Nashville Scene 6-23-22

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JUNE 23–29, 2022 I VOLUME 41 I NUMBER 21 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

METROPOLITIK: METRO NEEDS HUNDREDS MORE STAFF MEMBERS PAGE 7

FOOD & DRINK: 13 OF OUR FAVORITE SUMMER COCKTAILS PAGE 25

THE NASHVILLE PRIDE FESTIVAL, THE CITY’S QUEER HISTORY, A PROPOSED LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER AND MORE

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CONTENTS

JUNE 23, 2022

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25

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Conservation Group Receives Boost in Williamson County Land Dispute .............6

Tipple Play

A Little More Action … ........................... 38

CITY LIMITS

The dispute highlights the ongoing struggle to preserve history and green space in Middle Tennessee BY ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

Staffing Up ..................................................7 Metropolitik: Metro is seeking the equivalent of 504 new positions

FOOD AND DRINK 13 of our favorite summer cocktails

Baz Luhrmann’s Elvis is three films in one

BY KELSEY BEYELER, ASHLEY BRANTLEY AND MARGARET LITTMAN

BY JASON SHAWHAN

Space Is the Place .................................. 39 Neptune Frost is a funky fantasia that’s difficult to decipher but pretty to look at

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BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

ART

Off-Site: Jodi Hays in Los Angeles

BY ELI MOTYCKA

The longtime Nashvillian’s first solo show with Night Gallery opens June 25

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BY LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

Come Together ...........................................9

BOOKS

COVER STORY Pride 2022

A new nonprofit seeks to build an LGBTQ community center

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On Matters of Life and Death

BY ERICA CICCARONE

Vanderbilt neurosurgeon Jay Wellons reflects on a life devoted to healing

The Rainbow Connection ....................... 11

BY ABBY N. LEWIS AND CHAPTER 16

FiftyFoward offers LGBTQ elders focused support and fellowship BY LENA MAZEL

Class Acts ................................................ 11 Nashville Pride’s musical offerings include Daisha McBride, Bully, Tanya Tucker and more BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

Tales From the Women’s Protective Bureau ..................................................... 12 Two likely lesbian policewomen came to Nashville to keep an eye on the welfare of women and children in 1921

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What’s Next for Nashville After the Failed World Cup Bid? Dandgure’s Cafeteria to Close on June 30 Unnecessary Lightyear Blasts Off With Moderate Success

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In the Light of Day................................... 33 The Caverns Above Ground Amphitheater, a pandemic-era win for an indie venue, is here to stay BY CHRIS PARTON

Make America Laugh Again ................... 35

Digital Underground................................ 12

BY CORY WOODROOF

No Deeper Love ....................................... 35

BY LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

Eric Benét’s voice remains one of the finest in R&B

Not Too Young to Talk About It ............... 15

BY RON WYNN

BY KELSEY BEYELER

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Earth Goes to the Dogs in Lambchop’s ‘Police Dog Blues’

MUSIC

Nick Lutsko issues a supercharged brand of political parody

Despite harmful legislation on the state level, many Nashville organizations support LGBTQ youth

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THIS WEEK ON THE WEB:

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BY J.R. LIND

A talk with Sarah Calise, founder of the Nashville Queer History project

FILM

The Spin ................................................... 37 The Scene’s live-review column checks out Indigo de Souza, Goth Babe, Sons of Kemet and more at Bonnaroo BY LORIE LIEBIG, KAHWIT TELA, STEPHEN TRAGESER AND CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

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CRITICS’ PICKS Movies in the Park: Encanto, Flasher, Jackie Shane Block Party, Midnight Movies: Midsommar, QDP 10th Anniversary and Pride Party, Mandy Moore, Snooper w/$avvy & Moto Bandit and more

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THE JAN. 6 HEARINGS HAVE EMBARRASSED MANY REPUBLICANS — EXCEPT THE ONE WHO SHOULD BE MOST EMBARRASSED As the Jan. 6 committee hearings continue, truth is emerging about former President Trump’s actions, awareness and arrogance on the fateful day that our nation was under siege. Many Republicans in office have been embarrassed by the findings of these hearings. But the one GOP leader who should feel the most shame and regret apparently feels nothing of the sort. Trump continues to speak falsely, all for his personal gain. The U.S. House select committee’s investigation of the political insurrection on Jan. 6, 2021, has featured increasingly startling and profound revelations. What’s been made patently clear is this: Donald Trump was fully aware of the illegality of his “stolen election” claims but continued anyway. Everyone told him — from his closest aides to his daughter/senior adviser Ivanka, his son-in-law Jared Kushner and then-U.S. Attorney General William Barr. Barr, the senior-most government attorney in the country at the time, told Trump that his scheme of election fraud was incorrect and illegal. What did the president do? He ignored the direction so completely that Barr resigned during the “stolen election” frenzy, just days before the Capitol siege. Thanks to the dogged House investigation, we know that Barr said during his testimony: “I made it clear I did not agree with the idea of saying the election was stolen and putting out this stuff, which I told the president was bullshit. I didn’t want to be a part of it, and that’s one of the reasons that went into me deciding to leave when I did.” Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner both have confirmed that they didn’t believe the election-fraud story and attempted to persuade Trump accordingly. Small revelations from these hearings are resounding just as loudly as the gargantuan truths. This moment in particular won’t stop resonating in my mind: Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien referred to himself and the few others attempting to speak reasonably about the situation as “Team Normal”! That brings the danger home in a way that major testimonies cannot. The small bits of testimony and vivid imagery tell a story that rings with the awful truth. One particular image that most disturbs me is of Capitol security, weapons drawn, protecting the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives, doors barricaded with heavy furniture. And the image of our elected officials huddled in the balcony as if they were under attack … no, wait — they were under attack. That’s the horrible fact of the matter. They were under attack by the mob that our then-president had rallied

that very morning with these words: “We fight like hell. And if you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.” They sure took him at his word, didn’t they? Mere hours later, that angry mob stormed the Capitol and made history of the worst kind. Perhaps the worst image of all shows the makeshift gallows with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building in the distance. We’ve known since that horrible day that the mob was shouting “Hang Mike Pence,” but finding out that Trump “reacted with approval” to the chants? How can this have happened in the United States of America? Yet another mind-boggling detail uncovered by these hearings is that Trump scammed supporters out of $250 million for a fraud fund that didn’t even exist. That’s why he’s continued espousing claims that have been proven false again and again. He has 250 million reasons to keep the grift going — and that’s horrifying and unsurprising at the same time. As our country reels from the hard truths revealed by the House select committee, what has Trump said? Here’s what he said earlier this month: “January 6 was not simply a protest. It represented the greatest movement in the history of our country to make America great again.” We must hope that logic and reason will rule the day, and there are promising signs. Trump’s once-mighty chokehold on the Republican party seems to be weakening. According to a recent report by The Hill, “Trump’s influence is waning.” It also appears that Trump’s power may have been trumped up, so to speak — that the candidates he’s so proud to say he got into office would’ve most likely won without his endorsement. Many political pundits are questioning the value of the supposed “Trump bump.” How can the party of Abraham Lincoln continue to accept Trump’s lies and danger? Lincoln kept our country whole during the Civil War, famously saying, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” How can the party of Ronald Reagan tolerate the unfathomable harm that Trump brought to our country? We must hope that the horrors of Jan. 6 will be fully investigated and those responsible held accountable. Perhaps we should consider the words of President Ronald Reagan — held in the highest esteem by many of the very rioters who stormed the Capitol, ironically enough: “Peace is not absence of conflict; it is the ability to handle conflict by peaceful means.”

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Managing Editor Alejandro Ramirez Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Arts Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Culture Editor Erica Ciccarone Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Contributing Editor Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Hannah Herner, J.R. Lind, Eli Motycka, William Williams, KateLynn White Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Steve Erickson, Nancy Floyd, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Kashif Andrew Graham, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steven Hale, Steve Haruch, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Craig D. Lindsey, Margaret Littman, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Daryl Sanders, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Editorial Intern Claudia Villeda Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Festival Director Olivia Britton Marketing and Promotions Manager Robin Fomusa Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers Richard Jacques, Deborah Laufer, Niki Tyree Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Jada Goggins, Audry Houle, Alissa Wetzel Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Frank Daniels III Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2022, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

In memory of Jim Ridley, editor 2009-2016

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus, the Nashville Post and Home Page Media Group in Williamson County

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS

The dispute highlights the ongoing struggle to preserve history and green space in Middle Tennessee BY ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

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ctivists working to prevent the development of mansions on a tract of green space along the Harpeth River in Williamson County have received a boost in their efforts. The Williamson County Heritage Foundation placed Vaughn Road on its annual Sites to Save list in May, identifying it as part of the Old Natchez Trace, a historic highway used by Native Americans since precolonial times and later traversed by white settlers in the 1800s. Vaughn Road cuts right through the proposed development. The land belonged to late civic leader Alice Hooker — sister-in-law of prominent Tennessee political figure John Jay Hooker and a member of the Ingram family — who placed almost 189 empty acres into a restrictive covenant before her death in 2019. In 2020, her children — led by her daughter Lisa Hooker Campbell — removed the covenant and sought permits to build 128 residential lots on 175 acres and seven lots on 14 acres, sparking outcry from neighbors and conservationists. The Williamson County Planning Commission denied the 175-acre proposal but approved the 14-acre tract, where Vaughn Road is located. Laura Turner, the founder of Citizens for Old Natchez Trace and one of the main organizers against the development, says that while historical recognition won’t prohibit construction, she hopes public pressure will spur the family to conduct studies of the land and ultimately abandon development. “We’re trying to … make the argument that this is priceless,” she says. The Williamson County Heritage Foundation’s announcement followed another victory for the group, when a judge ruled that the conservationists’ petition to have a higher court review the plans was valid and denied a motion to dismiss it. Until the petition is settled, the development is stalled. Activists have also raised concerns about wildlife living on or near the location — including a bald eagle spotted nearby — and the fact that Native American artifacts and graves may be located on the property. Former state archaeologist Nick Fielder, hired by Citizens for Old Natchez Trace, notes that there is a documented Mississippian settlement on the side of the river opposite the Hookers’ property. Additionally, artifacts and graves have been found within a three-mile radius of the land. Fielder says it’s unlikely another large settlement will be found on the Hooker property, but he would expect to find evidence of smaller farms and homes. As far as Fielder knows, the Hooker prop-

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LAURA TURNER erty has not been surveyed. Finding Indigenous graves could create a serious complication for the development, as Tennessee law would require any gravesites to be preserved or remains reinterred elsewhere. There are, however, examples of landowners preserving such sites as they build on the land. Three miles south of the Hooker property

VAUGHN ROAD PROPERTY

sits Old Town in Franklin. The archaeological site is owned by the wealthy Frist family, and while it is an active farm, the land also contains graves, evidence of temples and two mounds that were part of a Mississippian settlement. Archaeology professor Kevin Smith lends his historical expertise to the Frists to help them be, in his words, responsible stewards of the land. His work there precedes the Frists’ ownership — he was first called out to the land in 1991 when the previous owner, musician Jimmy Buffett, found stone-box graves while expanding his mansion. Critics of the Hooker property development are aware their qualms may sound like “not in my backyard”-style complaints, though Smith says they’re just calling for more thoughtful approaches — especially as the number of acres with potential artifacts dwindles. He adds that developers who don’t survey ahead of time may also find themselves dealing with a much higher price tag if it proves necessary to relocate graves or drum up new plans to build around them. Smith notes that it can be hard to drum up interest and investment in Indigenous history from non-Natives, even though the Missisippians were a civilization as complex as the Aztecs. Hunter Campbell, a self-described amateur archaeologist and founder of the Native activist group Justice for All Tribes, shares the sentiment. “It shouldn’t have to be [your history] for you to care,” says Campbell, who identifies as Oglala Lakota and Taos Pueblo. He says his organization supports the protest against the development. Establishing and preserving archaeological sites isn’t easy, but it can happen. The site of Aaittafama’ — formerly known as Kellytown — is currently a large field of green space at the corner of Hillsboro Road and Old Hickory Boulevard in Forest Hills. That land was the subject of a dispute when

stone-box graves were discovered during a road expansion in 1999, leading to the discovery of more evidence that a settlement once occupied the location. After 10 years in the courts, the Tennessee Department of Transportation decided that rather than move the graves, they would instead pour concrete over them and continue with the road expansion. The park is now owned by Nashville’s parks department, purchased with contributions from a nonprofit group. “In my role as executor of my late Mother’s estate I have been tasked with fulfilling her wishes as clearly contained in her last will and testament,” Lisa Hooker Campbell says in a statement through her lawyer James Weaver. “I have taken no actions in the past, nor will I in the future, inconsistent with my legal obligations as the Executor of the Estate, nor inconsistent with her wishes as expressed in her will.” Weaver followed up, writing, “Mrs. Campbell … is bound by the laws of the State of Tennessee and her ethical and [fiduciary] duties to the beneficiaries to carry out her Mother’s final wishes.” He also criticized the public campaign against the development, saying conservationists had conducted “character assassination” and libel against his client. Weaver did not answer a question about surveying the land, though he told Tennessee Lookout in April that one had been conducted and nothing had been found. Campbell is suing the Williamson County Planning Commission over its denial of the larger development. In previous statements, she said she pursued development of the land because it would have lost value under new zoning laws that permitted just one unit per 5 acres. The Hooker property’s proposals were submitted before the change and grandfathered in. Matt Masters contributed to this report. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTOS: HAMILTON MATTHEW MASTERS

CONSERVATION GROUP RECEIVES BOOST IN WILLIAMSON COUNTY LAND DISPUTE

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS METROPOLITIK

STAFFING UP Metro is seeking the equivalent of 504 new positions BY ELI MOTYCKA

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here’s a quip around the Metro Courthouse that Nashville’s government is the right size for the city five years ago. While “New Nashville” has become synonymous with unaffordable housing, displaced families, unrecognizable commercial districts and dysfunctional transit corridors, the growing pains extend beyond the market strain that has accompanied a decade-long infusion of people and wealth. This year’s budget makes plain Metro’s struggle to provide basic services to residents. The city’s many and varied departments, in requests to the mayor and in a series of department hearings in front of Metro Councilmembers, are now asking the council for the equivalent of 504 new fulltime positions. On June 23, the mayor’s office is hosting a job fair at McCabe Park Community Center featuring 15 different Metro departments. Several of these departments, and the mayor’s office itself, have hemorrhaged employees in the past two years. “When you look at the overall population of firefighters, Memphis has 1,700,” Nashville Fire Department Chief William Swann told the Metro Council on May 18. “Indianapolis has 1,200, Charlotte has a little over 1,000. We have 850.” There are more than 200 vacant positions just between the fire and police departments, where a few on-duty officers are stretched across too many patrols. One of FY23’s new line items is $1 million to support police recruitment. Other departments — like emergency communications and codes — have stayed stagnant or ticked up just barely, far outpaced by Nashville’s population growth. In 2021, the Department of Emergency Communications, which answers 911 and nonemergency lines, had a 15 percent turnover rate, with dispatchers sometimes handling twice the recommended amount of calls. “911 is not an area where we look to save money,” emergency communications director Stephen Martini tells the Scene. “Late spring and into the summer, call volume increases. We’ve got the processes well identified and are adding people, the vast majority of whom are frontline dispatchers.” While the average Nashvillian may rarely interact with Metro’s deep innards, an understaffed codes department is scrambling to meet the demand for building inspections, structural safety, licensing and permitting in a city that is quickly remaking its physical environment. Other markers are more familiar — a season of stranded trash bins and frame-rattling potholes have contributed to the public perception that the city can’t deliver basic services. To get a read on the situation, Mayor John Cooper’s office tapped the consulting market

a few months ago, hiring Tampa-based firm MGT Consulting. Rather than task Metro staff directly, Cooper has often charged his office with tasking others, making consultants a go-to troubleshoot for the administration in recent months. Earlier this month, the Continuum of Care Homelessness Planning Council sat through a $500,000 report by New Orleans-based organization HousingNOLA that recommended building more supportive housing and creating a stand-alone Office of Homeless Services. (Advocates have long called for such measures, and Councilmember Freddie O’Connell had already filed a bill for a stand-alone office.) The mayor’s Office of Economic and Community Development, overseen by Courtney Pogue, is preparing to commission a second economic development study while newly hired consultants chip away at a local economic development strategy. Cooper has made a habit of reaching for third-party consults before formulating policy — a long list of advisory committees and task forces, each with associated recommendations and reports, trails his nearly three years in office. As a candidate, he vowed to create rules regulating the use and supervision of outside consultants. Those guidelines have not yet materialized. “In an effort to be thoughtful and strategic when spending tax dollars, Mayor Cooper commissioned outside experts to give an objective assessment for the most effective way we can add capacity and meet the workload demands of a thriving city,” spokesperson TJ Ducklo tells the Scene. Ducklo, a new hire who joined Cooper’s staff after being dismissed by the Biden administration, has notched nine weeks as Cooper’s chief communications director. These consultants’ findings fit into a new bit of city jargon introduced by the Cooper administration at April’s State of Metro address: “core city services,” the trash-andpothole type of deliverables that residents (and voters) expect — at minimum — from local government. A bulkier Metro, as budgeted for the next fiscal year by the Cooper administration, would see the equivalent of 8,434 total fulltime Metro positions, a 13 percent increase from the past two years: 83 additional positions at the fire department and EMS; 68 police; 39 in the Sheriff’s Office; 46 in parks; 35 in codes; 45 at Public Works and transportation; 43 in the Department of Emergency Communications; 18 at the health department; three in finance; and three in the legal department; among others. This year’s operating budget is also the priciest in recent years. Ducklo tells the Scene that the mayor wants departments generating more income to support increased expenses. “The additional staff across five departments — codes, planning, water services, [transportation] and fire — will be funded through new and/or updated development services fees so the burden is not placed on the everyday taxpayer,” says Ducklo. Metro Nashville Public Schools has faced its own churn. Teacher turnover spiked during the pandemic to 14 percent, and students’ chronic absenteeism nearly doubled to 29 percent. Amid slashed state funding, the Metro Council is caught in a well-documented struggle to make up the difference to secure a living wage for teachers and support staff. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


THE NASHVILLE PRIDE FESTIVAL, THE CITY’S QUEER HISTORY, A PROPOSED LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER AND MORE with the Nashville Pride Parade, kicking off from Broadway and Eighth Avenue South and continuing down Broadway to Second Avenue. The festival starts at 11 a.m. in Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park and picks up again Sunday at the same time. In addition to music — find our highlights on p. 11 — scores of vendors will be on site, and you can peruse many of the city’s LGBTQ-friendly organizations. There’s plenty for kids to do as well, including drag story time with Veronika Electronika at 3:30 p.m. both days. Get the full schedule of events and other info at nashvillepride.org. And for more Pride Month-related events going down this week, check out our Critics’ Picks on p. 19.

Come Together A new nonprofit seeks to build an

LEARN MORE ABOUT IN|TN AT INCLUSIONTN.ORG AND VISIT THEIR BOOTH SATURDAY AT NASHVILLE PRIDE FESTIVAL

LGBTQ community center BY ERICA CICCARONE

WHEN THE Scene rounded up recommendations for what Nashville needs for a cover story in February, we noted the lack of an LGBTQ community center that would give queer folks the place of belonging that other cities have. Readers responded affirmatively. Nashville has had small-scale spaces in the past — OutCentral on Church Street, the Rainbow Community Center and other unofficial but still important gathering places — but nothing formal has persevered. Over the course of five months in 2019, Nashville Pride conducted the Community Visioning Project, meeting with more than 2,000 LGBTQ folks in Middle Tennessee for structured feedback sessions to develop recommendations for how to secure a stable future for the LGBTQ community. The Scene attended one session, and the conversations were lively and passionate. Participants expressed frustration with the lack of housing, jobs and health care. They also came up with creative ways to solve problems in the future, expressing something close to hope. The report published by Pride — and available to read at nashvillepride.org/cvp — shows that 84 percent of participants prioritized a “centralized, safe, sober space for the LGBTQIA+ community” as a need. Other priorities include access to affordable and affirming health care, programming and resources for young adults and older adults, a centralized collection of resources and more year-round visibility of LGBTQIA+ life in the region. Phil Corbucci, who spearheaded the Community Visioning Project, spoke with the Scene in 2019 and expressed the urgency of obtaining broad community support for LGBTQ Middle Tennesseans: “Who’s going to step up to the plate and help create this? What organizations are going to step up to the plate and say, ‘We see that there’s a need in this specific arena, and we are best charged to carry that torch’?” Ultimately, Corbucci decided to found that organization himself. It’s called Inclusion Tennessee, abbreviated as In|TN, and it launched last week with a bold vision: building a Nashville LGBTQIA+ community center with satellite services throughout the region. “We want to build a space that we know people want to be in,”

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

Pride has come to Nashville again. In this year’s Pride Issue, we consider what the LGBTQ community needs to thrive. We explore the creative ways queer Nashvillians and their allies are collaborating and rallying, from efforts to build an LGBTQ community center to education advocacy and elder support. We talk with the founder of the Nashville Queer History project, who is creating a digital archive to document LGBTQ life in Music City. Meanwhile, our resident historian uncovers the lives of two likely-lesbian policewomen who came to Nashville in 1921. The two-day Nashville Pride Festival begins Saturday at 10 a.m.

PHIL CORBUCCI says Corbucci, “and where services and resources exist to touch every part of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. … This needs to be a space where people can be connected into the services and resources that allow them to be a fully present member of our society.” These services and resources come from the Community Visioning Project report and include health care services; smallbusiness incubators; fitness facilities; youth, elder and family programming; housing; workforce development; education; performing arts spaces; respite care for people who have just had gender-confirmation surgeries — the possibilities run the gamut from grand to intimate and everything in between. Corbucci also

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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acknowledges that urban growth is pushing many people outside the city, to areas where resources are already more scarce. The board, which is led by Corbucci, Dr. Quinton Walker and Meredith Fortney, includes members from a variety of fields, such as health care, education, nonprofit, branding, marketing and government. The organization is being incubated by The Center for Contemplative Justice, a group that “fosters unique justice startups.” Corbucci has suffered several losses since 2020 — his home was destroyed in the deadly March 2020 tornado, his service animal passed away, and his marketing business suffered due to the pandemic. “When people, in general, are dealt more than they can handle,” Corbucci says, “it allows them to see what really matters. And for me, it opened my eyes and allowed my path to be made clear.” “If Roe v. Wade goes away,” he says, “Republicans will continue to come at us for other things that they feel that they can chip away. And that is an incredible fear of mine. I think that the only way that we as a community can create change is by us coming together and ... modeling around ideas of collective impact to create the change.” Board member Dawn Cornelius wants the nonprofit to help LGBTQ people to be acknowledged for their many identities.

The Rainbow Connection FiftyFoward offers LGBTQ elders focused support and fellowship BY LENA MAZEL WHEN MARK EDWARD DICKERSON and Kevin Miehlke got married, they’d been together more than 30 years. The pair runs Donelson Cafe inside FiftyForward Donelson Station, and they held their wedding in the center’s gymnasium. The ceremony was packed to standing room only. Dickerson recently discussed his nuptials on FiftyForward’s Squeeze the Day podcast: “Seniors, you might think, ‘Hey, they’re not really going to be open to two guys here getting married.’ They all turned out, and it was such a wonderful evening.” Dickerson is one of many older LGBTQ adults in Nashville, a population that FiftyForward has been looking for new ways to support. The organization serves more than 20,000 individuals through its seven centers in the city, providing services like assisted care and conservatorship, but also offering chances to socialize through programs and events. Gretchen Funk, FiftyForward’s chief program officer, explains that while older LGBTQ adults may face issues similar to those of the general population — like increasing physical frailty, isolation and medical concerns — these issues are “more acute” in marginalized communities. In 2019, FiftyForward set up a series of listening sessions in the LGBTQ community. That same year, Nashville Pride began a large-scale study called the Community Visioning Project. Both organizations found

“When I walk into a room,” she says, “the first thing people see is that I’m a Black woman, and it’s not easily identifiable that I’m same-gender-loving. But it’s still part of my identity.” She “envisions In|TN to be a place where wherever you are, whatever your individual story is — and it all looks different — that everyone has a place, and there is this sense that we have some shared stories that obviously include sexual orientation [and] identity. There’s a whole lot more that binds us than that alone. When that part of us needs to be seen and needs to be validated and recognized or have a space for, In|TN becomes that place.” In|TN has partnered with the Nashville Civic Design Center to solicit further feedback from the community and conduct a feasibility study that will help put the next steps in place. NCDC has helped facilitate many such initiatives, including the recent The Fairgrounds Nashville plan and the park at Casa Azafrán. Their work will kick off at Nashville Pride on Saturday, where they’ll be soliciting feedback from attendees at the festival. They’re planning more engagements throughout the summer. The organizations hope to present their findings and next steps on Oct. 11, National Coming Out Day. A community center of these proportions

significant needs in the older LGBTQ community. Nashville Pride found that nearly 60 percent of older adults reported feeling a lack of companionship, and 50 percent reported feeling isolated from others. And Funk says that in FiftyForward’s listening sessions, about 9 out of 10 respondents said they didn’t feel prepared about aging and how to access resources. “For us, it was very clear,” says Funk. “This is something that we should provide a focus around.” Pride made six key recommendations in its Community Visioning Project report. One was dedicated resources for older LGBTQ adults. To address these needs, Pride created the Older Adult Visioning Task Force in 2019, a group that FiftyForward volunteered to host. Funk is one of the co-chairs of this committee. The other chair is Joseph Interrante, an LGBTQ community activist and former CEO of the HIV/AIDS service organization Nashville CARES. Interrante says many issues surrounding aging are “magnified by the loneliness that a lot of us feel.” Older LGBTQ adults are more likely to live alone and to have less connection with families; they’re also more likely to experience health disparities. Visibility is a primary concern; so is isolation. The task force meetings led FiftyForward to modify existing services and add new programs. One step was taking sensitivity training. In partnership with Stanford University’s PrideNet program, FiftyForward’s entire staff completed “cultural humility” training. Then they offered sensitivity training for community members in partnership with the local chapter of LGBTQ advocacy organization PFLAG. These sessions were well-attended, Funk says; many older adults know someone in the LGBTQ community and wanted to know how to support them. “Compared to maybe 10 years ago, so many people

will have a high price tag, and it’s difficult to estimate what that will be. Corbucci says that if they’re able to purchase an existing building and renovate, it might cost around $10 million. But buying a plot of land and starting from scratch could shoot up to $40 million — both daunting sums. Partnering with organizations, individuals and Metro government can get the needle moving. “If we do a good job of showing the value of this, engagement also builds support,” says NCDC CEO Eric Hoke. “The more support it has, the more favorable the project would be.” Another initiative of In|TN will answer a call from the Community Visioning Project: bringing together LGBTQ-mission-focused organizations, as well as those that touch LGBTQ life, to meet quarterly and collaborate. In|TN has worked with the Center for Nonprofit Management to build a comprehensive map of these organizations and get the ball rolling. In another initiative, In|TN is working with Vanderbilt University Medical Center to provide education around navigating the health care system, which is challenging for LGBTQ patients. “We just need the right people who can support this initiative,” says Corbucci. “And it’s governmental. It’s independent funders. It’s people who can tag onto a vision and say, ‘Yes, I want to join this fight.’ ” ■

have a child, a niece, a nephew, a neighbor, a church member that is in the LGBT community,” says Funk. “So I think there’s much more of an interest in learning.” To combat isolation, FiftyForward runs an LGBTQ peer support group, and Interrante points out similar benefits from volunteer opportunities, including on the task force. “The process of volunteering has made a lot of us feel less isolated,” he says. “It also increases our visibility within the community and within these organizations.” FiftyForward also works to make Pride events (which are sometimes physically demanding) more accessible to older adults. This year, the FiftyForward Pride Party will provide an air-conditioned space, food and games at their Rains Avenue center after the Pride parade. FiftyForward is also exploring longterm infrastructure changes. The Older Adult Visioning Task Force recommended exploring the possibility of becoming a SAGE affiliate (a satellite of the national advocacy group for older LGBTQ adults). SAGE affiliates operate differently in each city depending on the specific needs of the LGBTQ population, and Funk says there are some services, including the peer support group, that could already fit under SAGE’s umbrella. In the meantime, the group will continue adapting and expanding their programs. “It’s been a real joy to work with the people we’ve worked with,” Funk says. “There’s a lot of synergy and a lot of goodwill.” And for Interrante, being part of FiftyForward’s focus groups brought unexpected recognition. “Some of the most pressing and unmet needs are visibility and social isolation,” he says. “I felt it, and then in an odd way, I discovered to my delight that it wasn’t just me.” ■

Class Acts Nashville Pride’s musical offerings include Daisha McBride, Bully, Tanya Tucker and more BY BRITTNEY McKENNA

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NASHVILLE PRIDE JUNE 25-26 AT BICENTENNIAL CAPITOL MALL STATE PARK SEE THE FULL LINEUP AT NASHVILLEPRIDE.ORG, OR DOWNLOAD THE FESTIVAL’S APP

ive music is always at the heart of the Nashville Pride Festival, drawing queer acts and allies from Nashville and beyond to several stages during the two-day celebration. This year’s lineup is one of the festival’s best yet, bringing together local favorites like Bully, up-and-comers like The Kentucky Gentlemen and icons like Tanya Tucker for a diverse celebration of all things queer. And while Pride is always a crucial event, this year’s celebration feels particularly essential as the LGBTQ community weathers increasing scrutiny from right-wingers and mounting legislative attacks, like Florida’s controversial “Don’t Say Gay” law and anti-trans legislation here in Tennessee. Below, the Scene rounds up six acts not to miss on the main Equality Stage at this weekend’s Nashville Pride Festival at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park.

THE KENTUCKY GENTLEMEN

Twin brothers Brandon and Derek Campbell are The Kentucky Gentlemen, an emerging duo with a genre-defying sound, newly settled here in Nashville. Born and raised in Versailles, Ky., the brothers began singing together at an early age, coming back together after separate stints in college and moving to Nashville to craft their own take on R&B-influenced country music. The duo has found a breakout hit in “Whatever You’re Up For,” a clever, hook-laden love song that would liven up any country radio playlist. 12:30 p.m. Saturday

DAISHA McBRIDE

Nashville’s hip-hop community has received a lot of well-deserved — and long overdue — attention in recent years, in large part thanks to long-standing local acts like Daisha McBride. McBride is a prolific solo artist and frequent collaborator with fellow locals like Tim Gent and Mike Floss, earning acclaim and attention for tracks like 2020’s “On for the Night,” on which she shows off her singing chops, and her infectious 2019 album WILD. Look for newer tunes in McBride’s set, like this year’s bold, brassy “BUSS IT” and 2021’s icy “Nerve,” the latter off her excellent Let Me Get This Off My Chest. 2:45 p.m. Saturday

BULLY

There’s nothing quite like a Bully show, making the punk act’s early-evening set on Saturday a no-brainer. Principal member and songwriter Alicia Bognanno knows how to put on one hell of a performance, commanding the stage with her unrelenting vocals, wailing guitar and seemingly endless well of energy. Bognanno recently announced on Instagram that she’s tracking a new record, so keep an ear out for new tunes as well as cuts from Bully’s most recent LP, 2020’s critically acclaimed Sugaregg. 5:40 p.m. Saturday

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came to Nashville to keep an eye on the welfare of women and children in 1921 BY J.R. LIND

“WATCH YOUR STEP, MASHERS AND FLIRTS,” the Aug. 1, 1921, issue of The Nashville Tennessean bleated with a mixture of tut-tuttish warning and barely restrained glee about the subject matter to follow. The story lists all who should be on guard: “girls who spoon in the parks,” “fellows who hold hands with their girls in the movies,” “young women who hop in strange automobiles for drives, day or night” and “dance hall proprietors and devotees.” It’s a veritable cavalcade of ne’er-do-wells (and frankly, people who were having the most fun), but just to make sure this litany left no one out, the anonymous writer added to the catalog of the forewarned: “Girls in general, and, of course, the men, too.” Having covered everybody, we get to the news: Nashville’s first two policewomen were on the job. With funding from the Women’s Protective Bureau, the city hired Gertrude Whitney and Elizabeth Goodwin to come down from Buffalo, N.Y., and keep an eye on the welfare of women and children. It being 1921, the definition of women’s welfare was, of course, a little different, as was what women ostensibly needed “protection” from — public spooning, cinematic hand-holding, riding in cars with boys. But hey, it was a different time. The 19th Amendment was still a few weeks from its first birthday. The fact that Nashville was launching an arm of the police force specially dedicated to women wasn’t particularly notable. Lots of growing cities were starting similar programs. Women had moved to America’s cities in droves during World War I to pick up the work left vacant when the guys went Over There. Many were unmarried, making

Digital Underground

A talk with Sarah Calise, founder of the Nashville Queer History project BY LAURA HUTSON HUNTER IN SEPTEMBER OF LAST YEAR, public historian Sarah Calise launched Nashville Queer History, a digital archive that brings together newspaper articles, photos, videos and various other ephemera to help tell the story of Nashville’s LGBTQ history. For a relatively new endeavor, it has made huge strides toward making historically clandestine information acces-

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their own money and suddenly flush with the liberating power of the ballot. But cities were (and are, for that matter) often run by grumpy-Gus types who don’t like young women expressing their liberty so enthusiastically. Under the guise of “protection,” they wanted to keep an eye on all this freedom. That’s where people like Gertrude and Elizabeth came in. By 1921, they’d been at it for a while. The article gives the pair’s impressive credentials: They worked with Travelers Aid and in children’s welfare in Buffalo, “for the protection of girls” with War Camp Community Services in West Virginia during the war, and with the Chicago Refuge for Girls. These were seasoned pros. Gertrude told the paper they’d be carrying revolvers. While she and Elizabeth had never had occasion to use their pistols in the past, it’s not to say “we wouldn’t draw our revolvers and use them if the occasion demands.” But mostly they’d be working to “clean up the places in the city which encourage the misconduct of girls.” If all this sounds sort of antiquated and puritanical, well, it was. But here’s the thing. Gertrude and Elizabeth weren’t just partners. They were, almost certainly, Partners. And while gay and lesbian relationships date back to the dawn of man, and some level of community acceptance has always been present, at that time in America, there was always some obfuscation to maintain the “public dignity” (whatever that means). In this case, the reaction seems to have been … shrugs. There’s no record of the relationship being solemnized by church or state (finding a clergyman or county clerk who would have done such a thing would be a monumental task), but census records show them living together in 1920, 1930 and 1940, the latter two listing Gertrude — who was 10 years older — as head of household and Elizabeth as “partner.” Eventually, they’d be joined by their two adopted sons, Paul and Daniel, both bearing Gertrude’s surname of Whitney as their middle name and taking Elizabeth’s last name, Goodwin, as their own.

The family was woven into Nashville society. The boys attended public schools, the women were members of various social and writing clubs. Civic organizations praised their work. Despite the rather salacious and low-minded take of the initial Tennessean article, the women could be considered pioneers in combating what we’d now call sex trafficking. Later reporting lauded them for saving teenage girls from the perils of the city and lives of vice forced on them by unscrupulous men. The language was, as befitting the time, quite roundabout, but it’s clear Gertrude and Elizabeth were removing young women from forced sex work. Rather progressively for that time (and for this one, for that matter), their first instinct was to treat the women as victims rather than criminals, providing social services instead of simply locking them up. The Whitney Goodwins, if we may be so bold as to call them that, were rather peripatetic, but not because they had to flee cities once their family situation became well-known. Gertrude was plagued by respiratory problems. In one letter to a brother written in 1917, Elizabeth wrote of Gertrude, “I love her so much, I can’t bear to think of her being so miserable all the time.” The promise of a warmer climate is part of why they left upstate New York for Middle Tennessee. A drier climate is what pushed them to Dallas in 1937. They continued to work in children’s welfare. But Gertrude, by then in her 60s, remained in poor health, suffering a stroke and then a fall in 1943, leading to an injury from which she never recovered. She was buried in Cookeville, Tenn., where the local paper listed Elizabeth among her survivors, as a “close friend.” Paul and Dan were included as the couple’s adopted sons in the death notice, the paper opting to hyphenate WhitneyGoodwin in the boys’ names. Elizabeth lived until 1986, dying just shy of her 100th birthday. ■ AS PUBLISHED IN THE NASHVILLE TENNESSEAN, AUG. 1, 1921

Tales From the Women’s Protective Bureau Two likely lesbian policewomen

looks a lot like that of other American cities. Still, sible. Part of the project’s momentum comes from Calise has noticed a few things that stand out as Calise’s personal history as a queer person, but also unique to the area. from America’s ever-shifting political landscape. “One thing that’s shocked me is how “It seems like each year the government much certain church organizations were tries to ban LGBTQ content in public involved in queer community building,” schools, and it’s just really frustrating FOLLOW @NASHVILLEQUEERHISTORY she says. “The first gay community and demoralizing,” Calise tells the ON INSTAGRAM AND center we actually had was called Scene. “I just feel for queer and trans EXPLORE THE PROJECT AT NASHVILLEQUEERHISTORY.ORG Compton House, and it was on Compyouth who take that to heart, mentally ton Avenue, right by Belmont. And it and physically. Suicide rates are so high was run by the Metropolitan Community for queer and trans youth, and I know the Church, which was the Nashville chapter of a power of connecting to the past and how emnational organization. The whole church was a queerpowering it can be to know that people have survived affirming church — anyone could go to it, of course, and lived happily as themselves for decades in this but they were specifically trying to develop a queer area. So I wanted to be able to put that kind of hiscommunity. And in the 1980s, the lesbian movement tory out there in a way that’s online, so anyone with in Nashville heavily utilized the Unitarian Church on the internet can access it.” Woodmont Boulevard.” The story of Nashville’s queer history, it seems,

Continued from p. 11

BANTUG

Bantug is a fixture of Nashville’s pop scene, with the Atlanta-born artist first coming to prominence with 2017’s dreamy Blue EP. Fronted by Amanda Bantug, the band makes soaring, gauzy indie pop — a sound that should go over well with fans of Japanese Breakfast and Best Coast. Look for songs off the band’s most recent fulllength LP, 2021’s 12 Songs About Loneliness, which boasts the excellent single “High Worry.” 1:50 p.m. Sunday

MICHAELA JAÉ

Michaela Jaé is perhaps most famous for her role as Blanca Evangelista on FX’s critically acclaimed series Pose, which dramatizes the drag-ball scene of ’80s and ’90s New York. The Golden Globe winner is also a Berklee College of Music-trained vocalist and Broadway performer, as well as an emerging pop star. Jaé’s 2021 single “Something to Say” showed the multihyphenate could helm a pop tune with the best of them; if that track’s disco-tinged arrangement is any indication, Jaé’s set should turn Bicentennial Park into one giant dance floor. 4:30 p.m. Sunday

TANYA TUCKER

Country legend Tanya Tucker will close out the festival’s Equality Stage on Sunday evening. A longtime ally of the queer community, Tucker is sure to draw a huge crowd of fans hoping to hear her massive 1972 hit “Delta Dawn” or, more recently, tunes from her Brandi Carlile- and Shooter Jennings-produced, Grammy-winning 2019 LP While I’m Livin’. Entering a triumphant new act of her alreadystoried career, Tucker is still full of sass and swagger, and her performance should be, too. 6 p.m. Sunday ■

The Nashville Queer History Instagram account functions as a kind of microcosm of the project and features Calise’s illuminating captions. One early post included the newsprint poster for The Chute that looks like a Southern Tom of Finland cartoon. “The Chute,” Calise explains in the post, “was a complex of bars on Franklin Road that opened in the early 1980s and served as the home bar for several Nashville-area gay organizations, including the Smoky Mountain Rodeo Association, the Music City Bears and The Conductors, which is a leather club and the city’s oldest continuously run gay organization.” That kind of history is important to be able to visualize, says Calise. “It’s just so important to see that gay people have always been here, and they’ve been able to build lives and thrive despite whatever restrictions and oppressions have been placed upon them.” ■

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Not Too Young to Talk About It Despite harmful legislation on the state level, many Nashville organizations support LGBTQ youth BY KELSEY BEYELER IN TENNESSEE AND ACROSS the country, lawmakers have sought to introduce legislation banning LGBTQ-related instruction and conversations in schools and limiting trans student-athletes’ ability to participate in school sports. There’s no denying that these efforts are harmful to LGBTQ youth, but despite homophobic and transphobic legislation and the overwhelmingly conservative nature of Tennessee as a whole, there are many organizations in Nashville working to provide safe spaces, resources and support for LGBTQ youth. Metro Nashville Public Schools, for example, has made clear its support for LGBTQ students and staff. The MNPS for All campaign is geared toward providing what it calls Safe and Supportive Environments for the district’s LGBTQ community. The district has expanded its Gender and Sexuality Alliance student clubs in middle and high schools, implemented staff training and provided gender support plan templates that schools can use to help properly identify students’ pronouns. The MNPS board has also shown support for trans students by refusing to change its policy after the state banned trans student-athletes from competing on their own gender’s teams last year. This year’s legislative session produced a new, more specific law that withholds state funds from districts that don’t determine student athletes’ genders based on the student’s sex assigned at birth. Additionally, the MNPS board unanimously passed a resolution “affirming the physical, mental, emotional support of all students, staff, parents and stakeholders regardless of gender identity, gender expression or sexual orientation.” The district’s website lists resources for LGBTQ students, such as PFLAG, the Trevor Project, the Trans Buddy program, Vanderbilt’s program for LGBTQ health and the Oasis Center’s Just Us program. With Just Us, the Oasis Center — an organization that serves young people in crisis — specifically offers activities, meetings, resources and mental health support to LGBTQ youth across Tennessee, free of charge. Though young people can access Just Us

resources virtually, Clark says some folks travel from across the state to visit the Oasis Center. At the Oasis Center headquarters on Charlotte Avenue, the walls are lined with colorful art that celebrates Nashville’s LGBTQ community and leaders. “We’re really lucky being in Nashville, which is kind of the blue blip in the red sea, but that doesn’t mean it’s perfect,” says Just Us program manager Joseph Clark. “As soon as we cross out of Nashville, it’s a whole different story. We have a lot of young people who are homeschooled because their zoned schools are just not a safe space for them mentally, physically or emotionally.” Clark also notes that, despite MNPS’ efforts to create welcoming environments, some of its LGBTQ students don’t feel safe there either. This anxiety can be compounded for young people who are members of other marginalized communities, and mistreatment can come from peers, parents, government leaders and the media that young people consume. A way to support LGBTQ youth and combat intolerance is through education. “If you don’t have a space to be educated, to become aware, if you don’t have that visibility and that representation to know better, it’s very difficult to do better,” says Clark. There are several organizations working to educate folks at all levels, from individuals to school districts, communities and legislators. In addition to the Oasis Center, these organizations include the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, the Tennessee Equality Project and more. But LGBTQ support doesn’t always have to be formalized education. Clark notes how, for example, the Belcourt Theatre engages with Just Us’ Students of Stonewall group to watch and discuss LGBTQ media. He also mentions engagement offered by the Nashville Zoo and the Frist Art Museum. Local businesses like coffee shops and breweries donate proceeds to Just Us during Pride Month, and individuals can support their work through donations as well. “Having that visibility out in the community, too, I think is really impactful for people, especially young people to see — that they don’t just belong here at Oasis Center in our four walls, but they are welcome in a neighborhood in a community in social service spaces,” says Clark. As for the homophobes and transphobes? “I think the hate is always going to be louder than the love, the acceptance and the celebration,” says Clark. “We’re always going to see the not-so-great things more prolifically, more visibly and first, right? And we don’t always celebrate the small victories that are occurring every single day. There are a ton of things to celebrate.”

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MOVIES IN THE PARK: ENCANTO

Encounter an encanto under the stars this Thursday. Disney’s latest musical, Encanto, took home the Best Animated Feature Film award at this year’s Oscars. Featuring original music written by Lin-

Manuel Miranda, the film’s soundtrack hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart, with “We Don’t Talk About Bruno” landing at the top of the Billboard Hot 100. It’s official: The Madrigal family is a hit. (Even Bruno.) Become charmed by the colorful animation and catchy tunes of the Madrigal family in this Colombian-set magical story. You can sing and dance along to “We Don’t Talk About Bruno,” then cry along to “Dos

ART

“WHERE THE EARTH HIDES HIM,” LISA BACHMAN JONES

Erin Rae’s latest full-length, Lighten Up, was released in February 2022, but it’s still likely to land on a number of yearend best-of lists. That’s thanks to both the record’s spacey, expanded soundscape and to Rae’s vulnerable and hopeful songwriting, which is at its finest on this LP. Recorded in Topanga Canyon with producer and psych musician Jonathan Wilson — who’s also worked with Conor Oberst and Father John Misty — Lighten Up takes its title seriously, finding a bright spaciousness in the wake of the isolation of the pandemic. Rae’s become a hometown hero over the years, so Thursday night’s Basement East show should be a special one. Logan Ledger and DJ POBOY open. 8 p.m. at The Basement East, 917 Woodland St. BRITTNEY MCKENNA [O BROTHER]

THE ODYSSEY: A RETELLING, BY LISA BACHMAN JONES

If we’re ranking Nashville’s weirdest, most iconic interiors, a close second to the Egyptian Revivalist decor at the Downtown Presbyterian Church has got to be the Parthenon’s outrageously gilded Athena. It’s a great companion piece for this latest exhibition by longtime Nashvillian Lisa Bachman Jones, which opened June 22 in the Parthenon’s East Gallery. The Odyssey: A Retelling is exactly that — it’s Jones’ visual retelling of the epic Homer poem. She focuses on “the hospitality of the overlooked identities that made Odysseus’ long journey home possible.” While xenia — that’s the Greek concept of guest-friendship — is

a strong theme in the classic tale, it’s an interesting, unexpected approach that might well align with Nashville’s history as a destination for tourism. Look for sculptural works that recall the sea and female power. June 23-Jan. 8 at the Parthenon, 2500 West End Ave. LAURA HUTSON HUNTER MUSIC

R O U N D U P

[A CAPITAL IDEA]

FLASHER

Fresh-faced D.C. denizens Emma Baker (drums), Taylor Mulitz (guitar) and Danny Saperstein (bass) — Flasher, collectively — made a strong first impression with the 2018 debut Constant Image, a shotgun marriage of post-hardcore and mod-pop stylings. But Saperstein left the band shortly after, leaving Baker and Mulitz to soldier on as a duo. Constant Image’s hot-off-the-presses 13-song follow-up Love Is Yours recasts Flasher as a band that prioritizes tones and textures over livewire, band-in-a-room energy. Those whose collections include Stereolab and Broadcast records, Talking Heads’ Fear of Music, and/ or CDs by Aughts indie-tronica cult acts like Brooklyn-via-Michigan’s Mahogany and the Versus offshoot Plus/Minus, are sure to love it. Local motorik-punk greats Faux Ferocious and experimental pop juggernaut Heinous Orca support. 8 p.m. at The Blue Room at Third Man Records, 623 Seventh Ave. S. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

ART

W E E K L Y

[HERE WE GO IN SPURTS]

NASHVILLE ART TEACHERS: BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

Sometimes it seems like visual art is taken seriously only when it’s in a gallery or museum, but the most important and relevant artworks are often made in schools. Teaching artists are among the most important figures in art scenes, and Nashville’s are no exception. The Frist’s excellent survey of some of the area’s best work from elementary, middle and high school art teachers, Nashville Art Teachers: Beyond the Classroom, is a fantastic glimpse inside an undersung but influential community. A wool tapestry dyed with

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRITICS’ PICKS

SCENERY Arts and Culture News From the Nashville Scene

indigo by Crieve Hall Elementary School’s Sara Eberhart puts a dense, dreamy spin on the traditional mountain vista, while Two Rivers Middle School teacher Sydney Ellison paints the view from a car’s window that seems to reference both Edvard Munch and photorealism. Especially in the wake of the pandemic’s impact on education, it’s a great time to appreciate and celebrate the contributions of our area’s art teachers. Through Aug. 28 at the Frist Art Museum, 919 Broadway LAURA HUTSON HUNTER

25 DJ nashvilleleslie

26 DJ Los Afternoon Set PM ZG Smith’s Weekend Warblers 27 LIVE: Adam Meisterhans Trio 29 DARE TO FAIL Short Film Showcase

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Party at the Jefferson Street Sound Museum this Friday. Shane, who died at 78 in early 2019, is one of Nashville’s most important musical icons. She cut her teeth as a soul singer and drummer alongside Jefferson Street’s greatest — like Jimi Hendrix and Little Richard — before moving to Canada to further pursue her career and eventually leaving the spotlight in the early ’70s. Shane lived most of her life as an out transgender woman and is considered a pioneer of the queer community. Admission is free, and the event includes karaoke, a drag-ball contest, live music and more. 3-10 p.m. at Jefferson Street Sound Museum, 2004 Jefferson St. BRITTNEY MCKENNA

[MEMORY OF A FREE FESTIVAL]

MUSICIANS CORNER FEAT. TRÉ BURT, LERA LYNN & MORE

They say all good things must come to an end, and the first post-lockdown spring run of free weekly music fest Musicians Corner will indeed wrap up this weekend — but not without two more days of outstanding, local-centric live music amid the mighty oaks of Centennial Park. At the top of the bill Friday evening, you’ve got singer-songwriter and rocker Tré Burt, a thoughtful lyricist and fine bandleader who is among the last acts signed to the late John Prine’s Oh Boy Records before Prine’s death from COVID. Burt is reason enough to come out, but you don’t want to miss phenomenal singer-songwriters like Kyshona and Gustavo Moradel, either. Saturday’s headliner is another top-notch songsmith, Lera Lynn, who forced herself to take new creative approaches for her 2020 LP On My Own; she’d settled into writing and recording at home without outside input in 2019, just before the pandemic started. Her new studio LP Something More Than Love is set to be released in July. The nearlyimpossible-not-to-dance-to Brassville, who’ve proudly been building up a New Orleans-inspired brass band tradition here in Nashville, are also on the bill, along with rocker E.G. Vines, pop songsmith Ellisa Sun and lots more. 5-9 p.m. June 24, noon-6 p.m. June 25 at Centennial Park, 2500 West End Ave. STEPHEN TRAGESER [LONG MAY SHE REIGN]

JACKIE SHANE BLOCK PARTY

Celebrate the legacy of the late, great Jackie Shane at the Jackie Shane Block

[SHINY HAPPY PEOPLE]

MIDNIGHT MOVIES: MIDSOMMAR

I’m gonna keep it a hundred here: I don’t get this film. In fact, I’m not a big fan of Ari Aster in general. With this and his 2018 debut Hereditary, the man has built a rep for creating dismal arthouse horror where things start off bleak and just go off the gotdamn rails from there. But while Hereditary was mostly about freaking you out in the dark, his 2019 follow-up Midsommar is brazenly sunny and outdoorsy, no matter how fucked-up things get. (Like seemingly every other movie its distributor A24 drops these days, it proudly embraces its folk-horror roots.) But even though it’s not my thing, I can see a lot of Gen-Z and millennial sickos enjoying a midnight screening, watching Florence Pugh and a bunch of dumb American dudebros at a Swedish midsummer festival, unaware that they’ve immersed themselves in some twisted pagan madness. As my illustrious colleague Jason Shawhan once put it, it’s “a fine surgical probe coupled with a giant face-size mallet.” Midnight at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

PHOTO: STEVE CROSS

to collaborating on tunes with folks like Taylor Swift and Kanye West — though he’s since said he’d no longer work with West because of political differences. Bon Iver’s self-titled sophomore album won two Grammys, no doubt due in part to its rich, full and almost orchestral sound. And 2016’s 22, A Million and 2019’s I, I are no slouches either, both picking up Grammy nominations. Whether Bon Iver is playing something from the earlier days of Vernon’s Thoreau-style lyricism or a tune from a newer and breezier record, Ascend’s outdoor stage is a lovely spot to listen to it all. As part of Vernon’s organization 2 A Billion — which raises awareness for sexual abuse, domestic violence and gender disparity — each stop on this tour will call attention to a local nonprofit or organization working in those spheres. Folk trio Bonny Light Horseman is slated to open. 7:30 p.m. at Ascend Amphitheater, 310 First Ave. S. AMANDA HAGGARD

MUSIC

24 Hello Honky Tonk DJs

QDP

FILM

23 Residency: Paul Burch & WPA Ballclub

KRAFTWERK

[NOTHIN’ BUT A CLOWN DOG]

CLOWNVIS PRESLEY

When the pandemic hit, Clownvis Presley did what he does best — entertain the masses, only this time he was doing it online. Clownvis to the Rescue, a variety show of sorts livestreamed on Facebook and YouTube, has been streaming weekly ever since, with the Elvis-styled comedian and musical-parody performer bringing along a growing cast of oddball characters, such as Squeeb, his alien sidekick, and Brainina 95, a robot with the head of a mannequin. Featuring both classic bits and new songs and characters from

CRAIG D. LINDSEY

MUSIC

Nashville’s ONLY vinyl record store with full bar and 24 seasonal craft beers on tap.

MUSIC

Subscribe at nashvillescene.com/subscribe

[FOR LOVE OF THE KRAFT]

The biggest pop-crossover success of Germany’s post-World War II krautrock movement (see also: Can, Neu!), Kraftwerk offered contributions to the pantheon that encompass the symphonic (Autobahn, 1974), the robotic (The Man-Machine, 1978) and even the romantic (Electric Cafe, 1986). Düsseldorf’s finest lost its leader Florian Schneider in early 2020, but its 3-D concert series marches on to its steady trademark motorik beat. Through the 3-D specs, tunes like “Vitamin” (with its floor-to-ceiling visuals of pills cascading), “Tour De France” (a high-speed bike race right before your eyes) and, of course, Kraftwerk’s mission statement “The Robots,” take on new, immersive layers. Recommended especially for those with kiddos in the early stages of their musical journeys. 7 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Fifth Ave. N. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

COMMUNITY

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MUSIC

FRIDAY / 6.24

[GOOD WINTER IS COMING]

BON IVER W/BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN

Bon Iver’s debut album, For Emma, Forever Ago, was released 15 years ago — and I can hardly think of 2007 and 2008 without hearing bandleader Justin Vernon’s signature falsetto in my head. Vernon went from writing the band’s debut album isolated in the Wisconsin woods

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CRITICS’ PICKS the show, Clownvis will bring his show to Exit/In Friday with special guests The Beat Creeps. 7 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place JONATHAN SIMS

[PRIDE IN THE NAME OF LOVE]

QDP 10TH ANNIVERSARY AND PRIDE PARTY

411 KOREAN VETERANS BLVD., NASHVILLE, TN 37203

Your Best Yoga

L&L Market | 3820 Charlotte Ave. 615.750.5067 nashville.bendandzenhotyoga.com

[UNDER DA SEA]

THE SPONGEBOB MUSICAL

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If you think all there is to Mandy Moore is “Candy” and This Is Us, head to the Ryman on Saturday to be delightedly proven wrong. The onetime bubblegum pop star and celebrated actor just released a new album, In Real Life, that shows her songwriting chops delve far deeper than Top 40. Moore’s seventh record features dreamy indie pop with a healthy dose of introspection, reminiscent of more recent

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MANDY MOORE

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[THIS IS HER]

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I admit that I am too old to have an affinity for SpongeBob SquarePants, and the sponge’s popularity has always mystified me. Even still, the Nashville Children’s Theatre’s upcoming production looks like a lot of fun. Featuring the music of David Bowie, Cindy Lauper, They Might Be Giants and more, The SpongeBob Musical follows the adventures of Bikini Bottom’s favorite porous rectangle. Easton J. Curtis plays the titular sponge and Meggan Utech plays the thrill-seeking Texan squirrel Sandy Cheeks, with Amos Glass holding it down as the friendly but ignorant Patrick Star. The role of grumpy clarinetist Squidward Tentacles goes to Tyler Evick, and Deonté Warren plays Mrs. Puff, the pufferfish who tries in vain to teach S.B. to drive boats. The production is directed and choreographed by NCT artistic director Ernie Nolan. With lighting design by veteran technician Scott Leathers and David Weinstein directing music, it’s sure to be a colorful, lively time under the sea. June 25July 27 at Nashville Children’s Theatre, 25 Middleton St. ERICA CICCARONE

E V ENT

THEATER

Since 2012, Queer Dance Party — better known as QDP — has worked hard to move Nashville beyond establishing traditionally queer spaces and toward making everywhere feel welcoming for LGBTQ folks. And if you’ve wanted to have fun dancing with a truly diverse group of people in Nashville, their monthly events and other special parties have been your best bet. QDP’s annual Pride party on Saturday doubles as a 10th birthday celebration. The group’s DJs, whose party-friendly selections run the gamut from R&B and pop to hip-hop and various flavors of dance music, will be firing up the wheels of steel at Brooklyn Bowl — conveniently located a short walk from Nashville Pride Fest at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park — at 9 p.m. The venue will open up at 6 p.m. for bowling and food and drink, if that’s your preferred pregame. Expect the festivities to be punctuated with a bevy of drag performances; also expect cake and cava. Follow QDP on Instagram (@qdpnashville) for updates. 9 p.m. at Brooklyn Bowl, 925 Third Ave. N. STEPHEN TRAGESER

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DANCE

SATURDAY / 6.25

416A 21st South 615.321.2478 www.BenJerry.com

DOWNTOWN

Saturday, June 25

Sunday, July 10

SONGWRITER SESSION

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

Danny Wells

Ethan Ballinger

NOON · FORD THEATER

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Sunday, June 26

Tuesday, July 12

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

SONGWRITER ROUND

Eddy Dunlap 1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Martina McBride and Friends

Monday, June 27 – Saturday, July 9

Chris Lindsey, Aimee Mayo, and Brett Warren

FAMILY PROGRAM

2:30 pm · FORD THEATER

String City Nashville’s Tradition of Music and Puppetry

Sunday, July 17 MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

10:00 am and 11:30 am · FORD THEATER

Steve Hinson

FREE

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Sunday, July 3

Sunday, July 24

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

MUSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

Lauren Conklin

Jason Coleman

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

Check our calendar for a full schedule of upcoming programs and events. CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Calendar

Museum Membership Museum members receive unlimited Museum admission, concert ticket pre-sale opportunities, and much more. JOIN TODAY: CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Membership

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRITICS’ PICKS

6.27

6.28

Eric Benét

ALOK

Early & Late Shows

6.30

7.02

Chris Knight with Jason Eady

Gaby Moreno with Karina Daza

Presented by WMOT Roots Radio

6.25

NASHVILLE IMPROV IN THE LOUNGE

6.26

PONDEROSA GROVE IN THE LOUNGE

6.28 7.1

7.11 7.12

7.13 TYLER FISCHER LIVE STAND-UP COMEDY! 7.13 FEATURING WORLD RENOWNED ACTOR NICK SEARCY IN THE LOUNGE 7.14 WAYMORE’S OUTLAWS FEATURING TOMMY TOWNSEND 7.16

JON B ROREY CAROLL & TAYLOR MARTIN SOUL ASYLUM ACOUSTIC DUO

7.17

80’S BRUNCH FEATURING MIXTAPE

7.6

MIKE DAWES WITH TREVOR GORDON HALL IN THE LOUNGE

7.22

7.7

CHINA CRISIS 40TH ANNIVERSARY

TIM FOUST & FRIENDS FEATURING TEXAS HILL 6TH QUASI-ANNUAL BIRTHDAY BASH

7.8

HANNAH BETHEL IN THE LOUNGE

7.22

JOSH ROUSE IN THE LOUNGE

7.10

90’S BRUNCH FEATURING SMOKIN’ PEAS

7.24

ROCKABILLY BRUNCH FEATURING GOOD ROCKIN’ TONIGHT

ALL DAY, EVERYDAY, ALL SUMMER LONG!

BRING YOUR PUP TO OUR PATIO & RECEIVE HALF OFF YOUR FIRST GLASS OF WINE BOOK YOUR RESERVATION AT CITYWINERY.COM

609 LAFAYETTE ST. NASHVILLE, TN 37203, NASHVILLE, TN 37203 @CITYWINERYNSH . CITYWINERY.COM . 615.324.1033

22

MUSIC

[SUDDEN SERVICE]

S-E-R-V-I-C-E W/TOWER DEFENSE, CONAN NEUTRON & BAJA ERIK

S-E-R-V-I-C-E marks the return of Russell Simins to the stage — that’s the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion drummer, not

S-E-R-V-I-C-E the Def Jam label head — after a lengthy break from touring-band life. Fronted by Jilly Weiss — the gale-force vocalist from Indianapolis capital-R Rockers We Are Hex — with fellow Hoosier Mitch Geisinger holding down guitar duties and Simins manning the kit, the Indy indie trio rolls into town behind Drag Me, its massive-sounding debut for Bloomington’s Let’s Pretend Records. Birthday Party, L7 and Royal Trux fans take note. Also on the bill: Music City’s melody-forward dual-bass ensemble Tower Defense; Milwaukee-via-Oakland noise-rock agitator Conan Neutron and his band The Secret Friends; and Baja Erik, a self-described “uptight garage” combo with

SNOOPER W/$AVVY & MOTO BANDIT

STEPHEN TRAGESER

THE BACON BROTHERS ( EARLY & LATE SHOWS )

CHASTITY BROWN & LILLI LEWIS IN THE LOUNGE

[PEEK-A-BOO]

As pandemic restrictions eased back and live music became more common in fall 2021, Music City rockers Snooper really seemed to come into their own; they were a favorite of respondents to the Scene’s 2021 Rock ’n’ Roll Poll, as a favorite new discovery and as a band expected to rule in 2022. Fronted by singer and lo-fi filmmaker Blair Tramel and including longtime punk-scene stalwarts like guitarist Connor Cummins and drummer Cam Sarrett, Snooper is something of a performanceart project as well as a punk band — think of Devo’s immersive sensory experience, speed it up, add in a little dash of the wry comic sensibility of Frank Sidebottom and you’ve reached the gate to the ballpark. Through the winter and spring, they’ve been opening some of the best touring rock shows to come through Nashville (including appearances by Guerilla Toss and Sheer Mag) as well as rolling through SXSW. They’re headed out to Oakland, Calif., for the Mosswood Meltdown festival, but before they get on the road, they’ve set up a last-minute tour kickoff gig at much-loved DIY space Soft Junk. Multifaceted rapper $avvy and dream-pop duo Moto Bandits will open. 8 p.m. at Soft Junk, 919 Gallatin Ave.

SARAH POTENZA & KATIE KADAN

7.3

*WITH FOOD PURCHASE

WEEKEND CLASSICS: BADLANDS

FILM

Nashville Beatles Brunch featuring

Forever Abbey Road

[LOVE IS STRANGE]

PHOTO: GREG ANDREWS

Be The Rainbow

PRIDE Afterparty Drag Show

6.26

SUNDAY / 6.26

Inspired loosely by Charles Starkweather’s 1950s killing spree, auteur Terrence Malick’s 1973 directorial debut Badlands is a shockingly beautiful film — equal parts real and alien, and understatedly humorous when you least expect it. Martin Sheen’s disarmingly likable Kit Carruthers is a 25-year-old sociopath who takes Sissy Spacek’s Holly Sargis — a decade his junior and disquietingly unobjecting — on a murderous rampage through a cinematically pristine Midwest. Spacek’s Holly narrates their spree in a prairie-flat voice. “When people express what is most important to them, it often comes out in clichés,” Malick said once of Spacek’s narration. “That doesn’t make them laughable; it’s something tender about them.” And that, in its way, makes Holly — not the homicidal Kit — the film’s pivotal character. Badlands will screen twice this weekend as part of the Belcourt’s ongoing Weekend Classics series. If you’ve never seen it, or have never seen it on the big screen, don’t miss it. And if you find yourself yearning for more Spacek once you’re home, queue up the new, understated and underrated sci-fi series Night Sky on Amazon Prime Video. Spacek stars alongside the also-phenomenal J.K. Simmons, and proves that she hasn’t lost a step. 12:15 p.m. Jun 25-26 at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave. D. PATRICK RODGERS MUSIC

6.25

members of young-at-heart local punks Hurts to Laugh. 8 p.m. at The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

[CHICKEN! GOOD!]

THE FIFTH ELEMENT 25TH ANNIVERSARY

If it weren’t for John Woo’s over-thetop masterwork Face/Off — wherein John Travolta and Nicolas Cage do their most memorable work by basically performing insane impersonations of each other — Luc Besson’s chaotic sci-fi actioner would’ve been the only batshit-crazy summer blockbuster of 1997 made by a nonAmerican. Somehow, the La Femme Nikita director convinced Columbia Pictures to give him $90 million to make a futuristic disaster flick in which Bruce Willis’ flyingcab driver and Milla Jovovich’s manic pixie dream humanoid get together (in more ways than one, of course) to save the Earth. We also get Gary Oldman — going to 11, as always — as the main villain, Chris Tucker at his most Chris Tucker-y as a flamboyant talk-show host, and the bald-headed bully from the Friday movies (R.I.P. Tommy Lister Jr.) as the president. Both hectic and horny (Besson came up with the story when he was 16, which explains why this feels like both a fever dream and a wet dream), this space opera is essential viewing for sci-fi geeks who actually smash. Visit fathomevents.com for specific locations and showtimes. June 26 & 29 at AMC and Regal Theaters CRAIG D. LINDSEY MUSIC

FILM

LIVE MUSIC | URBAN WINERY | RESTAURANT | BAR | PRIVATE EVENTS

work from Vanessa Carlton or the rootsier side of Lucius. And don’t worry, longtime fans — “Candy” is still part of Moore’s set list, though in an updated, more mature form. Canadian singer-songwriter AHI will open. 8 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. BRITTNEY MCKENNA

[THE QUEENS STAY THE QUEENS]

ROBINAUGUST & QUEENS OF NOISE

RobinAugust Fritsch — guitarist for Southern Girls Rock Camp alums turned local faves Queens of Noise and now a student at Berklee College of Music

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CRITICS’ PICKS

This week at WEDNESDAY

6/23

THURSDAY

PHOTO: CAIT BRADY

6/24

FRIDAY

6/25 ROBINAUGUST

in Boston — steps out on her own with Avocado Head, her solo debut. She’ll return home to celebrate the occasion with a little help from her friends. Reversing a breakup announcement made last fall, the Queens themselves will also return to the stage for this double bill at Eastside Bowl, the new venue/diner/bowling alley just north of Briley Parkway on Gallatin Pike. Following in the footsteps of The Runaways (naturally), Joan Jett’s Blackhearts, The Donnas and Nashville’s own Those Darlins, the quintet’s perfectly primordial sound was great as is (give their ’19 debut Loretta a spin if you haven’t), but offered lots more to build on — here’s hoping this is more than just a one-off. 5 p.m. at Eastside Bowl, 1508A Gallatin Pike S. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

beautifully rendered songs (featuring a host of current and former Nashvillians, including William Tyler as musical director, Loney John Hutchins on guitar, Luke Schneider on pedal steel and more) are simultaneously soothing and engaging, blending various folk, blues and rock traditions with gospel as Jaye sings about where she’s been and what she’s learned about herself. She also worked with outstanding Nashville filmmaker Joshua Shoemaker on an accompanying film that illuminates the story and is synced to each song. Back in Music City for a visit, Jaye will give the songs their public debut with a full-band set at the Belcourt on Tuesday, followed by a screening of the film in full. 7 p.m. at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

FLASHER with FAUX FEROCIOUS BABY: AN INTIMATE R&B THROWBACK PARTY with DJS JOHN STAMPS & AFROSHEEN THE NUDE PARTY with CERAMIC ANIMAL The World Famous Bar & Venue at Third Man Records

STEPHEN TRAGESER

WEDNESDAY / 6.29

[SHELTER FROM THE STORM]

COURTNEY JAYE’S HYMNS AND HALLELUCINATIONS

Not having faith in religious organizations and hierarchies doesn’t have to mean you divorce yourself entirely from spirituality — from ideas about the importance of connections between humans and each other, or connections between humans and the world around them, or even that a higher power might somehow be involved in making it all work. But making those distinctions is not an easy task, made even harder when the public discourse is as extremely polarized as it has been for years. Courtney Jaye, who lived in Nashville in the early 2010s but left for Hawaii and Los Angeles, took her time processing her personal and spiritual journey. Following her 2013 record Love and Forgiveness, she began work on a collection of psychedelic gospel songs, or as she put it, “spiritual music for weirdos.” Keyboardist Ikey Owens, who worked with The Mars Volta and Jack White among others, was a big source of encouragement and support when others weren’t as enthusiastic. Following Owens’ death in 2014, Jaye kept working on the project slowly but surely, and in May, she self-released the resulting album, Hymns and Hallelucinations. The

FILM

FILM

TUESDAY / 6.28

[BLOOD WILL FLOW]

CREATURE FEATURE: IF FOOTMEN TIRE YOU, WHAT WILL HORSES DO?

Third Man Records’ deeply enjoyable Creature Feature movie nights continue with this majestic 1971 slice of homegrown exploitation, a heartfelt and perplexing shout at the unsaved from Nashvillians June and Ron Ormond. Taking a speculative sermon from Mississippi preacher Estus Pirkle, the Ormonds crafted a world gone wrong that is staggering to behold — an indictment of loose living, secular humanism, and living outside of Christian tradition. The Christian propaganda film is beholden to the principles of grindhouse filmmaking going all the way back to the elaborate depravities of 1934’s The Sign of the Cross. In 1996, co-writers David D. Duncan and the late, great Jim Ridley called Footmen “the most confounding piece of homegrown budget-conscious surrealism ever filmed,” and it’s all true. Now, thanks to the lovable freaks at byNWR, Nashville has a chance to see one of the defining works of our greatest exploitation filmmakers live again in the Blue Room, painting the walls red for a society that’s seen it all. 8 p.m. at The Blue Room at Third Man Records, 623 Seventh Ave. S. JASON SHAWHAN

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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EVERY TWO LANE BRINGS YOU HOME

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

Kick it up responsibly. American Golden Lager Beer. Brewed by Blue Crown Brewing, Daleville, VA. **Per 12 fl. oz. average analysis: Cals 99, Carbs 3.0 g, Protein 1.17 g, Fat 0.0g.


FOOD AND DRINK

TIPPLE PLAY 13 of our favorite summer cocktails

BY KELSEY BEYELER, ASHLEY BRANTLEY AND MARGARET LITTMAN

I

t’s hot, and you need a drink. (Longtime Nashville residents: Be sure to read that sentence in the voice of former regional pool-andspa spokesperson Jennifer Eichler, aka the “Watson’s Girl.”) This week, a handful of our tipple experts have rounded up 13 of our favorite cocktails from all over town — from East Nashville to downtown, West Nashville to Hillsboro Village. While some of the bars and restaurants mentioned here have been around for a while, many of them are new to the scene. But all of them have one thing in common: They make a mean drink. Read on. And if you don’t see your favorite cocktail listed here, shoot us a note — maybe it’ll land in our next roundup.

KIR ROYALE AT ONCE UPON A TIME IN FRANCE 1102 GALLATIN AVE. It only costs me $8 to be transported back to my carefree college days, spending a semester abroad in Paris. I just walk into East Nashville’s Once Upon a Time in France and order this combination of crème de cassis and Champagne. And I pay a tab I could have afforded even in college! Owner Melvil Arnt is adding it to the menu at his Overlord cocktail bar up the street too, so I can drink it even when OUATIF is too crowded to nab a seat at the bar. ML

FROZEN CAMPARI LEMONADE AT NICKY’S COAL FIRED

PALOMA AT PEARL DIVER

JIMMY RED AT AUDREY

PALOMA AT PEARL DIVER

809 MERIDIAN ST. There’s nothing Sean Brock’s team at Audrey can’t do with corn. These folks put heirloom Jimmy Red in everything from grits to beers to desserts — and now in cocktails. Made with brandy, sorghum and Appalachian spices, the Jimmy Red is all about the chilled corn milk. Served up, in a snifter, the delicate sipper is comforting, fragrant and sweet but also savory. If you’ve ever had milk punch during the holidays, this is summer’s answer. Cheers to Christmas in July. AB

1008 GALLATIN AVE. This favorite East Nashville bar offers many more involved, nuanced drinks, but sometimes you want something simple and straightforward, like a paloma. And Pearl Diver’s is the best version in town of the tequila-and-grapefruit refresher. ML

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

FROSÉ AT PINEWOOD 33 PEABODY ST. Yes, every honky-tonk and its mother has boozy adult slushies on the menu these days. But the one at Pinewood is the right combo of sweet and not, thanks to rose water and pisco. Plus, you can sip it while sitting in the outdoor pool. Summertime vibes all the way around. ML

PIMM’S CUP AT CAFE ROZE 1115 PORTER ROAD The bartenders at Cafe Roze like to mix it up, and that’s not just me using an awful pun. They’re constantly turning out new cocktails, but one remains the same: their Pimm’s Cup. Elegant in its simplicity — ginger, lemon, mint — the difference-maker is the strip of cucumber. It’s a garnish with a purpose, giving the fresh, spa-water vibes all summer drinks need. Plus, a proper Pimm’s is really the only civilized way to celebrate Queen Elizabeth’s Platty Jubes. (If you know, you know.) AB

PIMM’S CUP AT CAFE ROZE

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

5026 CENTENNIAL BLVD. If the closest you’ll get to Italy this summer is bingeing Bravo’s Below Deck: Mediterranean, get to Nicky’s Coal Fired for a Campari Lemonade. The bright-red frozen aperitif has the zing and zest you want from lemonade, the bracing bitterness of Campari and a high enough ABV that it’ll absolutely transport you to the Amalfi Coast — if only in your mind. AB

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

FROZEN CAMPARI LEMONADE AT NICKY’S COAL FIRED

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FOOD AND DRINK MOONWALK AT LE LOUP 1400 ADAMS ST. I love a historical fun fact, so I appreciate Le Loup’s list of “forgotten classics,” including some drinks that have fallen off menus — but shouldn’t have. Chief among them is the Moonwalk, which was the first thing astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin drank after returning to Earth from their historic trip. I surely didn’t do anything nearly as remarkable, but I’ll still happily sip the cocktail made with Champagne, dry curaçao, rosé and grapefruit to toast my day’s accomplishments. ML

MOCKTAIL AT ANZIE BLUE 2111 BELCOURT AVE. Local restaurants and bars are adding more nonalcoholic options to their menus, but still they’re sometimes an afterthought. Not so at Anzie Blue, the Hillsboro Village coffee shop that morphs into a bar at night. Try the Creamsicle, made with pina colada mix, or the Strawberry Cucumber Spritz, featuring muddled berries. ML

THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT AT VINYL TAP

INGLEWOOD OLD FASHIONED AT INGLEWOOD LOUNGE

24 CARROT MAGIC AT OTTO’S 4210 CHARLOTTE AVE. If I’m going to leave the East Side to go to a bar (likely to meet a friend who lives on the West Side and, likewise, doesn’t want to cross the river), I’m going to go to Otto’s. And I’m going to order the 24 Carrot Magic. Bartender James Karp crafted this gem from mezcal, house-made cinnamon demerara, carrot juice and bitters. It’s worth the price of a Lyft ride back home at the end of the night. ML

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT AT VINYL TAP 2038 GREENWOOD AVE. Gin and beer are two ingredients that don’t often live in the same drink, but they pair surprisingly well when done correctly. The Queen’s Gambit cocktail at Vinyl Tap features a shaken combination of Highclere Castle London Dry Gin, Pimm’s, ginger, lemon and saison beer, and it’s a delight in both smell and taste. It leads with a citrusy aroma before you start sipping. The cold drink then provides a refreshing taste — sort of a fruity, carbonated lemonade that’s grounded in the beer’s earthy flavor. My only concern is that it’s way too easy to mindlessly knock back. KB

24 CARROT MAGIC AT OTTO’S

LAVA FLOW AT CHOPPER

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

1100-B STRATTON AVE. If you’re looking for a frozen drink at Chopper on the East Side, you could order the Painkiller — a classic tiki drink made with rum, pineapple, orange, coconut, lime and nutmeg. Or you could get the Rum Runner, which features pineapple, orange, banana, lime, pomegranate and, of course, rum. Both drinks are fabulous, and there’s no wrong decision here. But for my money, the best decision is to combine them — they call that a Lava Flow. Think of it like Chopper’s version of a Miami Vice. It’s red, white, cold and sweet, and it’s the perfect accompaniment to wash down tacos from the Maiz de la Vida food truck parked outside the bar. KB

CHILL BILL AT REDHEADED STRANGER

3914 GALLATIN PIKE Thank the black-tea syrup for giving a flavorful, dark twist to Inglewood Lounge’s take on the gold standard of brown-liquor cocktails, the Old Fashioned. Enjoy it in the intimate, vibey environs of the lounge, a place that is made for savoring such a classic cocktail. ML

PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

INGLEWOOD OLD FASHIONED AT INGLEWOOD LOUNGE

305 ARRINGTON ST. Record-breaking heat requires frozen drinks. Sadly, most in Nashville are sickly sweet frosés intended to grease up gals for a spin on an electric bull, or a pole … or a country-singer-slash-stripper. Not at Redheaded Stranger. There, the Chill Bill blends biting Aperol with zippy lime, orgeat — an addictive almond syrup — and a healthy slug of vodka. It is strong. It is summery. And it proves that frozen pink drinks are for grown folks, too. AB EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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odi Hays has a long history in Nashville, and an even longer history in the South. A native of Hot Springs, Ark., Hays has lived in Nashville since 2005. She spent four years as the gallery director at Tennessee State JODI HAYS University, where THE FIND she brought in artJUNE 25-JULY 30 AT NIGHT world heavyweights GALLERY IN L.A. like William Pope.L, Hank Willis Thomas and Shaun Leonardo. She’s exhibited with Red Arrow Gallery and ZieherSmith, and her show at The Browsing Room inside the Downtown Presbyterian Church received a coveted ArtForum Critic’s Pick. For The Find, her first solo show in Los Angeles, Hays is exhibiting mostly largescale works that the artist refers to as “backless quilts” — a kind of descriptive shorthand for her unique process. “The Find relates to reclaimed materials and the idea that materials have been taken from Goodwill or recycling bins or hand-medowns from my family,” the artist tells the Scene from her home in East Nashville. “But The Find is also what an artist practices — a lifetime of searching for something.” Hays began utilizing used cardboard as artistic materials while socially isolating during the COVID pandemic. She arrived at a uniquely Southern aesthetic that references patchwork quilts and abandoned country stores, but also Rauschenberg’s “Bed” and Cubist collage. Her artist’s statement spells it out: “Landscape and the material vocabulary of the American South influence my abstraction. Mining a Southern povera, I use reclaimed textiles, fabric and cardboard. These materials serve as stand-ins for expressive marks, and resourceful labor.” The Find is a big show of big work, and in many ways, Night Gallery is the ideal platform for Hays to increase her visibility. Founded in 2010, the gallery was originally a strip-mall space that was open only from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. In recent years it’s developed into one of the West Coast’s most influential art spaces, representing an array of powerhouse artists like Samara Golden, Tau Lewis and Jesse Mockrin. At 46-by-45 inches, “Darkest Hour” is one of the exhibition’s midsize collage works, and is made from the waxy dyed cardboard from a mattress box pieced together with pink-hued slabs that look like flesh and worn-out bedsheets.

“Canaan” is one of four 76-by-52-inch works. Its bright-yellow hues are unflinchingly cheery — like an old doll grinning up from a dollar bin. Along its lower edge is a star-shaped doily, the perfect representation for the Southern niceties that persist even in

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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ON MATTERS OF LIFE AND DEATH

Vanderbilt neurosurgeon Jay Wellons reflects on a life devoted to healing BY ABBY N. LEWIS

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hen an editor at Random House read Jay Wellons’ 2020 essay in The New York Times about the extraordinary effort to save a critically injured ALL THAT MOVES US: A PEDIATRIC young girl, he was NEUROSURGEON, HIS so moved by the YOUNG PATIENTS, AND story that he got THEIR STORIES OF GRACE in touch with WelAND RESILIENCE lons, who is head of BY JAY WELLONS RANDOM HOUSE pediatric neurosur288 PAGES, $28 gery at Vanderbilt University Medical WELLONS WILL DISCUSS HIS BOOK 6:30 P.M. Center. The resultWEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, AT ing book, All That PARNASSUS Moves Us: A Pediatric Neurosurgeon, His Young Patients, and Their Stories of Grace and Resilience, is a compelling account of the physician’s life and career. The stakes are often high in Wellons’ medical field, and his stories capture the grave realities of his work. In “Luke’s Jump,” a 12-year-old boy suffers a head injury in a sudden pileup during a bike race. The father is quick to arrive at his son’s side, bundle him in his arms, and get him to a hospital. In the waiting room, as Wellons describes the procedure he is about to perform, he looks down at the father’s shoes. “There, slightly higher, on the cuff of his blue jeans and spilling down his socks, I could make out a vaguely familiar grayish color amid blood that had made its way onto his clothes. It was brain matter. His own son’s brain matter. Mixed with blood and hair and dirt and grass, right there on his person.” It is then that Wellons, early in his career as a surgeon at this point, realizes the distinction between the urgent, adrenaline-fueled excitement of operating on a body and the sheer responsibility of being in charge of the survival of someone’s child. His passion for healing doesn’t make him infallible. In “Rubber Bands,” he treats a little girl named Cheyenne who is suffering from a subdural empyema — an infection along the surface of the brain. The surgery goes well, and Cheyenne is on her way to recovery. It is only several months later that Wellons discovers he left two rubber bands, instruments used to secure scalp tissue that has been cut and folded back out of the way, inside Cheyenne’s brain. When he informs Cheyenne and her mother of his mistake, Cheyenne’s mother says, “My baby is here because of what you did that day. … I don’t care if you left your car keys up there, Dr. Wellons.” Her gratitude is not unique. Many patients have been so grateful for Wellons’ life-changing surgery that they have remained in touch with him over the years, often sending photos or postcards with life updates. All That Moves Us doesn’t focus solely on life-and-death medical drama. There are

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• Check out our website to learn more about more lighthearted personal memories as well. In “Family Charades,” Wellons describes a Christmas surprise gone awry: Years before I was born, when my sisters, Eve and Sarah, were eight and four years old and living with my parents in Richmond, Virginia, our father brought home a new color television set for Christmas. A huge thing, as deep as it was wide, with a rotary knob for twelve channels. I imagine the weight of it being nearly overbearing. After cajoling a work friend to help and then struggling to bring it in one afternoon while the girls were away, Dad found it to fit neatly under a table near the far corner of the den. The floor-length tablecloth, he thought, would be all that was needed to complete the camouflage for the three weeks prior to Christmas. Little did Wellons’ father know that table was a favorite hiding spot of Sarah’s, who soon bumped into it when crawling under the table. What follows is a double family deception by Wellons’ mother, who hides the fact that the girls are watching television each day while Dad is away and coaches them on how to act surprised on Christmas morning. Dad eventually found out the truth, but by then the tale had made the rounds through the extended family. In graceful, direct prose, Wellons recounts his experiences as a son, father, surgeon, friend and never-ending student of medicine, sharing some of the most intimate moments of both his personal and professional life. He willingly admits mistakes he has made over the years, and he confesses to concern about bringing work home with him in the form of excessive worry over his own children and the sudden accidents that could land them on an operating table. All That Moves Us is the story of a dedicated surgeon, told with honesty and humility. For more local book coverage, please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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IN THE LIGHT OF DAY The Caverns Above Ground Amphitheater, a pandemicera win for an indie venue, is here to stay BY CHRIS PARTON

“I

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW HOOTENANNY, SATURDAY, JUNE 25 PHOTO: KEITH GRINER

f necessity is the mother of invention, then desperation is the father,” says Todd Mayo, half laughing in a way that tells you he’s also completely serious. He’s the founder of The Caverns in Pelham, Tenn., about an hour and 20 minutes southeast of downtown Nashville. The underground music venue opened in 2018 and has since become one of the nation’s most unique — even magical — music destinations. But then came the pandemic. Suddenly, cramming a thousand or more people into a hole in the ground for live concerts seemed like maybe a bad idea, so Mayo and his team needed a fix. They found it with a brand-new above-ground amphitheater. While other independent venues in Nashville and elsewhere have struggled, in some cases closing down completely, The Caverns has thrived. “If you have a need to do something and you’re desperate enough, well, you’ll figure it the fuck out,” Mayo says, speaking with his typical gusto and born-selling bravado. “And that’s what we did.” Admittedly, doubling the size of The Caverns’ operation was a long shot in terms of “pandemic pivots,” as Mayo explains. An amphitheater was never part of his original plan. But with its serene Grundy County setting, eclectic bookings and a pod-based system that got people back in front of bands early — starting in October 2020 with a run of shows headlined by Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit — the amphitheater was an instant success. And now, it’s officially here to stay. On June 25, Old Crow Medicine Show will celebrate the grand opening of The Caverns Amphitheater’s new permanent stage, which officially adds space for 5,500 fans to a complex that was already a music lover’s nirvana. Years earlier, Mayo co-created the PBS performance series Bluegrass Underground, which first filmed at Cumberland Caverns. Under his guidance, a space known to residents in the Pelham area and spelunkers from all over as Big Mouth Cave was transformed into an otherworldly music venue with extraordinary acoustics for up to 1,200 fans. Bluegrass Underground moved over, and the site hosted an array of other shows as well. By the time COVID-19 arrived, The Caverns had hosted more than 100 concerts by everyone from jam-oriented rock heroes Gov’t Mule and psych legends The Flaming Lips to master songsmiths Dawes, dronemetal pioneers Sunn O))) and beyond. “We were poised to have our best year ever in 2020,” Mayo says, looking back on the unlikely move above ground. “The last show we did — which turned out to be his last show [before he announced his retirement] — was Arlo Guthrie. We had Arlo on a Saturday, and then the next Thursday the

whole world shut down.” At first, The Caverns team thought they could just push things back a few months, but soon it was clear they were in full-on survival mode. For a tourism business in a remote rural location with little else in the area to draw people in, that survival looked unlikely. But Mayo is one of those guys who always has one more card to play. Luckily, the cave system that created Big Mouth Cave was much more extensive than it might seem from the surface. There was another huge, awe-inspiring underground hollow known as Big Room Cave, and Mayo had always intended to open it for tours. Diverting workers to the excavation, they opened the state’s first new show cave — that’s a cave open to the public for tours — in about 50 years on July 4, 2020. Mayo figured “Red Rocks meets Ruby Falls” would be enough to limp through the pandemic. “It’s the size of three football fields, and at the back of it is something called Tombstone Pass, where it gets real narrow,” Mayo describes. “Then it opens up, just like in The Goonies, and there’s waterfalls and crystals everywhere — it’s incredible. It was good because we didn’t furlough anybody, and instead we just all became tour guides. … “But one day I was in the cave leading a tour, and when I came out I had a call from Andrew Colvin,’ ” he continues. “He’s the booking agent for Jason Isbell, Lucero, Orville Peck and different people, and he said, ‘Hey Todd, I saw this thing in the U.K. where they’re doing socially distanced, pod-based amphitheater shows, and man it looks just like the outside of The Caverns.’ I was like, ‘Huh, it kind of does.’ And then it was like the movie Field of Dreams — I was like, ‘Well, if Jason Isbell comes, we’ll fucking build it.’ So that’s what we did.” In six weeks, Mayo and his team built a whole new amphitheater from scratch. They harvested and cleared acres of hardwood forest, moved countless massive boulders and hauled 500 dump truck loads of dirt to

create tiers of seating space, and then built a temporary stage. Isbell did in fact come, performing the first of four shows on Oct. 8, 2020. Over four months in spring 2021, The Caverns Above Ground Amphitheater hosted 43 shows. People seemed to love the pod-based concert experience, with every ticket now feeling like a VIP upgrade. And after Mayo added camping to the equation — because why not? — he’d once again stumbled into something unique. “It saved our ass!” he says. “That was when the lightbulb went off, like, ‘Wait a minute, in the post-pandemic world, we’ve got a 5,500-capacity amphitheater here.’ So believe it or not, the whole vision of our property has really grown during the pandemic.” Now, The Caverns’ new chapter is beginning in earnest, with Old Crow Medicine Show hosting the first show at the amphitheater’s new permanent stage on Saturday. The show is billed as a “hootenanny,” and will also feature former Old Crow member Willie Watson as well as bluegrassers Town Mountain and country songsmith Joshua Hedley. Later this year, it will welcome performances from Fleet Foxes, Greensky Bluegrass and Umphrey’s McGee, as well as the inaugural Cave Fest in October, with Sam Bush and Leftover Salmon leading a lineup chock-full of bluegrass and newgrass luminaries. Those lineups speak to the venue’s unique pairing of natural wonder with roots-based music, which goes all the way back to the beginning of Bluegrass Underground. Mayo’s first booking was The SteelDrivers (back when Chris Stapleton sang with the band), and The Caverns opened up with Billy Strings in 2018, before the Grammy-winning prodigy had broken out. “Being the first band to christen a new venue is an honor in itself, but it’s especially meaningful for us because of the truly oneof-a-kind location,” says Old Crow Medicine Show in a prepared statement. “Todd Mayo and the Caverns staff have created a world-

class venue amidst the natural splendor of the region, an outdoor music venue only Tennessee could boast, where tall trees meet rock outcroppings and farm fields. It’s a place where eagles fly, cattle call, and the wind howls through the holler. Simply put: The place has vibe and plenty of it.” Looking ahead, that vibe will likely draw music fans from far and wide. Noting that 73 percent of all Caverns patrons come from outside Tennessee, Mayo says the new stage will more than double the number of fans who visit tiny Pelham and leave their dollars behind. He expects to keep hosting between 60 and 75 cave shows every year, while adding 20 to 35 at the amphitheater. “Before we had the amphitheater, we would have maybe 60-70,000 patrons coming per year, and now it’s gonna be more like 200,000,” he predicts. “The fact that it’s in one of Tennessee’s nine distressed counties — our real goal is to get Grundy County off that list.” Considering their history, that promise seems like more than lip service. With a summer camp for kids and an annual scholarship for local students already established, The Caverns will go even further this year. One dollar of each ticket sold will help fund music programs in Grundy County schools. Mayo says he’s proud of The Caverns’ deep roots in the community, and even more proud they’ve brought some positive attention to the whole area. And they’re not done yet. “In the future we’ll be looking at expanding even more,” he says. “We hope to do some hiking trails and expand the campground, and just offer different types of experiences. We just want to give folks all types of things to do while they’re here at the caverns, and also more all over Monteagle Mountain. “It’s not the destination, it’s the journey, right? But for us at The Caverns, the destination becomes the journey. And that’s not just marketing speak. That’s the reality.” EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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917 Woodland Street Nashville, TN 37206 | thebasementnashville.com basementeast thebasementeast thebasementeast

6/25

6/27

6/28

the Emo Band Karaoke

6/30

Sam Johnston w/ A.G. Sully & Arts Fishing Club

sara kays w/ hayd

owen

7/2

Soapbox

7/5

foxing

w/ Greet Death and Home Is Where

Upcoming shows erin rae w/ logan ledger & dj poboy ocean alley w/ le shiv live emo band karaoke owen Sara Kays w/ Hayd Sam Johnston w/ A.G. Sully & Arts Fishing Club Marisa Maino, Sam Varga, YOUTHYEAR, Knox, Winona Fighter, & Emo Night Nashville Foxing w/ Greet Death & Home Is Where GOLDEN CHILD savannah conley w/ secondhand sound Sundy Best w/ Highway Natives Ronnie James Dio Tribute dry cleaning w/ weak signal the deslondes w/ banditos the wrecks w/ girlhouse & mothe the summer set somo ian noe w/ kimberly kelly grayscale & guardian w/ bearings & the ivy icon for hire w/ sumo cyco corey kent

jun 23 jun 24 jun 25 jun 27 jun 28 jun 30 jul 1 Jul 5 Jul 6 jul 8 jul 9 jul 10 jul 11 jul 14 jul 16 jul 17 jul 22 jul 23 jul 25 jul 27 jul 29

jul 30 broncho w/ tchotchke jul 31 cobra man aug 3 memphis may fire w/ from ashes to new, rain city drive, & wolves at the gate

aug 6 Jerry Garcia Tribute ft. members of Los Colognes, Futurebirds, and more!

aug 8 Black Pistol Fire w/ Lillie Mae and Shooks aug 9 The Dear Hunter w/ The World Is A Beautiful Place & aug 12 aug 13 aug 14 aug 17 aug 18 aug 20 aug 31 Sep 1 Sep 3 Sep 4 Sep 6 Sep 7 Sep 8

IAm NoLonger Afraid to Die, &Tanner Merritt of O’Brother

josh a w/ justin stone City Morgue w/ SSGKobe sold out! Coi Leray Wavves w/ BOYO & Smut Brass Against Erra w/ Alpha Wolf, Thornhill, and Invent Animate Richie Kotzen w/ John Corabi Glass Cannon Live! The Josephines doobie Crowbar Ethel Cain w/ Colyer Vista Kicks

1604 8th Ave S Nashville, TN 37203 | thebasementnashville.com thebasementnash thebasementnash thebasementnash

6/24

LUTHI w/ Crumbsnatchers

6/30

Nick Boyd w/ Erin Grand

Upcoming shows jun 23 Moony 'n' Frens w/ Silvie, Willix, Abby Holliday, jun 24 jun 24 jun 25 jun 26 jun 27 jun 28 jun 30 jun 30 jul 1 jul 2

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Gabrielle Grace, Teddy At Night Madeline Edwards w/ Oh Jeremiah (7pm) LUTHI w/ Crumbsnatchers (9PM) Zachary Scott Kline w/ James Leprettre & Melissa Erin Leslie Stevens w/ Matt Boyer & Willy Tea Taylor

Matt Sahadi & Nite Tides Kimberly Kelly & Brit Taylor free! Nick Boyd w/ Erin Grand (7pm) Suzie Chism w/ The Untamed & Josh Rennie-Hynes (9PM) Oweda w/ Battery House Wild Love w/ Oceanic, A N X

jul 7 jul 7 jul 8 jul 8 jul 8 jul 9 jul 10 jul 11 jul 13 jul 13 jul 14 jul 15

Matthew Fowler (7pm) Liliac (9pm) The Altons (6pm) Goodnight, Texas (7pm) Vansire w/ Yot Club (9pm) Hadley Kennary w/ Michael Conley Chloe Kimes w/ Liv Greene, Drumming Bird Pindrop Songwriter Series Joshua Ray Walker (6PM) Ben Chapman (9PM) Mel Bryant & The Mercy Makers w/ Talker The Local Honeys

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


MUSIC

MAKE AMERICA LAUGH AGAIN Nick Lutsko issues a supercharged brand of political parody

BY CORY WOODROOF

B

y the time musician and comedian Nick Lutsko sent out his satirical battle cry asking to join conservative talking head Dan Bongino at the 2020 Republican National Convention, politics didn’t seem like it could get any PLAYING SATURDAY, JUNE 25, AT EXIT/IN crazier. It was the tail end of the Trump presidency. The president and his surrogates would soon be issuing their false rigged-election claims, and Rudy Giuliani would seemingly start to melt during an unhinged press conference. And that’s not to mention the ill-fated Trump boat parade in Texas that September, Trump contracting COVID-19, or any number of other historically cringe-worthy moments that still reverberate to this day. Enter Lutsko, a Middle Tennessee State University grad who released his song “I Wanna Be at the RNC” that fall, making waves on Twitter. It featured a sardonic,

impossibly sweaty version of himself sporting a starspangled bandana and Cookie Monster shirt as he loudly exclaimed that he longed to brush elbows with far-right figures like Bongino and gun-toting Missourian Patricia McCloskey. More songs followed, usually centered on the most bizarre headline of that day’s news cycle. Lutsko’s DIY satirical tunes took over Twitter during that ignoble fall, and for some of us, helped make the political madness just a little more tolerable. “I had somehow fallen into this extremely niche career that I could’ve never anticipated in a jillion years,” Lutsko says of his early days of online success. “I never had pursued comedy in any way. I’ve always loved comedy, been a huge fan of comedy, but I had a lot of sort of impostor syndrome [as far as] ‘This is how I’m making my living.’ Like, making people laugh, but it’s not necessarily my voice. It’s me taking someone else’s words. … I’m using those words to tell my story. It’s very different than just, like, creating something out of nothing.” Lutsko, currently a Chattanooga resident, soldiers on in the joke-song world in 2022. His gonzo brand of parody and impassioned delivery have tapped into the zeitgeist. Recently, Lutsko took aim at rabid Johnny Depp fans, portraying himself as a fedorawearing “Deputy of Dep” who misspelled the embattled star’s surname in a fake carving on his chest.

Prior to his 2020 viral moment, Lutsko earned some attention via collaborations with Tim Heidecker, Super Deluxe’s Vic Berger and Netflix. His “Emo Trump” song parodies for Super Deluxe found him reaching back to his Aughts punk-emo fandom days to lambaste some of the former president’s mopier ramblings. He also made satirical songs using the words of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones (via an indie-folk filter) and rapper Kanye West (in the style of Tame Impala). Those two songs alone have a combined total of 13 million views, just on YouTube. Super Deluxe shut down in 2018, leaving Lutsko without a permanent home (and financial incentive) for his unique brand of song parody. In 2019, he released his second non-comedy album Swords, which processes a lot of the same themes that were to come in Lutsko’s various viral tunes. Comedy was on Lutsko’s backburner for a time — until an impromptu parody about Chrissy Teigen unfollowing him on Twitter helped reignite his flame for homemade satire. It helped confirm to Lutsko that he could create his own work separate from the words of others. “I think something about the pandemic and just being stuck and isolated and everything else that came with it, was just kind of like, ‘Why not just throw whatever at the wall and see what sticks?’ ” Lutsko says. “I learned very quickly that people were into it.”

NO DEEPER LOVE

Eric Benét’s voice remains one of the finest in R&B BY RON WYNN

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ocalist Eric Benét epitomizes the strategies being used, more or less successfully, by a generation of contemporary R&B vocalists who can no longer call themselves youthful phenoms. Benét finds PLAYING EARLY AND LATE himself facing the exact SHOWS, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, issue that in previous AT CITY WINERY eras challenged singers like Jerry Butler or Lou Rawls: how to remain relevant and continue getting marketplace attention without having either a string of radio hits or frequent fulllength LP releases. Benét managed that trick partly because of the immense popularity of his past releases, and also partly by working in film and television. His acting roles include playing a recurring character on the late-’90s sitcom For Your Love and starring alongside Mariah Carey in 2001’s Glitter. The film was panned — and suffered from incredibly bad timing, as it was released right after 9/11 — but the soundtrack album, which Benét also worked on, has recently enjoyed a reappraisal. More recently, he was profiled in A Closer Look, a music documentary series produced by streaming service AllBlk. Benét has also dabbled in TV production, and AllBlk is set to release Snap, an anthology series co-executive-produced by Benét and showrunner Devin Hampton. But with the easing of the pandemic, Benét has returned to his primary focus: live performances. His

current tour includes a pair of shows on Tuesday at City Winery. Over three decades, his velvet tenor has retained its impressive range and silky sound, and he’s always been a masterful storyteller and a powerfully charismatic and romantic singer. Born in Alabama and raised in Wisconsin, Benét began his career with the synth-pop band Gerard in the mid-1980s. Then he teamed with his sister Lisa and their cousin George Nash Jr. for an early-’90s group project called Benét. Their lone self-titled LP mixed funk, soul and pop, and had some regional success, though it was far from a huge commercial hit. However, it earned enough attention for Benét to make his solo debut a couple of years later, launching a career that’s carried on through major peaks

— including four Grammy nominations — and difficult low periods, such as when his label declined to release Better & Better. On that album, recorded in 2001, he colored outside the lines of then-contemporary mainstream R&B. He changed labels for his follow-up, 2005’s Hurricane, re-recording some of the songs from the shelved project; the album went to No. 27 on the R&B chart. The song of Benét’s that still gets lots of airplay on Quiet Storm and Heart & Soul radio formats — as well as frequent use at weddings — is “Spend My Life With You,” a memorable duet pairing with Tamia. The song was released as a single from his second solo LP, 1999’s A Day in the Life, and it went to No. 1 on Billboard’s R&B chart, earning a gold certification

Next was a song about one of Lutsko’s cats repeatedly pissing in his bed, and then came that RNC classic (which Lutsko calls his “Big Bang” moment). Perhaps you’ve also seen Lutsko’s frenzied attempts to mount a third Gremlins film (in costume as Desmond), or his emergence as the de facto spokesperson for Spirit Halloween. Lutsko’s RNC video sparked those increasingly meta songs, compiled mostly on albums like 2020’s Songs on the Computer and 2021’s More Songs on the Computer. “So many opportunities started presenting themselves [after the RNC video],” Lutsko recalls. Those opportunities included an invitation to audition for Saturday Night Live. “It was just like, ‘OK, this is a green light to make this my thing. This isn’t just me goofing off and having fun on the internet. I’m going to put energy into this because I’ve made more strides in the couple weeks I’ve been making these weird songs on Twitter than I had in 15 years of a career doing other music.’ “I still love to do that as well,” he continues, “but I’ve learned that I can do both.” Though that SNL audition didn’t pan out, Lutsko made it his mission to commit to the bit. “It became my goal to make this my thing,” he says. “I’m going to keep trying to crank out these songs.” Lutsko’s show Saturday at Exit/In will feature performances of his most recognizable parodies as well as his more serious music, and he’ll be backed by his trusty $100K Band. Chattanooga-based bluegrass outfit Randy Steele and the High Cold Wind will open. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

from the RIAA in the process; it also earned Benét his first Grammy nomination. Along with Benét’s 1996 debut True to Myself — which featured a trio of charting singles in “Spiritual Thang,” “Femininity” and “Let’s Stay Together” — A Day in the Life established the pattern that Benét has maintained throughout his career. He excels on earnest love ballads; he’ll also mix in an occasional funk or dance number, while carefully selecting material that spotlights his dynamic, energetic approach. Benét has historically played well with others too, with collaborative projects running the gamut from other successful singles — his version of rock band Toto’s funky “Georgy Porgy,” a groovy duet with Faith Evans, was an international hit in 1999 — to work with Earth Wind & Fire and Somethin’ for the People. Benét has also played yet another key role as a guest vocalist on smooth-jazz LPs by such artists as George Duke, Boney James and Chris Botti. Benét’s most recent studio album, 2016’s Eric Benét, was a chart success, debuting at No. 7 on Billboard’s Top R&B Albums. And it’s an artistic triumph too, with rich, updated production, a stirring reunion with Tamia and other guest appearances from MC Lyte and jazz trumpet legend Arturo Sandoval. Benét has been often quoted in interviews as disliking the attention paid to his life outside music and acting. But he opened up in the A Closer Look profile about some of the personal tragedies and difficulties that have also shaped his life, including the death of his father from cancer, the death of his partner in a 1993 car accident that made him a single father, and his brief marriage to Halle Berry in the early 2000s. In spite of it all, the soulful voice that’s been his primary instrument for so long remains confident, elegant and eloquent, ready to inspire new audiences and longtime fans alike. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 – JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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JUNE 28

FISK JUBILEE SINGERS

WITH ALLISON RUSSELL AND O.N.E THE DUO JULY 20

SCHOOL OF ROCK

BENEFITING AUTISM TENNESSEE JULY 2

CHAGALL GUEVARA WITH OVER THE RHINE NOVEMBER 16

MIKE BIRBIGLIA ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM NOVEMBER 8

DAYGLOW

WITH SPECIAL GUEST RITT MOMNEY ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM NOVEMBER 19

DROPKICK MURPHYS

WITH JAIME WYATT AND JESSE AHERN ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM DECEMBER 19

AARON LEWIS

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10 AM

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


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MUSIC

TENNESSEE EDUCATION LOTTERY CORPORATION

THE SPIN

ermo & Co., as you can hear on should-be hits like “Vertigo Flowers,” “April Ha Ha” and others played Thursday. BACK IN THE SADDLE “That’s what I’m talking about!” exclaimed one fan, giving a we’re-not-worthy BY LORIE LIEBIG, KAHWIT TELA, STEPHEN salute as he departed the pit — a nice reminder that while the folks booking ’Roo TRAGESER AND CHARLIE ZAILLIAN have largely turned away from non-legacy rock acts, the festival’s audience hasn’t. t felt a little bit surreal on Thursday The heat abated a little once the sun to roll into Manchester along I-24, went down, but Nashville-born Bren Joy, to sort out passes and pitch tents, and then race through the muggy who moved to Los Angeles earlier this year, heat to meet up with friends ahead cranked it right back up at the larger-thanof the afternoon’s first must-see ever Who Stage. He’s the total package: an performance. After all, the last Bonnaroo Day insightful lyricist, a master showman and a superb vocalist who could sing your grand1 happened in June 2019 — more than a thouma’s meatloaf recipe and make it sound sand days ago, and months before anyone sexy. He had the sizable crowd on lock from had the faintest idea that a pandemic was the second he picked up the mic, and gracegoing to disrupt everything. Simultaneously, fully surfed on the tide of forward-leaning it seemed as if everything and nothing on the R&B whipped up by his band. It was an Farm had changed. absolute joy to watch, from originals like Throughout Centeroo, there were some “Freezing” to a spot-on cover of Childish thoughtful alterations: gravel paths paved Gambino’s “Redbone.” over, stout oak trees planted, giant ceiling fans installed at the tent stages. It’s not Indigo de Souza has a distinctive voice; it headline-grabbing stuff, but these are the tracks that the North Carolinian is labelkinds of things you can and should do to mates on Saddle Creek with Big Thief and mitigate potential sweltering heat and pourHop Along. De Souza’s mystique lies in how ing rain when you run a festival on the same she deploys said voice: a gut-wrenching site for 20 years. Also a great idea that could warble one moment, an operatic falsetto the have come sooner: working with a company next. The din of surrounding stages threatcalled Turn to make reusable cups available ened to drown out more intimate moments to vendors. Amid a bigger variety of moreof her tunes. But wielding a golden Gibson upscale food options, corn dogs were a little SG adorned with a lightning bolt, she retougher to find; thankfully, arepa stands sponded by emphasizing the between-song were present, though they weren’t open yet. feedback and gnarlier sonic aspects of “Sick Regardless of the notable increase in “brand in the Head,” “Real Pain” and other bloodactivations” throughout Centeroo, buying ied-but-unbowed songs from her stellar 2021 a couple hot cornmeal cakes with cheese LP Any Shape You Take. melting off their sides at 1 a.m. is an expeOn the stage at the Galactic Giddy rience that sets Bonnaroo apart. Up, a new addition this year out in One change has raised conthe campground at Plaza 5, Paul cerns, especially following Cauthen offered up a boisterNovember’s crowd-crush incious set. The Texas native’s READ MORE REVIEW dent at the Astroworld festival backing band, which featured COVERAGE FROM BONNAROO 2022 AT that left 10 people dead and seasoned talents including NASHVILLESCENE.COM/MUSIC many more injured. Bonnaroo Beau Bedford and Parker Twomey, organizers decided to funnel provided the perfect accomeveryone coming into Centeroo paniment to Cauthen’s deep, from the GA campground through thunderous vocals. The hourlong one entrance under the arch. Despite set included an array of tunes from a rumored lower attendance number, lines his latest album Country Coming Down, ingot very long on Thursday, and Reddit users cluding “Roll on Over” and “Champagne & a reported dangerous crowd conditions. At Limo,” along with older gems like “Cocaine press time, the festival had not issued an ofCountry Dancing.” His no-holds-barred atficial comment. titude and vibrant stage presence brought a From a musical perspective, Nothing much-needed jolt of electricity to the heatfatigued crowd. was the perfect soundtrack for getting Back at the Who Stage, Garcia Peoples’ back into the Bonnaroo rhythm. Since the Philadelphia band emerged on the national members locked into synchronous orbit scene about a decade ago, the lineup around with each other for some guitar-oriented bandleader Dominic Palermo has changed rock that owes as much to punk efficiency as it does to the exploratory tendencies of a good bit. The iteration that graced That the Grateful Dead co-founder who inspired Tent on Thursday afternoon featured a their name. A friend suggested, correctly, pair of newcomers, with second guitarist that the overall effect was more “chooglin’ Doyle Martin (of Nothing’s Relapse Records ” than “jammin’.” Their set captured the labelmates Cloakroom) and bassist Christina attention of some of the O.G. hippies in the Michelle joining singer and axman Palermo crowd, while others seemed unimpressed, and longtime drummer Kyle Kimball. despite the instrumental prowess packed What remains consistent, however, is the into the songs. strength of the material and the clarity of Palermo’s vision. Nothing’s fourth LP, 2020’s Sons of Kemet’s delightfully unhinged That The Great Dismal, is the group’s strongest Tent set was a big reward for Thursday yet, and it made up the bulk of their set on arrivals. Contemporary jazz messengers Thursday. Many bands have mined the inwhose music makes the listener think, feel tersection of paint-peeling walls of guitar and move, the quartet served trancelike and wistful shoegaze melodicism before, dual-drummer badassery flanked by tuba but few have it down to a science like Paland sax virtuosos in Theon Cross and Shabaka

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received§4-51-123(c)(4)(B), by the Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation or by atickets lottery retailer authorized Pursuant to T.C.A. holders of lottery for the above-referenced to pay the prize amount no later than close of business on Monday, September 26, 2022. instant ticket lottery lottery games must a cash prize ninety (90) aftermust the end Winning for theclaim above-referenced instant ticketforlottery games be of Tickets tickets for the above-referenced instant ticket lotterywithin games received prizedays payment after close of business on Monday, September 26, 2022, shall be null and void. game date of Tuesday, June 28, 2022. Neither the Tennessee Education Lottery received by the Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation or by a lottery retailer authorized Corporation any lottery may pay prize for a winning instant lottery game to pay thenor prize amount noretailer later than close of abusiness on Monday, September 26, 2022. ticket for the instant ticket lottery Monday, September Tickets forabove-referenced the above-referenced instant ticket lotterygames gamesafter received for prize payment 26, after close of business on Monday, September 26, 2022, shall be null and void. 2022.

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Hutchings, respectively. “It’s nice to hear musicians do this stuff, and not machines,” a passing showgoer remarked astutely, gesturing in the direction of the throbbing EDM beckoning from The Other. As has been the case for so many artists through the years, Thursday’s set at This Tent marked a full-circle moment for Griffin Washburn, leader of indie pop-and-rockers Goth Babe. He told the crowd that his visit to Bonnaroo 2015 was the first time he’d ever been to a music festival, and that taking the stage was something he’d dreamed about while making music in his dorm at Middle Tennessee State University. His show was as much about joyful crowd participation — from crowd-surfing on beach floaties to playing air-guitar along with Washburn on a leg some mannequin had lost along the way — as it was about the music. That, at the very least, was the Bonnaroo experience exactly as it should be. EMAIL THESPIN@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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rom the opening logos of Elvis, the promise is rhinestones and spectacle. That’s certainly one of the three tenets — alongside livewire innovation and a Breaking the Waves level of fatalism — that define ELVIS this jagged but ultiPG-13, 159 MINUTES mately rewarding OPENING WIDE FRIDAY, riff on the life of ElJUNE 24 vis Presley. This isn’t Rocketman, which remains the way to do an artistically cohesive and expressive rock biopic, but it’s imperative to state that after its first, disastrous trailer, Baz Luhrmann’s Elvis is a remarkable achievement. It is three films battling it out with one another for much of the runtime, but it’s still so much better than one could have hoped for. As has been the case with Luhrmann’s films since 2001’s Moulin Rouge!, Elvis is a film that understands the protean nature of popular music, and as such it remixes itself as it goes along. Famous/infamous since the film’s Cannes premiere is the post-Army montage of Elvis’ ascent into movie stardom, scored to a blend of “Viva Las Vegas” and Britney Spears’ “Toxic,” which is a masterful discussion of the power wielded over artists by whoever happens to be holding the purse strings at any given moment. The film itself makes the choice to open with a wallow in opulence that also feels like Scorsese’s 1995 Casino, the Vegas Strip illuminated in classical passion and contemporary flash, grounding us in the story of Andreas van Kuijk, aka Col. Tom Parker (Tom Hanks), the opportunist/criminal/intermittent genius who helped skyrocket Presley to the top. Parker then helped engineer the

gaudy cage that would keep him displayed through a protracted decay before the eyes of the world. Periodically the film feels the need to tell the audience about itself, usually through the voice of (initially) Elvis’ mother Gladys Presley, later the Colonel. And it’s in this way, in its exploration of parasocial relationships, that Elvis (the film) finds its hook for modern audiences unfamiliar with the Presley legacy. Carnival-funhouse metaphors are always a good foundation, and the early characterization of Parker as a carny and a huckster is the most effective representation of this cipher who only exists as a reflection of Elvis. We’re told he has gambling debts and a past creeping closer, but for how much the opening 10 minutes focus on him and how he becomes the structural engine of the rest of the film, Parker is simply whatever it is the script needs him to be — a supernatural force, an unhinged leech, a membrane stuffed with dreams, avarice and adrenaline. He is all of these things, and it makes sense that Hanks would embrace this opportunity. (As I love Cloud Atlas, I am firmly on board for films in which Hanks makes a choice and doesn’t let go until it thunders.) As the film goes on and Elvis gets a bit more into his addictions, Hanks looks more and more like Larry Miller. This is a film entranced by the concept of sexuality, never quite escaping the pearlclutching era it has grounded itself in, which, honestly, is an interesting choice that for the most part works. Li’l Elvis (Li’lvis?) grows up in the literal geographical intersection between the sexual and the spiritual, careening between a juke joint and a tent revival that are across a construction pit from one another, absorbing everything he sees, hears and feels. This sets up genuinely effective split-screen flashbacks later on. The film’s first third at times feels like a superhero origin story, the man with the bullet-time pelvis destined to free the 1950s from its institutional fear of hips, brought to life in the film’s first truly insane sequence — a performance at a baseball stadium that manages to feel like both Hairspray and Gimme Shelter.

Elvis’ ’68 Comeback Special — like Liza With a Z and Grace Jones’ One Man Show — is one of the enduring classics of the musical program for television, and Luhrmann spends the most captivating portion of the film focusing on the many factors that went into its making. The procedural approach to great art is always a worthwhile choice, and it yields the most rewards in evaluating the artistic identity that Presley put forth and envisioned for himself. Immediately following the sweltering press screening, the order of the evening was a comfy shower and a viewing of that special. In his acting debut, Alton Mason, who plays Little Richard, is amazing. Olivia DeJonge, this film’s Priscilla, does her best, but it’s an underwritten and moderately schematic part. Mickey Reece’s Oklahoma-shot 2017 indie film Alien is a great comparison piece; it was made with almost no money but gets at the emotions of the Elvis experience in a way that this big-budget telling only hints at. (That film’s Priscilla, Cate Jones, is one of the great performances in 2010s indie cinema.) And in the titular role, Austin Butler really does have fun with this. He’s very good, and charming in unconventional ways that never burn the audience out on a persona that’s been part of pop culture for 60-plus years. The film loves Panic Room-style diegetic identifying architecture, though there are a few too many whirling crash-zooms on the exterior of the International Hotel — a facade that occupies a significant portion of emotional real estate in the Presley legacy. But that becomes a default camera move, ultimately robbing the gesture of significance. Even so, given the myriad potential sins that could derail something of this scale and ambition, this is small potatoes. What lingers are a muddy message about the racial quagmire of America, a truly starmaking performance from Mason (and it’s transcendently fitting that Little Richard is reclaiming the spotlight from Elvis in his own movie), and the direct consumptiveness of the end times, where everyone knows the end is near but the show has to go on. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23– JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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’m telling you this right now: You may have to check out Neptune Frost a couple of times before you get at least some sense of what’s going on. That’s what I did — and I’m still trying to figure it out. Before I wrote this review, I even NEPTUNE FROST called my editor PatNR, 105 MINUTES rick and convinced SHOWING JUNE 24-30 AT him to talk me THE BELCOURT through it. I thought the movie broke my brain! This Afrofuturistic sci-fi musical throws a whole lotta things at ya. It’s about (I think) technology, racism, community, revolution, love, the future, the past, LGBTQ rights, police brutality, the sun, the moon, the stars, pink hearts, green clovers, purple horseshoes — all that shit. From what I gather, the plot has something to do with Neptune (Elvis Ngabo), an East African runaway who magically turns into both a woman (Cheryl Isheja) and a walking computer virus. Eventually known as “The Motherboard,” she begins hacking into smartphones all over the world from an interdimensional village filled with fellow hacker outcasts. That’s where she also bonds with Matalusa (Bertrand “Kaya Free” Ninteretse), a coltan miner who recently lost his brother. If this fusion of cyberpunk and Afropunk sounds more to you like a multimedia project than a narrative film, that’s because — well, that’s what it is. It’s actually part of co-director/writer/spoken-word artist Saul Williams’ MartyrLoserKing collection, which also includes albums (some of the songs appear in Frost) and a graphic novel. With the movie (which was mostly financed by a Kickstarter campaign), Williams — along with co-director/cinematographer Anisia Uzeyman — has created a raging, rhythmic

manifesto that’s very shiny and fluorescent. With help from costume designer Cedric Mizero, the pair often makes their characters look like neon nocturnal animals whenever the sun goes down. The directors go about killing a whole bunch of birds with the one stone they’ve got. They go straight to the Motherland in a mission to take down modern onlineobsessed culture (“Fuck Mr. Google!” one character yells during a herky-jerky musical number), reminding the audience that people have just as much power as phones. While they’re there, they also call out violent cops, closeted clergymen and other oppressive, patriarchal thugs who keep society as fucked-up as it is. Frost is a nutty, hallucinogenic experience — like if David Lynch and Octavia Butler decided to do a Sarafina!-style musical composed by Sun Ra. It buzzes with so much activity, a character even declares that this is so much during one scene. You might get the feeling that Williams was ready for viewers to dismiss all of this as pretentious prattle, the sort of heady, hotep nonsense you’d hear from a dashiki-wearing poet at an open mic. I did let out a loud cackle when Neptune, after her transformation, looks into a camera and, via voice-over, says in her subtitled native tongue, “Maybe you’re asking yourself WTF is this? Is it a poet’s idea of a dream?” A funky fantasia that’s difficult to decipher but pretty to look at, Neptune Frost joins Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s see-iton-the-big-screen-or-else Memoria on the growing list of 2022 films that are aurally/ visually stimulating and baffling as hell. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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JEFFREY PHILLIPS ANDREWS vs. ASHLEY GAIL ANDREWS In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ASHLEY GAIL ANDREWS. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 7, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 8, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

isfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ASHLEY GAIL ANDREWS. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 7, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 8, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: June 9, 2022 Trudy Bloodworth Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7/2022

NOTICE OF SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, Ryan Paige (“Grantor”), by that certain Deed of Trust dated December 29, 2021, of record as Instrument No. 20220112-0004512, in the Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee (the “Deed of Trust”), conveyed to Steven P. Disser, as Trustee, certain interests in the Property (as hereinafter defined) to secure the payment of certain indebtedness described in the Deed of Trust (the “Indebtedness”); WHEREAS, default has occurred by Grantor’s failure to comply with the terms and conditions of the Deed of Trust, and the Indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in the Deed of Trust, and the Indebtedness has not been paid; WHEREAS, Lender has demanded that the Property be advertised and sold in satisfaction of the Indebtedness and the costs of foreclosure in accordance with the terms of the Deed of Trust; and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Joshua D. Hankins, or my agent, has been dulyappointed as Successor Trustee in the place and stead of Steven P. Disser, said appointment being of record as Instrument No. 20220523-0059570, said Register’s Office. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that I, Joshua D. Hankins, or my agent, as Successor Trustee, pursuant to the power, duty and authority vested in and imposed upon me in the Deed of Trust, will on Friday, July 8, 2022, at 10:00 a.m., prevailing Central Time, outside the south entrance to the Da-

vidson County Historic Courthouse, located at 1 Public Square, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee 37201, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for immediately available funds, free from all rights which Grantor waived in the Deed of Trust, my interests in the real property situated in Davidson County, Tennessee, described as follows, together with my interests in any and all improvements, tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances, my interests in all easements serving or benefiting the property, and my interests in any or all fixtures and improvements now or hereafter attached to the property (the “Property”): A certain tract or parcel of land located in Davidson County, State of Tennessee, described as follows, to wit: Being part of Lot Nos. 1, 2 and 33 on the Plan of Kenmore Place of record in Plat Book 332, Page 32 and 33, in the Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described according to a survey by John Kohl and Company, dated June 24, 1983, as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly margin of McGavock Pike at the southwest corner of a lot conveyed to H.E. Waller and wife, by deed of record in Book 609, Page 126, said Register’s Office; thence with the said Waller’s westerly line and in a northerly direction 106.3 feet to an iron pin; thence in a westerly direction 37 feet to an iron pin; thence in a southerly direction 109.05 feet to the northerly margin of McGavock Pike in an easterly direction 39.6 feet to the point of beginning. Being the same property conveyed to Ryan Paige, a married man, by Warranty Deed from Brian L. Cox and Almeatricee J. Cox, husband and wife, of record in Instrument No. 201602010009310, Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee, dated January 29, 2016 and recorded on February 01, 2016. The Property is improved property known as 1109 McGavock Pike, Nashville, Tennessee 37216. The full legal description of the Property can be found in the Deed of Trust. The Map and Parcel number assigned to the Property is believed to be 072-06-0246.00, but such number is not part of the legal description. In the event of any discrepancy, the legal description in the Deed of Trust shall control. A review of the records at said Register’s Office disclosed that the Property may be subject to certain matters set

forth below and that the persons named below may be interested parties, along with the persons named in the first paragraph of this Notice: 1. Any and all unpaid ad valorem taxes payable to Davidson County, Tennessee (plus penalty and interest, if any) that may be a lien against the Property. 2. All plats, easements and restrictions of record in said Register’s Office. 3. Rights and claims of parties in possession, if any. The foregoing matters may or may not take priority over the Deed of Trust. To the extent such matters do take priority over the Deed of Trust under applicable law, the sale will be subject to them, and to the extent such matters do not take priority over the Deed of Trust under applicable law, the Property will not remain subject to them after the sale. The sale will be subject to any and all unpaid ad valorem taxes (plus penalty and interest, if any) that may be a lien against the Property and subject to any and all liens, defects, encumbrances, conveyances, adverse claims and other matters which take priority over the Deed of Trust upon which this foreclosure sale is had, and subject to any statutory rights of redemption not otherwise waived in the Deed of Trust, including the rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal, which have not been waived by such governmental agency, and matters that take priority over the Deed of Trust which an accurate survey of the Property might disclose. The Property is to be sold AS IS WHERE IS, without representations or warranties of any kind whatsoever, whether express or implied. Without limiting the foregoing, THE PROPERTY IS TO BE SOLD WITHOUT ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR USE OR PURPOSE. Successor Trustee will make no covenant of seisin or warranty of title, express or implied, and will sell and convey his interest in the Property by Successor Trustee’s Deed as Successor Trustee only. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of sale to another day and time certain, without further publication and in accordance with law, upon announcement of said adjournment on the day and time and place of sale set forth above, to sell the Property with or without division if the Prop-

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erty consists of more than one tract or parcel, and to sell to the second highest bidder in the event the highest bidder does not comply with the terms of the sale. Joshua D. Hankins, Esq. Aaron R. Winters, Esq. HANKINS LAW 117 Saundersville Road, Suite 205 Hendersonville, Tennessee 37075 (615) 246-2544 NSC 6/16/2022, 6/23/22, 6/30/22

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Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: June 9, 2022 Trudy Bloodworth Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7/2022

Your Neighborhood Local attractions near by: · AMC Theaters · Murfreesboro Square · The Avenue

Best place near by to see a show: · Center For The Arts

Top 3 bars and restaurants near by: · Demos Restaurant · The Alley on Main · Toot’s Restaurant

Best local family outing: · Sky Zone Trampoline Park

3 near by places you can enjoy the outdoors: (list 3) · The Greenway · Stones River Battlefield · The Fountains at Gateway

Favorite local neighborhood bar: · Whiskey Dix

List of amenities from your community: · Saltwater Pool · Dog Park, · Community Garden, · 24/7 Fitness Center, · Outdoor Kitchen w/ Grills, · Volleyball Court, · Multi-Sport Court, · Playground

Call the Rental Scene property you’re interested in and mention this ad to find out about a special promotion for Scene Readers

1510 Huntington Drive Nashville TN 37130 | liveatcolonyhouse.com | 615.488.4720 42

Need IRS Relief?

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23 - JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


Southaven at Commonwealth 100 John Green Place, Spring Hill, TN 37174

The Harper 2 Beds / 2 bath 1265 sq ft from $1700

The Hudson 3 Bed / 2 bath 1429 sq ft from $1950

3 floor plans southavenatcommonwealth.com | 629.777.8333 Colony House 1510 Huntington Drive Nashville, TN 37130 The James

The Washington

The Franklin

The Lincoln

1 bed / 1 bath

2 bed / 1.5 bath

2 bed / 2 bath

3 bed / 2.5 bath

708 sq. ft

1029 sq. ft.

908-1019 sq. ft.

1408-1458 sq. ft.

from $1360-2026

from $1500-2202

from $1505-2258

from $1719-2557

Rental Scene

The Jackson 1 Bed / 1 bath 958 sq ft from $1400

4 floor plans

liveatcolonyhouse.com | 615.488.4720

Gazebo Apartments 141 Neese Drive Nashville TN 37211 1 Bed / 1 Bath 756 sq ft from $1,119 +

2 Bed / 1.5 Bath - 2 Bath 1,047 – 1,098 sq ft from $1,299 +

3 Bed / 2 Bath 1201 sq ft from $1,399 +

5 floor plans

gazeboapts.com | 615.551.3832 Cottages at Drakes Creek 204 Safe Harbor Drive Goodlettsville, TN 37072

2 floor plans

cottagesatdrakescreek.com | 615.606.2422 2100 Acklen Flats 2100 Acklen Ave, Nashville, TN 37212

Studio / 1 bath

1 bed / 1 bath

2 bed / 2 bath

517 sq ft

700 sq ft

1036 - 1215 sq ft

starting at $1742

starting at $1914

starting at $2008

12 floor plans

2100acklenflats.com | 615.499.5979 Brighton Valley 500 BrooksBoro Terrace, Nashville, TN 37217 1 Bedroom/1 bath 800 sq feet from $1360

2 Bedrooms/ 2 baths 1100 sq feet from $1490

3 Bedrooms/ 2 baths 1350 sq feet from $1900

To advertise your property available for lease, contact Keith Wright at 615-557-4788 or kwright@fwpublishing.com

2 bed / 1 bath 864 sq ft. $1,324-1,347

1 bed / 1 bath 576 sq ft $1,096-1,115

3 floor plans

brightonvalley.net | 615.366.5552 nashvillescene.com | JUNE 23 - JUNE 29, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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S U H P I TC

Nashville is a diverse city, and we want a pool of freelance contributors who reflect that diversity. We’re looking for new freelancers, and we particularly want to encourage writers of color & LGBTQ writers to pitch us.

Read more at our new pitch guide: nashvillescene.com/pitchguide

CAROL’S HOMESTEAD

• Hemp & Herb Infused Culinary Class •

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Do you want to learn how to cook with HEMP? Sample, taste & smoke your way through the lessons! July & August Call 615-485-4548 for an appointment

CAROLSHOMESTEAD.ORG

nothing to do calendar.nashvillescene.com

MUSIC CITY

PSYCHIC 10% off

A TAROT CARD READING musiccitypsychictn.com 615-915-0515

GOOD NEWS TO THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA WORLD RENOWNED PSYCHIC

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 23 - JUNE 29, 2022 | nashvillescene.com