Nashville Scene 8-4-21

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CITY LIMITS: EXAMINING TENNESSEE’S LANDSCAPE OF CHARTER SCHOOLS PAGE 7

AUGUST 4–AUGUST 10, 2022 I VOLUME 41 I NUMBER 27 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

FOOD & DRINK: LOST IN THE SAUCE WITH SOME OF NASHVILLE’S BEST HOT SAUCES PAGE 30

BEST OF NASHVILLE VOTING STARTS NOW!

DOWN ON JUNIOR’S FARM FIVE DECADES AGO, PAUL McCARTNEY AND WINGS DECAMPED TO MIDDLE TENNESSEE TO TRACK A HIT. THE REST IS HISTORY. | BY J.R. LIND

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NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


CONTENTS

AUGUST 4, 2022

7

33

Chartered Territory ....................................7

Answering the Call

CITY LIMITS

THIS WEEK ON THE WEB:

THEATER

Examining Tennessee’s landscape of charter schools

The Calling Is in the Body celebrates early HIV/AIDS advocate Deidre Williams

BY KELSEY BEYELER

BY AMY STUMPFL

Adoption in Tennessee ..............................7 If adoption rates grow, so should psychological and legislative support BY HANNAH HERNER

Prix Game ...................................................8

35 ART

Crawl Space: August 2022

What to watch at this weekend’s Music City Grand Prix

Nashville’s First Saturday happenings include new faces and old spaces

BY STEVEN HALE

BY JOE NOLAN

Pith in the Wind .........................................9 This week on the Scene’s news and politics blog

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36

BOOKS

Nothing Contrived

COVER STORY

William Gay’s Faulknerian final collection depicts social misfits and blue-collar life

Down on Junior’s Farm Five decades ago, Paul McCartney and Wings decamped to Middle Tennessee to track a hit. The rest is history. BY J.R. LIND

Ernest Tubb Record Shop Building Sells for $18.3 Million Mayor’s Office Issues Statement on Metro Codes Following Scene Investigation Tailor to Reopen Aug. 11 Anti-Abortion Group Met With Counterprotesters in Downtown Nashville

Photo: Getty/Bettmann; Paul and Linda McCartney near the end of their stay in Lebanon, Tenn., July 18, 1974

BY WAYNE CATAN AND CHAPTER 16

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MUSIC

21

Another Look ........................................... 39

CRITICS’ PICKS Two-part James Turrell tour, Craig Robinson, Stage Fright & Slumber Party Massacre II, Wailin Storms, Three Colors: Blue, Pepe Aguilar, RuPaul’s Drag Race World Tour, To Kill a Mockingbird and more

The Scene’s music writers recommend recent releases from Jack White, The Black Keys, AhDeli, Ty Herndon and more

The Spin ................................................... 40 The Scene’s live-review column checks out The Cancellations at Springwater BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

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Lost in the Sauce .................................... 30

We Live, We Die, We Live Again ............. 42

FOOD AND DRINK

FILM

A roundup of some of Nashville’s best hot sauces

Resurrection is a testament to Rebecca Hall’s skill as a performer

BY KELSEY BEYELER

BY NADINE SMITH

Booze Hound ........................................... 31

A Secret Chord ........................................ 42

Proper Saké Co.’s new East Side location offers an impressive list of sakes — and a refreshing summer cocktail

The new doc Hallelujah goes deep on Leonard Cohen’s iconic song

BY D. PATRICK RODGERS

Prey for a Hero ........................................ 43

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The Predator franchise gets it right 35 years after the original BY JOE NOLAN

VODKA YONIC

On the Magnetizing Terror of Skydiving I responded to trauma by jumping out of a plane BY HAILEY HIGDON

BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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FOX NEWS AND OTHER CONSERVATIVE SOURCES THINK THE MIDTERM ELECTIONS ARE LIKELY TO BE MORE COMPETITIVE THAN MOST ANTICIPATE Midterm-election season is upon us, and the current political landscape is on the minds of many. What will happen and what will the results mean for our nation? As noted by Huffpost, CNN’s senior data reporter Harry Enten recently noted that his findings “are pointing in the wrong direction for Democrats, who hold a 12seat House majority.” However, a number of recent polls shows that the midterm elections could be much more competitive than many are thinking. Surprisingly enough, this news comes from GOP-leaning polls, including a poll conducted by Emerson College and referenced by Fox News: “The Emerson College National Survey revealed Republicans lead Democrats by just one point, 45 percent to 44 percent, which represents a nine-point improvement for Democrats since February.” This news should grab the attention of every Democratic voter and remind them in no uncertain terms that their vote will be of utmost importance come election time. And the Fox News report is just one of several I’ve recently seen. In a July poll conducted by The New York Times and Siena College, “41 percent [of registered voters] said they preferred Democrats to control Congress, compared with 40 percent who preferred Republicans.” The Times notes that this is happening despite the fact that “one of the most enduring trends in American politics is that the president’s party tends to fare poorly during midterm elections. And in 2022, that trend was supposed to reassert itself with a vengeance.” This is based on President Biden’s plummeting approval rating and inflation climbing “at its fastest pace in four decades.” But that is not happening. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce recently conducted a national poll, with surprising results. According to the “1,219 likely 2022 voters” who were surveyed, 46 percent chose the Democratic candidate for Senate when asked, “If the November election for the U.S. Senate were being held today, would you vote for the Republican candidate or the Democratic candidate?” A similar query regarding the U.S. House of Representatives turned up similar results, with 46 percent choosing the Democratic candidate and 41 percent choosing the Republican candidate.

Even more astounding are the results from a July 2022 poll conducted by Americans for Prosperity, the extremely far-right leaning Koch Brothers-founded organization that hardly needs any introduction. Their poll results showed that if midterm elections were held today, 39 percent of respondents would choose the Republican candidate, with 42 percent voting Democrat. Here’s an interesting twist: This poll found that a mere 7 percent had any interest at all in investigating the 2020 election. So why are Democrats faring better in polls than history predicts and current thinking presumes? One reason, of course, is the plethora of disturbing and increasingly compromising facts uncovered by the Jan. 6 hearings. New York Times columnist Spencer Bokat-Lindell recently noted that “Republicans are also reconfiguring their relationship with Donald Trump, whose grip on the party isn’t as strong as it once was, particularly as the fallout from the House Jan. 6 investigation compounds.” MSNBC’s The Sunday Show With Jonathan Capehart also shed some light on the issue during a recent interview with political strategist Rachel Bitecofer. Bitecofer commented that Democrats are faring better than expected largely due to “recent political turbulence, primarily the evisceration of Roe and the threat to right to privacy but also … bringing to life the idea that the armed insurrection was intentional and plotted by Donald Trump.” Bitecofer also said: “It is reason to get excited. But I do want to temper people’s enthusiasm and say it’s a trend in the right direction, [but] it’s certainly not telling us that as of today everything’s going to be cupcakes and rainbows for Democrats. But it’s telling us they have a chance to compete.” I couldn’t agree more! Just because the numbers currently show the competition will be close, this is no time to sit back and hope we “have it in the bag.” Democrats are making history right now. But we have to remember the work that remains ahead. Most of all, we must remember how important our vote is right now — perhaps more important than it has ever been.

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Managing Editor Alejandro Ramirez Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Arts Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Culture Editor Erica Ciccarone Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Contributing Editor Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Hannah Herner, J.R. Lind, Eli Motycka, William Williams, KateLynn White Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Steve Erickson, Nancy Floyd, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Kashif Andrew Graham, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steven Hale, Steve Haruch, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Craig D. Lindsey, Margaret Littman, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Daryl Sanders, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Editorial Intern Claudia Villeda Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Festival Director Olivia Britton Marketing and Promotions Manager Robin Fomusa Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers Richard Jacques, Deborah Laufer, Niki Tyree, Alissa Wetzel Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Jada Goggins, Audry Houle, Jack Stejskal Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Frank Daniels III Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2022, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

In memory of Jim Ridley, editor 2009-2016

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus, the Nashville Post and Home Page Media Group in Williamson County.

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS

CHARTERED TERRITORY Examining Tennessee’s landscape of charter schools he Tennessee Nature Academy’s supporters gathered for a party following the July 25 meeting of the Metro Nashville Public Schools board. Sure, their charter application had been rejected by a board vote of 5-4, but this was just the beginning of the process. Thanks to the creation of the Tennessee Public Charter School Commission, a ninemember body created and appointed by Gov. Bill Lee to hear charter school appeals, the state can override local decision makers. “I think what I heard from the board meeting is that some of the board members, they don’t agree with the approvement system for charter schools and all that,” says young TNA supporter Stanley Phanthavong. “Like, if you don’t like it, then [change it]. Can they do that?” MNPS board members can’t, though some wish they could. There is significant tension between the MNPS board and the state when it comes to charter schools and the processes surrounding them. “Really we’re just a pit stop on the way now, we’re not really a decider … in a lot of ways and that’s really frustrating,” said District 8 representative Gini Pupo-Walker at the July 25 meeting. To start a charter school in Tennessee, its sponsor must apply to a local board of education. District evaluators then review that application and rate it according to a rubric provided by the state. The district makes recommendations based on finances, operations, academics and, if applicable, past performance. The school board then votes to approve or deny a charter based on these findings.

MNPS District 1 representative Sharon Gentry, along with several other board members, expressed discomfort with the process at last month’s meeting. “There’s got to be a reason why questions around ‘how can the charter move the district forward?’ is not a part of the criteria,” said Gentry, who has served as a school board member for 14 years. “I can’t ask whether the charter is solving a problem, academically, that I have. Is it solving a problem, culturally, that I have? Is it … addressing an issue of capacity for me? I can’t ask those questions. I can’t make a strategic decision about bringing in a charter.” If a local school board denies an application and then later an appeal, a charter sponsor can appeal again to the state charter commission, which has the power to overrule local districts. If that happens, the district must decide whether or not it will authorize that charter — if not, the state commission must authorize. Schools looking to operate under the Achievement School District — a state-run district for priority schools — can apply straight to the charter commission. “It’s pretty clear that the state charter school commission is operating under a directive to approve as many charter schools as possible,” District 3 school board representative Emily Masters tells the Scene. This struggle for local control is at the heart of a long and loaded debate that has been playing out for years in Tennessee and across the country. Tennessee’s initial charter schools started in Memphis and Nashville in 2003. At first, they were available only to certain students in Nashville, Memphis, Chattanooga and

Knoxville. “The initial intention of charter schools was to fill gaps within public school systems,” says Masters. “It was also to create innovative replicable models, almost like a testing ground for some different strategies that can then be implemented in a wider, more far-reaching way.” A 2011 law enabled any Tennessee student to attend a charter school. In the years since, charter growth significantly expanded, with more than 100 charter schools currently operating across Tennessee. While those schools have traditionally stayed within the state’s largest cities, they’re starting to trickle to other school districts. Like most charter-related matters, this expansion has sparked waves of controversy. Earlier this year, Gov. Lee announced a partnership with conservative Michiganbased Hillsdale College to bring at least 50 charter schools to the state. Many opposed the additional charter schools from the start, but when NewsChannel 5 revealed a video of Hillsdale President Larry Arrn making disparaging comments about public school teachers, even more came out against the partnership. Some criticized Lee for not defending Tennessee’s teachers; even pro-charter Republicans disapproved of the potential partnership. Hillsdale-affiliated charter school applications that were denied in both Rutherford and Montgomery counties are now being appealed to the state commission — a decision that will be watched closely. Throughout their history, charter schools have seen buy-in from both sides of the aisle. Nowadays, they mostly see support from Republicans and criticism from Democrats. Though politicians like Lee contend that charter schools are public schools, they don’t function in the same capacity as traditional public schools — they receive public funds, but they are run independently. Critics argue that charters drain funds from public schools. “It is true that the money follows the student,” says MNPS chief financial officer Chris Henson. “But the costs don’t.” Critics also argue that charters

ADOPTION IN TENNESSEE

same-sex couples, among others. The coming years will likely show a catchup of adoptions that were delayed during COVID-19. It will take years to see whether adoption rates rise post-Roe, though those who work in the field hope to see more support for birth parents and children implemented sooner. The Adoption Project, which launched in April, looks to expedite the process for birth parents, adoptive parents and children. President and CEO Jeremy Harrell says it was three years between the time his family started a home study to adopt a child and the time the adoption of his young daughter was finalized. According to state law, a birth mother must go to court to sign over parental rights 72 hours after giving birth. She then has 72 more hours to change her mind. A child then has to be in their adopted home six months before the adoption can be finalized. The Adoption Project would like to see the time until finalization shortened, with another option besides in-person court available to mothers. Some states allow an attorney, a notary and a witness of one’s choice instead. “I understand the protection of taking somebody to court,” Harrell says. “There’s a judge who’s standing there making sure nobody’s being taken advantage of. There’s a huge protection to that. There’s also a lot of burden to it, that you’re taking somebody who’s just had a baby, you’ve gone home, you’re separated from your baby. Now we’re gonna make you go to court.”

In Tennessee, adoption from foster care has been steadily growing, even seeing a slight uptick to 1,186 children in 2020. In March 2021, Gov. Bill Lee called on faith communities in the state to support kids in the foster care system, and later extended TennCare coverage for adopted youth. To address how hard the process is on the birth mom, The Adoption Project’s legislative advocacy aims to also include services for birth mothers, including grief counseling from a mental health professional. Local adoption agency Miriam’s Promise offers free post-adoption counseling indefinitely for birth parents. Lee-Ann Higgins, director of program services, has been counseling birth mothers for 17 years. Most of the expectant parents she sees have decided to go through with the pregnancy, or “timing has made the decision for them,” and have not yet decided if they will parent the child. The most common deterrent to raising a child is finances, Higgins says. Birth parents often face criticism from their family for choosing adoption, too. “I think for many men and women, they’re going to be wrestling with their identity,” Higgins says. “Because on one hand, they are parents, and they have made a parenting decision for their child. But on the other hand, they are not going to be actively parenting that child in the sense of day-to-day life activities. We are talking to them about what that means for their identity going forward and helping them deal with

BY KELSEY BEYELER

T

If adoption rates grow, so should psychological and legislative support BY HANNAH HERNER

M

any opponents of abortion tout adoption as a solution for pregnant people who cannot or do not want to parent a child — especially in states like Tennessee that have all but banned abortion. But when a pregnant person is faced with a choice between abortion, adoption and parenting the child, adoption is historically least chosen. In Tennessee in 2020, 3,306 children were adopted, down from 3,782 adoptions in 2019, according to data from the National Council for Adoption. For reference, the state has around 8,000 kids in foster care currently, and 80,000 births each year. Thousands of families are on wait lists to adopt an infant. The state has also seen controversy around adoption lately, with a Jewish Knoxville couple’s case dismissed after challenging a 2020 state law that allows religious organizations to deny adoption services to

cherry-pick their students, have high teacher turnover, are funded by deep-pocketed special-interest groups, and can be mismanaged more easily than public schools. Take Knowledge Academies, which houses three charter schools on one campus. Its former leader was fired in 2019 for operating the school at a deficit, running side businesses from the school and having issues paying teachers (some of whom were unlicensed). The MNPS board voted to revoke the charter agreement, but the state board of education overturned that decision. This year, one of the Knowledge Academy schools sought to renew a contract that was set to expire in June. After a rocky application process that included an emergency amendment petition to consolidate all of Knowledge Academy’s charter schools, the MNPS board turned it down — but the state charter commission overruled that decision and charged the board with accepting it. The board discussed appealing the commission’s decision to a chancery court, but the majority voted against it. While politics surrounding charters rage, most Tennessee students aren’t on track academically. Many families don’t care whether their children are attending a traditional public school or charter school as long as their kids can receive a quality education. The young supporters of the Tennessee Nature Academy all attended both traditional public schools and charter schools — including Knowledge Academy, where they met TNA co-founder Jay Renfro. The students mentioned how each format had its pros and cons — most saw more attention and felt like they were challenged academically at their charter school, for instance, but public schools had more extracurricular opportunities. “I would like people to understand that when we’re awaiting decisions about charters, we are thinking about children,” says Masters. “I mean, if you are a child who lives in Metro Nashville Davidson County, it is my responsibility to ensure that you have access to a high-quality education, period.” ■

any kind of negative responses, especially from their support people.” Cost is top of mind for many looking to become adoptive parents too. More National Council for Adoption data surveying adopted parents shows that before 2010, the average cost of private domestic adoption was $17,018, and past 2010, the average was $33,142. Around 63 percent of adoptive parents saw cost as a barrier. Linda Ashford, professor of pediatrics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, hopes to see access to counseling for adopted children as well. Ashford explains that the attachment relationship is key for any child, and it is interrupted for adopted children. Trust in a caregiver built through everyday experiences such as feeding and diaper changes lays a neurological foundation through which an individual will be able to develop all relationships over time. The earlier the child is adopted, the better chances for their attachment to be typical, she says. “If we are hoping or suggesting that children are now going to be born who may not have been born last year, we have to be very attentive to the fact that this attachment relationship is key,” Ashford says. “There’s good evidence that adoption is both a great opportunity for a child and also a great risk. As a society, I guess we have to figure out what is the best balance, and how do we help families and children in this balance.” EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS out the top five is Pato O’Ward, an exciting young Mexican driver racing for Arrow McLaren. (Yes, the same McLaren from Formula 1.) O’Ward has won two races this year. (Actually, let’s make this a top six so we can tell you to keep an eye on Alex Palou, the reigning series champion who won last weekend’s race on the road course in Indianapolis.)

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OTHER DRIVERS TO WATCH

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f you’ve recently driven across the Korean War Veterans Boulevard Bridge, or anywhere in the vicinity of Nissan Stadium, then you’ve already seen the signs that IndyCar is coming back to town. Preparations, in the form of tall fences, barriers and bleachers, have been underway all around the 2.17-mile street circuit in advance of the Music City Grand Prix, the second running of the race after its debut last year. For many Nashvillians, last year’s race might have served as an introduction to the sport, or at least — for those who’ve hopped aboard the Netflix-powered Formula 1 train — to the American version of open-wheel racing. For IndyCar fans, it was a welcome return of the series to Nashville, following an eight-year run of races at Lebanon’s Nashville Superspeedway in the Aughts. Whether you’re a lifelong racing fanatic or a curious observer, allow us to preview this year’s race, from drivers to watch and storylines to follow to subtle changes to the course.

leading the way is Will Power, a veteran Australian driver racing for the iconic Team Penske’s No. 12 car. Power is a former series champion and four-time runner-up. Right behind him is Marcus Ericsson, the Swedish driver who debuted in IndyCar in 2019 after five seasons in Formula 1. Ericsson won last year’s Music City Grand Prix as well as the Indy 500 earlier this year. Coming into Nashville in third place is Power’s Penske teammate, Hendersonville’s own Josef Newgarden in the No. 2 car. The once and current Nashvillian is a two-time series champion and has won four races this year. Six-time series champion Scott Dixon is in the hunt as well, driving the No. 9 car for Chip Ganassi Racing. Dixon has the most race wins of any active driver. Rounding

Although they might not be competing for the championship, there are still drivers worth keeping an eye on further down the grid. Among them is Scott McLaughlin, a New Zealander driving the No. 3 car for Team Penske. A former champion in the Australian Supercars Championship, McLaughlin was named the IndyCar Rookie of the Year in 2021 and has won two races this season. Another driver running in his second IndyCar season — behind the wheel of Andretti Autosport’s No. 28 car — is Romain Grosjean. Formula 1 fans will know Grosjean as the Swiss-Frenchman who somehow walked away from a horrifying fiery crash in Bahrain in 2020. Grosjean brought considerable experience on both street and road courses to IndyCar, but he skipped all but one of the series’ oval races last year. This year, though, he’s racing the full slate. Middle Tennessee’s NASCAR fans will be quite familiar with the name of a third IndyCar sophomore, stock-car icon Jimmie Johnson. Like Grosjean, he skipped the ovals last season but is lining up for every race this year. Johnson struggled to find any pace in 2021 but collected his first top-five finish in IndyCar last month at Iowa Speedway. Just as he did in NASCAR, Johnson drives the No. 48 car. A few other drivers to be on the lookout for as the field comes racing by: four-time Indy 500 winner Hélio Castroneves, a driver — racing in the pink-and-black No. 6 car — who is impossible not to like and has

CUMBERLAND RIVER

NISSAN STADIUM SOUTH FIRST STREET

STARTING LINE

THE RACE FOR THE CHAMPIONSHIP

The Music City Grand Prix comes in the final quarter of the IndyCar season, with less than 50 points separating the top five drivers in the standings. Currently

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS also won Dancing With the Stars; secondgeneration drivers Colton Herta (son of four-time race winner Bryan Herta) in the No. 26 car and Graham Rahal (son of Indy 500 winner Bobby Rahal) in the No. 15 car, owned in part by longtime IndyCar owner David Letterman.

COURSE CHANGES

Last year’s Music City Grand Prix divided racing fans and pundits in large part because of a chaotic race that saw nine yellow flags and two full-on race stoppages. Although drivers were positive about the new circuit, many observers called for changes to its design. There are some changes to the course this year, albeit nothing major. The most significant is a shift in where restarts will occur. After caution periods last year, the race restarted at the finish line in front of Nissan Stadium. This year, organizers say, restarts will take place on the straightaway after the field exits the KWV Bridge, a change they hope will prevent wrecks as the race resumes and allow more opportunities for passing. Transition areas on and off the bridge are also being smoothed to decrease the likelihood of cars bottoming out as they go on and off. The circuit’s final turn, Turn 11, has also been widened. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

MUSIC CITY GRAND PRIX WEEKEND SCHEDULE FRIDAY, AUG. 5

9:30 a.m.: Gates Open 10:15 a.m.: Trans Am Series Practice 1 11:55 a.m.: GT America Test Session 12:30 p.m.: GT America Practice 1 1:15 p.m.: Trans Am Series Practice 2 2 p.m.: Indy Lights Series Practice 1 3:15 p.m.: IndyCar Practice 1 4:45 p.m.: Stadium Super Trucks Qualifying 5:20 p.m.: Freedom Friday Military Demonstration 6:15 p.m.: GT America Practice 2 7 p.m.: Concert Feat. Aaron Lewis

SATURDAY, AUG. 6

9 a.m.: Gates Open 9:30 a.m.: Trans Am Series Qualifying 10:15 a.m.: Indy Lights Practice 2 11:15 a.m.: Indycar Practice 2 12:30 p.m.: Trans Am Race 1:55 p.m.: GT America Qualifying 2:30 p.m.: Indy Lights Qualifying 3:30 p.m.: IndyCar Qualifying 5:45 p.m.: Vintage Indy Session 6:15 p.m.: Stadium Super Trucks Race 1 7:25 p.m.: GT America Race 1 8:30 p.m.: Headline Concert Feat. Tim McGraw 10 p.m.: Fireworks Show

SUNDAY AUG. 7

8 a.m.: Gates Open 9:15 a.m.: IndyCar Warm-Ups 10 a.m.: Vintage Indy Session 10:55 a.m.: GT America Race 2 12:10 p.m.: Indy Lights Race 1:20 p.m.: IndyCar Pre-Race Ceremonies 2:30 p.m.: IndyCar Big Machine Music City Grand Prix 4:45 p.m.: IndyCar Victory Lane Celebration 5:05 p.m.: Stadium Super Trucks Race 2 5:45 p.m.: Post-Race Concert Feat. Brantley Gilbert & Carly Pearce

THIS WEEK ON OUR NEWS AND POLITICS BLOG: School board races haven’t historically been known for mudslinging, but it’s a whole new world out here. With party labels present on the ballot for the first time in Metro Nashville Public Schools board history and wedge issues like book banning and various curriculum fights nationalizing what was so often the last truly local election, 2022’s race turned nasty in the weeks before the election. Councilmember Dave Rosenberg said District 8 candidate Amy Pate (hey that rhymes!) is pro-voucher, doesn’t live in the district and has the endorsement of the right-wing Moms for Liberty group. Speaking to Pith, Pate hedged on vouchers, explained she is currently living in one of her three homes that is outside District 8 but only because her main house is being renovated, and that she doesn’t have MFL’s endorsement. (She did in one MFL graphic, which was replaced with one in which they made no District 8 endorsement.) Meanwhile, various Twitter accounts began commenting on District 2 incumbent Rachel Anne Elrod’s weight. … Mayor John Cooper promised a review of Metro Codes’ process after the Scene’s July 28 cover story detailing the ways in which Codes violations have been weaponized to harass residents, specifically Black and low-income Nashvillians in gentrifying areas. … Fundamentalist Christian organization Operation Save America held a rally at the Tennessee State Capitol in downtown Nashville, claiming that the Supreme Court didn’t go far enough with this summer’s reversal of Roe v. Wade. OSA members were met with counterprotesters — anti-fascists and members of pro-choice group Jezebel Rebellion. OSA held a convention in nearby Smyrna last week. … Cooper’s Sustainability Advisory Committee heaped praise on AllianceBernstein and Vanderbilt University for their corporate environmental stewardship. Neither the asset management firm nor the university nor the committee talked at all about how both are heavily invested in fossil fuels. … Speaking of petrochemicals, fossil fuel broker Kinder Morgan filed, with Tennessee Valley Authority support, paperwork seeking eminent domain to build a natural gas pipeline a few miles outside of Davidson County on the Harpeth River. … Two senior Metro Health Department staffers resigned after months of open conflict with the department’s Bureau of Health Equity. Brian Todd, the department’s communications director, had filed a complaint against the bureau’s leader, Stephanie Kang, for referring to his race (Todd is white). Todd was later suspended for allegedly inappropriate workplace behavior. HR manager Les Bowron had been engaged in a paperwork war with the bureau, requesting public records of communications between the bureau and employees in his department. … Ernest Tubb Record Shop sold for the second time in two years, this time to a group including a Russian fiddler, a developer and Tubb’s grandson. The trio paid $18.3 million, more than three times what it sold for in August 2020. NASHVILLESCENE.COM/PITHINTHEWIND EMAIL: PITH@NASHVILLESCENE.COM TWEET: @PITHINTHEWIND

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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HOW CHIVALROUS NOBLEMEN DRESSED FOR SUCCESS Our latest exhibition showcases stunning examples of European arms and armor from the renowned collection of the Museo Stibbert in Florence, Italy. More than one hundred rare objects—including full suits of armor, mounted equestrian figures, helmets, swords, and other weaponry—tell the tale of the evolution of the European knight. Come learn about the historical and functional context of these works of art and experience firsthand their undeniable beauty.

THROUGH OCTOBER 10 Downtown Nashville, 919 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203 FristArtMuseum.org @FristArtMuseum #TheFrist #FristKnights Organized by Contemporanea Progetti in collaboration with the Museo Stibbert, Florence, Italy Suppor ted in par t by

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Mounted figure with equestrian bard: Italian (Brescia). Suit of armor, 1560–65. Steel, mail, bronze, leather, and fabric, total height: 74 3/4 in.; European. Chanfron, mid-16th century. Steel and leather, 27 1/2 x 11 3/4 x 13 in.; European. Bit and bridle, 16th century. Steel and bronze, 3 7/8 x 15 3/4 x 9 in.; European. Stirrups, 16th century. Steel leather, 11 3/410, x 11 3/4 |x 5nashvillescene.com 7/8; European. Elements of barding (peytral and crupper), 19th century. Fabrics, 34 5/8 x 41 3/8 x 15 in. Collection of Museo Stibbert, Florence, Italy AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 2022 NASHVILLE SCENE | and

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7/28/22 11:20 AM


DOWN ON JUNIOR’S FARM FIVE DECADES AGO, PAUL McCARTNEY AND WINGS DECAMPED TO MIDDLE TENNESSEE TO TRACK A HIT. THE REST IS HISTORY. BY J.R. LIND

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MIKE BOHAN, COYOTE MCCLOUD, WMAK

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s he did with many of his Wings-era songs, Paul McCartney peppered his 1974 non-album single “Junior’s Farm” with a cast of incongruous characters in improbable situations. Throughout the early to mid-1970s, freed from the self-seriousness of John Lennon — who, similarly, was freed from the surrealist silliness of McCartney — the former Beatle created four-minute worlds of whimsy. Joining the undertaker, the jailer, Sailor Sam and the county judge from “Band on the Run” and the sergeant major and the lady suffragette (is there any other kind?) from “Jet” is the troupe from “Junior’s Farm.” There’s the poker man, the Eskimo (forgive a Liverpudlian in 1974 for opting for the easy rhyme rather than the correct nomenclature), a sea lion, Junior himself, Jimmy, the president (oddly, at the House of Commons; maybe it’s the Lord President of the Council), comedy legend Oliver Hardy, an old man and a grocer. Like a Sid and Marty Krofft retelling of The Canterbury Tales, these disparate figures are all thrown together for Macca to play with: a cast of incongruous characters in an improbable situation. And “Junior’s Farm” — along with its B-side, “Sally G” — is the product of a cast of incongruous characters in an improbable situation. This is the story of the summer Paul McCartney and his retinue spent in, of all places, Lebanon, Tenn.

IN LATE 1973, Wings released Band on the Run. After some previous middling efforts from the band, the record was a triumph. Two singles — “Jet” and the title track — both went gold. The album went to No. 1 and was triple platinum in the United States, and has since become regarded as a classic and one of the greatest albums by an ex-Beatle. A critical and commercial success far outpacing Wings’ two earlier releases, Band on nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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the Run was recorded in Lagos, Nigeria. McCartney attributed the success of the album — at least in part — to having left the United Kingdom to lay down tracks. Eager to tour the record, McCartney wanted a similar away-from-Britain summer camp feel for himself, his wife Linda, their children and the other members of the band as they worked out new tunes and got ready for their triumphant turn on the road. Now, it would be easy to assume McCartney wanted to live on Curly Putman’s farm because of Putman’s reputation. By 1974, he’d already won songwriting accolades for “Green, Green Grass of Home” and “D-I-V-O-R-C-E.” Six years later, in 1980, he’d write “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” now considered one of the greatest country songs of all time. This was clearly a man with chops, and even McCartney could certainly bask in his reflected genius. That would be a nice story: Rock legend comes to the middle of nowhere to learn at the feet of a country music Yoda. The truth is a lot more prosaic. Linda McCartney’s father was Lee Eastman, the copyright attorney for, among other entities, Buddy Killen’s legendary Tree Music Publishing. So Eastman asked Killen to find somewhere in the pastoral verdancy of Tennessee for his daughter and his famous son-in-law and his grandkids and some pals to hang for six weeks. One of the heavy hitters for Tree happened to be Curly Putman. Putman, who died in 2016, told The Wilson Post in 2009 that he and Killen cruised all over the Nashville area looking for the right place. Killen called farms in the area and played it close to the vest as to who he was representing. But farmers are practical people, and they knew anyone who wanted to rent a farm for six or seven weeks sight unseen and was represented by a music power player like Killen had to have deep pockets. One farmer said Killen’s client could have his place for seven weeks for $200,000 (about $1.2 million in 2022) and he’d be able to pay off his mortgage. Eventually, Killen took Putman along on his quest through the countryside, but in hindsight, that may have been a setup. After all, Putman lived in a great big white house with acres of pasture and plenty of horses, plus a swimming pool and a fishing pond. “Finally, [Killen] sweet-talked me and Bernice into leasing our place to them,” Putman told the Post’s Ken Beck. “I was kind of nervous. You know how rock ’n’ roll bands were back then? They paid me pretty good for leasing it for six weeks. And they didn’t tear anything up.” His nerves eased and his bank account robust, Curly — more officially, Claude Putman Junior — and his farm were about to stake a corner of rock ’n’ roll trivia. Wings wasn’t exactly Led Zeppelin. The McCartneys brought their daughters Heather, Stella and Mary along with Wings members Denny Laine, Jimmy McCulloch and Geoff Britton. The entourage landed at Nashville Municipal Airport — Nashville International these days — June 6, 1974. It was a relatively low-key arrival. It didn’t exactly resemble the Beatlemania

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of a decade prior or even the swarming crowds and marching bands Robert Altman put on the same tarmac the next year for Barbara Jean’s return in his film Nashville. There were 40 or so fans and lookie-loos and a handful of reporters. In a 2002 interview with the Scene, Killen — who died in 2006, memorialized by a roundabout featuring Nashville’s most famous nudes — said he’d done his best to keep the trip on the down-low. “I’m terribly protective of the artists I work with,” Killen told the Scene, “and I kept Paul’s arrival very hush-hush.” The deal made and the check cut, the Putmans (Curly, Bernice and their then-12year-old son Troy) hosted a reception for the McCartneys, which Bernice said was just as down-to-earth and normal as any other Wilson County family stopping by for a visit. The Putmans spent a few days in Nashville — they popped back a time or two to find that Wings had converted their garage into a practice space; Troy rode horses with Heather — and then headed to Hawaii and the West. Wings made themselves at home. They had endless crates of oranges delivered (the McCartneys loved freshly squeezed orange juice) and stayed stocked in Johnny Walker Red (for the grownups) and Ovaltine (for the girls). Curly told Troy to put his dirt bike away before the family took off. Troy said he tucked it away in a small shed, but McCartney must have gone snooping, because one of the persistent memories of Lebanon residents of a certain age is seeing one of the world’s most famous men speeding around the sleepy little town atop that Honda XR75 (that had no headlights or taillights). Linda, who was a talented photographer, took dozens of photos of Paul on the bike, some of which were published around the world — a dirt-biking Paul was even spotted by the vacationing Putmans. And spotted by a state trooper. Putman’s farm was on Franklin Road about halfway between Lebanon proper and the unincorporated area known to locals as Gladeville. The area is in Tennessee’s unique cedar glades. (That’s the “xerohydric calcareous glades” for the deeply scientific; the “cedars” that give the glades and in fact Lebanon its name are actually junipers.) It’s a web of narrow and winding backroads, some with charming names only found in small towns. The fact that Chicken Road and Tater Peeler Road never made lyrical appearances in a McCartney song is truly one of the great upsets of his career. Anyway, Paul liked to take Troy’s bike out on these little two-lane blacktops. He one day found himself chugging along near what is now Cedars of Lebanon State Park, near the still-extant flea market, just where Highway 231 slopes down to the very bottom of Middle Tennessee’s Central Basin. Well, Paul wasn’t wearing a helmet. And that bike — without requisite lights — wasn’t street legal in any case. A Tennessee Highway Patrol officer flicked on the lights and sirens. The trooper, Charles Douglas, who surely was gobsmacked at his quarry, let McCartney go with a warning and then called his son Robert. Robert, coincidentally, was the manager

at Lebanon’s Hunt Honda, and sure enough, the next day Paul and Linda came in looking for a motorcycle. Wanting something he could, y’know, actually ride on the road, McCartney opted for the 124cc XR125. That wasn’t Wings’ only encounter with the police. Guitarist McCulloch, just 19, was actually arrested for reckless driving. Killen pulled strings to get him out of jail, but the charge put McCulloch’s visa status in jeopardy and nearly led to the cancellation of the Wings Over America Tour. McCartney & Co. spent their first week or two rehearsing and, among other things, getting acquainted with the Putman’s housekeeper, whose daughter told the Post’s Ken Beck that Paul liked his barbecue “charred” (even Homer nods) and that the famously vegetarian Linda gave her a recipe for carrots and turnips that she continued to make. But then, Wilson County’s most famous visitors decided it was time to see the big city, such as it was. Paul, after all, had told the Nashville Banner on his arrival: “I rather fancy the place. It’s a musical center. I’ve just heard so much about it that I wanted to see for myself.” The whole crew headed out to Opryland, naturally. Killen, for reasons he still couldn’t comprehend almost 30 years later, actually pulled up and bought tickets like a regular Joe rather than seeking freebies for the McCartneys et al. While at Opryland, the group took in the third annual Grand Masters Fiddling Contest. Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton happened to be playing a few tunes between the grand masters grandmastering, and Killen said as the group approached the two country music icons, it wasn’t long before fiddle fans recognized

Paul. But the old pro just autographed what was handed to him and moved along until Opryland security was able to corral him into a VIP area. Killen, who said it never occurred to him how crazy such a scene could be, said McCartney told him one of the enduring lessons from Beatlemania was to just keep moving. In one of those moments that seems contrived to the point that even the hackiest screenwriter wouldn’t include it in a script, that performance by Porter and Dolly was the last time they’d perform together. After a few tunes and a few snaps with Dolly and Porter (Stella looks thoroughly unimpressed by all the musical icons surrounding her), the crew stopped by Kentucky Fried Chicken — presumably Linda just had biscuits or something — and the McCartney filles wiped gravy all over the newly painted walls at Killen’s home. Killen — who honestly seemed as dumbfounded by children as he was by celebrity — decided it was time to take in the sights of Nashville, lest his walls become permanently gravy-scented. Stella, then just 3 and now, of course, a renowned fashion designer, ran headlong through the glass front door, shattering it and ending up bloody and needing a mend at the old Donelson Hospital on Lebanon Pike. Tour rehearsals were the raison d’être for the Wilson County decampment, though as the trip to Opryland and Paul’s new love for dirt bikes demonstrated, there were plenty of side trips. This wasn’t pure cenobitism. The crew met Johnny and June Cash at their place across the lake in Hendersonville. They hung out with Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed. They fell in love with The Loveless Motel, Killen telling the Scene the McCartneys visited the beloved biscuit business over and over. Paul and

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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THE OLD PRO JUST AUTOGRAPHED WHAT WAS HANDED TO HIM AND MOVED ALONG UNTIL OPRYLAND SECURITY WAS ABLE TO CORRAL HIM INTO A VIP AREA. KILLEN, WHO SAID IT NEVER OCCURRED TO HIM HOW CRAZY SUCH A SCENE COULD BE, SAID McCARTNEY TOLD HIM ONE OF THE ENDURING LESSONS FROM BEATLEMANIA WAS TO JUST KEEP MOVING. city’s inestimable sidemen. Lloyd Green played steel guitar on “Sally G,” with fiddle parts from three absolute stonecold legends: Vassar Clements, The Texas Playboys’ Johnny Gimble and the Texas Playboy himself, Bob Wills. Beyond the two best-known songs from the sessions, the most interesting story might be that of an instrumental called “Walking in the Park With Eloise,” which was released

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE GRAND OLE OPRY ARCHIVES. FOR IMAGE LICENSING REQUESTS PLEASE CONTACT OPRYPHOTOS@OPRY.COM.

“JUNIOR’S FARM” WAS the big hit that Wings recorded while in Nashville, but its B-side, “Sally G,” also did reasonably well on its own and nearly cracked Billboard’s country Top 50, something of which Paul — who had the English affection for country music that was more or less factorystandard for Brit musicians of his era — was quite proud. Unlike “Junior’s Farm,” with its nonsensical characters and odd plot, “Sally G” was fairly straightforward, explicitly setting its story in Nashville with a title character who “sang a song behind a bar” in Printers Alley. Killen insisted, including to the Scene, that Paul and Linda wrote it in his car as Killen was driving them back to Lebanon after dinner at The Captain’s Table and a few digestifs at Hugh X. Lewis Country Club. The late David “Skull” Schulman said Paul wrote it alone at a back table at Skull’s Rainbow Room after hearing one of the club’s singers belt some tunes. Her name was Diane Gaffney, and the song, Skull insisted, was originally “Diane G.” This is the version that’s most often repeated on the scores of Beatles fan sites. Killen’s and Schulman’s versions agree the song was written in one shot after a visit to the city’s famed block of vice, but even that may not be totally true. The housekeeper’s daughter — the one who let slip the unfortunate revelation about Sir Paul’s predilection for overdone pulled pork? Her name is Sally Palmer, and she told The Wilson Post’s Ken Beck that Paul laughed at the coincidence when they were introduced, because he was “writing” a song called “Sally G” (not “Diane G”). In other words, in that telling, “Sally G” was a process and not born full-sized like Athena. Paul, for his part, said later there was no singer — Sally or Diane or otherwise — who tried to woo him in Printers Alley, and the whole tale was just a product of his imagination. Wings recorded seven songs at Sound Shop studio in Nashville, and that was exactly seven more than the law allowed. Technically, recording songs (particularly, as with “Junior’s Farm” and “Sally G,” ones destined for commercial release) is work, and technically, the British subjects in the band didn’t have the necessary visas to work. In fact, Putman told Beck he tried to get Wings on an episode of Hee Haw (a show the band loved, he insisted), but there were worries a TV appearance might catch the unwanted attention of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. So the band settled for some not-exactlyclandestine but not-exactly-wholly-public recording sessions. And it was still Nashville, which meant Paul had access (maybe whether he wanted it or not) to the

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE GRAND OLE OPRY ARCHIVES. FOR IMAGE LICENSING REQUESTS PLEASE CONTACT OPRYPHOTOS@OPRY.COM.

Linda loved taking the girls to drive-ins, presumably as it was an easier way for one of the world’s most recognizable men to take his daughters to the movies and remain relatively unbothered. And Killen took Paul down to Printers Alley, still in the early ’70s a relative freefor-all rather than the stage-managed theme park version it has since become. And from Printers Alley the great mystery of the Wilson County Summer begins.

PAUL McCARTNEY ON THE GRAND OLE OPRY GROUNDS WITH HIS WIFE LINDA, ESCORTED BY POLICE.

as a single as well. Just don’t seek it in the Wings discography. The band put it out under the name The Country Hams (a nod to their Loveless fandom, perhaps), and it included the members of the band plus Chet Atkins, country piano legend Floyd Cramer and Clements. Paul played a washboard he bought at a flea market. The writing credit went to Paul’s father, Jim, who wrote the Dixieland-adjacent

instrumental stomper for his own band decades earlier. The elder McCartney was sick — he’d die in 1976 — and Atkins told Paul to cut the song as a gift. Paul actually did one better. Despite doing the arrangement and other assorted cleanup work on it, he assigned sole credit to his father. In a 1984 Playboy interview, Paul said when he told his dad, his father said “Son, I didn’t write it.” Briefly

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE BOHAN, COYOTE MCCLOUD, WMAK

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panicked that a barrage of lawsuits would be coming his way, Paul was reassured when his father explained that while the song was his idea, he didn’t write it, as in he didn’t put notes on a staff. He couldn’t annotate a tune, but then again, neither could Paul.

AMONG THE FEW observers of these recording sessions was a young up-andcoming radio man named Mike Bohan. In the nearly 50 years since, Bohan has been a fixture in Nashville broadcast media, sidekicking Gerry House for years as part of the country radio behemoth The House Foundation, among other notable accomplishments. He was inducted into the Tennessee Radio Hall of Fame in 2014. But in 1974, he was two years out of high school and working with the already legendary Coyote McCloud at WMAK-AM. Near the end of Wings’ month-and-a-half at Junior’s farm, Paul decided he’d hold a small press conference. WMAK, naturally, said they’d send McCloud, but the DJ asked Mike if he wanted to come along. When the radio men arrived, Paul and Linda were set up on Putman’s big white front porch, Paul demonstrating how well he’d embraced early-’70s Nashville in a truly remarkable white-and-red rhinestone suit and Linda having side conversations with the press who’d come out to Lebanon. Their daughters skittered about nearby. There was a little Nashville radio rivalry playing out as well, though of course the McCartneys couldn’t have known. WLAC sent Dick Downes, who had been on the air on WMAK until Scott Shannon — another Nashville radio legend — fired him and replaced him with the younger (and “cooler”) Coyote. In any event, there’s Mike Bohan — long before his famous ubiquitous beard graced his face, but with hair down to his shoulders — gripping a mic and a tape recorder, as McCloud, for reasons Bohan never figured out (and never will, as McCloud died in 2011), took pictures instead of conducting the interview as originally planned. So

Bohan — just barely in his 20s — found himself interviewing one of the most famous men on earth on a porch in Lebanon. In the retelling, he’s way too hard himself for the questions he came up with. “Really, really pathetically lame,” he says. OK, so maybe Lester Bangs wouldn’t have asked Paul McCartney what he thought about Anne Murray’s cover of “You Won’t See Me” or if the former Beatle wanted a WMAK T-shirt of his very own. But how many people have digitized versions of an old tape recording of themselves interviewing a bedazzled former Beatle on a Wilson County front porch? Not Bangs. (It was local press only.) After the mini-gaggle broke up, Wings went back to the studio to finish mastering their septet of tunes. Emboldened by McCartney’s graciousness from earlier in the day, Bohan decided to swing by Sound Shop. Linda came out to the lobby for a chat (and a smoke from a joint large enough Bohan remembers it 48 years later), and Bohan could hear the strains of Wings’ output wafting down the hall. He followed the music and peeked through a door to see Paul and the engineer working out the final bits and pieces. A nod from Paul — Bohan read it as “dismissing” — and Bohan slipped away. Paul and the band left Nashville July 18, as agreed. He begged Putman to let him stay just a few more days, but the Putmans were ready for Junior’s Farm to be theirs again. Paul had his new dirt bike shipped back to New York and wrote “Quite a pad!” in a thank-you note to the Putmans. And all of Curly’s worry about what a handful of rock ’n’ rollers might do to his beloved farmhouse was, of course, misplaced. Kind of. Ultimately, a few of the upstairs bedrooms did need some repainting. Stella — already a budding artist, and already having covered Killen’s walls with KFC gravy and broken his door — had drawn on the walls in crayon. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Media & Politics

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CRITICS’ PICKS O F

T H I N G S

T O

D O

organization was able to put together such a timely documentary, covering the protests around the leak of the draft Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson, weeks before it was ultimately decided in June. But even before that, the organization weathered attacks — including having its Knoxville clinic destroyed by arson. Even with the abortion ban deeply enshrined in the law for Tennessee, it’s encouraging to see people still willing to fight for bodily autonomy. Standing Strong is an original documentary chronicling the fight for abortion rights in Tennessee and Mississippi, and it screens on Thursday at the Belcourt. A local look at the movement, along with a Q&A session with local Planned Parenthood staff members, is sure to shed some light on how we got here. 7 p.m. at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

COMEDY

HANNAH HERNER

AUG. 4-7 Zanies

[SWEET BABY JAMES]

TWO-PART JAMES TURRELL TOUR

The Frist’s Light, Space, Surface exhibition is one of Nashville’s most comprehensive contemporary art shows in recent history, and it gives locals the rare opportunity to match all that great art with something special of their own. James Turrell is arguably the most important artist from the Light and Space movement, and his work features prominently in Light, Space, Surface. He also has a piece on permanent exhibition at Cheekwood. “Blue Pesher” is one of Turrell’s early Skyspace works, and it’s relatively clandestine on the historic estate’s private sculpture garden trail. On Thursday, you can join a tour of the Frist’s

exhibition, then proceed to Cheekwood for a sunset tour of “Blue Pesher” with an elevated context. The event coincides with Cheekwood’s Thursday Night Out programming, so you can stick around for atmospheric pop R&B from Isaia Huron. I can’t imagine a better date night. 5-8 p.m. at the Frist, 919 Broadway, and Cheekwood, 1200 Forrest Park Drive LAURA HUTSON HUNTER FILM

ART

THURSDAY / 8.04

[THAT’S THE PLAN]

STANDING STRONG

Providing health care — including abortions — was the day-to-day work of Planned Parenthood before Roe v. Wade was overturned. The striking thing about Planned Parenthood’s response is that the nonprofit wasn’t surprised to see this legislative action. Perhaps that’s why the

CRAIG ROBINSON

Craig Robinson — whose extensive résumé includes scene-stealing roles in ensemble comedies like The Office, Pineapple Express and Hot Tub Time Machine — has the rare ability to make almost anything funny with his deadpan, fourth-wall-breaking delivery. It was alarming, then, to see a recent Instagram video of him being completely raw about an active shooter that displaced him from the North Carolina comedy club where he was just about to perform. “It was a moment for sure,” he said. For those of you familiar with Robinson’s stand-up, it likely won’t surprise you that his mother was a music teacher, and that he himself was a music teacher before he broke into comedy. Look for him to sprinkle his musical talents into his sets at these Music City shows — he’s known to perform while seated at a keyboard, towel tossed over his shoulder, all sly smolder and mock sincerity. Aug. 4-7 at Zanies, 2025 Eighth Ave. S. LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

FRIDAY / 8.05 MUSIC

CRAIG ROBINSON

[THROW THE TOWEL]

the satisfying and carefree feeling of riding your bike so fast that the trees, houses and people are nothing but blazing streaks of color. If your summer has been feeling extra heavy — and hasn’t everyone’s? — head to The East Room and let Spaceface’s glittery grooves chase your blues away. 8 p.m. at The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave. MEGAN SELING

MUSIC

R O U N D U P

[HELLO BELLOWS]

BELLOWS

Bellows’ Oliver Kalb makes little secret of his influences on his latest, Next of Kin. He borrows wholesale the intimate double-tracked vocal approach favored by Elliott Smith during his too-short time on earth and imbues his arrangements with folk instruments and gospel-like harmonies in a Sufjan Stevens-like way. But there’s a perceptible sense of joy to the 14-song collection — the NYC songsmith and producer’s fifth in total, but first to feature a full band — that elevates Bellows above

BELLOWS

garden-variety singer-songwriter homage. Of particular note is “Biggest Deposit of White Quartz,” a joyously unpredictable long-form meditation on past tour experiences that finds Kalb & Co. at their most dynamic and reflective. Richmond, Va.’s Addy will appear in support. 8 p.m. at Drkmttr, 1111 Dickerson Pike CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

[WATCH THIS SPACEFACE]

SPACEFACE

According to The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a website and a book in which creator John Koenig uses the history of language to concoct new words for emotions that aren’t yet defined by words, “anemoia” means “nostalgia for a time you’ve never known.” It’s a fitting title for Spaceface’s latest full-length, a collection of songs that are at once familiar and entirely otherworldly. The Memphisbased band, featuring former Flaming Lips band member Jake Ingalls, paints vivid compositions that are lush with psychflavored feel-good odds and ends culled from pop, funk, rock, dance, ambient and more. Songs like “Happens All the Time” and the single “Millions & Memes” sound like sherbet-colored childhood memories —

FILM

W E E K L Y

[KILLER MOVES]

MIDNIGHT MOVIES: STAGE FRIGHT & SLUMBER PARTY MASSACRE II

This weekend, the Belcourt will be playing midnight screenings of not one, but two musical slasher flicks from 1987 — both featuring dance numbers, loose feathers, and someone at some point being set on fire. It starts on Friday with Stage Fright, the debut feature from Italian giallo director Michele Soavi (Cemetery Man), in which an escaped mental patient dons an owl head and wreaks bloody havoc on a theater production during one dark, stormy night. It’s certainly a more gruesome, suspenseful ride than Slumber Party Massacre II, the campy, cringey follow-up to its 1982 predecessor. In what has to be the looniest allegory for a young girl’s sexual awakening

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Nashville’s ONLY vinyl record store with full bar and 24 seasonal craft beers on tap.

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LIVE: Airpark, Jay + Shields, Taylor Zachry 5 Lilly Hiatt In-Store, DJ Val Hoyt 6 DJ Dregs + DJ Juice 7 DJ DeFrost Sunday Afternoon Psych Set 8 Vinyl Bingo: Get Lucky w/ DJ Cream Jeans 10 LIVE: Jack Silverman Quarter 11 LIVE: Paul Burch & WPA Ballclub

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FLUMMOX

UPCOMING EVENTS 6:30PM

MUSIC

PARNASSUSBOOKS.NET/EVENT FOR TICKETS & UPDATES

THURSDAY, AUGUST 4

ANTHONY MARRA

with ANN PATCHETT at PARNASSUS Mercury Pictures Presents 10:30AM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6

STORYTIME with HEATHER & SHOP DOG MARLEE at PARNASSUS 6:30PM

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9

ADDISON ARMSTRONG at PARNASSUS The War Librarian 7:00PM

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9

COLSON WHITEHEAD with ADAM SERWER on ZOOM Harlem Shuffle 7:00PM

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10

MARIANNE WIGGINS on ZOOM Properties of Thirst 6:30PM

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17

ADRIA BERNARDI at PARNASSUS Benefit Street

3900 Hillsboro Pike Suite 14 | Nashville, TN 37215 (615) 953-2243 Shop online at parnassusbooks.net @parnassusbooks1 @parnassusbooks1

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@parnassusbooks Parnassus Books

Looking for the latest on art and culture in Nashville? Subscribe to Scenery, our weekly newsletter that covers visual art, theater, comedy, books, film and more. Subscribe at nashvillescene.com/subscribe

[SLEEP WHEN DEAD]

GET HAPPIER FRIDAYS FEAT. A GIANT DOG, ORNAMENT & MORE

Hopefully by now rock fans have come around to the idea that the genre is far from “dead.” One of rock ’n’ roll’s most ferocious bands is Austin, Texas’ A Giant Dog, whose raw energy, snarling riffage and heartfelt songs are liable to turn any local morgue into a dance party. They’ve lain low for a little bit, what with the pandemic as well as singer Sabrina Ellis and singer-guitarist Andrew Cashen also working on their other project, Sweet Spirit. They’re back on the road as revered indie label Merge is reissuing their first two albums — 2012’s Fight and 2013’s Bone — and putting them on vinyl for the first time. They’ll stop in Nashville at The Basement’s weekly outdoor free show Get Happier Fridays, with a stacked collection of local folks in support: Get there in a timely fashion and stick around for Future Crib, Ornament and BCKHND. 6 p.m. at The Basement, 1604 Eighth Ave. S. STEPHEN TRAGESER

SATURDAY / 8.06 [YOU GUYS WAIL]

WAILIN STORMS

If my vinyl collection were big enough to include a dedicated Southern Gothic hard-rock section, I might be inclined to file Wailin Storms in there somewhere near my All Them Witches, My Morning Jacket and Pallbearer records. The South Texas foursome, now residing in North Carolina’s

MUSIC

Arts and Culture News From the Nashville Scene

Research Triangle, has existed since 2012. The Silver Snake Unfolds, Storms’ justreleased beast of a fourth LP, is a bracing, high-decibel amalgam of confrontational noise-punk, pained doom metal howls and haunting cinematic soundscapes sure to speak to fans of The Birthday Party, Eyehategod and/or Earth. Show up early for always-on-point Tape Deck Mountain, whose 2021 LP True Deceiver was riff-tastic grunge-gaze par excellence. Black Moon Mother and Maiden Mother Crone complete the four-band bill. 8 p.m. at Drkmttr, 1111 Dickerson Pike CHARLIE ZAILLIAN [OH SO LONESOME FOR YOU]

THREE COLORS: BLUE

The Belcourt is going trilogy-crazy this month, screening several classic threepart sagas. They kicked things off last week with the original Star Wars trilogy. Soon, we will get Sergio Leone’s iconic Man With No Name trilogy and the Lord of the Rings trilogy at the end of the month. But the one set of films I’m most psyched about is Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colors trilogy from 1993 and 1994, which will be shown (in a brand-spanking-new 4K restoration!) for the next few weekends. Call me a snobby asshole, but as someone who binged these films back in college in order to get better acquainted with world cinema, the final work Kieślowski did before he retired (and died just a couple of years later in 1996) struck a chord with me. The first one out the gate — with Juliette Binoche as a woman who goes on a liberating personal journey after the accidental deaths of her husband and child — truly and thematically matches the color of its title. Aug. 6-7 at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave. CRAIG D. LINDSEY MUSIC

for independent people

SCENERY

ever put on film, 1980s-’90s sitcom star Crystal Bernard, Playboy Playmate Kimberly McArthur and a bunch of other young, horny dipshits get hunted down by an Andrew Dice Clay-looking killer with a combination guitar/power drill. (Told ya this shit was loony.) Stage Fright Aug. 5 & Slumber Party Massacre II Aug. 6 at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave. CRAIG D. LINDSEY

MUSIC

an independent bookstore

[SIMMERIN’]

FLUMMOX 10TH ANNIVERSARY

Flummox’s heavy yet nimble sound is a veritable stew of prog, metal, jazz and dramatic vocal pop that’s been on the burner for a decade. All that cooking time

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Live at the Schermerhorn THE

ROBERT CRAY BAND

Opening Act: Jeff LeBlanc

August 16

Presented without the Nashville Symphony.

coming soon GRAND FUNK RAILROAD

THIS FRIDAY • August 5*

CHRISTOPHER CROSS: 40TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR August 11*

TERRY FATOR September 2*

BONEY JAMES September 18*

HOLST'S THE PLANETS

September 29 to October 2

GO NOW! THE MUSIC OF THE MOODY BLUES October 7

August 26

LITTLE RIVER BAND Presented without the Nashville Symphony.

GHOSTBUSTERS IN CONCERT October 14 to 16

*Presented without the Nashville Symphony.

EXPLORE OUR CONCERT CALENDAR AND BUY TICKETS

WITH SUPPORT FROM

| AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE NashvilleSymphony.org/Tickets | nashvillescene.com 615.687.6400

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CRITICS’ PICKS

SEPTEMBER 21 CONCERT FOR CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES

AND SPECIAL GUESTS THE KENTUCKY HEADHUNTERS

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM NOVEMBER 17

YELAWOLF & SHOOTER JENNINGS INTRODUCE

SOMETIMES Y

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM NOVEMBER 25, 26 & 27

BRETT ELDREDGE GLOW LIVE TOUR

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM DECEMBER 9

ALLMAN FAMILY REVIVAL ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM DECEMBER 22

MUSIC CITY CHORUS CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION

[LIVE WIRES]

JONATHAN WIRES QUARTET

Since relocating to the Nashville area in 2011, bassist Jonathan Wires has made an impressive mark in local recording and academic circles. He earned a master’s degree in jazz studies from MTSU, and subsequently became an instructor both there and at Nashville State. As a bandleader he heads a quartet, and has recently recorded a strong LP for Jeff Coffin’s Ear Up label, which had him working with several top Music City jazz artists. Wires will bring his quartet to Rudy’s as the Saturday night late headliner. 11 p.m. at Rudy’s Jazz Club, 809 Gleaves St. RON WYNN

SUNDAY / 8.07 [ENAMORADO]

PEPE AGUILAR

Award-winning Mexican American icon Pepe Aguilar is the son of performers Antonio Aguilar and Flor Silvestre, who are both considered legends in Mexican culture for their contributions to spreading Mexican cinema and music across the world. For his Jaripeo Sin Fronteras tour, Aguilar will be joined by his children Leonardo and Ángela, who have also made names for themselves as singers — the Aguilar family boasts multiple generations of musical talent. Groups Banda Azul Tequila and Mariachi Zacatecano will be in the lineup for this massive bill. Even if

you’re not familiar with regional Mexican music, you’ll find something to love here. 8 p.m. at Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway CLAUDIA VILLEDA

COMEDY

MONDAY / 8.08 [LAUGHING THROUGH THE TEARS]

MARIA BAMFORD

Into each life, some Maria Bamford must fall. Maybe you know Bamford from her Netflix original series Lady Dynamite. Maybe you know her as the Target lady from those holiday commercials that aired a few years ago. Maybe you recognize her voice from Big Mouth or BoJack Horseman. Maybe, like me, you were riveted by her 2007 web series The Maria Bamford Show, in which she plays herself, her mother, her father and her sisters. If you’re someone who uses humor to explore the dark recesses of your brain, Bamford is likely your comedy queen. Bamford’s comedy is imaginative, personal and relatable. On Monday and Tuesday, Bamford will return to Nashville to fill our hearts with comedy, our ears with vocal inflections, and our thoughts with, “I wonder if I can pull off clogs?” 7 p.m. Aug. 8-9 at Zanies, 2025 Eighth Ave. S. KIM BALDWIN

TUESDAY / 8.09 MUSIC

WITH JOSEPH

MUSIC

THE SHINS

MUSIC

AUGUST 17

has done a world of good, as they’ve gotten progressively better and more ingenious (which is, y’know, what you hope for when you keep playing for a long time). In March, they released the delightfully odd, delightfully loud Rephlummoxed, an album featuring songs they’d written over many years that they finally felt ready to tackle. They’ll mark their 10th anniversary at Exit/In on Saturday, with a host of theatrically inclined pals, including Nashville rockers Fable Cry, self-described “haunted cabaret Atlanta rock ’n’ roll” ensemble Sarah and the Safe Word, and Music City’s own chaotic-evil punks Medusa’s Hairdresser, who ride the line between hardcore and various shades of black metal. 7 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place STEPHEN TRAGESER

[THE GRAY MAN]

DAVID GRAY

David Gray’s 1998 album White Ladder was a landmark moment in the British singer-songwriter’s career, producing hits like “This Year’s Love,” “Sail Away” and, of course, “Babylon,” the latter perhaps the biggest song of Gray’s multi-decade career. He’ll celebrate the 20th anniversary of White Ladder at Ascend on Tuesday with a career-spanning set that’s sure to please die-hard fans and newcomers alike. (If you’re doing the math at home, that 20th anniversary technically celebrates ATO Records’ 2000 rerelease of the album, with the tour originally slated for 2020 prior to the outbreak of the COVID pandemic.) The first 40 minutes of the show will feature some of Gray’s greatest hits before a 20-minute intermission leads into a performance of White Ladder in its entirety.

MARIA BAMFORD

ON SALE SATURDAY AT 10 AM

FEBRUARY 17, 2023

CORY WONG

FEATURING VICTOR WOOTEN ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

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NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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B E A P O E T. B E A N E W WO R L D .

Sing Me Back Home: Folk Roots to the Present EXHIBIT NOW OPEN

DOWNTOWN MKTG_BeHere_SceneAd_Ephemera.indd 3

VISIT TODAY

CountryMusicHallofFame.org

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12/17/21 3:40 PM


CRITICS’ PICKS

August in... 8/04 – thursday

21+

8/05 – friday

TICKET

8/06 – saturday

TICKET

DJ CORN DISCOVERY NITE baby: playing PUNK, HIP-HOP & MORE DJs JOHN STAMPS & AFROSHEEN

RILEY PARKER, MELAINA KOL, MORGAN

GAMES NIGHT

21+

8/12 – friday

ABBA DISCO

FUTURE CRIB, BABE CLUB, JO SCHORNIKOW

MARIO KART, CHESS, CARDS, & MORE!

with DJ LIZA ANNE

8/13 – saturday

8/14 – sunday

8/18 – thursday

8/20 – saturday

8/22 – monday

RICH RUTH

ALBUM RELEASE

with SPENCER CULLUM & BLEARY

8/19 – friday

ALBUM RELEASE

SEAN THOMPSON

with ANNIE WILLIAMS 8/25 – thursday

21+

MUSIC TRIVIA NIGHT

with BEN BLACKWELL

TICKET

in support of Abortion Care of Tennessee

COMEDY NIGHT with CHLOE STILLWELL

LA WITCH with CHROME PONY

21+

ALBUM RELEASE

WOMBO & DUMMY HOOVERIII with SHADOW SHOW & PETITE AMIE with SNOOPER 8/26 – friday

JAZZ NIGHT

with THE GREASY NEALE

21+

8/27 – saturday

LIKE YOU MEAN IT RECORDS SHOWCASE

8/31 – wednesday

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE WORLD TOUR 8 p.m. at Ascend Amphitheater, 310 First Ave. S. BRITTNEY MCKENNA

creature feature film night

Legend of the Stardust Brothers

OPEN WEEKLY Thursday through Saturday 623 7TH AVE S. NASHVILLE, TENN.

[BOOTS DOWN]

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE WORLD TOUR

It’s hard to argue that there’s anyone who has done more to drag drag into the mainstream than RuPaul. From the moment Ru debuted on the New York club scene, it was obvious to anyone paying attention that this was a sashaying, shantaying superstar on the rise. Ru first hit the small screen leading the Soul Train moment in The B-52s’ 1989 video for “Love Shack” and released an album of his own in 1993, which included the classic “Supermodel (You Better Work).” Post-Reagan America was embracing fabulousness and Ru was ready to hug out silly Puritanism. As the host of RuPaul’s Drag Race, he’s won 11 Emmys — the most of any person of color in television history — and further solidified drag’s place in the zeitgeist. Drag — despite being unassailably awesome — is now engaged in what has to be the stupidest culture war of all time. (And that’s saying something, given that culture wars are, in general, pretty dumb and that men dressing as women has been

part of pretty much every culture since Euripides had Dionysus glam up Pentheus in Bacchae.) But the Queen of Queens will not be dragged (sorry) down to the level of the shrillest, most lugubrious doofuses on earth (many of whom are running for Congress!). The road show of Drag Race hits the Ryman on Tuesday. Kameron Michaels, Rose, Vanessa Vanjie, Yvie Oddly and Season 14 finalists Angeria Paris VanMichaels, Bosco, Daya Betty, Lady Camden and Willow Pill are scheduled to appear. (Nashville’s own Jorgeous finished sixth, just outside the final group, but don’t rule out any surprises.) 7:30 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. J.R. LIND THEATER

BMI SHOWCASE

8/11 – thursday

DRAG

8/10 – wednesday

[A TRUE AMERICAN CLASSIC]

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

It’s been more than 60 years since Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird was first published, but this Pulitzer Prizewinning novel remains as potent — and relevant — as ever. Starting Tuesday, you can experience the American classic in a whole new way, as Broadway’s historymaking production arrives at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s Jackson Hall.

TO KILL A MOCKBIRD

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NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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9pm Taxiway, Rosebud & Shrieking Violet 9pm Status Foe, The Dangerous Method & Year of October 9pm JD Wilkes, Mary Rodgers, Jeff Moon, Josephine Michener

8/4 8/5 8/6

3pm Springwater Sit In Jam

9pm The Hungry & Dangerous, Sleep Nation, Sideline Heroes, Underworld Skum & Hex Automata

8/7

8/10

5pm Writers @ the Water Open Mic

9pm Kristan Mikala, Elaine Cole & Forest Romm

DOWNTOWN

Saturday, August 6

Saturday, August 20

SONGWRITER SESSION

HATCH SHOW PRINT

Ronnie Bowman

Block Party

NOON · FORD THEATER

10:00 am · 12:30 pm · 3:30 pm

Saturday, August 6

HATCH SHOW PRINT SHOP

HATCH SHOW PRINT

Saturday, August 20

Block Party

SONGWRITER SESSION

3:30 pm · HATCH SHOW PRINT SHOP Sunday, August 7 MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

Kent Blazy and Cory Batten NOON · FORD THEATER

Justin Moses

Sunday, August 21

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

Saturday, August 13

Charlie Worsham

SONGWRITER SESSION

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Wade Bowen

Saturday, August 27

NOON · FORD THEATER

SONGWRITER SESSION

Sunday, August 14

Adam Hambrick

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

NOON · FORD THEATER

Megan Lynch Chowning 1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Check our calendar for a full schedule of upcoming programs and events.

Museum Membership Museum members receive unlimited Museum admission, concert ticket pre-sale opportunities, and much more. JOIN TODAY: CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Membership

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Your dish should be delicious and artistic and feature the tomato prominently in its flavor profile. It can be sweet or savory and points will be weighted for how the dish incorporates art or its artistic flair— whether beautifully plated and presented, or the dish made to appear like a piece of art itself, AND, of course, how delicious it is.

Reist by Auus 10!

tomatoartfest.com/events/recipecontest 28

KENDELL MARVEL W/ASHLEY McBRYDE, LAINEY WILSON & MORE

WEDNESDAY / 8.10 [LIBRARY MUSIC]

QUIET ENTERTAINER 15TH ANNIVERSARY

Greg Freeman, better known as DJ and producer Quiet Entertainer, is a

[GET LIT]

AUTHOR EVENT WITH COLSON WHITEHEAD

Without the airy splendor of Davis-Kidd Booksellers (RIP) or the one-click savings

PHOTO: H.N. JAMES

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[MARVEL UNIVERSE]

Country singer-songwriter Kendell Marvel brings his beloved Honky Tonk Experience to Exit/In on Tuesday, and along with it a stellar lineup of special guests — Ashley McBryde, Lainey Wilson, Brent Cobb and Everette. With that kind of lineup, there are sure to be some exciting, possibly unorthodox collaborations, as well as opportunities for guest artists to show off their own material. And Marvel, whose most recent release is 2019’s acclaimed Solid Gold Sounds, has a new album, Come on Sunshine, due out Sept. 23, so keep an ear out for new tunes like the recent single “Put It in the Plate.” Singer-songwriter Brit Taylor will open the show. 8 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place BRITTNEY MCKENNA BOOKS

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highly decorated writer) Ann Patchett. Whitehead’s crisp and animated fiction has earned him a rare two-Pulitzer streak, winning for The Underground Railroad in 2017 and The Nickel Boys in 2020. His latest, Harlem Shuffle, follows entrepreneur Ray Carney through the Black, white and gray economies of midcentury New York City. Whitehead’s drama navigates race and class in the tenements of post-Harlem Renaissance Upper Manhattan, showing off his singular ability to blend deep historical research with a penchant for reconstituting the inner worlds of Black characters living in white America. Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic and fellow literati VIP, will join Whitehead in discussion. Read the book first. 7 p.m. via Parnassus Books ELI MOTYCKA

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Academy Award winner Aaron Sorkin offers a decidedly fresh approach to the beloved tale, which follows small-town lawyer Atticus Finch, as he defends a Black man falsely accused of raping a white woman in 1930s Alabama. Directed by Tony Award winner Barlett Sher, the touring cast includes stage and screen veteran Richard Thomas as Atticus Finch, along with Melanie Moore as his precocious daughter Scout. And adding interest is the fact that Mary Badham — who earned an Oscar nod for her portrayal of Scout in the 1962 film version — has joined the national tour, this time playing the Finches’ nasty neighbor, Mrs. Dubose. Aug. 9-14 at TPAC’s Jackson Hall, 505 Deaderick St. AMY STUMPFL

QUIET ENTERTAINER

of Amazon, deep in the heart of Green Hills, it can be easy to lose sight of what makes Parnassus Books such a critical outpost for Nashville’s readers. This week’s virtual event with Colson Whitehead is a reminder that Parnassus is more than a vendor — it is the city’s toehold on the national literary zeitgeist, thanks to the still-bright star of co-owner (and fellow

Nashville institution. He started making vibey instrumental hip-hop and ambient electronic music his own way — you might say “thoughtfully,” or even “quietly” — long before the local rap scene was getting national attention. To celebrate 15 years of keeping the beat in Music City, he’s carrying on his tradition of throwing a show around the time of his birthday, and all of us are invited to the gig on Wednesday. He’ll be joined by lots of friends, including big-bearded rhymesmith Spoken Nerd. In addition to his own projects, Spoken Nerd recently helped complete and release the late kidDEAD’s posthumous album The Man Who Lived Forever. Piano-rooted pop ’n’ rocker Chip Greene, alt-prog ensemble Spy Machine and rapper James Fate will all be there as well, helping Freeman start off his next 15-year run in style. 9 p.m. at The 5 Spot, 1006 Forrest Ave. STEPHEN TRAGESER

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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FOOD AND DRINK

LOST IN THE SAUCE A roundup of some of Nashville’s best hot sauces BY KELSEY BEYELER

H

ot chicken ain’t the only spicy game in town. Nashville is brimming with adventurous foodies, and some of them make hot sauce. Here we round up five of our favorites. There are options scattered across farmers markets, local shops and online stores, so check each maker’s website to find out where to snag them. Though most producers offer a variety of sauces — from green in color to tamarind in flavor — everyone’s got some kind of red sauce, so that’s where the Scene started.

MY SAUCE LAB — PANDEMONIUM ($9) mysaucelab.com

BLISTER — ORIGINAL ($7.99) blisterhotsauce.com

Blister has three flavors — Original, Carolina Weeper and a green sauce called Jalapeño Business. All feature smoked peppers, and the original sauce certainly smells and tastes very smoky. At first it hits like a typical hot sauce, though it finishes with the suggestion of a barbecue sauce — but don’t mistake it for a spicy barbecue sauce. Featured peppers in this flavor include red jalapeños, habaneros and Anaheims. The flavors are deep and complex, and while it’s spicy enough to warrant caution, it doesn’t overwhelm. I appreciate the rubber stopper on the bottle. It’s an important feature that prevents accidental overpouring, which

is crucial for sauces that are too spicy to drown your food in and too precious to waste. Blister comes from brothers Jeremy, Richie and Jonathan Lister, and you can check their website to see which stores across town sell their sauces.

TUCKER’S PEPPER CO. — THE CHUPACABRA ($7) tuckerspeppers.com

When it comes to Tucker’s Pepper Co., a little goes a long way. The Scene opted for Tucker’s Chupacabra flavor — which proved to be the spiciest of this roundup. The Chupacabra features red bell and ghost peppers (hence the kick) along with a handful of other ingredients that ground the heat to a solid flavor. It’s bright and well-balanced, but the peppers are the stars here. The peppers come from Tucker’s Mt. Juliet farm, which focuses on the quality of its produce and displays them through a variety of sauces, nuts, powders and rubs. You can find many of these offerings via the website, or at the farmers markets where they often pop up. Be careful with your pours — this sauce will carry you through many dishes if you use it wisely.

HOT SAUCE NASHVILLE — HOT GARLIC ($10) hotsaucenashville.com

Hot Sauce Nashville may be the most recognizable of this bunch. In fact, spotting

HSN’s bottles across town is what inspired this article. The company is owned and operated by a local couple, and offerings include Hot Ginger, Hot Green, Hot Tropic and Hot Garlic. Garlic is the company’s flagship flavor, so that’s where the Scene started. If you’re not a huge fan of garlic-based hot sauces, start elsewhere. But if you’re a garlic person, you’ll love this sauce. Garlic definitely dominates the sauce’s flavor, but the spiciness of the peppers (bell, jalapeño and habanero) and a touch of sweetness make for a good balance. According to the company’s website, a portion of proceeds from each bottle is donated to Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.

NASHVILLE HEAT — SWEET SMOKED CHIPOTLE ($6.95) nashvilleheatsauces.com

The title says it all with this one. Aged red chipotle is the only kind of pepper featured in this sauce, and it dominates the flavor profile. But there’s also a significant, vinegary follow-up that kicks in once the blast of smokiness subsides. Nashville Heat’s Sweet Smoked Chipotle is the least spicy of this bunch, but it gets bonus points for having a rubber stopper on the bottle. Other flavors from the company include Jalapeño, Garlic Habanero and Two Pepper. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

My Sauce Lab is the passion project of Vasisht Ramasubramanian, Praveen Pedankar and Arjun Meherish. According to their website, they created the shop “out of deprivation of flavor, and frustration from high prices.” Among the six offerings on the website are sauces like Green Goodness, a

tamarind sauce called Imlee, and El Fuego, which they dub “the new sriracha sauce.” The Scene decided to go with Pandemonium — a bright, vinegar-forward concoction that features interesting ingredients like Champagne vinegar and elderflower syrup. With a relatively standard base of habanero, jalapeño and bell peppers, it’s got good heat but isn’t overwhelming. This one could pair well with many different foods. The texture is thin and smooth. You can find these bottles at Serendipity on 12th Avenue South, or order them on the company website or via Amazon and eBay.

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NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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PHOTOS: DANIEL MEIGS

FOOD AND DRINK

Booze Hound

Cocktails You Should Be Drinking

Ginjo-ka at Rice Vice Proper Saké Co.’s new East Side location offers an impressive list of sakes — and a refreshing summer cocktail BY D. PATRICK RODGERS

H

idden away at the eastern edge of the East Side neighborhood known as Talbot’s Corner, Proper Saké Co. owner Byron Stithem’s brand-new Rice Vice is a vibey, low-key oasis. It’s nestled in among the myriad industrial spaces on Ambrose Avenue. Seek it out. Nashville’s only sake distillery, Proper Saké began brewing the fermented rice drink in a location near downtown in 2017. That spot is closed now, but with Rice Vice, Stithem & Co. continue to brew a number of sakes on site. You’ll find those on the Rice Vice RICE VICE menu, along with an eclectic and well-curated selection of Japanese sakes you’re 3109 AMBROSE AVE. not likely to see elsewhere. Aficionados will absolutely want to sample everything PROPERSAKE.CO Stithem has on the house-made and Japanese-import menus. In addition to a menu of small bites and a list of takeaway sake bottles, Rice Vice also offers a rotating selection of highballs. One they’re likely to leave on the menu for a stretch is the Ginjo-ka, which makes for an incredibly refreshing summer-evening cocktail. Made with cantaloupe tepache, ginjo sake and lime, the Ginjo-ka is a light, bubbly, citrusy offering that goes down very smoothly. Almost too smoothly. Dangerously smoothly. It’s good for the experienced sake drinker and the newcomer alike. Rice Vice is a cozy and well-appointed space, open Wednesday through Sunday. Most nights you’re liable to find Stithem and a bartender on staff, spinning vinyl and chopping it up with customers about Japanese culture and the ins and outs of sake brewing. Dip in and join them. You’ll be glad you did.

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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ON THE MAGNETIZING TERROR OF SKYDIVING I responded to trauma by jumping out of a plane BY HAILEY HIGDON

Vodka Yonic features a rotating cast of women and nonbinary writers from around the world sharing stories that are alternately humorous, sobering, intellectual, erotic, religious or painfully personal. You never know what you’ll find in this column, but we hope this potent mix of stories encourages conversation.

W

hen I was 24 years old, I jumped out of an airplane. It wasn’t my idea. I had accepted a grant to study in South Africa, and when the grant money ran out, I met up with an old friend. Instead of taking me on a tour of the South African beaches, he nervously locked me in his house and tried to sleep with me. I stayed up those nights with my eyelids locked open — my arms protecting my body and deflecting his reaches. On the third day, I forced an escape. I left terrified. Naturally, when I got back to the U.S., I promptly dropped out of graduate school and started working at a no-stress job in retail. It had been a summer of hell. When my work buddies asked me to go skydiving, I immediately refused. After lots of coaxing, I agreed to go along “just to support.” It was one of those bright blue Wisconsin summer days. One by one, my co-workers ferried up in a tiny six-seat airplane and then floated to the ground, flushed and exhilarated. Eventually, a woman handed me a clipboard with a waiver to sign. I skimmed through the pages. The gist of it: “You can’t sue anyone if your parachute doesn’t work.” They took me and my boss, who would jump with me, through a brief training, and because I didn’t believe I would actually jump, I didn’t really listen. I picked my music from a karaoke binder. I went for thrills — the themes to Rocky and Magnum, P.I. After returning from South Africa, I put myself in all sorts of danger with a blind belief that nothing could hurt me. My safe landing after being abducted had left me feeling virtually invincible. Years later, after working with therapists, I started to understand my behavior as an artifact of trauma. For me, being terrified was magnetizing. I signed the waiver to jump because I couldn’t do otherwise. I climbed into that tiny airplane, and away we went to the soundtrack of Rocky Balboa’s triumphant ascent up the steps to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Below, farmlands cut in geometric patterns — crop circles, squared-out plots, lines and rows. At this point, the video from that day awkwardly cuts to a close-up as I make my way to the door. I am stark pale, gape-mouthed, wide-eyed and terrified. The woman who is filming is bubbling over. “Are you so excited?” she asks. I try to answer her question, but instead

I SOUGHT OUT FEAR-INDUCING SITUATIONS, AND THEN BAREKNUCKLED THROUGH THEM WITH MY HEART POUNDING, VISUALIZING HOW THEY’D END ME. produce an open-mouthed attempt to swallow, which, if you try it out, just looks like gagging. Then my boss, who is strapped to my back, launches my foot onto the plank. Against all the resistance I can muster, he pushes our shoulders into the open air. For a lot of my adult life, I’ve been plagued by what my therapist calls “intrusive thoughts.” They are graphic depictions of my own death. I see the smack of my body on the ground. These thoughts, along with my appetite for risk, started after that summer in South Africa. I sought out fearinducing situations, and then bare-knuckled through them with my heart pounding, visualizing how they’d end me. The woman filming us jumped too, capturing our descent on a camera strapped to her helmet. In the video, I can see how much force is needed to pull my arms open so I can actually float. They are crossed over my heart in an X, just like they were as I stayed up that night trying to protect my body. Then the Magnum, P.I. theme comes in. Imagine high-energy shots of Tom Selleck loading a gun, a helicopter racing over a beachfront town, cars blowing up. Then Tom drives off in his red Ferrari looking like he hasn’t a care in the world. He can float between high-intensity crime fighting and being an average guy who spends his spare time teaching beautiful women to scuba dive. Once my arms are open, I start smiling. I open my eyes. By the time my boss pulls the rip cord, I want to stay there forever, floating toward farms and yellow fields. Since then, I’ve found a lot of excuses to casually let people know I hurled my body from a moving airplane. It has been almost 20 years since those nights in South Africa, and I still have lots of moments when I clench up, especially when I travel. But sometimes, when I step into an airplane, I remember the lightness of that descent. Once in the air, I gaze down at the mountains, farms and cities. Who lives there, and what would it be like to drive my red Ferrari on those roads? EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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hether it’s through her work as a theater artist or as a public health professional, Cynthia C. Harris has always recognized the power of THE CALLING IS IN THE BODY storytelling. AUG. 5-13 AT THE “As a child, I DARKHORSE THEATER; grew up listening TICKETS AT to women share ACTORSBRIDGE.ORG. their stories in my mother’s beauty shop,” the Nashville native says. “Even then, I think I understood that it wasn’t necessarily about the details of the story itself — it was the power of being in community together, of recognizing ourselves somewhere in the story.” Harris hopes audiences will find that moment of recognition with The Calling Is in the Body, which premieres this weekend at Actors Bridge Ensemble. Billed as a choreopoem, this new work tells the story of one of Harris’ own mentors — Deidre Williams, a vibrant young Black woman who was an early advocate for people with HIV/AIDS in 1990s Nashville. “Deidre was an incredible human being,” says Harris, who received a Rural Performance/Production Lab fellowship

*

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BY AMY STUMPFL

bigger, rounder, older. That can really change your sense of self, right? And yet all the things that were true about us before, are still true now. “In talking to people about Deidre, so many spoke of her joy, her energy and the way she was able to encourage and support others, even when she was sick,” Harris continues. “How did she do that? How does anyone make peace and learn to just be in their body, while acknowledging that they still deserve — and can create — goodness?” Harris says she is delighted to explore such questions with the cast of The Calling Is in the Body, including Teacora Sherrill, Destinee Monét Johnson, Nicole Mason, Rachel Agee and Lisa Yolanda Treece. “We have an incredibly talented cast — a few returning to the stage after years away and some recent graduates,” Harris says. “I like my cast to reflect a diversity of bodies and hair textures. I like my heroes to be young and older. We’re building something really beautiful, and these are the only humans for the job.” Likewise, Harris says Actors Bridge — under the leadership of producing artistic director Vali Forrister — is uniquely positioned to bring The Calling Is in the Body to life. “For me, Vali Forrister simply is Actors Bridge,” says Harris. “She’s absolutely committed to lifting up women’s voices, making space for others to grow and develop as artists. Vali’s been there to support me every step of the way in this process, and I can’t think of a better place to present this work that means so much to me.” EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

E V ENT

The Calling Is in the Body celebrates early HIV/AIDS advocate Deidre Williams

from The Mississippi Center for Cultural Production to support the development of The Calling Is in the Body. “She spoke at a Red Cross Leadership Camp that I attended during high school, and I was immediately drawn to her. She was young, ambitious and full of energy. And then she tells us that she has HIV, and our jaws hit the floor. I mean, this is the early ’90s, so there was a real stigma surrounding that whole subject. But she was so open and wise, and encouraging. I felt like she really saw me. This was in the days before social media and cellphones, and we eventually lost contact. But she had such a profound effect on my life. And as I started working on this piece, I discovered that she had a real impact on a lot of lives.” As with Harris’ other original works — including Phrases of Womanhood and How to Catch a Flying Woman — The Calling Is in the Body blends storytelling and movement, much in the style of Ntozake Shange’s groundbreaking for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf. “My aunt gave me a copy of for colored girls when I was in fifth grade, and I think I’ve always gravitated to that type of work because it provides the most freedom to explore and really express what you’re feeling.” In this case, Harris was particularly interested in exploring the idea of “how we navigate this life in our human bodies.” “I’ve always been fascinated by how we relate to our changing bodies,” she says. “It doesn’t necessarily have to be a serious illness or accident that changes the way we function or how we see ourselves. It could just be the process of aging — getting

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ART

CRAWL SPACE: AUGUST 2022

KEEP DREAMING AT ZEITGEIST

Nashville’s First Saturday happenings include new faces and old spaces BY JOE NOLAN

Keep Dreaming, one of the most anticipated art shows of the summer, opens at Zeitgeist on Saturday. Levi Morales, Abraham Lara and Sebastian Lara are Watkins alums who’ve been creating an art renaissance in South Antioch with their art, music and fashion house-party pop-ups. If you wonder where Nashville’s artists go when they’re pushed out of the real estate they made valuable in the city’s core, you probably don’t realize how weird things are getting in the suburbs. Keep Dreaming brings South Antioch to Wedgewood-Houston with a display of upcycled T-shirts, paintings, posters, animation and sculptures. Come for one of Morales’ gritty T-shirt designs, stay for the sensory overload of Abraham Lara’s glitched-out multimedia paintings. Gallery hours are noon through 6 p.m. Every year, Coop sets aside a month to show off the work of its new members, and it feels like an annual marker — a holiday or the passing of a constellation. Coop used the occasion — and the added wall space — of moving into a bigger gallery at The Packing Plant to spotlight some of its new members back in February. But that was before the creative co-op added 25 members, literally tripling their ranks in July. Many hands make light work, and this growth in membership makes Coop’s recent expansion look more than sustainable. All this news has Coop’s second new-members exhibition of the year feeling like a summer celebration as much as an art show. The obliquely titled Further Hues: New Members Show will feature work by seven of Coop’s new members — Ashleigh York, Austin Reavis, Louis Holstein, Rachel McKee, Sarah Spillers, Tree Lily Butcher and Emily Doty. Doty’s colorful abstracts are a highlight — her painterly panels and canvases read like gooey garden spaces dripping with textured tones, hues and light. The show opens on Saturday, with expanded gallery hours from 1 until 9 p.m. Bridget Bailey is a Nashville-based emerging artist who’s already created a recognizable style with her colorful sculptural installations of molding clay, push pins and even ceramics. These chromatic and cacophonous works are all about space, texture and bold pops of color, spreading over walls and spilling from ceiling to floor. Bailey’s latest works find her returning to a more painterly practice, but incorporating lots of multimedia materials in her canvases. The Moon Can Be a Diva Sometimes is an exhibition of sculptural paintings made of air-dry clay, wax, caulk, spackle, paint, paper, collage, foam, found objects and images, felt, acrylic mediums and glues. Bailey also incorporates text from poems

“APOCALYPSE,” SEBASTIAN LARA

WEDGEWOOD-HOUSTON

and songs into these works, making it a great fit for Open Gallery and The Packing Plant community of creative spaces, which also includes Free Nashville Poetry Library, Risology Club print shop, and WXNA community radio. Opens on Saturday night from 6 until 9 p.m. Andy King’s Inheritors of Chance opens Saturday at the Modfellows outpost at The Packing Plant. King’s oil paintings combine symbolic images in narrative compositions that speak to universal themes. Inheritors is King’s first solo exhibition, and the ambitious installation doubles down on its storytelling themes with a sequential layout in which each piece speaks directly to the next. Opening reception from 6 until 9 p.m.

DOWNTOWN The downtown art scene has taken a few big blows lately with the closing of The Rymer Gallery, and The Arcade being shut down for renovations and an uncertain future as a visual art destination. With that in mind, the reopening of The Browsing Room Gal-

lery at the Downtown Presbyterian Church offers a note of welcome good news. The former library space on the ground floor has expanded the church’s storied artists-inresidence program into a curatorial project. Browsing Room exhibitions have received attention in the Scene’s Best of Nashville issues and been written up in ArtForum, and Michael Dickins’ Wailing Wall installation was the only local Trump-era resistance project that transcended partisan propaganda to deliver a deeply moving work of art. The Browsing Room closed down shortly after the pandemic came to town back in March 2020. The gallery teased a comeback in December with AIRing It All Out — an exhibition of new work by the artists-in-residence. And the Browsing Room came back online for real with its June/ July showing of photographs by Gabriel McCurdy. For August, the Browsing Room hosts an exhibition of collaborative work by Downtown Presbyterian artist-in-residence Sarah Hart Landolt and the church’s pastor, Larissa Romero. The Enneagram Heart: An Artistic

Exploration of Human Fears, Desires, and Pathways to Growth and Service is a big title for a show full of big questions. Landolt’s interpretive fluid ink painting practice has produced colorful, amorphous takes on everything from emotional states to the signs of the Zodiac. Here, she and Romero create an immersive, interactive installation of paintings based on the nine personality types described by the Enneagram model of the human psyche. As an Enneagram Personality 9, I can assure you that this show is worth a trip downtown. Opening reception is Saturday night from 6 until 8 p.m.

EAST NASHVILLE The Red Arrow Gallery opened Julian Rogers’ Wave Upon Wave exhibition last month. The show of light-filled, candy-colored clouds will make a great backdrop for an improvisational musical performance by Julian and a few of his more tuneful artist friends Saturday afternoon from 3 until 6 p.m. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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The purportedly final posthumous book is Stories From the Attic, a collection of four fragments from unpublished worksin-progress and eight short stories, all of which were previously unpublished aside from “Homecoming” and “The Dream.” The book also includes four essays about Gay’s life as a writer, among them a piece about William Faulkner that first appeared as the preface in a folio edition of As I Lay Dying. In “The Ascension of Pepper Yates,” the title character is a pathetic figure, a recently appointed lawman obsessed with the profession. Yates did not have a great role model: “His father had been an itinerant preacher, travelling from town to town with his old guitar strapped to his back, preaching in the streets for pennies.” The law provided hope for Yates, and Officer Henry Garrison was his idol: “The .38 on his hip as lethal as a cancer.” Yates is married to Jeannine, who could polish off a dozen Fat Boy burgers and six Double-Colas in one sitting. The story opens with Yates posing as an officer in his Cadillac, waiting for a car with a wobbly wheel or a blackened tail light. He cons the supposed offender into seeking a repair at a local garage owned by Jess Duckbutter, and Duckbutter gives Yates a kickback. Yates also helps direct traffic at the Mule Day parade, but he is embarrassed when a woman assaults him and Garrison scolds him. This is “the nadir of Yates’ life.” When he is handed his uniform, Yates makes an immediate impact, but his ego balloons to dangerous heights. Gay’s depiction of a cop wannabe is exceptional, and the characters are memorable for their unique names — what is better

than Duckbutter? — and pitiful actions. At the center of “Nighttime Awakening” is miscreant Herschel Clay, a professional drifter. The story opens with Clay making a deal to buy a crippled Buick. He needs the wheels for an upcoming pipeline job to show the state he is a good father so he can get his daughter back. But in typical Clay fashion, he fumbles the deal. To tide himself over for a couple of days, he thinks about cleaning out some old wrecks for Itchy Mama, a bootlegger, who is always good for a pint and a few dollars. This job never comes to fruition, so he moves on to Mabel Peters’ porch, where he and Mabel, the town harlot, down a pint of whiskey. Mabel, who is Itchy’s sister, “had been a woman of awesome proportion who outweighed Clay at least a hundred pounds.” When Mabel dies, Clay begins working at the local rubber factory, but that ends quickly and tragically. That event precedes Clay’s ultimate evil act, showcasing Gay’s ability to invent one of the most despicable characters in contemporary Southern fiction. William Faulkner was one of Gay’s major influences, and he pays homage to Faulkner in “Reading the South Part II (Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying).” He leads into the piece by discussing other influences: Thomas Wolfe, Flannery O’Connor, Truman Capote and Erskine Caldwell. Gay was “a little put off” by Caldwell because the Georgia author wrote about white men mistreating African Americans and included scenes of incest in his books. Gay preferred Faulkner, who “never stoops to this,” and he appreciated Faulkner’s characters as “actual people.” Gay called As I Lay Dying “Faulkner’s most perfectly realized novel” and admired it “for the mythic sweep of the story and the sheer beauty of the language.” The Bundrens’ journey to Jefferson to bury Addie stayed with Gay throughout his career: “There is nothing contrived about this novel, and when the end comes it is inevitable and irrevocable.” As with Faulkner, there is nothing contrived in Gay’s stories. He had an uncanny ability to write realistically about social misfits and blue-collar life. Gay was a poet of the impoverished South who had a knack for making his readers empathize with every character and event proffered in his creations. To read an extended version of this review — and more local book coverage — please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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MUSIC

ANOTHER LOOK

The Scene’s music writers recommend recent releases from Jack White, The Black Keys, Ah-Deli, Ty Herndon and more BY BRITTNEY McKENNA, DARYL SANDERS, JASON SHAWHAN, STEPHEN TRAGESER, CHARLIE ZAILLIAN AND JACQUELINE ZEISLOFT

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epending on what’s going on in your life right now, August might mean it’s time for one more summer road trip, or perhaps time to head back to FIND LINKS TO STREAM AND school. Either BUY THESE RECORDS AT NASHVILLESCENE.COM/MUSIC way, you’re going to want some new music to listen to, and Nashville musicians are here to help with a heap of recent releases. The Scene’s music writers have nine new recommendations for you — add ’em to your streaming queue or pick them up from your favorite local record store. Though the next Bandcamp Friday promotion (in which the platform waives its cut of sales for a 24-hour period) isn’t set to come back until Sept. 2, many of our picks are available to buy directly from the artists on Bandcamp, too.

JACK WHITE, ENTERING HEAVEN ALIVE (THIRD MAN) It’s not quite accurate to call Entering Heaven Alive, the second of the two albums Jack White is releasing in 2022, “the acoustic one,” as opposed to its very electric predecessor Fear of the Dawn. But the new LP does benefit from a more scaled-back production that emphasizes acoustic instruments and puts White’s contemplative lyrics about human connections in the foreground. One standout is “If I Die Tomorrow,” in which he reflects on the fragility of his existence; another is “I’ve Got You Surrounded (With My Love),” a jazzy number with a jammy section that faintly echoes — no joke — Phish circa 2000. (Seriously, listen to it back to back with “Gotta Jibboo” and see if you agree.) STEPHEN TRAGESER

THE BLACK KEYS, DROPOUT BOOGIE (NONESUCH) When the synth horns blast out of the speakers a couple of measures into “Wild Child,” the opening track and single from the new Black Keys record Dropout Boogie, it’s clear the Keys are back to doing what they do best — making infectious, distortion-drenched, bluesinflected rock ’n’ roll. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are on top of their game here, with Carney’s drum work giving the record a lot of bounce, and Auerbach’s guitar work and lead vocals infusing it with soul and swagger. The duo teamed with

co-writers on half the 10 tracks, including Billy Gibbons, who also swaps some nasty lead licks with Auerbach on the blues rocker he co-wrote, “Good Love.” But some of the album’s strongest cuts were written just by the duo — like the hilarious “Your Team Is Looking Good,” on which Sierra Ferrell sings backing vocals, the atmospheric “How Long” and the hooky finale “Didn’t I Love You.” DARYL SANDERS

TY HERNDON, JACOB (PIVOTAL RECORDS) Since Ty Herndon released his debut album What Mattered Most in 1995, he has become one of country music’s most interesting and important figures. He released a string of charting hits over the years, and in 2014 he became one of the first mainstream country artists to come out publicly as gay. Herndon’s new album Jacob charts many of the more difficult moments in his life, including stories of addiction and mental illness. But the album is ultimately a celebration of redemption, and one well worth your time. Many of Herndon’s musical friends feature on the album, including Terri Clark, Shelly Fairchild and Emily West. BRITTNEY McKENNA

AH-DELI, “LIVE MY LIFE,” “PERSIA,” “GOOD TIME” (SELFRELEASED) Back in June at The East Room’s 10th anniversary shindig, Heru Heru wowed the crowd with their hyper-lyrical, early-2000s-inspired self-described “heal-hop.” The consensus reaction in the crowd seemed to be, “Wow, that ruled — wait, they’re local?” The trio consists of DJ-producer Konscience Beats and MCs Ah-Deli and Foundation Mecca, and they still seem to be finding their spot in the Nashville rap landscape. Ah-Deli has kept busy this year with a trifecta of solo digital singles, each with its own distinct feel. Between the ’70s string sample that guides it and the basketball parlance in its lyrics, “Live My Life” is a continuation of what made Heru Heru’s 2021 opus The Legacy so fun. “Good Time,” meanwhile, fortifies Ah-Deli’s bars with gurgling 808s and a sultry, Auto-Tuned hook worthy of a Drake or Weeknd joint. Both history lesson and hip-hop banger, “Persia” is an ode to the land where the U.S.-born rapper’s family is from, which is now modern Iran, and it’s the standout of the series. The song’s lyrics serve a corrective function: Though a well-known hub of the Silk

Road trade route, Persia remains largely unheralded for its offerings to poetry, technology, architecture, medicine and beyond. “I don’t recall reading anything about Persia in school,” Ah-Deli wrote in a note to the Scene. “I just wanted the Persian perspective to finally be heard, because we are always dismissed and misunderstood when our contribution to the world is far greater than realized.”

CHARLIE ZAILLIAN ORNAMENT, ROCK SOLID (SELFRELEASED) Whether you like your pop music straightforward or a bit more complex, it’s tough not to love Ornament and their rollicking second LP Rock Solid. The core duo of longtime local-scene stalwarts Will Mann and Ryan Donoho has been making music together for more than seven years. Among all the cheeky wah pedal riffs and the intricate Beatles-inspired piano riffs on their latest record are brilliant pop songs that beg to be played on repeat. Crooning, growling and shouting in Stephen Malkmus-esque fashion, Mann is a magnetic frontman whose bravado is infectious. Album standouts like “Sometimes People Get Together and They Dance” and “In Her Light” swing optimistically and joyfully, in spite of uncertainty. JACQUELINE ZEISLOFT

BEZ, FLYWAY VOL. 1 (LEAVING FOR MEMPHIS) Among the many assets of Georgia-born rapper Brandon Evans, better known as BEZ, is a mighty muscular flow. On his latest record Flyway Vol. 1, he focuses on staying on his grind and commanding respect. Over rich, dark, soul-kissed beats, he gives context with stories about difficult circumstances he faced as a youngster. It’s not about asking for sympathy, as he raps: “Surpassing my predecessor / No ill intent / Black excellence / Got no pleasantry for this peasant shit.” STEPHEN TRAGESER

TWEN, ONE STOP SHOP (SELFRELEASED) Twen came to Nashville from Boston, roaring out of the gate with their debut LP Awestruck — despite being an effort that came together over several years as the band was learning how to be a band, it came in at No. 9 on the Scene’s Top Local Albums Poll in 2019. Thanks in part to COVID, permanent members Jane Fitzsimmons and Ian Jones have been less of a presence on the local scene lately, though they have had some extensive

tour treks. But their newly released follow-up LP One Stop Shop is worth the wait. Listeners who remember Juliana Hatfield and others who made Boston a center for rock in the ’90s — or who might have recently discovered them — will welcome album standouts like the pensive “Dignitary Life” and cheeky “Feeling In Love (From the Waist Down)” as sonic time travel. Between six-stringer Jones’ jangly Johnny Marr-indebted riffs, singer Fitzsimmons’ winning lilt and the variety and quality of their songs, it feels like a safe bet that they’re destined to hit festival undercards and indie-rock-friendly stations across the country sooner than later. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

JONNY GOWOW, REVELATION ACCORDING TO JON (SELF-RELEASED) Always one of Nashville’s more distinctive voices, voivod of vaudeville Jonny Gowow returns with a five-song EP that does a remarkable job at covering a lot of emotional ground in less than 20 minutes. The opening “Settle Down” finds the aspirational side of love in the time of apocalypse; here, Gowow is smart with arrangement and, as always, clever with the lyrics. The closer “Picking Up Work” has the feel of a forgotten Broadway song ripe for rediscovery (something Gowow makes seem effortless), but the Do Not Pass Go banger is “Little White Buick LeSabre,” which uses the specific to become universal in a way that will have anyone who hears it ready to karaoke their ass off in shitkicker heaven. No one else in town is doing something quite like this. JASON SHAWHAN

XISTS, ELECTRIC NIETZSCHE (ZURN) When widely loved Nashville multihyphenate Joseph Hudson — a writer, teacher, actor, musician and professional wrestler — died in February 2021, among the things he left behind was an unfinished film project that he’d started with his brother Seth, featuring music by their synth band Xists. Seth Hudson finished the pieces they’d started and released them in July as Electric Nietzsche, a collection that draws strength from the kaleidoscopic array of ways that electronic instruments and production techniques have been used over the past 50 years. The textures and moods range across the album from the mechanical, panic-inducing opener “Death and Vengeance” to the gentle, melancholy closer “Orpheus Emerged.” Throughout, the pair seeks out meaning in our strange and uneasy existence; one of the places they find it is in the electrifying power of danceable beats, as in “Dance Til You Die.” Proceeds from sales of the record will go to the fund established for Joseph Hudson’s son. STEPHEN TRAGESER EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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MUSIC

THE SPIN

STOMPING GROUNDS BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

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PHOTO: CLAIRE STEELE

or generations of Nashvillians, nights at Springwater have reliably promised cheap beers, sets from all manner of local and touring musicians, and a sense of community. Those were the driving forces that sent me to West End on Saturday, when a pair of hometown acts I’ve spilled a lot of ink on in recent years but had yet to see live — flannel-flying power trio Nehoda and prolific pop-rockers The Cancellations — shared a bill at the storied dive with Young Romantics, a foursome of young classic rock and prog appreciators from Bowling Green, Ky. I walked in as The Cancellations, who were first up, fired off a Costello-esque number titled “Walk in the Clouds.” You’ll find the recorded version of that tune on Love Letter, the second of three full-lengths the band has issued in just 18 months. As you may know, the venue has been called Springwater Supper Club and Lounge since the late 1970s, and the building has housed a bar since the 1890s. Back when Springwater shows ran on punk time and smokers could still light up indoors — a practice retired in

LOOK ON MY WORKS, YE MIGHTY: YOUNG ROMANTICS

2016 — a show starting at 9 p.m. on the dot would’ve been practically unheard of. But Cancellations frontman Elijah Jones and his cohorts were raring to go, even with only a small, subdued, mostly seated crowd on hand, reflecting the seldom-used “Supper Club” portion of the tiny bar’s full name. Sedentary audiences can be tough to connect with, but The Cancellations acquitted themselves well Saturday, cycling through a smattering of the 30-odd tunes in their songbook of sometimes-lovestruck, oftenlovesick power pop. In one-on-one settings, Jones tends to be loquacious, but he kept between-song banter to a minimum, which worked well for the show. “Verse and a Chorus,” the song that leads off the band’s most recent album Pity Parade, was a definite standout in the set, with laid-back, bossa-nova-indebted verses giving way to a killer power-pop chorus. Later in the set, “Whatever You Want” explored an interest in disco, while the elemental garage rock of “She’s the Needle” served strong earlyAughts vibes — think The Libertines or The Walkmen. Lead axman Anthony Keener became part of The Cancellations fold recently; Saturday was only his second gig since joining. But the new addition already seems to have

loosened the team up. On the set-closing “It Won’t Leave Me Alone” — the tune that put the band on my radar back in February 2021 — tall, stoic guitarist Erik Matthijs cut loose with some ecstatic Bob Pollard-style high kicking. Speaking of Anthonys, sandwiched between The Cancellations and Nehoda were the aforementioned Young Romantics. The band’s singer Griffin Fletcher is not only the spitting image of Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Anthony Kiedis, but he also channeled the Peps frontman with his onstage mannerisms; Fletcher’s T-shirt made it about three songs before it was ripped off. After the show, I asked bassist Gabe Rogers about whether the group had any connection to Cage the Elephant, as do so many bands from the home of Western Kentucky University. Not to his knowledge, Rogers said, though they do share an alma mater, Greenwood High. He added that, as much of an institution as Cage is in Bowling Green — even years after moving to Nashville — the scene there is due for a new breakout band. Will Young Romantics be it? Saturday’s set was pretty rough around the edges, but with enough woodshedding, who knows where their energy will take them. Having held court near the sound booth all night, Nehoda singer-guitarist Patrick Nehoda, bassist Grayson Papa and drummer Jeremy Gill took the stage just after 11. With a Flying V as his battle ax and a buttonup shirt splashed with Halloween imagery as his onstage garb, the 6-foot-7 frontman and his bandmates launched right into a thrashing homage to Bleach-era Nirvana, cheekily titled “What Would Kurt Do.” “WWKD” was the first of several new songs played Saturday, alongside highlights from their debut LP But Anyways…, released in 2020. Older tunes included “Shakey Pop,” among the best Dinosaur Jr. tunes J Mascis never wrote, and “Devil’s Bitch,” a slow-burning stoner-rock tour de force. “WWKD” was also neatly bisected with an abridged rendition of Neil Young’s frequently covered, yet never-not-affecting “Cortez the Killer”; Nehoda clarified that they were covering it in the style of Built to Spill circa 2000. Two summers ago, talking to the Scene at Gill’s house near Five Points, the drummer mentioned that before joining, he’d already been a fan. Nehoda’s songwriting, Gill told me, came off “heavier and more grown-up than a lot of bands — the feeling behind it, the timbre of his voice.” The group’s sonic language is just as direct, with little in the way of effects pedals or other accouterments. Though the venue has played host to a broad spectrum of creative expressions over the years, a new Nehoda tune tentatively titled “Bells” — on which Gill does double duty on drums and xylophone — was about as experimental as the group got on Saturday. The honest, emotive and thrillingly loud set was about the best thing you could ask for to cap off the night; sometimes, that’s all you need. EMAIL THESPIN@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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FILM

WE LIVE, WE DIE, WE LIVE AGAIN Resurrection is a testament to Rebecca Hall’s skill as a performer BY NADINE SMITH

A

s an actor, Rebecca Hall has built a distinct body of dramatic work, embodying the lives of women at moments of severe stress and crisis. With films like 2016’s Christine and last year’s The Night House, she earned acclaim for portraying characters whose professional accomplishments and poised demeanor come unraveled amid mental duress and intense trauma. The confidence she displays in her career, joined with the RESURRECTION emotional intensity NR, 104 MINUTES of her acting, makes OPENING FRIDAY, AUG. 5, Hall uniquely suited AT THE BELCOURT to the new film Resurrection, a work that requires both incredible strength and intense vulnerability. What also sets Hall apart from so many of her peers is how she’s taken her career into her own hands — she served as executive producer on Resurrection and The Night House, and seeks out demanding and challenging roles in an industry that so often casts aside women entering middle age. Inhabiting a sleek and icy corporate milieu that’s visually just a few degrees chillier than Succession, Margaret (Hall) is an accomplished woman in the biotech industry, the kind of supervisor her interns seek out for life advice. It’s clear that her world is small and micromanaged, all part of a well-oiled routine, but the relative comfort of her life and the confidence she displays in the workplace are a cover for the pain she’s experienced and the festering wounds just

below the surface. At its outset, Resurrection seems grounded in realism, an unsparing look at how trauma can live on inside you even when its source is gone from your life. Margaret holds it all together for years, until her manicured reality falls apart in a single moment: At a biotech conference, out of the corner of her eye, she sees a long-lost demon from her past. In what has to be one of the most truthful cinematic depictions of being triggered, Margaret enters immediate fight-or-flight mode and has to escape, her senses heightening and overwhelming. Even running out of the room isn’t enough — fresh air is no relief, and upon bursting out of the building she’s swarmed by the oppressive industrial noise that soundtracks city life. Soon, she begins to see David (Tim Roth) everywhere, and we learn about years of torture and abuse she endured at his hands before the put-together life she now

leads. As one of cinema’s most gifted chameleons, Roth is expertly cast as a purely evil man who hides the violence of his words beneath a facade of normalcy and paternal confidence. Given its relatively restrained and claustrophobic use of interior locations, Resurrection often feels somewhat theatrical, particularly in its defining scene, an unbroken monologue in which Margaret opens up about her relationship with David for the first time. There’s no blood or gore, but it’s undoubtedly the film’s most horrifying moment, as Margaret’s all-too-real experience of a manipulative and controlling partner turns into a singularly unsettling experience of body horror. The walls close in and darkness swells as Margaret reveals her pain, and though it makes for a purposely suffocating viewing experience, it’s a testament to Hall’s skill as a performer that

she could sit with such horrific material so unflinchingly. As the threads of her character’s carefully woven life are ripped apart, Hall’s performance turns from stately and controlled, to somewhere in between Gena Rowlands spiraling in a John Cassavetes movie and the badass heroine of a revenge thriller coming for blood. Resurrection consistently pushes the viewer into uncertain territory, never quite acknowledging whether Margaret’s experiences are grounded in reality, or the physical manifestation of her internal trauma. Either way, it’s clear that for Margaret, all of this is real, at the very least emotionally — the pain and abuse David inflicted is still living like a parasite inside her. You can take moments of the film as a dream or delusion, but there’s no denying that the trauma of enduring gendered violence is all too real. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

Yetnikoff just didn’t like it. By the time Cohen began singing the song live on tour, there were whole new lyrics. It was more secular, with verses involving intercourse and being tied to a kitchen chair. When Cohen got his own tribute album — 1991’s I’m Your Fan: The Songs of Leonard Cohen — The Velvet Underground’s John Cale did a cover merging both Cohen versions. It’s a rendition that rising ’90s musician Jeff Buckley would angelically sing right up to his untimely death in 1997. (His version was for a long time the one I remember the most, especially after hearing it on an episode of The O.C.) “Hallelujah” has been sung in many different arrangements by many different performers. The first

Shrek movie had a G-rated version of Cale’s take on the song. (A cover by Rufus Wainwright appeared only on the soundtrack album — Cale sang the truncated version in the movie.) That particular version tends to be the go-to song for those looking to impress Simon Cowell on a reality talent show. Inspired by Alan Light’s 2012 book The Holy or the Broken: Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, and the Unlikely Ascent of “Hallelujah,” directors Dan Geller and Dayna Goldfine basically make the case that the song is the new “Yesterday” — a moving anthem that’s been performed so often by so many that, even if you’re not a fan, you must know the words by now. But the history of “Hallelujah” is just a small but fascinating section of Hallelujah, which spends most of its run time recounting Cohen’s life in a respectful, restrained manner. Cohen is mostly presented as an insightful, aloof, wandering poet, creating monotonously sung, bleak and bitter tunes that were mostly inspired by either religion, the human condition or women he loved and lost. Call him a dapper, depressed Bob Dylan. (You probably won’t be surprised to learn that Dylan used to perform “Hallelujah” live.) As much as Geller and Goldfine assemble a flattering chronicle via archival footage/audio and interviews with friends, collaborators and admirers (what

up, Eric Church!), they don’t delve that deeply into the man’s personal past. The two kids he had with artist Suzanne Elrod are mentioned practically in passing, and you certainly won’t hear much about his ’60s romance with muse Marianne Ihlen. Considering how Cohen’s life has already been the subject of several documentaries (Kurt & Courtney director Nick Broomfield tackled the Cohen-Ihlen relationship in 2019’s Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love), it seems like Geller and Goldfine just wanted to remind people of what this cult troubadour accomplished. Even in his later years, he recorded music and did shows — right up until his death in 2016, at age 82. The doc fails to mention that Cohen died two days before Trump was elected, as well as how that week’s Saturday Night Live opened with Kate McKinnon, in character as Hillary Clinton, sitting at the piano singing — you guessed it! — “Hallelujah.” It’s a shame Cohen left before he got to see that melancholic but soothing performance. As someone who believed that making a joyful noise is sometimes the appropriate response when life gets batshit, Cohen might’ve dug hearing his song calm the masses after we all went through the Most Batshit Thing Ever.

A SECRET CHORD

The new doc Hallelujah goes deep on Leonard Cohen’s iconic song BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

I

s it just me, or has “Hallelujah” turned into “The Aristocrats” of songs? Just like that notoriously dirty joke — the subject of a 2005 documentary in which many comedy icons give their own distinctive, disgusting spin on the bit — the song has HALLELUJAH: LEONARD COHEN, A JOURNEY, A SONG been remade in myriad PG-13, 115 MINUTES ways. OPENING FRIDAY, AUG. 5, That’s what you find AT THE BELCOURT out halfway through Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, a Journey, a Song, a new documentary about the celebrated tune and the Canadian singer-songwriter who wrote it. Cohen was also the first person to redo the song. It was originally a spiritual number, part of an album Columbia Records didn’t release because then-president Walter

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FILM

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PREY FOR A HERO

The Predator franchise gets it right 35 years after the original BY JOE NOLAN

J

ohn McTiernan’s 1987 Predator is a classic genre-bender that begins as an action movie about a colorful band of military operatives on a rescue mission in the jungles of Central America. What might have been just a post-Vietnam War version of The Dirty Dozen — what Quentin Tarantino calls a “bunch-of-guys-on-a-mission movie” — quickly turns into a sci-fi nightmare when the dense greenery is painted red by an offworld hunter collecting human prizes. Predator gave moviegoers a tough-guy cast for the ages, including pre-California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, pre-Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura, post-Rocky PREY R, 87 MINUTES; AVAILABLE Carl Weathers and IN COMANCHE DUB AND beloved, rugged COMANCHE SUBTITLE character actors VERSIONS Bill Duke and Sonny STREAMING VIA HULU Landham. It also FRIDAY, AUG. 5 brought us one of the most iconic movie monsters of all time. Predator is still a fun watch, but the sequels have mostly disappointed. Predator 2 (1990) finds the creature terrorizing contemporaneous Los Angeles, and it’s grown a cult following thanks to Danny Glover as a police lieutenant spitting lines like, “Hey kid, welcome to the war.” Predators (2010) gives us a “bunch-of-mercenaries-kidnapped-toan-alien-game-reserve” film, featuring a great but underutilized cast. And The Predator (2018) pits a band of soldiers against a pair of Predators, but that one fell flat with audiences and critics alike. Now Prey — a Predator prequel helmed by 10 Cloverfield Lane’s Dan Trachtenberg — comes to Hulu. This installment aims to build a story within the Predator universe

while attempting a more unique take on the original formula: In the Northern Great Plains in 1719, a young Comanche woman named Naru (Amber Midthunder) joins the other women and babies in her band harvesting breadroot, but she’d rather be hunting with her brother. After inexplicably trying to take down a white-tailed deer with a hatchet, she finds herself at the edge of a cliff staring at a turbulence churning across the sky — a writhing cloud full of fire and lightning. Naru tells her brother she’s seen a vision of a thunderbird, and that it’s time for her to be initiated as a hunter. And when one of the warriors is dragged off by a mountain lion, Naru gets her wish and joins her brother on a rescue mission. The decision to think outside the straightahead Predator formula is one of many good choices here. The plot is pinned together with coming-of-age actioner story and clichéd dialogue, but the sins aren’t so great that this able-bodied cast can’t make it work. Midthunder is in nearly every scene and manages to make her retro-feminist character believable. It helps that both the most mundane and the most fantastic elements of the story feel grounded: Her sideeyeing mom and hero brother are loving but understandably doubtful about Naru’s huntswoman ambitions. Her first hunt is a disaster, and she can’t win the respect of the warriors and make them believe her warnings about the Predator. The wild-animal and cloaking-device effects are intense fun here, and a blood-drenched Predatorversus-grizzly fight gives us one of the best monster reveals in the franchise. (Where was this dude when Leo needed him in The Revenant?) Prey works because it speaks to Naru’s realistic “weaknesses” instead of imbuing her with less-than-believable strengths. She’s small, but she’s quick; she’s not strong, but she’s smart; nobody believes in her, and therefore they never see her coming. For the full immersion, check out the optional all-Comanche-language version of Prey when it debuts on Hulu. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

mmm...

So Refreshing! Refreshing! A women’s column featuring a rotating cast of contributors

Vodka Yonic nashvillescene.com nashvillescene.com | AUGUST 4 – AUGUST 10, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRYSTAL THOMPSON vs. PERRY THOMPSON In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon PERRY THOMPSON. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after August 11, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on September 12, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon PERRY THOMPSON. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after August 11, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on September 12, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: July 13, 2022 Jennifer L. Honeycutt Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 7/21, 7/28, 8/4, 8/11/22

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in CS or rel & 5 yrs IT exp. Alt, Master’s (U.S./frgn equiv) in CS or rel & 3 yrs IT exp. Also reqs: in-depth understanding of OSI model; exp w/ fiber optic cabling, copper cabling, patch panels, & connector types; exp w/ VTP, ISL, 802.1Q trunking, spanning-tree, & VLANs; exp w/ OSPF/BGP routing protocols, IP advertising/filtering/redistribu tion, Qual of Service, IP multicast Eng consults for Level III network troubleshooting/problem resolution, protocol anlys, network troubleshooting/problem determination skills w/ network trace/capture/ anlys software; understanding of end-to-end data flows & traffic patterns. Email resume to Elaine.Healy@hcahealthcar e.com IT Architect (Multiple Positions, GEODIS Logistics, LLC, Brentwood, TN): Reqs Bach (US/frgn equiv) in CS or rel + 6 yrs exp in app dsn, implementation, & support of lrg enterprise netwks & 5 yrs exp in front & back-end .Net web dev. Alt, will accept Master’s (US/frgn equiv) in CS or rel + 4 yrs exp in app dsn, implementation, and support of lrg enterprise netwks & 3 yrs exp in front & back-end .Net web dev. Also reqs 3 yrs exp in PL/SQL prg; extensive proven exp in specifying, dev & deploying archts & infrastructure for sw apps in new media multitiered app envrn; exp defining & dev high-volume, horizontally scalable archts; knowledge of HTML, AngularJS, Javascript, Node JS & JQuery; exp w/ API integrations w/ HTTP/REST/JSON; exp w/ code quality, continuous delivery, testing & GIT tools; proficient in MS Office prods inc Word, Visio, Excel, & Outlook. Qualified applicants mail resume: Sharon Barrow, 7101 Executive Center Drive, Suite 333, Brentwood, TN 37027 Ref # ITARC027599

Sr. Administrators, IT Database. Responsible for the recoverability, availability, performance, and compliance of a major retailer’s database environments. Employer: Tractor Supply Company. Location: Headquarters in Brentwood, TN. May telecommute from any location in the U.S. Multiple openings. To apply, mail resume (no calls/e-mails) to P. Hatcher, 5401 Virginia Way, Brentwood, TN 37027 and reference job code 150162. UBS Business Solutions US LLC seeks Authorized Officer, IT Support Analyst in Nashville, TN. Handle lifecycle of incidents related to Group Functions Finance global platform suite of apps. Reqs: Bach deg or foreign equiv in Comp Sci, Comp Eng, or rel fld & 4 yrs of rel exp. Qualified Applicants apply through shprofrecruitingcc@ubs.com. Please reference 000999. NO CALLS PLEASE. EOE/M/F/D/V.

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