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WALK A MILE: IN HIS MONTHLY COLUMN, J.R. LIND EXPLORES A HISTORIC LITTLE PIECE OF EAST NASHVILLE

JULY 15–21, 2021 I VOLUME 40 I NUMBER 24 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

PAGE 7

CITY LIMITS: TENNESSEE CONTENDS WITH LOW VACCINATION RATES AND REPUBLICAN DEMAGOGUERY PAGE 11

INSIDE: SEE DETAILS ABOUT MAIN STREET FESTIVAL

GROW, COOK, SHARE 10 YEARS OF THE NASHVILLE FOOD PROJECT BY ERICA CICCARONE

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com


CONTENTS

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29

Walk a Mile: Cleveland Park .....................7

Mother’s Instinct

CITY LIMITS

JULY 15, 2021

THIS WEEK ON THE WEB:

BOOKS

In the 19th installment of his column, J.R. Lind explores a historic little piece of East Nashville

Emotional bond between mother and son fuels Rea Frey’s Until I Find You

BY J.R. LIND

BY G. ROBERT FRAZIER AND CHAPTER 16

This week on the Scene’s news and politics blog

31

Pith in the Wind .........................................8

Metropolitik: A Refreshing Display of Black Rage and Righteous Anger .......... 10

MUSIC

In the Cut ................................................. 31

The Hambrick family’s response to the Delke plea deal will hopefully unsettle Nashville’s power structure

Jon Byrd brings advanced guitar moves to his new EP with Paul Niehaus

BY SEKOU FRANKLIN

Tennessee Contends With Low Vaccination Rates and Republican Demagoguery ... 11 With variants circulating, state and local health officials are facing resistance amid mistrust and disinformation

BY EDD HURT

Into the Territory ..................................... 31 John R. Miller wrestles with an itinerant spirit on Depreciated BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

Shades of Blue ........................................ 32

BY STEVEN HALE

Ida Mae stretches out on Click Click Domino

12

BY DARYL SANDERS

Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit Announce 2021 Ryman Run Mobile Home Residents Decry Mass Evictions Third Man Records Opens Blue Room Bar MNPS to Host Vaccine Events for Seventh-Graders

The Spin ................................................... 33

COVER STORY

The Scene’s live-review column checks out Namir Blade w/SeddyMac at Acme Feed and Seed

10 Years of The Nashville Food Project

BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

BY ERICA CICCARONE

34

Grow, Cook, Share

23

ON THE COVER:

Carrots grown by the Growing Together farmers at Haywood Lane Farm Photo by Eric England

FILM

CRITICS’ PICKS

Toy Story 4, The Marcus Finnie Band, Noel Coward’s Fallen Angels, Record Store Day’s RSD Drops, Alanna Royale w/Brassville, Music City Mondays: The Players Club, I Think You Should Leave Season 2, LEGO Masters, More Life and more

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Going Faster Miles an Hour .................... 34 Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain compellingly eulogizes the beloved television star BY CORY WOODROOF

Hog Wild .................................................. 34 Pig is a bit much, but it gives us some good Nicolas Cage BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

FOOD AND DRINK

Cooking With the Stars: Kristin Cavallari ....................................... 26 Reading, cooking and — let’s be honest — judging Cavallari’s newest cookbook True Comfort BY ASHLEY BRANTLEY

Veg Out..................................................... 27 The plant-based fare at this downtown outpost is satisfying and creative BY MARGARET LITTMAN

Primal Stream 60 ................................... 35 Infants of industry and fresh R.L. Stine, now available to stream BY JASON SHAWHAN

37 38

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

MARKETPLACE

28 ART

Into Focus

In a new exhibit at Scarritt Bennett, photojournalists turn their lenses toward the pandemic’s effects BY RON WYNN

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW Tyler Hynes

Trevor Donovan

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Britney Bristow

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PET OF THE WEEK!

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UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENTS 6:00PM

THURSDAY, JULY 15

HELEN ELLIS

in conversation with MEGAN ABBOT Bring Your Baggage and Don’t Pack Light

6:00PM

MONDAY, JULY 19

ELIZABETH GILPIN Stolen

6:00PM

TUESDAY, JULY 20

BRAD THOR Black Ice

6:00PM

WEDNESDAY, JULY 21

ROB RUFUS

in conversation with JEFF ZENTNER Paradise, WV

6:00PM

THURSDAY, JULY 22

MEG FLEMING & LUCY RUTH CUMMINS Sounds Like School Spirit

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FRIDAY, JULY 23

MIKE WOLF

in conversation with LISA DONOVAN Barantined

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PHOTO: DPA PICTURE ALLIANCE / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

OK - WHERE ARE OUR TEDDY BEAR FANS?

GOV. BILL LEE WITH THEN-PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP

GOV. LEE SURPRISES STATE SENATE AND HOUSE LEADERSHIP WITH ANNOUNCEMENT OF FREE AIRFARE FOR TOURISTS Gov. Bill Lee recently announced that the state will be footing the bill for 10,000 tourists’ airfare if they visit one of Tennessee’s four largest cities. Neither Lt. Gov. Randy McNally nor Speaker of the House Cameron Sexton was aware of this project prior to Lee’s announcement, and both of them have expressed their concerns with the program. Marketing tourism to out-of-state visitors isn’t a bad idea. We’ve successfully done it for decades and have seen our cities and state thrive as a result. However, this program is off-kilter, and even our GOP officials have seen it. McNally in particular questioned why the governor would emphasize tourism to our cities when our rural areas have been hit as hard, if not harder, than our cities have by the economic fallout of the pandemic. Our cities have well-funded tourism budgets and are poised to address the major hit our hospitality industry has suffered. For instance, the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp’s total revenue, according to its federal tax filings, was more than $33 million in 2018. That compares well to the budget for the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development, which was $25.6 million in the FY 2021 state budget. The timing of the announcement of this program — called Tennessee on Me — was undeniably callous, coming on the same day as federal pandemic unemployment assistance was ending for Tennesseans. The assistance ended at the direction of Gov. Lee, who chose to opt Tennesseans out of this targeted support for those whose lives have been upended by the pandemic and its financial and employment repercussions. The timing was also ironic, as Lee made the announcement just prior to Nashville’s Fourth of July celebration — attended by hundreds of thousands of attendees, who presumably footed their own bill to travel to Nashville for what the city says is the largest fireworks celebration in the country. These visitors, who decided to come and enjoy Nashville’s events and festivities, did so without being lured by free airfare — airfare that’s going to be paid for by tax dollars straight from the pockets of hardworking Tennesseans. Besides being callous and ironic, this PR stunt is also looking quite unnecessary. Nashville’s tourism has bounced back well since we’ve been able to safely ease travel and public gathering restrictions. Air travel at BNA has surpassed pre-pandemic levels

— the average counts of screened departures are now higher than before the pandemic, and according to the Metro Nashville Airport Authority, “the number of nonstop routes is at a record high.” Looking at nothing but our airport’s current successes, it is clear that Nashville’s tourism is well on its way to recovery. Tennesseans both Republican and Democrat have written letters to The Tennessean’s editor to express their disgust over this situation. One letter asked: “Is Tennessee so bad as a state that we must pay people to come visit us? Are the attractions in Tennessee so poor that no one wants to enjoy them?” So let’s get this straight. Gov. Lee surprised everyone — his own GOP state leaders included — when he announced that he’s giving away taxpayer dollars to make it rain for out-of-state tourists. Forget that many Tennesseans cannot afford groceries or their electric bills, much less airfare for a vacation. Vacations are a faraway dream for Tennesseans who are struggling to make ends meet — especially those Tennesseans who are right now trying to adjust to the elimination of federally funded pandemic unemployment support that Lee chose to opt us out of. The governor’s Tennessee on Me program should’ve been named Tennessee on You and Me, since we’re the ones footing the bill. In the light of the substantial budgets operating in the state and even in Nashville for tourism development, this $2.5 million program is relatively small. But what gets to me is that this money, which would have certainly exceeded the tourism budgets in practically every rural county in the state, isn’t going to help Tennesseans. Lee has chosen not to accept the United States’ offer of unemployment assistance, but he’s more than willing to gamble millions on improving tourism figures — which are improving all by themselves. It’s salt in the wound for many Tennesseans. Imagine what our food banks could have done with $2.5 million. Tennessee on Me doesn’t make much sense, and Lee’s continued Trump-like behavior — placing politics and PR stunts over people — has become more and more shameful.

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Associate Editor Alejandro Ramirez Arts Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Culture Editor Erica Ciccarone Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Contributing Editor Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Nancy Floyd, Steven Hale, Kara Hartnett, J.R. Lind, William Williams Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Marcus K. Dowling, Steve Erickson, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steve Haruch, Geoffrey Himes, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Katy Lindenmuth, Craig D. Lindsey, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Chris Parton, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Cy Winstanley, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Editorial Intern Kahwit Tela Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Events and Marketing Director Olivia Britton Promotions Coordinator Caroline Poole Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Maggie Bond, Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers Olivia Bellon, William Shutes, Niki Tyree Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Aya Robinson, Price Waltman Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Frank Daniels III Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2021, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

In memory of Jim Ridley, editor 2009-2016

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus, the Nashville Post and Home Page Media Group in Williamson County.

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS

CLEVELAND PARK

In the 19th installment of his column, J.R. Lind explores a historic little piece of East Nashville

Walk a

Vernon Winfrey

Avenue

Vaughn Street

with J.R. Lind

N 6th Street

Meredian Street

Mile

BY J.R. LIND | PHOTOS BY ERIC ENGLAND

Cleveland

Street

THE ROUTE: From Cleveland Park, right on Cleveland Street, then right on Meridian Street. Right on Vaughn, left on Lischey Avenue and then right on Vernon Winfrey Avenue, continuing to North Sixth Street and back to Cleveland Park. CRANES: 2 ABANDONED SCOOTERS: 0 Once a month, reporter and resident historian J.R. Lind will pick an area in the city to examine while accompanied by a photographer. With his column Walk a Mile, he’ll walk a one-mile stretch of that area, exploring the neighborhood’s history and character, its developments, its current homes and businesses, and what makes it a unique part of Nashville. If you have a suggestion for a future Walk a Mile, email editor@nashvillescene.com.

B

irds squawk at the morning runners and dog walkers around Cleveland Park. This July day started off still but pleasant, the usual breakfasthour stickiness staying away, at least for now. The avian set is taking advantage of a baseball diamond flooded by overnight showers, using the drowned basepaths as a birdbath and observing goings-on from the islet formed by the pitcher’s mound, up above the shallow water like a miniature seamount peeking over the swell of a tiny ocean. Cleveland Park is largely open space with its fields dotted by trees. A more substantial treeline runs along its eastern edge as a largely ineffective sound barrier from the rail line. The public pool is empty at this hour, its cool waters only slightly disturbed by the occasional breeze rippling its surface. The community center stands nearby, home of the local Boys & Girls Club. The benches on the basketball court show evidence of what the kids are working on. Dozens of Ziploc bags are taped up, each with a couple of inches of dyed-blue water. In black marker,

the future scientists have written various best-effort spellings of “evaporation,” “condensation” and “precipitation,” indicating these little bags are meant to demonstrate the water cycle. They’re doing a good job too — the water in most is well below the lines showing how deeply they were filled originally, steam is built up around the zipper, and droplets are flowing down the plastic. Between the hoops courts and the (netless) tennis courts: three hard-surfaced alleys, each with gutters running down the long ends. The alleys are too narrow for pétanque and the surface too hard for bocce. There’s no crown as in lawn bowls and no markings for shuffleboard. The gutters make no sense for horseshoes, and there’s no place for a post to go in the ground in any event. Across North Sixth Street, workers are building three new houses in a row south toward Cleveland Street. They’re still just frames and lumber, and so it’s hard to say if they’ll fit the cottage and woodsided character of the road in style, but it’s obvious the new builds will be much larger than their neighbors. West on Cleveland, a new condo complex is getting its finishing touches. It already has the requisite mural — it’s apparently meant to depict Jimi Hendrix, though the guitar is all that’s really obvious to the non-abstract eye. Cleveland is busy with workers as the sun climbs higher. A utility worker wraps up his duties and reopens the sidewalk across from Murrell School (officially it’s two schools: Murrell at Glenn School and Glenn Enhanced Option Elementary; the original Murrell School was in Edgehill) with a smile, the sweat dripping

nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS

into his graying beard. The houses along Cleveland are mostly wood-sided (or at least reasonable facsimiles of the same) but clearly are in a range of vintages. The lots are mostly elevated, and the homeowners take pride in the little swaths of green along the sidewalk. One welllandscaped patch around the mailbox urges passers-by to please scoop if their canine pal poops. Another fencerow is filled with more echinacea than a supplement store. Untended plants have, however, taken

THIS WEEK ON OUR NEWS AND POLITICS BLOG: U.S. District Court Judge Aleta Trauger issued a preliminary injunction last week, temporarily halting the implementation of a state law requiring businesses and public facilities to post signage if they allow transgender people to use bathrooms matching their gender identity. In a frankly very entertaining opinion, Trauger found the plaintiffs in the case — a group of Tennessee businesses, including Nashville’s Bongo Java, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union — are likely to succeed at trial. Trauger also found the state’s arguments against the injunction wanting (in one delightful passage, the judge explained Tennessee’s admission to the union and what the relationship between the state and federal government actually means).

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over much of the lot at the northeast corner of the Cleveland-Meridian intersection. An abandoned church — originally built in the 1920s as Meridian Street Methodist, but later serving as home to Ray of Hope Community Church — sits for sale, along with its massive four-story annex behind, its New York City owners having let the bushes burst into scraggles and allowed moss to slicken the stairs. The sunlight catches the wide stained-glass windows, dull now after years without cleaning.

The law, which went into effect July 1, is now suspended pending trial. … Roughly 38 percent of Tennesseans are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. That’s one of the lowest rates in the country. Case rates, hospitalizations and deaths have plummeted around the country — and in Tennessee — since wide-scale vaccination began earlier this year. As staffer Steven Hale notes, that should be evidence enough for the state’s (almost exclusively Republican) leaders to encourage folks to get the jab. Extremely online state Rep. Jeremy Faison used Twitter to respond to White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki, telling Psaki that she was welcome at his house to sip sweet tea but that she wouldn’t be forcibly injecting him. This is after Psaki announced that part of the Biden Administration’s efforts to encourage vaccination would include going door-to-door with flyers, a very different process than forcing people to be injected. “The Republicans who run this state get really turned on by the idea of standing up to the feds, and it gets their voters all hot and bothered too,” Hale writes. “Unfortunately, what’s actually happening here is that Faison is lying to his constituents about a government plan to

Across Meridian, more history is boarded up: Fountain Blue (or Blue Fountain), the stately home built by some member of the McGavock family. The property was a gift to James McGavock, a son of David McGavock, an early Middle Tennessee settler. But James was murdered on Whites Creek Pike in 1841, and Nashville records from before his death don’t indicate a large house on the tract. His daughter Lucinda inherited the Fountain Blue property. She was married to Jeremiah George Harris,

hand out some flyers about the vaccine. It would definitely be creepy and bad if the government was sending people around to stick a needle in your arm against your will. Good thing that’s not happening.” … David Raybin, the attorney for former Metro Police Officer Andrew Delke, twice served as an expert witness for Davidson County District Attorney-General Glenn Funk in ethics cases. This revelation came on the heels of a controversial plea deal wherein Delke agreed to plead guilty to involuntary manslaughter for shooting Daniel Hambrick in 2018. Delke, who was indicted for first-degree murder by a grand jury, was sentenced to three years in jail, though he’ll likely serve about half that. Raybin confirmed he provided expertise on Funk’s behalf before the state’s Board of Professional Responsibility in a matter related to Funk’s serving as a prosecutor pro tem while transitioning from private practice to the DA’s office and in another matter regarding Funk’s handling of the domestic violence charges against high-profile developer David Chase. Both complaints were ultimately dismissed by the BPR. … Following her July 8 cover story about the forgotten Benevolent Society No. 2 cemetery,

who — in addition to palling around with James K. Polk and holding various sinecure jobs — founded the Nashville Daily Union newspaper. He wrote to Polk in 1844, after a trip to Europe, that his home was under construction. In any case, the property bounced around various McGavock descendants for a while and later became home to, among other people, Alonzo Webb, who worked for the Nashville school system as supervisor of writing and drawing. He purchased the house in 1905, but spent most of his time at another home on Wilburn Street. He sold part of the land — though not the house — to his boss, school superintendent J.J. Keyes. The home was converted to apartments around 1915 and was owned by the Ray of Hope Community Church for a time. In May of this year, a local investor filed paperwork asking for the property to be rezoned for a brewery.

contributor Betsy Phillips went on the trail for more historical Black cemeteries in Nashville, specifically the cemetery for the people enslaved at The Hermitage. She found some connections behind an old church, and what’s more, she found some descendants who showed her around. … Tenants of a Dickerson Pike mobile home park are decrying mass evictions, saying they want more time and compensation before vacating the property. The owner of the mobile home community started to deliver notices to tenants telling them to leave their lots by Aug. 31, according to residents. “Nashville is growing and I can’t stop that,” one resident told Pith. “That’s very good for Nashville, but, like, where are we going to go?”

NASHVILLESCENE.COM/PITHINTHEWIND EMAIL: PITH@NASHVILLESCENE.COM TWEET: @PITHINTHEWIND

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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Architect. Designer. Artist. Visionary. At the end of the 19th century, the Glasgow Style emerged as the major manifestation of Art Nouveau in Britain, and Charles Rennie Mackintosh was its greatest proponent. Experience the first US exhibition in a generation to highlight Mackintosh’s innovative architecture, designs, and paintings. See how he played with light and dark, soft curves, and delicate lines to achieve opulent effects. Explore the larger circle of artists and craftspeople, including many women, with whom he collaborated to create the unique and dynamic Glasgow Style.

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 12

FristArtMuseum.org @FristArtMuseum Downtown Nashville, 919 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203 #TheFrist #FristGlasgowStyle Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style is a touring exhibition co-organized by Glasgow Museums and the American Federation of Arts. The exhibition comprises works from the collections of Glasgow City Council (Museums and Collections), with loans from Scottish collections and private lenders. Support for the US national tour is provided by the Dr. Lee MacCormick Edwards Charitable Foundation. Platinum sponsor

Hospitality sponsor

Education and community engagement supporters

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The Frist Art Museum is supported in part by Friends of the Arts of Scotland and

Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh. The May Queen (detail), 1900. Made for the Ladies’ Luncheon Room, Miss Cranston’s Ingram Street Tearooms, Glasgow. Gesso on burlap (hessian) over a wood frame, scrim, twine, glass beads, thread,

nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

and tin leaf, 62 1/2 x 179 7/8 in. overall. Glasgow Museums: Acquired by Glasgow Corporation as part of the Ingram Street Tearooms, 1950. © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection. Courtesy American Federation of Arts

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CITY LIMITS

barbershop, a sign reminding patrons that they want your head in their business. It’s decked out in whitewashed cinder block, trimmed in the traditional red, white and blue of the tonsorial artist. Catty-corner, another cinder-block building is home to the C.H.A.N.G.E. Ministry church. It’s mostly windowless, but painted in gray and muted purple. Vernon Winfrey Avenue slides down into an intersection with Sixth at the edge of Cleveland Park, where the kids at the Boys & Girls Club would be happy to learn the sun has done its work and dried up the ball field. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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METROPOLITIK

A REFRESHING DISPLAY OF BLACK RAGE AND RIGHTEOUS ANGER The Hambrick family’s response to the Delke plea deal will hopefully unsettle Nashville’s power structure BY SEKOU FRANKLIN

POOL PHOTO BY JOSIE NORRIS, THE TENNESSEAN

As the sun creeps higher, over the ridges girding Nashville and the trees along Meridian and Vaughn, summer stickiness arrives, the brief respite from a typical July now a memory. Many houses on Vaughn, particularly along its southside, follow the same familiar pattern with L-shaped porches and two front doors, perhaps all built from the same Sears & Roebuck kit a century ago. The houses turn more modest (and more modern) on Lischey, home of Hermann Holtkamp Greenhouses, which claims to be the leading grower of African violets in the world. Near the Holtkamp operation is a historical marker noting the original location of Joy Floral, which grew (forgive me) to become the South’s largest florist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Winfrey Barber and Beauty Shop is at the corner of Lischey and Vernon Winfrey, named for the barber, grocer and Metro councilmember. And yes, Oprah’s father, with whom she was sent to live as a teenager. She credits his emphasis on education and hard work for her early success, resulting in her landing a job on the radio as a teenager while still a student at the old East High School, before moving on to Tennessee State University and … well, everything else. The Winfrey shop — now owned by The Chicago Trust Co., whatever that is (wink wink) — is all brick and very 1990s. Just across the street, though, is the much more vintage Reed & Son’s

VICKIE HAMBRICK IS OVERCOME WITH EMOTION AS SHE SPEAKS IN COURT WHERE ANDREW DELKE PLEADS GUILTY TO MANSLAUGHTER ON JULY 2, 2021

“W

e didn’t even get a chance,” screamed Daniel Hambrick’s cousin at the July 2 court hearing in response to District Attorney Glenn Funk’s plea agreement with now-former MNPD Officer Andrew Delke. Delke, a white police officer, shot Daniel Hambrick, a Black man, three times in the back on July 26, 2018. From the view of Blacks long victimized by excessive sentencing, wrongful convictions and racial profiling, the plea deal had echoes of a Jim Crow criminal justice system. Delke received only a threeyear sentence with a likelihood of being released in a year-and-a-half despite a grand jury indictment for first-degree murder. He is serving the sentence in Davidson County (not a maximum- or medium-security prison) in a cell with a private shower and away from the general population. The plea deal was negotiated without the knowledge or consent of the Hambrick family, just two weeks before the trial was to commence. DA Funk did his best to portray the agreement as a historic occasion because it was the first time a Nashville police officer was sent to jail for killing a Black person. Hambrick’s family and Black community advocates, however, rejected the decision and saw it for what it is — a huckster’s agreement. Protests, shouts of disapproval and anger expressed by the Hambrick family disrupted the faux decorum of Judge Monte Watkins’ courtroom. The Hambricks

cursed Delke, Funk and the criminal justice system writ large. Vickie Hambrick, the mother of Daniel, lunged at Funk in a fit of righteous anger. The collective rage was a refreshing display of Black resistance and an unapologetic cry for justice. Black rage cuts against the grain of middle-class respectability. It shatters the image of racial etiquette that defines Nashville’s political culture. In historian Vincent Brown’s award-winning book Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War, which documents the Jamaican slave wars, Brown tells us that rebellion can lead to large-scale transformations such as freedom for the enslaved or territorial acquisition. As reinterpreted today, rebellion has the potential to transform the criminal justice system or overhaul police departments. Yet institutional transformations are difficult to achieve in societies where racial and economic subjugation is the norm. The hope then, as Brown states, is that rebellion and rage can give the injured and oppressed a chance to reclaim their dignity and self-worth. By disrupting the courthouse decorum, the Hambrick family fought back and demanded respect. Their unscripted and unbounded rage delegitimized a criminal justice system that has been unforgiving and vulturous to Nashville’s Black and Brown communities and the poor. Black rage can be unpredictable and may lack political discipline, but it offers important lessons for those who seek to understand it. Martin Luther King Jr. saw Black rage up close in the Watts and Chicago disturbances in the mid-1960s.

He heard it from poor Black women in the Mississippi Delta during the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968. His internal compass forced him to listen and learn from Black rage with the hope that it can be converted to transformative change. For some observers, the Hambrick family’s fury was out of bounds. In his best version of racial troping, David Raybin — the attorney for Delke, who has also represented the Fraternal Order of Police — called the demonstrative behavior a “riot.” Had the Hambrick family withheld their rage, however, their position about the plea deal could have been interpreted as submissive and cooperative. Hambrick’s mother, although legally blind, saw clearly through the morally bankrupt proceedings. More than anything, her rage painted a different picture of her son than the North Nashville criminal that the Metro Nashville Police Department intended to depict after Delke killed him. Despite Vickie Hambrick’s disability, Daniel was never “ashamed of or embarrassed by” her, as noted by a statement delivered by Joy Kimbrough, the family attorney. The mother’s outrage recast her son as both her “eyes” and as a caregiver who sewed family bonds. The utter unfairness of the plea deal was not lost on longtime advocates in the courtroom. Earlier in the week, a young Black woman was convicted for the same charge as Delke — first-degree murder — and sentenced to the mandatory 51-year prison sentence. The contrasting sentence — 51 years with no chance of parole for a Black woman, compared to a short jail stint for Delke — exposes a rigged and antidemocratic system that failed the Hambrick family. A day before the court hearing, activists learned that Funk may have possibly reached out to influential Black Nashvillians with the hope that they would help him spin the plea deal as a step in the right direction. This was to be expected. The city’s political establishment — from mayors and district attorneys to councilmembers and the business community — has spent decades trying to cultivate a Black managerial class to defend racially problematic decisions when necessary. Yet on this issue, Black leaders refused to be Funk’s accomplice and rejected his overtures. Black and civil rights organizations universally condemned the decision — including the Napier-Looby Bar Association, the Metro Council’s Minority Caucus, the NAACP’s Nashville Branch and the Tennessee Conference of the NAACP. In the end, Nashville may move past the trial and continue with business as usual. Funk may be re-elected in 2022. The Black managerial class, perhaps, will retreat to protecting a political regime that deems it inferior. The overhaul of the criminal justice system and police department that activists have long clamored for may not happen soon. Yet the rage will continue to simmer and hopefully translate into the kind of political agitation that unsettles the power structure. If so, we have the Hambrick family to thank. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS

TENNESSEE CONTENDS WITH LOW VACCINATION RATES AND REPUBLICAN DEMAGOGUERY With variants circulating, state and local health officials are facing resistance amid mistrust and disinformation BY STEVEN HALE

PERCENTAGE OF VACCINATED TENNESSEE RESIDENTS BY AGE GROUP 100%

80%

Not Vaccinated

60%

Fully Vaccinated

STARBENDERS / TUK SMITH AND THE RESTLESS HEARTS G

OCT 1 OCT 6

20%

JUL 23

FUNK NIGHT NASHVILLE

FT. RICKEY CALLOWAY, THE GRIPSWEATS, OLIVER JAMES, & ADMIRAL PHUNK

AND HIS FABULOUS MARTY STUART SUPERLATIVES

OCT 7

JUL 29 - 31

AN EVENING WITH

0%

PHIL LESH & FRIENDS BIG SOMETHING

OCT 9

TOWN MOUNTAIN + KELSEY WALDON

OCT 15

Partially Vaccinated

81+

71-80

61-70

51-60

41-50

31-40

21-30

16-20

12-15

40%

SOURCE: DATA.TN.GOV • DATA FROM JULY 11, 2021

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even months after the first COVID-19 vaccination in Tennessee, only 42.4 percent of the state’s residents have received at least one dose. Only 38 percent are fully jabbed up, according to the state’s latest data. Tennessee’s vaccination rates are among the lowest in the country. Tennesseans who are skeptical about the effectiveness of the vaccine can look at the data and see the remarkable impact that even this state’s meager vaccination campaign has had. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the virus have all plummeted since the end of 2020. No doubt that’s due in part to the fact that vaccination rates have been highest among older residents who are most vulnerable to serious illness from the virus. But more recent trends have public health officials warning against complacency. On July 9, the Metro Public Health Department tweeted that “over the past week, our team has observed a 25.7% increase in active cases of COVID-19.” The health department also noted an increase in the test positivity rate and reiterated that the so-called Delta variant of the virus has been identified in Nashville. At the state level, the seven-day average of new cases also began trending upward in the first week of July. As many pandemic-related restrictions have been relaxed if not lifted altogether, state and local health officials say the best protection against the virus and the variants that have been circulating in recent months is vaccination. But getting Tennesseans to trust that fact and act on it at the scale needed to truly snuff out the virus has proven difficult. As Sarah Tanksley, communications director for the Tennessee Department of Health, notes, resistance to the vaccine is not unique to Tennessee. Other Southern states have had similarly lagging vaccination rates. The divide is not just regional but political; states won by President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election have higher vaccination rates than those won by Donald Trump. In April, the TDOH commissioned a third-party survey of 1,000 adult Tennesseans about their views of the vaccine. Among the survey’s main conclusions, according to the department: “The primary concern is the speed and haste with which the vaccines were tested and developed,” and “white, conservative rural Tennesseans are the least willing to accept the vaccine and seem to have planted their heels in the sand.” The results of that survey, Tanksley says, informed the sort of information the health

department has been putting out since. The public figures who those white, conservative rural Tennesseans are most likely to listen to have not exactly been the most helpful when it comes to cultivating trust in the vaccine. Gov. Bill Lee received the vaccine in March, but did so as quietly as possible. At the state Capitol, the health department found itself under attack when Republican lawmakers threatened to eliminate the department because of outreach efforts they deemed were “peer pressuring” teens into getting vaccinated. More recently, right-wing figures in the state and on the national stage have been demagoguing about the Biden administration’s efforts to encourage Americans to get vaccinated. Earlier this month, in response to White House announcements about local door-to-door canvassing to provide information about the vaccines, state Rep. Jeremy Faison tweeted: “You’re welcome to the house. We can go sit on my very cool deck and sip some sweet ice tea. We can definitely talk politics. However, you’ll not put a needle in my arm.” Although Faison said in a subsequent tweet that he does not oppose the vaccine but doesn’t believe the government should “push” it, his comments echoed those increasingly coming from right-wingers with even bigger platforms. U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, continuing a streak of Holocaust references, recently called members of the Biden administration’s vaccination campaign “medical brown shirts,” a reference to Nazi paramilitary groups who aided Adolf Hitler’s rise. Fox News hosts, led by ratings giant Tucker Carlson, have smeared the vaccination information campaign and, like Faison, falsely implied it includes forcible injections. Meanwhile, the unvaccinated continue to make up almost all deaths and hospitalizations from the illness — and they also serve as a breeding ground for new variants. Tanksley says state health officials will be coordinating with higher-education institutions to hold vaccination events and encouraging local health care providers to become vaccine providers so that Tennesseans can get information and a shot from medical professionals they are more likely to trust. As this story was going to press, The Tennessean’s Brett Kelman broke the news that Dr. Michelle Fiscus, who was heading up the state’s vaccination efforts, had been fired. Fiscus told Kelman she was being tossed overboard to appease state Republicans.

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nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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7/12/21 4:41 PM


10 YEARS OF THE NASHVILLE FOOD PROJECT BY ERICA CICCARONE

FROM LEFT: SAVANNAH CHILDRESS, RON HARRIS AND SARAH FARRELL PREP MEALS IN THE NASHVILLE FOOD PROJECT KITCHEN

GROW, COOK, SHARE O

n any given day, Bianca Morton-Hughes might get to work and have something outrageous waiting for her — like 1,000 pounds of fresh asparagus, or enough meat to stock her walk-in freezer for a year. Morton-Hughes is the chef director at The Nashville Food Project, a nonprofit that makes 5,000 nutritious meals every week for Nashvillians in need. That half-ton of asparagus was donated by Walmart, and it was perfectly fresh. So that week, everybody had some. “You got asparagus-andegg casseroles,” says Morton-Hughes, “you got asparagus-and-vegetable blends, you got asparagus that was pureed to add into sauces, you got asparagus vinaigrette. … Stir-fries, vegetable medleys, cut them up, add them to pasta salad. We were going to get as many uses in different ways as we could.” Typically, The Nashville Food Project marshals about 380 volunteers per month to collect food from gardens, conference centers, farms and stores. Under Morton-Hughes’ direction, the volunteers

prepare meals from scratch that are tailored to 35-plus partnering organizations, and they load them into catering trucks for delivery. During the pandemic, they suspended their volunteer program, leaving all of that work to the staff. But the need for food didn’t slow, and the Food Project has continued to provide. The efficacy of the organization can be attributed in part to its practicality. The Food Project partners with anti-poverty organizations across the county, like Open Table Nashville, Gideon’s Army and Project Return. Whether these organizations are fighting poverty, interrupting violence or supporting people after incarceration, they’re the ones who know their communities best. The organization keeps upward of 220,000 pounds of food out of landfills each year. You can also look at food recovery as a manifestation of the Food Project’s ethos: There is plenty to go around, and when we work together, we find that there are many more seats at the table.

PHOTOS BY ERIC ENGLAND

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BIANCA MORTON-HUGHES

nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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This belief has been the guiding force behind The Nashville Food Project since its inception a decade ago. The organization’s founder, Tallu Schuyler Quinn, had a radical vision of a movement that would not just provide emergency relief to hungry people, but also connect people to food systems and the land in order to remove barriers that keep them undernourished and underfed. As the nonprofit celebrates 10 years of growing food, making meals and sharing them, the Food Project community is experiencing a devastating crisis. One year ago, at age 40, Quinn was diagnosed with grade four glioblastoma, an aggressive, terminal form of brain cancer. Quinn grew up in Nashville. After getting a bachelor’s degree in papermaking and bookbinding, she headed to seminary at Columbia University. With a Master of Divinity degree, she went to Nicaragua, where she worked on food-security projects with resident farmers. It was there that she started to see food differently: not as a commodity, but as a “vibrant tool for healing.” “Living in Nicaragua, where food was very scarce and very much part of a whole

— economic justice, food justice, racial reconciliation and racial justice. “We certainly didn’t invent food accompanying the creation of community,” she continues. “That’s ages old. … But to be able to find community, period, is so special. To be able to find really awesome food alongside that, especially if you’re living in poverty or have a lot of challenges around accessing adequate nutrition, is so important.” In 2010, Grace Biggs — then a student at Lipscomb University — met with Quinn while doing some research for her senior capstone project. That conversation turned into an internship with Mobile Loaves & Fishes. Biggs was tasked with picking up food at Sam’s Club and slicing bread for sandwiches. Working out of Woodmont Christian Church, the nonprofit relied on volunteers to deliver meals in the city. Biggs says Quinn was already asking questions that would deepen their work. People most impacted by food insecurity and poverty needed to be part of creating solutions, Quinn maintained. She wanted to create long-term partnerships, not just oneoff interactions. “Just handing out meals

“TO BE ABLE TO FIND COMMUNITY, PERIOD, IS SO SPECIAL. TO BE ABLE TO FIND REALLY AWESOME FOOD ALONGSIDE THAT, ESPECIALLY IF YOU’RE LIVING IN POVERTY OR HAVE A LOT OF CHALLENGES AROUND ACCESSING ADEQUATE NUTRITION, IS SO IMPORTANT.”

TALLU SCHUYLER QUINN IN 2013

— TALLU SCHUYLER QUINN

community’s cultural identity,” says Quinn, “I think I got the privilege of getting this peek into how sacred food can be and what a powerful tool for good things it can be. It’s been very much weaponized in the way it is unaffordable or inaccessible.” When Quinn came back to Nashville, she started working with the local chapter of the national nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes, handing out sack lunches and bottles of water at places in town where people without housing congregated. Emergency food systems like this have their place — often, that’s all that’s available for hungry people. But Quinn saw the need for something greater that could break the cycle and change the story. “My hopes and dreams for Nashville were building and finding people to be part of a movement that really could build community and focus on different expressions of justice

14

endlessly,” says Biggs, “you could do that forever and not solve any of these issues. So how can we best align the resource of a meal with other anti-poverty and communitybuilding work happening in the city?” In the three weeks following Nashville’s historic May 2010 flood, the team distributed more than 19,000 meals to displaced residents and relief workers. They started a garden behind their office at Woodmont Christian Church, and Quinn met with everyone who would give her a meeting to garner support. She wanted to differentiate what she was doing from food banks and pantries. “I don’t really believe in banking food,” says Quinn. “Why hang onto all this nourishment when so many people lack?”

IN 2011, QUINN ESTABLISHED The Nashville Food Project as a nonprofit, and Biggs stuck with her as an employee. They started

GRACE BIGGS

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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converting those sack lunches to hot meals made from scratch that could be served family-style. “We were so scrappy and really under-resourced and didn’t have land,” says Quinn. “But so many people started to step up to the plate with the very generous resources of time and insight and money and really good questions and guidance for me and other staff as we were able to hire people on, which was very slow-moving.” Establishing the nonprofit legitimized what they were doing, and it helped them launch an agricultural program. The Woodmont garden grew food for the kitchen — but from her experience in Nicaragua, Quinn suspected that giving people the opportunity to connect to the land and grow food for their families themselves would provide empowerment. Over time, they opened gardens in places around the city and put the word out that they were available for community gardeners. By meeting twice a month as a group for lessons in planting, growing and harvesting organically — and with access to their plots any time during the growing season — gardeners got their hands into the soil. In 2019, the Food Project got the opportunity to steward a new garden on the site of the future Mill Ridge Park in Antioch. Metro broke ground on the land in June of this year, and the 600-plus acres will be a welcome recreation and conservation space in a part of the city that has lacked public greenspace for decades. The Community Farm at Mill Ridge is three acres for now, and the Food Project will have the opportunity to expand as it builds capacity. Community gardeners have plots — some individual and some communal. Renting a plot for a year costs just $15-$30, depending on the size, and the Food Project is able to accept SNAP for plant sales each spring. Twelve-foot sunflowers grow across from the shaded pavilion. Gardeners are growing tomatoes, squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkins and much more. “There are so many stories and histories in this garden,” says Lauren Bailey, director of garden programs. Some people are totally new to gardening, while others connect to their agricultural roots. It’s especially beneficial to people who rent their homes and don’t have a plot of land they can alter with flowers and vegetables. But one thing unites them, says Bailey: they’re “lots of people who love digging their fingers in the dirt.” Another arm of the Food Project’s agricultural program is Growing Together, a market garden program that supports people who want to sell produce for income and to connect more deeply to food systems. The program currently supports farmers who arrived in the U.S. as refugees from Myanmar (formerly Burma) and Bhutan. At the Haywood Lane Farm, the Growing Together farmers grow enough to sell via community-supported agriculture — which is like a subscription service of fresh veggies — and sometimes also sell to restaurants and to the Food Project for meals. Lulu Nhkum helps her mother-in-law tend to her plot and also acts as the interpreter for the gardeners and Growing Together manager Tallahassee May. Nhkum and her family are growing greens, radishes, gourds, pumpkins, cucumbers, eggplant and more. Nhkum comes from a family of farmers, although it is increasingly difficult for her parents, who still live in Myanmar,

16

FROM LEFT: NORA McDONALD, LAUREN BAILEY AND JULIA REYNOLDS THOMPSON AT THE COMMUNITY FARM AT MILL RIDGE

GROWING TOGETHER FARMER LAL SUBBA PREPARING A CSA to grow crops because of the increasingly violent military coup. The vegetables that are grown in Myanmar and Bhutan are hard to find in Nashville, so growing them gives these farmers a taste of home. Of the program, Nhkum says: “It helps our mental health — makes us whole. It’s our workspace. It’s no pressure. We can learn a lot, and we can grow any kinds of vegetables that we like. If we don’t know [something], we can ask. This has changed our life.” The garden is a haven for Nhkum, and her

GROWING TOGETHER FARMER DIM PAU WASHES VEGETABLES family is financially supported by the sale of their vegetables. Her 5-year-old son David is on site when the Scene visits, and he bounds around with his grandmother, playing and helping with the harvest. Nhkum says that sharing the space has made her son more willing to try vegetables than he used to be. Many of the farmers are in their 60s, and part of their vision is to get younger people like David involved to carry on their agricultural traditions. “Everything is possible,” says Nkhum. “It’s amazing.”

AS THE FOOD PROJECT EVOLVED, it grew out of its home at Woodmont Christian Church, using a kitchen at St. Luke’s Community House. But as their partnerships and their staff increased, they needed their own home. In 2017, Quinn spearheaded a $5 million capital campaign for the construction of a headquarters with a large commercial production kitchen, offices, a community dining room and meeting rooms. Located on California Avenue in The Nations, the space is gorgeous and airy, and the state-of-the-art kitchen gives Chef

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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Morton-Hughes plenty of room to play. After culinary school, Morton-Hughes did what she calls a rite of passage for Nashville chefs: She worked at the Opryland Resort & Convention Center. For nearly two decades, she worked in high-capacity, high-quality catering kitchens — as the executive sous chef at the Sheraton downtown, as part of the opening team at the Music City Center and more. That was her dream, but she felt unfulfilled. Three years ago, she arrived at The Nashville Food Project. “I felt like I was at home,” MortonHughes says. “I realized that I’ve always been the type of chef that, what I do, I [form] a personal connection. So I love that the meals and the food that we’re crafting and we’re sharing, it’s thought put into it. It’s love.” This sentiment, of feeling at home and cared for within the organization, is common among employees. It’s one of the things that makes The Nashville Food Project so special. During the Scene’s visit on a Friday, the kitchen team is packing up boxes of beef lo mein — the beef is from Porter Road Butcher, which donates 100 pounds of ground beef every week — for Open Table Nashville and New Immigrant Community Empowerment. Other meals of the day will go to the YMCA children’s summer camp, the Martha O’Bryan Center, Operation Standdown and 15 more partners. Morton-Hughes is charged with tailoring meals to the partners, which is no easy task. As director of food access, Biggs receives feedback from the partners, which she relays to Morton-Hughes. The chef does her best to accommodate this feedback, while making use of whatever food ends up in her kitchen via donations. Some are unfathomably large — the day of Nashville’s March 2020 tornado, the Annual Meat Conference at Opryland had 28,000 pounds of fresh, never-frozen meat on their hands, and the folks at the Food Project took it. Recently, a first-grade class brought four little bags of lettuce they had grown, and backyard gardeners often donate bags of tomatoes. “It’s like being on Chopped,” says Morton-

Hughes. “Every single day.” She enjoys sharing knowledge about food and nutrition with partners, particularly those serving children. Vegetables can be a hard sell, especially ones like asparagus, and while the chef can “hide” them inside other foods, she wants kids to know what they’re eating. “When you look at the kids that turn their nose up at anything other than some fast food,” says Morton-Hughes, “that’s where [food injustice is] showing up. We just don’t know better, and it’s become a norm. So when we’re trying to do this, we’re fighting against our own selves and our own beliefs.” They have a saying, Quinn tells the Scene: “Cheap food hurts people.” “Growing food cheaply on land and [continuing] environmental degradation comes back to hurt us in myriad ways,” says Quinn. “Cheap food that is sugar-laden and prepared with shitty ingredients, it hurts people in our physical diet. If we keep poisoning our earth to grow cheap strawberries, that’s going to come back and hurt us too.” She uses Growing Together as an example. “It’s the opposite of cheap food, and it’s also the opposite of hurting communities. It’s power. It’s money. It’s reconnecting to the land. It’s reconnecting to one’s culture. It’s brilliant farmers having a path to reconnect to the work that they love, the work that they know, and to earn meaningful income while doing it to be able to grow food that is meaningful culturally to them, to share that knowledge with other farmers as well as their customer base who may or may not know about these specific mustard greens that come from Nepal, for example, and how to prepare them.”

QUINN STEPPED DOWN from the role of CEO last summer when she got sick. Last week, the Food Project announced a new CEO, C.J. Sentell, whose experience in sustainable farming, nonprofit management and social entrepreneurship should prepare him to fill some very big shoes. He co-founded the Heifer USA Grass Roots Farmers’ Cooperative in Arkansas, where he explored the economic viability of

cooperative farming and sustainable animal husbandry. He then worked at FORGE Community Loan Fund, focusing on helping economically disadvantaged people start and maintain agricultural businesses. His dissertation at Vanderbilt University traced the relationships between freedom and food through the intersection of slavery and agriculture. Like his predecessor, Sentell is passionate about creating food systems that work for everyone. Despite visual and cognitive strain, Quinn has kept a public journal since she became ill. In writing, as in person, Quinn is wise, funny and brave. She posts poems by Wendell Berry and Mary Oliver, retells the story of how she met her husband Robbie, and professes her admiration for Nora Ephron and the Indigo Girls — she’s seen the group in concert 50-plus times, she says. She also grieves the life she will soon leave behind. The long-term life expectancy for patients with glioblastoma is three to five years, but many people die much sooner. “Life,” she wrote in a May journal entry, “will dash and devastate, all while handing you a damn dream come true.” Her clear-eyed optimism and her belief in this work have not dimmed. Quinn says of The Nashville Food Project: “I want us, as we move forward into the future, to be emboldened by constantly pursuing what we know we’re here to do. And what we’re here to do is constantly show up in active ways for people who are oppressed, for people who do not have power, and not to give them power, but to uncover whatever barriers or shackles are in the way that keeps us from being the just society that we are here to be.” Biggs has spent the past 11 years helping the organization to grow and thrive, and she’s one of many. It’s a difficult time, but she too is hopeful. “The heart of the Food Project is the same,” says Biggs. “There are new faces and different people. I still very much feel and see Tallu’s legacy and mark on the ways we are moving forward together.” It’s like Quinn tells the Scene: “A place to belong in this broken world is pretty much everything.” EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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CRITICS’ PICKS W E E K L Y

R O U N D U P

O F

T H I N G S

T O

D O

NICOLE ATKINS THURSDAY, JULY 15

NICOLE ATKINS’ POOL-OOZA ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

You can be a fine singer-songwriter without having major theatrical flair — but if you’re gonna go in for that multidimensional kind of musical storytelling, you have to commit. New Jersey-born East Nashvillian Nicole Atkins narrates the business of living — with yourself, with other people, as a professional musician — with style, grace, depth and ingenuity that you could compare to Roy Orbison, Bobbie Gentry, Nick Cave or Kate Bush. Not that you’d mistake Atkins’ music for anyone else’s; over the past two decades, she’s cultivated an ever-evolving sound with roots in ’60s and ’70s rock and pop. On Goodnight Rhonda Lee and Italian Ice — the two records she’s released since moving to town circa 2015 — Atkins tightens her orbit around soul and R&B a bit; Italian Ice, released last summer, was recorded in soul mecca Muscle Shoals, Ala. Now that pandemic restrictions have eased enough for her to do a proper tour in support of the record, she’s stopping by the East Side’s poolparty-friendly Dive Motel for a two-night release celebration on Thursday and Friday. In addition to an art sale and tarot readings — bringing in a little flavor of the boardwalk near Atkins’ hometown that’s part of the inspiration for the album — many surprise guest appearances are promised. Two sets of

STEPHEN TRAGESER

FRIDAY / 7.16 [PLAYTIME]

TOY STORY 4

A little more than two years ago we said goodbye to Woody the cowboy in Toy Story 4 — for real this time. The fourth installment of the Toy Story saga somehow proved that the series was worth continuing after that pitch-perfect ending in Toy Story 3. If you’re eager to revisit the memories, we can’t blame you — so how would you like to round up your own cowpokes and enjoy Toy Story 4 in the great outdoors? Friends of Mill Ridge Park will host a free screening of the film for its Outside Cinema Friday, which comes complete with free popcorn and lawn games before the flick. Showtime is at sunset, so make sure to get there by a little after 8 p.m. There’s no drive-in viewing for this one, so a blanket or lawn chair should do the trick. Sundown at Mill Ridge Park, 12965 Old Hickory Blvd. CORY WOODRUFF

[THAT’S A WRAP]

LETTUCE

Were you excited to see the jam-bandheavy lineups that Bonnaroo offered from 2002 to 2005 or so? The Caverns — the subterranean Pelham, Tenn., venue where the PBS program Bluegrass Underground is filmed, also home to the pandemic-friendly Above Ground Amphitheater — is the place for you this year. Among others, Disco Biscuits, Dark Star Orchestra, moe. and Umphrey’s McGee have all been through, while more are on the way. Friday and Saturday, it’s new-school funk ensemble Lettuce’s turn. The first iteration of the group came together in 1992 in Boston,

[RHYTHM MASTER]

THE MARCUS FINNIE BAND

Ace drummer and bandleader Marcus Finnie is a true rhythm master. He’s equally comfortable in every phase of jazz — from hard bop to avant-garde — and also superb at crafting masterful support in R&B, funk, country or pop settings. He’s excelled working with everyone from Kirk Whalum and Keb’ Mo’ to India.Arie and Lalah Hathaway. But Friday’s gig at Rudy’s Jazz Room finds Finnie spearheading one of Music City’s best-working ensembles. The Marcus Finnie Band is a first-rate group with the kind of strong, powerful soloists who have always been featured in jazz groups led by premier drummers. The current lineup includes pianist David Rodgers (2016 James Miltenberger International Jazz Piano Competition winner and current Keb’ Mo’ band member), saxophonist Jovan Quallo, guitarist Adam McPhail, bassist Brian Allen and trumpeter Emmanuel Echem. This stellar group is as idiomatically flexible as its leader, and will likely provide audiences with a sonic portrait of how the best 21st-century jazz musicians both embrace tradition and expand on it. 9 p.m. at Rudy’s Jazz Room, 809 Gleaves St. RON WYNN

PHOTO: JAY SANSONE, HUMAN BEING MEDIA

[A JERSEY SHORE OF THE MIND]

Atkins’ fellow theatrically adept rockers have been tapped to warm up the crowd: Justin and the Cosmics on Thursday, and The Minks on Friday. See nicoleatkins.com for individual tickets and eight-person cabana options. 6 p.m. at The Dive Motel, 1414 Dickerson Pike

FILM

MUSIC

THURSDAY / 7.15

MUSIC

PHOTO: BARBARA FG

MUSIC

The Dive Motel

when most of its members were teenagers geeking out over Herbie Hancock and Earth, Wind and Fire records. They honed their chops for a decade before releasing their debut album Outta Here, and since then have been on an upward trajectory to a long run of international touring. A slew of standout players like guitarist Eric Krasno (Soulive), keyboardist Jeff Bhasker (Kanye West, Mark Ronson) and trumpeter Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band) have moved through Lettuce’s ranks, but the current version of the group isn’t slacking off: Their 2019 LP Elevate was a contender for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album at the Grammys. Both of this weekend’s shows will be outside, with safely spaced pod seating at the Above Ground Amphitheater. 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at The Caverns, 555 Charlie Roberts Road, Pelham, Tenn. STEPHEN TRAGESER

LETTUCE

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CRITICS’ PICKS

NOEL COWARD’S FALLEN ANGELS

One of Nashville’s newest theater companies will take on a classic comedy this weekend in its first live, in-person production. Little Thistle Theatre Co. will present Noel Coward’s Fallen Angels in collaboration with The Barbershop Theater. A group of former and current Belmont University students established the company in June 2020 with the idea of “putting the play back in playhouse.” Coward’s uproarious comedy certainly fits that description. The fast-paced story follows best friends Julia and Jane, who — though happily married to others when the play commences — are sent into a tizzy when a dashing Frenchman from their past announces that he’ll soon pay a visit. The cast includes Erin-Grace Bailey (who also is directing the production), Sydney Lofton, J.R. Knowles, Luke McGuire, Evelyn Petty and Jack Tanzi. For more information, visit the company’s Facebook page, facebook.com/littlethistletheatreco.

AMY STUMPFL [ON THE RECORD]

RECORD STORE DAY’S RSD DROPS

As a response to the pandemic, the Record Store Day organization pivoted to a series of RSD Drops dates to continue spotlighting the mom-and-pop stores that are here for you all year. Each Drops date brings a smaller supply of limited-edition titles than the traditional single blowout event, and the second of two planned Drops events for 2021 will take place Saturday. Every store celebrates a bit differently, so you’ll want to watch shops’ websites and social media for the most up-to-date info. Some will offer discounts but not carry exclusives, some will have a selection of special titles as well as storewide sales, and one announced a concert before press time. From noon to 8 p.m., East Nashville’s The Groove (1103 Calvin Ave.) will host a release party for Kiss My Ass Goodbye, a tribute to the late, great John Prine. Both show and

album include deep-catalog Prine tunes performed by Scene faves like Heaven Honey and Justin and the Cosmics, and proceeds from sales benefit the Nashville Rescue Mission. There’s more Prine, too. Stay Independent: The Oh Boy Years is a comp curated by indie record stores of songs released on the label Prine co-founded in 1981, while Prine’s onetime label Atlantic is releasing two live sets as Live at The Other End, December 1975. On Earth, a comp of highlights from Nashville powerpop maestro and prolific home recordist R. Stevie Moore, will also be out Saturday, as will Willie Nelson: American Outlaw, a recording of the all-star tribute to Nelson held at Bridgestone Arena in January 2019, and country singer Kip Moore’s Live From Grimey’s Nashville, recorded at the store in October. Margo Price’s rendition of “Red Temple Prayer (Two-Headed Dog)” is just one reason to pick up May the Circle Remain Unbroken, a tribute to psych legend Roky Erikson. Trouble, Heartaches and Sadness is another gem, featuring the first vinyl pressing of a collection of Candi Staton

recordings from the 1960s and ’70s at FAME Studios that weren’t released at all until 2011. Check out recordstoreday.com for the full list of titles. STEPHEN TRAGESER

parents got as much satisfaction out of snapping bricks together and seeing a creation come to life as I did. More mature appreciators of LEGO are such a devoted fanbase that there’s even a word for them: AFOLs, or Adult Fans of Lego. The AFOL community receives its first step in on-screen representation with Fox’s surprisingly compelling competition show LEGO Masters, hosted by Will Arnett — think The Great British Bake-Off, but much louder, much faster-paced, and much nerdier. Teams of two compete every week in marathon building competitions, turning disorganized piles of plastic into intricate dioramas and elaborate sculptures that quite frequently verge on art. The challenges aren’t all about aesthetics or architecture: Some emphasize motors or mechanical moving parts, while others require building something that’s meant to be exploded, dropped or smashed. Though the show is often filled with eye-rollworthy gags, forced chuckles and jokes more painful than stepping on a LEGO brick, it overcomes the more cringeworthy elements of its premise and presentation by spotlighting contestants who are undeniably talented and endlessly creative. Skill-based competition shows might be a dime a dozen, but LEGO Masters stands out as more than just another brick in the wall. Watch it via Hulu. NADINE SMITH

Created by Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio (Despicable Me), this wacky sendup of Broadway’s golden age features Strong and Keegan-Michael Key as an on-therocks couple who become “trapped in Schmigadoon, a magical town filled with singing and dancing townspeople, and learn they can’t leave without finding true love — which they thought they already had.” The cast boasts a huge lineup of Broadway and Hollywood names, including Alan Cumming, Kristin Chenoweth, Jane Krakowski, Fred Armisen, Martin Short, Aaron Tveit, Ann Harada, Ariana DeBose and more. Schmigadoon! premieres July 16 on Apple TV+. AMY STUMPFL

MUSIC

[COWARD’S WAY OUT]

7:30 p.m. July 17; 2 & 7:30 p.m. July 18 at The Barbershop Theater, 4003 Indiana Ave.

MUSIC

THEATER

SATURDAY / 7.17

[WITH OR WITHOUT CHEESE]

ALANNA ROYALE W/BRASSVILLE

Alanna Royale was quiet for the bulk of 2020. While many local musicians took to the internet in an effort to stay connected with their audiences — and alleviate the weight of isolation — Royale embraced the opportunity to be alone. During an online performance in April, she announced that she’d gotten through the pandemic by hopping in the car and taking a road trip from Nashville to the San Francisco Bay to “contemplate some shit.” She drove through the deserts in Arizona and New Mexico and thought a lot about love — what it means to love, what it means to be loved and, most importantly, what it takes to allow yourself to receive love. Finally, we have our first official peek at what came from those inspiring adventures: She shared the new single “Fall in Love Again” last week, and it

24

EXPLORE THE MORE LIFE EXHIBITION VIA DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY

More Life, the sprawling, multi-gallery art show that’s on view at multiple David Zwirner locations through the end of the year, is so essential that it warrants local attention even though the exhibition itself is in New York. Its mission is simple: marking the 40th anniversary of the Centers for Disease Control’s first report of what would eventually be known as AIDS through a series of solo exhibitions that highlight artists whose lives were cut short by HIV/AIDS-related complications. The loss of the More Life artists — Ching Ho Cheng, Derek Jarman, Frank Moore, Mark Morrisroe, Jesse Murry, Marlon Riggs, Silence=Death collective and Hugh Steers — is just the tip of the culturally, socially, artistically devastating iceberg. The exhibition’s website, davidzwirner. com/exhibitions/2021/more-life, provides a detailed, annotated timeline of the past 40 years of HIV/AIDS and its impact on artists. The timeline was created with assistance from the What Would an HIV Doula Do? collective, and begins in 1969 with the death of 16-year-old Robert Rayford — later tests of his tissue revealed that he was infected with HIV. There are also portions of the exhibition that reward online visitation, including artist Ryan McGinley’s curation of photographs by Mark Morrisroe — even if you can’t visit the East 69th Street location in New York, you can still read McGinley’s poignant essay about Morrisroe, see high-definition images of around 15 of his gritty, angelic photographs, page through facsimile copies of his journal, and more. LAURA HUTSON HUNTER [MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE]

STREAM LEGO MASTERS ON HULU

As a product, LEGO is clearly marketed toward children, but the appeal of its openended potential cuts across generations — when I was growing up, I think my

[TRAPPED IN TRIPLE-THREAT LAND]

WATCH SCHMIGADOON! ON APPLE TV+

As anyone who follows Saturday Night Live can tell you, Cecily Strong is a die-hard Broadway fan. She regularly serves up sassy musical theater parodies —  from Gypsy and Les Misérables to West Side Story and The Sound of Music — for the show. So it really should come as no surprise that Strong is currently starring in Apple TV+’s new six-part comedy series Schmigadoon! (It also probably doesn’t hurt that Lorne Michaels is an executive producer on the new venture.)

STREAMING

In December, Democratic U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar deployed a stunningly appropriate meme in response to a tweet from ExxonMobil about how the oil behemoth was “working collaboratively toward solutions to mitigate the risks of climate change.” What was the meme that ultimately landed Rep. Omar hundreds of thousands of likes, retweets and replies? A seemingly unlikely screenshot from the first season of Netflix’s sketch series I Think You Should Leave With Tim Robinson. The sketch (in which a man dressed as a hot dog, played by Robinson, feigns outrage and asks his fellow customers who is responsible for crashing a hot-dog-shaped car through the storefront) was perfect shorthand for “These fools are responsible for this disaster and none of us are buying their misdirection.” That bit was just one of many moments from ITYSL’s six short episodes that transcended sketch comedy to become something as big, powerful and accessible as it is stupid and juvenile. Last week, Netflix unleashed the show’s second six-episode season, and it’s just as jam-packed with meme-able moments, scatological humor and impossibly idiotic characters as the first. In addition to many of the popular performers from Season 1 (Patti Harrison, Sam Richardson, Conner O’Malley, Tim Heidecker), this one features appearances from Bob Odenkirk, Paul Walter Hauser and John Early. If you loved the first season, you’ll love this one too. If you’re a newcomer — well, Robinson’s form of frequently blue and always cringe-inducing humor (which for some reason often features hot dogs, conference rooms and weird shirts) may or may not be for you. So pop on your finest fedora with safari flaps and give it a try. D. PATRICK RODGERS

[GIMME MORE]

TV

WATCH SEASON 2 OF I THINK YOU SHOULD LEAVE

ART

[I KNOW THAT. I’M NOT STUPID. I’M SMARTER THAN YOU.]

TV

TV

EVERGREEN: STUFF YOU CAN DO ANYTIME

[COCOA BUTTER IS ANNOYING]

WATCH BLACK BLASPHEMY ON THE ALL DEF YOUTUBE CHANNEL

I don’t know if you know this, white people, but there are some things Black people can’t say or admit in the company of other Black people, for fear of being clowned, getting their Black card revoked or just getting straight stomped out. The folks at All Def have found a clever, hilarious way for people to freely admit these sacreligious beliefs on the interwebs. The unapologetically Black game show Black Blasphemy (which usually drops new episodes on Sundays) consists of a rotating panel of African American comedians and personalities coming up with their most blasphemous opinions in four categories: music, food, movies/TV and general Black culture. A member from the panel then sits in the “snitch seat,” picks an opinion from one of the categories and has to guess who said that crazy shit. This show has already had people admitting controversial things like Stevie Wonder ain’t blind, Richard Pryor’s comedy hasn’t aged well and — gasp! — biscuits are trash. While those statements might incite a brawl at a cookout, that’s just laugh-out-loud fodder for this show. CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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CRITICS’ PICKS

JULY 17

A CELEBRATION OF REP. JOHN LEWIS

Free and Open to the Public

JULY 22 ALANNA ROYALE is a confident and sexy soul song with more than a heavy pinch of ’70s R&B. There are stirring strings, funky midtempo drums and Royale’s’ buttery voice crooning, “Don’t you wanna? Don’t you wanna fall in love again?” It’s the kind of rich, breezy song that would indeed sound fantastic while driving through a desert, perhaps in a convertible, with someone who makes your heart flutter. The band returns to the stage Saturday to celebrate the song’s release with the excellent eight-piece brass band Brassville. I fully expect to see some heavy makeout sessions in the corners when Alanna Royale plays the new jam. 8 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place MEGAN SELING

FILM

MONDAY / 7.19 [PLAY ON]

MUSIC CITY MONDAYS: THE PLAYERS CLUB

Now that the tweetstorm-turned-dark comedy Zola is the toast of the arthouse world, the Belcourt figured it would be a good time to show that 35mm print of Ice Cube’s 1998 directorial debut that they’ve had for a while. (Not really: The film was scheduled to screen as part of the Belcourt’s ongoing Music City Mondays series two days after the theater shut down for COVID.) Just like Zola, The Players Club follows a Black protagonist (LisaRaye McCoy) who runs into characters both eccentric and predatory while making ends meet as a stripper. A spastic Bernie Mac plays the owner of the down-and-dirty club where she works, while a young Jamie Foxx serves as the club’s DJ, and plays soundtrack selections from Jay-Z, Scarface and the late DMX — and yes, Ice Cube. Sheronica Hayes, the Belcourt’s front-ofhouse manager, will provide an introduction. 7:30 p.m. at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

SPRINGER MOUNTAIN FARMS BLUEGRASS NIGHTS AT THE RYMAN

DAILEY & VINCENT

were a burgeoning rebellious preteen, no album straddled the line between your past and future like The Black Crowes’ tripleplatinum-selling Shake Your Moneymaker. This album had it all — solid melodies that were easy to sing along with, drug references, swagger for days. Luckily for us, the brothers Robinson have gotten the band back together, and they’re playing Moneymaker in its entirety on a two-month, 37-show tour that kicks off with shows on Tuesday and Wednesday at Ascend Amphitheater. The tour was originally planned to coincide with the album’s 30th anniversary in 2020, but COVID came through to postpone your anguish about being an old-ass motherfucker. The bright side: These songs have held up astonishingly well, and the Crowes remain stellar showmen. In addition to the full Moneymaker album — which includes “She Talks to Angels,” “Hard to Handle” and “Jealous Again” — they’re promising to play other hits too. Don’t forget that “Remedy” still fucks, and the Crowes’ rendition of John Lennon’s “Jealous Guy” rivals Otis Redding’s “Hard to Handle” as the band’s best cover song. July 20-21 at Ascend Amphitheater LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

AUGUST 14 AT 7 & 9:30 PM

THEO VON

AUGUST 28 3RD SHOW ADDED!

ASHLEY MCBRYDE

with Caitlyn Smith

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

AUGUST 31

THE BAND CAMINO

with special guests Valley & Nightly

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

DECEMBER 12

TRAILER PARK BOYS

20th Anniversary Sunnyvale Xmas

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

MARCH 26, 2022

BUDDY GUY

with special guest Eric Johnson

CRAIG D. LINDSEY

TUESDAY / 7.20 MUSIC

UPGRADE YOUR NIGHT WITH A RYMAN PREMIUM PASS [DRUGSTORE LOVIN’]

THE BLACK CROWES PLAY SHAKE YOUR MONEYMAKER

The year was 1990 — a year before Nirvana’s Nevermind, but a year after Milli Vanilli’s Girl You Know It’s True. If you

FOR TICKET INFORMATION AND MORE, VISIT RYMAN.COM THE BLACK CROWES

Historically Cool Since 1892

FOLLOW US @THERYMAN

116 Rep. John Lewis Way North Nashville, TN 37219

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FOOD AND DRINK

COOKING WITH THE STARS:

KRISTIN CAVALLARI

Reading, cooking and — let’s be honest — judging Cavallari’s newest cookbook True Comfort BY ASHLEY BRANTLEY

of every recipe, every time — especially for things like Big Mac Salad (p. 80), which sounds like a train wreck that I need in my eyeballs.

THE WRITING

Let’s begin with my favorite moment: Kristin defines okra (p. 150). “If you don’t know what okra is, it sort of looks like a thicker green bean and has a milder flavor.” Clearly, I take issue with that assessment — we’re just going to skip right over the goo? — but most importantly, I have to ask: Do they not have okra in California? Or Illinois? Or anywhere KCav’s legions of fans are clamoring for True Comfort? The recipes in this book call for goat’s-milk butter and vegan mayonnaise; I feel like okra isn’t what needs explaining. Overall, the writing is clear if bland, which isn’t a word I thought I’d ever use to describe Kristin. I get it: We’ve all grown up! But the mom of three still had an edge as recently as Very Cavallari. In this book, it feels like every ounce of bad bitch has been stripped out and replaced with healthmommy sponcon. I’m sure that’s good for business, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t miss the girl who once yelled at a friend: “He’s cheating on you! Take it from someone who used to cheat.” Iconic.

THE DRAMA

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

There are two introductions to this book: one from Kristin and one from Michael. Who is Michael? Great question. An explanation is nowhere in this book, which required me to do some digging. The short story is this: Mike Kubiesa was the family’s personal chef for years, and he partnered with Cavallari on her first cookbook, True Roots. When this one came out, Kubiesa felt a little pushed out — no press appearances, few mentions, etc. He told the Chicago Tribune: “They’re all my personal recipes that we had catered towards her and her family. We went over every recipe together, but I would say the majority of them are things I have made in the past and just elevated them or health-ified them for the book.” In general, Kubiesa wanted acknowledgment

L

ike any good reality-TV relationship, my love of Kristin Cavallari is deep and problematic. From day one, I preferred her no-shits-given approach to LC’s vacant vibe on Laguna Beach. I stuck with her through two great seasons of Very Cavallari and one abysmal one. I own not one but two pairs of earrings from her ridiculously named Uncommon James. And I didn’t fully abandon her, even when I learned of her anti-vaxxer stance. (I also choose to remain blissfully unaware of whether that particular insanity extends to COVID.) This unhealthy love of all things KCav caught up with me in an unexpected place recently: an aisle at Books-A-Million. I was there researching a trend: celebrity cookbooks. These days, every celeb — from A- to D-list — has decided that their Meemaw’s tuna salad must be shared with the masses. It made me wonder: Are any of

26

THE RECIPES

I cooked four recipes from True Comfort, the groceries for which cost me $164. Building a Kristin-approved pantry doesn’t come cheap! You need stuff like gluten-free nut flours and chia seeds and pink Himalayan salt. (Kristin deeply believes the latter is healthier than table salt, while experts point out that you’d have to take down 3.7 pounds of it to meet your daily recommended amount of potassium, for example. As a salt lover, I’m game to try.) The first recipe I made was Chile Sesame Noodles With Spicy Meatballs (p. 71): bison meatballs, soba noodles, ponzu-chile sauce. The meatballs were tender and flavorful, laced with tamari, fresh ginger and sesame oil. I was curious about using almond flour in place of white, but it worked perfectly as a binder. The sauce was addictive, with plenty of zing from rice vinegar and mirin, umami from ponzu and bite from fresh jalapeños and scallions. I’m not a fan of soba — Kristin likes it because it won’t spike blood sugar like white pasta — so I’d swap out the noodles and add some veggies, but overall, I’d make this again. The second recipe I tried was Cucumber Salad With Dill and Shallots (p. 70). It is exactly the cool summer side dish it sounds like,

these books any good? Zac Brown, Martina McBride, Alan Jackson, Reese Witherspoon. Are we really to believe that all of these people not only cook, but also that they are so prolific in the kitchen that they’ve got 100 print-worthy recipes in the holster? A few might — I’m looking at my queen Trisha Yearwood — but I have questions when it comes to Joe Diffie (RIP), Hank Williams Jr. and Jessie James Decker (the latter of whom I had to Google). Today, we begin to answer those questions, starting with Ms. Cavallari’s cookbook True Comfort.

THE LOOK

The aesthetic of True Comfort is aggressive neutrality. In photos, Cavallari looks pretty and sterile — like a mannequin from a high-end store that’s been thrown into a field to sleepily sip a Turmeric Lemon AntiInflammatory Smoothie (p. 236). Overall, the photos are pleasing and innocuous — the kind that routinely net influencers 50,000 likes on Instagram. It’s all ... fine. My biggest issue is that only every third recipe gets a photo, and I need more. Social media has made me an image monster. I want a beautiful photo

CHILE SESAME NOODLES WITH SPICY MEATBALLS

PHOTO: ASHLEY BRANTLEY

In her new occasional series Cooking With the Stars, writer Ashley Brantley will put Nashville celebrity cookbooks to the test so you don’t have to.

for being “the undercover chef and brains behind the book.” Is this a surprise? No. Did I think KCav had two cookbooks up her chunkysweatered sleeve? Hell no. I knew she’d have a chef, a ghostwriter and everyone in between. But to not explain who this dude is assumes everyone who bought this book either: 1. owns the first one, or 2. follows Kristin’s life closely enough to know who Michael is, and that’s an overestimation of her fame. It’s also bad journalism! Give the man one line explaining his credentials and connection. Then I don’t have to Google him, and we don’t have this low-key messiness. (Or better yet, start a public feud with him and give us all the real drama we seek.)

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

FOOD AND DRINK

CUCUMBER SALAD WITH DILL AND SHALLOTS

For dessert, I made Avocado Chocolate Cookies With Sea Salt (p. 216), which use avocado in place of saturated fat. I mixed it with the other healthy stuff — oat flour, raw cacao powder, maple syrup — and baked it for the suggested 8 to 10 minutes, at which point it was a pudding-cookie. After another six minutes, the toothpick was clean and I had a tasty, chocolate-cakey treat. They’re more like brownies than cookies, and they cause some disconcerting condensation in your Tupperware, but everyone I gave them to liked them. Finally, in the name of impartiality, I tried something that could not interest me less: Espresso Overnight Oats (p. 30). The method was attractive: Dump stuff in a Mason jar; in the morning, eat said stuff. Into my jar went rolled oats, nut milk, maple syrup,

chia seeds, cacao nibs and a quarter-cup of cold brew. The next day, I opened it and took a bite. The result was, in a word, wet. Also mushy, bland, watery and overall a real bummer. Now, I am not an oats person, so I’d give special dispensation for that. However, Cafe Roze has made oats that I love, and my husband spit out the one bite of this he took.

Overall rating: 3.125 stars out of 5

THE VERDICT

Should you buy this book? I could go either way. At $27.99, True Comfort gave me a few swaps I couldn’t clock as healthy replacements in the finished dishes, and that’s a win. But it also gave me oats that had big Sixth Sense girl-under-the-bed vibes. If you’re going to grab a KCav book, I’d wager True Roots is probably the superior of the two. Professional chefs spend years perfecting every last recipe before they put out a cookbook, and that’s what makes me leery of the idea that every “CEO of a lifestyle brand” has one cookbook in them, let alone two. But if all you want is to put on a cozy sweater, drink a charcoal latte and channel your inner KCav, True Comfort should get it done. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

with some twists. First, it uses thinly sliced shallots in place of onions, which keeps it delicate and balanced (though I’d soak them in water for 10 minutes first). Secondly, it punches up its vegan-mayo dressing with Champagne vinegar and lemon zest, both of which are excellent chef-inspired secret weapons to have in your arsenal.

VEG OUT:

COPPER BRANCH — UNITY FALAFEL WRAP The plant-based fare at this downtown outpost is satisfying and creative

AVOCADO CHOCOLATE COOKIES WITH SEA SALT

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

I

t’s unusual for the Scene to highlight the local outpost of a restaurant chain, but Copper Branch is an unusual case. The Nashville location of what claims to be the world’s largest plant-based restaurant chain opened downtown earlier this year. The entire menu, from breakfast to dinner, is vegan, so if you are eschewing meat — either on occasion or 24/7 — this is the place to get quick, filling, not-at-all-boring eats COPPER BRANCH 601 CHURCH ST. downtown. 615-915-1474 Located where Provence Breads and Cafe used to be in the Nashville Public Library building (yes, they validate parking in that library garage), Copper Branch offers smoothies, maple tempeh sandwiches, "wings," baked goods, salads, soups and pretty much anything else you can imagine, made with plant-based ingredients. There’s even a vegan poutine. The satisfying Unity Falafel Wrap is spiced with nutritional yeast, red cabbage, turmeric and garlic and uses a spelt tortilla to hold it all together. There are a few tables inside, plus on the patio, but the restaurant is across the street from the newly reopened and entirely awesome Church Street Park — so if you’re going to picnic, this is a great spot to grab supplies. Free WiFi means you can send your friends pics of the brightly colored sriracha coleslaw. MARGARET LITTMAN

nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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ART

INTO FOCUS

In a new exhibit at Scarritt Bennett, photojournalists turn their lenses toward the pandemic’s effects BY RON WYNN

PRI NTERS ALLEY

PRI NTERS ALLEY

NASHVI LLE, TN

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THERE’S NOT NOT BOOZE IN HERE

I

t goes without saying that COVID-19 has been devastating — not only in terms of lost lives, but also the impact it’s had on business, personal and artistic endeavors. But despite all the negativity, many people have NASHVILLE: A PANDEMIC found positive OBSERVED ways to express OPENING RECEPTION themselves during 4:30-6:30 P.M. THURSDAY, the pandemic. One JULY 15; THROUGH SEPT. 1 AT THE SCARRITT BENNETT of them is prolific CENTER, 1027 18TH AVE. S. Nashville-based THE PEARL & THE WOLFE photographer Joon BY JOON ROBIN POWELL Robin Powell. AND TARA POWELL Along with HORSE & BUGGY PRESS several of her col$45 leagues, Powell utilized the time and circumstances of forced

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PHOTO: JOON ROBIN POWELL

PHOTO: BILL STEBER

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isolation and confinement to focus her photographic eye on intensely personal situations and relationships, and the results are now on display at the Scarritt Bennett Center. The exhibition, Nashville: A Pandemic Observed, includes images shot by Powell and her collaborators — John Partipilo, Bill Steber and Dawn Majors. There will be an opening reception Thursday, and the exhibition will be on view until September. After the Scarritt Bennett show ends, Vanderbilt will host the artists’ work next year, and it will then become part of the university’s permanent collection. “In the summer of 2020, I was deep into photographing my family during the pandemic,” Powell tells the Scene. “I had reached out to the other photographers, because they are friends, peers and col-

leagues whose work I had followed, and I had wanted to form some kind of community and plan an exhibit together. They were all enthusiastic about it. We all were seeking fellowship and wanted something tangible and lasting to look forward to. “Even though we all have been or are newspaper photographers, one of my favorite things about this group is how different we are,” she continues. “I enjoy looking at other people’s photos, and feel that I can learn something from each of them: Bill’s careful compositions, John’s dedication to the decisive moment, Dawn’s rich visual metaphors.” Each of the four artists in the exhibit pays close attention to detail, opting for a striking, distinctly individual approach to the exhibit’s general pandemic theme. The intimacy of Powell’s family photographs resonates in shots like one that features one of her children seated next to her husband, or another featuring both kids interacting. Steber, who is also an excellent musician and well-known for his visual chronicles of blues and the Southern experience, has intense portraits of frontline workers directly engaged in helping those most affected. Partipilo has engaging and joyful views of newly vaccinated women and other community scenes, while Majors brings home the pandemic’s shattering impact in vivid fashion through contrasting nature pictures, including a pair that simultaneously shows both a vivid range of colors and a decaying plant, or a dying bird. “There were a lot of difficult choices,” Powell says. “In the end, my selections serve as a guidebook for how our family got through the worst of the pandemic. It shows the children’s closeness to each other, their rich inner worlds, how our house became work, school, playground and refuge. It shows how they passed the time in the woods around our house, how we gathered in small groups, formed our own pod, wore masks, and tried to keep each other safe.” Powell also has a visually impressive new book available for sale. The Pearl & the Wolfe combines her photography with the written contributions of her sister, poet and author Tara Powell. As with the exhibit’s material, the book’s lens is turned inward. “I also developed migraines in 2016 when I was pregnant with my second child, and got pneumonia and was hospitalized for a spell.” Powell says. “The migraines changed the way I see things forever. Made me want to slow down and use film, and delight in little pieces of light and savor life in general. That experience essentially made me want to make The Pearl & the Wolfe a reality.” “As a newspaper photographer,” she says, “the most important things I ever photographed were storm coverage — including Outer Banks hurricanes, the flooding Mississippi River in Cairo, Ill. — the TennCare cuts in 2005 and 2006, and various social justice stories in Nashville. But the photos I carry around with me in my mind are always those of my family: the children, my sisters, aging parents and grandparents. I think that family, whether it is biological or found later in life, is a perfectly valid and important thing to document.” EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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BOOKS

MOTHER’S INSTINCT Emotional bond between mother and son fuels Rea Frey’s Until I Find You

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all it what you will — maternal instinct or mother’s intuition — but mothers seem to have a natural ability to know what a child needs and the resolve to ensure those needs are met. When the 3-month-old son of Rebecca Gray is apparently switched with another child, she summons that reserve of energy to find him in Until I Find You, Rea Frey’s emotionally intense third novel. Bec, as she is known to her friends, is already beset by many of the challenges of single motherhood when the unthinkable happens. Both her husband and her mother have recently passed away, leaving Bec to raise young UNTIL I FIND YOU JackREA FREY son by ST. MARTIN’S GRIFFIN 312 PAGES, $16.99 herself. On top of that, she’s suffering from a degenerative eye disorder, rendering her nearly blind. Only her photographic memory of familiar places helps her get around as well as she does. “As my vision went, it was like staring at a painting whose center had been wiped clean,” Bec muses. “It was manageable at first, like having really bad vision and forgetting your glasses. And then, everything finite slipped away.” While she has plenty of friends she can rely on to help her get around — many of whom are other mothers she frequently visits at a nearby park — Bec valiantly attempts to maintain as much independence as she can, often rejecting their offers of assistance. Even when she has an uncanny feeling that someone has been following her and moving things around in her mother’s house, where she now lives, she is reluctant to solicit the help of police. But after returning home from the park where she inexplicably had a fainting spell, Bec is convinced the baby in her stroller is not Jackson but someone else’s child. “An unfamiliar scent invades my nostrils, and I stop rocking,” Bec says. “There’s a baby in this room: a baby who feels like Jackson, who looks like Jackson, who could probably pass for Jackson if someone weren’t paying close enough attention. But I am. … This child is not my son.” Naturally, no one believes her. Frey expertly casts plenty of doubt on Bec’s interpretation of events among her friends and the police, including an ex-boyfriend who’s a detective. As much as they care for her and do their best to

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comfort her, there is seemingly no rational reason that her child has been switched with another, leaving them reluctant to take her at her word. And when she has been having blackouts, when she has been having trouble sleeping, when there is no physical proof to back up her claims, why should they? With the story told mostly from Bec’s first-person point of view, Frey easily sweeps readers into Bec’s mindset and evokes sympathy for her plight. While it seems plausible that she’s suffering from hallucinations brought on by sleep deprivation or has developed an unnatural paranoia, readers want to believe Bec isn’t delusional and that she will find Jackson. Frey’s straightforward prose keeps readers firmly rooted in Bec’s mission to find her son while ratcheting up the emotional angst as the novel progresses to a surprising end. Frey, a Nashville author of two previous novels and four nonfiction books, gives credit to the Tennessee School for the Blind, several doctors and several visually impaired individuals for their assistance in understanding life without the ability of sight. Frey admits in her acknowledgments that “stepping into Rebecca Gray’s world was one of the most humbling — and terrifying — experiences of my life.” With Until I Find You, she has shared that experience tenfold. For more local book coverage, please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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Jon Byrd brings advanced guitar moves to his new EP with Paul Niehaus

T

he first thing you notice about singer-songwriter Jon Byrd’s new EP Me & Paul is the guitar attack. Byrd’s latest batch of material hews to the laws singer-songwriters respect, and he sings in a tenor voice that sounds a little like Gram Parsons’ — but without the maudlin overtones. Me & Paul, which is Byrd’s first release in four years, advances the art of the Nashville co-write, with Byrd sharing songwriting credits with tunesmiths Kevin Gordon and Shannon Wright. Indeed, Byrd’s new music comes out of the singer-songwriter tradition. It also gives an idiosyncratic guitarist the opportunity to show off his highly ornamented style. Pedalsteel player Paul ME AND PAUL OUT FRIDAY, Niehaus — that’s JULY 16, VIA LONGLEAF the other guy in the PINE RECORDS EP’s title, whose résumé includes stints with alt-country band Calexico and Nashville rockers Lambchop — glides beside him. Byrd snaps off terse licks, played on a small nylon-string guitar equipped with a pickup, that function both as rhythm parts and as melody lines. The simplicity of Me & Paul puts the songs across, which is what singer-songwriters aim for. Me & Paul was produced by Joe V. McMahan, a Nashville guitarist and producerengineer who has overseen records by local songwriters like Gordon and blues singer Patrick Sweany. It presents a version of the sound Byrd and Niehaus have perfected in the Nashville shows they’ve done together over the past few years at venues like Madison’s Dee’s Country Cocktail Lounge, where the duo just wrapped up a June residency. They’ve also done similar residencies at

Betty’s Bar & Grill over on the West Side and Springwater by Centennial Park. For Byrd, who moved to Nashville 20 years ago with ambitions to be a picker and a songwriter, Me & Paul is about the songs, as people often say in Music City. It’s also about his guitar style, which is the product of long experience. “I came here as a sideman,” Byrd says via phone from his home in Nashville. “I never wanted to be the front guy. I just wanted to play guitar, find a great band and get better as a songwriter. I’d written a few songs and I thought they were pretty good, and so I just said, ‘You know, I want to go where the songwriters are.’ ” Byrd made the move to Nashville after spending the previous two decades in Atlanta, where he had played guitar in rock outfits like The Windbreakers and Slim Chance & the Convicts. He laughs about being what he calls “one of those shoegazing art-rockers” during his time in Atlanta, but Byrd spent his early years in Alabama, where he got a dose of both the hits of the day and country music. He was born on Sept. 4, 1955, in Birmingham, and grew up in the Alabama towns of Frisco City and Tuscaloosa. By the time he made his way to Atlanta in 1981, he was a proficient guitarist who listened to axmen like Television’s Tom Verlaine. That’s interesting, since Byrd makes a point of saying he never rocks. As he told writer Juli Thanki in a piece for The Tennessean: “I love rock. But I also know what rock is.” In Nashville, Byrd became immersed in the city’s alt-country songwriting scene. He joined a group of songwriters that includes folk-rocker Amelia White, country tune-

PHOTO: GINA FRARY BACON

BY EDD HURT

JON BYRD (RIGHT) AND PAUL NIEHAUS smith Davis Raines and New Wave guitarist and singer Tim Carroll. Byrd has also written with other quasi-country artists on the level of writer and musician Peter Cooper, who penned the jokey pro-Nashville tune “If Texas Is So Great” with Byrd. That song found its way onto Byrd’s album of material by some of his songwriting friends, 2017’s Dirty Ol’ River. Me & Paul replicates Byrd’s recent shows with Niehaus, right down to Byrd’s twangy vocals and push-and-pull guitar approach. For Niehaus, playing with Byrd has given him a chance to perform with a true guitar stylist. “It gives me an opportunity to play real country, and honor our heroes,” says Niehaus. “I hear a lot of Willie Nelson and Merle in his style. But he brings a new thing to it, which is inevitable. You can’t really go anywhere with just doing retro.” Me & Paul isn’t retro — listen to the way

Byrd fires off his guitar licks during a cover of The Louvin Brothers song “Cash on the Barrelhead.” Byrd and Niehaus also essay “I’ll Be Her Only One,” which Byrd wrote with Gordon. Like much of Byrd’s music, it skirts sentimentality but remains tough, thanks to his pained singing. Elsewhere on Me & Paul, “Why Must You Think of Leaving?,” Byrd’s co-write with Shannon Wright, dips its toe into rock, complete with chords that remind me of those in Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s 1972 folk-rock hit “From the Beginning.” Byrd’s percussive guitar makes the song work in the context of Nashville singer-songwriterdom, a subset of rock that generally doesn’t rock. “If I’m playin’ a steel-string acoustic, or my own Tele, I’m just blurring and blending. But man, I can do a little trill or a run on my nylon-string guitar, and it cuts.” EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

INTO THE TERRITORY

John R. Miller wrestles with an itinerant spirit on Depreciated BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

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PHOTO: DAVID McCLISTER

n John R. Miller’s song “Lookin’ Over My Shoulder,” the narrator has come back to a town he used to frequent and finds that things aren’t quite as he left them. “I used to roam these streets till daylight,” he sings. “Now the corners, they all look a little darker / I could swear they’re haunted / But I lost my proof.” “Lookin’ Over My Shoulder” opens Miller’s masterful new album Depreciated, out Friday DEPRECIATED OUT FRIDAY, JULY 16, VIA via Rounder Records. ROUNDER RECORDS; It’s also a window into PLAYING SUNDAY, JULY 18, the West Virginia-born AT 3RD AND LINDSLEY singer-songwriter’s artistic process. Miller has a gift for writing immersive songs that listeners can live inside, inspired by the places that shape us — and more often, the places we can’t go back to, hard as we may try. Miller, now a Nashvillian, wrote most of the 10

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songs that make up Depreciated over the past several years, road-testing many of them with the same adept country-folk-rock band that plays on the album. The group set up shop in Studio A of Nashville’s own Sound Emporium Studios with co-producers Justin Francis and Adam Meisterhans, embarking on what for Miller was an unusual recording experience. “I’ve never done [an album] like this, where I very intentionally go in and do it live in a studio with a band that had been playing the songs for a little while,” Miller tells the Scene. “So it was a much more intentional process than anything I’d really done in the past.” Miller, his band and collaborators finished Depreciated in just three days, recording most of the tracks live. He credits spending so much time honing the songs on the road — pre-pandemic, of course — as a major contributor to the ease the group felt during their time at the Sound Emporium. The process also allowed Miller’s songs to evolve. “Having greater perspective on [the songs] over time, I’ll change entire lines, I’ll change melody structures,” Miller explains. “Sometimes I’ll even change the whole feel of the song. … It’s sort of like a blob that we gradually make look like something.” You don’t have to spend long with Depreciated to hear that roadworn influence, with many tracks taking on the lived-in feeling of a favorite T-shirt. “Faustina” is based loosely on the story of Saint Faustina Kowalska, the Polish nun whose visions of Jesus in the early 20th century have had a big influence on Catholic worship practices surrounding the mercy of God. The song crackles with the warmth of fingerpicked guitar and Miller’s own voice, which sits somewhere between the plainspoken grit of Craig Finn and the hard-edged twang of fellow country singer-songwriters like Tyler Childers. “Coming Down,” a favorite of both fans and contemporaries like Childers, employs a deceptively laid-back arrangement for a melancholy story of the difficulties sometimes faced when returning home. “[Coming Down is] the oldest song we’re still playing,” Miller says. “That one was one that I had done with Adam [Meisterhans] before in a band that we had called Prison Book Club, back in West Virginia a long, long while back. That was a song that seemed to resonate with some folks. It’s kind of the only one that I kept playing over the years, but that I still really enjoyed.” Lyrically, Miller is the kind of writer who can find inspiration in nearly any situation, though he credits his travels as being particularly fruitful sources for new songs. As Miller has grown older, traveling still offers him new perspectives. But the wide-eyed vigor of his youthful wanderings has given way to a search for a sense of rootedness. “I’d always been really anxious to travel when I was younger,” he says. “I kind of always wanted to be someplace, anyplace else from where I was at. And I felt like I was looking for something, and I wasn’t even sure what it was. … As I’ve moved around and traveled so much, home was just in the van or, you know, with my buddies traveling around playing music. So, I think I sort of lost that sense of an anchor, and I feel like I’ve always been trying to find it again. And, you know, as I get older, it’s just become wherever I’m at.” Right after we spoke, Miller kicked off his first string of tour dates since the COVID-19 pandemic shut down the live music industry in March 2020. Following Sunday’s show at 3rd and Lindsley, he’ll spend July traveling the country in support of Depreciated, and he’s eager to be back at it. “I haven’t really gone too far from Nashville since we all got locked down, so I’m really looking forward to the opportunity to see some old friends and people I haven’t seen in a long time. … It’s pretty wild, and I didn’t really expect that we would get to do it, so I’m just taking it day by day.”

SHADES OF BLUE

Ida Mae stretches out on Click Click Domino BY DARYL SANDERS

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t’s approaching “fish and chips time” in London when the members of Ida Mae — husband and wife Chris Turpin and Stephanie Jean — join a Skype call to discuss Click Click Domino, their impressive new album, which will be released Friday. The British roots-rock duo moved to Nashville in 2019, but they’ve been back in the U.K. for a couple of months when we talk. They’ve been visiting family, as well as preparing for a live performance of their new material that would be streamed from a studio in London in late June. They’ve also been making CLICK CLICK DOMINO OUT music videos for FRIDAY, JULY 16, VIA VOW the singles from the ROAD RECORDS new record. “The video for ‘Click Click Domino’ was done in about two hours,” Turpin says. “About 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning, we ran around London, which was still in lockdown, just with our director friend Tim Hyland and a camera. It actually ended up snowing, and it very rarely snows in London.” Turpin is the group’s primary lyricist. He explains that the title track is a reaction to the political upheaval in the U.S. and to the power of social media. “I wanted to write a song that was kind of intuitive Twitter statements that pointed the finger at some of that stuff,” he says of “Click Click Domino.” “I’m the one that comes up with the strange lyrics and ideas, and Steph kind of comes in at the end as

EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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more of a director-slash-editor.” Ida Mae seems like an act on the brink of something big. With their good looks, mod attire and engaging personalities, they ooze star quality. But if a quick ride to fame and fortune was what they were chasing, they could have remained in England and built upon the success they had in the critically acclaimed alternative rock band Kill It Kid. No, the pair were in pursuit of something deeper and more fulfilling than stardom: musical freedom. After the breakup of Kill It Kid, they were working on new material in Turpin’s hometown of Norwich and performing occasionally in a nearby town on the east coast of England. “We had a load of new acoustic songs that we just wanted to play,” Stephanie Jean recalls. “So we’d go to this pub in Lowestoft, and we’d try them out once a month.” “As it happens, one of the guys in this small seaside town filmed us playing one of the songs and put it on Facebook,” Turpin adds. “And that ended up getting watched by an A&R man from Decca Records, who then picked us up for the first album.” Through Decca, they connected with renowned producer Ethan Johns, who signed on to produce their 2019 debut Chasing Lights. After the band had cut half the tracks, the label raised a complaint about the music. “It wasn’t commercial enough, and we weren’t willing to compromise,” Turpin explains. “And neither was Ethan.” Rather than comply, the couple split with Decca and ultimately formed their own label, Vow Road Records. With help from their manager at the U.K. office of Nashvillebased Vector Management, they arranged a distribution deal with Thirty Tigers. Before Chasing Lights came out, they moved to Nashville and hit the road in support of the record. “We did nearly 100,000 miles up and down

the U.S.,” Turpin says. “We did 43 states in about a year-and-a-half.” Their travels included slots opening for a pair of artists who are also now based in Nashville, Marcus King and Greta Van Fleet. That led to King and GVF lead guitarist Jake Kiszka making guest appearances on Click Click Domino. The new record builds on the sonic foundation laid on Chasing Lights. Blues is one of Ida Mae’s fundamental building blocks, and folk is another, which is itself informed by rural blues. The couple chose the name Ida Mae in part because of their mutual love for bluesman Sonny Terry’s song of the same name. It was the first song they ever sang together. Stephanie Jean brings her love of gospel into the mix as well. Because of COVID, Turpin and Stephanie Jean tracked the new album at their home in Nashville with Turpin wearing the producer’s hat. They then sent the tracks to Johns, who added drums at his studio in the U.K. Bassist Nick Pini added his parts remotely too. The record further establishes Turpin as an emerging guitar god. He plays a variety of guitars and other stringed instruments on it, making them sing, ring, cry, moan, growl and howl. As a classically trained pianist who was performing lunchtime jazz recitals when the couple first met, Stephanie Jean is herself no slouch on the keys. But Ida Mae’s soulful and unique vocal harmonies are the key to their captivating musical appeal. They have a special kind of vocal chemistry usually heard only between blood kin. The magic was present from the first time they sang together, and it hasn’t diminished. “Sometimes we can’t tell who’s who when we’re listening back, which is weird,” Stephanie Jean says with a laugh. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTO: ZACH PIGG

MUSIC

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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Namir Blade

told me when we spoke for a recent Scene profile. “I try to play the songs in unique ways we may not otherwise again. That’s what made the bands of yesteryear legendary. You had to be there.” Blade’s show Thursday night on the rooftop of Acme Feed and Seed — part of Lovenoise and Acme Radio’s The Change Up series — may end up being one of those shows talked about for years to come by the few dozen who caught it. With support from Clarksville MC SeddyMac, who warmed up a mostly seated crowd with a series of

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agile, scholarly raps with a bit of singing for good measure, the gathering functioned as a belated dual record release for Blade. The local rapper-producer issued two albums mid-pandemic: the solo outing Aphelion’s Traveling Circus, as well as Imaginary Everything, a collab with North Carolina producer L’Orange. Showgoers stood up and moved closer as Blade took the stage in a black silk buttonup splashed with artwork from Dragonball Z. The kind of guy whose Labor Day plans are more likely to involve DragonCon than Bonnaroo, Blade keeps the atmosphere light. But he’s dead serious about his craft. A musician from a very young age, now coming into his own at 29, he had no trouble filling a headline-length set. Where Blade’s shows typically involve a live band and a film element, on Thursday he was backed solely by DJ Jevity, with birds flying by as people slowly made their way along the downtown pedestrian bridge. The setup further highlighted his raw talent on the mic and ability to command a crowd. Playing off a tuned-in audience that had the words to many of the songs committed to memory, Blade touched on highlights from both of his recent releases. That included the Aphelion’s R&B vibe-out “Stay” and emotional tour de force “The Holy Mountain,” as well as Imaginary Everything’s anthemic, guitar-driven “Nihilism.” A camera crew was on hand filming the whole performance, and vocalists Jordan Webb (sporting a Dragonball shirt that matched Blade’s) and JSKodiak reprised their guest spots from the recorded versions of “Pace” and “Homesick,” respectively. From one moment to the next, the performance was simultaneously humorous and solemn, tough and vulnerable, squaring a flair for the eccentric with potential to connect with the masses. It reaffirmed what makes Blade such a compelling, intriguing up-and-comer — an artist whose best work still lies ahead. “He’s true to himself, and true to his influences,” said JSKodiak, caught for a comment after the show. “He thinks about the listener, and tries to shine a light on lesserknown ideas of Black culture, of nerd culture. … He creates a space where these new ideas have room to grow. You see it when you see him perform. People get so excited about singing the lyrics in his songs because they’re like, ‘That’s me.’ ” EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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FILM

GOING FASTER MILES AN HOUR

Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain compellingly eulogizes the beloved television star BY CORY WOODROOF

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nthony Bourdain lived a life larger than words can really describe. The culinary master turned insider writer extraordinaire turned television traveler and truth-teller captivated the globe with his sojourns into parts unknown, always armed with a sly sense of humor, open eyes and a big appetite. Certainly, Bourdain’s penchant for eating things like Vietnamese cobra hearts and insects earned him virality (no, not that kind), but his willingness to dive into culROADRUNNER: A FILM ABOUT ANTHONY BOURDAIN tures new to him R, 118 MINUTES without Western OPENING FRIDAY, JULY 16, bias made him a AT THE BELCOURT spiritual mentor to millions who tuned in to his various television shows and read his numerous books. To many, Bourdain understood how to live. His life was enviable — to travel around the world, meet new people, explore a bevy of cuisines and get paid for it? Bourdain’s journeys were, to his audience, dreams vicariously fulfilled. Bourdain killed himself in June 2018, just days after famed fashion designer Kate Spade did the same. It was a critical moment in mental health history — two beloved figures dying by suicide so close to one another. It sparked a national conversation on suicide prevention. For some people questions abounded as to why a person who seemed to live such a gregarious, full life would want to leave it. Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain wants to tell Bourdain’s story and eulogize his grand life, but

it also desperately wants to understand the tragedy of his death, almost above all else. Documentarian Morgan Neville is known for, among other projects, 2018’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor? — which studied another beloved entertainer, Mr. Rogers. Here Neville talks to many of Bourdain’s friends, coworkers and even one of his ex-wives about how the chef and television star formed his patented persona. He had a gruff but nevertheless inviting charm, a foul mouth and a giving heart. He had countless experiences to reference and an uncanny ability to connect with strangers. His programs — No Reservations and Parts Unknown among them — encouraged viewers to step outside their comfort zones and explore the grander world, free from undue judgment but always seeking out the best. He was a cook’s cook, a writer’s writer and a TV personality’s TV personality. Bourdain was revered. He was also human, and Roadrunner is at its best when it gently recounts some of Bourdain’s inner struggles. He was a busy man, one who didn’t get a ton of time to spend with his young family or to develop the sort of domestic bliss that so many take for granted. Bourdain’s life was certainly enviable, but the documentary shows that, as a sought-after celebrity, he had little opportunity to recharge and feel normal. Friends and colleagues paint a portrait of someone who felt a strong urge to tell people’s stories for them and affirm different cultures, but also of someone who

had a strong desire to feel loved. To some extent, the film dances around the melancholy of the situation, until it can’t help but face it directly: Bourdain died by suicide, and the visible horror, sadness and frustration felt by his friends, family and colleagues won’t fade away just by honoring his memory. Suicide is incredibly difficult to discuss, particularly because sometimes friends, family or fans want to rationalize why it happened. Roadrunner, despite trying to contextualize where Bourdain’s mind might’ve been at the time of his death, wisely stays

HOG WILD

Pig is a bit much, but it gives us some good Nicolas Cage BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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t seems like every couple of years, Nicolas Cage comes out of the forest to track down the sonsa-bitches who kidnapped his precious female partner. He did it in 2018 in Panos Cosmatos’ hella-trippy Mandy, in which he goes on a violent, vengeful journey to wipe out the cult who took his beloved titular girlfriend. Now he’s doing it again in Pig — and here he goes on a not-that-violent, not-soPIG vengeful journey to invesR, 92 MINUTES OPENING FRIDAY, JULY 16, tigate the whereabouts of AT THE BELCOURT his beloved titular pet. Cage plays a grizzled old dude who lives in the woods of Oregon and scoops up truffles with his female pig. All hell breaks loose when, late one night, his prized sow is taken. Our protagonist calls up a young buyer he usually does business with — a very douchey Alex Wolff (Hereditary) — and goes on the hunt for his hog. This means heading back into Portland, where the buyer

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discovers that the old man is a culinary legend who decided to take up a life of solitude when he lost a special someone. Yeah, Pig is kind of a wacky movie — dare I say, a tonally scattered one. Writer-director Michael Sarnoski plays everything straight as Cage and Wolff

venture through Portland’s weird food underworld, complete with a fight club where food servers beat the crap out of poor schnooks. I’m assuming this is because they need to take the bullshit they absorb from customers out on somebody. Pig often teeters between solemn-as-hell and

away from giving a cause. In the end, we’re left with a beautiful life cut short by inner demons, and a legacy this documentary does a wonderful job of recognizing and praising. As he did with Fred Rogers, Neville gets to the heart of who Bourdain was to us, but also who Bourdain was when the cameras were off. Trying to cope with such an overwhelming loss still hurts for those who loved the entertainer, but in the end, it’s the call to not take life for granted and to explore the beauty of the world around us that still rings true. Bourdain may be gone, but Roadrunner stands as a grand testament to who he was and how he continues to live on through those who keep his open-minded sensibilities close to their heart. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 — it’s a free, 24/7 source of assistance and guidance. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

amusingly absurd. The scene in which Cage quietly humiliates an ass-kissing chef he knows for selling out and creating trendy bullshit cuisine falls in the latter category. And yet, most of the movie has Cage dramatically wandering around Portlandia, visiting a former home, meeting up with an old loved one and coming face to face with a sinister restaurateur (Adam Arkin) who may know the whereabouts of our boy’s pig. Pig is yet another movie that features Cage working his stoic, straight-outta-the-woods magic, once again proving he isn’t manic and batshit-insane in every performance he does. I don’t know when it started (maybe with the 2013 David Gordon Green movie Joe), but the Oscar winner has been building quite a rep playing men who seem to be in their element only when they’re in the wilderness. Unfortunately, the movie doesn’t know whether to play it straight or balls-to-the-wall. Considering the fact that this year already gave us The Truffle Hunters — an enjoyable documentary about truffle foragers and their pets (who are mostly dogs) — Pig feels unbalanced and a little too much. However, if you want to see Nicolas Cage act cool, calm and collected, I can’t think of a better movie you should watch. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 – JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com

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his week’s guide to what is streaming is brought to you by an occasional pleasant breeze cutting through the humid soup of summer, fried everything, peanut-butter-fueled desserts (low-carb living can be hacked, thank you coconut milk), late afternoon sweat fits, the joy of hats (and UV umbrellas), and the complete and utter terror of the ocean being on fire. As always, look back at past issues of the Scene for more streaming recommendations.

THE BOSS BABY: FAMILY BUSINESS IN THEATERS AND ON PEACOCK

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If ultimately a little too loosey-goosey with its mythology and way meaner than it ought to be (Note: That is not what an industrial slicer is for), this first installment in a trilogy of films (the sequels, 1978 and 1666, are forthcoming) is a promising strike across the bow of contemporary horror. Bloody and brutal in abundance, with (in this installation, at least) enough ’90s hits to let you know they put that music budget to good use, this reinvention/resurrection/revitalization of R.L. Stine’s Fear Street series of books steps things up considerably from the Goosebumps universe, and it delivers some good scares and excellent sound-effects mixing. But here’s the thing: Fear Street Part One: 1994 delivers something that I’ve personally always wanted to see — a fusing of giallo stalkcraft and mall-culture decadence that pulls taut the synapses of timeless terror and youthful nostalgia. I’m talking about a suspense sequence in an after-hours Spencer’s Gifts lit only by black light. Maybe that’s not something that speaks to you. If not, I don’t know what to tell you. There are also weirdly heightened high school rivalries, palpable lesbian drama, a lot of murderers and a witch’s curse. Although there is probably more to the situation, which finds the town of Shadyside facing unspeakable horrors every few decades, than something as patriarchally pat as all that. Truthfully, it’s kind of sad that a film that exults in its R-ratedness to this extent is instead a Netflix exclusive, but if it gets more audiences to take a chance on bread-and-butter horror like this, I can’t complain. Bring on 1978 and 1666. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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There are two axioms to be aware of before reading anything I have to say about this sequel to the 2017 surprise international hit featuring Alec Baldwin making Glengarry Glen Ross jokes for, you know, the kids. One: This was not made for me, nor with me in mind as a possible member of its audience. Two: There is nowhere I won’t follow Amy Sedaris. The specifics of The Boss Baby: Family Business are very hazy, just because the material was not particularly engaging to my sensibilities. But honestly, I thought it would be a larf to see Jerri Blank herself deconstructing the family film industry from within. The universe of these Boss Babies is perplexing, because there is an entire industry of extremely advanced babies with an ingrained business structure. (They also wear little tailored suits, which is absolutely a warning about baby couture and how it is to be viewed with skepticism — one cannot really wear a suit until one has experienced a feeling of such mortification that they have a baseline sense of shame to battle against with slacks and a tie. Babies are shameless, in all senses of the word, so to have them wear business suits is both surreal and obscene.) But this movie has a squad of baby ninjas, so who am I to try to impose aesthetic guidelines? What makes the biggest impression in this animated whatsit is how at every step of the way, the tenets of reinforcement and repetition are in play. You can see this in just about every film aimed at kids, or trying for that four-quadrant appeal, in which every reel requires a restatement of the film’s thesis. (In this case, that babies help shock parents out of routine and drudgery through a benevolent chaos and that unity is stronger than division and that family problems spring from misunderstandings left to fester.) It’s weird, though, because this film is sort of at war with itself: On one side, there’s brightly colored madcap baby adventure and body transformation, and on the other there’s a labyrinthine conspiracy involving Jeff Goldblum’s Halloween IIIstyle quest to eliminate parents coupled with family drama meant to stick in Mom and Dad’s craw and compel them to reach out and make that call and heal whatever rift is eating away at their own family. It’s

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BY JASON SHAWHAN

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Infants of industry and fresh R.L. Stine, now available to stream

certainly more ambition than you might initially expect. As for Amy Sedaris, she’s vibrant and energetic and delivers exactly what was asked of her, which is kind of — disappointing? Again, this film has no reason to be concerned with what I, a single person in his 40s with no kids, have to say about it, but I really hoped there might be some interesting facets peeking out from behind this tsunami of digital everything. There’s a three-way brawl that for some reason is cut to “The Time Warp” from The Rocky Horror Picture Show, and that’s weird. It is defiantly not even casually addressing what that song or experience represents — it’s just part of a pop-culture gumbo that incorporates ’90s dancehall slang and a random assortment of movies and music from the past few decades, assigning them new meanings for the next generation. This is not Parker Posey in Blade: Trinity — it is a dartboard of several decades’ worth of entertainment magazines assembled in a lab, and it made me feel like the most decrepit, rotting mummy of a sentient being you could imagine.

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Name that derives from the Hebrew word for “earth” First female U.S. attorney general X in XXX, maybe Most expensive spice in the world by weight Frequently Tip-off Model Miranda God depicted wearing ostrich feathers Per Be a political candidate ___ Up, political group formed in response to the AIDS crisis A little over three grains Big name in rental cars One- or two-person vehicles in the Olympics Source of latex Actress Falco Hardens Ending of seven country names River that starts in Pittsburgh Finish some gift-wrapping, say Word before black or Blue Meager

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Vodka Yonic nashvillescene.com Participating boutiques Any Old Iron K. McCarthy Memma The French Shoppe Flash Trash and a little bit of Sass Banded

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 9,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/ crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

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Rental Scene

Welcome to 2100 Acklen Flats

Your Neighborhood Local attractions: · Vanderbilt University and Hospital · Belmont University · Hillsboro Village · Music Row

Neighborhood dining and drinks: · Double Dogs Restaurant · Hopdoddy Burger Bar · Ruby Sunshine · Biscuit Love · Belcourt Taps · McDougal’s Chicken Fingers and Wings

FEATURED APARTMENT LIVING

· Nicoletto’s Italian Kitchen · Fido · Pancake Pantry

Favorite local neighborhood bar: · Double Dogs Restaurant

Enjoy the outdoors: · St. Bernard Park · Fannie Mae Dees Park · Centennial Park · Centennial Dog Park

Best local family outing: · Adventure Science Center

Best places nearby to see a show: · Belcourt Theatre · The Station Inn · The Basement · Ryman Auditorium

Your new home amenities: · Green Pet Area · Controlled access parking garage · Outside lounge area with gas grill and TV · Washer and Dryer in each apartment

Call the Rental Scene property you’re interested in and mention this ad to find out about a special promotion for Scene Readers

2104 Acklen Avenue, Nashville, TN 37212 | www.2100acklenflats.com | 615.291.0606

To advertise your property available for lease, contact Keith Wright at 615-557-4788 or kwright@fwpublishing.com

Cumberland Retreat 411 Annex Ave Nashville, TN 37209 1 Bed / 1 Bath 675 sq ft $959

2 Bed /1 Bath 1008 sq ft $1259 2 floor plans

cumberlandretreatapartments.com | 615.356.0257 Dupont Avenue Apartments 601 N. Dupont Avenue Madison, TN 37115

1 bed / 1 bath 650 sq ft $872 to $1184 3 floor plans

dupontavenue.com | 615.285.5687

Gazebo Apartments 141 Neese Drive Nashville TN 37211 1 Bed / 1 Bath 756 sq ft $1,119 +

2 Bed / 1.5 Bath - 2 Bath 1,047 – 1,098 sq ft $1,299 +

3 Bed / 2 Bath 1201 sq ft $1,399 +

5 floor plans

gazeboapts.com | 615.551.3832 38

NASHVILLE SCENE | JULY 15 - JULY 21, 2021 | nashvillescene.com


East End Village Townhomes 307 E Village Lane Nashville, TN 37216

1700-1820 sq ft plus 400 sq ft attached garage $1950-$2400 4 floor plans

eastendvillageapartmentsnashville.com | 629.205.9131

Fairfax Flats 206 Fairfax Ave Nashville, TN 37212 Non-Resident Notice Fourth Circuit Docket No. 21D780

1 bed / 1 bath $1200 to $1375 634 sq ft

TAMARA L. HOSSMAN vs. STEVEN J. HOSSMAN

Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D700 SHARITA MICHELLE MILTON vs. HERSHEY BENARD BURNETTE

InjuRy Auto ACCIdEnts WRongFul dEAth dAngERous And dEFECtIvE dRugs

Voted Best Attorney in Nashville Call 615-425-2500 for FREE Consultation

www.rockylawfirm.com LEGALS Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 21D700

SHARITA MICHELLE MILTON vs. HERSHEY BENARD BURNETTE In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon HERSHEY BENARD BURNETTE. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 29, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 30, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be

Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: June 30, 2021 Larry B. Hoover Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 7/8, 7/15, 7/22 & 7/29/2021 Non-Resident Notice Fourth Circuit Docket No. 21D780 TAMARA L. HOSSMAN vs. STEVEN J. HOSSMAN In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon STEVEN J. HOSSMAN. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 29, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 30, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: July 1, 2021 F. Michie Gibson, Jr. Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 7/8, 7/15, 7/22 & 7/29/2021

1 floor plan

fairfaxflats.com | 629.702.2840

2100 Acklen Flats 2104 Acklen Avenue, Nashville, TN 37212 Studio / 1 Bath 517 sq ft $1600 - $1625

NSC 7/8, 7/15, 7/22 & 7/29/2021 IN THE JUVENILE COURT FOR DICKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE AT CHARLOTTE Docket No.: 06-21-079-DN IN RE: LEXI GWEN CUNNINGHAM, A minor child under the age of eighteen (18) years MATTHEW CUNNINGHAM, MEGAN JONES, Petitioners, v DANELLE MAI BARR, Mother, Respondent. PAUL RYAN CUNNINGHAM, Father(Deceased). SERVICE BY PUBLICATION TO: DANELLE MAI BARR Pursuant to an Order entered by Dickson County Juvenile Court Judge Michael Meise, it appearing from the Petition for Dependency and Neglect filed in this cause, which is sworn to, that you are a resident of the State of Tennessee so that ordinary summons cannot be served upon you and you are therefore commanded to serve on Kirk Vandivort with Reynolds, Potter, Ragan and Vandivort, PLC., whose address is 210 East College Street, Dickson, Tennessee 37055 an Answer or Response to the Petition filed against you in this cause within 30 days from the fourth publication of this notice as required by law; otherwise a judgment by default will be taken against you. It required that this notice appear in the Nashville Scene for four consecutive weeks. This the 23rd day of June, 2021. NSC 7/1, 7/8, 7/15, 7/22, 2021

2 Bed / 2 Bath 1036-1215 sq ft $2400 - $2800

12 floor plans

naviHealth Inc. seeks multiple Senior Software Engineer’s in Brentwood, TN to design, develop, document, test, and debug new and existing software products. Req. MS+2 or BS+5 yrs. exp. To apply: Mail resume to naviHealth, Attn: Jaclyn Langseder, 210 Westwood Place, STE 400 Brentwood, TN 37027. Must reference Job Title & Job Code: 000044.

2100acklenflats.com | 615.499.5979

Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: July 1, 2021 F. Michie Gibson, Jr. Attorney for Plaintiff

1 Bed / 1 Bath 700 sq ft $1825 - $1975

LEGAL NOTICE Howard C. Gentry, Jr., Criminal Court Clerk It is my privilege as your elected Criminal Court Clerk to notify all citizens of Davidson County, that relative to grand jury proceedings, it is the duty of your grand jurors to investigate any public offense which they know or have reason to believe has been committed and which is triable or indictable in Davidson County. In addition to cases presented to the grand jury by your District Attorney, any citizen may petition the foreperson (foreman) of the grand jury for permission to testify concerning any offense in Davidson County. This is subject to provisions set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated 40-12-105. Pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 40-12104 and 40-12-105, the application to testify by any citizen must be accompanied by a sworn affidavit stating the facts or summarizing the proof which forms the basis of allegations contained in that application. Your grand jury foreperson is Parker Toler. His address is 222 Second Avenue North, Washington Square Building, Suite 510, Nashville, Tennessee 37201. The grand jury will meet at 8:00 A.M. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays for three (3) months. Submission of an affidavit which the applicant knows to be false in material regard shall be punishable as perjury. Any citizen testifying before the grand jury as to any material fact known to that citizen to be false shall be punishable as perjury. For a request for accommodation, please contact 8624260. NSC 7/15/2020

EMPLOYMENT naviHealth Inc. seeks multiple Senior Software Engineer’s in Brentwood, TN to design, develop, document, test, and debug new and existing software products. Req. MS+2 or BS+5 yrs. exp. To apply: Mail resume to naviHealth, Attn: Jaclyn Langseder, 210 Westwood Place, STE 400 Brentwood, TN 37027. Must reference Job Title & Job Code: 000044.

Sr. Analytics Engineer needed for HCA/Management Services, Nashville, TN. Perform Splunk configuration and administration. Work in a distributed/clustered environment and a multi-site environment. Will be responsible for Splunk security. Manage multiterabyte data ingestion. Engage in shell scripting, write SQLs and use Python. The employee may work remotely from home within commuting distance of Nashville, TN up 3 days per week. Must have a BS degree in computer science or engineering and 5 yrs. of overall progressive IT exp. working with Splunk which includes at least 2 yrs. of exp. in the skills listed above. Will also accept a MS degree in computer science or engineering and 3 yrs. of overall progressive IT exp. working with Splunk which includes 2 yrs. of exp. in the skills listed above. Send resumes to: elaine.healy@hcahealthcare .com

Advertise on the Backpage! It’s like little billboards right in front of you! Contact: classifieds@ fwpublishing .com

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In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon HERSHEY BENARD BURNETTE. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 29, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 30, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon STEVEN J. HOSSMAN. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HIS appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 29, 2021 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 30, 2021. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

Rental Scene

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nashvillescene.com | JULY 15 - JULY 21, 2021 | NASHVILLE SCENE

39


S U H P I TC

Nashville is a diverse city, and we want a pool of freelance contributors who reflect that diversity. We’re looking for new freelancers, and we particularly want to encourage writers of color & LGBTQ writers to pitch us.

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