Nashville Scene 9-22-22

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CITY LIMITS: AFRICAN AMERICAN CEMETERIES YIELD CLUES TO THE PAST

SEPTEMBER 22–28, 2022 I VOLUME 41 I NUMBER 34 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

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SPIN: OUR RECAP OF LAST WEEK’S AMERICANAFEST PROCEEDINGS PAGE 32

CITY LIMITS: HILLSDALE COLLEGE CONTINUES ITS CHARTER SCHOOL PUSH PAGE 7

DOWN BY THE RIVER Nashville has big plans for the Cumberland River. It’s also one of the state’s ‘impaired’ waterways. BY ELI MOTYCKA

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NASHVILLE SCENE | OCTOBER 22 – OCTOBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

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Communities of the Dead .........................6

Toward Justice

CITY LIMITS

BOOKS

African American cemeteries yield clues to the past

Anthony Ray Hinton’s The Sun Does Shine comes to young readers

BY MICHAEL RAY TAYLOR

BY DAVID DARK AND CHAPTER16.ORG

Highway to Hillsdale .................................7 Three Hillsdale College-affiliated charter schools argued their cases to the state last week BY KELSEY BEYELER

‘Unseen’ Shows Difficult Truths in the Lives of Parent Caregivers ........................8 Local filmmakers Amanda and Tom Dyer dedicated three years to making their new documentary

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MUSIC

Mirror Image ........................................... 31 Buick Audra’s new album and memoir examine self-identity BY EDD HURT

Cosmic Thing ........................................... 31

Pith in the Wind .........................................9

Proudly unclassifiable trio The Comet Is Coming returns with Hyper-Dimensional Expansion Beam

This week on the Scene’s news and politics blog

BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

BY HANNAH HERNER

The Spin ................................................... 32

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THIS WEEK ON THE WEB: Ariel Bui Rides the Wave in ‘Sixteen’ Stock Trading Investigation Names Six Tennessean Members of Congress Two New Restaurant Projects Announced for Charlotte Avenue Pearl Is a Showcase for Mia Goth’s Technicolor Freakout

ON THE COVER:

Photo by Steve Cross Photography

The Scene’s live-review column checks out AmericanFest performances by Taj Mahal, Kyshona, Jim Lauderdale, The Black Opry Revue and many more

COVER STORY

Down by the River Nashville has big plans for the Cumberland River. It’s also one of the state’s ‘impaired’ waterways. BY ELI MOTYCKA

BY P.J. KINZER, STEPHEN TRAGESER, ELI MOTYCKA AND EDD HURT

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Hooked to the Silver Screen ................. 34 David Bowie takes the Belcourt with a dazzling new doc and a movie retrospective

CRITICS’ PICKS Tower Defense w/Freak Genes & Invitation, Rick Griffith Artist Talk, Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival, Hispanic Heritage Festival, Kevin James Thornton, Metric, Post-Gonerfest Throwdown, Pretty Woman: The Musical and more

BY JOE NOLAN

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In his new documentary, Ben Oddo shines a light on the annoying and the endearing sides of Nashville bachelorette parties

FOOD AND DRINK

Worried Sick ............................................ 34 Don’t Worry Darling is sadly far less entertaining than the drama surrounding it BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

Oddo Pairing ............................................ 35

BY HANNAH HERNER

Vegan Is Believin’

Seek out the bibimbap and bourbon at AVO, Nashville’s vegan virtuoso BY ALIJAH POINDEXTER

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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ART

MARKETPLACE

Black Beauties Joseph Patrick II’s nude photography deradicalizes Black beauty BY RACHEL EBIO

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917A Gallatin Pike S, Madison, TN nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PET OF THE WEEK!

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NASHVILLE TO HOST THE NHL DRAFT AND NHL AWARDS IN 2023. COULD THE SUPER BOWL BE NEXT? Nashville was recently named the host city for the National Hockey League’s 2023 Draft and NHL Awards. If you’re a hockey fan, then you’re probably as excited by that news as I am. These two events are routinely held in separate cities and at different times. But Nashville will host the events back to back in June of next year. As noted by the Scene’s sister publication the Nashville Post, “It’s been more than 15 years since these two events were hosted in the same city in the same year.” Nashville has hosted the NHL Draft once before — in 2003, when the Nashville Predators selected Shea Weber — but until now, we have not hosted the NHL Awards. The awards will be held on June 26, and the two-day draft will begin two days later at Bridgestone Arena, home of the Predators. Butch Spyridon, CEO of Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp, told The Tennessean in July that talks between the city and NHL were taking place. There had been some concern about having enough hotel rooms, but this is Nashville — as Spyridon says, “Room availability is not an issue.” The Post notes that this will be “the fifth major NHL event the city has hosted, joining the 2003 NHL Draft, 2016 NHL All-Star Game, 2017 Stanley Cup Final and 2022 Stadium Series.” “The Stadium Series drew a crowd of more than 68,000 and had an estimated economic impact between $15 and $20 million,” writes the Post’s Michael Gallagher. “The 2016 All-Star Game drew an attendance of 17,113, and at the time it was the most-watched NHL All-Star game since 2004. It had an economic impact of approximately $25 million.” This sets the stage for an incredible summer in 2023. The NHL events fall squarely between the CMA Fest and our city’s annual Fourth of July celebration. Our last Fourth of July bash resulted in $11 million in direct visitor spending, and the CMA Fest added $65.2 million in estimated direct visitor spending, according to the NCVC. The NCVC has been working hard over the years to bring major events to Nashville that will increase our exposure and further boost our city’s reputation.

Frankly, in my estimation, they are hitting it out of the park. In April 2019, Nashville found itself hosting the NFL Draft, with a reported 600,000 fans in attendance. This resulted in, according to the NCVC, $132.8 million in direct spending and pulled in amazing media coverage with 47.5 million viewers. Nashville could potentially host the NFL Draft again in the next few years, which would bring additional financial benefits to our city. The 2021 Fourth of July bash brought an estimated 350,000 people to Nashville. And let’s not forget the New Year’s Eve celebration — the NCVC estimated 250,000 to 300,000 people were in attendance. Beyond these events, Spyridon and other city leaders are still vying to get us our first Super Bowl! In August, Nashville hosted the American Society of Association Executives’ Annual Meeting and Exposition. The Nashville Business Journal quotes ASAE president and CEO Michelle Mason as saying: “Our meeting is considered the Super Bowl of meetings for associations. We estimate that an immediate economic impact is about $15 [million] to $18 million, and historically, over 20 percent of our attendees will bring business back to the host city.” Further, the Journal reports, “When Nashville hosted the event in 2014, it led to 41 convention bookings and 201,205 room nights, resulting in $120.5 million in direct spending and $21 million in tax revenue, according to the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp.” Nashville becomes more and more popular each year — the city even landed at the top of National Geographic’s recent list of the best places to travel in June. As the NCVC continues to reach for every major event appropriate for our city to host, our peerless reputation continues to grow. Of course, we all know that Nashville has long been grown-up, and that we long ago surpassed our reputation as just Music City. Now the whole world is taking notice.

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Managing Editor Alejandro Ramirez Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Culture Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Digital Editor Kim Baldwin Contributing Editors Erica Ciccarone, Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Hannah Herner, J.R. Lind, Eli Motycka, William Williams, KateLynn White Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Steve Erickson, Nancy Floyd, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Kashif Andrew Graham, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steven Hale, Steve Haruch, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Craig D. Lindsey, Margaret Littman, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Daryl Sanders, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Editorial Intern Connor Daryani Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Graphic Design Intern Hanna Milosevich Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Festival Director Olivia Britton Marketing and Promotions Manager Robin Fomusa Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers Richard Jacques, Deborah Laufer, Niki Tyree, Alissa Wetzel Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Jada Goggins, Audry Houle, Jack Stejskal Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Mike Smith Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2022, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

In memory of Jim Ridley, editor 2009-2016

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus and the Nashville Post.

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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We’re saving you a seat . . .

at The Temple

High Holy Day Service Schedule Sunday, September 25, 2022

Tuesday, October 4, 2022

7:30 pm ........... Erev Rosh Hashanah Service

7:30 pm ........... Kol Nidre Service

Monday, September 26, 2022

Wednesday, October 5, 2022

8:30 am .......... Family Service 8:30 am .......... Tot Rosh Hashanah Service 10:15 am ......... Morning Service 10:15 am .......... Youth Program (K-6th grade) 12:30 pm.......... Rosh Hashanah Reception 12:45 pm ......... Tashlich at the Creek 4:00 pm ........... Rosh Hashanah Family Experience at the Creek

8:30 am ........... Family Service 8:30 am .......... Tot Yom Kippur Service 10:15 am ......... Morning Service 10:15 am .......... Youth Program (K - 6th grade) 12:45 pm.......... Congregants’ Hour 2:00 pm ........... Afternoon Service 3:15 pm ............ Yom Kippur Afternoon Experience 4:30 pm ........... Yizkor & Concluding Service

For additional High Holy Day information or to join The Temple services online please visit thetemplehub.org Questions? Contact Erin - erin@templenashville.org or (615)352-7620

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PHOTOS: HAMILTON MATTHEW MASTERS

CITY LIMITS

JO ANN McCLELLAN WITH HER BOOK GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN IN ROSEMOUNT CEMETERY, COLUMBIA, TENN.

COMMUNITIES OF THE DEAD African American cemeteries yield clues to the past BY MICHAEL RAY TAYLOR

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fter retiring from a long IT career in 1999, Jo Ann Williams McClellan began researching her family’s Tennessee genealogy from her home in Dallas. Her husband retired three years later, and the couple moved to her birthplace in Maury County,

Tenn. She joined the county’s genealogical society and found her calling for the next three decades: studying local history by finding and preserving historic African American cemeteries. Working with the Tennessee Historical Commission, she stands at the forefront of an army of volunteers and professionals cataloging hundreds of cemeteries

GRAHAM PERRY USES HIS PHONE’S FLASHLIGHT TO INSPECT A HEADSTONE IN PEGRAM CEMETERY, PEGRAM, TENN.

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across the state. McClellan, who is Black, never planned to become a cemetery expert: She just wanted to track an ancestor’s wife. After returning to Tennessee, she discovered her greatgreat-grandfather, the Rev. Wesley Williams, in the 1870 census — the first census to list African Americans by name (although it listed only last name and first initial). The reverend’s first wife, Violet, died in 1871, and McClellan was curious about how she died. African American death certificates were not issued before 1908. The county archivist suggested that she search cemeteries for possible information on headstones. With that suggestion,

McClellan’s hobby soon blossomed into obsession. Since then she has documented 72 African American cemeteries — 65 in Maury County and seven more in bordering counties. In 2009, she published Gone but Not Forgotten: African American Cemeteries and 1908-1930 Death Records of Maury County, Tennessee. She later formed the African American Heritage Society of Maury County, launching a planned memorial for the county’s United States Colored Troops and a local lecture series. She has compiled records of early Black educators, health workers and religious leaders, especially in Columbia, the seat of Maury County. She plumbed the records of the Maury County Teachers Institute, which was begun in 1914 and trained Black teachers for 40 schools. “I had one of those teachers,” McClellan says. “My grandmother was one of those teachers.” Leading the ongoing project for the Tennessee Historical Commission is Graham Perry, a preservationist specializing in cemeteries, who works with Stacy Graham at the Center for Historical Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. With volunteer help, they hope to identify, as Perry puts it, “all African American cemeteries across the state as quickly as possible.” Many grave sites are poorly marked and face neglect or — in some cases — potential destruction by development. Perry dislikes the common term “slave cemeteries.” “What a lot of people call ‘slave cemeteries’ were used by the same communities after the Civil War,” he explains. “They tend to have many more people buried in them who were not slaves. They were historically part of the community, just as in any cemetery.” He assists family members and others seeking graves, as well as landowners who may not be aware of laws regulating cemeteries on their property. If someone wants to relocate graves to make way for a quarry or housing development, Perry examines their petitions and often reaches out to the family members of those buried at the site. “I’m trying to develop a valid cemetery program for the state,” Perry says. “I’m trying to lay the groundwork for future people in my position.” Sheer numbers make this a daunting task. “Think of all the people who have lived in Tennessee and died in Tennessee,” says Dr.

DR. MICHAEL FLETCHER IN MURFREESBORO’S EVERGREEN CEMETERY. BEHIND FLETCHER ARE MARKED GRAVES IN THE CEMETERY’S AFRICAN AMERICAN SECTION; THE OPEN FIELD CONTAINS AN UNKNOWN NUMBER OF UNMARKED GRAVES.

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Michael Fletcher, another preservationist specializing in African American cemeteries. “They all have to be buried somewhere.” Fletcher was drawn to the effort while working on his Ph.D. at MTSU. He calls these cemeteries “the last bastion of history” within their communities. One example he cites is Rose Mount Cemetery in Columbia, one of the first to be documented by McClellan. Fletcher is writing a nomination of the location for the National Register of Historic Places. Its earliest graves are of people born into enslavement, but he explains that these were the same people who built the community after emancipation: educators, doctors and business owners. “It was a thriving community in the midst of an atmosphere of hatred and bigotry,” Fletcher says. The names on the headstones — including several of McClellan’s forebears — attest to a legacy of success. Fletcher engages with community members in order to learn and share their stories with the Tennessee Historic Cemetery Register, which Perry is compiling into an online state cemetery map. Talking to residents is a practice familiar to regular Scene contributor Betsy Phillips, who prowls the cemeteries of Davidson County in search of headstones sculpted by William Edmondson, a legendary Black Nashville artist. While some cemetery locations are considered “forgotten,” Phillips has discovered “there’s usually one or two older people who know everybody buried there by name, whether or not those graves are marked.” She explains that older memorials may “not be recognizable to most white people.” In white cemeteries, for example, headstones bearing a lamb are usually reserved for children, while the lamb is a common symbol on many early African American burials of all ages. Atop older graves she finds propped-up but unmarked fieldstones, beds of lilies and vinca ground cover. Such places can wrongly be considered “discarded” or “lost” or “unmarked.” “With graves of people not allowed to be literate, you see more markings made with plants or with rocks,” Phillips says. “They might not have wanted evidence in stone or in wood that they had the ability to read and write.” Earlier this year, a call from a friend led Phillips to a cemetery in Pegram that Perry later added to the state register. He visited the site earlier this month with photographer Matt Masters, placing pink flags on unmarked graves to help create a photographic record. “If you’re a human being walking past them, you can see the graves,” Perry says. “But the problem is the camera doesn’t always pick them up.” He uses special lighting techniques — rather than rubbing or other physical contact — to tease faded letters and dates from monuments. He also offers classes in how to preserve weathered or damaged monuments without disturbing them. “I want to encourage people to learn how to do it properly and then go out and do it,” he says. “Because I can’t do them all.” Michael Ray Taylor is the author of Hidden Nature and other books. He lives in Arkansas. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCNEE.COM

PHOTO: HAMILTON MATTHEW MASTERS

CITY LIMITS

DEMONSTRATORS AGAINST THE CHARTER SCHOOL INITIATIVE

HIGHWAY TO HILLSDALE Three Hillsdale Collegeaffiliated charter schools argued their cases to the state last week BY KELSEY BEYELER

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hree school districts saw Tennessee Public Charter School Commission hearings over Hillsdale College-affiliated charter schools last week. The hearings landed after each school board denied applications for an American Classical Academy, Hillsdale’s K-12 charter schools. The commission members were appointed by charter supporter Gov. Bill Lee. Whether they will overrule the local school boards’ decisions remains to be seen. These hearings come amid statewide pushback on Michigan’s conservative Hillsdale College and its president, Larry Arnn. Initially, criticism was pointed at Hillsdale’s 1776 curriculum, which would be used in ACA charter schools, along with Gov. Lee’s desire to bring at least 50 of them to districts across the state. Critics condemn charter schools for diverting much-needed public funds from school districts, and some say Gov. Lee’s charter commission is working under a directive to approve as many charter schools as possible. Additional bipartisan opposition grew in June when Arnn made disparaging comments about teachers, saying they are “trained in the dumbest parts of the dumbest colleges in the country.” Gov. Lee refused to rebuke Arnn’s comments, garnering further criticism. Charter supporter and House Education Administration Committee chair Rep. Mark White (R-Memphis) told the Scene in July that he’s not interested in supporting any forthcoming Hillsdale-related legislation. The Rutherford County, Clarksville-Montgomery

and Jackson-Madison school systems each had its own charter commission hearing last week. ACA charter schools have not applied to any other districts, though in March The Tennessean reported that a charter school with ties to Hillsdale withdrew its application in Williamson County, and in July a Chattanooga charter school cut ties with the college. According to district employee Caitlin Bullard, Rutherford County Schools rejected the application because of a lack of demonstrated ability to serve students with disabilities and reach diverse families, among other concerns. Bullard also notes that the charter school used “blatantly disingenuous” data in its application. According to Clarksville Now, the Clarksville-Montgomery school board also had concerns about ACA’s ability to serve disabled students, as well as concerns about community support and academic, financial, governance and operational aspects, including “19 requested waivers of state laws.” West Tennessee’s WBBJ-TV reports that the JacksonMadison County School District had similar concerns about ACA’s application. Charter commission executive director Tess Stovall pressed ACA representatives in at least two of last week’s three meetings regarding untimely changes to its governance structure, asking if it had changed the makeup of its board without alerting districts. (ACA changed its board membership significantly since submitting its initial applications, ultimately adding more local representation.) “We think it’s a waste of time to be talking about it today, rather than once the school is authorized,” said ACA legal counsel Rich Haglund at the Rutherford County hearing. The public comment portions of all three hearings were flooded with supporters of ACA — to the frustration of other community members. “Most people … do not want charter schools in Montgomery County at all,” said independent state House candidate Monica Meeks, who spoke against ACA at the Clarksville-Montgomery hearing. “Those that had the microphone make it seem like they are the majority, but they are not. It’s just that they have the privilege of being able to be there at 9 a.m., where the working-

class parents do not.” Chris Burger, a former aide to Gov. Lee, sent statements to the Scene on behalf of ACA organization American Classical Education following each hearing. One — from former state Sen. Dolores Gresham, who is a volunteer board member for ACE — reads, in part: “American Classical Academy is so pleased by the overwhelming support showed [sic] today for our application for a free public charter school in Madison County. The eloquence of the many parents and grandparents who expressed the struggles and challenges they have faced finding the right educational options in a district that currently offers no choice, spoke to everyone in the room.” The hearings saw press conferences beforehand from concerned community members and politicians. State Reps. Gloria Johson (D-Knoxville) and John Ray Clemmons (D-Nashville), Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Martin and others appeared at Sept. 14’s Rutherford County hearing. Congressional candidate Odessa Kelly and state House District 67 candidate Ronnie Glynn, both Democrats, appeared at the Clarksville-Montgomery hearing. “[This is] nothing but a pathetic reach by Bill Lee and his charter board school cronies to indoctrinate our children … with this ideological, Trumpian nonsense,” said Kelly in a video shared by the Tennessee Holler. “It’s gonna be interesting, the political calculus they make as to whether or not they cut the cord with Hillsdale to save their overall objective to charterize and privatize Tennessee,” Clemmons told the Scene after the Rutherford County hearing, referring to the state charter commission’s next steps. “Because right now, Hillsdale, which was their prize pig, is now an albatross around their neck.” A final decision on American Classical Academy charter schools, along with a few others proposed for Metro Nashville Public Schools and the ClarksvilleMontgomery County School System, will be made at a specially called charter commission meeting Oct. 5 in Nashville. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. at the Davy Crockett Tower. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS

‘UNSEEN’ SHOWS DIFFICULT TRUTHS IN THE LIVES OF PARENT CAREGIVERS Local filmmakers Amanda and Tom Dyer dedicated three years to making their new documentary

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PHOTOS: QUIET LIFE CREATIVE

BY HANNAH HERNER

learned that the wider public may not know aring for a child with it, because parents of disabled children profound disabilities who often don’t have the energy to advocate for needs near constant care can themselves. be an isolating experience “They don’t have the time or the capacity for parents. That’s something to share some of this,” Tom Dyer says. Jessica Ronne is keenly “They are overloaded as it is.” aware of as the caregiver for her son Lucas, People with disabilities often find and she has sought to reach out to others in themselves at the center of an inspirational similar situations as an author and advocate. story, about how they managed something When Nashville filmmakers Tom and “normal” like going to college or Amanda Dyer learned of Ronne holding a job. But for children and her family’s story, they who have more profound couldn’t forget about it. It disabilities, these sorts of became a passion project for “UNSEEN” SCREENS 4 P.M. accomplishments may not the pair, who for three years SUNDAY, SEPT. 25, AT BRENTWOOD be possible. It was important shadowed Ronne and other BAPTIST CHURCH CAREGIVERDOC.COM to the filmmakers and to the parent caregivers to create families featured in the film the 45-minute documentary that their experiences not be “Unseen: How We’re Failing sugarcoated. Parent Caregivers and Why It “Our motivation throughout Matters.” the whole time was, we wanted to give “Caregiving happens at home in private caregivers permission to share that — it’s just not something that you see or difficult side of the story as a way to open think about very often if it’s not your story,” people’s eyes to that reality so they couldn’t says Amanda Dyer. “That’s where the just watch it and say, ‘Oh, they’re fine,’ ” documentary could be helpful to first open Amanda says. “We wanted it to kind of hit people’s eyes to some of the realities of you hard and be that raw look at it. It can be caregiving.” uncomfortable to watch, but you’re forced The Dyers learned about the plight of to reckon with what that brings up in you.” parents of children with severe disabilities There’s not just one solution for these as they were making the documentary, caregivers, the Dyers found. Some parents mirroring the experience of the viewer. would like to reenter the workforce, while They discovered that caregivers need more others would like to be able to make their support — for their own mental health as living as a caregiver — many don’t have well as help with care for their children either option. Kameron Dawson is the and homemaking tasks. But they also

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NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS senior staff attorney for A Better Balance, an advocacy organization for caregivers, and served as a consultant on the film. She hopes to not only see Tennessee join 11 other states in offering paid medical and family leave, but also to see workplaces offer flexible scheduling and accommodations for any caregiver. “It’s hard to take off weeks at a time and not receive pay, and that ultimately leads many caregivers to have no choice at all but to leave the workforce entirely because they need to take care of their family member,” Dawson says. “For so many it’s so hard to reenter the workplace because there are not many jobs that have those supportive workplace policies like paid family and medical leave.” A common refrain the filmmakers heard from families is the lack of respite care — or short-term relief. Sometimes that means hiring a qualified nurse, and sometimes it just means a friend who is willing to provide temporary child care. When families are granted some money from the state to pay for respite care, there’s a scarcity of

workers to do it. “We talked to so many families who said that when they know they have respite care, that changes everything,” Amanda says. “That just a short break, if they know it’s on the horizon, or they just had a break, that can change everything and fuel them for the future.” Beyond tangible help, those looking to support caregivers can offer social interaction. The Dyers say that when families with a severely disabled child are out and about, they can often feel people’s stares. “It’s not just about standing offers, trying to stay out of the way or viewing from a distance, but just approach, say hello, be friendly,” Tom says. “They all feel so isolated. That was such a common thread.” Adds Amanda: “That’s what we tried to focus on, was think about where you are, what your sphere of influence is when you watch this, and what you can do to make a positive impact for the caregivers that you know and that you interact with.” EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

THIS WEEK ON OUR NEWS AND POLITICS BLOG: U.S. Rep. Mark Green ventured into Midtown for a campaign event, a rare city sighting for the Clarksville Republican whose redrawn 6th Congressional District now includes a slice of Nashville. After a short reception at his campaign office, Green spoke to the Vanderbilt College Republicans, where he faced a barrage of questions related to his vote against certifying the 2020 election, his confused understanding of climate change and his opposition to the COVID vaccine. During a particularly heated exchange, Green told a student, “I was willing to die so you could have your right to vote.” He faces organizer Odessa Kelly in November’s general election. … The Scene’s Connor Daryani heard from developers and Metro Councilmember Sean Parker about how car-friendly Gallatin Avenue has created a hostile environment for cyclists, pedestrians and public transit. Community meetings have brought the issue to the forefront of a new mixed-use proposal by Southern Land Co., which currently has East Nashville’s Lincoln Tech campus under contract for purchase and has chosen to orient its storefronts away from the arterial and toward more walkable side streets. … Councilmember Courtney Johnston has continued her push to audit the disaster responses of the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a major clearinghouse for fundraising after disasters hit. Metro does not pay CFMT but often directs people to donate to the foundation under a decade-old memorandum of understanding. Last week, the Metro Audit Committee agreed

to ask the foundation to pick an outside audit firm. … A stock-trading investigation by The New York Times cited five of Tennessee’s congressional representatives and its junior senator, Bill Hagerty, for potential ethical breaches. Hagerty, John Rose, Diana Harshbarger, Steve Cohen, Mark Green and Chuck Fleischmann traded in industries directly related to their congressional committee work, potentially using privileged information to trade ahead of the public. Rose, for example, dumped Wells Fargo stock months before the House Financial Services Committee (on which he sits) issued a critical report that tanked the company’s value. Some insist they do not directly manage their financial portfolios. … Contributor Betsy Phillips refers to the ongoing Hillsdale College saga as “charter grift” and “a giant con” in her weekly column, recapping American Classical Academies’ ongoing efforts to establish a charter network in Tennessee. ... After stepping down from nonprofit Thistle Farms and publicly flirting with a 2023 run for mayor, Hal Cato won’t launch a campaign for the job after all. Cato says he “can still do a lot of good in Nashville in another area without trying to push it through Metro bureaucracy.” Metro Councilmember Freddie O’Connell and former Metro official Matt Wiltshire have launched campaigns, and Mayor John Cooper has been fundraising without officially kicking off his campaign publicly. Metro Councilmember Sharon Hurt is reportedly considering jumping in. NASHVILLESCENE.COM/PITHINTHEWIND EMAIL: PITH@NASHVILLESCENE.COM TWEET: @PITHINTHEWIND

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Nashville has big plans for the Cumberland River. It’s also one of the state’s ‘impaired’ waterways. BY ELI MOTYCKA

F

ourteen years ago, environmentalists and Metro councilmembers stripped down to their bathing suits for a publicity stunt. The pod completed a short swim across the Cumberland River, staging the event at Riverfront Park. Officially, the swim celebrated the city’s progress reducing waste overflows, a blight that continues to plague Nashville’s convoluted sewer system. More broadly, the dip was an attempt to destigmatize the river. For the past 200 years — the span in which Nashville has had modern waterworks — the Cumberland has been Nashville’s foundational natural resource, as well as its drain. With billion-dollar projects now slated for both sides of the river, the prospect of additional territory

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for commercial development has supported a push to “activate,” “re-engage” or “turn towards” the Cumberland, a vision full of boat commutes and riverside pools. At the same time, the river is still trying to outrun its past. It’s not that the Cumberland is literally full of shit. (Things were far worse a few decades ago.) It’s that sewage still finds a way to get in — enough to keep the downtown bend and almost all of its Davidson County tributaries on the state’s 303(d) list, a register for Tennessee’s “impaired and threatened” waterways. The Cumberland enters Tennessee from Kentucky in Clay County, near Celina. It runs blue — the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s code for passable water quality — until it hits Woodland Street a few hundred miles later. Nashville’s riverfront section of

the Cumberland is known officially as the Cheatham Reservoir because it’s upstream of the Cheatham Dam, one of 10 dams managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the Cumberland and its direct tributaries. The federal government rolled out an extensive program of river control in Tennessee in the decades following the Great Depression, building dams and flooding reservoirs across the state with the Tennessee Valley Authority as its flagship. Ever since, the river could better be understood as a series of reservoirs flowing at different speeds. The Army Corps directs barge traffic and regulates the river level via various locks and dams. Nashville’s riverfront bend is known even more technically as TN05130202001-3000. Metro Water pulls its 90 million gallons a day from two spots upriver — the K.R. Harrington and Omohundro water treatment plants. Harrington is near McGavock High School and Two Rivers Park — the latter so-called because it’s where the Stones River, which flows out of Percy Priest Dam, feeds the Cumberland. You can spot Omohundro, a cathedral-like

PHOTO: STEVE CROSS PHOTOGRAPHY

DOWN BY THE RIVER red-brick outpost, across the river from Shelby Bottoms. These plants clean river water before introducing it to the city’s thousands of miles of pipes, which stretch out to 212,000 homes and businesses, a customer base that’s increased almost 25 percent in the past 15 years. Three massive wastewater treatment plants — Central, Dry Creek and Whites Creek — are Metro Water’s kidneys, cleaning sewage, groundwater and greywater before returning it to the Cumberland. Unlike the critically overdrawn Colorado River — and unlike in California, where there’s a near-constant megadrought — the Cumberland provides every day. The real problems happen when it rains.

NASHVILLE’S WATER INFRASTRUCTURE is a vast circulatory system of mishmashed sewers and drains, treatment plants, equalization facilities, pumps, mains and reservoirs, a huge web that has expanded unevenly as the city has grown and technology has advanced. In 1823, the growing settlement, then

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

AN OIL PIPELINE STRETCHES ACROSS BROWNS CREEK

OMOHUNDRO WATER TREATMENT PLANT

relying on carting water from several area springs, hired one of its first private consultants, who tried and failed to modernize a water supply system. A decade later, Nashville completed its first public water system, financed by a wealthy Philadelphian. The brick-and-clay system was built by 12 enslaved Black masons, 10 of whom were sold to pay down the city’s debt after the project was completed. The city kept two of these people, their names so far lost to history, in bondage until the Civil War, presumably relying on their expertise to help operate city infrastructure. From the day it opened its first waterworks in 1833 — complete with ceremonial cannon fire and downtown parade, recalls John Wooldridge in his 1890 History of Nashville, Tenn. — the city has relied on the Cumberland. The city’s water and sewage network slowly expanded from downtown as the city grew. Cholera outbreaks in the 1880s prompted the modern, underground sewer system Nashville has today, meant to get runoff out of the streets and separate waste water from the water supply. Nashville’s topographical unevenness means there are all sorts of plumbing nooks and crannies, where underground networks meet hills and basins to create vulnerabilities that have become more apparent as lines get taxed with more people and more water. “We have these legacy issues where we know now, from science, that that wasn’t the right thing to do,” says Mekayle Houghton, executive director of the Cumberland River Compact, a nonprofit entirely dedicated to the Cumberland watershed and thousands of miles of tributaries. “But how to fix it, whether you want to allocate the budget to fix it when you’ve got all these problems, those are the decisions that leaders are making. “It’s beautiful to think that the city is trying to treat the river as something more than a waste conduit, which is how rivers have been treated for years and years and

years,” says Houghton. “The more people that get on the river, the more pressure the city will feel to clean up the river.” In 2006, after “water surged from the floor drains, shower drain, and through the back door” at a Midtown dentist’s office, the office sued Metro, testifying that the “water contained fecal matter based on its stench and the debris left in the parking lot.” A backand-forth continued for 10 years, settling in 2016 after several more unsanitary backups. At issue was a Metro water hookup in which a 12-inch pipe fed a 108-inch combined sewer. When it rained enough, the 108-inch sewer fed the 12-inch pipe. A similar story played out on Blair Boulevard, where raw sewage backups seeped through showers, sinks and toilets, leaving neighbors to fend for themselves after heavy rains. Metro Water addressed that hotspot in 2021. Residents across the city frequently report sewage leaks to the city and state, which regulates Tennessee waterways. In East Nashville, heavy rain backs up the stormwater drain in front of The Lipstick Lounge at Woodland and 14th, reliably jumping the curb and flooding the bar multiple times a year. Sewer separation for the neighborhood is planned for June 2028. In North Nashville, District 21 Councilmember Brandon Taylor recently heard from constituents about raw sewage pooling at a multifamily housing complex. Rehabilitation for 193,000 linear feet of pipes and lines near Hadley Park is scheduled for completion by 2026. The practice of cobbling together sewer lines and stormwater drains in cities across the country — a preferred plumbing design last century — has become this century’s headache. Following the Clean Water Act in 1972, the federal government started paying close attention to wastewater, mandating that municipalities eliminate raw sewage overflows that were finding

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

their way into ponds, creeks, streams and rivers. For Nashville, this meant a massive, expensive, extensive overhaul. Three decades later, the Environmental Protection Agency determined that Nashville wasn’t making enough progress and filed a consent decree that now governs the city’s sewer rehabilitation. Eliminating overflows is an elaborate game of Whac-A-Mole that requires extensive street surgery across the six overflow basins that cover the urban core and East Nashville: Kerrigan (West Nashville), Schrader (North), Driftwood (Napier), Boscobel (Lockeland), Benedict & Crutcher (Edgefield), and Washington (the rest of East Nashville, up to Inglewood). Each one is like a natural sink with a drain into the Cumberland. Kerrigan and Washington, the biggest by area, empty downtown by the Jefferson Street Bridge. “In 1990, when we started work under a state order to improve our conditions on our sewer system, we had 32 combined sewer discharge points,” says Ron Taylor, the engineer who oversees Metro Water’s Clean Water Nashville program. “Since then, we’ve eliminated all but six of those points. For the area upstream of downtown — Nashville to Shelby Park — we’ve eliminated discharges unless there’s a huge rainfall, so we’re opening it up for recreation, hopefully compatible with all those improvements Planning is talking about for the East Bank.” According to Taylor, the whole project

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will wrap up by 2031. Runaway sewage is the chief culprit for why, exactly, the Cumberland keeps testing positive for intestinally destructive strands of E. coli, the infamous gut bacteria found in fecal matter. Since beginning its overflow abatement effort in earnest in the 1990s, Nashville has drastically reduced sewage runoff, but still reports tens of million gallons of sewage overflows that make their way into the Cumberland, either directly or via tributaries like Dry Creek, Mill Creek and Browns Creek. According to Metro Water spokesperson Sonia Allman, progress is limited by personnel, design capacity, sequential planning requirements and, of course, money. “Our waterways are compromised during heavy rainfalls,” Allman tells the Scene. “It is a significant undertaking the city has taken on. It’s definitely something that needs to be addressed. It is a long-term, extensive project that we’ve been working on and will continue to work on.” Next to a proposed $2.2 billion new Titans stadium, Clean Water Nashville is the city’s priciest project. The 2023 Capital Improvements Budget lists the project at $1.24 billion, but Metro Water estimates the total cost at around $2 billion, funded by the “Sewer Infrastructure Replacement Fee” surcharge on your water bill. Water’s only financial commitment to Metro is a $4 million payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT), obligated by the Metro Council in the 1990s to back debt for the Titans’ first stadium.

Beyond E. coli and sewer overflows, general runoff from all across Davidson County finds its way downtown. The Cumberland and its tributaries form a natural, sophisticated and efficient drain for a pristine watershed populated by a delicate balance of flora and fauna. Undisturbed areas like Tennessee State University’s wetlands off Ed Temple Boulevard, currently eyed as a candidate for a potential MLB stadium, are still far better at handling stormwater and preserving the Cumberland than anything humans have designed. Before colonization by white settlers, the river and its tributaries were hunting grounds and transportation routes for Indigenous people, dotted by Shawnee settlements. As Nashville grew and industry developed, residents created their own filter on top of the watershed, sealed by asphalt, littered with Styrofoam and stuffed with gravel, sand, oil, petrochemicals, plastics and every other environmental affront that fuels modern life. Complaints about illegal or unregulated industrial runoff in Davidson County that are currently open with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation cite auto repair shops, oil and gas companies, metal fabricators, chemical manufacturers, and roadside dumping. In addition to sewer overflows, TN05130202-001-3000’s only other tag is simply “MUNICIPAL (URBANIZED HIGH DENSITY AREA)” — in other words, the Cumberland is a city’s river.

THE COLORADO RIVER bisects Austin, Texas, and locals dip at Barton Springs, a slow-flowing tributary pool near downtown. Tourists paddle around on rented kayaks surrounded by a cityscape on both sides. The Charles River, which separates Boston from Cambridge (take a second to imagine if East Nashville had its own council, zoning jurisdiction and school system), hosts almost 2,000 boats and a couple hundredthousand fans at its annual regatta, the country’s premier rowing event. Like a professional team in 1996 or a top-tier convention center in 2008, a recreational riverfront overflowing with people has landed on Nashville’s wish list. River entrepreneurship has already begun to take hold on the Cumberland, a small but growing niche inside the lucrative downtown tourist economy. Kayaks and paddle boats are go-to offerings for day adventures, though the industry is somewhat hindered by a lack of launch points — a very specific problem that Metro’s river activation has pledged it will fix. Actually getting in the water isn’t yet mainstream, but some of the people who know the most about the Cumberland, like Houghton and Peter Westerholm, feel comfortable taking a dip. “I’ll jump in while I’m canoeing and, granted, I’ll always take a shower when I get home,” Westerholm tells the Scene. Back in 2008, Westerholm joined the group of river boosters for their swim across the Cumberland, a year before he was elected

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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9/19/22 3:03 PM


LA BOHÈME LA BOHÈME

SEPT 22 + 24

| T P AC

Young love and unforgettable friendships unfold in timeless Paris. (No wonder it was reborn as RENT!) Lose your heart and find bliss.

SEPT 22 + 24

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Tickets | nashvilleopera.org

nashvillescene.com | OCTOBER 22 – OCTOBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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OCTOBER 13

DIANA KRALL OCT 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22 & 23

JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT NOVEMBER 13

LYNYRD SKYNYRD ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

DECEMBER 6, 7 & 8

LAUREN DAIGLE ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM FEBRUARY 2

NOAH KAHAN

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM FEBRUARY 23, 24 & 25

TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM MARCH 9

MARGO PRICE

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“I’VE TAKEN MY KIDS OUT THERE FOR A SWIM, WITH A LIFE JACKET OF COURSE. SURE, IF THERE’S BEEN A BIG RAIN, IT’S PROBABLY NOT A GOOD IDEA TO SWIM THAT NEXT DAY OR TWO. BUT I STILL HAVE ALL MY TOES, I STILL HAVE ALL MY FINGERS AND I DON’T HAVE ANY SUPERPOWERS.” — PETER WESTERHOLM to the council representing East Nashville’s District 6. “But I’ve taken my kids out there for a swim, with a life jacket of course. Sure, if there’s been a big rain, it’s probably not a good idea to swim that next day or two. But I still have all my toes, I still have all my fingers and I don’t have any superpowers.” Up near Opryland, the General Jackson offers a kitschy riverboat experience nearly every day — so iconic that it earned a spot in Metro Planning’s renderings of development planned for the river’s East Bank. The Cumberland is also a working river. Barges shuttle heavy industrial commodities like coal, fuel, sand, construction materials and gravel, many working for hometown Ingram Industries. Cargill, CEMEX and Citgo have industrial sites near where the river’s barge terminals and railroad crossings intersect. Tech giant Oracle’s billion-dollar corporate campus, planned for the industrial East Bank, signals a shift for the Cumberland, from industrial logistics to tech workers. The city’s own massive plan to redevelop the bank fits the pivot, with Mayor John Cooper coordinating across departments toward a developed riverfront like the ones in Austin, Boston and Chattanooga. “The interior bend flows faster than the exterior, so it cut away at the downtown side, forming that bluff,” Harriett Brooks tells the Scene. Brooks, along with other Metro planners, has been laser-focused on the massive “Imagine East Bank” project, a comprehensive rollout of potential area redesign. “On the inside, it flows slower, depositing the silt and sand on the East Bank. That’s why it’s level and a floodplain, and why industry developed there.” Metro’s East Bank strategy relies on an ambitious civil engineering plan to “lay back” the river, cutting away at the bank to add a graded slope. This is one of the recommendations from outside consultants hired to recommend measures to mitigate the site’s flood risk. “Laying back the bank needs significant modeling and work with the Army Corps — we’re talking about removing land that someone can potentially develop on,” says Anna Grider, Metro Planning’s East Bank project manager. “We still need to look into

laying back the bank, how much and at what grade. There’s still many, many steps of study to be done.” The Tennessean helped drive the media hype train with a feature in January headlined “Nashville’s next chapter is being written on the banks of the Cumberland,” sourced by commercial real estate developers and the mayor himself. After a bumpy and expensive land acquisition process secured the necessary parcels, Wharf Park, Metro’s proposed location for a city boathouse, will soon enter a third phase of community input after nearly three years of planning. Metro has teased a boathouse at Wharf Park for the Nashville Rowing Club, a young nonprofit that offers after-school competitive rowing opportunities. The sport is a fast track to college scholarships and often associated with New England prep schools and Ivy League athletics departments. “We’ve been working with the city for a long time to make that a community-based setup, really the last five years,” says Cory Sanderson, Nashville Rowing Club’s executive director. Nashville Rowing Club is trying to expand competitive programs with a specific focus on accessibility for public school students. Right now, the club rows on Percy Priest Lake and would help run programs out of a Metro boathouse. Though the club has grown steadily in the past few years, it’s not clear why elevating the sport has become a city priority.

DEVELOPING AROUND the river forces a certain humility. Last week’s East Bank stadium committee discussed the financial implications of backing the city’s debt with a floodplain that could be completely incapacitated if the Cumberland got angry like it did in 2010. Next month, like it does every quarter, the city will report how many millions of gallons of sewage it discharged in July, August and September. While the prospect of lucrative real estate continues to be a guiding light, the river forces the city up against practical and natural constraints — rain, mostly, and all the shit that might come with it. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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9/19/22 3:04 PM


CITYBLUFFS.COM A mixed-use development in Northwest Nashville, CityBluffs offers quick access to North and East Nashville, The Nations, and Midtown. Now selling the next phase of 3- and 4-bedroom townhomes (a limited number of which are eligible for non-owner occupied short-term rental permits).

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Pictured above: Mark Deutschmann, Newell Anderson, Danielle Helling, Crystal Atkinson, Caroline Dean, Callie Hughes, Deborah Vahle, Anna Dorris, Devin Mueller, Giovanna Burchell, Maggie Kay, Latina Davis, Shelbi Aimonetti

nashvillescene.com | OCTOBER 22 – OCTOBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Live at the Schermerhorn 100+ Concerts On Sale Now

coming soon

HOLST’S

VANESSA WILLIAMS

THE PLANETS

Oct. 20 to 22

WITH THE NASHVILLE SYMPHONY

LEDISI SINGS NINA

Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor | Tucker Biddlecombe, chorus director

Nov. 6

Sept. 29 to Oct. 2

CELEBRATING DAVID BOWIE: Live In Concert Featuring Todd Rundgren, Adrian Belew, Angelo Moore Nov. 7*

RONNIE MILSAP Nov. 8

THE MUSIC OF THE MOODY BLUES

SINATRA AND BEYOND WITH TONY DESARE

with the Nashville Symphony

Oct. 7

Michael Krajewski, conductor

Nov. 10 to 12

CHRIS BOTTI Ghostbusters image © 1984 Columbia Pictures Industries

Nov. 29 & 30

IN CONCERT WITH THE NASHVILLE SYMPHONY

HOME ALONE IN CONCERT

Nathan Aspinall, conductor

Dec. 2 to 4

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Oct. 14 to 16

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NASHVILLE SCENE | OCTOBER 22 – OCTOBER 28, 2022 | Giancarlo Guerrero, music director

nashvillescene.com

NashvilleSymphony.org/Tickets

WITH SUPPORT FROM


CRITICS’ PICKS W E E K L Y

R O U N D U P

O F

T H I N G S

T O

D O

[IT WON’T ALWAYS BE LIKE THIS]

[BOHEMIAN LIKE YOU]

LA BOHÈME

Look, I’ve never claimed to be an opera buff. But every rube out there has at least heard of La Bohème. First performed in 1896, Giacomo Puccini’s masterpiece is known for being a key entry point to opera. A cultural gateway drug, if you will. The tragic love story of struggling bohemians living in Paris later went on to inspire a little production called Rent. This version is being staged by Nashville Opera artistic director John Hoomes and conducted by maestro Dean Williamson, and features Italian lyrics with projected English titles. So dig out your pearls and monocle. It’s time to experience some real culture. 7:30 p.m. Sept. 22 & 24 at TPAC’s Jackson Hall, 505 Deaderick St.

MUSIC

TOBY LOWENFELS [AT THE HELM]

THE NEW RESPECTS W/MADISON RYANN WARD

Since they first started making a name for themselves around Nashville in the mid2010s, The New Respects have been a force to be reckoned with, making a danceable, rocking and soulful brand of pop-schooled R&B. Like everyone else, their momentum

SEPT. 24-25

The Park at Harlinsdale Farm

ground to a halt with the onslaught of the pandemic in 2020. As The New Respects explained in an in-depth interview with WNXP’s Jewly Hight, a lot of other things changed for them during that time too. Bassist Lexi Mowry left the quartet to focus on parenting full time — her twin sister Zandy remains the group’s guitarist, and their cousins, brother and sister Jasmine Mullen and Darius Fitzgerald, are still its singer and drummer, respectively. At the same time, the group left its label in an effort to focus more on its goals and identity. In February, they released their first new material since reconfiguring — a relatively downtempo, acoustic-centric, self-produced EP titled Don’t Panic. It leans into the worship music they grew up with, but retains the flavor that makes the group distinctive. They followed that in May with a single called “Don’t Worry,” in which the pendulum swings back, with strong cues from 1980s and ’90s dance pop and R&B; think a little bit of Prince and a lot of Janet Jackson. Wherever they’re headed, they’re steering the ship, and now’s a good time to hop on board. Soulful songsmith Madison Ryann Ward opens their gig on Thursday. 8 p.m. at The Basement East, 917 Woodland St. STEPHEN TRAGESER [TOWER OF SONG]

TOWER DEFENSE W/FREAK GENES & INVITATION

Dual-bassist combo Tower Defense’s 2020 sophomore LP In the City shares more

than just a title with The Jam’s instantclassic 1977 debut. The 10-song set is jam-packed with clever hooks, intricate harmonies, a D.C. post-hardcore streak and a wry post-apocalyptic theme. The foursome plans to debut three new songs from In the City’s in-the-works follow-up at this show. Also on the bill: Freak Genes, a strippeddown Mancunian synth-punk curiosity stopping through en route to Gonerfest in Memphis, and Invitation, which is local musician Cameron Reiss Wilson’s toughto-Google avant-noise-pop solo project. 8 p.m. at The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

FRIDAY / 9.23 [ROARIN’ AND RAMPAGIN’]

MIDNIGHT MOVIES: KILL BILL VOL. 1 &2

At this point, “badass protagonist on a revenge rampage” has become an entire subgenre of action movies. But you know what John Wick doesn’t have? A brutal 30-minute sword fight involving more than 40 bad guys versus our lone protagonist — four minutes of which is in black-and-white due to the MPAA asking Quentin Tarantino to tone down the violence. You know what The Revenant is missing? What feels like hours of excruciating stress as we listen to Uma Thurman get buried alive, only to punch her way out of an early grave later in the movie. And everyone knows Taken

would have been a whole lot better with a flute-playing, silver-tongued, chillingly evil antagonist named Bill. You know what two movies are not missing any of these things? Kill Bill Vol. 1 and 2. The cult classics will be playing back-to-back nights at the Belcourt for the theater’s Midnight Movies series, so get some friends together and go see Pai Mei’s Five Point Palm Exploding Heart Technique on the big screen. Sept. 23-24 at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave. CONNOR DARYANI

MUSIC

OPERA

KIM BALDWIN

PILGRIMAGE MUSIC AND CULTURAL FESTIVAL

FILM

Malaka Gharib’s new book, It Won’t Always Be Like This, is an intimate graphic memoir about an American girl growing up with her Egyptian father’s new family, forging unexpected bonds and navigating adolescence in an unfamiliar country. She recounts her summers in Egypt from ages 9 to 25 as she tries to understand her role in her new family, the country and herself — who she is and who she wants to be. Gharib’s previous book, I Was Their American Dream, won an Arab American Book Award and was named one of the best books of the year by NPR, The Washington Post, Kirkus Reviews and the New York Public Library. Gharib will be in conversation with Nashville writer Yurina Yoshikawa for an in-store event at Parnassus Books. This is a free event. Space is limited, so registration is required. You can register at parnassusbooks.net/event. Masks are strongly encouraged. 6:30 p.m. at Parnassus Books, 3900 Hillsboro Pike

[HARVEST FOR THE WORLD]

MY MORNING JACKET

My Morning Jacket’s self-titled 2021 album is a landmark of post-COVID, homiletic rock, but it makes for a strange listening experience. The best tune on the album, “Complex,” is sort of like 1970s FM rock, and it sports a nice, basic guitar riff and light prog touches that work well. Apparently, bandleader Jim James came to some harsh conclusions about human existence during the pandemic, and My Morning Jacket reflects his state of mind. Talking to Esquire’s Madison Vain in 2021, James railed against the insurance industry and talked about his relationship with God. James has a point, of course, since the use of credit default swaps played a major role in the 2008 financial meltdown. On the other hand, you might be grateful for your insurance policy if a tree falls on your car in your driveway. James’ latest album veers into both musical and lyrical

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PHOTO: HAMILTON MATTHEW MASTERS

MALAKA GHARIB W/ YURINA YOSHIKAWA AT PARNASSUS

MUSIC

BOOKS

THURSDAY / 9.22

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9/19/22 4:08 PM


CRITICS’ PICKS

RICK GRIFFITH ARTIST TALK

LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

RICK GRIFFITH ARTIST TALK

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SHINERS

The former home of the historic Woolworth lunch counter, which was the site of the apex of the civil rights sit-ins, has been through a number of iterations over the years. Its next act begins on Friday, when the 30,000-square-foot Woolworth Theatre opens. The theater’s first show, Shiners, tells the story of a family of moonshiners who get together for a reunion. The comedic show stars country music artist Chuck Wicks, who is one of the owners of the new theater. Also onstage will be two-time Tony Award-nominated Broadway actress Laura Osnes. The production is choreographed by Nappytabs. The Woolworth Theatre is located at 223 Rep. John Lewis Way N., where the front window features museum-style displays about Lewis and the civil right movement. The theater is also home to the Twisted Wool, a speakeasystyle bar open to the public. Ticket prices for Shiners range from $60 to $115, with an option for upgrades to VIP booths with included bottle service. Opening Sept. 23 at Woolworth Theatre, 223 Rep. John Lewis Way N. MARGARET LITTMAN MUSIC

When a designer shifts into a fineart environment, the results are often incendiary. That might be because working designers think about how things look all

[OVER THE MOON]

[MUNATICS]

MUNA

Muna is a band that is constantly reinventing itself, finding ample space for sonic and personal evolution within their decidedly queer brand of indie pop-rock. They released their most recent album, this year’s Muna, through a joint venture between Dead Oceans and Phoebe Bridgers’ Saddest Factory Records Imprint, a nod toward the band’s introspective bent but

MUSIC

SATURDAY / 9.24 [HOWDY, PILGRIM]

PILGRIMAGE MUSIC AND CULTURAL FESTIVAL

The annual family-friendly Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns to Franklin’s charming Harlinsdale Farm this year with a wide-ranging lineup that offers a little something for just about everyone. Rocking country-Americana songsmith Brandi Carlile headlines on Saturday, and bourbon-voiced stellar country singer-songwriter Chris Stapleton headlines on Sunday, but there’s a huge variety of music to intrigue and excite. On Saturday, don’t miss out on blues-expanding queen Adia Victoria, much-loved singersongwriter-rockers Dawes and inventive New Orleans-born pianist and composer Jon Batiste, among others. You’ve also got a shot at a full set from sterling blues-rock power trio Celisse, whose opening set at Brandi Carlile’s Ascend Amphitheater show got rained out in July. Sunday’s undercard highlights include songwriter and bluegrass hero Molly Tuttle and her band Golden Highway, topflight genrebusting fingerstyle guitarist Yasmin Williams, country phenom Brittney Spencer, rockabilly champ Rosie Flores, and even harmonious folk-pop crew The Avett Brothers. Sept. 24-25 at The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, 239 Franklin Road, Franklin STEPHEN TRAGESER COMMUNITY

[TALK TO ME]

day, and they’ll instead let emotion and intuition steer their ships while they’re creating. That definitely seems to be the case with Rick Griffith, a fantastic designer and creative director whose installation of 30 collaged panels, Call and Response and Other Black Technologies, is one of the highlights of Tennessee State University’s recent slate of exhibitions. For his source material, Griffith used a single issue of Sepia magazine from December 1971. The resulting works remind me a little of the collages of Lorraine O’Grady — who has called her minimalist cutouts “haiku diptychs” — or even John Baldessari. At 6 p.m. Friday, Griffith will give an artist’s talk titled What Design Might Be, and a pizza party courtesy of Slim and Husky’s Pizza Beeria will be in the gallery from 5 until 8 p.m. Artist talk 6 p.m. at TSU’s Hiram Van Gordon Gallery, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd.; exhibition through Oct. 27

LELAND GANTT’S RHAPSODY IN BLACK

BRITTNEY MCKENNA

[FLAMINGO-FRIENDLY FESTIVAL]

HISPANIC HERITAGE FESTIVAL

As part of its Hispanic Heritage Month programming, local nonprofit Conexión Américas is bringing a day of cultural celebrations to the zoo from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entertainment includes tours in English and Spanish, folkloric dances, mariachi, performances by singer Luna Morena and dance troupe Danza Azteca, and even a puppet show and story time for the kids courtesy of the Nashville Public Library. There’s also a special menu for the day, featuring elote, empanadas, horchata and more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Nashville Zoo, 3777 Nolensville Pike ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ MUSIC

oversimplification — he sings about how a post-slavery society sends poor people off to war and the death of the record business. The music on My Morning Jacket is an amalgam of yacht rock and prog, with moments that seem lifted from ’70s records by the likes of The Isley Brothers — the group should cover the Isleys’ “Harvest for the World.” Something titled “The Devil’s in the Details” lasts nine minutes, and the rest of the album is similarly leisurely. Can these guys jam? Not really, but I give them points for attempting to add experimental touches to basic song structures. Folk-soul singer Joy Oladokun opens. 7 p.m. at Ascend Amphitheater, 310 First Ave. S. EDD HURT

[FLYING SOLO]

LeLand Gantt has built a successful career as an actor, with a slew of impressive stage credits (including the Broadway revival of Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom), along with notable roles in television and film. But this weekend local audiences will get to know another side of Gantt, with his autobiographical solo show Rhapsody in Black. Developed at New York’s Actors Studio and directed by Academy Award winner and American Theater Hall of Famer Estelle Parsons, the piece follows Gantt on a journey from the ghettos of McKeesport, Pa., to a career that often found him feeling like the only Black person in the room. Billed as “a powerful personal narrative on racism, identity and self-image,” it’s an exciting way to kick off TPAC’s inaugural Perspectives Theatre Series — a unique collection of performances that promises to both challenge and entertain audiences. Sept. 23-25 at TPAC’s Johnson Theater, 505 Deaderick St. AMY STUMPFL THEATER

PHOTO: AUSTIN NELSON

MY MORNING JACKET

ART

PHOTO: ISAAC SCHNEIDER

THEATER

LELAND GANTT’S RHAPSODY IN BLACK

not necessarily their vibe. There’s some tearful bangers in the mix, to be sure, but the synth-heavy pop also begs dancing. Look for a vibrant, energetic set from the trio when they play Marathon Music Works this Friday. High-octane pop-punkers Meet Me at the Altar will open. 8 p.m. at Marathon Music Works, 1402 Clinton St.

[TELLING STORIES]

TODD SNIDER

The stories Todd Snider tells on his new album Live: Return of the Storyteller are choice, which means the humorist and songwriter figured out a way to be funny that doesn’t get in the way of his songwriting. Snider’s songwriting is, of course, superb on his new record — I can’t think of a more accomplished exponent of the seemingly simple, ready-made song than the guy who wrote “Alright Guy” and the incredible “The Ballad of the Kingsmen.” The latter tune isn’t on Live: Return of the

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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B E T H E S U I T. BE THE SOUND.

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9/19/22 12:31 PM


CRITICS’ PICKS

9/24 9/25

9pm Modern Primate, Inclination of Direction, Freebase Masons 3pm Springwater Sit In Jam

9pm Obey the Trooper, Jawfane, & Dial Up Ghosts 5pm Writers @ the Water Open Mic

9pm Mandy Moon, Chelcie Jette & Monica Guardado

MUSIC

9/28

4pm The Dosstones FREE

To keep up with us, follow us on Instagram! @livvislunchbox

[OLD IS NEW]

CLUTCH W/QUICKSAND, HELMET & J.D. PINKUS

Clutch released its latest record, Sunrise on Slaughter Beach, just days into a North American tour with Quicksand, Helmet and J.D. Pinkus — a lineup made in ’90s posthardcore and alt-rock-and-metal heaven. Even so, not one musician on this list is stuck back where they started. Clutch, of course, has released a dozen albums, and the dynamic and driving Blast Tyrant gave them a midcareer boost in 2004. They’ve been on a worldwide 30 Years of Rock and Roll Tour for months ahead of their dates in the States this fall. Quicksand may not have been as prolific, releasing just four albums in the same amount of time, but the band’s 2021 album Distant Populations is as fun, energetic and kickass as 1995’s Manic Compression. This tour will be an excellent chance to see them play Distant Populations, along with the old favorites, live. Alt-rockers Helmet and the eclectic and eccentric J.D. Pinkus of Butthole Surfers as openers will be the icing on the cake. 7:30 p.m. at Marathon Music Works, 1402 Clinton St. AMANDA HAGGARD

MUSIC

SUNDAY / 9.25 [STEADY CAM]

CAM W/AMYTHYST KIAH & JILLIAN JACQUELINE Country singer-songwriter Cam has

Nashville’s ONLY vinyl record store with full bar and 24 seasonal craft beers on tap.

COMEDY

9/23

9pm Bedrooms, Zac Chase, K.O.N. & Grove Inn 9pm Symptom of the Universe & Rattle Trap

carved out a unique niche for herself over the years, writing infectiously melodic pop-country songs that would sound right at home on country radio (that is, if country radio played music made by women), but that also appeal to fans of the more inventive fringes of the genre. Her most recent album, 2020’s The Otherside, is a delightfully complex collection of country songs that find intersection points with Top 40, EDM and soul — songs that should blend well with her equally great back catalog when she plays the Ryman on Sunday. And don’t be late, as Cam has tapped two fantastic artists to open the evening: Johnson City’s folk-blues singer-songwriter Amythyst Kiah and the critically acclaimed country up-and-comer Jillian Jacqueline. 7:30 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. BRITTNEY MCKENNA [IT WAS THE NINETIES]

KEVIN JAMES THORNTON

Kevin James Thornton caught my attention with his Auto-Tune-laden TikToks, which center on stories about his fundamentalist Christian childhood. His ability to find comedy in life’s most cringe — and sometimes downright traumatic — moments gives important perspective. If he can give a full hilarious story in a minutelong bite on TikTok, I can’t wait to see what he can do with a full set. It’s especially sweet to see Thornton have his moment on the Zanies stage — he’s a film, photography and comedy artist with a long history as a performer in both Nashville and Los Angeles who has a newfound fan base on the apps. 7 p.m. at Zanies, 2025 Eighth Ave. S. HANNAH HERNER

MUSIC

9/22

Storyteller, but “Alright Guy” is there, along with a slew of other classic Snider songs. Analyzing how humor works is almost as dumb as trying to figure out what makes songs great, but Snider knows how to cast himself as an outsider who really isn’t all that outside. At 27 songs, Live makes a good introduction to Snider’s work, and it also serves as a summation of his art that longtime fans will appreciate for its retrospective tone. Speaking of readymades, I also like his guitar playing on this record — without trying to be some kind of stylist, Snider achieves the trick of sounding like the really good version of every halfway-good guitarist you’ve ever heard at a guitar pull, only with more juice. Snider appears Saturday night with one of his great forebears, the legendary folkie Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, who took his early cues from Woody Guthrie. 8 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. EDD HURT

[DON’T GO QUIETLY]

METRIC

It’s a bold move kicking off your record with a 10-and-a-half-minute track in this, the attention-span-deprived year of 2022. (It’s also not entirely unironic naming such a lengthy leadoff track “Doomscroller.”) But that’s precisely what indie-pop Canucks Metric did with this year’s Formentera, the band’s eighth studio album. As it happens, the song is a compelling slab of shape-shifting synth pop, replete with dancy electronic noise and frontwoman Emily Haines’ characteristically incisive lyrics. Hatched from the same late-’90s/ early-Aughts Toronto indie-rock scene that produced Broken Social Scene, Stars and Do Make Say Think, Metric has featured

CAM

22 LIVE: The Fats Kaplin Gang 23 Rock & Metal Night with The Holmies

24 Melt into the Weekend 25

with DJ Butter

LIVE: Coley Hinson & Friends

27 2sDay Nite Hang with

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28 Dare to Fail Short Film Showcase

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

21


CRITICS’ PICKS

9/16 – friday

MUSIC TRIVIA NIGHT MAGIC NIGHT hosted by MITCH DANIELS

feat. CASEY MAGIC & JORDAN JONAS

9/17 – saturday

9/22 – thursday

VINYL RECORD FAIR & lizzie no 9/23 – friday

21 +

JOSH HALPER’S BOSSA NOVA BAND 9/24 – saturday

TYVEK AND Game night DAVID NANCE GROUP

21 +

come play ours or bring your own!

9/30 – friday

9/29 – thursday

GREG KOCH

with THE KOCH MARSHALL TRIO

PAUL BURCH & WPA BALLCLUB

OPEN WEEKLY Thursday through Saturday 623 7TH AVE S. NASHVILLE, TENN.

[THEY’RE HERE]

POLTERGEIST 40TH ANNIVERSARY

As Fathom Events drops screenings of 1982 supernatural classic Poltergeist into multiplexes this week, the great debate still rages on: Who really directed this flick? Was it Steven Spielberg, who co-wrote and produced it but was too tied up with E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial to direct, or Tobe Hooper, who got the credit? While cast, crew and even Spielberg himself have said that Hooper (who died in 2017) was the man behind the camera, film bros and other online shit-starters insist that Spielberg was really in charge. But no one has ever considered that, although Spielberg made the production happen, he needed a sick bastard like Hooper to fully execute the terrifying thrills. Let’s keep it a hundred here: Spielberg has never been a filmmaker who knows how to come with creepy, chaotic cinema. (Anyone who saw Jaws in theaters recently may have been surprised that, for a killer-shark movie, it’s actually quite quaint.) However, Hooper became a horror star in the ’70s with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre — perhaps the creepiest, most chaotic slasher film ever made. At best, Poltergeist was a two-man job — and one certainly couldn’t have done it without the other. Visit fathomevents.com for tickets and showtimes. Sept. 25, 26 & 28 at AMC and Regal theaters CRAIG D. LINDSEY

MUSIC

MONDAY / 9.26

[SICK, SAD WORLD]

SICK THOUGHTS

Sick Thoughts is the stage name of New Orleans-based punk artist Drew Owen, who will make a stop at Drkmttr on Tuesday in support of the outfit’s latest album, Heaven Is No Fun. The album is as playful and fun as its title implies, with songs like “Mother, I Love Satan” and “Horrible Death” marrying mordant humor with crunchy, power-pop-adjacent guitars and swaggering vocals. Owen has a knack for working catchy melodies into his often heavy arrangements, a dynamic that no doubt will lend itself to an especially spirited performance. Heaven might not be too much fun, but this show should be a hell of a good time. 7 p.m. at Drkmttr, 1111 Dickerson Pike BRITTNEY MCKENNA

[THAT’S NOT A KNIFE]

POST-GONERFEST THROWDOWN

GeeTee and Research Reactor Corp, crucial pieces of the mulleted Aussie garage-punk wave coming up from the Land Down Under, both have records out on Music City imprints. Sweet Time released a live 12-inch from both acts, and Electric Outlet, a label from the folks in Snooper, put out a single from GeeTee and a nine-track U.S. tour compilation from RRC. Both bands will be fresh off their Gonerfest debut and playing with fellow Aussies Satanic Togas and PNW bands Gobs and Cherry Cheeks, who released a banger on Total Punk last year. Locals Snooper, Wesley & The Boys and Shitdels (featuring Sweet Time label boss Ryan Sweeney) are also on the postGoner fam gig. 6 p.m. at The Basement, 1604 Eighth Ave. S. P.J. KINZER

TUESDAY / 9.27 MUSIC

MUSIC

21 +

might exemplify the spirit of conceptual art. Having seen Falco and his band The Panther Burns rip up rockabilly, rock ’n’ roll and blues at a great 1981 show at Vanderbilt University — the band sported drummer Ross Johnson and guitarist Alex Chilton — I can attest to the fact that Falco’s version of rockabilly didn’t have much to do with the form as it’s practiced by acolytes who dress the part but decline to get crazy. Falco & Co. revived the music of Memphis and Mississippi greats like blues singer R.L. Burnside and songwriter and guitarist Cordell Jackson, and The Panther Burns ignored niceties like bar lines in favor of performances that hurtled toward an uncertain payday. Since then, Falco has written incisively about the myths of Memphis in 2011’s Mondo Memphis, and he’s kept The Panther Burns going through a series of personnel changes. Falco is one of the era’s great performance artists — an unclassifiable creator of work whose meaning never seems fixed. These days, Falco lives in Bangkok, Thailand, and his 2021 EP Club Car Zodiac is the testament of a displaced American artist who can make the hoary blues tune “House of the Rising Sun” sound interesting. 7 p.m. at The Basement, 1604 Eighth Ave. S. EDD HURT

[MEMPHIS MYTHS]

TAV FALCO’S PANTHER BURNS

THEATER

9/15 – thursday

pretty much the same lineup for the past two decades, consistently producing records that achieve that rare combination — fun and smart. Haines & Co. will land at Brooklyn Bowl on Sunday, and attendees will likely hear new tunes as well as bangers from all across Metric’s catalog, from 2003’s undeniable “Combat Baby” and 2005’s “Monster Hospital” to 2018’s “Now or Never Now.” Alt-rockers Secret Machines will open. 8 p.m. at Brooklyn Bowl, 925 Third Ave. N. D. PATRICK RODGERS FILM

September in...

[I WANT THE FAIRY TALE]

PRETTY WOMAN: THE MUSICAL

However you may feel about the seemingly endless supply of movie-toBroadway musical adaptations, it seems the trend is here to stay. Next up at TPAC is Pretty Woman: The Musical, another Nashville premiere from the organization’s 2022-23 Broadway at TPAC season. Based on the iconic 1990 film starring Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, the story follows the unlikely romance of a “free-spirited Hollywood prostitute” and a high-powered businessman. We’ll have to see how well the storyline has aged. But it’s certainly an impressive creative team, anchored by two-time Tony Award-winning director and choreographer Jerry Mitchell (Hairspray, Kinky Boots, Legally Blonde). The musical also features a book by Garry Marshall (the movie’s legendary director) and screenwriter J.F. Lawton, plus an original score by Grammy winner Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance. Sept. 27-Oct. 2 at TPAC’s Jackson Hall, 505 Deaderick St. AMY STUMPFL

Four decades into a career that’s seen him recast rockabilly in Memphis, write books and make films, Tav Falco

22

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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9/19/22 4:09 PM


UPCOMING SHOWS AT THE MUSEUM’S CMA THEATER SEPTEMBER 20

MATT NATHANSON

WITH SPECIAL GUEST DONOVAN WOODS SEPTEMBER 24

TOMMY EMMANUEL CERTIFIED GUITAR PLAYER

SEPTEMBER 30

WESTERN EDGE

LOS ANGELES COUNTRY-ROCK IN CONCERT OCTOBER 2

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THE DESERT ROSE BAND

OCTOBER 18

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JOHN PETRUCCI

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BOBBY BONES

COMEDICALLY INSPIRATIONAL

for independent people

OCTOBER PICK

NOVEMBER 1

AN EVENING WITH NICOLLE GALYON

UPCOMING EVENTS 6:30PM

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

NOVEMBER 12

MALAKA GHARIB

STEVE VAI

INVIOLATE TOUR 2022

with YURINA YOSHIKAWA at PARNASSUS It Won’t Always Be Like This FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 6:30PM

NOVEMBER PICK

AN EVENING WITH RODNEY CROWELL

NOVEMBER 18

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

AN EVENING WITH LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM DECEMBER 6

at PARNASSUS Word for Word 6:30PM

NICOLLE GALYON

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY’S WILD & SWINGIN’ HOLIDAY PARTY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

ALANA WHITE

with TRACY BARRETT at PARNASSUS The Hearts of All on Fire THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 6:30PM

DECEMBER 10

DECEMBER PICK

MIKE FARRIS SINGS! THE SOUL OF CHRISTMAS

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

KWAME ALEXANDER

at THE NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY The Door of No Return SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 10:30AM

SATURDAY STORYTIME

with HEATHER AND SHOP DOG MARLEE at PARNASSUS Books About Libraries TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 6:30PM

MIKE FARRIS

PARNASSUSBOOKS.NET/SPROUT-BOOK-CLUB

Museum members receive exclusive presale opportunities for CMA Theater concerts. Learn more at CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Membership.

Listen to Sprout books & more read aloud in store at our Saturday Storytime with Heather & Marlee!

ERICA WATERS at PARNASSUS The Restless Dark 2:00PM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8

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with ANNE BYRN at PARNASSUS The Red Truck Bakery Farmhouse Cookbook

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NASHVILLE IMPROV PRESENTS: THE “OFFICIAL” TALK LIKE A PIRATE IMPROV SHOW

9.25

NASHVILLE BEATLES BRUNCH FEATURING FOREVER ABBEY ROAD

9.26

JESUS IN A BAR FEATURING GRACE GRABER, JENNY AND TYLER MASON MECARTEA, GRAYSON RUSSELL NATHAN MOHR, & ELI GABLE

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10.1

JACKIE EVANCHO SINGS JONI MITCHELL

10.2

JOHN SPLITHOFF ALL IN - THE SOLO TOUR

10.3

THE FAUX PAWS WITH FRANK EVANS & BEN PLOTNICK IN THE LOUNGE

10.3

BILLY COBHAM’S CROSSWINDS PROJECT BMI PRESENTS “AN EVENING OF SONGS AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM WITH STEVE DORFF AND FRIENDS”

9.26

JOACHIM COODER IN THE LOUNGE

10.4

9.27

CARBON LEAF PRESENTED BY WMOT ROOTS RADIO

10.5

ELLA MINE

9.28

CMT “NIGHT OUT NASHVILLE” PRESENTS: NEXT WOMEN OF COUNTRY

10.5

TYRONE WELLS “THE SOMEBODY TO YOU” TOUR

10.1

JOCELYN & CHRIS IN THE LOUNGE

10.6

RADNEY FOSTER

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October 8 September 24

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TAB BENOIT + SPECIAL GUEST DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND

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FOOD AND DRINK

JUNGLE JULEP BIBIMBAP

Seek out the bibimbap and bourbon at AVO, Nashville’s vegan virtuoso BY ALIJAH POINDEXTER

M

y perception of plantbased dining once hinged on the concept of imitation. It was not enough that a collection of greens, carbohydrates and non-animal AVO proteins could taste 3 CITY AVE., SUITE 200 good, or even great. EATAVO.COM That simply would not do. In my own biased Middle American way, the food had to resemble something familiar to my palate, be it a cheeseburger, hot dog or plate of baked ziti. It had to smell almost, but not exactly, like the greasy dish it imitated. It had to taste nearly, but not precisely, like the chili dog or carne asada tacos it looked to for inspiration. And therefore it could never truly hit the spot. Sure, it almost tasted like a burger. But the vegans, it seemed, had it all wrong. Then came the mid- to late 2010s, which brought to Nashville skyrocketing rents, “woo” girls, a booming downtown core, and a mutating sense of collective identity. Locals began to ask what Nashville actually was: “Athens of the South,” or an old-money town with unshakeable antebellum undertones? Burgeoning tech and research hub, or America’s next big party destination? It’s

now late 2022, and we still cannot seem to decide. But one thing Nashville has always been is eclectic. A home for singer-songwriters, scholars and poets. There’s a lot to complain about when it comes to Davidson County, but inventiveness is not one of them. It’s as fitting a place as ever to make plant-based food taste really good. Everybody has their favorite spot, but AVO, just off Charlotte Avenue in the shadow of HCA’s corporate headquarters, intrigued me after I grew restless with my typical haunts. A perennial competitor in the Readers’ Poll of the Scene’s Best of Nashville Best Vegan category, the restaurant tends to finish in third place. I knew of its roots as a hub for raw locally sourced veganism, which was in stark contrast to the comfort-food-style options on offer at other plant-based favorites. I assumed it would be a bit more radical than its competitors; images of alfalfa, kale and carrot shavings appeared, say, less Coachella and more Woodstock or Monterey Pop. But AVO caught me by surprise with its focus on elegant versions of bistro classics. I’ll start with the unlikely first: I like the bibimbap here better than any other place in Nashville. Now, I’m not saying it is objectively the best. Korea House has a strong claim on that title. But the bibimbap at AVO is so fresh and well-balanced that I forget it’s missing the salty-sweet beef and over-easy egg yolk. And while it’s decidedly not raw or gluten-free, the dish succeeds because it embodies fresh, clean eating without sacrificing what’s special about the original dish. There are no pickled mango cubes or frizzled arugula stems here; AVO isn’t attempting to doll up a traditional bibimbap for popular appeal. It just is bibimbap, sans animal products, accomplishing what all good food sets out to

OG NACHOS

PHOTOS: DANIEL MEIGS

VEGAN IS BELIEVIN’

do — it satisfies. The Lion’s Mane “Crab” Cakes, topped with slaw, sweet-potato crisps and a tart remoulade, are another favorite, a fresh take on a seafood staple utilizing a mushroom known for its purported effects on mood and brain health. Brunch is also good, with breakfast burritos, French toast and avocado toast (topped with palm-heart mousse) perfect for a day spent watching drunk tourists fail at beach volleyball. This isn’t all to say AVO can’t satisfy more decadent cravings. Hearty vegan cheeseburgers, from the Cali Burger — with its coconut queso, jalapeños and guacamole — to the barbecue-centric Western Burger have enough “beefy” flavor for Nashville’s staunchest carnivores. Mac-and-cheese and french fries serve as sides, while the OG Nachos manage to bring a wallop of gluten-free Tex-Mex spice. Craft cocktails are also on pour, and while the Avocado Margarita is a people-pleaser, I like the Jungle Julep, which

plays notes of mint and passionfruit against a boozy bourbon base. There’s no shortage of quality restaurants in Nashville, each with its own set of quirks and specialities, and AVO is no different. It’s odd to find a plant-based spot where the salads are the least interesting part of the menu — but that’s the deal at AVO. AVO’s success lies in its preparation. Dishes are well-balanced and evenly seasoned, the quality has been consistent during my various visits, and the presentation is superb. Most importantly — and I say this as a former veganism nonbeliever — it doesn’t leave me wanting “the real thing.” The burgers and nachos are no pale imitation, but an inventive high-quality variation that replaces sinful richness with fresh feel-good ingredients. Is one better or worse than the “real thing”? Your mileage may vary. Is it cheap? No, not really. But I really like the bibimbap, and that’s all that really matters. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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ART

BLACK BEAUTIES

Joseph Patrick II’s nude photography deradicalizes Black beauty BY RACHEL EBIO

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flowers, these two women embody goddesses of healing, grace and peace. The third and final piece in this triptych showcases the woman with dashes of red and gold on her skin, sitting against a dark, forest-green backdrop. Unlike the first two figures, her eyes are open — she has no flower. She seems to exude the kind of confidence that comes from the abundance of nature and divine femininity. This last image hints at a transition — that a transformation is coming. Next hangs “Black Venus,” a black-and-white photograph depicting feminine sensuality and invigoration. The subject grips her hip while light cascades down the side of her body. This woman feels like a secret — like the camera chose not to capture her face, but to keep her identity hidden. Black Venus isn’t just one woman, or even a mirage — she’s a call of embodiment to awakened Black women. “She’s imposing, but not threatening,” Patrick says. Patrick has discovered a way for nude Black bodies, lighting and poses to speak to one another and begin a formal dialogue in a single image. Each series is a new opportunity to normalize Black bodies and deradicalize Black beauty. The shadows that trace a muscular thigh. The light that captures a bare breast. The shine and definition of coily tresses. The smoothness of freshly lotioned arms. Black nudity can be a source of vulnerability, but it can also be an opportunity for strength. Black bodies have been subject to appropriation, othering and fetishization. Patrick showcases the beauty of each Black body, whether through black-and-white images or color. Unconventional, scientific, methodical, instinctual. With Body of Work, Patrick helps lay a path for the evolution of contemporary nude photography and future Black photographers. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

DAMN GOOD DESIGNER GENES, JOSEPH PATRICK II

J

oseph Patrick sits beneath his Bare Witness Triptych, his eyes glowing with excitement as he details the vision behind his exhibition, Body of Work. His main camera, a Mamiya RZ67, sits beside him on the wood table. Inspired by photographers like Carrie Mae Weems and Herb Ritts, Patrick has forged a path from photojournalist and fashion photographer to contemporary artist. Enter Body of Work. The exhibition includes 17 images from seven different series: Cinnamon and Brown Sugar I and II, Damn Good Designer Genes, Alone Together/To Gather Alone, Bare Witness Triptych, Crystal Blossom, Untitled(s) and Black Venus/I’m Black, No Sugar. A common reaction to a woman’s nude body is to fetishize, criticize or sexualize it. What if we were to remove these lenses of misogyny and instead add a single lens of appreciation — or even curiosity? Both 36-by-24 inches, Cinnamon and Brown Sugar I and II feature two women, but their faces are turned away from the camera, as if Patrick has chosen to hide their faces from the viewer. The figures lean against each other leisurely. With a gradient sky-blue background granting them a commonality, you can really focus on the bodies and enjoy the differences between them. The cool-toned skin of “Brown Sugar” plus the warm, golden skin tones of “Cinnamon.” Brown Sugar’s tight, textured hair and Cinnamon’s locs. The lighting perfectly illuminates the smoothness of their skin and curvature of their lines — the captivating individuality of Blackness. Cinnamon and Brown Sugar I and II sit as a dynamic set JOSEPH PATRICK II — a story of reclamation and BODY OF WORK NKA GALLERY, 919 identity. Named after terms BUCHANAN ST. once used to fetishize Black GALLERY HOURS: women, Cinnamon and Brown TUESDAY-FRIDAY 11 Sugar now bask in these A.M.-7 P.M.; SATURDAY 10 A.M.-2 P.M. reclaimed titles to poetically celebrate the female form. Next to this set hangs a three-part series titled Damn Good Designer Genes. Each portrait features a different woman who faces the camera with washes of color adorning her skin. In the first photo, the model holds an unfurled white flower to her crown in the left hand, while she fingers a single petal with the other. Strokes of sunflower-yellow frame her face as her neutral-toned skin is highlighted by the ocean-blue backdrop. Her facial expression is placid and calm, her eyes delicately closed. The second photo shows a figure leaning her crown on her hand in front of a scarlet-orange backdrop. Her face is glowing with shades of tangerine, while her décollatage and shoulders are painted a sapphireblue. Eyes closed, lips parted, she looks like a sleeping beauty, seemingly caught in a dream. In each photograph, each woman is captured just above the chest lying on her side. These are the portraits of lovers and muses waiting to be devoured by desiring eyes. Cast in a world of color and blooming

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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TOWARD JUSTICE

Anthony Ray Hinton’s The Sun Does Shine comes to young readers BY DAVID DARK

I

njustice isn’t an accident. As Nashville-based psychologist and author Christina Edmondson once observed, “Decisions create culture.” That three-word aphorism, applied personally and publicly, can go a long way toward THE SUN DOES SHINE (YOUNG READERS EDITION) getting a fix on fate, BY ANTHONY RAY HINTON, even arresting — and WITH LARA LOVE HARDIN possibly reversing AND OLUGBEMISOLA — the sinking feeling RHUDAY-PERKOVICH of the inevitable. If FEIWEL & FRIENDS decisions create cul288 PAGES $19.99 ture, perhaps what is isn’t what has to be. HINTON WILL APPEAR AT The tension beBELMONT UNIVERSITY’S CURB EVENT CENTER 7 P.M. tween what is and what’s supposed to SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 be marks any genuine consideration of the witness of Anthony Ray Hinton of Alabama. Wrongfully imprisoned, awaiting execution, and eventually exonerated and set free after 30 years on death row, Hinton exists among us as a courageous and movingly candid survivor of our state violence, an alive and signaling example of what’s wrong with our criminal justice system. His jarringly thorough memoir, The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life, Freedom, and Justice, was published in 2018. The appearance of an edition for young readers (subtitled An Innocent Man, A Wrongful Conviction, and the Long Path to Justice) is very good news for those invested in the dismantling of taxpayer-funded racist terror and the pursuit of transformative justice in the here and now. From the moment in 1985 when Hinton, at 29, is arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder, readers encounter an assortment of villains, but as a narrator studying and reflecting upon his own experience, Hinton never villainizes the people who are wronging him. Instead, he confronts them with a commanding and often charismatic curiosity, chronicling aloud in court, for instance, their crushingly bad decisions (“You people don’t want the truth. … All you wanted was a conviction.”), as well as his resolute refusal to fritter away his own soul by dwelling in enmity: “I thank God that it came to me that I can’t make it into heaven hating anybody.” At the heart of his method is a conviction he picked up from his mother: With enough compassion, empathy and imagination, some form of family can be made to exist anywhere. This is particularly evident when Hinton wrests from the warden the right to conduct a book club on death row. Like the guards with whom Hinton developed something akin to friendship, the warden was puzzled and charmed by his forthright friendliness coupled with a resolute unwillingness to

suffer foolishness. (For instance, Hinton declined to appear or be addressed on camera when celebrity journalist Geraldo Rivera filmed himself spending the night in a cell.) When asked, the warden eagerly agreed to distribute copies of Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain to be shared, read and discussed among the inmates. From there, Hinton conducts civil and even revelatory conversations with men like Henry Hays, a Ku Klux Klan member convicted and sentenced to death for his role in the lynching of Michael Donald, a Black man. Hinton and Hays end up reading Baldwin aloud to each other, with Hinton highlighting this: “For the rebirth of the soul was perpetual; only rebirth every hour could stay the hand of Satan.” Following his death by electrocution, Hays, like other departed book club members, is remembered through the setting aside of an empty chair. That gesture is of a piece with a commitment Hinton promises his peers he’ll extend beyond his years of incarceration: “I’m going to tell the world about how there was men in here that mattered. That cared about each other and the world. That were learning how to look at things differently.” Hinton holds to that promise by refusing the opportunity to accept a life sentence when a lawyer working with Equal Justice Initiative places it before him — even if it means execution is in his future: “I’d rather die for the truth than live a lie.” By firing that particular lawyer, he enters into a working relationship with EJI’s founder and executive director, Bryan Stevenson. After that, the delays are maddening. Even with his innocence essentially proven, the determined denials of well-heeled public officials in Alabama, who want above all else to save their own reputations, keep him caged. Readers are made to see the multipronged strategies and interlocking tactics involving courtrooms, journalists and network news producers that anyone — lawyers, activists, allies — must undertake to move the needle toward justice. Hinton’s story reminds us how betrayals of self and others add up to injustice and an accompanying climate of fear. But little rituals of attempted righteousness — of remembrance and self-regard — add up too. Small, meaningful actions can change the course of human events. In the telling of his tale and his determination to find common cause with unlikely others, Hinton endures by being nimble and refusing to reduce his soul to the size of someone else’s fear. To read an uncut version of this review — and more local book coverage — please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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MUSIC

MIRROR IMAGE

Buick Audra’s new album and memoir examine self-identity BY EDD HURT

Proudly unclassifiable trio The Comet Is Coming returns with Hyper-Dimensional Expansion Beam BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

I

f you went to the 2019 installment of Knoxville’s Big Ears Festival, you might have arrived unfamiliar with The Comet Is Coming. But once the East London trio got to showcase its irrepressibly energetic PLAYING SUNDAY, SEPT. fusion of punk, jazz, EDM 25, AT THE BASEMENT and beyond, there was EAST no forgetting it. The group is a meeting of the minds between best buds Dan “Danalogue” Leavers on synths and Max “Betamax” Hallett behind the kit. They were performing as a duo called Soccer96, which intrigued

talents in a music business that can often be hostile to women. “I wanted it to be an honest and sort of indelicate set of statements,” Audra says about the album. “The five songs that I chose were really pivotal works for me — about leaving a marriage and my brother going to prison for two-and-a-half years, and about leaving my life behind and moving here alone.” Indeed, the music on Conversations is as multifarious as the writing in her essays. On the album, “Afraid of Flying” — one of the older songs on Conversations, written more than a decade ago about her experiences recording with Stone — is paired with “From Down Here,” a great rock tune that seems to come from a position of strength

Audra is grateful to occupy. Conversations is a first-rate rock album that’s melodic and riff-savvy. “I feel like, at my core, I’ve always been a rock musician,” she says. “Even in my softer stuff I lean that way. I tend to play electric guitar, and I have a big old voice. I tend to be a rock musician that can moonlight in Americana and other genres.” Audra cut almost all of Conversations in one day at Nashville’s Sound Emporium Studios with a band that included guitarist Kris Donegan, bassist Lex Price, and her Friendship Commanders bandmate, drummer Jerry Roe. She tells me she wrote the new songs in similarly speedy fashion, over a couple of weeks. One tune, “Simply Said,” about her brother, was cut at a separate session.

If Audra’s album provides insight and rock ’n’ roll thrills, the accompanying essay collection could serve as a cautionary tale for women attempting to thrive within a skewed musical ecosystem. In the essays, Audra writes unsparingly about various men who take music as their exclusive domain. She also describes her time working with Stone as an example of how music-business success can equal entitlement. Audra writes well, with a combination of concrete detail and philosophical insight. Taken together with her album, the book makes a case for her work ethic and aesthetic sense. Audra makes it clear that the best rock ’n’ roll comes from true self-empowerment, and that’s a potent combination. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

sax savant Shabaka Hutchings, co-founder of avantjazz leading lights Sons of Kemet and bandleader in the rich and dynamic Shabaka and the Ancestors. When the trio joined forces as The Comet Is Coming — named for a piece produced at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop — boundless energy became the unifying force behind their wildly eclectic sound. The aforementioned Big Ears show (and a follow-up appearance at Bonnaroo a couple months later) was part of the trio’s tour supporting its thennew second full-length Trust in the Lifeforce of the Deep Mystery. Their follow-up LP Hyper-Dimensional Expansion Beam is set to hit stores and streaming services on Friday. By design, it goes further, harder and even more boldly. The group stops in at The Basement East on Sunday, and Leavers hopped on the phone to help the Scene fill in the blanks about the new record and share some insight into the artistic drive that motivates the trio.

PHOTO: FABRICE BOURGELLE

COSMIC THING

PHOTO: ANNA HAAS

Y

ou get the idea of what Buick Audra has in mind from the title of her latest full-length Conversations With My Other Voice. But the album is not just a series of songs about the circular nature of identity. The ALBUM AND MEMOIR WILL BE SELF-RELEASED Nashville singer, FRIDAY, SEPT. 23; songwriter and guiPLAYING THE BASEMENT tarist put the record SEPT. 28 together around a conceit: She would return to songs she had written previously and then pen new songs that mirrored the themes of the older tunes. In addition to the record, Audra has written a memoir, Conversations With My Other Voice: Essays, that will be released along with the album on Sept. 23. The book serves as a companion to the album, and both are powerful pieces of self-revelation and subtle psychological insight. For Audra, who moved to Nashville in 2008 after growing up in Miami, her latest work is a way to examine how female artists can survive in the music business. Audra, who is the guitarist and songwriter for Nashville rock duo Friendship Commanders, has had a remarkable career. She won two Grammys in 2010 for her vocal duet with English soul singer Joss Stone on the traditional gospel tune “This Little Light of Mine.” The song was included on a 2009 multi-artist collection of gospel tunes, Oh Happy Day: An All-Star Music Celebration, and Audra took home Grammys for both her vocal performance and her production of the track. Speaking from her home in Nashville, Audra tells me how she came to record Conversations. She’s just come back to town after playing a couple of metal festivals with Friendship Commanders. Audra comes across like a very enthusiastic — and intelligent — observer of how she wants to use her

What do you remember most about playing Big Ears in 2019? The late-night show at The Pilot nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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MUSIC

THE SPIN THE AMERICANA DREAM BY P.J. KINZER, STEPHEN TRAGESER, ELI MOTYCKA AND EDD HURT

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s the wide-ranging AmericanaFest took over venues

across Music City once again, Scene music writers dipped into various shows around town. Here’s a highlight reel of what we saw. You wouldn’t expect an 80th birthday celebration to start at 10 p.m. on a weeknight. But Taj Mahal, a revered picker and singer of blues, soul, folk and more — who turned 80 a few months back on May 18 — is not most octogenarians. As the Americana Music Association Honors and Awards ceremony was wrapping up over at the Ryman on Sept. 14, one of the organization’s previous Lifetime Achievement Award winners took the stage at The Basement East, flanked by his longtime partners Billy Rich and Kester Smith. Bluegrass duo Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley joined the band, but Mahal doesn’t fix what isn’t broken: The frontman’s rhythm section has been consistent since 1972, when he completed his trio with Rich on bass and Smith on drums. Throughout the two-hour performance, Mahal explored his curvy path of internationally flavored blues with help from a wide variety of guests. Together, they highlighted all the ingredients in his gumbo of a sound, showing off techniques borrowed from Caribbean calypso musicians and guitarists from island nations around the Pacific; Guatemala-born singer Gaby Moreno’s guest appearance brought out the Central American

there with a blank slate — no prewritten material — and explored altered states of consciousness as a means to capture spontaneous compositional energy. Shabaka’s playing is so intuitive and melodic it gave us plenty to work with. Although we only recorded for four days, Max and I spent four months editing, rearranging, overdubbing and mixing. What was your first-ever band called, and what did it sound like? Max and I had a post-rock group called A Scandal in Bohemia, named for the first Sherlock Holmes novel. [Laughs] It was a lumbering beast with six members and many instruments, flavors. Among the show’s highlights was a particularly compelling duet with Nashville’s own Kyshona on “Queen Bee,” a longtime repertoire staple and fan favorite, which inspired slow dancing in the audience. The set hit terminal velocity just before midnight, when another special guest came out for two songs. The appearance of 70-yearold Nashville-residing blues luminary Keb’ Mo’ — who collaborated with Taj Mahal on 2017’s Grammy-winning TajMo — was a little like finding the extra fries in the bottom of the bag. Experience has taught you to expect them to be there, but it’s a thrill when it happens nonetheless. Then, as is usual for this sort of celebration, all of the evening’s guests — including Rissi Palmer, Will Hoge, Kaia Kater and Jim Lauderdale — returned to the stage for an ensemble sing-along, this time of “Everybody Is Somebody” from Mahal’s 1986 album Taj. Perhaps the most emphatic expression of the love of music in the room was the impromptu Soul Train dance procession that broke out as the guests shook their way off the stage to Chuck Brown’s funk masterpiece “Bustin’ Loose.” It’s hard to believe there was a time when there wasn’t a bluegrass community in Nashville, but it exists because the group of pickers who opened the Station Inn in 1974 was determined to build one. One year after the death of J.T. Gray, who ran the venue for four decades, it remains a bluegrass institution. During AmericanaFest on Thursday, the squat building in the Gulch hosted musicians working hard to cultivate their chosen family. That afternoon, New York-born and New Orleans-residing Leyla McCalla joined WNXP’s Jewly Hight and other musicians for a panel discussion on Black roots artists and worldbuilding in their music. McCalla’s newest project Breaking the Thermometer — which is both a stage production and an album —

PHOTO: ANGELINA CASTILLO

TAJ MAHAL AT THE BASEMENT EAST

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making long, progressive tracks that often surpassed 20 minutes. Our first-ever show was supporting Godspeed You! Black Emperor. The aliases “Danalogue” and “Betamax” speak to an appreciation of dated technology once considered cutting-edge. In what ways does analog media influence your work in The Comet Is Coming? I just love the simplicity and directness of analog synthesizers. We record almost exclusively to tape — and on the new album, 24-track two-inch tape for the first time. The Comet Is Coming is a spectacle onstage,

and you mentioned trying to approach that in the studio this time. Was that difficult? The studio is a different place, and [we] don’t necessarily seek to replicate the live show [on record]. That said, we like to get very heavy [while recording], and tracks like “Code,” “Pyramids” and “Atomic Wave Dance” off the new record are testament to that. What does The Comet Is Coming stand for, as a band? Cooperation. Courage in the face of adversity. Facing demons. Celebrating life. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

LEYLA McCALLA AT THE STATION INN

PHOTO: STEVE CROSS

Light. It’d been a while since we’d rocked a packedtight, sweaty bar. We didn’t sound check — we just blazed through our favorite tracks, with people dancing right in front. Tell me about making the new record. Was there anything new about your approach to Hyper-Dimensional Expansion Beam? For this session, I really wanted to bring the sound of our studio performances closer to that of our live performances. As lockdowns eased, we managed to leave London and get out to the countryside, to Peter Gabriel’s Real World Studios [near Bath]. We went in

takes a deep dive into the Haitian heritage she treasures. It focuses on the story of Radio Haiti-Inter, a station whose journalists broadcast in Haitian Creole and fought back against the corrupt and autocratic regimes of Francois Duvalier and Jean-Claude Duvalier. The hour of music McCalla and her bandmates presented was kinetic and funky, and sung almost entirely in Haitian Creole. Though most of us in attendance probably couldn’t speak a word of the language, the emotional impact carried through and was almost overwhelming. The crowd swelled to near capacity when it was time for The Black Opry Revue, the touring road show Black Opry’s Holly G established in 2021 to foster community for Black and brown roots and country artists. For this occasion, a backing band of trans and nonbinary players had been assembled, with songsmith Jessye DeSilva on keys, Owen Hohenberger on bass and Claire Steele (whose freelance photography work you’ve seen in the Scene on many occasions) on drums. Leading off the slate of three Black Opry artists was Virginia-born Jett Holden. His rich, country-schooled narrative tunes like “Taxidermy” and “Necromancer” do the opposite of what the commercial country world seems to expect — in that they investigate emotions and circumstances you might not be comfortable talking about, and they’re all the better for it. He was followed by San Antonio’s Nicky Diamonds, whose songs like “Lonesome Rose” draw ingeniously on old-school honky-tonk country, rock ’n’ roll, and pop of the ’60s and ’70s, delivered in his velvety high-register croon. North Carolina’s Nikki Morgan rounded out the set; her catalog is diverse, but time was growing short, so she focused on electrified country-blues barn burners like “I’m Going Home.” It was a shame that we didn’t get to hear

more from all three players. When she spoke with Scene contributor Brittney McKenna, Dr. Tressie McMillan Cottom said she would like to see The Black Opry Revue become a rite of passage for acts on the rise in Nashville. Folks in positions of power ought to listen to her, for many reasons — including the depth and range of the artists onstage Thursday, as well as the crowd’s enthusiasm. As the sun set on Friday, Jim Lauderdale took the stage at Exit/In and held court. Throughout the week, one of Nashville’s most prolific industry vets had played the part of unofficial AmericanaFest ambassador as he has for decades; he’d appeared as a guest during at least two other shows, and now it was his turn to take the spotlight for a set of his own. Clad in a cerulean Western suit spangled with rhinestones, Lauderdale showcased tunes from all corners of his vast catalog, now more than 30 albums deep and spanning more than 40 years. By the time he got to “King of Broken Hearts,” the beloved country staple cut by Ringo Starr and George Strait, Lauderdale had once again made a strong case for why he’s considered a founding father of Americana. He and his band seamlessly blended rhythmic rock and slide guitar with bass lines that are — simply put — funky. The set was an effortless sampling of the wide range of music that you might classify as country, folk or rock depending on the context but has been referred to as Americana since the late 1990s. Played to an audience with a great deal of gray hair, the set also showed off how much gravity Lauderdale can carry gracefully. He spoke at length about close friendships with legends like his longtime running partner Buddy Miller, who was recognized during Wednesday’s Americana Honors and Awards ceremony with a special lifetime achievement award given by Robert Plant. Near

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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MUSIC JIM LAUDERDALE AT EXIT/IN

KYSHONA AT RIVERSIDE REVIVAL

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the end of his set, Lauderdale brought up another sometime collaborator, the multitalented Lillie Mae. Lauderdale mentioned that the outstanding singer-songwriter-fiddler makes him think of a young George Jones. The seasoned entertainer ended his set with a shoutout to writing partner Sara Douga and an apology for all the songs he didn’t get to play that night. There are a lot. It was hard to tell that Jaime Wyatt, who appeared decked out in a cool silky paisley suit of her own, is a comparatively recent addition to Nashville’s country music landscape, with the natural way she sings about whiskey, heartbreak and much more besides. Amid preparations to follow up Neon Cross — her powerful 2020 LP produced by Shooter Jennings that reflects on a season of big changes in her life, including coming out and getting sober — Wyatt brought along a stellar touring band, with whom she’s gearing up for a cross-country road trip. Guitarist Ryan Hartman showed off with a few precise solos and creative use of a (presumably) empty Bud Light bottle as a slide. Joshy Soul, an L.A. artist with a growing body of his own solo work, flew in for the performance and dazzled on keys. Wyatt stole Soul’s spot at the keyboard for “Sweet Mess,” the leadoff ballad from Neon Cross, and she leaned on the crowd-pleasing “Wasco” for a finale, a throwback to 2017’s Felony Blues that had Wyatt singing “ain’t nobody going to tell me who to love.” There was a symbolic element to her set following a long-standing talent like Jim Lauderdale — she’s living proof that Americana has bench depth to spare, with relative newcomers who are just as capable as the legends. It was Saturday night church, Americana style, at Inglewood performance and event space Riverside Revival. As the name suggests, the relatively new space does indeed sit inside a historic Nashville church. Several bands led by women made their various cases for Americana as a humanistic form of what you might call roots-pop. The unifying thread of the show was the way songwriting and performance style work together: You could hear strains of gospel-folk, Laurel Canyon-style country-rock and post-punk, and you could also detect some old-time country in the mix. The CSNY-meets-Joni Mitchell side of Americana got representation from Canadian singer-songwriter Amanda Rheaume. Her band, which featured fiddle and guitar along with a solid rhythm section, played

folk-pop-country, and they had a great flow. Rheaume performed songs from her new album The Spaces in Between, which is a classic singer-songwriter record focusing on the history of Canada’s Indigenous Métis people. Ishkōdé Records, a label Rheaume co-founded, held the first AmericanaFest showcase of all Indigenous artists on Thursday. When Rheaume sang “Supposed to Be” and “All Sides of Me,” she sounded like a pop artist figuring out a way to reconcile reality with idealism. In contrast, S.G. Goodman began her set with “Work Until I Die,” a one-chord tune that’s on her latest album Teeth Marks. It featured a sprung, skewed drum pattern, a repetitive bass line and skronky guitars. It swung like post-punk, and the rest of her set showed off her ability to write indelible riffs that make her songs — Teeth Marks is the Tennessee-born and Kentucky-residing songsmith’s breakthrough album — even more appealing. Goodman sings like a punkinfluenced musician who also grew up singing in church, and the contrast makes for bracing music. Goodman’s songwriting has affinities to, say, folk, and maybe even the Drive-By Truckers’ tales of getting lost in the South, but her music aspires to the denseness of punk. There isn’t any punk in the folk-blues work of Nashville’s own Kyshona, who plays funky acoustic guitar and writes songs that have a tinge of jazz-folk — some The Hissing of Summer Lawns — in them. With fellow vocalists Maureen Murphy and Nickie Conley helping out, she sang recent songs like “Out Loud,” a co-write with Caroline Spence released earlier this year that’s about claiming the space you deserve. Across her catalog, Kyshona directs her skill as a singer and songwriter and her presence onstage toward compassion, keeping it at the center. Closing out the night was Kentucky-born songsmith Kelsey Waldon, who has proven herself an advanced country singer, songwriter and bandleader. Her band was sharp and understated, and they navigated her songs with ease. Waldon’s songs — check out her fine new album No Regular Dog — take cues from ’70s country. But she also played a couple of country waltzes that sounded like the hard stuff, with no intervening layers of Americana to soften the edges. Her traditionalism felt like innovation, and that’s one possible definition for Americana. EMAIL THESPIN@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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FILM

HOOKED TO THE SILVER SCREEN

David Bowie takes the Belcourt with a dazzling new doc and a movie retrospective BY JOE NOLAN

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he centerpiece of the Belcourt Theatre’s new Bowie on Film program is Brett Morgen’s Moonage Daydream — a new experimental odyssey into David Bowie’s creative, musical and spiritual journey. It’s the first MOONAGE DAYDREAM PG-13, 134 MINUTES officially sanctioned OPENING FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, documentary about AT THE BELCOURT the changeling BOWIE ON FILM, singer-songwriter, SEPT. 23-OCT. 5 and it features narration by Bowie, who tells his own story as one of the rock era’s most prolific, creative and influential artists. Bowie inhabited compelling characters on the screen as well as onstage, and Bowie on Film illuminates the admirable breadth of the late, legendary musical artist’s actorly ambitions. Morgen’s Moonage Daydream (opening Sept. 23) lands loaded with early hype that casts his documentary as a work of art that matches its creative subject. It’s not hype. Morgen’s masterstroke is dismissing the familiar linear biographical story we see in countless documentaries and television shows made over the course of Bowie’s sixdecade-long career. Instead, the director offers a rich portrait of Bowie’s evolving creative process that will have Nashville music, art and drama folk scribbling notes in their heads throughout the film’s twohour-and-14-minute runtime. The archival footage and music look and sound superb, and Bowie’s insights into his creativity are mostly eloquent and generous — he was always the great gentleman of rock, even in

WORRIED SICK Don’t Worry Darling is sadly far less entertaining than the drama surrounding it BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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isten, I don’t know what the hell happened on the set of Don’t Worry Darling to make the cast act like the cast of Real Housewives in public. That premiere at the Venice Film Festival — where most of the players tried (and failed) to put on a brave face DON’T WORRY DARLING on the red carpet — was R, 123 MINUTES an ass-showing frenzy, a OPENING WIDE FRIDAY, maelstrom of high-profile SEPT. 23 passive-aggression topped with awkwardness, visible contempt and possibly saliva. I only hope Vanity Fair has a tea-spilling piece all lined up for next year’s Hollywood issue. But we’re here to talk about the movie itself, which is sadly nowhere near as entertaining as the gossip surrounding it.

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gowns and plastic pumps. Morgen gets one strike for lingering over Bowie’s popular superstar rise from “Space Oddity” to “Let’s Dance,” rather than diving deeper into the shape-shifter’s neglected post-1980s oeuvre and his stunning adieu, the posthumously released Blackstar. Roger Ebert’s review of Tony Scott’s 1983 film The Hunger (showing Sept. 30 and Oct. 3) explains exactly why it’s a cult classic: “The Hunger is an agonizingly bad vampire movie, circling around an exquisitely effective sex scene.” It’s a sentence that launched 1,000 VHS rentals, but it’s also a limiting way to describe a unique, style-saturated take on the evergreen bloodsucker story: Catherine Deneuve is an ancient vampire, and Bowie is her dying human partner — he’s lived for several centuries, but he’s not immortal. Susan Sarandon is his doctor — and maybe Deneuve’s next lover/victim? Is The Hunger pretentious? Totally. Should you see Bowie playing an elegantly ailing vampire alongside a pair of legendary leading ladies in an erotic horror movie by the director who brought you Top Gun? One-hundred percent. The Man Who Fell to Earth (Sept. 30 and Oct. 2) is my favorite Bowie film. The 1976 science-fiction drama tells the story of an extraterrestrial named Thomas Jerome Newton who crash-lands on Earth while

Florence Pugh is the personification of slowly disintegrating sunshine as Alice, a housewife who starts to question her way-too-perfect surroundings. She lives in a nicely manicured, ’50s-era cul-de-sac while her dashing British husband Jack (Harry Styles) works all day on some top-secret shit. And considering how the cast is quite multicultural for a film that’s supposedly set in the Eisenhower era (If Beale Street Could Talk’s KiKi Layne — who’s been suspiciously absent during this whole publicity madness — has a brief role as a troubled homemaker), you already know something is up with this place. With Darling, co-star/director Olivia Wilde continues her journey as a populist/feminist filmmaker, doing popcorn films with a pro-woman message. The script was written by rom-com vet Katie Silberman (Isn’t It Romantic) and two of Dick Van Dyke’s grandkids. (I’m sure they binge-watched a bunch of their grandpa’s iconic, eponymous sitcom, in which he was the breadwinner and a young, capri-wearing Mary Tyler Moore kept the home fires burning.) Wilde builds a semi-nightmarish vision of patriarchal oppression that’s sparkling and lacquered. She also

searching for water for his drought-stricken planet. Paul Mayersberg adapted Walter Tevis’ 1963 novel of the same name, and his weird script is the perfect vehicle for iconoclast director Nicolas Roeg and David Bowie in his first lead role in a feature film. Roeg was hitting his stride with a run of unique weird masterpieces: Performance (1970), Walkabout (1971), Don’t Look Now (1973) and Bad Timing (1980). Like Roeg’s other post-Performance films, The Man Who Fell to Earth is a strange tale featuring the director’s penchant for experimenting, keeping his visionary flights in service of his story. Bowie’s flair for embodying alien characters onstage — and a debilitating drug habit — made him a natural to play the otherworldly, naive Newton. The result is an intense, still-unique science-fiction movie about an alien who becomes a monster when he learns to be human. Paul Mayersberg also co-wrote Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (Oct. 1 and 4) with director Nagisa Ōshima. The 1983 film is based on the memoirs of Sir Laurens van der Post, a prisoner of war in Japan during World War II. Bowie plays Maj. Jack Celliers, a British officer who radiates resilience and leadership. Japanese rock star Ryuichi Sakamoto plays the camp commander obsessed with his new prisoner.

hired some exceptional ladies — including production designer Katie Byron and costume designer Arianne Phillips — to make this man-made hell look all shiny and immaculate. Unfortunately, it’s also obvious and derivative. Like most Hollywood filmmakers, Wilde keeps giving us work that is heavily reminiscent of other films. Her 2019 feature debut Booksmart was a retread of Superbad — she even cast Jonah Hill’s sister in the Jonah Hill role. But while people have already made comparisons to The Stepford Wives (both the original and that lousy comic remake with Nicole Kidman), Darling has more in common with reality-bending

This is one of Bowie’s best roles, and Sakamoto’s synthy score is a big part of this movie’s cult status — hear it on big speakers in a theater. The 1983 film debuted at Cannes just one month after Bowie dropped Let’s Dance, and it’s just-so-Bowie to be starring in an offbeat, sort of queer POW drama at the launch of his global superstardom. Christopher Nolan’s 2006 film The Prestige (Oct. 1 and 4) is a fable about obsession: Robert Angier (Hugh Jackman) and Alfred Borden (Christian Bale) are rival magicians in turn-of-the-20th-century London, recklessly competing to discover the ultimate illusion. Bowie plays Nikola Tesla with dyed-black hair and a just-go-for-it Czech accent. I’ve written this entire paragraph in the voice of Michael Caine, who’s perfectly cast here as a fatherly stage engineer. Martin Scorsese originally offered Sting the role of Pontius Pilate in 1988’s The Last Temptation of Christ (Oct. 2 and 5). Sting could have brought the petulance he oozed in his portrayal of Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen in David Lynch’s 1984 Dune adaptation to the Roman Empire here, but Bowie gives us a different take. Bowie’s Pilate is analytical and measured, skeptical and inquisitive — political. He only gets one long scene, but he embodies the casual cruelty of the state, and he holds his own with Willem Dafoe’s ginger Jesus. David Lynch’s prequel to his television series Twin Peaks is one of the best-aged films of the 1990s. But when Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Oct. 2 and 5) hit theaters in 1992, it was so weird and violent that fans of the series were shocked and confused. Here Bowie plays FBI Special Agent Phillip Jeffries in the prologue of this haunting, painful movie documenting the last week of Laura Palmer’s life. Jeffries walks out of an elevator into a Philadelphia FBI office after going missing for two years. He rants about Special Agent Cooper before disappearing into thin air. It’s one of the weirdest scenes in Lynch’s supremely bizarre filmography, partly thanks to Bowie with a high blond pompadour and a hot-sauce Cajun accent. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLSCENE.COM

films like The Village, The Truman Show and even The Matrix. I don’t know if Pugh was using the backstage tension she had with Wilde as fuel for her performance, but she does effectively give off the vibe of someone who’s fed up and wants to get the fuck outta Dodge ASAP. Her scenes with Styles, who somehow comes off even dreamier than Pugh, are more satisfactory than scintillating — even when ol’ boy props her up on a table and devours her like a gotdamn sponge cake. Honestly, Pugh has more chemistry with Chris Pine, who does a helluva charismatic job as the debonair but sinister Svengali behind this tight-knit community. As far as beautiful, dark, twisted fantasies go, Don’t Worry Darling is one good-looking road to nowhere. It’s a chilly, extreme parable that basically reminds viewers what a lot of us (women, POC, foreigners, the LGBTQ community, etc.) already know: There are a lot of white men out there who still wanna keep your ass down. If only the movie were as fascinating as seeing the cast act a damn fool while promoting it. As a friend of mine said recently, let’s hope this press tour never ends. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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FILM

In his new documentary, Ben Oddo shines a light on the annoying and the endearing sides of Nashville bachelorette parties BY HANNAH HERNER

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hen Ben Oddo was giving bus tours of Nashville, his jokes about bachelorette parties always landed. It became clear to him that these parties were an object of fascination among those on the “NASHVILLE buses, and he wanted BACHELORETTES: A BEN ODDO INVESTIGATION” to demystify them SCREENING 7:30 P.M. for those who don’t THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, AT know — and maybe THE BELCOURT VISIT NASHBACHFILM.COM even those who don’t TO FIND OUT HOW ELSE TO want to know. WATCH In his documentary “Nashville Bachelorettes: A Ben Oddo Investigation,” the local comedian (and, full disclosure, occasional Nashville Scene contributor) immerses himself in the world of matching pajamas and penis straws. But he also digs deeper, into the juggernaut best described as Nashville’s “bachelorette industrial complex,” what bachelorettes do in our city, and why so many locals have such an issue with them. What was most surprising to Oddo while making the film was how small a percentage of Nashville tourists the parties represent. That’s especially because of something else he noticed while filming over a few days in June — they’re everywhere. “We found out, and I hope it came through in the film, that the hype really is bigger than the reality,” Oddo says. “They make up less than 1 percent of overall tourists. But

that said, optics matter. I think what surprised me the most was like, really how they are everywhere.” They’re a visible minority — and they spend a lot of money. Bach to Basic, a party-planning organization featured in the film, estimates that the bachelorette industry is worth $11.3 billion nationally, that trips cost $908 per person before flights, and that they take an average 108 days to plan. Oddo chose one lucky group to shepherd him through the party rituals. Through their eyes, he got to see the heartfelt side of the bachelorette party. The women he followed spoke to him about their friendships, about their hopes for the future. Oddo says it was much more reflective than bachelor parties he’s attended. “It’s at odds with what people see out in the streets,” Oddo says. “They just see these unencumbered women and they think they’re very raucous. But once you’re in the house, it’s a lot more low-key and just hanging out with one another.” The film also hears from locals like restaurateur Tom Morales (who owns Acme Feed & Seed) and Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp CEO Butch Spyridon, who attempt to drill down on why Nashville is such a destination for bachelorettes, and what could ease the tension between them and locals and natives. For what it’s worth, it’s a tension that the bachelorettes are very much unaware of, Oddo says. A highlight of the documentary is a historian who explores the roots of the bachelorette. Oddo learns that the original purpose of the custom was acknowledging that women were giving up something in marriage too, and had also had sexual partners before — almost mocking the seriousness of the bachelor party as a last night of freedom. “I think that’s why you see a lot of the phallic imagery,” Oddo says. “It was women making fun of men, basically, for doing that. I love that it’s a little campy, and the roots of it are by design.” While the teaser trailer for “Nashville

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Bachelorettes” leans into the sense of local panic that they’re taking over the city, the film seeks to ease it. Says Oddo: “I’m really hoping it sparks a discussion amongst Nashvillians and helps maybe make some of us reexamine what’s really going on here in the bachelorette culture in a way that isn’t so, ‘Ugh they’re the worst, they stink.’ ” Even so, he can relate to locals’ frustrations. Seeing tall-and-skinny developments put up for the purpose of short-term rentals, seeing Nashville bend to the bachelorette, seeing business owners and city leaders cater to the whims of transient tourists — it’s annoying for locals like him. With the post-COVID wedding boom and the visibility of Nashville visitors, It’s a good time to talk about bachelorettes. The film documents a giant and relatively new industry — one that wasn’t available to our parents. In the grand scheme of things, Oddo notes, bachelorettes are better than folks like the guy who was arrested for waving his colostomy bag at Lower Broad bar patrons last year. “Do I see the bachelorette invasion stopping one day?” he asks. “No. But I certainly see it stopping in Nashville, if Nashville suddenly doesn’t become the hot ticket anymore. Then it’s like, ‘Oh God, we miss all the bachelorettes.’ And you know, Nashville might have its It’s a Wonderful Life moment. That is something I could definitely see.” EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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NASHVILLE SCENE | SEPTEMBER 22 – SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


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Prefix meaning “10” that’s associated with 12 Ambitious email goal, and a hint to four squares in this puzzle Misters Still shrink-wrapped, say Jiffy First X or O State gemstones of Utah and Texas Pat (down) Almond confection Brought up

52 53 54 56 57 59 61 63 65

Indian princes Some tracks Bits in a salad, perhaps Small, oily fish Face-plant Stately estate Large vat Part of a Mad. Ave. mailing address Back

25

% OFF

E N T I R E PURCHASE W H E N YO U SPEND $100 O R MO R E 25 White Bridge Rd., Nashville, TN 37205, 615-810-9625

www.MyPleasureStore.com *Offer Ends 10/25/2022. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Discount Code: NSSCHOOL25

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ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS ABS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS EXPERTS

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE B M W S M O T F A C T S

L A I C

O T T O

C T H U L A T H A H U H E S O L E I R E D O R A B I H I N O N G

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 9,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/ crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021.

11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021.

Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/ studentcrosswords.

11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021.

11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021.

11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 11/25/2022. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021. 1/4/2021.

Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia 1006 Carmack Blvd 1006 1006 1006 Carmack Carmack 1006 Carmack 1006 Carmack Blvd Blvd Carmack Blvd 1006 Blvd Carmack Blvd Blvd Columbia, TN Columbia, TN Columbia, Columbia, Columbia, TNColumbia, TN TN Columbia, TN TN 931-398-3350 931-398-3350 931-398-3350 931-398-3350 931-398-3350 931-398-3350 931-398-3350

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Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 22D415 ESMERALDA GONZALEZ ZAMORA vs. ALFREDO SILVA MENDEZ In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ALFREDO SILVA MENDEZ. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 6, same being the date of the last publi-

cation of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 7, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: September 7, 2022 Matt Maniatis Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/22 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D1243 QUAMESIA J. HARVEY vs. ROMAINE DONVON GARDNER In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ROMAINE DONVON GARDNER. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 6, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 7, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 2, 2022 Richard Hedgepath Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/22 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit

Docket No. 22D479 TRINA JEAN TURNER WATSON vs. DAVID JAMES WATSON In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon DAVID JAMES WATSON. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 6, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 7, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 2, 2022 Robyn L. Ryan Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/22 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 18D391 SHARDEA ANGELIC HAMBLIN vs. RUSSELL LENOX HAMBLIN In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon RUSSELL LENOX HAMBLIN. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 6, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 7, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4)

weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 8, 2022 Shardea Hamblin Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/22 IN THE FOURTH CIRCUIT COURT OF DAVIDSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE AT NASHVILLE In re: Arianna Lamonte Drake Raymer (D.O.B. 02/21/2021) Upon the Petition of Timothy Wayne O’Donnell, Petitioner, and Ashley Marie O’Donnell (Laney) (Fredericksen), Petitioner. v. Stephenie Renne Raymer, Biological Mother/Respondent, and William Lamont Drake, Senior, Putative Father/Respondent. To: Stephenie Renne Raymer and William Lamont Drake, Senior: You are hereby notified that a Petition for Adoption and Termination of Parental Rights has been filed against you in the Circuit Court for Davidson County, Tennessee, 1 Public Square, Suite 302, Nashville, TN 37201 (mailing address: P.O. Box 196303, Nashville, TN 37219-6303), and your defense must be made within thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice. You are directed to file your defense with the clerk of court and send a copy to the Petitioners’ attorney, Sarah Reist Digby, at Digby Family Law, PLC, 5123 Virginia Way, Suite C-22, Brentwood, TN 37027, and show cause why this termination and adoption should not be granted. In case of your failure to defend this action by the above date, a judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the judgment. NSC 9/1, 9/8, 9/15, 9/22/2022 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit

Docket No. 22A60 DONALD RICHARD DOWDELL, et al. vs. SARA RAE QUEEN DOWDELL In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon SARA RAE QUEEN DOWDELL. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 13, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 14, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Joseph P. Day, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: September 16, 2022 Laura Tek Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/22, 9/29, 10/06, 10/13/22 Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 22D653 JOSUE JOEL CASTANEDA CUYUCH vs. CELFA ROSAS CAZAREZ In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon CELFA ROSAS CAZAREZ. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 13, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 14, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4)

Welcome to Brighton Valley

Your Neighborhood Local attractions nearby: · Nashboro Golf Course · BNA airport

Nearby places you can enjoy the outdoors: · Percy Priest Lake · Long Hunter’s State Park Best place near by to see a show: · Ascend Amphitheater

Favorite local neighborhood bar: · Larry’s Karaoke lounge List of amenities from your community: · Indoor swimming pool and hot tub · Outdoor swimming pool · Ping pong table · Fitness center · Gated community

weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Joseph P. Day, Clerk L Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 16, 2022 Matt Maniatis Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/22, 9/29, 10/06, 10/13/22

Advertise on the Backpage! It’s like

Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 22D971

little billboards right in front

ADOLFO LEON ISAZA vs. MARINA LINDA ISAZA In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon MARINA LINDA ISAZA. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after OCTOBER 13, same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on NOVEMBER 14, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Joseph P. Day, Clerk L Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: September 16, 2022 Nathaniel Colburn Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 9/22, 9/29, 10/06, 10/13/22

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brightonvalley.net | 615.366.5552 nashvillescene.com | SEPTEMBER 22 - SEPTEMBER 28, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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