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SEPTEMBER 23–29, 2021 I VOLUME 40 I NUMBER 34 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

CITY LIMITS: NASHVILLE LEADERS RESIST A RETURN TO PRE-DELTA COVID RESTRICTIONS PAGE 6

FOOD & DRINK: INTERNASHIONAL NIGHT MARKET TO SHOWCASE IMMIGRANT-OWNED RESTAURANTS PAGE 24

Heading into AmericanaFest, talking with Emerging Act of the Year nominee Allison Russell about how music and music communities promote healing See more AmericanaFest preview coverage inside

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NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com


CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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Mask Not ....................................................6

Life in a Season

CITY LIMITS

VODKA YONIC

With vaccines available and the ire of state lawmakers looming, Nashville officials resist a return to pre-Delta restrictions

People survive losing two kids. I think about those parents often. And then I think about my son.

BY STEVEN HALE

BY ELIZABETH JONES

Vanderbilt Seeks Volunteers for HIV Vaccine Program ........................................6 Developing a safe vaccine would provide an ‘extra layer of protection’ for those who might come into contact with the virus BY KELSEY BEYELER

Pith in the Wind .........................................7 This week on the Scene’s news and politics blog

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Chosen Family ............................................8 Talking with Emerging Act of the Year nominee Allison Russell about how music and music communities promote healing BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

Hear Hans Condor Thrash It Out in ‘Breaking and Entering’ The Weird History of Old Hickory’s Boundaries

ART

Raw Glaze A collaborative exhibit between Elephant Gallery and the new Buchanan Arts initiative speaks to creative traditions and community arts education BY JOE NOLAN

COVER STORY

THIS WEEK ON THE WEB:

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Joyland Adds Doughnuts Advice King: Talking to Republicans About Vaccination

BOOKS

ON THE COVER:

A Symphony of Listeners

Allison Russell Photo by Daniel Meigs

Many voices harmonize in Paper Concert BY LAUREN TURNER AND CHAPTER 16

Cardinal Directions ................................. 10 Talking with Jed Hilly about piloting the AmericanaFest ship through pandemic waters BY GEOFFREY HIMES

Stepping Out ........................................... 12

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MUSIC

The Next Stage ........................................ 31

Your quick-reference guide to our favorite shows of AmericanaFest 2021

Kacey Musgraves finds lessons in her grief on Star-Crossed

BY ABBY LEE HOOD, EDD HURT AND STEPHEN TRAGESER

BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

The Envelope, Please .............................. 14

The Spin ................................................... 31

Brandi Carlile, Sturgill Simpson, more take top Americana honors

The Scene’s live-review column checks out Orville Peck, Kim Petras, Salt-N-Pepa and more at Nashville Pride Festival

BY STEPHEN TRAGESER

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BY SETH GRAVES

Conexión Américas’ Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration, PANORAMA: An Evening of Dance, Fall Paint Jam, Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival, Art for Animals, The Blam Blams w/Pepper Said & Big Gorgeous, Okkervil River and more

FILM

CRITICS’ PICKS

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32 Taking Prisoners Sion Sono’s Nicolas Cage vehicle Prisoners of the Ghostland is a gung-ho gonzo fest BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

FOOD AND DRINK

The International Language of Food The upcoming InterNASHional Night Market will showcase the diversity of Nashville’s immigrant-owned restaurants

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FROM BILL FREEMAN WHAT STRATEGY? LEE LEADS TENNESSEE TO HIGHEST COVID-19 CASES PER CAPITA IN THE COUNTRY. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control found that Tennessee led the nation in new COVID-19 cases per capita. Though we have since improved, in the week leading up to Sept. 15, our state saw an average of more than 8,300 new coronavirus infections every day, with a disturbing number of children contracting the disease. One hospital in Memphis went from treating five pediatric patients to 33 within a few weeks — and in August, three children died from the virus. Why is our state performing so poorly in managing this disease? A prime reason is of course the low vaccination rate among Tennesseans. To date, we’ve seen only about 44 percent fully vaccinated. According to a Vanderbilt Medical report from earlier this month, 190 out of 218 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were unvaccinated — and none of the 17 patients on ventilators were vaccinated. After decades of work to make Tennessee one of the most attractive states in the country, we’re now known as the state where residents are the most likely to catch COVID-19. Even prior to being the absolute worst in the nation for COVID cases, we were the butt of jokes on latenight talk shows. In July, Stephen Colbert noted that Tennessee “has one of the worst vaccination rates in the country — and they aim to keep it that way.” Gov. Bill Lee’s strategy has been to take care of himself and let everyone else fend for themselves. He received his vaccination quietly, when doing so publicly could have gone far in encouraging others to follow suit. He has not promoted mask wearing, and his executive order to override the authority of school districts that wished to mandate masks for children has met with stiff opposition. On Sept. 9, President Joe Biden announced an emergency rule requiring businesses with 100 or more employees to test their employees weekly or require vaccinations. Lee joined GOP governors from Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia to strike back at Biden’s attempts to slow the spread of the virus. These other three states also have some of the highest COVID-19 rates and lowest vaccination rates in the country. Biden spoke to the nation about using the tools at our disposal to combat and curb the COVID-19 disease sooner than later. “If we raise our vaccination rate, protect ourselves and others with masking and expanded testing, and identify people who are infected, we can and we will turn the tide on COVID-19,” said the president. He also noted that many are frustrated with the 80 million Americans who remain unvaccinated, even though the vaccine is “safe, effective and free.” His words echoed the thoughts of many health professionals who’ve seen firsthand that “this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated.” Biden also has to square off with those fighting against his administration’s efforts. “There are elected officials actively working to undermine the fight against COVID-19,” he said. “Instead of encouraging people to get vaccinated and mask up, they’re ordering mobile morgues

for the unvaccinated dying from COVID in their communities.” Unfortunately, our governor has been called to task by many doctors and medical professionals for doing this very thing. Biden noted that “based on available data from the summer, only one of out of every 160,000 fully vaccinated Americans was hospitalized for COVID per day.” We all value human life. I believe we all prefer our family members, friends and neighbors to stay safe and healthy. That sentiment should not be political, yet this pandemic seems to have people thinking COVID-19 is partisan politics. It isn’t. As Biden pointed out: “These pandemic politics … are making people sick, causing unvaccinated people to die. We cannot allow these actions to stand in the way of protecting the large majority of Americans who have done their part and want to get back to life as normal.” If you’d like to know whether or not vaccines work, look to Vermont, Connecticut and Massachusetts, all of which have more than two-thirds of their residents fully vaccinated. These states show the lowest new COVID-19 cases per capita, according to CDC data. This is not a fluke. The states with more vaccinated residents have fewer COVID-19 cases. Commercial Appeal writer Tonyaa J. Weathersbee surmises that Gov. Lee’s lack of political experience “may be one reason why children now make up about 40 percent of Tennessee’s COVID-19 cases,” and that Lee’s strategies contributed to our being No. 1 in new infections. Weathersbee notes that Lee’s “inexperience, or rather, indifference, on how government is supposed to work,” can “lead to a body count.” I’m unsure of how Gov. Lee thinks his strategy to take care of Tennesseans during this pandemic is working. What I know is he needs a new one.

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus, the Nashville Post and Home Page Media Group in Williamson County.

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Associate Editor Alejandro Ramirez Arts Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Culture Editor Erica Ciccarone Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Contributing Editor Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Nancy Floyd, Steven Hale, Kara Hartnett, J.R. Lind, Kathryn Rickmeyer, William Williams Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Marcus K. Dowling, Steve Erickson, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steve Haruch, Geoffrey Himes, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Katy Lindenmuth, Craig D. Lindsey, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Daryl Sanders, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Events and Marketing Director Olivia Britton Marketing and Promotions Manager Robin Fomusa Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Maggie Bond, Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers William Shutes, Niki Tyree Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Caroline Poole, Alissa Wetzel Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Frank Daniels III Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2021, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

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CITY LIMITS

MASK NOT With vaccines available and the ire of state lawmakers looming, Nashville officials resist a return to pre-Delta restrictions

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n Sept. 7, with Tennessee ranking among the world’s leaders in new COVID-19 cases, Nashville’s Metro Council took up a resolution urging the city’s public health department to reinstate a mask mandate for public indoor spaces. Although vaccines are now widely available, nearly half the city’s residents have not yet gotten the jab, and the Delta variant has proven far more contagious than the original strain of the virus. The COVID-19 death toll in Nashville has now surpassed 1,000 people. “Our priority should also be our constituents and keeping them alive,” said Councilmember Joy Styles, lead sponsor of the resolution. “So I think that we should support the health department and push them to put this mask mandate back in place.” Speaking in opposition to the resolution, Councilmember Tonya Hancock encouraged her colleagues not to “get political” and referenced a similar resolution that the council had voted down last year, in the name of deferring to city health officials. “We are not nurses, none of us are doctors,” Hancock said. The resolution went on to pass — narrowly, with 21 councilmembers voting for it, nine voting against and five abstaining. Meharry Medical College president and infectious disease expert Dr. James Hildreth — one of the city’s most visible public health leaders throughout the pandemic — praised the council’s action. A statement from the Metro Public Health Department following the vote expressed appreciation for the council’s “encouragement.” In early August, Mayor John Cooper did reinstate a mask mandate inside all Metro government buildings. Soon after that, the Metro school board voted to require masks

VANDERBILT SEEKS VOLUNTEERS FOR HIV VACCINE PROGRAM

Developing a safe vaccine would provide an ‘extra layer of protection’ for those who might come into contact with the virus BY KELSEY BEYELER

S

ince 1987, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine has been working to develop a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus. HIV, which was first diagnosed in the

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in the city’s schools. One Cooper staffer tells the Scene that the administration believes its policy on Metro buildings helped clear the way for the subsequent Metro schools policy. But officials had already indicated they weren’t inclined to go further than that, and a little more than a week after the council passed its resolution, Metro Public Health Department Director Gill Wright reiterated that position. In a letter to members of the Metro Board of Health, Wright said the health department “unequivocally agrees” with the recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that people should wear masks indoors regardless of their vaccination status. But he denied the council’s request for a citywide mask mandate. “Prior to the vaccine, masks and distancing were the only public health interventions available to use, which led to public health orders that included a county-wide mask mandate and capacity restrictions,” said Wright in his letter. “MPHD phased out all restrictions shortly after an appropriate medical intervention — the vaccines — became widely available. As valuable as masks are, the way through this pandemic is vaccination.” Among the factors Wright said would complicate a mask mandate’s effectiveness is the inconsistency of COVID policies in the region. Many of the patients contributing to the strain on Nashville’s hospitals are from outside the county, Wright said, meaning that a Metro mask mandate would be unlikely to affect such cases. Other officials skeptical of a return to requiring facial coverings have cited the difficulty of enforcing such a rule and raised questions about what metric the city would use to determine when to lift a mandate. There’s another factor also apparently weighing on city health officials, though

— one that was not mentioned in Wright’s letter but was openly discussed in a tense council committee meeting earlier this month. Councilmembers who opposed the resolution voiced a reluctance to further politicize mask-wearing, and staffers in the mayor’s office frame the administration’s position similarly, as one of deference to public health officials over politics. Be that as it may, Nashville’s health department is still operating under political pressure. During the Sept. 7 meeting of the council’s Health, Hospitals and Social Services Committee, Tom Sharp — the health department’s policy director and governmental liaison — briefed committee members on the latest COVID data and explained the department’s position on a mask mandate. Sharp would later echo Wright’s statements about how the availability of vaccines as a medical intervention made officials less inclined to mandate masks. But he also cited the threat of not only preemption by state lawmakers if Metro brought back citywide COVIDrelated mandates, but also retaliation. Asked early in the meeting by Councilmember Emily Benedict to explain the department’s reasons for opposing a mask mandate, Sharp said: “I think the main one is, and this is

speculation on my part just from having been through these things, that it could have very negative outcomes for the health department politically, at the state level.” Nashville is already at odds with the state over the school board’s decision to stick by its mask requirement in the face of the governor’s attempt to undermine it with an executive order allowing parents to opt out. Sharp referenced state House Speaker Cameron Sexton’s efforts to strip the state’s six independent health departments — including Nashville’s — of authority over disputes regarding COVID restrictions, and suggested a new mask mandate could draw unwanted attention to Metro. “I will tell you that I really don’t believe that the state would fund the health department here anywhere near the level that you guys have traditionally funded,” he said. The issue likely isn’t going away. Along with the resolution urging the health department to act, Styles and others also sponsored a bill that would institute a mask mandate by Metro ordinance. That bill passed on the first of three readings earlier this month, and as of this writing, is on the agenda for the council’s Sept. 21 meeting. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

U.S. in the early 1980s, attacks a person’s immune system, and without adequate treatment can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. In 2019, 36,801 people were diagnosed with HIV in the United States and dependent areas. Vanderbilt is working as part of a larger group called the HIV Vaccine Trials Network, a multidisciplinary network that connects HIV research institutions around the world. Currently, there is neither a cure nor an effective vaccine for HIV, though there are drugs that can reduce an HIV-positive person’s viral load and prevent further transmission. Where HIV or AIDS diagnoses may have in the past been considered a death sentence, medical advancements have enabled people living with HIV to manage their condition and lead long lives. According to Jarissa Greenard, community educator and recruiter for Vanderbilt’s HIV Vaccine Program, developing a safe and effective vaccine would provide an “extra layer of protection” for those who might come into contact with HIV. As part of its HIV vaccine research, Vanderbilt is seeking volunteers to participate in clinical studies. Participants must be between the ages of 18 and 60, HIV-negative and willing to

commit to several visits over the course of nine to 15 months. Volunteers are compensated for their participation. “Transparency is key, and it’s so important to a lot of the work that we’re doing,” says Greenard. “I say that because we’re there to address medical mistrust

that has occurred in the past.” Vanderbilt also relies on several layers of internal and external advisories that review all aspects of the vaccine trials, from monitoring data and checking consent forms to reviewing clinical protocols. These

MAYOR JOHN COOPER AND DR. ALEX JAHANGIR AT A VACCINATION EVENT IN MARCH

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

BY STEVEN HALE

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS processes ensure that volunteers aren’t being taken advantage of. Greenard’s job is to educate volunteers so they can make informed decisions and act as their own agents. “They … have the right to be treated with respect and dignity [and] to have all their questions answered,” she says. Those who are interested in volunteering first have an education session to learn about the study and ask questions. Greenard says she then typically gives participants a consent form to review on their own time. Once they resolve outstanding questions and sign the form, volunteers go through a screening process to ensure their health aligns with the requirements of the study. Those enrolled have no risk of contracting HIV from the study, because the vaccines do not contain the virus. Matthew Seckman has been a Vanderbilt HIV Vaccine Program volunteer for more than 11 years. One day many years ago, Seckman got a call from someone in his life informing him that he might have come into contact with HIV. But he tested negative. “Having that scare really was a catapult to try to be more educated and to prevent HIV infection,” says Seckman, who notes that he “trusted the science.” After hearing about Vanderbilt’s HIV vaccine trials, he enrolled. Seckman has been a part of multiple trials. Because he was in a placebo group for the first trial, he was able to participate in another, and was the first person in the world to participate in an international antibody-mediated prevention study. Now he’s participating in another vaccine trial. He says that apart from sensitivity around injection sites, he’s never felt any adverse side effects from the vaccine trials. “They are extremely knowledgeable and very candid about known risks,” he says of Vandy researchers. Volunteers are always informed of the potential risks before they enroll in any trial, from possible side effects to past incidents that have occurred and how those have been resolved. They are also informed of results and findings from the trials they participate in, though that information can take years to finalize. Vanderbilt tries to create a community with its volunteers — Seckman says he’s participated in optional social outings with other participants. While volunteers are needed for vaccine trials, there are other ways to get involved with Vanderbilt’s HIV program. It has a community advisory board, for example, that reviews updates, trial results and related news. People can also help educate others about research and resources related to HIV, as longstanding stigmas and misinformation associated with the virus still occur and perpetuate discrimination. The LGBTQ community, for example, has been unfairly blamed for the HIV and AIDS epidemic. While HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men — and particularly those who are Black or Latino — they are far from the only populations affected by HIV and AIDS. Anyone can contract HIV through sexual transmission or needle sharing, and it can also be transmitted to a baby from a pregnant or nursing mother who has HIV. HIV.gov has awareness days for all kinds of communities affected by HIV, including Native, Black, Asian and Latinx populations, women and girls, transgender people and more. Sept. 27 is National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Vanderbilt’s HIV Vaccine Program works with different communities across Nashville — alongside other local organizations like Nashville CARES — to connect people with resources, combat misinformation and develop a vaccine. Those interested in learning more can visit Vanderbilt’s HIV Vaccine Program website via vumc.org. “It’s teamwork,” says Greenard. “It truly is a collaborative effort. The only way we’re going to overcome this virus is by working together, and that means bringing in all types of experts, all types of people who have experiences and knowledge that we can share together to develop a vaccine.” EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

THIS WEEK ON OUR NEWS AND POLITICS BLOG: Another mandate under fire: President Joe Biden mandating employers with more than 100 employees to require vaccination and a testing regime. Tennessee Attorney General Herb Slatery responded to the directive with a letter questioning its legality. Slatery argues that Biden’s mandate does not comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and might be unconstitutional. He also said the mandate “risks undermining the federalist structure of our joint government.” Among other arguments, Slatery says that COVID-19 is not a “grave danger” at every workplace and thus would not meet the threshold for such action by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which Biden has tasked with enforcing the mandate. Slatery also says, “Tennessee has worked diligently to respond to the pandemic by balancing the need for public health with the rights of its citizens.” Tennessee has the most COVID cases per capita among the United States since the pandemic began. … Three more incarcerated Tennesseans have died of COVID-19, ending a nearly seven-month stretch in which there had been no deaths from the illness in Tennessee’s prisons. A total of 45 people incarcerated in state prisons have died from COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic, along with five Tennessee Department of Correction staffers. … Local charities are preparing to welcome 300 Afghan refugees to Nashville following the American military’s withdrawal from the country and its takeover by the Taliban. Catholic Charities of Tennessee and the Nashville International Center for Empowerment both have contracts with the U.S. Department of State to receive and assist refugees. Catholic Charities expects to receive its first group of refugees — a family of four — within two weeks. Refugees will be relocating in phases through March 2022. … Old Hickory is where we thought it was and where we think it isn’t, contributor Betsy Phillips writes this week in a fascinating examination of the northeastern Davidson County burg.

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Talking with Emerging Act of the Year nominee Allison Russell about how music and music communities promote healing

I PLAYING THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, AT BROOKLYN BOWL NASHVILLE

BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

t’s an unseasonably nice September morning in East Nashville. Allison Russell is seated on the front porch of the home she shares with her husband and collaborator J.T. Nero, their daughter Ida and their dog Millie. A cool breeze moves through the small wonderland of flowers and greenery in the family’s front yard. It’s the kind of day that almost makes you forget about the news — like protests against masking, overflowing hospitals, the abortion ban in Texas, the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, to name just a few recent headlines. But not quite. Over the course of an hourlong conversation, Russell finds many connection points between her own story and the ills of the day, particularly as they relate to caring for her family and raising her daughter. It’s been a banner professional year for Russell, who celebrated the release of her critically acclaimed debut solo album Outside Child in May. Though Russell has been a fixture in roots music for nearly two decades — first with the band Po’ Girl, later with Birds of Chicago and Our Native Daughters — the album, with its deeply vulnerable exploration of the sexual abuse Russell suffered as a child and her subsequent road to healing and redemption, is still something of an introduction to the singer-songwriter. When asked what it felt like to visit that trauma in such a public way, Russell credits the support of her family — her chosen family — as enabling her to open up and finally tell her story. Below, Russell talks with the Scene about Outside Child, her Emerging Act of the Year Nomination at this week’s Americana Music Honors and Awards, and how raising her daughter has helped her weather the tumult and tragedy of the past year-and-a-half.

It’s tough to sum up a year-and-a-half, but how have you held up during the pandemic? Both personally, for you and your family, and as a professional musician reliant on income from touring.

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That seems to be a common sentiment, that sense that the pandemic forced us to confront our priorities and take stock of where we put our energy.

We were in this grind of subsistence touring for so many years. I was in another project called Birds of Chicago with J.T., and we did that for years. We brought our daughter

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

Chosen Family

It’s been, in turns, devastating but also deeply reflective. It’s been a very big reset for me and for my family. When the pandemic started, we were living in Madison with my sister Awna Teixeira and Yola, and my partner J.T. , and our daughter Ida, who was 6 when the pandemic started. We just battened down the hatches together and did a crash-course in how to continue working via Zoom. We just tried to keep each other going. We did lots of benefit concerts virtually and just tried to find ways to keep engaging with our chosen community, and helped when we could. … I had this record that I had made that I didn’t know what to do with. That pandemic time, I just dug in on that and decided that I needed to find a family for it. That was a lot of the pandemic for me, as well as learning to be a homeschool teacher, taking care of my daughter, making sure I wasn’t terrifying her more. I couldn’t allow myself to fall into the depression and despair I felt at the beginning because our daughter needed us. So that was great, to be forced to keep going and get creative and get into the desperation of, “What do we do? All our work is gone.”

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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Those doors certainly don’t open often without a nudge, especially if you don’t look or sound a certain way.

It was actually our friend Brandi Carlile who connected me with Fantasy Records. She really championed my record. I sent it to her because she’s someone I deeply admire and whose business acumen I have taken note of and am so impressed by. For a long time, I felt abashed to think of art as business as well. And I think women tend to have a harder time with that. We really created this long-distance network and community of a coalition of the willing and creative.

Speaking of that coalition of roots musicians, you’re going into a particularly big AmericanaFest season. It’s not your first rodeo with the festival, but what is it like going into things with your first solo album and as an Emerging Act nominee? And does it feel strange to think of yourself as “emerging,” given how long you’ve been a professional musician?

I was just joking that I’ve been “emerging” like a cicada for 20 years. [Laughs] But I think that it’s also appropriate, in that this is the first time I’ve ever put work forward under my own name, telling my own stories in my own words, and just owning it, in a way. It’s new for me. But I am also just so enamored of that whole category. I feel so honored to be nominated alongside Amythyst Kiah, Joy Oladakun and Waxahatchee and Charley Crockett. Just the fact that three queer and Black women were nominated in one category had me like, “OK, we just won. There you go!” And four women out of five artists. And Charley, who is not white. So it was really exciting to see that category because it felt like this opening up — and I don’t think there was ever this intentional ostracizing, or anything like that. But you can only see from where you stand, and from your lived experience. The last year — not just the pandemic but all of the renewed zeal for true equality and the pain of the violence that has been perpetrated on the Black community, with Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd. In some ways, the hardest thing for me as an

considerably less than male headliners, even when they have a greater draw. It’s insidious. And it’s not just in the arts.

A moment ago, you mentioned Outside Child as being your most honest work. Now that the album has been out for several months and you’ve had the chance to see how listeners connect to the music, has your perspective on the material shifted at all? How has it felt to have those stories, which are so personal, out in the world and living lives of their own?

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

with us for years until she had an intervention with us, when she was about 4-and-ahalf. She told us she wanted to go to school and not be touring all the time. So we had been, since that point, realizing that we couldn’t be out on the road all the time and learning to take shifts. That was part of the motivation, really trying to find a home for this debut solo project. That was one way we could eventually make ends meet in this working artist family. It gave us a chance to do outreach and think really deeply about what our values were in the way we were approaching our art — and art also as our career and business and how we provide for our child. In that, I got to have great conversations with women I admire. Yola and I would spend hours debriefing at the kitchen table and plotting how to nudge some doors open for ourselves and others like us who are perhaps less well-represented in the roots world. Yola had such an incredible year in 2019, and she really used that platform to kick the door open for other women, like having Amythyst [Kiah] go on tour with her, and for me as well, just putting in good words about me to people she was beginning to have influence with.

“THIS IS REALLY THE MOST HONEST I’VE EVER BEEN ON A RECORD, AND IT’S THE RECORD THAT’S BREAKING THROUGH TO THESE NEW LISTENERS, PEOPLE WILLING TO LISTEN.” artist in 2020 was that a lot of things started to shift and open for my career after George Floyd. Suddenly people were looking at me, and I started getting a lot of phone calls and opportunities that had never presented themselves before or been available to me before. I’m deeply grateful for that, but it was also painful to think that’s what it took.

That had to bring a host of complicated emotions, knowing you could realize some of your dreams but only after experiencing such grief and trauma. We had to do some processing. A critical mass of us did some processing. And then another critical mass did some reacting and resistance to that. But it’s important, I think, that we’re finally having a sustained conversation about the ongoing disparities and inequities. That does actually give me hope, that we’ve had a sustained conversation and one that resulted in a lessening of tokenism. You can honor and support and hear more than one Black woman at a time, you know?

You can even have more than one represented in the same awards category. And we’re all totally different! [Laughs] We are not interchangeable. We don’t look alike. Our music is completely different. I know that sounds obvious, but I have to tell you, the number of times in my career that I’ve heard things like, “We love your band, but we already have a Black woman who plays banjo at the label.” Can you imagine, saying with a straight face to, you know, Neil Young? “You know, we already have Bob Dylan.”

Sorry, we already have a white guy with a guitar. We have one. We don’t need more. And

that’s what it was. We have room for one of you. Which then sets up false competition, which isn’t actually competition. And it sets up false scarcity and this idea that there’s only a limited amount of attention that can be sustained for Black women artists, or queer artists. And that’s just not true. That’s a manufactured disinterest based on never platforming these artists. Like of course, no one will be interested in this music if they’ve never heard it and you won’t play it on the radio and your label won’t support it and you won’t distribute it and you won’t publicize it. So, you’re right. There’s no interest. [Laughs] And that’s the thing that has been so surreal about this album release campaign for Outside Child. It goes against all the things that I’ve been told in the past, like, “Oh, that’s uncomfortable, no one wants to hear about that,” or, “You’re opening a can of worms,” or, “Let’s talk about pleasant things.” This is really the most honest I’ve ever been on a record, and it’s the record that’s breaking through to these new listeners, people willing to listen.

To your point about this creation of competition and scarcity, the anecdote you shared about your kitchen-table conversations with Yola seems important. You worked together and created a network, and a community, that lifted all of you.

Right? What did we get paid for that? We are so scared, as artists and as women, to ask about money. And men have no qualms, generally speaking, about that whatsoever. They will happily negotiate for their worth. And women are made to feel grasping, or like a bitch, if you have a boundary and say, “I’m worthy. I’m worth as much as that man.” It’s like women headliners being paid

I think I understood immediately, as soon as I put it out, that it wasn’t really mine anymore. That’s the alchemy, to me — the magic of music. It becomes whatever it is for the listener. That is real interaction and that’s a transformation of whatever I intended. So many people have reached out to me about their own experiences. And I knew the statistics. I think it’s 1 in 3 women, 1 in 4 men, 1 in 2 trans or nonbinary or intersex folks who have experienced similar histories or present ongoing sexual abuse. I think those stats are probably low, unfortunately, due to underreporting. There has been this communion that has occurred, and deeper conversations, and it’s painful, obviously, but also feels very human. It gives me hope that we can get to a critical mass of people who understand that this is a pandemic, too. It’s not just COVID. We’re dealing with abuse and bigotry, and those pandemics are plaguing our human family. In the same way I feel like the album isn’t really mine, I’ve also learned, since the birth of our daughter, that this world isn’t ours. We are supposed to be ensuring safety for future generations, whether we are directly parents or not. These are the future generations of our species, as well as the other species we are destroying. … I’m also understanding more and more, as I talk about the record more, that it’s really not about abuse. It’s about survivor’s joy and survivor’s community and chosen family, and the power of art to help us process trauma and transform it into connection and into community. I think that’s art’s worth. Creative problem-solving is required of all of us right now. You don’t have to be an artist or a musician. That creative, problem-solving part of our brain needs to be on high alert. So I feel good about having a tiny part in helping nudge things in a less harmful direction.

It feels strange to ask about plans for the future when everything is so uncertain, especially in a line of work like yours that relies so heavily on live events. But I’m wondering what you see when you try to look ahead to your next few months. I have a literary agent and I’m working on a book. It’s a memoir, with poetry mixed in. It’s grown out of the explorations I began with Outside Child. I have a wonderful literary agent. I am also looking around at what’s happened with all of the full hospitals, and seeing a lot of artists who can afford to cancel shows, who aren’t relying on that income, and thinking about the rest of us trying to get every venue on board with basic safety measures. In my case, I’m not willing to play a show unless they have them. I’m inevitably going to be losing some shows, which I’m OK with. I have to go by my own moral compass. It’s an all-hands-on-deck situation.

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CARDINAL DIRECTIONS

Talking with Jed Hilly about piloting the AmericanaFest ship through pandemic waters BY GEOFFREY HIMES

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JED HILLY time to talk to people helped. Also I think people who might want to push back were getting tired of doing so.” With fewer venues and a goal of some social distancing, the organization decided to double the price of wristbands to $199 and to limit the number of wristbands available to 50 percent of what’s usually offered. To compensate for the price increase, AmericanaFest will this year give wristband wearers the same priority of admission as badge holders. “If we sell fewer wristbands,” Hilly explains, “there’ll be more space in the venues. Our intent was not to cram every venue but to create a safe, comfortable environment. The people who will really want to come will come. In part, that was to make the budget work, but it was also a safety measure.” Hilly credits Isbell, who has won multiple AmericanaFest awards, for making the decision easier. “Bravo for Jason,” Hilly says. “He spoke his mind. He wasn’t saying, ‘If you’re not vaccinated, you can’t come.’ He was saying, ‘I want to go back to work, and I want the people who come to see me to feel safe.’ That made it easier to reach an agreement with the venues, because they all know Jason and trust him.” This is not the first crisis Hilly has faced since taking his job in 2007. The organization has long struggled to diversify itself in terms of race, gender, geography and genre. “I woke up after the 2013 awards show,” Hilly recalls, “and noticed that our specialaward honorees were all white and were all men. The competitive awards are chosen by

PHOTO: DAVID McCLISTER

T

he Americana Music Association does a lot of things, but its flagship event is the annual AmericanaFest. The pandemic forced the organization to turn last year’s bash into a virtual gathering. This year, however, AmericanaFest returns as an inperson extravaganza to downtown Nashville that runs through Saturday. Last year’s move to the internet was “devastating,” says the association’s executive director Jed Hilly. “We lost a lot of money,” he says. But out of that crisis came some promising developments. As a trade group, the organization can’t accept donations, but they were already in the process of creating a charitable sibling, the Americana Music Association Foundation, which would operate much as the CMA Foundation does for the Country Music Association. The newly launched foundation raised the money for the online Americana gathering; it didn’t seem right to call that AmericanaFest, so they retitled it Thriving Roots. What surprised Hilly was that people were willing to do more than just donate money. Jackson Browne wanted to interview Mavis Staples. Rosanne Cash wanted to lead a panel on the history of protest music. Taj Mahal wanted to interview Rhiannon Giddens. There was a reservoir of goodwill for the organization. All those things helped make Thriving Roots a success, and the Americana Music Association lived to see another day. But just when this year’s AmericanaFest seemed a sure thing, along came the Delta variant. “I got back from the Newport Folk Festival at the end of July,” Hilly says, “just as the variant was becoming a real threat. Newport had required vaccinations, but I can’t put a fence around AmericanaFest the way they did around their site. We don’t own the venues we use during AmericanaFest; they’re private businesses who give us their venues for free. True, they get to keep their liquor and food sales — it’s a win-win for both of us. But I can’t dictate to them how to run their businesses.” As August rolled by — as Bonnaroo and City Winery announced vaccination requirements, as Jason Isbell announced he wouldn’t play any venues without such a requirement — the festival was silent about its plans. “I felt I had to reach out to every one of our venues,” Hilly explains, “and ask what they thought about protocols. I had to take my time and listen to what each one said.” In the end, a majority of the venues — enough to hold a scaled-down festival — said they wanted protocols. Only then did the fest announce that it would require proof of vaccination or of a recent negative test. “We’ve had a little pushback,” Hilly says, “but not much. The fact that we took our

our members, and we don’t know who they are until the envelope is opened. But we know who the lifetime achievement awardees will be, and we try to make sure they will show up to accept in person. So before the next awards show, I went to the committee and said, ‘I want our first two acceptances to be a woman and a person of color; then we’ll move on to other names. You can’t tell me there aren’t women and people of color who are deserving.’ ” And that’s what happened. Key to opening the door to nonwhite artists was breaking down the notion that Americana was a euphemism for alt-country. From the beginning, the organization has declared itself an advocate for all forms of American roots music. That includes country, of course, but it also includes blues, gospel, folk, bluegrass, rockabilly and old-school R&B. In recent years, Lifetime Achievement Award winners have included Mavis Staples, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Los Lobos, Buddy Guy, Flaco Jimenez and Robert Cray. This year’s lifetime achievement winners include three African American acts (Carla Thomas, Keb’ Mo’ and The Fisk Jubilee Singers) and a biracial group (The Mavericks). Four of the five nominees for this year’s Emerging Act of the Year and three of five acts in the running for Duo/Group of the Year are people of color. “Our community has undergone a huge change, and that’s been hard for some people,” says Hilly. “I had a longtime member come up to me and say, ‘It’s no longer my Americana.’ What does that mean? Americana is not just alt-country. [The Americana

Music Association] started as a reaction to certain artists being excluded from a community — when country radio stopped playing Emmylou Harris, Dwight Yoakam and Steve Earle. If we start excluding people, we’re repeating the mistake that made us start the organization.” But it’s easier to diversify the awards show than it is to diversify the membership. You can’t force certain people to join up and pay their dues, nor can you force the dues-payers to vote a certain way. All you can do is create the kind of programming that is attractive to all demographics. The organization did launch a Diversity and Inclusion Committee that includes BMI exec Shannon Sanders and two members of Our Native Daughters, Allison Russell and Leyla McCalla. If it often seems that Nashvillians such as Jason Isbell, Buddy Miller and the late John Prine win an inordinate number of Americana Music Association Awards, that’s because the awards voting has an Electoral College problem — that is, some regions have more impact on the voting than others. And because the organization’s membership is concentrated in Middle Tennessee, artists from that area do better in the voting. Prine, Isbell and Miller are all deserving artists, but the list of non-Tennessee roots musicians who have never won an award from the Americana Music Association include such major figures as Dave Alvin, BeauSoleil, Paul Kelly, Anais Mitchell, Bettye LaVette, Ray Wylie Hubbard, John Doe, The Bottle Rockets, North Mississippi Allstars, Neko Case and Jimmie Dale Gilmore. But once again, Hilly argues, he can’t do anything about who becomes a member and how they vote on the contemporary awards. On the other hand, the membership has grown from less than 800 to more than 3,000 during his tenure, and now represents 49 states and several countries. So Tennessee’s dominance has been diluted if not eliminated. To encourage that broadening of membership, the association has helped launch an Americana Music Association U.K. and an Australian Americana Music Honours show. Before the pandemic, the association co-hosted an Americana concert series at Lincoln Center in New York and now is partnering on an Americana course at NYU. “We have three elements in the AmericanaFest,” Hilly points out. “The Lifetime Achievement awards represent where Americana is coming from, the people who inspired us. Buddy Guy is a blues artist who inspired us; Porter Wagoner is a country artist who inspired us. The competitive awards are where Americana is today. And the showcases are where it may be tomorrow. If you look at our radio charts from 2001 and 2021, they are very different, much more inclusive. Yola was No. 1 on our charts for weeks. That would never have happened 20 years ago, and that’s great.” You’ll never hear Hilly say a bad word about any Americana artist, label or company. That relentless optimism can sometimes wear on those of us whose job or inclination is to make distinctions between the good and the bad. Americana music needs constructive criticism, but it also needs an unwavering advocate. And Hilly refuses to apologize for embracing that role. “That’s my job,” he declares. “I’m here to evangelize. I love these musicians.”

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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STEPPING OUT

Your quick-reference guide to our favorite shows of AmericanaFest 2021 BY ABBY LEE HOOD, EDD HURT AND STEPHEN TRAGESER

THURSDAY, SEPT. 23 Among Thursday’s shows, you’ll find somewhat more traditional performers rooted in singer-songwriterdom, blues and outlaw country. To get a picture of the modern exponents of those time-honored traditions, check out the day party that runs from 2 to 6:30 p.m. at Eastside Bowl, a multi-use space in Madison that occupies the site of a former Kmart store. The party comes ahead of the venue, restaurant and bowling alley’s official opening later this fall. Austin, Texas, label Nine Mile Records will showcase some of its artists including Nashville blues-soul guitarist and singer Patrick Sweany and rockpop duo Greyhounds and singer-songwriter Kevin Galloway. Some noteworthy artists signed to other labels are joining in, too, including blues-country singer Sierra Ferrell and songsmith David Ramirez. NPR Music will be broadcasting a series of interviews and performances, billed as AmericanaFest Day Stage, from the site on Friday and Saturday. If songsmiths are your primary interest but you’re not able to get out until later, you might plan to head over to Brooklyn Bowl for Allison Russell (see our interview with her on p. 8) at 9 p.m., Kathleen Edwards (whose muchloved Total Freedom, her first album since 2012, came out last year) at 10 p.m. and Hayes Carll (whose new LP You Get It All is set for release Oct. 29) at 11 p.m. However, this year’s AmericanaFest features many brilliant musicians who seek to move country-esque music into the future, without the aid of Nashville’s big-ticket

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YASMIN WILLIAMS music industry. Country Queer is hosting Rainbow Happy Hour from 4 to 7 p.m. at Vinyl Tap, featuring Lilli Lewis, Paisley Fields and more. Miko Marks, who plays Exit/In at 8 p.m., came to Nashville in 2003 with aspirations to be a country star. Marks, who is female and Black, released a pair of excellent albums — 2005’s Freeway Bound and 2007’s It Feels Good — that sounded more or less like a version of mainstream country, right down to her smooth vocals and instrumental backing that included banjos and mandolins. Marks didn’t break through, but earlier this year she released a soul-country-pop album called Our Country, her first LP in more than a decade. In case you feel nostalgic for the hippie-fied country of 1970s pioneers like Commander Cody, Austin, Texas, countryboogie band Mike and the Moonpies plays Exit/ In at 11, offering a sly, subversive blend of ’80s country and post-Gary Stewart outlaw music. Mike and the Moonpies know their history, and their music suggests that there might just be a place for Stewart and Johnny Paycheck in the increasingly diverse and experimental world of Americana. Speaking of diverse sounds under the big Americana tent: Beginning at 9 p.m. at 6th and Peabody, see the duo of Wu Fei and Abigail Washburn, whose self-titled album highlighting the commonalities between Appalachian and Chinese folk music (performed on the banjo and a Chinese zither called the guzheng) was released just after the start of the pandemic. Following them at 10 p.m. is Yasmin Williams, who will play her meditative, slightly avant-garde acoustic guitar. Her approach is derived from ’60s and ’70s folk, and you can hear her fingerstyle picking on this year’s gorgeous Urban Driftwood. For a taste of pop country that is also weird and forward-thinking, give a listen to Leah Blevins, who takes the 3rd and Lindsley stage at 10 p.m. Blevins’ latest, this year’s First Time Feeling, sports a track titled

PHOTO: KIM ATKINS PHOTOGRAPHY

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mericanaFest’s in-person programming comes roaring back for 2021 with more than 200 in-person performances on deck through Saturday, and we’ve assembled a quickreference guide with a handful of our favorite shows among the wide variety on offer. You have priority access to these if you’ve got a full conference registration or a wristband. A limited number of general admission tickets are available for some of them, while a few are free and open to the public. The festival has a blanket COVID-19 protocol requiring proof of vaccination or a negative test less than 72 hours old (read more about that on p. 10), but rules about things like masking might vary slightly depending on the venue. If you have any questions about procedures, it’s a good idea to check with the venue before you go out. For up-to-date scheduling and policy information, keep an eye on americanamusic.org or check AmericanaFest’s custom app. Side note: You can expect interesting unofficial showcase events to pop up around the city, so keep an eye on social media for information about those.

AARON LEE TASJAN “Clutter” whose eccentric rhythms and deep aural space might make you rethink the struggle between mainstream country and Americana. Stick around to see Kelsey Waldon, who plays at 11. Waldon specializes in intelligent folk-country that takes its cues from artists as diverse as Kris Kristofferson and Nina Simone. —EDD HURT

FRIDAY, SEPT. 24 If you want to start the party early and are feeling a Broadway vibe, kick it off right with the California Country Showcase, running noon to 5 p.m. on the first floor of Acme Feed and Seed. The all-ages show has enough talent hailing from or inspired by music of the West Coast to keep you camped out for a few hours, including soulful, rockin’ locals LadyCouch and Brian Wright and the SneakUps as well as folks from further afield like Texas-raised The Whitmore Sisters and NYC-based The Mastersons. Those last two groups share Eleanor

Whitmore in common; she and husband Chris Masterson have also played with Steve Earle and the Dukes. Expect late addition Ted Russell Kamp, who has played bass for Shooter Jennings and Tanya Tucker among many more, to bring the rock ’n’ roll attitude. Afterward, you can head west to Centennial Park for the evening’s AmericanaFest installment of Musicians Corner’s September Sundown. (The annual free festival hosts AmericanaFest-affiliated lineups on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.) The show starts on a high note at 5:05 p.m. with Queen Esther, whose recent album Gild the Black Lily features rich country vocals and tunes like “The Black Cowgirl Song.” The hits keep coming with performers like Anna Tivel, who plays at 7:15 p.m. — her new album Blue World spotlights her Neko Case-esque haunting voice and her lyrically driven folk songs — and ingenious power-popper Aaron Lee Tasjan, whose headline set begins at 8:10 p.m. Once you’ve had a dinner break, catch Christone “Kingfish” Ingram, starting at

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE

Brandi Carlile, Sturgill Simpson, more take top Americana honors BY STEPHEN TRAGESER

PHOTO: CHRIS PHELPS

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BRANDY CLARK 9:30 p.m. at Cannery Ballroom. The Grammynominated Ingram is a stellar blues guitarist whose newest album 662 dropped in July. There are a lot of opportunities to dance during AmericanaFest, but Ingram’s set ranks among the best. Alternatively, you have several chances throughout the fest to see Nashville’s own bluegrass and roots legend Jim Lauderdale, hot on the heels of his optimistic LP Hope, including his Friday set at 3rd and Lindsley that kicks off at 9 p.m. At 11 p.m., you’ll find the ever-busy Lauderdale at The Basement East for Power to the Music: Songs of 1971 — Fall. It’s the last in a series of four sets scheduled for that evening featuring songs released that year, looking back at what was happening in America as Nixon’s first term drew to a close. Country singer-songwriter Kristina Murray, indie rocker Drumming Bird and Jillian Andrews (better known as one-half of melodious duo Hush Kids) are among the others on the roster. —ABBY LEE HOOD

SATURDAY, SEPT. 25 You’ve got plenty of opportunities to pack as much music as possible into the last day of AmericanaFest 2021. Venerable East Side hangout The 5 Spot has a Brunch Jam from noon to 3 p.m. featuring ace guitarist (and, full disclosure, Scene contributing editor) Jack Silverman. In the wake of his instrumental “crime jazz” EP Now What, he’s bringing in guests including bass phenom Viktor Krauss

(Lyle Lovett, Bill Frisell) and keyboardist Rob Burger, whose long-as-your-arm résumé includes Iron and Wine, Calexico, John Zorn and Laurie Anderson. If your view of Americana skews more toward roots and rock, come back to The 5 Spot later on for folks like Sam Doores, who plays at 9 p.m., and Riley Downing, his bandmate in currently inactive New Orleans outfit The Deslondes. You could also check out a stacked bill at City Winery, including a soul singer and a Nashvillian by way of Chicago, Phillip-Michael Scales. Catch his 7 p.m. set to hear tunes from his exquisitely named LP Sinner-Songwriter, due Oct. 29, and stick around for superb vocal group The McCrary Sisters at 9. As you decide how to finish out your festival, you might consider whether you’d prefer top-notch singer-songwriters in a more gentle mode or in a more raucous one. If somewhat more chill suits you, aim for 3rd and Lindsley, where you can hear Rodney Crowell at 8 p.m. (in the wake of his excellent new album Triage), Emily Scott Robinson at 10 p.m. (previewing songs from American Siren, her LP due Oct. 29 on the late John Prine’s Oh Boy Records) and Brandy Clark at 11 p.m. (continuing to celebrate her excellent 2020 album Your Life Is a Record). If you’d rather amp it up, head to The Basement East, where you’ll see Sarah Shook and the Disarmers at 9 p.m., Lilly Hiatt (who’s set to release a new LP called Lately on Oct. 15) at 10 p.m. and the great Carlene Carter at 11 p.m. —STEPHEN TRAGESER

fter the COVID-19 pandemic forced the Americana Music Association to cancel its annual Honors and Awards gala at the Ryman in 2020 and move it to social media, the event made its in-person return on Wednesday. Overall, this year’s slate of winners showcased a better balance than in 2020, when The Highwomen won three of the six awards voted on by the association’s membership. One of the few bummers was that Allison Russell (read our interview with her on p. 8), her fellow phenomenal songwriter and bandleader Amythyst Kiah and the supergroup they’re part of, Our Native Daughters, all went home without a trophy. You can almost bet that Russell’s Outside Child and Kiah’s Wary + Strange — both released this year after the eligibility window closed — will be among the 2022 Album of the Year nominees. This time, though, Album of the Year went to Sturgill Simpson’s Cuttin’ Grass, Vol. 1: The Butcher Shoppe Sessions. The record is the first of a two-volume set co-produced by Simpson and longtime collaborator David R. Ferguson, featuring renditions of the top-notch singer-songwriter’s tunes that home in on the mountain music that’s a core influence on many of them. This volume was made at The Butcher Shoppe, the now-defunct Germantown studio and office that Ferguson shared with the late John Prine. In 2020, following his death from complications of COVID-19, Prine won the association’s Artist of the Year award for the fourth time. He received another posthumous award Wednesday: Song of the Year for the poignant “I Remember Everything,” his Grammy-winning final co-write with fellow great Pat McLaughlin. For the second time in her career, the excellent Brandi Carlile was recognized as Artist of the Year. Carlile is far from the only talented or thoughtful individual working in the field of music. But if the point of writing and singing songs, producing other people’s records and performing in public is to process and convey emotional experience and understanding, it’s hard to find anyone doing it better or with more empathy. Similarly, the field of Instrumentalist of the Year nominees was packed with superb players. This time, the award went to Kristin Weber, an MVP of strings who’s played with everyone from Dolly Parton to Lorde to beloved Nashville ’90s tribute act My So-Called Band, and has without a doubt earned it. As noted by contributor Geoffrey Himes in his conversation with Americana Music Association executive director Jed Hilly on p. 10, Nashville musicians tend to have a geographical advantage when it comes to voting. The winners of the other membership-voted categories at the 2021 awards buck the trend. Black Pumas, the Grammy-nominated Austin, Texas, psych-pop-soul group who took home the Americana Music Association’s Emerging Artist of the Year award in 2020, were recognized this time as Duo/Group of the Year. Their fellow Texan Charley Crockett won Emerging Artist of the Year. Crockett, born in 1984, has a heap of stories to tell: He spent his early years in the rural Rio Grande Valley near the border with Mexico, was tempted by the allure of crime as a teenager in Dallas, and struck out on his own, sometimes living on the street, to get away from it. He began his music career in earnest in his early 30s and has been releasing lively, perceptive records — blending a wide range of traditions from Western swing to New Orleans R&B and beyond — at an astonishing rate, including two full albums in 2020 and two more (so far) in 2021. This year’s lifetime achievement honorees include The Fisk Jubilee Singers. The widely revered vocal group, which celebrates its 150th anniversary in October, represents one of Nashville’s oldest and richest ties to our Black cultural heritage. The group was recognized with the Legacy of Americana Award, a co-presentation with the National Museum of African American Music that was first presented to Rhiannon Giddens and in honor of the late Frank Johnson in 2019. The Inspiration Award went to Memphis soul legend Carla Thomas, while phenomenal engineer Trina Shoemaker took home the Producer/Engineer Award. Latin American country-rock-and-pop group The Mavericks received the Trailblazer Award, while the Performance Award went to their fellow Nashvillian, blues stalwart Keb’ Mo’. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

BRANDI CARLILE

PHILLIP-MICHAEL SCALES

14

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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9/20/21 5:07 PM


Fall Into

History Andrew Jackson’s

th The7Hermitage Visit the Home of the President

This 1,120-acre National Historic Landmark will take you back to 19th-century America, shedding light on a pivotal time in our nation’s history. Be sure to stop by Natchez Hills Winery for tastings, flights, pints and bottles of local wine and craft beer. Picnics and leashed dogs are welcome!

WWW.THEHERMITAGE.COM

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com


CRITICS’ PICKS W E E K L Y

R O U N D U P

O F

T H I N G S

T O

D O

COMMUNITY

THURSDAY / 9.23 [SIEMPRE PARA ADELANTE]

CONEXIÓN AMÉRICAS’ HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATION

[ON THE RISE]

FULL MOOD EP RELEASE

FILM

FRIDAY / 9.24 [TAKE TWO]

HEIST! SERIES: INCEPTION, THE ITALIAN JOB & THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE

Well, let’s see what the Belcourt is unspooling this week for its ongoing Heist! film series. To start with, there’s a reminder

THURSDAY, SEPT. 23

that the ever-baffling Christopher Nolan is still a genre filmmaker at heart. His cerebral 2010 caper thriller Inception involves Leonardo DiCaprio rounding up a crew to infiltrate people’s dreams. If you’re looking for something more mod, there’s 1969’s The Italian Job, in which Michael Caine also rounds up a crew to steal gold in Italy. And last but definitely not least, we have a 35mm screening of The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, the darkly comic 1974 flick with Walter Matthau as an NYC transit policeman going toe to toe with a team of criminals (led by Robert Shaw) who’ve taken a subway car hostage. It’s a favorite of mine — when it played the Belcourt’s Nashville Film Noir Festival in 2008, I gave it a very calamitous intro. As the great James Cathcart told me later, “It was awesome! It’s like you were taking the audience hostage!” Inception 9 p.m. Friday and 2:35 & 8 p.m. Tuesday; The Italian Job 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; The Taking of Pelham One Two Three 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Belcourt Theatre, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

innovative artists and vibrant new works. And you can check out some of those artists this weekend at The Barbershop Theater. PANORAMA promises an evening of dance featuring works by Sarah Salim, Amanda Reichert and Lenin Fernandez. Salim and Reichert will present “Chewing Gum,” an “installation-inspired work that studies duration, weight and its impact on our individual and collective relationships over time.” Fernandez will premiere “I Made Something for You,” a new solo work that’s

described as an “exploration into tones of anticipation and anxiety.” Tickets are $15, and you must show proof of vaccination and wear a mask at all times inside the building. Details are at thebarbershoptheater.com. Sept. 25-26 at The Barbershop Theater, 4003 Indiana Ave. AMY STUMPFL [IT AIN’T TOO MUCH STUFF]

FALL PAINT JAM

One of my favorite socially distanced activities of 2020 was to put the dog in the

CRAIG D. LINDSEY

SATURDAY / 9.25 [PANORAMIC MOVEMENT]

PANORAMA: AN EVENING OF DANCE As any dance lover can tell you, Nashville is home to a small but mighty dance community, anchored by

PANORAMA: AN EVENING OF DANCE: “CHEWING GUM”

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PHOTO: KATTY DANGER

The East Room

PHOTO: CAIT BRADY

STEPHEN TRAGESER

FULL MOOD

ART

Dreamy Nashville pop-rock duo Full Mood, aka Florida transplants Miranda McLaughlin and Nick Morelly, seems like the kind of band that will absolutely blow up once they’re able to cultivate a wide audience. The combination of evocative sounds artfully deployed and pointed lyricism richly delivered grabs your ear instantly, but is extremely compelling on repeat listens. In the slow-burning song “Beats Me,” McLaughlin describes a relationship that offers status benefits but not much satisfaction, and you have to put the lyrics on paper to have any idea that it took considerable effort. “Oh, you’re expensive, too much upkeep,” she sings, “It’s an investment and I don’t have a lot of money / They tell me you’re worth it, keep paying my rent / But I never wanted a house with a white picket fence.” Could it have worked for The Smiths or Radiohead? Sure. Could Solomon Burke or Charlie Rich also sell it masterfully? Definitely. But it’s a Full Mood song, and there are several more like it on their new EP Redsleep, recorded with outstanding producer-engineer Collin Pastore (Lucy Dacus, Illuminati Hotties) and out Friday via much-loved local indie Cold Lunch Recordings. They’ll celebrate the release Thursday night with an assist from fellow dream-popster Love Montage and a set from DJ Drama Club. Get there for the pleasure of the performance, and maybe also for the satisfaction of being able to say you saw them way back when. 8 p.m. at The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave.

THEATER

MUSIC

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, which lasts from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, Conexión Américas will livestream its annual award ceremony that recognizes local figures young and old in Nashville’s growing Latin American communities. The Orgullo Hispano (Hispanic Pride) and Amigx We Love awards will go to high school student essay contest winners and community leaders. RSVP at conexionamericas.org/hhm, and keep an eye on that page for more details. The event starts at 6 p.m. and will be streamed from Casa Azafrán. ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

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9/20/21 12:15 PM


CRITICS’ PICKS

NATALIE HEMBY, IDA MAE, & MORE

MERCY COMPLEX

FRI 9.24  AMERICANAFEST 2021

THE DEAD SOUTH, THE VEGABONDS, & MORE

MERCY COMPLEX

S AT 9.25  AMERICANAFEST 2021

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, MAGGIE ROSE, & MORE

MERCY COMPLEX

MON 9.27  WRITER'S BLOCK: NASHVILLE THE HIGH WAT

TUES 9.28  WEATHERS

AARON TAOS, KENZO CREGAN

THE HIGH WAT

TUES 9.28  FAYE WEBSTER · SOLD OUT DANGER INCORPORATED

MERCY LOUNGE

WED 9.29  THRICE

TOUCHE AMORE, SELF DEFENSE FAMILY

CANNERY BALLROOM

WED 9.29  SONGS FOR SEPTEMBER: WE EMO NIGHT

GOODNIGHT, TEXAS

MERCY LOUNGE

THU 9.30  BLAKE RUBY CHLOE HOGAN

THE HIGH WATT

F RI 10.1  SOCCER MOMMY SQUIRREL FLOWER

CANNERY BALLROOM

FRI 10.1  BOOMBOX MERCY LOUNGE

SAT 10.2  BIG FREEDIA CANNERY BALLROOM

S AT 10.2  BAILEY BRYAN LEAH KATE

THE HIGH WATT

SAT 10.2  MOUNTAINS LIKE WAX

CARVER COMMODORE, CREATURE COMFORT

MERCY LOUNGE

TUE 10.5  BRELAND THE HIGH WATT

MAREN MORRIS MUSIC

THE HIGH WATT

THU 9.30  THE BROTHERS COMATOSE

THU. 9/22- SAT. 9/25 Americanafest 2021

Manchester Orchestra, Maggie Rose, & more

TUES. 9/28

weathers

the high watt · Aaron Taos, Kenzo CregAN

WED. 9/29 thrice

Cannery Ballroom

FRI. 10/1

soccer mommy

cannery ballroom · Squirrel Flower

FRI. 10/8

SAT.10/2

sleigh bells

big freedia

mercy lounge

cannery ballroom

11.5  SAWYER

2.7  THE WOMBATS

11.8  VANDOLIERS AND GABE LEE

2.18  SQUIRREL FLOWER

12.2  NICK SHOULDERS

3.15  MAISIE PETERS

1.10  ALLEN STONE

5.5  JAMES ARTHUR

TUE 10.5  TV GIRL

SAT 10.9  GOLDPARK

MERCY LOUNGE

THE HIGH WATT

MERCY LOUNGE

CANNERY BALLROOM

JORDANA

MERCY LOUNGE

FRI 10.8  BBNO$ CANNERY BALLROOM

FRI 10.8  SLEIGH BELLS MERCY LOUNGE M

SAT 10.9  HELLOGOODBYE MERCY LOUNGE

CANNERY BALLROOM THE HIGH WATT

MERCY LOUNGE

CANNERY BALLROOM

MAGGIE MILES & EASY HONEY

THE HIGH WATT

SUN 10.10  NOTHING,NOWHERE. MEET ME @ THE ALTAR, ARMS LENGTH

MERCY LOUNGE

MON 10.11  MANDA

NANCY DAINES, JACKSON DREYER

THE HIGH WATT

TUES 10.12  MONOPHONICS PAUL & THE TALL TREES

THE HIGH WATT

18

[TRAVELING THROUGH]

PILGRIMAGE MUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

Franklin’s Pilgrimage festival has had its ups and downs since its inaugural run in 2015 — traffic issues in 2017, getting rained out in 2018 and, as with pretty much all live entertainment, being canceled due to the pandemic in 2020. This year, the fest is back at the beautiful Park at Harlinsdale Farm with two very full days of music that appeals to a pretty broad audience on a family-friendly schedule. It’s worth noting a couple of differences this year: First off, the festival has a proof-of-vax/negativetest protocol in place, so be ready with your COVID-19 vaccination card or a negative test result time-stamped less than 48 hours from the start of the festival; either way, be sure to bring a mask if you’re planning to go into any of the indoor spaces. Second, there’s no ancillary stage in the walking horse arena this year, but there are more short sets sprinkled throughout both days in the Americana Music Triangle Experience tent. Saturday, headliners The Black Keys are set to play at 8:25 p.m., coming through on the heels of their Hill Country blues tribute record Delta Kream, possibly bringing along some of the Hill Country players who join them on the record. Among other evening sets to look forward to on Saturday are country phenom Maren Morris and pan-American roots ace Valerie June, but you won’t want to miss afternoon sets from soul-blues singer Robert Finley, top-notch songwriter Katie Pruitt, energetic rockers Low Cut Connie or Southern rock champs The Marcus King Band. Sunday has plenty of highlights on the early side too, like rising gospel quartet The Harlem Gospel Travelers and rising country ace Morgan Wade. Later in the afternoon, you can catch the danceable joyful noise of Tank and the Bangas, the chilled-out funk groove of Khruangbin, soulful songsmith Blessing Offor; as evening comes on, look out for outstanding country singer-songwriter Hailey Whitters, rockers Cage the Elephant and Texas psych-soul duo Black Pumas. Headliner Dave Matthews Band is a jazzy, jammy, folky group you either love dearly or wouldn’t touch with a 10-footpole; either way, it’ll likely work out well for you that their festival-closing set is scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. Keep an eye on pilgrimagefestival.com or the fest’s app for the most up-to-date info. Sept. 25-26 at The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, 239 Franklin Road, Franklin STEPHEN TRAGESER

car and head west 90 minutes to Waverly’s Walls Art Park. The free park — which was built by a local businessman, not by the city — is dotted with cinderblock walls. Any artist can paint the walls however they want (one rule: no profanity). Paint the date on the art, and no one can paint over it for at least 30 days. I’d wander the paths and see what had popped up since my last visit. This Saturday and Sunday, Walls Art Park hosts the Fall Paint Jam, which includes artists from around the country painting those walls, accompanied by live music and food trucks, plus a big old morale boost for the town of Waverly — it was devastated by flooding last month, though Walls Art Park did not suffer any damage. Many of these artists don’t normally get a lot of recognition for their work, as they often paint on bridges and abandoned buildings, so it is a treat for

them to have an appreciative audience. The Fall Paint Jam takes place from 9 a.m. until dark both Saturday and Sunday. Sept. 25-26 at Walls Art Park, 220 South Clydeton Road, Waverly MARGARET LITTMAN ART

THU 9.23  AMERICANAFEST 2021

[PAWS FOR A CAUSE]

ART FOR ANIMALS

Getting a cat or dog fixed at a traditional veterinary hospital can be prohibitively expensive — and pets who are intact are likely to figure out a way to mate and reproduce, often resulting in kittens and puppies without homes. East Nashville’s Pet Community Center offers low-cost spay/ neuter surgeries to resident pet owners, as well as vaccinations and treatments for things like fleas and parasites. In addition, the center works with Metro Animal Care and Control to sterilize and vaccinate

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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9/20/21 12:15 PM


BE A PIONEER. B E A M OV E R .

Outlaws and Armadillos: Country’s Roaring �70s EXHIBIT NOW OPEN

DOWNTOWN

VISIT TODAY CountryMusicHallofFame.org nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

MKTG_Be Here_SceneAd_9.23_21.indd 1

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9/20/21 1:27 PM


PERPETUAL GROOVE // OCT 2

THE NUDE PARTY // OCT 5

K CAMP // OCT 11

W/ TWEN

w

sho

new

w

sho

HALFNOISE // NOV 7 W/ LOUIS PRINCE & ELKE

Upcoming shows sep 23 sep 24 sep 25 sep 28 sep 29 sep 30 oct 1 oct 2 oct 5 oct 6 oct 7 oct 8 oct 11 oct 12 oct 14 oct 16

the dead south, strung like a horse, & the 40 acre mule Americanafest (1 pm) langhorne slim, jill andrews, peter bradley adams, s.g. goodman, katie toupin Americanafest (7 pm) songs of 1971 Americanafest carlene carter, lilly hiatt, sarah shook & the disarmers, charlie marie, adam chaffins Americanafest wild rivers w/ jillian jacqueline SOLD OUT! dk the drummer w/ brassville Fozzy w/ Royal Bliss & Black Satellite Jukebox the Ghost w/fleece Perpetual Groove the nude party w/twen freddie gibbs emo night Mae & The Juliana Theory k camp natalie hemby okey dokey w/nordista freeze & gatlin parker millsap w/molly parden

oct 17 Oct 18 oct 19 oct 20 oct 21 oct 22 oct 24 oct 25 oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 nov 2 nov 3 nov 4 nov 5 nov 7 nov 8

new

free-roaming cats. By treating 40 to 50 of these community cats per week, the organizations have seen euthanasia rates drop to single digits. You can support these efforts by attending the PCC’s annual fundraiser Art for Animals and place your bids in an auction that includes art, vacation packages, concerts and more. The evening will include dinner and drinks, and you’ll meet the friendly folks who help kitties and pups across the county. Tickets are $150 at petcommunitycenter.org. 6:30 p.m. at The Westin Nashville, 807 Clark Place ERICA CICCARONE

LUCIE SILVAS // NOV 5 sep 23

ART FOR ANIMALS

noga erez w/mckinley dixon Madison Cunningham w/s. g. goodman gus dapperton w/spill tab how long gone the backseat lovers w/brandon anderson SOLD OUT! Pecos & the Rooftops SOLD OUT! southern underground pro wrestling highly suspect tennis w/molly burch Jake Wesley Rogers shannon and the clams w/thelma and the sleaze

tauk Rome & duddy badflower w/teenage wrist & dead poet society stephen day w/carly bannister shane smith & the saints susto w/hotel fiction & Paul Whitacre lucie silvas halfnoise w/ louis prince & elke the lemonheads w/ soft kill & hey rocco

w

sho

NAMIR BLADE // SEP 26

SUNDAY / 9.26 MUSIC

new

really listen. If only they used their musical prowess for good instead of dick jokes. Proof of vaccination or a recent negative COVID test is required for entry. 8 p.m., The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave. MEGAN SELING

[PERV POP]

THE BLAM BLAMS W/PEPPER SAID & BIG GORGEOUS

Nashville glam rockers The Blam Blams released Opening Night, their full-length concept record, more than a year ago, but consider Sunday night’s show at The East Room the band’s release party. It’s the first time the band has taken the stage in Nashville since — save for livestreams and a quick acoustic performance during Outloud Music Fest in June — and The Blam Blams have made it clear that they are best experienced live, where they can fully lean into the performance and attempt to transport onlookers to their own glitter-filled galaxy where spandex and David Bowie rule. Opening the show is Big Gorgeous, a pop trio from San Francisco. Their latest single, from their 2020 release Perv Pop, is “Crack in Her Hand,” a hookfilled synth-laced pop anthem about wanting weed but getting crack. Other songs include “Limp Dick Party Tricks” (“Limp dick party tricks / things to do when you can’t get it stiff / You can lick it, you can suck it / But you’re never gonna fuck it”), “Real Pussy” and “Firecrotch.” It’s like if Reggie and the Full Effect let a 12-year-old boy write their lyrics — it sounds great until you

FOOD & DRINK

FT. BRASSVILLE

livestream tickets also available

DK THE DRUMMER // SEP 29

CRITICS’ PICKS

[HEIRLOOM]

THE NASHVILLE FOOD PROJECT 10TH ANNIVERSARY PICNIC PARTY

For 10 years, The Nashville Food Project has been growing, cooking and sharing food with communities across the city. The nonprofit partners with anti-poverty organizations that know their communities best, and the staff and volunteers prepare meals from scratch that are tailored to 35-plus groups per week. But the Food Project’s mission goes above and beyond an emergency food system. The organization keeps upward of 220,000 pounds of food out of landfills each year. Its community gardening program empowers Nashvillians to grow their own food, and its market garden program Growing Together supports people who want to sell produce for income and to connect more deeply to food systems. It’s a nourishment that goes straight to the heart. The organization will celebrate its 10th anniversary virtually this year with a livestreamed bluegrass concert featuring Justin Hiltner and a video showing the project’s transformational work. Learn more and buy tickets at thenashvillefoodproject.org. 6 p.m. online ERICA CICCARONE

MONDAY / 9.27 MUSIC

917 Woodland Street Nashville, TN 37206 thebasementnashville.com

PHOTO: MANDY WHITLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

thebasementeast basementeast thebasementeast

[BEARS, HAWKS, SOX, BULLS]

SERENGETI

You wouldn’t expect a rap song named after late character actor Brian Dennehy to slap, but life, like Chicago rapper Serengeti, is full of surprises. “Dennehy” is an ode to Windy City clichés and stereotypes, with the indie MC adopting the persona of middle-aged Kenny Dennis. Serengeti would explore that character over the course of multiple songs and even full EPs and LPs, a unique and impressive capstone in Serengeti’s already eclectic discography. He kicked off a new character study on 2020’s Ajai, following the exploits of a young sneaker-head — who also runs into Kenny Dennis. His most recent release is have a summer, a collection of (the rapper emphasized on Twitter) unironic summer pop jams. 8 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

MOON KISSED // OCT 25 UPCOMING SHOWS

W/ SEDDY MAC & VIBEOUT

sep 23 sep 24 sep 25 sep 25 sep 26

india ramey, zach schmidt, phoebe hunt & the gatherers, rach baiman, violet bell Americanafest amy speace, ana egge, brit taylor, mac leaphart, ruthie collins Americanafest kelsey waldon, bendigo fletcher, justin wells, s. g. goodman, eric bolander, grayson jenkins, cody lee meece Americanafest (12 pm) the whitmore sisters, sadie campbell, wesley dean, gabe lee, brooke stephenson Americanafest (7 pm) namir blade w/seddy mac & vibeout

sep 29 sep 29 sep 30 oct 1 oct 2 oct 2 oct 3 0ct 4 0ct 6 0ct 6 oct 7

naked gypsy queens & mac saturn (7 pm) christina tripp w/abigail rose (9 pm) palm palm sweettalker, behold the brave & lindsay starr chip greene, katie cole (7 pm) jive talk w /crumbsnatchers & travollta (9 pm) charles kaster, the great dying, & ben de la cour zoe cummins w/madeleine, allie dunn ellie turner w/connor mcginnis (7 pm) annie williams w/Good buddy & bryan cates (9 pm) me Nd adam w/emily deahl

1604 8th Ave S Nashville, TN 37203 thebasementnash 20

thebasementnash

thebasementnash

THE BLAM BLAMS

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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9/20/21 12:15 PM


101 HILLSBORO VILLAGE YEARS CELEBRATE | UPCOMING EVENTS

GET TICKETS & LEARN MORE AT PARNASSUSBOOKS.NET/EVENT

DOWNTOWN

Thursday, September 23 CONVERSATION AND ALBUM PREVIEW

Brandi Carlile In These Silent Days 4:00 – 5:15 pm

CMA THEATER

JERRY PARK

Saturday, October 2 LIVE IN CONCERT

Lori McKenna The Two Birds Tour CMA THEATER

at PARNASSUS Slow Roads America

LESLIE HOOTON

6:00PM

Jim Lauderdale

The PTO Comedy Tour

on CROWDCAST Trisha’s Kitchen

2:00 – 3:00 pm

Friday and Saturday, November 12 – 13

CONVERSATION AND PERFORMANCE

Planet of Love

FORD THEATER

Saturday, September 25 SONGWRITER SESSION

Vincent Neil Emerson NOON – 12:45 pm

FORD THEATER

SONGWRITER SESSION

Matt Jenkins •

CMA THEATER

LIVE IN CONCERT

Willie Nelson And Family CMA THEATER

FORD THEATER

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1 2:00PM

CAROL ORSBORN

with HARRY RICK MOODY on FACEBOOK LIVE The Making of an Old Soul

Mike Farris Sings! The Soul of Christmas CMA THEATER

Check our calendar for a full schedule of upcoming programs and events.

CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Calendar

Members Get More Membership includes unlimited Museum admission, ticket pre-sale opportunities, and much more. JOIN TODAY: CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Membership

SALON@615 SPECIAL EDITION:

ELIZABETH STROUT OCT 20 at 6:15PM Montgomery Bell Academy Ticket Required

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2 6:30PM

Friday, December 17

OCT 6 at 6:30PM on Zoom Ticket Required

SUSAN ORLEAN

TRISHA YEARWOOD

SOLD OUT

LIVE IN CONCERT

Saturday, October 2

NOON – 12:45 pm

Nurse Blake

AMOR TOWELS

with KEVIN WILSON at PARNASSUS The Secret of Rainy Days

LIVE ON STAGE

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Friday, September 24

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SHARON CAMERON

LOUISE ERDRICH

with J. T. ELLISON at PARNASSUS Bluebird MONDAY, OCTOBER 4 6:30PM

JESS WALTER at PARNASSUS The Cold Millions

NOV 9 at 7:00PM on Crowdcast Ticket Required

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ALIX HARROW

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DR. DOG

Earlier this year, Dr. Dog announced that this tour would be the band’s final live run together. They’ve since clarified that they have no plans to break up, but just in case this tour truly is their last — be sure to catch the beloved psychedelic roots rockers when they play a two-night stint at Brooklyn Bowl on Tuesday and Wednesday. Given the finality of the tour, expect the band to pull out some deep cuts from their nearly twodecade catalog, including their most recent studio release, 2018’s Critical Equation. North Carolina folk act Bowerbirds open both nights. Sept. 28-29 at Brooklyn Bowl, 925 Third Ave. N. BRITTNEY McKENNA MUSIC

FEAT. BRITTANY HOWARD, MARGO PRICE, TRISTEN, ERIN RAE, BECCA MANCARI

DR. DOG

[INDIE DREAMS]

OKKERVIL RIVER

Like fellow indie-pop songwriters Will Oldham and David Berman, Okkervil River leader Will Sheff mixes up seemingly incompatible ideas of what songwriting — and indie pop — should be. If the rockers of the 1960s looked askance at the idea of celebrity culture and consumerism, as in The Rolling Stones’ 1965 song “Satisfaction,” indie pop-rock-country artists like Sheff take the pleasures and discontents of that consumerism as givens. Okkervil River’s brand of indie includes nods to country and folk, as does, say, Oldham’s, but what makes indie so very indie is its relative lack of fidelity to idiom. In other words, Sheff folds in aural signifiers that reference country or rock, but he comes from the great nowhere that is pop music. That’s cool, and Sheff hits the mark on a very strange song from Okkervil River’s 2018 album In the Rainbow Rain. I have to give credit to a songwriter and record maker who could come up with

something like “Famous Tracheotomies,” which name-checks well-known musicians who have had — you guessed it — tracheotomies. Among the celebrities Sheff celebrates are Gary Coleman and head Kink Ray Davies. Singing about another star, Mary Wells, Sheff lets loose with these lines: “She was known as Motown’s queen / But laryngeal cancer / Left her unable to sing.” Okkervil River released a new tune, “In a Light,” earlier this year. Appearing with Sheff will be singer and songwriter Damien Jurado. 7 p.m. at Third Man Records, 623 Seventh Ave. S. EDD HURT

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Over on the streaming side of things, two new adult-oriented animated comedies have recently premiered, and both feature ballsy, boozy broads who pretty much cause chaos wherever they roam. Someone at Netflix decided it would be a novel idea to take the Chicago Party Aunt Twitter feed and turn it into a full-fledged show. Superstore’s Lauren Ash voices the titular character, a paunchy party animal who lives her life one drunken stupor at a time. Meanwhile, Paramount+ has The Harper House, with Better Call Saul’s Rhea Seehorn as the can-do matriarch of a once-affluent family, now forced to live in a rundown home on the poor side of town. Both these cartoons pull out their share of crass, crude gags, with some being more effective than others. However, the animated sight of these middle-aged gals constantly giving zero fucks will never not be funny. CRAIG D. LINDSEY CHICAGO PARTY AUNT

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OKKERVIL RIVER

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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Arts and Culture News From the Nashville Scene

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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FOOD AND DRINK

THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE OF FOOD The upcoming InterNASHional Night Market will showcase the diversity of Nashville’s immigrant-owned restaurants BY JENNIFER JUSTUS

24

EDESSA RESTAURANT

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

C

hef Lamar Alvarez of Chez Lama, a food truck and catering operation serving Alvarez’s native Haitian cuisine, opened in 2010. But his business hasn’t been in operation since INTERNASHIONAL NIGHT MARKET the pandemic hit 6-9 P.M. FRIDAY, SEPT. 24, in March 2020. AT TIRRC, 3310 EZELL ROAD Catering business dried up, and uncertainty clouded its future. “My wife was pregnant,” says Alvarez. “It’s like, what do we do? The best course of action was to not expose myself so I don’t bring anything home to her. I did try to do a little bit of catering jobs here and there, but it wasn’t enough to really keep stuff going.” Now, a year-and-a-half later, he’s gearing up to revive the business for the InterNASHional Night Market hosted by the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition on Sept. 24. It’s at least the second time the folks at TIRRC have provided a springboard for Alvarez. The first happened just after the chef launched his business from his garage. “When I started catering in 2010, TIRCC was one of the first clients,” he says. “That was my biggest job. That was the first time I was introduced to them, and we’ve been kind of partnered ever since. They’ve really supported my business, and they were a blessing to me.” Beyond helping spread the word about immigrant- and refugee-owned businesses, TIRRC advocates for immigrant rights through coalition building and legislative advocacy. This week, the nonprofit’s largest fundraiser of the year will showcase Chez Lama as well as more than 15 other food entrepreneurs — from hidden gems to well-established favorites, including the Kurdish and Turkish cuisine of Edessa Restaurant, the Puerto Rican dishes of Merengue Cafe and the foods of East Africa from Madina Restaurant. Just as Alvarez’s business has evolved, so has TIRRC’s InterNASHional food series. While it began as a food-crawl tour to showcase businesses eight years ago, it grew into an event drawing more than 1,000 attendees with guests having the option for a guided or self-guided tour. Various tracts also were added to highlight desserts or spicy foods, for example. After COVID arrived, organizers wanted to keep connecting chefs NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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MADINA RESTAURANT with the community and support the entrepreneurs’ storytelling through food, especially as they faced the challenges that the pandemic brought to bear. So last year, InterNASHional offered online cooking classes and a to-go dumpling sampler, for example. And while this year won’t see a full return to packing more than a thousand people into buses and restaurants, there will be some carefully reimagined in-person events once again. “This year felt more comfortable bringing people together outdoors in socially distanced settings,” says Elizabeth Welliver Hengen, TIRRC’s community relations manager. “And also, how can we use our headquarters as a way to bring people together?” TIRRC hosted friends at its new building in Antioch for the first time in August at an event called Welcome Home Party. The organization had special COVID safety protocols in place, just as they will for the night market, an all-outdoor event. It’s another way to highlight the new headquarters while also featuring a range of restaurants from a wider geographic swath without the constraints of a bus route. At their heart, the food events for TIRRC aim to show the diversity of cultures in Nashville.

PHOTOS: ERIC ENGLAND

FOOD AND DRINK

MERENGUE CAFE As Hengen explains it, the families who own these businesses are families that TIRRC has relationships with from English classes or other programs. “So many times restaurants are where our communities congregate,” she says. At their establishments, you might find a young student finishing his homework at the table while his parents work. “Food connects us, and it’s a cultural currency — a way of highlighting creativity and nourishment,” Hengen says. Alvarez agrees. He came to the United States from Haiti at age 13, and while he studied landscape design at Florida A&M and worked in the field for a while, it’s food that captured his interest as a way to showcase his culture, which in recent years could have been overshadowed by tragedy. “Usually people love to talk about the kind of food they eat no matter where they’re from,” Alvarez says. “They’ll say, ‘Oh yeah, I like this and that,’ and it opens the door to conversation. That’s one way I like to tell people about Haitian culture. I will tell them about griyo, which is fried pork, and fried plantains and something we call pikliz, which is like coleslaw or chow-chow but spicy and vinegar-based.”

From TIRRC’s perspective, these relationships built over food also help strengthen their other work. “If you get to know a chef and know their story,” Hengen says, “and if there’s a policy that affects immigrants in your community, you have a face and a taste associated with it. It’s no longer abstract. You’ve received hospitality.” In addition to the InterNASHional Night Market, TIRRC also planned to host A Feast With Louisa Shafia: Private Dinner on Oct. 24 but decided to cancel the indoor dinner due to COVID concerns. Shafia, author of the award-winning cookbook The New Persian Kitchen, plans to offer different types of events in the future. Shafia says her relationship with TIRRC began at a “truly awful time in American history.” “It was 2017, and the Muslim-ban crisis had started,” Shafia says. “My father is from Iran. I was distraught because it directly affected my extended family, both the people in Iran and the ones living in the U.S.” She wanted to do something that would contribute to the dialogue on immigration in a positive way, so she called TIRRC’s main number and said she wanted to do a Persian dinner to raise funds for their work. Shafia

had learned about TIRRC just a few months prior while volunteering for another nonprofit at the National Immigrant Integration Conference, which TIRRC co-hosted. “I started crying on the phone when I tried to explain to the staff person who I was and what I wanted to do,” Shafia says. Shafia ended up planning a Persian New Year dinner at East Nashville’s acclaimed Butcher & Bee. Tickets sold out quickly. “It was an emotional night, with speeches from people who had been helped by TIRRC,” says Shafia. “The dinner gave people a way to learn about TIRRC by having a fun night out, and it brought in a lot of new support.” The night also led to dinners featuring other immigrant cooks across the city. “Unless you work in an industry that relies heavily on immigrant labor, like hospitality or agriculture, immigrants in Nashville can be invisible,” Shafia says. “But they’re here in substantial numbers, and punch far above their weight in those industries. … And I can’t think of a better way to get people invested in the well-being of immigrants than to have people meet them over a beautiful feast of that particular culture’s food.” EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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9/20/21 12:18 PM


VODKA YONIC

LIFE IN A SEASON

Vodka Yonic

People survive losing two kids. I think about those parents often. And then I think about my son. BY ELIZABETH JONES

Vodka Yonic features a rotating cast of women and nonbinary writers from around the world sharing stories that are alternately humorous, sobering, intellectual, erotic, religious or painfully personal. You never know what you’ll find in this column, but we hope this potent mix of stories encourages conversation.

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W

ith the first breath of cool air into my lungs, my heart grows heavy. Fall — inarguably the best season in Tennessee — has turned on me. The time of year that once brought the excitement of cardigans and football and fire pits is now dulled by a pang of longing. I know a healthy baby isn’t a given for any expectant mother. I approach each of my friends’ new pregnancies with the skepticism I’ve given my own. Nothing should be taken for granted, and there are always more milestones to cross. Even if, miraculously, a healthy baby is born, crazybad shit can still happen. It happens all the time. I think about my healthy daughter leaving me every day. It’s a dread I cannot escape. It’s a pain I could not bear again. But people do it. People survive losing two children. I think about those parents often. And then I think about my son. My son liked his hospital room cold, so I wore sweatshirts from September to December. I distinctly remember the day his unit closed due to the bedside surgery of another patient — forcing me to leave the hospital and head outside, to my neglected dog, eager for a walk. The leaves were already on the ground. I hadn’t noticed them turning. The heat of the summer was long gone. Two women on my street were due within months of my son’s birth. We had dreamily discussed how our children would grow up with neighborhood kids their same age. I drove by them Halloween night as they were experiencing the first of a lifetime of holidays with their healthy children. I cursed out loud, seething with envy. “I can’t imagine” is the phrase I hear most often when someone learns that our son died. I know it’s meant to soothe — to recognize the unbearable tragedy of the loss. But often, it makes me angry that people can’t — or won’t — imagine a fate like my own. It’s as if they let their minds linger at the edge of the deep well of grief, and then turn away and pack those feelings up. But then, who would willingly go down that well? There used to be a time when I could count the minutes before the subject of my son would come up. It was always on the tip of my tongue, ready to tumble out: “Hello, yes, I would like fries with my burger. Also, my kid died.” But now, five years later, there

HOW CAN I BE A GOOD MOTHER IF I’M NOT SHOUTING THE STORY OF MY SON FROM THE ROOFTOPS? are people I’ve known for a long time who aren’t aware of it. That feels even more awkward than being labeled The Woman Whose Son Died. How can I be a good mother if I’m not shouting the story of my son from the rooftops? My husband and I recount all the times we could have brought him up but didn’t, justifying to each other that we remember him — of course we remember him — but we know about societal rules. There are times I boldly relay his story to random people who dare to ask questions like, “Do you have any other kids?” But most of the time, people are just filling the silence with small talk. They’re not looking for a life lesson about how everything doesn’t necessarily work out all the time. It’s not my job to warn them. But in the fall, it’s harder to keep quiet. My son’s life lasted just three months, all within hospital walls — a perfect quarter slice of the yearly pie. In fall, we had a son. In winter, we did not. Yes, I missed the bonfires and weekend hikes, but I got to witness new eyes open in wonder. I felt a tachycardiac heart slow with human touch. I learned just how large our extended family had grown, how many hospital omelets were too many, the exact timing of morning rounds, and what every dang machine beep on the fourth floor of the pediatric hospital meant. I learned to fully love. And I felt deep despair, the limits of the medical field, the hardest goodbye of my life. There are the five stages to grief — denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. But they don’t always come in order, and once you’re in a tornado of those feelings, you can’t really ever get out. But I offer a sixth stage: the grieving of your grief. That moment when you can’t call the tears up as quickly, or summon the image of your son taking his last breath quite as readily, and how that distance makes you feel even more distant from him. It’s the loss of immediate attachment to your past devastation. It’s when that first breath of fall doesn’t jolt your heart. I long for that day, and I dread that day. And I know I will always be counting down until the next fall. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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ART

RAW GLAZE

A collaborative exhibit between Elephant Gallery and the new Buchanan Arts initiative speaks to creative traditions and community arts education BY JOE NOLAN

other. I mean, Rebecca Morgan — one of her first experiences working with clay was at a workshop she went to at Arrowmont that was taught by Tom Bartel, and both of them are in this show. It’s really neat seeing Tom’s work and Rebecca’s work kind of looking at each other right now.” Bartel’s marionette-like ceramic dolls are exactly as spooky as what you think of when you think of marionette-like ceramic dolls. They’re also gorgeously crafted and packed with real pathos. Morgan’s “Dream Jug” is a vessel with the deranged face of a fairytale giant. It looks more than a little like a berserk Randy Quaid frozen in carbonite. Like teacher, like student. Donovan taught art at the university level for 25 years before resigning from Middle Tennessee State University four years ago. He had a plan, but his plans had plans of their own. “I was just ready to try something else,” says Donovan. “I feel like I’d experienced the full spectrum of experiences being in higher ed, and I got just a little divided. I felt like I was partially invested in both Murfreesboro and Nashville, which meant neither of them were getting my A-game. I was like, ‘I’ve got to figure out a way to be like entirely invested in one community.’ ” Donovan’s fine art ceramics are represented by Zeitgeist Gallery in Nashville and LeMieux Galleries in New Orleans. He launched his Tenure Ceramics studio more than a decade ago, and his wheel-thrown custom clay creations can be seen at local foodie destinations like

City House, Bastion and even Audrey, chef Sean Brock’s forthcoming East Nashville restaurant compound. After leaving university life, Donovan planned to turn his Tenure Ceramics sidehustle into his main gig by partnering with Lockwood and building a new clay studio headquarters behind Elephant. After purchasing and shipping a prefabricated metal building from Colorado, red tape and contractor woes sent the entire project sliding sideways and caused Donovan and Lockwood to hit the pause button. Over almost a yearand-a-half, the pair ruminated on their plans, which changed, grew and evolved. “I never wanted to quit teaching,” explains Donovan. “My peers in academia and I all love teaching, but you’re burning 60 percent of your gas not teaching when you’re at a university. The teaching was always the good stuff. Our original plan to expand Tenure didn’t work out, but that was for the better, actually. We ended up turning that building into the teaching space for Buchanan Arts.” The new classroom studio — which includes the building’s covered front porch — measures approximately 2,500 square feet. Donovan will also have a classroom space in the original Elephant Gallery building. Buchanan Arts was granted 501c3 nonprofit status in May, and they’re already teaching adult classes. By the beginning of 2022, they hope to open to North Nashville’s middle and high school students to offer both ceramics and digital arts classes as a supplement to the public education

“UNTITLED,” TOM BARTEL

“FOLLOW YOUR PATH,” BENJIE HUE

T

he Elephant Gallery exhibition States of Clay brims with subtle colors and engaging forms, ideas about identity, and reflections on the beauty of the natural world. The exhibition of contemporary ceramic STATES OF CLAY CLOSING RECEPTION 6-9 P.M. sculpture opened FRIDAY, SEPT. 24 in August, and it ELEPHANT GALLERY naturally reflects 1411 BUCHANAN ST. on centuries-old art traditions that stretch across the globe and reach back into prehistory. The exhibition is curated by Nashville-based artist John Donovan, whose signature ceramic creations feature the warlike toy animal figures that have made him one of the Southeast’s most recognizable sculptors. States of Clay manages to show mainly figurative art, while also demonstrating the breadth of contemporary ceramics. Benjie Heu’s frightful-and-funny sculptures fit right into the commonly quirky aesthetics we expect at Elephant shows: “Ghost” is a Cabernet-colored anime-ish twist on a poltergeist from Pac-Man. April Felipe’s “Above” is a stunning mixed-media piece that pairs thoughtful textile work and ceramics decorated with transferred images that look like delicate pencil drawings. “Above” reads like a religious icon, and Felipe’s work demonstrates the subtle expressions that can be formed from clay in fire. Donovan is a longtime arts educator, and the exhibition’s opening also kicked off a new community arts initiative founded by Donovan and Elephant Gallery owner and artist Alex Lockwood. Buchanan Arts occupies a newly built studio on the same Buchanan Street lot as the gallery, and both the exhibition and the initiative highlight the kind of pedagogical lineage that’s crucial for nurturing the arts and artists alike. States of Clay spotlights regional artists across the Southeast, and most of the sculptors in the show are planning to return to Buchanan Arts next year to lead classes and workshops. Donovan’s decades-long career in the Southeast — and his experiences as a university gallery curator — make this a top-notch survey of contemporary ceramics. Donovan’s also woven in a real-life narrative about the still-living, now-ancient traditions that have always seen ceramic sculpture-making techniques and traditions deftly handed down from teachers to students since the beginning of the Bronze Age. “This show’s got former students of mine and also peers,” says Donovan in a phone chat with the Scene. “So for me, when you walk into the show, it shows crosspollination. There are artists in this show who mentored each other or taught each

offerings in the neighborhood. “That’s baked into the batter of this cake,” explains Donovan. “It’s not icing on the cake, it is an ingredient in the batter of this cake — to make sure we’re nurturing and providing opportunity for the creative community that’s already here.” Buchanan Arts is expanding community arts education at a time when North Nashville’s schools are demonstrably in crisis: At about the same time that Buchanan Arts won nonprofit status, the Metropolitan Nashville Board of Public Education controversially voted to close four schools in North Nashville in a cost-savings bid. The closures were passed after only one week of input from Nashvillians living and working in a neighborhood that’s built on the educational legacies of HBCU institutions like Meharry Medical College, Tennessee State University and Fisk University — the home of Nashville’s greatest art collection, the Alfred Stieglitz Collection. “My former grad professor James Watkins is in the show,” Donovan says. “And he’s at a very kind of typical period in his career, where he’s doing major museum exhibitions, solo shows in Houston. And we’ve also got Gary White, who’s a Watkins [College of Art] BFA alum from North Nashville. He’s in the third year of his MFA at UT right now, and he’s got two pieces in this show. And in that same show is an artist like Watkins, who’s at that kind of pinnacle level.” The wheel spins. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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BOOKS

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A SYMPHONY OF LISTENERS Many voices harmonize in Paper Concert BY LAUREN TURNER

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n theater, the phrase “in the round” refers to a stage placed with an audience on at least three of its sides. In Nashville, it’s often used in reference to a performance of multiple singer-songwriters who take turns playing their songs around a semicircle. Amy Wright’s Paper Concert: A Conversation in the Round employs a similarly polyphonic approach, compiling interviews with a variety of thinkers and artists who explore an array of topics from climate change to ketchup. Among these diverse voices are Dorothy Allison, Rae Armantrout, Gerald Stern, Lia Purpura, Raven Jackson, Wendy Walters, Kimiko Hahn, PAPER CONCERT: A CONVERSATION IN THE ROUND BY AMY WRIGHT SARABANDE BOOKS 188 PAGES,$16.95 Philanese Slaughter and many more, of whom Wright says, “Some of them are famous, some will be, some should be — but all of them refract the light of the unknowable mystery of the self.” She serves as conductor as well as author, inviting the reader to listen to the ways that each part harmonizes within this symphonic text. In the book’s introduction, Wright — an English professor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville — depicts a spider crafting a vast web as a metaphor for her writing process: “An essayist in miniature, the spider had spun a line as tenuous as the one that starts the fabric of an idea.” Similarly, Wright is leaping into the spaces between conversations with this book, creating a web of associations and connections in hopes of answering one question: What am I? She writes that it “wasn’t a search for personal identity but for the origins of the conflict at the heart of being.” How better to illuminate this conflict than in shining a light on the heart of other beings? Pages later, the writer Nancy Lord is quoted defining the word “essay” as an “attempt to learn, to discover, to wander around in ideas.” This sense of active discovery pulses throughout Paper Concert, rendering it a participatory read. Each section begins with Wright’s stunningly lyrical prose and moves into a series of related conversations with the interviewees. These bits of conversation are excerpted and peppered throughout, much like a musical theme that returns in various movements throughout a composition. At several points in the book, images and insights poignantly reflect the nature of

work in which they appear. For example, the poet Dan Beachy-Quick muses on dialogue: “It seems to offer, ideally, a profound kind of trespass, an overhearing, in which the actual importance of two people talking together exists not in the conversation itself, but rather in the intimacy only trespass allows: a glimpse, a listening-in that feels worthy exactly because it doesn’t initially belong to you at all.” This sacred experience of “listening-in” feels descriptive of reading Paper Concert. Elsewhere, the multidisciplinary artist Raven Jackson says: “Creating complicated and layered Black women and girls in my work truly feels like listening. I approach each character like a real, breathing person and, if I listen, I can hear what they’d say or do in certain scenes and situations.” Jackson’s listening posture toward her work is also shared by the writer Lia Purpura: “So the ear, indeed, reaches out, casts out past idea, creates a shadow space into which ideas shimmy.” Ears join voices in Wright’s composition, shimmying out into an environment of interactive meaning-making. Paper Concert contains multitudes, but ultimately explores the nature of being an individual within a collective. The writer Sejal Shah describes a group folk dance called “raas” from the state of Gujarat in India: “Imagine two concentric circles facing each other. As the circles turn in opposite directions, you are dancing with people whose names you will not know — there’s something about civic engagement and community for me in that you make eye contact, greet each other, acknowledge.” In these pages, a paper dance of raas seems to take place: Disparate thinkers who may not know each other are dancing together in a community of thought. The biologist David Haskell offers another poignant metaphor when defining a forest as “a living network where ‘individuality’ is a temporary manifestation of relationships. Networks of interconnection persist, evolve, and are the fundamental biological ‘ground’ of being in the forest, not ‘selves’... [The] social nature of humans means that most ideas live in the networked relationships among people, not in ‘individual’ minds.” Wright embodies this interconnectedness in her decision to make Paper Concert an ecosystem in which ideas cohabitate. Like the skillful spider, Wright’s feat of web-spinning is courageous and bold. Her trust in each glistening thread before her challenges the reader, also, to trust where each one might lead into infinite connections. For more local book coverage, please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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MUSIC

THE NEXT STAGE

Kacey Musgraves finds lessons in her grief on Star-Crossed BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

W

hen Kacey Musgraves released her landmark Grammywinning album Golden Hour in 2018, the world was a different place. The word “pandemic” STAR-CROSSED ALBUM AND FILM OUT NOW was little more than good Scrabble fodder. Musgraves herself was riding a personal high, celebrating a quickly growing fan base, glowing critical acclaim and the honeymoon stage of a new marriage to fellow singer-songwriter Ruston Kelly. But to quote the title track of Musgraves’ fourth studio album Star-Crossed, released Sept. 10, “Then the darkness came.” As the Golden Hour album cycle came to a close, so did the relative “normality” of a prepandemic world, as well as Musgraves’ marriage to Kelly. The couple announced their divorce in July 2020. Almost overnight, the glittery butterflies and rainbows of Golden Hour seemed like dusty relics of the past. Like its predecessor, Star-Crossed was co-produced by Ian Fitchuk and Daniel Tashian, who also co-wrote the bulk of the album’s songs with Musgraves. In tandem

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with the album, Musgraves released a film, also called Star-Crossed, featuring appearances from actor Eugene Levy, comedian Meg Stalter and drag queen Symone, among others. Star-Crossed is divided roughly into three sections, which describe the beginning of a marriage, its dissolution and the healing that one party reaches — eventually, excruciatingly. The title track opens the record with a prologue, with Musgraves establishing the story of “two lovers ripped right at the seams” over glistening nylon-string guitar that sounds at once dreamy and ominous. A choir, with Fancy Hagood and Brothers Osborne among its talented ranks, comes in as the song builds into a wall of sound that eventually dissolves as one might lift a curtain in a theater. The second track, “Good Wife,” is a trippy exploration of ways to keep a marriage afloat. Some are healthy — “Listen to his problems” — while others hint at trying to shape oneself to fit another’s demands. Similar themes emerge in the gut-wrenching ballad “Angel,” in which Musgraves laments her inability to pull her partner “out of the darkness,” and the hypnotic “If This Was a Movie,” which is partly a meditation on how commercial media warps our perceptions of healthy relationships. Midway through the album, arpeggiated chords lead into one of the LP’s most infectious (and scathing) tracks. “Breadwinner” is Star-Crossed’s analog to the Golden Hour kiss-off “High Horse,” with a deliciously poppy arrangement built atop muted guitar and understated synth. Musgraves sings,

“He wants a breadwinner / He wants your dinner / Until he ain’t hungry anymore,” warning another would-be target of a smooth-talking con artist. The 21st-century cautionary tale “Camera Roll” comes next, instantly softening the mood, and perhaps hinting that beneath the bravado of “Breadwinner” still lies a well of hurt. Narrating the experience of scrolling through old photos after a heartbreak — and hoping, it seems, to save listeners from a similar fate — she sings: “All the best / That’s all that’s left / Cruel evidence / It does me no favors.” What’s most remarkable about the narrative of Musgraves’ songs is its resistance to pointing fingers. With the exception of “Breadwinner,” these are not scorchedearth country songs à la Carrie Underwood’s “Before He Cheats,” Miranda Lambert’s “Gunpowder and Lead,” or even Taylor Swift’s breakup-heavy back catalog. Musgraves often turns inward and examines her role in the relationship, taking pains to place her own behavior under the microscope at times, too. On the single “Justified,” for example, she repeats the lyric, “You should have treated me right,” but at the song’s bridge she changes it to, “I should have treated you right.” The lyrics on Star-Crossed don’t rely on clever turns of phrase as you hear on Musgraves’ earlier albums. But the language of grief — real, down-on-your-knees grief — is simple, blunt and desperate. The sonnets come later. What Musgraves does is distill moments of genuinely complex emotion into crystalline couplets, as when

she sings: “Signed the papers yesterday / You came and took your things away,” on “Star-Crossed.” For something as painful as the end of a marriage, the facts alone are enough to devastate. There’s a trio of hopeful songs that you shouldn’t sleep on, including the ’70s-popstyled, disco-leaning banger “There Is a Light,” which features a flute solo by living legend Jim Hoke. The album closes with a cover of “Gracias a la Vida,” which was made popular by Brazilian singer Mercedes Sosa and later by Joan Baez. It was written by Chilean folk-revival pioneer Violeta Parra, who died by suicide in 1967 shortly after her recording of the song was released. Musgraves’ version incorporates recordings from both Parra and Sosa before leading into her own take on the song, which grows darker and more distorted with each repetition. The film ends on a similarly dark note, though it seems to be about saying goodbye to a former self more than signaling a bitter end. At 15 tracks, Star-Crossed is more sprawling and less curated than Musgraves’ earlier work. The album is better for it, though, allowing the listener to stumble, ruminate and — eventually — feel some healing right alongside Musgraves. As a result, Star-Crossed has a kind of immersive, companion-like quality not often found in streaming-era albums. Fittingly, it’s a lot like grief: messy in places, flush with pain, dizzyingly circuitous — and when we’re lucky, a path to transformation. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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9/20/21 3:52 PM


MUSIC

THE SPIN

RAINDROPS KEEP FALLIN’ ON MY HEAD BY SETH GRAVES

R

ORVILLE PECK

KIM PETRAS than compensated for my disappointment at not being able to see the transgender pop queen down on The Bonnaroo Farm. Flanked by a troupe of dancers, Petras came out blazing with a sassy and sultry strut, half-jokingly asking the crowd, “Are there any rich men here who wanna buy me shit?” Though her discography includes just two full-length albums, both released in 2019, Petras is a pop veteran who has released a steady drip of club-friendly singles since 2011. She managed to pack a heap of them into her hourlong set. Some of the highlights included the bratty, down-the-middle pop of her breakout 2017 single “I Don’t Want It All” and her very recent release “Future Starts Now,” as well as dark, razor-sharp blog-house-revival bangers “Death by Sex” and “Wrong Turn” from her Halloweeninspired album Turn Off the Light. Throughout, Petras’ cartoonish obsession with sex and decadence yielded glittering, highspeed collisions of radio-pop earworms, bombastic EDM and the morbid excess of a Bret Easton Ellis novel. Sonically, she doesn’t push the pop envelope, but she’s a purist who masterfully condenses all of

pop’s guiltiest pleasures into the most potent pill imaginable. By the time Petras closed with her 2018 single “Heart to Break,” the crowd was primed for anything else the

night could bring. Unfortunately, one thing it brought was more rain. Shortly after 11 a.m. on Sunday, it was announced that the park was simply too soggy to handle more partying, and the day’s shows were canceled. Mid-afternoon, however, word went out that at least some of the performers would appear at The Basement East during the Sweet Tea Dance, an installment of the recurring dance party that was set to close the festival. Longtime freelance photog Steve Cross was the only member of the Scene team who was able to make it over. Per his report, however, local popster Freak Daddy turned in a ferocious set with an assist from stellar rapper Daisha McBride. Pop-schooled Canadian MC Tommy Genesis, suffering from vocal issues following a recent illness, kept it short and sweet; though she couldn’t muster the energy she’d probably have liked, a small cluster of thrilled fans packed in tight. And hip-hop legends Salt-N-Pepa, seemingly delighted at the unexpected chance to rock a far more intimate party than initially planned, practically blew the doors off the place with a hit-filled throwback set. It may not have been the Pride everyone would have liked, but fans, artists and organizers powered through to make it one to remember. EMAIL THESPIN@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

SALT-N-PEPA

PHOTOS: STEVE CROSS

ain has become a persistent problem for music festivals in the Midstate scheduled for late summer or early fall, aka hurricane season. In 2018, a deluge in Franklin meant that Pilgrimage had to be called off after just a couple of hours; Bonnaroo, whose long-awaited return was set for Labor Day weekend, was likewise canceled after Hurricane Ida turned the site into a mud wallow. After a steady downpour literally rained on its parade Saturday morning, Nashville Pride had to make a pivot. The precipitation finally let up around midday, but the festival grounds at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park needed time to dry out before they could be opened to the public. The site opened around 3 p.m.; many of the local acts scheduled to play had to be struck from the bill, while the headliners were able to go on about an hour behind schedule. Though fans had to navigate some treacherous patches of mud on this muggy evening, it seemed little could dampen their spirits. A substantial crowd turned up to be heard and seen, shining as their truest selves and bopping along to some top-notch pop of various flavors. Both of the acts I got to see had occupied top spots on my to-watch list at Bonnaroo. Just around sunset, sporting a luminous blue Nudie-style suit and the signature fringed mask that’s concealed his identity thus far, enigmatic Canadian troubadour Orville Peck took the stage with his band against a backdrop of low-flying clouds. It was an ideal setting for the star-swept, melodramatic and subversively nostalgic homage to country music’s golden era Peck does so well. Peck opened with the violent and sentimental “Roses Are Falling” from his 2019 debut Pony, his sole full-length so far. The song is a showcase for the anthemic hooks he delivers gently through a baritone croon that feels like something out of a movie; it’s also a prime example of his deft and dreamy blend that includes goth, indie rock and classic country. This was one of the first stops on the band’s COVID-delayed tour for last year’s Show Pony EP. Peck revealed to the crowd that newer songs like the original “Drive Me, Crazy” and the Bronski Beat cover “Smalltown Boy,” which was originally released for the 2020 Pride edition of the Spotify Singles series, were being played live for the first time. As if fan favorites like “Dead of Night” and “Queen of the Rodeo” weren’t already killing it with this delighted audience, Peck’s twangy reimagining of Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way,” released earlier this summer as part of a companion to the 10th anniversary edition of the Born This Way LP, was a better crowd-pleaser than anything I could have imagined. As night fell, the crowd moved closer together and closer to the stage in anticipation of German-born, L.A.-based singer-songwriter and underdog pop diva Kim Petras. The choice time slot and dialed-in audience more

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the movie, which he does once certain body parts begin to be obliterated. Prisoners is the English-language debut from director Sion Sono, who has been doing similarly wild-ass films in his homeland of Japan for several decades. (This is the man who gave us 2001’s Suicide Club and 2017’s Tokyo Vampire Hotel.) As Japanese genre filmmakers are prone to do, Sono — along with screenwriters Aaron Hendry and Reza Sixo Safai — melds several genres in one with Prisoners. When Cage is in The Governor’s land (aka Samurai Town), it’s a straight-up samurai Western, with men drawing swords and six-shooters, kind of like Sono saw the last half of Kill Bill Volume 1 and turned it into an attraction at Universal Studios. When Cage ventures out into desolate, dusty territory, it’s more Mad Max Lite, filled with grungy folks covered in spiked gear, surrounded by beat-up cars and bracing for a hellish apocalypse. As much exposition as this movie drops, I still don’t know exactly what the hell happens. Of course, Cage’s character takes his hero’s journey as he aids those dingy outcasts in their battle against the obviously corrupt Governor. It’s just hard to tell how the dude got to that point. (Hero does have a couple of epiphany-filled dreams after some body parts get destroyed.) Sono works so hard in making everything madcap and bizarre that he never quite thinks about reining things in. By the time Hero is greeted by his old psychotic partner-in-crime (Cage’s Face/Off co-star Nick Cassavetes) — a ghost killed during a road accident involving toxic waste — you may find yourself like, “Whatever, dude, I’m too crazied-out to care.” Thankfully, Sono throws in some sick showdown sequences. Even so, Prisoners of the Ghostland may be too extra for your tastes. It’s a good thing Cage is around to navigate the crazy along with us. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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to pay the prize amount no later than close of business on Monday, December 27, 2021.

29,for2021 | nashvillescene.com NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER Tickets the above-referenced instant ticket lottery games received for prize payment

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after close of business on Monday, December 27, 2021, shall be null and void.

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Marketplace

In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon NICCI LYNN HAWKINS. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after September 30, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 1, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

Rocky McElhaney Law Firm InjuRy Auto ACCIdEnts

Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell Deputy Clerk Date: September 2, 2021

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www.rockylawfirm.com LEGALS Non-Resident Notice Fourth Circuit Docket No. 21D633

ANTHONY R.E. WALKER vs. NICCI LYNN HAWKINS

Rental Scene

James V. Mondelli Attorney for Plaintiff

In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon NICCI LYNN HAWKINS. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after September 30, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 1, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

MARIA TERESA NUNEZ DUENAS vs. MANUEL NUNEZ ESPARZA In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon MANUEL NUNEZ ESPARZA. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after October 7, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 8, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell Deputy Clerk Date: September 10, 2021

on November 8, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell Deputy Clerk Date: September 10, 2021 Matt Maniatis Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/2021

Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D1143 SIFSAGADANI JULA vs. ZENEBE DEGEFA In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ZENEBE DEGEFA. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after October 14, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 15, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: September 15, 2021 F. Michie Gibson, Jr. Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14/2021 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D985 JAMES STANFILL vs. TERESA STANFILL In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon TERESA STANFILL It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after October 14, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 15, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

JAMES STANFILL vs. TERESA STANFILL In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon TERESA STANFILL It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after October 14, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 15, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: September 15, 2021 Martin A Kooperman Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14/2021 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D731 TRACY KAY BRANT vs. ANDREW STEVEN BRANT In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ANDREW STEVEN BRANT. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after October 14, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on November 15, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 16, 2021

Welcome to Chase Cove Apartments Matt Maniatis Attorney for Plaintiff

NSC 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/2021

Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell Deputy Clerk Date: September 2, 2021

Rebecca Toca Attorney for Plaintiff

NSC 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14/2021

and defend or default will be taken on November 15, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 16, 2021 Rebecca Toca Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14/2021

Brokerage operations or in IT role supporting or implementing Freight Forwarding or Customs Brokerage apps; knowledge of Supply Chain Execution apps including CargowiseOne or nexgen; familiarity w/ B2B/EDI processes & data formats; PC literate w/ proficiency w/ Microsoft Word, Excel, Visio, Project, PowerPoint, & Outlook. Qualified applicants mail resume to Sharon Barrow, GEODIS Logistics, LLC, 7101 Executive Center Drive, Suite 333, Brentwood, TN 37027 Ref: IMPLE019733.

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Star Bagel in Sylvan Park neighborhood is hiring! FT/PT...$18-24/hour including tips! email starbagel@icloud.com Amazon.com Services LLC seeks candidates for the following (multiple positions available) in Nashville, TN. Mail CV to: Amazon, PO Box 81226, Seattle, Washington 98108, referencing job code: 150.8185.7 Program Manager II (Job Code 150.8185.7). Develop network headcount & capacity planning model. Manage large scale capital projects. Support a fast paced environment that deploys multiple projects, programs, and initiatives simultaneously. *Telecommuting benefits are available. Implementation Analyst-Freight Forwarding (Multiple positions. GEODIS USA, LLC, Brentwood, TN): Reqs Bachelor’s in Logistics, Transportation, Comp Sci, Mgmt Info Sys, or related; 3 yrs exp in Freight Forwarding or Customs Brokerage operations or in IT role supporting or implementing Freight Forwarding or Customs Brokerage apps; knowledge of Supply Chain Execution apps including CargowiseOne or nexgen; familiarity w/ B2B/EDI processes & data formats; PC literate w/ proficiency w/ Microsoft Word, Excel, Visio, Project, PowerPoint, & Outlook. Qualified applicants mail resume to Sharon Barrow, GEODIS Logistics, LLC, 7101 Executive Center Drive, Suite 333, Brentwood, TN 37027 Ref: IMPLE019733.

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Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: September 15, 2021

James V. Mondelli Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/9, 9/16, 9/23, 9/30/2021

Your Neighborhood

Martin A Kooperman Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14/2021

Neighborhood dining and drinks: · La Villa Mexican Grill & Seafood · Ruby Tuesday Enjoy the outdoors: · Hamilton Creek Park · Smith Springs Recreation Area · Nashville Paddle Co. Best place near by to see a show: · AMC Antioch 8 · Grand Ole Opry

Best local family outing: · Nashville Shores · Nashville Zoo at Grassmere Your new home amenities: · NEW Outdoor Amenity Area · Lake Views Available · Close to Marina · Boat Storage · 24 Hour Fitness Area · Dog Park · Playground · Swimming Pool · Professional Management

Call the Rental Scene property you’re interested in and mention this ad to find out about a special promotion for Scene Readers

2999 Smith Springs Road, Nashville, TN 37217 | chasecoveapartments.com | 615.813.6279 34

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 23 - SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | nashvillescene.com


Cumberland Retreat 411 Annex Ave Nashville, TN 37209

2 floor plans

cumberlandretreatapartments.com | 615.356.0257

British Woods 264 British Woods Drive Nashville, TN 37217 1 bed / 1 bath 725 sq ft $1084+ per month

2 bed 1.5 / 2 bath

3 bed / 2.5 bath

1025 to 1150 sq ft $1227+ per month

1650 sq ft $1670+

Rental Scene

2 Bed /1 Bath 1008 sq ft $1329

1 Bed / 1 Bath 675 sq ft $1049

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www.britishwoodsapartments.com | 615.205.1862

Gazebo Apartments 141 Neese Drive Nashville TN 37211 1 Bed / 1 Bath 756 sq ft $1,119 +

2 Bed / 1.5 Bath - 2 Bath 1,047 – 1,098 sq ft $1,299 +

3 Bed / 2 Bath 1201 sq ft $1,399 +

5 floor plans

gazeboapts.com | 615.551.3832 Sunrise Apartments 189 Wallace Rd Nashville, TN 37211 1 Bed / 1 bath 600 sq feet $950 - $1150

1 Bed / 1 bath 630 sq feet $999 - $1200

3 floor plans

sunrisenashville.com | 615.333.7733 Chase Cove Apartments 2999 Smith Springs Road, Nashville, TN 37217 1 Bed / 1 Bath 730 sq ft $930 +

2 Bed / 1 Bath 1050 – 1184 sq ft $959+ call for details 5 floor plans

3 Bed / 2 Bath 1225-1315 sq ft $1482 + call for details

chasecoveapartments.com | 615.813.6279 Brighton Valley 500 BrooksBoro Terrace, Nashville, TN 37217 1 Bedroom/1 bath 800 sq feet $1360

2 Bedrooms/ 2 baths 1100 sq feet $1490

3 Bedrooms/ 2 baths 1350 sq feet $1900

To advertise your property available for lease, contact Keith Wright at 615-557-4788 or kwright@fwpublishing.com

Studio 330 sq feet $900 - $1000

3 floor plans

brightonvalley.net | 615.366.5552 nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 23 - SEPTEMBER 29, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

35


S U H P I TC

Nashville is a diverse city, and we want a pool of freelance contributors who reflect that diversity. We’re looking for new freelancers, and we particularly want to encourage writers of color & LGBTQ writers to pitch us.

Read more at our new pitch guide: nashvillescene.com/pitchguide BOTH LOCATIONS OPEN DAILY 11-9 FOR TAKE-OUT YOUR FAVORITE MEXICAN FOOD & ‘RITA, TOO!

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Nashville Scene’s Marketplace on pages 34 - 35.

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