% to over 43 billion gallons daily. Buildings account

BIOPHILIA AND HUMAN WELL-BEING Responsible environmental practices in buildings have a direct and interconnected relationship with human health and well-being. More people work in sedentary jobs in urban or suburban environments than ever before, and have fewer opportunities throughout their day to connect to the natural world, or engage in physical activity. Fast-paced virtual

Source: USGBC

environments and fast-food create stresses on the body that are the catalyst for many ailments. Sustainable building strategies related to site, energy, water, materials, and indoor environment all play a part in contributing to the health of the planet and all species, including people. Programming and planning can further improve human wellbeing by encouraging physical

mobility within a building and the surrounding environment, establishing connections to the natural world, and promoting a sustainable lifestyle through urban planning. Green buildings also educate and create awareness amongst users, encouraging them to reflect upon and potentially change unhealthy habits.


Nordhavnen: City Regenerative

Awards Copenhagen, Denmark Competition 2008 500 Acres / 200 Hectares

2012 Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design, Green GOOD DESIGN Award 2010 The Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2010 MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Awards, Regeneration & Masterplanning

3

4

1

2

2

1 Mass Transit

3

Vertical Farms

4

On-Site Prefabricated Construction

District Sea Water Thermal Exchange

Compact Development Land Preservation

Wind Turbine Energy

Habitat Creation

Rainwater Collection Greywater Treatment


FXCollaborative participated in an international competition for the Nordhavnen district in Copenhagen, Denmark. This 200-hectare waterfront site is currently a container port and cruise ship terminal. The competition brief called for urban planning and innovative architectural strategies to create a dynamic and sustainable city poised for growth over the next 50 years. The new district is expected to house 40,000 residents, create 40,000 jobs, and provide access for 40,000 bicycles. FXCollaborativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision, entitled City Regenerative, connects urban infrastructure, extends the existing waterway, and weaves open space through a series of neighborhoods and commercial nodes. The project sets a new standard for low-carbon consumption.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES Net Positive,

Carbon Neutral Development

100% Wind Energy for Electrical Power

25GW

of Electricity Fed Back to Grid Annually

370 Acres of New Habitat Created

A quilt of greenways intermixed with transit and waterways enables convenient access to multiple modes of transportation, open space, and natural areas. The project sets a new standard for low-carbon consumption by satisfying all of its energy needs,

optimizing water resources and recovery, minimizing and naturally filtering waste, and recycling materials and buildings. On-site manufactured housing will reduce waste, embodied energy, and carbon emissions.

54%

Open Space

90%

Rainfall Collected

60%

Potable Water Reduction

FEATURE: SITE Vertical Farms In order to create a totally self-sustaining community, the design team proposed that fruit and vegetables be farmed year-round in vertical towers. An emerging technology, vertical farms are likely to become more common in the near future. Unlike conventional farming, urban-based, locally-farmed produce requires little energy to

transport. Vertical farms promise to be highly-efficient, with significantly higher yields and reduced plant disease and crop failure. In addition to supplying produce, the vertical farm towers at Nordhavnen would treat water from the surrounding area and generate electricity. PRESSURIZED-TREATED WATER OUT GREYWATER IN BLACKWATER IN LOCAL HEATING (OUT)

WATER TOWERS

ROTATED VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINES

FARMERS MARKET WATER TREATMENT PLANT WASTE/RECYCLING COLLECTION POINT FOOD DISTRIBUTION PIER SYS EXHAUST SYS INTAKE DISTRICT SEA WATER HEATING/ COOLING PLANT


Canal District, Waterfront

Dubai, UAE

Awards

Nakheel Properties

2007 MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Award, Commendation

Completion 2010 500 Acres / 200 Hectares

1

7

4

7

3

5 2

1

6

Urban Density

2 Microclimate Water Fingers

4

3 Public Green Spaces

6

5 District-Wide Cooling

Reflective Materials

Light Rail System

Maximize Daylight & Views

7 Bioclimatic Street Orientation


FXCollaborative has master planned 200 hectares of land as the largest new sustainable mixed-use development in a high-growth district within the UAE, designed to the standards of U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND). The master plan divides the site into eight smaller districts pierced with water canals and connected by a new light rail system and a series of parks and pedestrian boulevards. Careful massing of low-, mid-, and high-rise buildings allows a cohesive urban fabric to emerge. FXCollaborative’s sustainable guidelines mandate that all future buildings on site will be LEED Gold, and that, through a total system approach, resources will be shared between energy systems, wastewater systems, and building water-use.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Gold

Required in Development Guidelines

Waste Water Treatment for Cooling Towers

Public Transit

within 400 Meters of all Development

Indigenous

Landscape Design

A

designed to LEED for Neighborhood Development standards. Best practices include alternative mass transit systems such as a light rail system, a network of pedestrian and bicycle paths, and a water taxi service.

FEATURE: BIOPHILIA AND HUMAN WELL-BEING Microclimate

A

Longitudinal section

Challenged by a site with high humidity and an average temperature of 103° F during the summer, the design team sought to create a hospitable local climate that would facilitate a vibrant street life. Extending from the adjacent canal, water basins were used to create a series of microclimates that cool

the local atmosphere. A gradual shift in grade between each basin creates a valley that extends through the urban landscape. In these low-lying areas, the cool air will linger. Adjacent to each basin is a shaded open space with a unique water feature where residents can find respite from the sweltering heat.

Solar Shading

from Building Adjacencies

Vegetative Cooling

A

The Canal District masterplan envisions a dense urban environment, with distinct neighborhoods and ample open space, forming a vibrant, sustainable community. Strategies to conserve energy and water are hallmarks of the Canal District Masterplan,

& Heat Island Reduction


Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Crossing

Dubai, UAE

Awards

Dubai Roads and Transport Authority

2009 The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design American Architecture Award

Design Completion 2008 5,600 Feet Long / 1,700 Meters Long

2009 AIA New York Chapter Design Award of Merit 2009 International Design Award for Urban Design 2008 Cityscape Dubai/ Architectural Review, High Commendation Award

2

2

1 4

3

6

5

1

West Landing

2

Boat Slips and Moorings

Piers Amphitheatre

Indigenous Island Habitat Dubai Creek

Festival Promenade

Site Plan

ikh

Central Walk

Ras

hid

Bin

Sae

ed

Saltmarsh

Cro

ssin

g

Ferry Terminal & Pier

Station

Marina

Saltmarsh

She

ikh

Open space

Ras

hid

Bin

Sae

ed

Open Space

3 Central Metro Station and Public Ferry Service

Open Space Open Space

She

Cro

ssin

g

Central Walk Pedestrian Bridge Saltmarsh Nature Walk

Nature Launch Saltmarsh

Opera Island

SHEIK RASHID BIN SAEED CROSSING

8.96m

Shaded Pedestrian Walkway ENLARGED EDGE ELEVATION

3.78m

SHEIK RASHID BIN SAEED CROSSING

3.75m

4m

ENLARGED EDGE SECTION

2m 1m

East Landing

WARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE June 2008

101010

ENLARGED EDGE RCP

ENLARGED EDGE PLAN

PARSONS DE LEUW, CATHER OVERSEAS LIMITED

NOTES

FXFOWLE INTERNATIONAL, LLP

W ARCHITECTURE & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, LLC AWA LIGHTING DESIGNERS

SIXTH CROSSING CORRIDOR SHEIKH RASHID BRIDGE

Efficient Steel Structure

ROADS & TRANSPORT AUTHORITY

PRIME CONSULTANT

ROADWAY EDGE

50m

NAVIGATIONAL CHANNEL

L

40m

STEE

20m 10m

SCALE=1:500

0m

WEST SPAN ANALYSIS

Not to Scale R777 / 3A1

DESIGN CONSULTANTS

205.99m

PROJECT ARCHITECT

RETE

6 Environmental Education Program

CONC

5 Narrow Beam Lights

15.5m

4

4.65m

4m

FXFOWLE ARCHITECTS, LLP | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

05 SEPTEMBER 2008

19


The Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Crossing, a new 1.7 kilometer bridge, will be the largest and tallest spanning arch bridge in the world. The bridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s form, a simple arch, is the most basic of structural solutions for spanning great distances. This particular application of the arch, however, is informed by the culture, topography, light, and script of the region. The structure visually connects to the earth, and then takes a bold leap. As the bridge descends it touches down to embrace and frame the opera house. The structure rises again and makes a lighter, smaller arch before ending in a gesture of reaching skyward. The bridge also incorporates two metro lines and pedestrian pathways.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES Low-Intensity Lighting Habitat Creation Recycled Steel Fly-Ash Concrete New Wetland Area Photovoltaics The Sheikh Rashid Bin Saeed Crossing supports multiple modes of transportation, including pedestrian walkways, public ferries, and a metro station. With real estate at a premium in Dubai, the bridge design offers a unique

opportunity for an island that includes a new public park with cultural and recreational facilities. Located in proximity to an important bird habitat, the design of the bridge is careful to minimize light pollution, reducing avian mortality.

High-Albedo Road Surface

FEATURE: SITE Dubai Nature Island

SHEIK RASHID BIN SAEED CROSSING

Roads

Al Ja

ddaf

HABITAT CREATION AT NEW ISLAND & EMBANKMENTS

Ras

Antipollution Barrier Sanctuary Boundary

Ras

Creek Extension

hor

Al K

Trails Deep Water Shallow Water Tidal Areas Mangrove Scrub & Mangrove Sabkah/Salt Marsh

Al

o

Kh

Oud Metha Rd

the sanctuary with 70,000 Once a muddy intertidal zone, square meters of salt marsh. Dubai Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wetlands were dredged in the twentieth century This environment will help restore the creek by providing natural to create a modern waterway. water filtration and added habitat At the terminus of the basin, the Ras Al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary in an area threatened by rapid development. Accessible by ferry has preserved a portion of the and metro, the island will act wetland, home to over 88 bird species. The Dubai Nature Island, as a gateway park and will feature a nature interpretive center. located at the landing of the Sheik Rashid Bridge, will augment

RAS AL KHOR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY by

Rug

Sand/Silt Bird Hides

b

Clu

lub

yC

Al Khail

Rd

tr oun

C

June 2008 FXFOWLE ARCHITECTS, LLP | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

u

Ind


Second Avenue Subway

New York, NY

Awards

New York City Transit

2004 City of New York/US EPA Green Building Design Award

Design Completion 2006

6 5

1 2

DRAFT 3.4 Lighting

3.5 Signage

3.6 Acoustics

3

8

Signage

Lighting .../CSD/CS73188X12.DGN

.../CSD/CS73188X12.DGN

04/16/2004 03:57:45 PM

The lighting design for the Second Avenue Subway will improve the passenger experience via brightly lit walls, enhanced lighting at transition points, and incorporation of daylight, especially at entrances. Energy-efficient technologies in concert with a station-wide lighting control system ensure that lighting power allowances, as mandated by EO 111, are not exceeded.

4

7

3

04/16/2004 03:55:52 PM

4

6

Noise Pollution Reduction

.../CSD/CS74188X11.dgn

04/16/2004 03:55:52 PM

.../CSD/CS74188X11.dgn

04/16/2004 03:55:52 PM

9

LED Technology

Supplementary Cementitious Materials

8

7 Thermal Mass Storage

5

Second Avenue Subway

New York City Transit

Energy-Efficient Aluminum Rail

Station designs have been fine tuned, both in terms of geometry and the strategic use of sound absorptive materials, to provide a comfortable aural environment with clear intelligible announcements from the Public Address System.

2 Materially Efficient Form

.../CSD/CS74188X11.dgn

04/16/2004 03:57:45 PM

The comprehensive signage planning embraces both fixed and variable sign messaging elements. The centrally controlled variable messaging system allows LED and LCD variable message boards to display continuously updated train information, as well as emergency information, throughout a station. Fixed and variable message signage will be integrated into a station’s architectural features to enhance passenger navigation and flow, and to increase visual clarity.

1 Increased Daylight & Natural Ventilation

Acoustics: Improved Intelligibility .../CSD/CS73188X12.DGN

04/16/2004 03:57:45 PM

Ground Source Heat

Recycled Plastic Track Ties


The creation of the Second Avenue Subway line in Manhattan will ease the congestion on the nearby Lexington Avenue line and provide a much-needed connection to mass transportation for the east side of the island. As the architects on a diverse multi-disciplinary team for the preliminary phase of the project, led by a DMJM-Harris/Arup joint venture, FXCollaborative helped create a completely new line that will allow the realization of NYC Transit’s goals of environmental responsibility, high-performance design, and maintainability, while creating a world-class system that meets passenger needs for comfort, ease, and security. The new line will capture the energy and enthusiasm of the city—celebrating the civic realm and providing an exciting experience for tourists and residents alike.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES Aluminum Third Rail Spoils Reuse Air Tempering Optimized Structural Form Low-VOC Materials Commissioning J

M

Z

N

2

3

2

3

C J

F

Q

V

N

M EZ

B

L

7

E

V

W

L

7

E

V

W

D

R

V

N

E

B

4

5

6

4

5

6

F

N F

Q

C

R

F

D

SEAPORT

CHATHAM SQUARE

GRAND STREET

HOUSTON STREET

14TH STREET

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

MINED

CUT & COVER

MINED

CUT & COVER

MINED

MINED

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

HANOVER SQUARE

SEAPORT

CHATHAM SQUARE

GRAND B STREET

HOUSTON F STREET

14TH STREET L

23RD STREET

34TH STREET

42ND STREET 7

55TH STREET E

72ND STREET

86TH STREET

96TH STREET

106TH STREET

116TH STREET

125TH STREET 4

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

MINED

MINED

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

CUT & COVER

F

L

D

B D

23RD STREET

34TH STREET

42ND STREET

125TH STREET

HANOVER SQUARE CUT & COVER

55TH STREET

An extensive analysis of sustainable opportunities resulted in strategies that encompass five areas: energy efficiency, materials conservation, indoor environmental quality, site V

MINED

CUT & COVER

MINED

7

V

V

CUT & COVER

E

V

72ND STREET

86TH STREET

96TH STREET

106TH STREET

116TH STREET

management, and operations. Stations were designed with an economy of materials and a high quality indoor environment, with increased daylighting and natural ventilation compared

to existing stations. Stormwater management and efficient operation through the implementation of commissioning plans were key concerns.

of subway tracks to help place trains in motion as they leave the station. An incline was included to slow trains as they pull into a station, reducing the need to break. Less breaking will reduce heat generated by the trains, thereby cutting the amount

of energy needed to ventilate stations by as much as 12%. Unnoticeable to commuters, this slight change in track alignment will save an enormous amount of energy, maintenance and money over the 100-plus year lifespan of the subway.

5

6 4

5

6

FEATURE: ENERGY Hump Tracks Breaking and accelerating consume a large amount of energy in the operation of a subway. By taking advantage of gravity, the design team expects to significantly reduce energy use. A gentle decline was incorporated into the design

42nd Street Station

55th Street Station


Georgia Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal

Atlanta, GA

Awards

Georgia Department of Transportation

2016 Boston Society of Architects Design Award, Unbuilt Architecture and Design

Design Completion 2013 119 Acres / 51 Hectares

2014 AIA - Washington, DC, Honorable Mention, Urban Design and Planning 2014 International Design Awardsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gold Award, Urban Design 2014 AIA - New York State, Award of Merit, Urban Design 2014 Chicago Athenaeum International Design Award 2013 World Architecture News, Transport Award

1 5 3 6 7 4

9

2

8

1

3

2 Skylights for Daylight Optimization

4

Vegetated Bioswales for Stormwater Management

5 Positive Pressure for High Indoor Air Quality

7

6 Bioverse Native & Adapted Drought Tolerant Planting

8 Concrete Thermal Mass with Night Purge Ventilation

Deep Overhangs on South to Minimize Solar Heat Gain

Semi-Intensive Green Roof

9 Thermal Piles for Heating and Cooling

Water Reclamation Treatment and Reuse


The Georgia Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal (MMPT) creates a new regional and metropolitan transportation center, and a master plan for 119 acres of downtown Atlanta. This critical piece of infrastructure integrates service for 10 passenger train platforms, including commuter rail and high-speed rail, and 80 bus bays for local, regional, and intercity buses into a single complex. By decking over existing rail yards (known locally as “the Gulch”) that divide downtown from the city’s sports and convention center complex, the MMPT knits together major activity centers of the city. Developed through a public-private partnership, the MMPT creates a new civic presence and acts as a catalyst for private development.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES To reduce Atlanta’s infamous sprawl the MMPT connects street grids with new streets, linking surrounding neighborhoods, and becoming a catalyst for development. The centrally located new neighborhood links major activity centers including office buildings, residential neighborhoods, the convention center, entertainment & sports, and university campuses. By also linking multiple transportation modes—including walking, biking, streetcar, commuter rail, long distance rail, car and car share, local buses, regional buses, and inter-city buses—the MMPT creates a comprehensive multisystem network. This increases access and mobility throughout the region, reducing automobile dependence, potentially dramatically impact the city and region’s carbon footprint.

FEATURE: WATER Water Reclamation and Re-Use Positioned to become’s Atlanta’s first “eco-district”, the master plan promotes water savings at a district scale. By providing a green infrastructure to collect and centrally manage stormwater at the district-scale, the master plan can sustain the intensity and activity of the terminal which requires large quantities of grey water for plumbing fixtures, rooftop irrigation, and cooling towers. This “Economies of Scale”

approach to water reclamation and reuse utilizes the inherent size of the project area to meet the demands of the terminal’s 24hour operations. The terminal’s 4.5 acre roof landscape will serve as a crowing public space, increasing natural habitat and biodiversity within the urban core, while retaining Atlanta’s 49.7 annual inches of rain in a tank below track level.

LEED ND Gold Anticipated LEED Silver Anticipated 13 Acres of New Parks

Mixed Mode Ventilation

of Bus Parking Areas

Water Efficient Landscaping High Recycled Content Solar Shading

on Tower Overbuilds


King Abdullah Financial District

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Awards

Rayadah Investment Company

2014 The Chicago Athenaeum: International Architecture Award

Completion 2018 8,000,000 GSF / 743,224 GSM

2011 The Chicago Athenaeum: American Architecture Award 2010 Cityscape Global, Community Future Design Award (Highly Commended)

3

6

1 5

2

4

7

ECOTECT SOLAR SHADING

1 Building Performance Modeling

3

10am

Green Roof/Wall

11am

12pm

1pm

2pm

3pm

4pm

5

4 Solar Shading Device

6

2

Photovoltaic Panels

Pedestrian Walkway

Sky Gardens

Greywater

Urban Cooling

7 Self Shaded


The King Abdullah Financial District comprises seven development parcels in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Programmatic components include office, residential, educational, sports, retail, cultural and religious components. The design vision proposes a separation between pedestrian and vehicular traffic, while including public spaces within each site. Protected skywalks will encourage pedestrian traffic, and a monorail system will promote the use of public transportation. A traditional wadi, a dry river bed to collect runoff, creates a continuous green open public space connecting the four developments and provides shelter for local plants and animals. Green roofs will provide additional landscaped areas.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Silver-Gold 30%

Water Use Reduction

High Indoor Air Quality Photovoltaics Wadi

for Water Runoff and Urban Cooling

With average temperatures as high as 109°F, Saudi Arabia’s extreme climate posed a challenge to the design of a series of transparent, yet energyefficient structures. This was accomplished by incorporating shading devices into the façade

and by angling its form to increase the shaded area of the building. The buildings are also connected by elevated, conditioned skywalks and at street-level around water features, creating a vibrant urban experience.

FEATURE: ENERGY Interactive Solar Shading Simulator In order to maximize daylight and views, yet control solar heat gain, the design team used specialized software to simulate the effects of orientation, form, and individual architectural elements. Façades were designed with an average of 40% glass, yet achieved a solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) as low as .17. Approximately

20% less than required, this lower number indicates façade’s superior ability to block heat from the sun, which otherwise would need to be removed by air conditioning. This was accomplished through a combination of vertical and horizontal solar shading devices, louvers, and setbacks.

Mono-Rail System Habitat Restoration


Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Renovation

New York, NY

Awards

Empire Development Corporation

2017 AIA New York State Excelsior Award for Public Architecture

Completion 2014 (Phase 1)

2016 Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, Special Recognition Award

1,800,000 GSF / 167,000 GSM

2015 American Institute of Architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; New York Chapter, Committee on the Environment, Honorable Mention 2014 AIA Chicago Distinguished Building Award 2014 Environmental Design + Construction, Excellence in Design Awards

1

2

3

4

5 6

1 HighPerformance HVAC

7

2

3 Green Roof

4 HighPerformance Curtain Wall

6

5 Maximized Daylighting

Building Re-use

7 Highly Insulated Exterior Envelope

Restored Habitat


Located on the far west side of Manhattan, the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center is New York City’s primary venue for trade shows and conventions. A new subway extension currently under development will provide mass transit access connecting the facility to hotels and other venues. The revitalization plan includes: reworking the entry plaza to create pedestrian friendly landscaped urban space, improved truck marshaling and storage, updating the building enclosure with a new high-performance curtain wall and skylights, a highly insulating 6.75-acre green roof, and new mechanical and electrical systems that will reduce energy consumption by 26%. Renovated interior spaces will improve occupant interaction, operational efficiency, and adaptability. Improved natural light, interior/exterior landscaping, and wayfinding systems will greatly enhance the visitor experience. FXCollaborative collaborated with Epstein on this prestigious project.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Silver 26%

Energy Reduction

50%

Water Reduction for Landscaping

30%

Potable Water Reduction

> 75% The renovation of this megastructure offered a unique opportunity to significantly improve the environmental impact of both the building and the greater context of New York City. At over one million squarefeet, the renovation resulted

in significant gains in energy and water efficiency, improved daylighting and indoor air quality, and enhanced public spaces. A new building envelope, mechanical systems, and a green roof are major contributions to these improvements.

Re-Use of Structure and Envelope

75%

Construction Waste Diversion Projected

Occupancy & CO2 Sensors Bird-Safe Glazing Strategies

FEATURE: WATER Green Roof At 6.75 acres, the Javits Convention Center’s green roof will be one of the largest on the East Coast. In order to support the additional weight of the green roof, the load of the existing roof assembly and rooftop mechanical systems was reduced. The green roof uses an extensive system consisting of a modular, lightweight growing medium pre-planted with sedum—a hearty plant species that grows in thin soil depths and requires little maintenance. A drainage

layer underneath protects the roof and allows water retention. Green roofs retain over 50% of rainwater, reducing the discharge

of sewage into the Hudson River due to combined sewage and stormwater overflows during heavy rains.

Growing Medium Roof Membrane Leak Detection Insulation Existing Deck


4 Times Square

New York, NY

Awards

The Durst Organization

2001 AIA Honor Award for Architecture

Completion 1999

2001 World Architecture Awards, Commendation

1,600,000 GSF / 149,000 GSM

2000 AIA New York State Excellence in Design Award 2000 New York City Audubon Society Major Achievement Award

2

1

1

2 Gas-Fired Absorption Chiller

Efficient Structural Design 3

3

4 HighPerformance Curtain Wall

5

4

Building Integrated Photovoltaics

6 Improved Air Quality

7

Natural Gas Fuel Cells

8 Building Automation

Public Transportation

5 6 7 8


The first tower of the 42nd Street redevelopment project, FXCollaborative’s 4 Times Square embraces the essence of Times Square while meeting the needs of corporate tenants. A varied composition of interlocking, set-back forms and façade treatments respond to the diverse scale and character of the neighboring buildings. As the building rises, a collage of volumes, surfaces, and super-scaled signage draws vitality from the street and evolves into an integrated composition, culminating in a highly-energized finale. All building systems and construction technology were evaluated for their impact on occupant health, environmental sensitivity, and energy reduction, making this the first project of its size and type to adopt state-of-theart standards for energy conservation, indoor air quality, recycling systems, and the use of sustainable manufacturing processes.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES As the nation’s first green skyscraper, The Condé Nast Building’s unprecedented integration of sustainable design principles and technologies galvanized the green building movement and served as a catalyst for development of the USGBC LEED rating system. The building uses significantly less steel than a conventional skyscraper by connecting the exterior walls to the core of the building through a hat truss, visible in the exposed metal beams that form its iconic top. Filtered air, a high ventilation rate, and low-VOC materials provide a high indoor air quality for occupants.

Catalyst for LEED System 50%

Increased Fresh Air Intake

15kW

Building Integrated Photovoltaics

Optimized,

Variable-Speed HVAC

Fuel Cells Tenant Guidelines Commissioning

FEATURE: ENERGY Fuel Cells Fuel cells transfer the energy of natural gas directly into electricity using a chemical reaction, generating hot water as a byproduct. In contrast to a conventional combustion engine, fuel cells convert energy more efficiently and generate little noise or pollution. In the Condé Nast Building, two UTC PC25 200 Kw fuel cells provide approximately five percent of the building’s electrical power. Located on the fourth floor,

the system powers the building’s base electric loads and functions as a back-up in the case of a blackout. Hot water from the fuel cell is reused as domestic Clean Exhaust hot water and in perimeter heating. Hydrogen Rich Gas

FUEL Natural Gas In PROCESSOR

DC Power AC Power

POWER SECTION

POWER CONDITIONER

Electricity to Base Building Power

Cooling to Building Systems Usable Heat to Building Systems


The New York Times Building

New York, NY

Awards

The New York Times / Forest City Ratner

2009 AIA Honor Award for Architecture

Completion 2009

2008 AIA New York State, Award of Excellence, Commercial/ Industrial Large Projects

1,500,000 GSF / 140,000 GSM

2008 AIA New York Chapter Design Award of Merit 2008 AIA New York Chapter Building Type Honor Award, Sustainable Design

1

1

2

2 Condenser Water Tower

3

3

HighPerformance Glazing and Sun Shading

4 Automated Shading System, Daylight Dimming, Under-

4

5

Open Office Plan and Internal Connecting

6 Courtyard Garden

8

Automated Skylight

8

7

Fresh Air Intake

On-Site Cogeneration

9 Public Transportation

6

5 9

7


Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXCollaborative collaboratively designed a new headquarters for The New York Times. The building, located on Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st Street opposite the Port Authority Bus Terminal, unites the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s employees under one roof in an exceptional signature structure. The design incorporates a transparent glass tower screened by planes of glazed terracotta tubes that appear to float above the street. An advanced sunshading system, floor-to-ceiling glass, increased ceiling heights, efficient lighting and mechanical systems, displaced ventilation, extensive mock-up testing, and a variety of additional sustainable features ensure that The New York Times Building is a new standard of comfort, productivity, and efficiency in high-rise office space.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES The design of the New York Times Building uses a ceramic rod curtainwall, reducing solar heat gain by approximately 30%. Under-floor air distribution delivers air efficiently and ensures a high indoor air quality and thermal comfort control for all occupants. An on-site natural gas co-generation plant produces 1.5 megawatts of electricity, with an efficiency of 89%.

70%

Lighting Power Reduction

30%

Solar Heat Gain

85%

Efficient Air Filtration

1.3mW

Co-Generation Plant

FSC Certified Wood Low-Flow

Plumbing Fixtures

FEATURE: ENERGY Daylight Dimming In the New York Times Building, daylighting is harnessed and controlled through the integrated combination of a ceramic rod curtainwall, high-performance glass, and daylight sensors and controls. advanced automated controls have reduced energy use for lighting by 70% below code. A dimmable lighting system adjusts levels automatically in accordance with available

natural light using ceilingmounted photosensors. In order to prevent glare and reduce heat gain, an automatic shading system reacts to the position of the sun and prevailing sky conditions. Using data from a radiometer, a device that measures ambient light, and the sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s predicted position, the system adjusts the shades accordingly.

Jun 21 Noon

Dec 21 Noon


Eleven Times Square

New York, NY

Awards

SJP Properties

2014 CODAawards, Collaboration of Design + Art, Finalist

Completion 2010 1,100,000 GSF / 102,000 GSM

2012 BOMA/NY Pinnacle Award for New Construction 2011 Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Best Tall Building (Americas), Finalist 2011 Environmental Design+ Construction, Excellence in Design

1 7 2

1

2 Greywater System for Cooling Towers

3

4

Custom Sunshading

4 High Efficiency Fanwall HVAC

3

High Performance Curtainwall

6

5 Efficient Structure 40% Fly-Ash in Concrete

Increase of Air Filtration 360% Above Code

High Albedo Roof Pavers

Green Tenant Guidelines

5

7

Public Transportation

6


Eleven Times Square defines the western gateway to Midtown Manhattan’s most exciting business districts: Times Square and the 42nd Street corridor. The design features a sculptural composition of forms sheathed in various combinations of sheer glass curtainwall and unique “silk–glass” panels. In keeping with the Times Square streetscape, there are large–scale signage “spectaculars,” including a 40-foot-diameter iconic globe at the corner. High performance glazed curtainwalls allow ample daylighting, optimize views, and provide superior environmental control. Eleven Times Square is a state–of–the–art, environmentally– responsible building.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES Eleven Times Square’s structural design is highly efficient and minimizes embodied energy, consisting of a concrete core and steel-framed bays. Energy performance is enhanced by spectrally-selective, low-iron, low-E glass, reducing space conditioning. Expansive glazing and a column-less perimeter create a light-filled interior with panoramic views, reducing the need for artificial lighting. Interior design and construction guidelines encourage tenants to develop spaces that meet stringent standards for sustainability.

LEED Gold 2030 Challenge Compliant Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR 82%

Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill

30%

Increased Ventilation

> 75%

Spaces with Daylight, 90% with Views

Building Management System to Control Mechanical Systems

Tenant Sub-Metering Low-VOC Materials

FEATURE: ENERGY Energy-Efficient Curtain Wall Eleven Times Square achieved an exceptionally low heat transfer coefficient, or U-Value, of .28, making it an extremely efficient curtainwall. Its insulated glazing units use a thick exterior pane and airspace between panes—3/8” and 3/4”, respectively. This extra thickness reduces the flow of heat between the exterior and

interior of the building. A lower conductor of heat, stainless steel was used instead of aluminum around the edge of the panels to form an air barrier between the panes. Rather than using metal fasteners between panes, which can create heat transfer points, the structurally glazed system uses a silicone sealant.


The Helena

New York, NY

Awards

The Durst Organization / Rose Associates

2006 City of New York/US EPA Green Building Design Award

Completion 2005

2005 AIA New York Chapter Affordable Green Housing Award

600,000 GSF / 56,00 GSM

2004 Global Green Sustainable Design Award

1

2 Microturbine

Photovoltaics 2

1

3

3

4 Habitable Green Roof

Energy Star Appliances 4

6

5 Occupancy Sensors

7

5

Certified Wood 6

8 HighPerformance Window Wall

9 Recycling Chutes

Blackwater Treatment Plant

settling tank

7 8

9


Located on the western end of 57th Street in Manhattan, The Helena is a 37-story residential building with 580 studio, one- and twobedroom apartments. Floor to ceiling glass, wrap-around windows and sleek metal panels create a highly marketable rental property. Integrated sustainable technologies such as photovoltaic panels, a blackwater treatment plant, efficient microturbines, and green roofs earned this building a LEED Gold Certification from the USGBC.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Gold 65%

Energy Reduction

100%

Recycled Waste and Rainwater

80%

Daylight Penetration

Extensive and Intensive In order to maximize daylight without sacrificing energy performance, The Helena is aligned along an east-west axis to reduce heat gain, which can increase energy for cooling. The building’s meticulously insulated metal

façade saves further energy by preventing heat loss. Amenities include 12,000 square feet of extensive and intensive green roofs, which minimize heat gain, reduce stormwater runoff, and provide recreational areas for residents.

Green Roofs

40%

Reduction in Water Consumption

Building-Intergrated Photovoltaics

FEATURE: WATER Blackwater Treatment Water reuse can play an important role in helping relieve overtaxed municipal sewage systems. In New York City, 27 billion gallons of raw sewage is discharged into the New York harbor annually due to combined sewage and stormwater overflows. Instead of discarding sewage water, The Helena’s blackwater treatment system purifies and reuses it in toilets, landscape irrigation, and the building’s cooling towers. Water is treated in three-stages.

First, non-biodegradable solids are removed. Next, water is treated with anaerobic and aerobic Blackwater bacteria, Ultra-violet Equalization converting Bio Filter contaminants Tank into carbon Disinfection Blackwater Equalization Tank

Screen Filter Screen Filter

Bio Filter

Anoxic Chamber Anoxic Chamber

Aerobic Chamber Aerobic Chamber

dioxide, methane, and water. Finally, any remaining pathogens are destroyed using ultraviolet light and bleach. Ozone To Condenser Unit, Storm Water Infusion

Storm Water

To Condenser Unit, Drip Irrigation & Toilets

Ultra-Violet Ozone Disinfection Infusion

Overflow to Sanitary Sewer Overflow To Sanitary Sewer

Drip Irrigation & Toilets

Storage Hypochloride Tank Treatment Storage Tank

Hypochloride Treatment


Place de la Cité Internationale

Montreal, Canada Confidential Client Design Completion 2013 350,000 GSF / 32,500 GSM

5

1 HighPerformance Curtainwall

7 NRETTAP TIRF HTIW_GNIREDNER LANOITCES EDACAF

57 NGISED TPECNOC DESIVER 1102 REBMECED 10

|

|

2 Under-Floor Air System

LANOITANRETNI ETIC AL ED ECALP LAERTNOM / ERAUQS AIROTCIV

DEVRE SE R STHG I R L L A | P L L , ST CET IH C R A E LWOFXF 1 102 ©

1

3 Employee Daycare

6 2

4 Public Transportation

5 High Albedo Roofing

3

6 Storm Water Management

7 Heat Recovery

Intergrated Daylight Optimization

8

4


FXCollaborative designed a new 350,000 square-foot highperformance, environmentally-responsible regional headquarters for a multi-national corporation. The project is situated on a prominent infill site on Victoria Square in downtown Montreal. The building is designed to optimize views and daylighting while responding to the extremely cold climatic conditions. The design will create large efficient open office arrangement around a center core to optimize interior work areas. The ground floor includes a large public lobby and atrium space as a refuge from the inclement winter weather. The lobby is connected directly to the city’s underground promenade and metro system. The building’s lower floors include amenity spaces such as day care with play space, fitness center, cafe, and conference facilities. The upper floors of the building will be connected with open communicating stairs between floors and the design includes a number of outdoor spaces that are carved from the building form. Under-floor air distribution systems and automated shade system are some of the sustainable features being planned for the building. The building aims to obtain a LEED Platinum certification from the CaGBC.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum Anticipated R35 Walls 90% Daylit

No

Potable Water for Irrigation

40% The client’s mandate was to create an iconic building that expresses the tenant’s corporate environmental priorities. While the building addresses strategies holistically, as an end user the most important requirement for the client was to achieve the highest possible indoor environmental quality for their

employees. The project integrates under-floor air distribution for superior controllability as well as significant energy savings. The building also utilizes daylight dimming and automated window shades system to control daylighting. Daylighting and views are a very high priority. The building utilizes rain water/storm

FEATURE: INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Optimized Comfort, Daylight, And Views The project is being designed to optimize the quality of the indoor environment. High ceilings and optimized glazing allow for excellent daylight penetration and views in a northern climate with reduced daylighting hours. Black and white automated shades are programmed to enhance winter heat gain while minimizing it during the summer and providing glare control. Radiant heating at the perimeter ensures occupant comfort, as does under-floor air distribution that can be controlled individually.

Energy Cost Savings Over Code

35%

Water Reduction

water collection for reuse as well as highly efficient fixtures. Heat recovery systems optimize energy consumption and are designed to meet cold weather standards.


SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion

Newtown Square, PA

Awards

Completion 2009

2011 Boston Society of Architects, Sustainable Design Awards

425,000 GSF / 40,000 GSM 210,000 GSF (Phase 1)

2010 The Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2010 Environmental Design+ Construction, Best Commercial Building (Finalist) 2009 The Chicago Athenaeum American Architecture Award

3

6

4

7

8

2 5

1

1

2 Ground Source Heat Exchange Radiant Heating/

3

Rainwater Collection Greywater Tank

4 Photovoltaic Panels

6

5 Natural Ventilation

7 Triple Glazing Bird Safe Curtain Wall

Ice Storage

8 Habitable Green Roof

FSC Certified Wood


FXCollaborative designed the corporate headquarters and interiors for an environmentally–responsible Germany-based software company. The two-phase complex complements the existing structure by integrating the office campus into the topography while preserving views of the wooded-site. Offices are focused on the north side of the building to capitalize on landscape views, with service and fixed elements grouped together in nodes along an anchoring spine. As a design hallmark, the south-facing laminated wood atrium is shaded by warmly–detailed brise soleil that reduces sun penetration, while framing views of the inner courtyard and facilitating natural air circulation emanating from an underfloor displacement air system. Green roofs further weave the structure into the landscape, serving as part of a calibrated system of sustainable strategies. This is the first LEED Platinum building of its type in the mid-Atlantic region.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum 2030 Challenge Compliant Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR Raised Floor

Supplying Under-floor Air

The project achieves exceptional standards of sustainability through an integrated approach. Optimum energy performance is realized through combined passive strategies such as building orientation, solar shading, natural ventilation, green roofs, and triple glazing which enables the elimination

of perimeter heating. These are supplemented by efficient mechanical systems including ice storage tanks, under-floor air, and radiant and geothermal systems. Water efficiencies are achieved through a combined approach of reduction, recycling, and harvesting.

Water Reduction

No Water Use for Landscaping

28%

Energy Reduction

75%

Construction Waste Diversion

30%

Increased Ventilation

FEATURE: ENERGY Ice Storage By creating ice at night used to cool the building during the day, peak electric demand is significantly reduced. Expensive to produce, peak electricity is typically produced by older, less-efficient power-plants. At night, a tank with spiral-wound tubes is filled with water, and cooled to below freezing using

42%

a chemical solution that maintains the water’s liquid state. Water surrounds the tubes, and is then frozen. During the day, the liquid solution leaving the tank is cooled by the surrounding ice to 44° degrees Fahrenheit. The building’s HVAC system then uses the solution to cool the air.


Cornell University Warren Hall Renovation

Ithaca, NY Cornell University Completion 2014 128,000 GSF / 11,900 GSM

1 2 3

4

5 6 7

8

1

2 Natural Ventilation

3

High-Performance Windows

4 Additional Insulation

6

5 Modular Green Roof

7 Native Planting

Salvaged Stone Flooring

8 Permeable Paving

Lake Source Cooling


FXCollaborative renovated Warren Hall, home of Cornell’s undergraduate business program, the Charles W. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. This dignified campus landmark, one of the original 1930’s structures defining the Agricultural Quadrangle, is being brought up to the level of a 21st century educational facility. The exterior envelope is being restored and upgraded, while the teaching and office spaces are completely renovated. New infrastructure systems will optimize the operations of the building, reduce energy use, and dramatically improve the quality of the indoor environment. With new social and collaborative spaces, increased access to natural lighting, and state of the art A/V facilities, the building will enhance the educational experience and provide a rewarding learning environment for future generations of students.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum 2030 Challenge Compliant 62%

Energy Savings Over Code

1,600 SF

Salvaged Marble Flooring

The most recent data published by the Department of Energy says new commercial buildings add only about 1% to the total U.S. building stock each year. This means new sustainable buildings alone are not enough to make an impact on our carbon footprints. Retrofitting existing building stock to be more energy-efficient and sustainable needs to be at the forefront of

green construction. The renovation of Warren Hall transforms the almost 100-year-old academic building into a state-of-the-art facility while reducing its energy use. This is achieved through natural ventilation, foam insulation lining the existing masonry envelope, and tapping into the campus’s lake source cooling.

Slot Ventilators

Assist Natural Ventilation

30%

Water Savings Over Code

70

Bicycle Storage Racks

50%

FSC Certified Wood Products

FEATURE: ENERGY Lake Source Cooling Cornell University has installed an innovative, yet simple method for cooling campus buildings. It consists of a closed loop system that exchanges the cool water from the depths of nearby Cayuga Lake, and expels the warm water into the shallow waters of the same lake. The water is drawn through an intake that comes from water about 2 miles out and 250 feet deep, where the temperature is about 39°F year-round. The heat

returned to the lake is negligible and does not effect the lake’s ecosystems. This system has an energy saving of 80% over conventional refrigerant system.

Cornell University

60° Heat Exchange Facility

45°

450’

Cayuga Lake 48-56° 250’ 69-41°

10,400’

12,000’


Rochester Institute of Technology, Golisano Institute for Sustainability

Rochester, NY

Awards

Rochester Institute of Technology

2014 American Institute of Architects, Rochester Design Awards

Completion 2013 84,000 GSF / 7,800 GSM

2014 Environmental Design + Construction, Excellence in Design Awards 2013 ENR New York, Best Green Project

5

10

2

9 6

4 7

3 8

1

1 Radiant Flooring and Ground Source Heat

2

3 Separately Zoned Galleria

5

4 400kW Fuel Cell

6 Continuous R38 Roof

8

50kWh Lithium Ion Battery

7 Rain Garden

9 Rainwater Harvesting & Cistern for Capture and

Performance Dashboard

10 Active Chilled Beams

Wind Turbine Energy

Butterfly Garden and Green Roof

Solar Shading and Highly Insulated Envelope

12 Photovoltaic Panels


The Golisano Institute for Sustainability creates a living laboratory for the research and development of sustainable industrial processes and building systems. Lab space, the main component of this new facility, provides users with the space necessary to research issues such as how to improve the process of manufacturing and “re-manufacturing.” The facility is equipped with the capabilities for experimentation, testing, and prototype manufacturing. The goal for this project was to create a world-renowned institute that improves sustainable processes and serves as a beacon for innovation. Highperformance materials were used for this facility.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum 32%

Energy Reduction from National Median EUI for Building Type

114kBtu/SF/year Total EUI

76%

Reduction in Potable Water Use

The Golisano Institute for Sustainability was designed to be a living laboratory where students, visitors, and faculty are able to learn how the building functions in response to the environment on a daily basis. The central Galleria functions as the building’s energy center by providing a source for tempered air and generating electricity

through the roof mounted PV arrays. The building capitalizes on daylight harvesting to minimize the amount of artificial lighting required. This is achieved through a high-performance enclosure system that utilizes different glazing technologies to provide a high insulating value while still providing ample daylight.

FEATURE: INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Daylighting vs. Insulation The building enclosure for the GIS was designed with an integrated approach, using careful analysis and a variety of innovative glazing technologies to optimize daylight harvesting while minimizing heat loss. A highly insulative (R-20) translucent Nanogel glazing allows for deep daylight penetration. Sections of spandrel glazing provide additional insulation (R-22) where daylight or views were not required. The vision glazing below the spandrel uses a unique radiant

film technology that conducts heat to optimize thermal comfort in cold weather, eliminating the need for perimeter heating. Glazing units with heat mirror film provide the thermal performance of triple glazing without the associated weight. All these products were carefully composed in elevation not only to ensure the exemplary performance of the enclosure, but also to create an active façade that expressed the building’s ambitious sustainability goals.

100%

Water Reduction in Landscaping

> 20%

Recycled Construction Waste

90%

Outdoor Views


Tulane University Richardson Memorial Hall

New Orleans, LA Tulane University Completion 2011 (Phase I) 67,500 GSF / 6,300 GSM

2

3

1

4

5 6 7

9

5

8

1

2 Building Re-use

4

3 Rainwater Harvesting

5 Photovoltaic and Solar Thermal Panels

6 Habitable Green Roof and Wall

8

7 Natural Ventilation

Daylight Harvesting

Chilled Beams

9 Ceiling Fans

Rain Garden/ Storm Water Retention


FXCollaborative developed a comprehensive sustainable strategies study for Richardson Memorial Hall, the School of Architecture at Tulane University. The analysis investigates sustainability from a holistic perspective, providing recommendations on energy efficiency, water management, ecological materials, indoor environmental comfort improvements, maintenance and operations, energy and water metering and integration of sustainability into architectural education. Whole building energy and daylight models were done as part of the study. The report proposes strategies to meet ambitious goals, including LEED Platinum Certification, 80% water reduction and achieving 2030 Challenge emissions reductions. The investigation was carried out through an inclusive and integrated process, where a detailed occupancy survey was administered to faculty and students, who then participated in a two day workshop to share sustainable design ideas and priorities for both the buildings and campus circulation.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum Anticipated 53%

Total Energy Savings

80%

Reduction in Potable Water Use

39%

Energy Saving from Passive Strategies

Renovations to Richardson Memorial Building center on the reuse of the existing neogothic structure. Steps to reduce the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carbon footprint include harvesting daylight and rainwater to reduce energy consumption and costs. Maximizing natural ventilation by adding ceiling fans as well as

chilled beams will reduce cooling costs while improving indoor comfort. A long-term goal of the project is achieving carbon neutrality, part of the 2030 challenge. A partnership among IBM Building Innovation, Johnson Controls, and Tulane University School of Architecture is developing sophisticated energy

FEATURE: SITE Climate Adaptation and Resilience Renovations to Richardson Memorial Hall must demonstrate a resilience to changing climatic conditions, rising sea levels, and an increase in storms. Ground floor finishes will anticipate potential flooding and higher levels of humidity that could lead to the development of mold. New mechanical and electrical equipment will be elevated above the flood plain. The ground floor will be further protected by a landscape designed to direct stormwater away from the building.

50%

Increase in Stormwater Retention

100%

Photovoltaic Power for Energy

and water data analysis and collection to future reduce energy consumption.


Hunter’s Point Campus

Queens, NY

Awards

New York City School Construction Authority

2015 AIA New York State Excelsior Award for Public Architecture

Completion 2013

2014 Learning by Design, Award of Excellence— Outstanding Project

145,000 GSF / 13,500 GSM

2013 Queens Chamber of Commerce, Building Award— New Construction, Schools & Colleges

5

6 1

2

4

3 8 9

7

1

2 Outdoor Terrace

4

3 Blue Roof

5 Daylit Corridor

7

6 High Albedo Reflective Roof

8 Landscaping with No Potable Water

Light Pollution Reduction

High-Performance Building Envelope

9 Translucent Wall Assembly

Optimized Site Orientation


The new Hunter’s Point Campus accommodates 1,071 students and comprises three organizations, an Intermediate School, a High School, District 75, and shared facilities. The site for the 145,000-square-foot school is a previously-undeveloped parcel of the Hunters Point South Development in Queens, now being reformed as part of the City’s rezoning and redevelopment project. The School complies with the requirements of the New York City Green Schools Guide. FXCollaborative’s design creates distinct learning environments that allow each program to function independently, while sharing common resources. The orientation and configuration of space capitalizes on light, air, and views. Major assembly spaces are clustered in the southwest wing of the building, while the auditorium is located as an object in the center of the third and fourth floors, straddling the I.S. and H.S. The project’s top floor is literally its crowning feature, with dining spaces located adjacent to a large outdoor terrace, affording sweeping views of Manhattan and the East River.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES NYC Green Schools Guide Compliant 28%

Less Energy Use Than Code

40%

water reduction

Building Management Systems for Energy Monitoring

The SCA’s program originally required a six-floor structure, but through rigorous analysis of program adjacencies and exploration of layout alternatives, the design team compressed circulation and maximized connectivity among spaces, achieving a five-floor building. By locating the large programmatic elements (gyms, theaters,

cafeterias) in the core of the building, each floor became more efficient. The judicial shaping of the building form will result in use of fewer construction materials and creates a westfacing 5th floor terrace, providing “found” outdoor space that the owner had ssumed was not possible on the constrained urban site.

FEATURE: SITE Blue Roof A blue roof design is intended to store water—typically rainfall— and provide temporary storage of rainfall to mitigate runoff impacts, storage for reuse, such as irrigation or cooling water makeup, or for recreational opportunities. In dense urban areas such as New York City, the storm water and sewer systems

are combined into one. Heavy rainfall often overwhelms the combined sewer system and sewage treatment plants, resulting in raw sewage being dumped into the adjacent estuary. Blue roofs help reduce combined sewer overflow by storing water during these times and releasing it only after the storm has passed.

Occupancy Sensors in Classrooms & Offices

81,000 Gallons

of Water Retained on Blue Roof


PS 62 Net Zero School

Staten Island, NY NY School Construction Authority Competition 2010 70,000 GSF / 6,500 GSM

4

1

3

5

2 6

7

1

2 “Solar Chimney”

3

4 Highly Insulated Enclosure

5 Photovoltaic Panels

7

6 Natural Ventilation

8

Ceiling Fans

Habitable Green Roof

8 Radiant Heating and Cooling

Ground Source Heat Exchange


Beyond meeting the SCA’s Net Zero and Net Positive energy goals, FXOWLE aimed to design a holistically sustainable school. By incorporating passive design strategies such as proper siting of the building, developing a responsive enclosure system, and optimizing the building’s form for both daylight and natural ventilation, the design achieves a significant reduction in energy usage even before the introduction of any active systems. Situating the building along the East/West axis took advantage of the site's long frontage, and served to optimize solar control during the summer/winter seasons. A mix of one- and two-story classroom massings allows daylight into each space and provides views toward the various landscaped play areas that surround the school. These classroom blocks are grouped around shared spaces such as the oculus sky-lit gym and library. Through a combination of interconnected green roofscapes and ground-level play areas, the school weaves itself into the site, blurring the boundary between building and landscape.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES 2030 Challenge Compliant Net Zero Energy 32%

Energy Reduction from Passive Strategies

25%

Energy Reduction from Efficent Strategies

The landscape approach uses local and native plantings, reduces heat island effect, and includes rainwater collection and waste water treatment, resulting in net zero water for all non-potable uses. Materials were selected for sustainability, durability, and ease of

maintenance. The project proposed recuperating site trees for reuse, sourcing materials locally, and minimizing construction waste. Fresh air and ventilation rates would be optimized to ensure a healthy indoor environment.

FEATURE: ENERGY Renewable Energy: Photovoltaics In order to operate independently of the electrical grid, the design uses over 31,000 square feet of photovoltaic panels for solar energy collection. Producing 350,000 kWh/yr, these parking lot and roof-mounted panels provide 100% of the school’s annual electricity requirements on-site. The systems are netmetered with the electrical grid, eliminating the need for battery storage. In addition to providing

a renewable energy source, the panels also provide shading for the building and parking lot, thereby reducing heat island effect.

43%

Energy Produced by Renewables

19kBtu/SF/year Energy Use Intensity


Center for Global Conservation

Bronx, NY

Awards

Wildlife Conservation Society

2011 The Chicago Athenaeum: American Architecture Award

Completion 2009 43,500 GSF / 4,040 GSM

2010 Environmental Design+ Construction, Best Institutional Building 2010 MIPIM Award, Green Buildings (Finalist)

3 5

2

4

7

6

1

8

1

2 Salvaged Red Stone

3

4 FSC Certified Exterior Shades

6

5 Habitable Green Roof

7 Bioswale

Cogeneration Plant

Reflective Roof

8 Bird-Safe Glass

Under-Floor Air


The Center for Global Conservation is the Wildlife Conservation Society’s headquarters for international programs, providing space for administrative efforts and scientific research within the Bronx Zoo. The design respects the natural features of the site—bridging rock outcroppings and avoiding significant vegetation—and uses these elements and the flow of water through the site as part of the entry sequence. The east/west linear orientation of the building maximizes daylighting and cross-ventilation. The cantilevered form and materials blur the lines between interior and exterior; interior meeting and gathering spaces have exterior extensions. The ramped ground plane—an intensive green roof—allows each floor to open directly to the native planted exterior green space.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Gold 2030 Challenge Compliant 30%

Potable Water Reduction

48%

Energy Reduction

32% The design team achieved environmental responsibility through a synergy between the building’s form, siting, and systems. Efficient systems condition the building, daylighting is maximized, and local, renewable, and recycled materials are incorporated.

The building also exhibits the WCS’s conservation efforts through an information center and displays. The building’s integration with the landscape preserves and enhances the visitor’s experience of the natural environment.

Locally Manufactured Materials

92%

of Construction Waste Recycled

87% of Site Area

Restored with Native Plantings

50%

Water Reduction for Landscaping

> 75% of Spaces

with Daylight, 90% with Views

FEATURE: SITE Bird Safe Glass Birds are unable to perceive glass as a barrier, resulting in millions of fatalities each year. Bird safety was a priority in the design of the Center for Global Conservation, located between an aviary exhibition and a body of water. The south and east facades use an innovative glass with a special ultra-violet coating that appears opaque to birds yet transparent to humans. Birds, unlike humans, are able to perceive ultra-violet light as a separate, enhanced color. The glass has a vertically-

striped coating that reflects ultra-violet daylight. Behind this coating is another that absorbs

ultra-violet light, heightening the contrast of the pattern, which birds perceive as an obstacle.


Lion House Reconstruction

Bronx, NY

Awards

New York City Department of Design and Construction & Wildlife Conservation Society

2009 AIA New York State, Award of Merit

Completion 2008 43,000 GSF / 4,000 GSM

2009 The Municipal Arts Society of New York City, MASterworks Award, Best Restoration Project 2008 Society of American Registered Architects Design Award of Merit 2006 City of New York/US EPA Green Building Design Award

4

2 3

8 7

6 5

1

1

2 Ground Source Heat

3

4 Dynamic ETFE Skylights

6

5 Natural Daylighting

7 FSC Certified Wood

Building Re-Use

Building Management System

8 Fuel Cells

Under-Floor Air


The Lion House is the largest building on historic Astor Court, an assemblage of Beaux-arts buildings at the center of the Bronx Zoo. A designated landmark, the building had been closed to the Zoo’s visitors since the late 1970s when the big cats moved to more expansive environments. The reconstruction transformed the former open-air cages into new natural environments for the flora and fauna of Madagascar, while the former public viewing hall became a rentable, multi-purpose space opening to a landscaped exterior garden and terrace. The building has a recycled greywater system, a fuel cell, and geothermal wells, making it a model of environmental sustainability.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Gold 2030 Challenge Compliant 50%

of Existing Shell and Interiors Preserved

42%

Potable Water Reduction

The revitalized Lion House is an expression of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s mission of global conservation. A 200 kW fuel cell and a campus gas-fired co-generation plant supply the building with electricity, steam and hot water, and coupled with a geothermal heat pump,

result in minimal greenhouse gas emissions. Significant reduction in water consumption is supplemented by a water filtration system that serves an adjacent sea lion pool, eliminating the disposal of 1.6 million gallons of water annually.

50%

Water Reduction for Landscaping

77%

Energy Reduction

77%

Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill

96%

Regional Materials

FEATURE: INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ETFE Skylight In order to maintain a consistent environment in the exhibit area, dynamic skylights automatically adjust in response to ambient light and temperature. This helps to recreate a natural setting, allowing flora and fauna to receive ample daylight. At the PRIN

T PAT

TERN

imprinted with a grid-like pattern. same time it avoids solar heat When the upper air chamber is gain that would tax the building’s PRIN T PAT TERN pressurized, environmental systems. The 1 the pattern overlaps and light is allowed to penetrate. skylights are made of ETFE, When the lower air chamber a transparent, lightweight OPEN is pressurized, the graphic is film fused together to create a cushion filled with air. The PRINoffset, blocking light from entering T PAT TERN 2 the space. device consists of two chambers

1

OPEN

CLOSED

AIR P

Open

RESS

PRIN

T PAT

TERN

2

Closed

URE


Housatonic River Museum

Pittsfield, MA

Awards

River Museum, Inc.

2010 American Society of Civil Engineers/ National, Honor Award

Completion 2012 13,100 GSF / 1,100 GSM

2009 American Society of Civil Engineers/ NY, Engineering Excellence Awards

2

3

1

6

7 5

4

1 Ground Source Heat

Green Roof

3

2

Daylighting Tubes

Photovoltaics/ Solar Thermal

5

4

6 Bioswale

Rainwater Harvesting

7 Sun Shades

Radiant Heating


The Housatonic River Museum will be the first net zero buildings in the Northeast and one of only seven nationally; it is designed to produce as much energy as it consumes and is projected to achieve LEED Platinum. Dedicated to the Housatonic River’s history and ecology, the high-performance design and siting embodies the museum’s environmental mission. Located in historic Wahonah Park, the structure responds to its low-rise urban residential context by continuing the bordering street wall and by framing a new axial approach to the adjacent wooden grandstand built in 1919. Situated within the 100-year floodplain of the neighboring Housatonic River, piers raise the museum above the ground. The building’s program— consisting of galleries, office, circulation, support, and outdoor space—integrates with energy saving and generating strategies to achieve net zero status.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum Anticipated Carbon Neutral Daylighting Tubes Radiant Heating Greywater Treatment The Housatonic River Museum is designed to achieve net zero energy through an integrated approach that uses passive strategies to reduce energy consumption, and active technologies to generate energy on-site. Solar heat gain, which can increase energy use for cooling, is

minimized through building form, orientation, slot windows, and sun shades. Natural ventilation also minimizes requirements for artificial cooling, and daylighting tubes reduce the need for artificial lighting. Energy generating systems include solar thermal panels, photovoltaics, and geothermal heating.

FEATURE: ENERGY Natural Ventilation The Housatonic River Museum is naturally ventilated, relying on wind, temperature, and pressure differentials to move fresh air through a building instead of mechanical ventilation. Cool air enters through louvers located beneath the raised building. As the air warms, it rises through the open gallery levels and is exhausted out the wind

tower on the roof. A wind cowl on the tower rotates according to the direction of the wind, creating a negative pressure that draws air out of the building. By using natural ventilation, the Housatonic Museum uses significantly less energy compared to a conventional building, helping it to achieve net zero energy.

Bioswale Wind Cowl


Corporate Offices

New York, NY

Awards

Confidential Client

2013 Contract Magazine, Interior Awardsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Adaptive Reuse

Completion 2012 55,000 GSF / 5,100 GSM LEED Silver

2

4

6

5

1

3

1 Bike Storage

2

3 Skylights

5

4 Prominent Circulation Stair

Under-Floor Air Distribution

6 High Recycled Content Flooring

FSC Certified Wood


FXCollaborative designed the renovation of a landmarked former military building on Manhattan’s west side to house new corporate offices for a global multimedia entertainment company. The 3-story building, previously a television studio, now accommodates approximately 240 employees. While the landmarked shell remains, additional mezzanine levels were added to the interior, increasing the overall area to 55,000 square feet. The renovation restores original features and introduces skylights in order to maximize and harvest natural daylight into the space. Glass partitions increase the visual transparency and allow light to filter throughout the offices and workstations. Breakout and gathering spaces provide space for informal meetings and group working sessions. Conference rooms and common areas balance the public/private aspect of the program. The renovation reveals the antique industrial character of the early 1900s building, while a dynamic modern appearance identifies the new elements.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Silver 86% Building Reuse of Walls, Floor and Roof

94% Construction Waste Recycled or Salvaged

> 30% Recycled Content in Construction Material

> 20% Regional Materials Sustainable features of the building include under-floor air distribution and automated daylight-sensing light fixture controls. Bike storage and a locker room are provided to promote alternative means of transportation as well as physical fitness. Dual flush

Used in Construction

toilets and waterless urinals were installed to reduce water use. Low-VOC Prominent interconnecting stairs Paints, Adhesives and Flooring encourage reduced elevator use. The new standing seam > 95% metal roof is highly reflective FSC Certified Wood to mitigate the heat-island effect, while respecting the building’s 31% historic integrity. Supplemental Cementitious Material in Concrete

FEATURE: INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Daylight Analysis When the Armory was used as a television studio, all exterior openings in its Drill Hall were permanently closed. In order to bring daylight back into this large space, the design team proposed installing multiple skylights in the new roof. The goal was to maximize daylight penetration and minimize direct sunlight and glare on the upper mezzanine. Multiple configurations were tested using Ecotect software which resulted in the installation of a single row of skylights on the south side of the peaked roof with a second section directly over the multiple connecting stairs. one row—south of peak


Rockefeller Brothers Fund

Awards New York, NY Rockefeller Brothers Fund Completion 2009 29,000 GSF / 2,700 GSM

2010 Environmental Design+ Construction, Best Institutional Building (Honorable Mention)

LEED Platinum

3

5

6

2

7 1

8

1

2 Task LED Lights on Occupancy Sensors

Low-VOC Finishes

4

3

5 Daylight Dimming

Maximized Daylight & Views

7

6 Recycled Content

Low Flow Fixtures

8 Rapidly Renewable Materials

Reused/ Refurbished Furniture

4


FXCollaborative designed corporate offices for The Rockefeller Brothers Fund’s new location in Manhattan’s Morningside Heights. The resulting design creates an environment that resonates with staff, visitors, donors, and the non-profit community. A key feature of the office is the Grants Hub, a central place for staff to collaborate, discuss grant-related issues, and review proposals. The space both highlights the core business of the Fund, and serves to further improve operational efficiencies. To counteract the low ceilings and small windows of the 1950’s building, FXCollaborative embraced the sunlight by centrally-locating glass-fronted offices, leaving the perimeter bright and open, and allowing sunlight to reach the entire office. FXCollaborative’s vision for the Rockefeller Brothers Fund coincides with the organization’s commitment to ensure that sustainability is incorporated holistically throughout the entire project. The office achieved a LEED Platinum certification from the USGBC.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum 90%

Views

35%

Below Code Lighting Levels

40%

Reduction in Water Consumption

89% The interior’s understated elegance is enriched with a neutral and natural palette, complemented by vintage Mid-Century furniture, custom millwork and recycled materials such as IceStone, rapidly renewable bamboo, high percentages of FSC certified

wood, and local slate from Vermont. The office’s layout blurs the boundaries between public and private with a flexible openoffice plan to encourage better communication and provide greater access to daylight and views.

20%

Recycled Content Materials

64%

FSC Certified Wood

15%

Re-Used or Refurbished Furniture

FEATURE: MATERIALS & RESOURCES Certified Wood FSC certified wood is wood that is certified under the standards set by the Forest Stewardship Council, an independent non-profit certification body represented in over 57 countries, created to render international forestry practices more sustainable. FSC certification is awarded

Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill

to companies and landowners that carry out forestry practices consistent with FSC standards. FSC certification is based on 10 forestry principles and 56 criteria that aim to ensure that forest resources are managed to meet the social, economic, and ecological needs of present and future generations.

Educational

Green Construction Video


National Audubon Society Headquarters

New York, NY

Awards

National Audubon Society

2009 IIDA NY Lester Dundes Interior Design Award, Sustainable Design Category

Completion 2008 25,000 GSF / 2,600 GSM

2009 Environmental Design+ Construction, Excellence in Design Award, Commercial Category 2009 CoreNet Global Sustainable Leadership and Design Award, Design/Interior NonProfit Category

3 8 4

1

7 6

2

5

1

2 Maximized Daylight & Views

Low-VOC Finishes

4

3

5 Low-Flow Fixtures

Daylight Dimming

7

6 Locally Built Furniture

Under-Floor Air

8 Reclaimed Barn Siding

Recycled Bamboo Millwork


The National Audubon Society recently relocated to a full floor at 225 Varick Street. This former printing house offered high ceilings, full-height windows, and large floor plates that allowed all 125 staff members to be on one floor. Working closely with the client and their real estate advisors, FXCollaborative assisted with programming, test fits, feasibility and lease reviews. The design for their new headquarters is inspired by their mission to ‘protect and restore vital ecosystems, and to ensure a healthy environment for people, wildlife, and the earth’s natural resources.’ The work space functions as a model for their environmental mission. Innovative features include: energy efficient systems, under-floor air distribution, open space planning to allow daylight penetration to the entire floor, occupancy sensors and controls, the use of recycled and locally-produced materials, and high indoor environmental quality.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES LEED Platinum 90%

Daylight Penetration

35%

Lighting Levels Below Code

40%

Reduction in Water Consumption

30% FXCollaborative’s design organizes the single rectangular floorplate around a central core. Closed conference rooms are at the center of the building to maximize daylight and views. Glazed wall surfaces and low-

height partitions allow natural light to reach core spaces. The palate of materials used was inspired by Audubon’s roots in nature and are reclaimed, recycled, and rapidly renewable.

FEATURE: INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Under-Floor Air In a conventional system, conditioned air is supplied and returned at the ceiling level, using an extensive network of ducts. In under-floor air distribution, the floor is slightly raised above a plenum. Conditioned air is sent directly to the plenum where it flows freely to supply outlets in the floor. These devices have

individual controls, allowing occupants to adjust the temperature in their workspace. As the air warms, it rises to the ceiling where it is exhausted. By taking advantage of the natural buoyancy of air, this air flow pattern significantly reduces energy use and improves air quality compared to a ducted system.

Increased Efficiency of HVAC

75%

Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill

> 75%

of Spaces with Daylight, 90% with Views


Green Roofs FXCollaborative has designed living roofs for a variety of program types. Working closely with plant specialists, we design the roof as the “fifth facade” to a building, creating a carefully conceived aesthetic experience while ensuring technical integrity.

From accessible amenity spaces on residential and commercial buildings to high-performance renovations of cultural facilities and schools, we have responded to a variety of complex conditions and worked with diverse green roof systems. We provide evaluation services to determine if an existing structure is appropriate for a green roof, as well as design and construction administration to facilitate proper installation practices. As a member of Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, the recognized industry leader, FXCollaborative is able to access cutting-edge roof and wall research and the latest industry best practices standards and developments. FXCollaborative has a Certified Green Roof Professional on staff who continues advancing our knowledge and expertise in this area.

WHAT IS A GREEN ROOF? Green Roofs are vegetated roof covers, with growing media and plants. The number of layers and the layer placement vary from system to system and green roof type, but at the very least all green roofs include a single to multi-ply waterproofing layer, drainage, growing media and plants, covering the entire roof deck surface. There are two main types of green roofs— extensive or intensive—although a green roof is often designed with features of both, and subsequently referred to as either semi-extensive or semi-intensive. The benefits of building a green roof include building performance enhancements and environmental improvements, as well increased amenity value for building occupants.


Lincoln Center Redevelopment North Plaza Renovation

Intensive Green Roof

New York, NY Completion 2009 11,000 GSF Green Roof

Situated on the south side of 65th Street, a dramaticallysloped, 11,000 square foot green roof offers a new public amenity to patrons and performers at Lincoln Center. Located above a restaurant and the entrance to the Elinor Bunin-Munro Film Center, the torqued roofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a hyperbolic paraboloidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is accessible from the southwest corner where it dips down to meet the plaza. The roof appears to float above

Designed in Collaboration with Diller Scofidio + Renfro

the glass curtainwall below and is cantilevered at its northern edge, two stories above street level. Supported by steel columns, the roof structure consists of steel frame beneath metal decking and poured concrete. A customized retention system secures the 10 inch semi-intensive growing medium to the sloped roof, preventing slippage. A turf-type mix of Tall Fescue and Kentucky Bluegrass was selected for its durability and low-maintenance.


250 Hudson Street Roof Conversion

Semi-Intensive Green Roof

New York, NY Completion 2009 6,000 GSF / 600 GSM

FXCollaborativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green roof for a newly renovated office building in lower Manhattan provides both private and communal outdoor space for tenants. A large gathering space with outdoor furniture is located in the southeast corner at the intersection of two large planted areas, offering panoramic views of the Hudson River and lower Manhattan. Set back from the perimeter to allow for circulation, the green roof is shallow at the periphery and deep at the center, allowing a flush edge with the

Designed in Collaboration with Plant Fantasies Inc.

adjacent walkway. This creates a flowing landscape with trees, deeply-rooted tall grasses, and perennials throughout the center of the beds, surrounded by a carpet of shallow rooted sedums and other succulents. Plantings provide a variety of color throughout the seasons, beginning with pink armeria in the spring, yellow roses during the summer, and lavender asters in the fall. A wood trellis made of locally-sourced black locust forms a covered walkway, providing shade from the summer sun.


SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion

Extensive Green Roof

Philadelphia, PA Completion 2009 60,000 GSF Green Roof LEED Platinum

Green Roof Designed in Collaboration with WRT

2030 Challenge Compliant Designed to Earn the Energy Star

Nestled into the landscape, the green roof of this highperformance suburban office building integrates the structure into its natural surroundings. Along the roofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s northern edge is an area of stone pavers and lawn that provides space for outdoor gatherings and meetings. Chosen for texture, color, and seasonality, a varied planting selection creates a visually appealing space for employees year-round. Raised planting

beds with tall grasses that last throughout the winter define the gathering area. At the southern edge, behind raised planting beds and a perforated metal screen, mechanical equipment is fully integrated into the green roof, surrounded by sedum, and accessible by pavers. A peaceful setting amidst the forest, the roof provides a welcome amenity that benefits employees and the environment alike.


Center for Global Conservation

Bronx, NY

Intensive Green Roof

Completion 2009

Green Roof Designed in Collaboration with HM White Site Architects

4,000 GSF Green Roof LEED Gold 2030 Challenge Compliant

Located in a forested area on the northern edge of the Bronx Zoo campus, this living roof bridges the building with its natural surroundings. Rising from the forest floor, the sloped roof brings vegetation from the surrounding landscape up to the second and third-floor offices, culminating in an outdoor gathering area above an existing rock outcropping. The roof uses an intensive growing medium of approximately one foot, planted with a mixture of meadow grasses, flowers, and

shrubs. Amidst these plantings is a winding pathway made of reclaimed stones. In addition to its aesthetic and environmental benefits, the roofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sloped design eliminates the need for fire stairs by linking the upper floors with an at-grade egress, allowing for greater space efficiency. Integrated into its local environment, and designed to encourage wildlife habitat, the roof design is a powerful symbol of the Wildlife Conservation Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission.


The Helena

New York, NY Completion 2005

Semi-Intensive/ Extensive Green Roof

12,000 GSF of Green Roofs LEED Gold

The green roof of the Helena provides a desirable urban outdoor amenity for the residents of this 37-story LEED Gold residential building. Located on the top floor facing the Hudson River, a patio wraps around the south and east façade of the building, offering a gathering space for tenants. Facing the river, an area of lawn provides space for recreation. Surrounding the entire roof,

an eight-foot high glass barrier blocks strong wind currents and allows unobstructed views to New Jersey and beyond. Lowlevel setbacks are covered with an extensive green roof, planted with colorful sedum. Rainwater from the green roof is collected and processed by the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackwater treatment system, then reused for landscape irrigation and in the cooling tower.


The Calhoun School

Semi-Intensive Green Roof

New York, NY Completion 2005 1,200 GSF Green Roof

Using a variety of growing media and components, FXCollaborative transformed The Calhoun Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roof into a safe, multi-purpose space for teaching and recreation. An oasis from urban life, the green roof has become an integral part of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curriculum. At its center, a semi-intensive lawn provides a space for recreation and educational activities. The lawn is a synthetic-natural hybrid that blends artificial and natural grass to protect the living root structure from overuse. In a

tray-system of deep, intensive beds that surround the lawn, students grow vegetables and herbs, planted as a joint project between the Lower School classes and food service chefs. Accessible, ramped walkways provide a pathway around the perimeter. Bordering the walkway are sedum plants, grown in a shallow, extensive medium. A full-height mesh screen provides protection and allows sweeping views across the urban landscape.


Symphony House

New York, NY Jack Resnick and Sons, Inc. Completion 2011 12,000 GSF/ 1,100 GSM

FXCollaborative transformed an underused, 9th floor setback of the Symphony House, a 25-year-old luxury apartment building in Midtown Manhattan, into a 12,000 square-foot environmentally-friendly amenity for its tenants. By contouring the roofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscape and strategically planting tall grasses and river birch trees,

Semi-Intensive Green Roof Designed in Collaboration with Plant Fantasies Inc.

we were able to create formal and intimate seating areas for residents to relax and entertain in a desirable urban outdoor environment. The roof collects and stores rainwater to support plant life which in turn reduces the roofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambient temperature, making the space cooler throughout the summer or warm fall days.


315 Hudson

New York, NY Jack Resnick and Sons, Inc.

Semi-Intensive/ Extensive Green Roof

Completion 2013 20,500 GSF / 1,900 GSM

315 Hudson is an assemblage of four separate buildings previously combined in the late 1960s to form a 10-story office building with 40,000-squarefoot office floor space in the Hudson Square neighborhood of Lower Manhattan. FXCollaborativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design adds an additional 15,000 square feet of rentable space and an extensive green roof accessible to all building tenants of the

expansive office building. The 5,500-square-foot roof terrace features flowering trees, tall grasses and a variety of colorful annuals, while the elevator bulkhead at the roof level includes a large gathering space, pantry, restrooms, and storage. The adjacent building roof space will also receive an extensive green roof. We are studying the possibility of combining both roofs with photovoltaic array.


Sustainability Guidelines Guidelines have the power to affect measurable change at a large scale. The policies FXCollaborative authors focus on sustainability from a holistic long-term perspective, addressing issues from pollution and climate change to human health and ecological restoration. Establishing comprehensive and cohesive policies prior to developing a project is crucial to successfully implementing sustainability strategies. Well developed guidelines align the specific needs of clients and users with building and site conditions, costs, legislation, third party metrics and global objectives. FXCollaborative has successfully worked with clients

to develop customized documents for initiatives of a range of scales, from the New Jersey rail network to tenant guidelines for individual spaces. We are skilled at collaborating with government organizations to garner support for specific sustainability strategies and seek to establish synergies with existing legislation.


Waterfront Precinct G9

Dubai, UAE Nakheel Properties Completion 2012 300 Acres / 125 Hectares LEED-ND Gold Equivalent

were sustainability and G9 represents a large-scale experience of the natural effort to integrate sustainable environment. development throughout the The Master Plan includes fabric of a rapidly developing Sustainability Guidelines for city. The goals of the Precinct all developments to ensure that G9 Master Plan were to build SHADING DEVICES BREEZE FUNNELING the built realm is constructed in an enduring, valuable urban an environmentally-responsible development which maximizes GREEN ROOF EVAPORATIVE COOLING manner. Guidelines address the attractiveness of the best practices, opportunities environment for potential and metrics, integrated urban occupants. Equally important

planning, infrastructure, architecture, and construction practices. Six areas of environmental response are targeted: Site, Water, Energy, Materials, Indoor Environmental Quality, and Carbon Footprint. Guidelines integrate the requirements of third-party benchmarks of LEED-NC, LEEDCI, and LEED for Retail.


Canal District, Waterfront Design Guidelines

Dubai, UAE

Awards

Nakheel Properties

2007 MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Project Award, Commendation

Completion 2008 500 Acres / 200 Hectares LEED-ND Gold Equivalent

FXCollaborative has master planned 200 hectares of land as the largest new sustainable mixed-use development in a highgrowth district within the UAE, designed to the standards of US Green Building Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND). The master plan divides the site into eight smaller districts, pierced with water

canals and connected by a new light rail system and a series of parks and pedestrian boulevards. FXCollaborativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sustainable guidelines ensure that all future buildings on site will be LEED Gold, and that through a total systems approach, resources will be shared between energy systems, wastewater systems, and building water-use. The

guidelines target three primary areas of environmental action as a direct response to local conditions: increasing energy performance, increasing water efficiency, and decreasing dependency on automobiles. The project has received an award from Architectural Review magazine.


Eleven Times Square Tenant Guidelines

New York, NY

Awards

SJP Properties

2010 The Greater New York Construction User Council Outstanding Project Award

Completion 2009 1,100,000 GSF / 102,000 GSM LEED Gold

2009 Roger H. Corbetta Award for Quality Concrete 2008 Perspective New York Magazine, Best Mixed-Use Development

A speculative LEED-CS Gold office tower, Eleven Times Square sets a new standard for sustainable highrises in New York. The tower features an extremely high-performance building envelope with perforated aluminium sunshades, highlyinsulated glazing units, and ceramic frit coatings. Water conservation strategies include

greywater reuse for cooling towers and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Interiors feature improved indoor air quality and use of recycled and local materials. Guidelines were developed to educate prospective tenants about the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green features and their importance with respect to greater environmental issues. The guidelines provide

recommendations on environmentally responsible design of tenant facilities, purchasing, cleaning practices, and pest management. They are also intended to ensure that proper operational practices are carried out throughout the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifespan.


Second Avenue Subway

New York, NY

Awards

New York City Transit

2004 City of New York/US EPA Green Building Design Award

Design Completion 2006

FXCollaborative led a multidisciplinary team to develop sustainable design guidelines for the Second Avenue Subway line in Manhattan. This task force ensured that every aspect of the subway planning process was analyzed for and informed by sustainable design principles under the MTA’s “Design for the

Environment” (DfE) program. The DfE program established five pillars of sustainability around which the guidelines were developed: Energy Efficiency, Material and Resource Conservation, Indoor Environmental Quality, Water Conservation and Site Management, and Operations

and Maintenance. The Guidelines focuse on optimizing strategies to capitalize on economies of scale, particularly regarding energy efficiency and resource conservation. Indoor environmental quality is a key priority, including minimizing noise pollution through effective use of geometry.


Black Rock Forest Center for Science and Education Design Guidelines

The Black Rock Forest Consortiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s central administration, research and educational facility is located within the 3,750-acre Black Rock Forest and houses orientation, display and instructional space including wet/dry labs, research labs, a reference library and conference room, administrative offices and a data center which serves as the base station for the Consortiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental monitoring system. The Forest Lodge, a two-story building located just east of

Cornwall, NY

Awards

Black Rock Forest Consortium

2004 Northeast Green Building Awards, Honorable Mention

Completion 2006 18,000 GSF / 1,800 GSM

the center, provides overnight accommodations and includes a flexible dining and 100-seat meeting room, a warming kitchen, and appropriate services. Our work with the Black Forest Consortium began in 1997 with a master plan that developed a program and sustainability guidelines for an on-site center for the research and teaching of the natural ecosystem. The design and construction of the Center was carefully planned so

that the building addresses the needs of the researchers and educators while not compromising the environmental ethic that is the foundation of the Black Rock Mission. These buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; site sensitive design, building form, material use and energy consumption management incorporates a geothermal heat pump system, composting toilets, and increased natural daylight and ventilation.


Battery Park City Design Guidelines

New York, NY Hugh L. Carey Battery Park City Authority Completion 2001 92 Acres / 37 Hectares

FXCollaborative developed Battery Park City Sustainable Design Guidelines, the first such guidelines ever created for residential buildings. The guidelines cut energy and fuel use dramatically, require that five percent of each buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy is produced from renewable sources, and specify blackwater treatment systems. Apartments created according

to the guidelines must be 30% more energy-efficient than required by New York State energy codes, and allow 30% more natural light than city codes demand. The Sustainable Design Guidelines for Commercial Development, a sequel to the Residential Guidelines, provides both required and suggested strategies for increasing the environmental sustainability

of future developments. To increase energy efficiency by 40%, the guidelines require integrated photovoltaic panels and fuel cells. The guidelines call for structures to reduce overall water usage by 20% by requiring all building setback areas to collect reusable rainwater and to use reclaimed water for nonpotable purposes.


NJ Transit Sustainable Design Guidelines

The New Jersey Transit Green Guidelines developed by FXCollaborative provide direction for the design of new and rehabilitated rail stations and facilities. The Guidelines set global goals and recommend regional strategies. Sufficiently flexible, they enable project teams to meet

New Jersey NJ Transit Completion 2001

functional requirements while addressing the long-term energy, environmental, and social needs of the community. The Guidelines cover a range of important issues such as site management, water conservation, construction methodology, and operations and maintenance. They stress energy efficiency, the preservation

of biodiversity, and the use of recycled and reclaimed materials. The Guidelines expand upon and further develop NJ Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s established practices, moving the organization to a leadership position amongst transit and other public agencies regarding environmental stewardship.


The Conde Nast Building at 4 Times Square Tenant Guidelines

New York, NY

Awards

The Durst Organization

2001 AIA Honor Award for Architecture

Completion 1999 1,600,000 GSF / 149,000 GSM Catalyst for the LEED System

2001 World Architecture Awards, Commendation 2000 AIA New York State Excellence in Design Award 2000 New York City Audubon Society Major Achievement

As the first sustainable skyscraper in the United States, the Condé Nast Building set new standards for environmental responsibility and was a catalyst for the USGBC’s LEED rating system. Building systems were evaluated for their impact on occupant health, environmental sensitivity, and energy reduction, making this the first project of its size and type to adopt state-

of-the-art standards for energy conservation, indoor air quality, recycling systems, and the use of sustainable manufacturing processes. Guidelines are fundamental to educating prospective tenants about this innovative project. Being a precursor to LEED, the guidelines play a crucial role in attracting tenants and making them aware of environmental

issues. They elaborate upon the project’s sustainable technologies and systems, and explain green operational practices carried out by the building owner. The guidelines provide recommendations for sustainable space planning, lighting systems, and construction practices.


Pre- & Post-Occupancy Evaluation Services Designing a truly sustainable building or interior requires careful analysis of existing conditions and post-construction follow up. FXCollaborative offers customized pre- and postoccupancy analysis tools and services to help ensure a projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-performance and occupant satisfaction throughout its lifespan, ultimately reducing operational costs and productivity losses. Pre-occupancy surveys and building performance data collection provide highly specific information that inform program development, building design and overall project approach. Collecting information about equipment, lighting, schedules and user behavior can streamline space requirements,

determine system zoning, and establish criteria for appropriate comfort and controls. Post-occupancy services enable on-going energy and water efficiency, and provide a mechanism to ascertain and ensure occupant satisfaction. Surveys and energy and water benchmarking help identify discrepancies or problems that facilities can address, such as excessive energy consumption of a particular system. Finally, FXCollaborative provides education for building occupants, one of the key factors to ensuring the on-going sustainability of a project.


Pre- & Post-Occupancy Surveys

Many conditions affect the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of a space. These include lighting, acoustics, temperature, air quality, views, operability, and privacy. Pre-occupancy surveys are a critical tool to assess occupant comfort, how an existing facility is being used, and what could be improved upon. This data can prove especially important during the programming stage of a project to ensure issues are addressed at a fundamental level. It is not enough to simply design and construct a sustainable building. The postoccupancy phase of a project is critical to achieving sustainability goals and human comfort. With comprehensive user-experience

surveys, basic user education, and adjustments to systems, buildings can be optimized to achieve more efficient userfriendly environments. When used in conjunction with pre-occupancy surveys, post-occupancy surveys can provide compelling insight into the human impact that good design can achieve. FXCollaborative’s pre- and post-occupancy surveys helped to assess our strategy of The Rockefeller Brothers Fund’s new offices in Manhattan’s Morningside Heights. Many design features were able to undergo a before and after comparison to document the successful transformation of the work environment. For example, to counteract the low ceilings

and small windows of the 1950’s office building, the design team embraced sunlight by centrally-locating glass-fronted offices, leaving the perimeter bright and open, and allowing sunlight to reach the entire office. This design strategy was assessed using pre- and postoccupancy surveys that showed occupants were more satisfied with both natural daylight and artificial lighting in their new workplace. Similar results were recorded for improved air quality, temperature, and acoustics. Ultimately, occupants believed that their new workplace heightened collaboration and job performance while contributing to a higher quality of life.


Rockefeller Brothers Fund

RESPONDENTS

OVERALL SATISFACTION

AIR AND TEMPERATURE

LIGHTING AND CONTROLS

Pre-move: 26 Post-occupancy: 29

Overall Work Environment

Air Quality

Lighting

RATING SYSTEM

post-occupancy

post-occupancy

post-occupancy

pre-move

pre-move

pre-move

Job Performance Due to Environment

Temperature

Quantity of Natural Light

post-occupancy

post-occupancy

post-occupancy

pre-move

pre-move

pre-move

Improvement on Community & Collaboration

In Hot Weather, Space is:

-3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 dissatisfied neutral satisfied

too hot

post-occupancy Quality of Life Improvements in New Office

post-occupancy

comfortable

ACOUSTICS too cold Noise

post-occupancy post-occupancy

pre-move

pre-move

In Cold Weather, Space is: too hot

post-occupancy pre-move

comfortable

too cold

Sound Privacy

post-occupancy pre-move


Pre- & Post-Occupancy Benchmarking

The collection of data from energy and water systems is important to understanding how existing facilities are performing. Metering and reporting tools allow insight into existing systems in order to discover inefficiencies and strategically target building improvements. This is particularly important when addressing sustainable retrofits of existing building stock. A truly sustainable design does not stop at the certificate of occupancy. It is necessary to commission and monitor systems after the building is completed to ensure it is performing as intended. Metering and reporting

tools help us collect performance data that determines if a building is working as designed. Analyzing this information allows us to optimize installed systems, assess our designs, and educate users of new facilities. FXCollaborative led a team focusing on benchmarking existing performance at Tulane Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School of Architecture. This involved an indepth assessment of Richardson Memorial Hall. Energy and water use data was collected using the IBM Intelligent Building Management Software. This software collects real-time data and events from

sensors on boilers, air ducts, lights, water pipes, chillers, computer rooms, and external temperature monitors, as well as from a buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s management system. At RITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Golisano Institute for Sustainability, we are working with students and facilities to monitor the postoccupancy performance of the overall building as well as specific systems, and calibrate design estimates with actual conditions. This process will help identify incongruities and ensure ongoing building efficiency.


Rochester Institute of Technology, Golisano Institute for Sustainability

STUDENT ANALYSIS OF BUILDING SYSTEMS AT GOLISANO INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Water Recovery

Water Level Sensing

Water Pressure Sensing

Non-potable Pulse Meter

PAFC—WebCTRL

PAFC—Electrical Demand

PAFC—Gas Meter

Wind: Annual Generation

Wind: Daily Generation (24 October 2013)

Fuel Cell

Solar & Wind

Effect of Seasonal Timing on Solar Power Generation


References


LEED Projects

LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS 888 Boylston Street: LEED Platinum

Center for Global Conservation: LEED Gold

35XV Residences: LEED Silver

Allianz Tower: LEED Platinum

Eleven Times Square: LEED Gold

Golisano Institute of Sustainability, RIT: LEED Platinum

The Epic: LEED Gold

King Abdullah Financial District Parcel 2.14: LEED Silver

National Audubon Society Headquarters: LEED Platinum

The Greenwich Lane: LEED ND Gold Pre-certified

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center: LEED Silver

The Helena: LEED Gold

Multimedia Company Corporate Office: LEED Silver

Rockefeller Brothers Fund Corporate Offices: LEED Platinum SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion: LEED Platinum Warren Hall Renovation, Cornell University: LEED Platinum

Lion House Reconstruction at Bronx Zoo: LEED Gold

Circa Central Park: LEED Silver

Navy Green: LEED ND Silver

King Abdullah Financial District Parcel 2.09: LEED Gold

7770 Norfolk Avenue: LEED Certified

Kings County Criminal Courthouse: LEED Gold

Avalon Clinton: LEED Certified

WSP Flack & Kurtz Offices: LEED Gold

OFS Brands Furniture Showroom: LEED Certified

SELECT LEED PROJECTS IN DESIGN/CONSTRUCTION 3 Hudson Boulevard: LEED Gold Anticipated New Business School, Columbia University: LEED Gold Anticipated

Center for Integrated Technology Learning, SUNY Purchase College: LEED Silver Anticipated

Aljamea-tus-Saifiyah: The Radiant Campus: LEED Certified Anticipated

The Crossing at Jamaica Station: LEED Silver Anticipated

Columbia University School of Nursing: LEED Gold Anticipated

La Central: LEED Silver Anticipated

King Abdullah Financial District Parcels, Multiple Projects: LEED Certified Anticipated

The Greenwich Lane: LEED Silver Anticipated

Museum of the Built Environment: LEED Silver Anticipated

Ames Street Residences: LEED Silver Anticipated

The Forge: LEED Silver Anticipated


SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion


Recent Sustainable Design Awards

2018 The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design, Green GOOD Design, 888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

2012 Education Design Showcase, Green Judges’ Choice Winner, Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester, NY

The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, Green GOOD DESIGN, Nordhavnen: City Regenerative, Copenhagen, Denmark

BOMA/NY Pinnacle Award for New Construction, Eleven Times Square, New York, NY

Fast Company, World Changing Ideas Awards (Finalist), Public Square, New York, NY

2016 American Architecture Prize, Architectural Design—Green Architecture, Gold Award, Allianz Tower, Istanbul, Turkey

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, Special Recognition Award, The Javits Center Green Roof, New York, NY

BUILD News, Best Global Green & Sustainable Architectural Practice, FXFOWLE

BUILD News, Best Sustainable Large-Scale Residential Building Project, 77 Greenwich Street, New York, NY

Big Apple Brownfield Award—Economic Development, Circa Central Park, New York, NY

2015 American Institute of Architect—New York Chapter, Committee on the Environment, Honorable Mention, Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Renovation, New York, NY

Building Owners and Managers Association of Greater Rochester, Rochester Recognition Award, Sustainable Building Category, Rochester Institute of Technology, Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester, NY

2014 Environmental Design + Construction, Excellence in Design Awards, Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester, NY

Environmental Design + Construction, Excellence in Design Awards, Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, NY

2013 Education Design Showcase, Green Judges’ Choice Winner, Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester, NY

ENR New York, Best Green Project, Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester, NY

2011 Boston Society of Architects, Sustainable Design Awards, SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion, Newtown Square, PA

Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Best Tall Building (Americas), Finalist, Eleven Times Square, New York, NY

Environmental Design + Construction, Excellence in Design, Eleven Times Square, New York, NY

American Institute of Architects—New York City, Honor Award for Urban Design, Lincoln Center Public Spaces, New York, NY

2010 International Commercial Property Award (Americas), SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion, Newtown Square, PA

Architect Magazine, Annual Design Review (Citation), Center for Global Conservation, Bronx, NY

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, Green Roof Award of Excellence, 250 Hudson, New York, NY

Society of American Registered Architects Professional Design Award, Center for Global Conservation, Bronx, NY

Society of American Registered Architects Professional Design Award, SAP Americas Headquarters Expansion, Newtown Square, PA

Society of American Registered Architects Professional Design Award, Eleven Times Square, New York, NY


The New York Times Building


Our Sustainability Services

FXCollaborative works together with clients to establish environmental performance goals and to outline a process for achieving them. At the onset of every project, we identify and lead the most effective team of experts for the effort. Goals are achieved in compliance with budgetary and time constraints, as well as with existing standards and guidelines. FXCollaborative designs existing and new spaces to high-performance standards, develops environmentally responsible planning visions, authors sustainable policies and guidelines, and outlines

green operational practices. We work through an integrated process with a clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in-house team, facilitating projects with ambitious environmental goals, and identifying economic opportunities by which they

can be achieved. We strive to educate clients and users to ensure environmentallyresponsible practices continue throughout a projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifespan.


GUIDELINES

MASTER PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING

Planning and Campus Sustainability Guidelines

Feasibility Studies

Sustainable Development Guidelines Green Infrastructure Guidelines Green Tenant Guidelines Green Renovation Guidelines for Existing Facilities Green Operations Guidelines Organizational ‘Best Practices’ Guidelines

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN

High-Performance Site Selection Analysis Building Design Existing Building Environmental Green Retrofits Assessments

CERTIFICATION ASSISTANCE

COSTS

LEED Certification Coordination

Lifecycle Costing

ENERGY STAR Qualified Projects

Financial Incentives Coordination

Greening Landmark and Historic Buildings

2030 Challenge Compliant Projects

Ecological Restoration Strategies

Sustainable Interior Design

Brownfield Redevelopment Strategies

Green Roof Design

Living Building Challenge Implementation

Existing Building Green Audits

Water Resource Strategies

Building Envelope Evaluation and Retrofitting

Programming and Space Planning

Daylighting Analysis and Design Strategies Energy-Efficient Lighting Strategies Energy Analysis and Design/Efficiency Strategies Pre- & Post-Occupancy Evaluation and Analysis

International Metrics: Gold Star, BREEAM, CASBEE etc.

Cost-Benefit Analysis


FXCollaborative Architects

Gerard F.X. Geier II, FAIA, FIIDA, LEED AP Managing Partner

Kenneth Bohall, CPA, LEED GA Chief Financial Officer

Daniel J. Kaplan, FAIA, LEED AP Senior Partner

Len Cerame, AIA, IIDA Principal

Sylvia J. Smith, FAIA, LEED AP Senior Partner

Stephan Dallendorfer, AIA, RIBA, LEED AP Principal

Mark E. Strauss, FAIA, AICP/PP, LEED AP Senior Partner

Brian Fanning, AIA, LEED AP Principal

Heidi L. Blau, FAIA, LEED AP Partner

Elizabeth Finkelshteyn

Nicholas Garrison, AIA, OAQ, LEED AP Partner Tim Milam, AIA, LEED AP Partner, Managing Director John Schuyler, AIA, LEED AP Partner

Angie Lee, AIA, IIDA Principal Alfreda Radzicki, AIA, LEED AP Principal Irina Rice, Esq., LEED AP General Counsel Jack Robbins, AIA, LEED AP Principal, Director of Urban Design Gustavo Rodriguez, CODIA, LEED AP Design Director Ann M. Rolland, FAIA, LEED AP Principal Michael Syracuse, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Principal Bruce S. Fowle, FAIA, LEED AP Founding Principal Emeritus Sudhir S. Jambhekar, FAIA, RIBA, LEED AP Senior Principal Emeritus


Center for Global Conservation


Glossary of Sustainable Terms

BLACKWATER TREATMENT The treatment and reuse of wastewater from toilets and other domestic processes for landscape irrigation, toilet water, and in cooling towers. BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM A computerized system that controls and monitors a building’s environmental systems, ensuring optimal ventilation, lighting, temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels, and overall energy use. BIOSWALE A shallow drainage ditch filled with vegetation, designed to naturally treat storm water runoff before being released into a watershed or storm sewer. BIOCLIMATIC PLANNING Strategies that respond to local climatic conditions in order to minimize energy use. BRISE SOLEIL Vertical or horizontal projections extending from a façade used to prevent overheating and glare in interior spaces due to high-angle summer sun, yet enable penetration of low-angle winter light. BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAICS BIPVs use photovoltaic cells to harness the energy of the sun to generate electricity, and

are an integrated part of the structure or building enclosure, requiring no additional structural support.

skylight because it captures low-angle winter light and avoids the overpowering summer midday sun, providing a consistent and abundant source of light.

CARBON NEUTRAL Net zero carbon emissions achieved by balancing the amount of greenhouse gases released with an off-set or by producing on-site renewable energy. See net zero energy.

DISTRICT HEATING AND COOLING A neighborhood system for distributing heat or cooling generated in a centralized location and distributed to local buildings. District plants are more efficient and less polluting as they minimize transmission losses associated with larger city-wide systems.

COGENERATION captures and uses the waste heat from electrical generation, requiring less fuel than would be needed to produce electricity and heat separately. COMMISSIONING Third-party verification and consultation to ensure that a building’s systems function as designed. COWL A wind tower cover consisting of a directional rudder, causing the exhaust opening to pivot in the direction of the prevailing wind, creating a negative pressure that draws air out. DAYLIGHTING TUBES Reflective tubing that captures daylight using a roof-top dome lens and channels it into the space below. The system is advantageous compared to a traditional

ECO-CORRIDOR The perimeter of an office is the most difficult area to ensure occupant comfort due to its close proximity to windows. Placing desks away from the perimeter and using this area as a circulation zone reduces heating and cooling costs and makes light available to more occupants. EMBODIED ENERGY The total amount of energy required to produce a product or material. With regard to a building, embodied energy includes the energy used in sourcing, manufacture, delivery, and installation of materials in the building’s fabric, and in materials required for its on-going use.


ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) Quantity of total energy used (kBtu) per unit of Area (SQ FT) over the difference of one year. EXTENSIVE A green roof with a lightweight, engineered growing medium of 3-6 inches, used for plants with shallow root structures, such as sedum. FIRST GROWTH FOREST A forest that has grown with minimal interference for over 100 years. First growth forests are biologically diverse and act as carbon sinks, storing carbon dioxide that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. FLY-ASH CONCRETE See Supplementary Cementitious Materials. FSC CERTIFIED WOOD The Forest Stewardship Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certification program is a guarantee that wood was sourced from a well-managed forest. FUEL CELLS Using natural gas, fuel cells generate electricity and supply heat on-site through an electrochemical process instead of combustion.

GREENWAY A corridor of land reserved for recreational use and environmental preservation. GREYWATER TREATMENT The treatment and reuse of wastewater from domestic processes such as dish washing, laundry and bathing for landscape irrigation, toilets, and washing machines. GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMPS Heat pumps that take advantage of the year-round constant ground temperature which is cooler than the air during the summer, and warmer during the winter. The pumps exchange temperature with the ground instead of the outside air in order to heat and cool a space. As a result, geothermal heat pumps are 25-50% more efficient that a conventional system. HEAT ISLAND EFFECT The elevated temperature of a city compared to a rural area due to an excess of impermeable surfaces, thermal mass, and a lack of vegetation. Adverse effects include increased energy consumption, higher levels of air pollutants, and compromised human comfort.

HIGH ALBEDO A surface with a high reflectivity that lowers the absorption of solar energy, decreasing the transfer of heat into a building. INTENSIVE A green roof with a deep, engineered growing medium of at least one foot, used to support shrubs and trees. LED A type of semiconductor, lightemitting diodes (LEDs) are more advantageous than incandescent light bulbs due to their reduced energy consumption and long lifetime. MICROTURBINE A combustion engine used to generate electricity on-site from natural gas. On-site electrical generation is significantly more efficient than energy sourced from the electrical grid. If waste heat is recovered, a microturbine can achieve an efficiency of up to 85%. NET ZERO ENERGY A building that annually uses an amount of energy equal to what it produces on-site from renewable sources. NET POSITIVE ENERGY A building that annually produces more energy on-site from renewable sources than it consumes.


glossary continued

RADIANT HEATING AND COOLING A system in which hot or cold water is pumped through tubing laid underneath the floor. Heat naturally rising from the floor delivers warmth. A chilled floor absorbs the heat in the room, cooling the space. Radiant cooling can also occur through chilled ceiling panels. RAPIDLY RENEWABLE A material made from a material that will naturally regenerate in 10 years or less, such as bamboo, cork, straw, or wool.

SOLAR HEAT GAIN An increase in the temperature of a space due to the heat of the sun. SOLAR-THERMAL SYSTEM A method of harnessing the energy of the sun for hot-water and space heating. Using a rooftop collector, solar energy is transformed into heat and transferred to a liquid for storage or immediate use.

between the structural concrete slab and a raised floor instead of a ceiling-based air distribution system. This system provides greater occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. VARIABLE-SPEED HVAC Heating and cooling equipment with efficient motors that deliver a variable amount of air to meet temperature requirements instead of operating in a binary (on/off) mode.

SEA WATER HEAT EXCHANGE Sea water is drawn in and pumped through heat exchangers that reject or extract its heat, and then pumped into the district cooling or heating network.

SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS (SCM) An additive to concrete that serves as a substitute for portland cement, which is highly energy and carbon intensive. SCMs are waste by-products of industrial processes that would otherwise be landfilled. Examples include fly-ash, blast furnace slag, and silica fume.

SEDUM A hardy genus of plants consisting of over 400 species that requires little maintenance or irrigation, with water-storing leaves and a shallow root structure, making them ideal for green roofs.

TRIPLE-GLAZING A window or curtain wall composed of three sheets of glass each separated by a sealed air or gas-filled space, providing increased insulation and thermal comfort.

WATER-SIDE ECONOMIZER A less energy-intensive method of cooling a building during cold months. Instead of using a chiller, a water-side economizer uses water from the cooling tower to cool a building.

UNDER-FLOOR AIR A highly energyefficient method of space conditioning in commercial or public buildings that delivers air using the open space

WIND TOWER A type of natural ventilation that draws naturally-rising, warm air from a space and exhausts it instead of using mechanical ducts.

SEMI-INTENSIVE A green roof with an engineered growing medium of 6-12 inches deep, used for grasses, perennials and shrubs.

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCs) Found in both building and household products, VOCs are carbonbased chemicals released into the air and may or may not have odor. Prolonged exposure to VOCs can cause health problems for certain individuals.


FXCollaborative Architects 22 West 19 Street New York, NY 10011 main +1 212 627 1700 www.fxcollaborative.com

Daniel Piselli, AIA, LEED AP, CPHD Director of Sustainability T +1 646 292 8137 dpiselli@fxcollaborative.com

FXCollaborative Sustainability  
FXCollaborative Sustainability