Nashville Scene 6-16-22

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CITY LIMITS: THE STATE PAUSES TO RECONSIDER ITS EXECUTION METHODS

JUNE 16–22, 2022 I VOLUME 41 I NUMBER 20 I NASHVILLESCENE.COM I FREE

INSIDE: SEE THE WINNER OF OUR PET PARTY PHOTO CONTEST, PLUS MORE PET STORIES

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ART: A LOOK AT AMBER ROBLES-GORDON’S POLEMIC QUILTS AT TINNEY CONTEMPORARY PAGE 31

THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE IN TENNESSEE How a Roe v. Wade reversal would play out in Tennessee, and ways to support the right to choose in our state

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CONTENTS

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Tornado Cats ........................................... 27

CITY LIMITS

Walk a Mile: South Nolensville Road and Lake Providence.........................................6 In the 29th installment of his column, J.R. Lind heads south to a neighborhood with international cuisine, a deep religious history and no crosswalks BY J.R. LIND

Tennessee’s Executions Under Review .....8 After botched protocols in the execution of Oscar Smith, the state pauses to reconsider its methods BY ELI MOTYCKA

Pith in the Wind .........................................9

This week on the Scene’s news and politics blog

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COVER STORY The Right to Choose in Tennessee

Abortion Restrictions Are Deeply Enshrined in Tennessee Law .................. 11 A legal perspective on how Tennessee’s trigger law would play out in a post-Roe v. Wade world BY HANNAH HERNER

OB-GYN Residency Programs Don’t Require Abortion Training ...................... 11 Says Dr. Howard Herrell, ‘A graduate from a residency program should be able to terminate a pregnancy’ BY HANNAH HERNER

A Map of Area Abortion Providers ......... 12 For now, these clinics within a five-hour drive of Nashville provide abortions

Getting familiar with East Side skate shop Asphalt Beach’s feline residents BY KELSEY BEYELER

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FOOD AND DRINK

THIS WEEK ON THE WEB:

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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Black Artists Say Lower Broad Resists Diverse Music and Performers

MARKETPLACE

BY ALIJAH POINDEXTER

Tennessee Valley Authority Draws Criticism From NES, John Cooper, Activists

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July Reservations Are Finally Open for Sean Brock’s June

At Everest Restaurant and Bar, fragrant curries and Himalayan specialties make for a tantalizing experience

ART

Flagged

Amber Robles-Gordon’s polemic quilts balance form and content

The Belcourt Schedules Jordan Peele’s Nope for July Run

BY JOE NOLAN

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BOOKS

Re-Election

ON THE COVER:

Photo: Hamilton Matthew Masters

Tom Perrotta delivers up-to-the-minute satire in Tracy Flick Can’t Win BY FERNANDA MOORE AND CHAPTER 16

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MUSIC

Once Bitten .............................................. 34 No longer on the Broadway grind, Heath Haynes revels in power pop BY P.J. KINZER

How you can help support the right to choose here in Tennessee

Adam Schatz, widely traveled multiinstrumentalist and Japanese Breakfast member, rolls with it

BY ERICA CICCARONE

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Bhutan Meets Bell Road

BY KELSEY BEYELER

Get Up, Stand Up .................................... 14

JUNE 16, 2022

The Man in the Fog ................................. 36

BY SEAN L. MALONEY

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The Spin ................................................... 38

CRITICS’ PICKS

Movies in the Park: Black Widow, Bonnaroo, Back to the Future With the Nashville Symphony, The Great Trinity Bazaar, Juneteenth, The Last Podcast Network Country Jamboree, RC Cola-MoonPie Festival, Tenille Townes and more

The Scene’s live-review column checks out Peachy, Heru Heru and more at The East Room’s 10th Anniversary Celebration BY CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

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Like Father, Like Bot

Paws for Effect ........................................ 25

Now It’s Time to Get Funky

Brian and Charles is a surprisingly touching ode to parenthood

PET PARTY

Pawster Nashville helps temporarily house pets in need BY ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

Pet Party Photo Contest ......................... 26

BY CORY WOODROOF

Cha Cha Real Smooth offers a quaint, charming May-December love story BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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FROM BILL FREEMAN CONSENSUS GROWS THAT CHANGE IS NEEDED WITH CHAMBER LEADERSHIP — SCHULZ SHOULD RESIGN Consensus is growing among city leaders, Metro school officials and local employers that the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce’s mismanagement and unfocused attempts to undercut Nashville necessitate a change in chamber leadership. The most recent problem with the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce’s mismanagement involves the chamber’s attempt to short-circuit school boards with sponsored legislation that is roundly considered an attempt to reduce city school boards’ effectiveness. Recent news coverage has shown clearly that both the mayor’s office and the Metro Council were displeased with being shut out of the planning of this legislation, and were completely unaware of it prior to its appearance on the docket. By supporting such legislation, the chamber essentially declared war on local school boards by erasing their autonomy and instead placing oversight of troubled schools directly under the management of the city. Moves like these are clear indications that the chamber has more to gain by undercutting local school boards and cozying up to the state legislature than by supporting the will of the people in determining the focus and direction of their own public schools. Under president and CEO Ralph Schulz’s leadership, did the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce either inadvertently or intentionally keep Metro Nashville’s elected leaders completely in the dark about their backroom dealings to cut school boards off at the knees? How can a leading economic driver such as a county chamber of commerce shut out both the mayor’s office and the Metro Council — shut them out of key legislation that will potentially very negatively impact the public education systems in its own capital city and across Tennessee? It raises a question: Why hasn’t the chamber yet received a major shakeup in its C suite? Such a change would have occurred long ago if the chamber were run like the large corporations whose favor the chamber so desperately curries. Since the chamber doesn’t operate like a corporation but instead seemingly chooses to conduct its workings in backrooms, the Metro Council has seen fit to reduce the organization’s annual allowance in the upcoming fiscal budget to a mere $175,000 — the lowest allotment in more than 30 years. Frustrated by the chamber’s lack of communication with the Metro Council and the mayor’s office, the council voted in support of a reduction in financial support. Granted, this is largely a symbolic gesture, since the chamber relies largely on major corporate donations and hefty membership dues to cover its swollen multimilliondollar annual budget. But membership being in decline over several years, plus the well-known fact that the chamber recently sought substantially smaller office space, certainly speaks to the group’s waning influence with businesses and residents, not to mention its alienation of Nashville’s leaders. The action that speaks the loudest is

RALPH SCHULZ the council’s own resolution staunchly disagreeing with the chamber-led legislation that popped up so abruptly in the General Assembly this past session. Metro Councilmember Dave Rosenberg, along with multiple co-sponsors, presented a resolution opposing the state legislature’s move against the autonomy of local school boards. With a resounding vote of 23-1, the council clearly showed its opposition to the mechanics of the legislation and their displeasure at being kept in the dark throughout the entire lifespan of that legislation. It can take months, if not years, to research, draft and execute legislation such as this item, which would decapitate local school boards. This legislation was clearly kept under wraps for its entire development, unveiled to the public and to impacted cities and school boards only when it was abruptly introduced for a vote by the state legislature. It simply cannot have been an accident that the mayor’s office and Metro Council were kept unaware of this legislation. There must have been an overt decision by the Schulzled chamber to keep the city and council in the dark. For this reason alone, it should be time for a dramatic change in the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce’s leadership. Add to this glaring mistake the decadeslong efforts to enhance our region at the expense of Nashville’s own security and prosperity, and it is clear that the era of the chamber as we know it must end. I know I’m not alone in this conclusion. I simply hope the chamber’s board members feel the same way. It may finally be in their best interest to investigate a new direction in leadership. Declining memberships, shrinking office space, getting sideways with duly-elected city leaders, watching our surrounding counties thrive while Nashville struggles to cover the nut? I can’t think of a deeper hole that the chamber could dig for itself. What else will it take for the board to see that new life is needed in the chamber’s C suite? Quite simply, chamber CEO Ralph Schulz should resign.

PHOTO VIA YOUTUBE.COM

PET OF THE WEEK!

Editor-in-Chief D. Patrick Rodgers Managing Editor Alejandro Ramirez Senior Editor Dana Kopp Franklin Arts Editor Laura Hutson Hunter Culture Editor Erica Ciccarone Music and Listings Editor Stephen Trageser Contributing Editor Jack Silverman Staff Writers Kelsey Beyeler, Stephen Elliott, Hannah Herner, J.R. Lind, Eli Motycka, William Williams, KateLynn White Contributing Writers Sadaf Ahsan, Radley Balko, Ashley Brantley, Maria Browning, Steve Cavendish, Chris Chamberlain, Lance Conzett, Steve Erickson, Nancy Floyd, Randy Fox, Adam Gold, Kashif Andrew Graham, Seth Graves, Kim Green, Steven Hale, Steve Haruch, Edd Hurt, Jennifer Justus, Christine Kreyling, Craig D. Lindsey, Margaret Littman, Brittney McKenna, Marissa R. Moss, Noel Murray, Joe Nolan, Betsy Phillips, John Pitcher, Margaret Renkl, Daryl Sanders, Megan Seling, Jason Shawhan, Michael Sicinski, Nadine Smith, Ashley Spurgeon, Amy Stumpfl, Kay West, Abby White, Andrea Williams, Ron Wynn, Charlie Zaillian Editorial Intern Claudia Villeda Art Director Elizabeth Jones Photographers Eric England, Matt Masters, Daniel Meigs Graphic Designers Mary Louise Meadors, Tracey Starck Production Coordinator Christie Passarello Festival Director Olivia Britton Marketing and Promotions Manager Robin Fomusa Publisher Mike Smith Senior Advertising Solutions Managers Sue Falls, Michael Jezewski, Carla Mathis, Heather Cantrell Mullins, Jennifer Trsinar, Keith Wright Advertising Solutions Managers Richard Jacques, Deborah Laufer, Niki Tyree Sales Operations Manager Chelon Hill Hasty Advertising Solutions Associates Jada Goggins, Audry Houle, Alissa Wetzel Special Projects Coordinator Susan Torregrossa President Frank Daniels III Chief Financial Officer Todd Patton Corporate Production Director Elizabeth Jones Vice President of Marketing Mike Smith IT Director John Schaeffer Circulation and Distribution Director Gary Minnis For advertising information please contact: Mike Smith, msmith@nashvillescene.com or 615-844-9238 FW PUBLISHING LLC Owner Bill Freeman VOICE MEDIA GROUP National Advertising 1-888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

©2022, Nashville Scene. 210 12th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. Phone: 615-244-7989. The Nashville Scene is published weekly by FW Publishing LLC. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Back issues are available at our office. Email: All email addresses consist of the employee’s first initial and last name (no space between) followed by @nashvillescene.com; to reach contributing writers, email editor@nashvillescene.com. Editorial Policy: The Nashville Scene covers news, art and entertainment. In our pages appear divergent views from across the community. Those views do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. Subscriptions: Subscriptions are available at $150 per year for 52 issues. Subscriptions will be posted every Thursday and delivered by third-class mail in usually five to seven days. Please note: Due to the nature of third-class mail and postal regulations, any issue(s) could be delayed by as much as two or three weeks. There will be no refunds issued. Please allow four to six weeks for processing new subscriptions and address changes. Send your check or Visa/MC/AmEx number with expiration date to the above address.

In memory of Jim Ridley, editor 2009-2016

Bill Freeman Bill Freeman is the owner of FW Publishing, the publishing company that produces the Nashville Scene, Nfocus, the Nashville Post and Home Page Media Group in Williamson County.

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CITY LIMITS

SOUTH NOLENSVILLE ROAD AND LAKE Walk a PROVIDENCE In the 29th installment of his column, J.R. Lind heads

Mile

with

south to a neighborhood with international cuisine, J.R. Lind a deep religious history and no crosswalks BY J.R. LIND | PHOTOS BY ERIC ENGLAND

e vill ens

Nol

Taylor Road

Goins Road

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THE ROUTE: From its intersection with Haywood Lane, north on Nolensville Road. Right on Taylor and then left on Goins. Left on Nolensville, then back to the beginning. CRANES: 0 ABANDONED SCOOTERS: 0 (though one spotted in use)

Once a month, reporter and resident historian J.R. Lind will pick an area in the city to examine while accompanied by a photographer. With his column Walk a Mile, he’ll walk a one-mile stretch of that area, exploring the neighborhood’s history and character, its developments, its current homes and businesses, and what makes it a unique part of Nashville. If you have a suggestion for a future Walk a Mile, email editor@nashvillescene.com.

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he stretch of Nolensville Road south of Edmondson Pike is short on traffic lights. That’s no doubt welcome to the legion of commuters who use the route to commute into downtown. Steep ridges line Nolensville here as it follows the valleys cut by creeks — some, like Sevenmile, still extant; others buried under the road or converted to sewers only occasionally peeking above the ground. It swoops and cambers gently and largely uninterrupted. Given the paucity of sidewalks and an almost total lack of signaled crosswalks, it is clear why the good people at local advocacy group Walk Bike Nashville focus so much time on Nolensville — particularly since there is a relatively high number of pedestrians, either making their entire trip via boot-leather or, at the least, shuffling down to the bus stops. Haywood Lane screams down a hill —

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topped by Art Pancake’s massive campus from which a shockingly comprehensive equipment rental empire is run — to a stoplight near a Bank of America and a CVS. There’s a Salvadoran market and restaurant nearby, and a Thai restaurant. Sulav International Market has a Kurdish name and Kurdish signage, but promises (in Spanish) plenty of products aimed at folks from Mexico and Central America as well. It also has a European Union flag, so maybe there are products from, say, Malta or Latvia too. Sulav shares its strip with a vape store (of course) and a cashadvance storefront (even more regrettably). What there isn’t in this amalgam of international commerce is a damn crosswalk. Or a sidewalk of notable length. Crossing Nolensville here requires a perilous game of real-life, high-stakes Frogger but on the east side of the street, the reward: the stunning turquoise edifice of Taqueria Mexico Tennessee and the equally intense orange of Tennessee Quick Cash. There’s also the rather sedate-by-comparison kelly green of an O’Reilly Auto Parts. At the corner of Nolensville and Taylor Road, Genesis Fresh Produce (clever slogan: “Quality From the Beginning”) occupies a quirkily shaped building that appears to have been designed by three committees operating over a period of decades. Nevertheless, Genesis has a beautiful selection of fresh fruits and vegetables, evinced by its very pleasing Instagram page. Somewhere nearby somebody is baking something, the smell wafting up Taylor. There is no transition between Nolens-

ville and Taylor. The change is abrupt and dramatic. The busyness and business of Nolensville give way immediately to a road that might as well be in Pegram. Taylor is heavily shaded with rich, verdant undergrowth creeping into the right of way. It is shockingly quiet after the bustle of Nolensville. And it climbs straight up a hill. Where there are houses — there used to be more, as indicated by the stubby driveways to nothing that appear on occasion — none bear the splashy paint jobs of Nolensville’s commerce. Instead, it’s simple neutral-colored clapboard for the most part, again more suited for more rural environs. Alas, there is a bit of suburban creep. After the overgrowth of the trees gives a bit at the summit of the hill, a brick house more associated with a doughnut county sits on a sizable lot, also more associated with a doughnut county. The homeowner, trying to beat the looming June heat, is wrapping up what must have been a monumental mowing job. Across from the detritus of spring cleaning left in the ditch — a tube television, no-longer-in-style furniture — a rocky outcropping of a vacant lot seems to have not been vacant all that long. A relatively kempt shed is against the back property line, and the grass and weeds have yet to take over. A

glimpse of what could be coming is just up the street. On Old Goins Road, things are not old. They are new. They are tall. They are skinny. And there are more coming. On Goins (current Goins?) there’s more of the same, though some existing stock survives. On the northern side of the road, there’s no construction, old or new. The dense underbrush hides what lies beneath, which could be anything from a steep drop to … just more undergrowth. No doubt the ticks would be pleased if anyone ventured a looksee. In any event, the property is owned by a developer who received zoning approval for 99 multifamily units in 2020. No building permits have been pulled, and the only visible resident is a buck rabbit, undisturbed by the curious human. Across from the wee feeding mammal is Nu-Style Beauty & Barber. Truist Bank has a branch at Goins and Nolensville with a truly unnecessary number of parking spaces — unless everybody in the county is banking there simultaneously. Officially the property is owned by 3NB LLC. Truist merged with SunTrust, which consumed Third National in 1986. Why bother updating the paperwork in a world where bank mergers are more and more common?

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS

TENNESSEE’S EXECUTIONS UNDER REVIEW After botched protocols in the execution of Oscar Smith, the state pauses to reconsider its methods BY ELI MOTYCKA

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ennessee was set to kill Oscar Smith on April 21. The state tried and failed, thwarted by a breakdown in chemical testing mere hours before Smith’s scheduled execution, which has since led to a complete halt on Tennessee executions. Gov. Bill Lee and the Tennessee Department of Correction have remained tight-lipped about what happened that day, a chilling hiccup in an already secretive process that involved last-minute text messages and a botched protocol. Now Smith waits. On May 2, the governor announced an “independent review” of TDOC’s lethal injection process. Pending that review, Lee suspended all 2022 executions, effectively a reprieve for six death row inmates: Smith, Harold Nichols, Byron Black, Gary Sutton, Urshawn Miller and Donald Middlebrooks. (Michael Rimmer’s execution had been

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thodoxy. Incredibly, this is the second time Walk a Mile will include a brief explanation of the Christological controversy that dates back to the Council of Chalcedon in 451. In short, Oriental Orthodox churches are miaphysite, believing that Jesus’ humanity and divinity are united in a single nature. Monophysite churches, which bind to the decision at Chalcedon, believe that the divine and human natures of Jesus are separate but united in a single body. So tenuous is the difference — both sides agree that there’s not much space between them — that every once in a while, the two sides discuss coming up with some kind of unifying theology. This has been going on for almost 1,800

stayed a few days before Smith was set to be killed.) Tennessee has 47 individuals on death row, all in Nashville — 46 men at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution and one woman, Christa Pike, at the Debra K. Johnson Rehabilitation Center, a women’s prison off County Hospital Road in Bordeaux. At 72, Smith is the oldest. The state relies on a three-drug cocktail to carry out executions: midazolam to sedate, vecuronium bromide to paralyze the body, and potassium chloride to stop the heart. A trickle of information from TDOC and the governor confirmed that the state had not tested for endotoxins, which could have caused unforeseeable side effects and potentially breached Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment. Lethal injection has been scrutinized by critics for decades, from procurement to testing to procedure. In Oklahoma, the state’s use of midazolam narrowly survived a constitutional challenge. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine issued a similar supply-chain mandate in February, citing “problems involving the willingness” of pharmaceutical companies to supply execution drugs. The details and timeline of Tennessee’s investigation haven’t been made public. U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton — retained by the state to review the lethal injection process — did not respond to requests for comment, and the governor’s office directed the Scene to Lee’s May 2 press release. “It is anticipated that after the review, the department will make changes to the execution protocol,” says Kelley Henry, chief attorney with the Middle District of Tennessee Federal Public Defender’s

years, but who knows? A solution could be moments away. To the south and on the west side of the street, charter school power player Valor has a campus nearly rivaling the scope of the Pancake realm. Valor even has a crosswalk and a signal. Unfortunately, the signal, during these non-school times, is perpetually flashing yellow — so it’s another edition of bipedal Frogger to make the crossing. On a plinth no longer holding its street light: a piece of cardboard riddled with the careful penmanship of an HVAC worker marking duct lengths and vent locations for some project. Nearby: a supermercado

with a rad luchador-themed neon sign advertising Modelo. Also nearby, a sign marking the home of Squire and Lucinda Pratt. The Pratts were obviously beloved by their children (who paid for the sign). The 1940 census tells us Squire was a farm operator and Lucinda was a housekeeper. Across the street, 1st Chance Auto & Repair welcomes drivers with a plastic palm tree and a building adorned in a livery looking suspiciously like the flag of Norway, for some reason. Truly, this stretch of Nolensville offers something for everybody. But crosswalks for none. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTO: DANIEL MEIGS

Just to the northwest, the inestimable K&S World Market neighbors a rather stereotypical run of businesses: used cars, used tires, used cars, barbershop. There’s a new cocina opening where there was once a soul-food joint near the intersection of Nolensville and Providence Heights (like many streets in the area, a dead end). The old — and these days rarely used — name for the area was Lake Providence, which took its name from Lake Providence Missionary Baptist Church, still meeting on Nolensville, but two-and-a-half miles south after the road becomes a pike. After emancipation, many formerly enslaved people started farms and dairies in the area and had taken to meeting and reading the gospel in each other’s homes. According to the church, suddenly, a man named the Rev. Larry Thompson arrived and organized the congregation, first meeting under an oak tree and then building the small church. Assured his fledgling congregation would survive, he resigned and went to Indian Territory to preach the Good News there. The church lent its name to the community (there is no actual lake extant — though, of course, there could have been in the time before paving). Its members gave their names to many of the roads in the area. These days, the former location of Lake Providence Missionary Baptist is noted with a historical marker. The property itself is home to a car dealership (of course). A little farther south is a Christian community newer to Nashville than the Baptists but with a much longer legacy, denominationally speaking. Debre Keranio Medhanialem Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church is the local congregation of the largest branch of Oriental Orthodoxy, distinct from both Roman Catholicism and Eastern Or-

RIVERBEND MAXIMUM SECURITY INSTITUTION

Capital Habeas Unit. Henry and her unit represent Smith, Middlebrooks and Black. “No executions can move forward until the new protocol has been put into place.” While the state struggles to administer its death penalty, Tennesseeans on death row struggle with legal proceedings. Without a concrete execution date, Middlebrooks can’t schedule the competency hearing that could save his life. The Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals is refusing another hearing for Black, a 66-year-old Black man convicted of murder in 1988, despite the state’s acknowledgment that Black has a severe intellectual disability. Even though today’s legal standards could protect Black from execution,

the court is choosing to recognize legal proceedings that took place under now-obsolete standards in the early 2000s. Tennessee is a national outlier in capital punishment, one of a few states clinging to executions despite constitutional challenges, logistical obstacles, and moral appeals from citizens, victims, politicians and clergy. Tennessee joins Texas, Arizona, Oklahoma and Ohio as states that still consistently put inmates to death, and was second only to Ohio in the number of executions planned for 2022. Arizona and Oklahoma have already executed inmates twice this year. Texas has killed once, with three executions pending and two stayed. Missouri and Alabama have each car-

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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CITY LIMITS ried out one execution. Writing about witnessing Tennessee’s execution of Billy Ray Irick in 2018, former Scene staff reporter Steven Hale described it as an “execution dressed up like a medical procedure.” Tennessee hadn’t executed anyone since 2009, and Irick’s killing was Tennessee’s relapse, preceding a new age of capital punishment under Gov. Bill Haslam’s and Lee’s administrations. Six more men have been executed since Irick — five by electric chair, one by injection. The last time Tennessee executed inmates at this clip was in the Jim Crow Era: five each in 1955, 1948 and 1946; seven in 1943; 10 people each in 1937 and 1939; and 11 in 1922, the century’s one-year high. Most people put to death have been Black, convicted on charges of rape or murder — occasionally both. From 1960 to 2000, Tennessee executed no one. The nation appeared to turn away from capital punishment after the civil rights era, and no executions took place anywhere in the country from 1967 to 1977. During that decade, the Supreme Court wrestled with its own precedent, struggling to square the practice of state-sanctioned killing with Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment. In 1972, the court declared executions cruel and unusual punishment in Furman v. Georgia. A series of death penalty cases unwound that ruling over the next decade under Chief Justice Warren Burger, a period in which the court began skewing

THIS WEEK ON OUR NEWS AND POLITICS BLOG: Metro continues its land-buying frenzy. What for? It’s anybody’s guess! The Metro Council approved the $20.3 million purchase of the former Tennessee School for the Blind on Hermitage Avenue. The Cooper administration has thrown out all kinds of ideas as to what the city will do with it, but much like the $44 million purchase of the Global Mall at the Crossings (or as the old heads among us insist, “Hickory Hollow”) there are plenty of potential uses, described with various levels of vagueness. … The annual public budget hearing — a charter-required exercise during which councilmembers listen to people talk about what they’d like to see in the budget, promise they are listening, and then do exactly nothing about what the people said — focused on a cost of living adjustment. Metro’s Civil Service Commission recommended a 5 percent COLA bump; the budget as proposed has a 4 percent increase. The current rate of inflation is almost 9 percent. … The glowing orations of praise for the proposed new Tennessee Titans stadium have now been joined by the critical voice of the Sycamore Institute, a Tennessee-focused think tank. Consistent with literally decades upon decades of studies, Sycamore argues that pro sports venues redirect existing tax revenue rather than attract new spending and incur hard-to-quantify opportunity costs — money that might otherwise go elsewhere. Associated jobs often come with low wages, precarious employment and lots of turnover. Surely Metro’s powers-that-be will soberly consider this report before the new stadium is approved unanimously. … The state education department released the funding rules for the Tennessee Investment in

more conservative and issuing reactionary rulings to liberal gains of the 1950s and ’60s. Nashville has a long tradition of opposing the state’s reliance on capital punishment. During the waning decades of the 20th century, Harmon Wray — a lecturer at the Vanderbilt Divinity School and clergy member who died in 2007 — organized and wrote extensively about what he described as the state’s twisted affinity for incarceration and punitive justice. Clergy remain at the forefront of the fight to end statesanctioned killing — while lawyers invoke the Eighth Amendment, the Sixth Commandment leaves significantly less room for interpretation. With Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, Presbyterian minister Stacy Rector is a leading figure organizing and advocating against Tennessee’s embrace of capital punishment. With the No Exceptions Prison Collective, former Riverbend chaplain and abolitionist Jeannie Alexander has brought scrutiny to the many inhumanities of Tennessee’s carceral system, from overly punitive sentencing to the private prison industry and capital punishment. Days after Lee issued his last-minute writ halting Smith’s execution, Rector joined Kelley Henry and other organizers, lawyers and clergy at a press conference calling out the governor. “There is nothing healing about the reprieve,” Rector said. “Only more trauma. Tennessee is a national outlier by continuing to hold onto a false narrative that the death penalty makes us safer.”

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Student Achievement Act, the legislation that sets the funding structure for the state’s public schools, replacing the three-decade-old Basic Education Program. TISA is a student-focused system, with districts receiving a base of about $6,800 per pupil, with weights added for, among others, English-language learners, low-income students and students with disabilities. … The Metro Arts Commission terminated strategic funding and initiatives manager Janine Christiano. The embattled department has been at the center of equity concerns in Metro government since two former staffers filed complaints against agency leadership in August. Christiano was the first and only person of color in a management position at the agency. The Nashville chapter of Showing Up for Racial Justice launched a campaign calling for the commission to terminate Ian Myers — the former finance and operations director now serving as interim director, and the person who launched the HR investigation against Christiano. SURJ also called for the commission to remove commission chair Jim Schmidt. … Twiceimpeached former President Donald Trump — who failed to win the majority of American votes in both the 2016 and 2020 presidential elections — will be the keynote speaker at the Road to Majority Policy Conference in Nashville. The event will take place at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center this weekend. … Contributor Betsy Phillips writes that everything sucks a little bit and the country’s leadership is either willfully ignorant or criminally negligent. “Biden is not a good president. Obviously, he’s not the worst president in living memory, because one dude tried to stage a coup. But Biden is objectively out of touch with the fact that most of us are living in The Great Suck, and whatever it is he’s doing to make things better, they don’t seem to be changing people’s day-to-day lives.” NASHVILLESCENE.COM/PITHINTHEWIND EMAIL: PITH@NASHVILLESCENE.COM TWEET: @PITHINTHEWIND

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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6/13/22 5:28 PM


THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE IN TENNESSEE How a Roe v. Wade reversal would play out in Tennessee, and ways to support the right to choose in our state

On May 2, Politico published a massive scoop. A 98-page draft document leaked to the Washington, D.C.-based news organization showed that the United States Supreme Court is likely to overturn Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey when it rules on Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization this summer. “The draft opinion is a full-throated, unflinching repudiation of the 1973 decision which guaranteed federal constitutional protections of abortion rights,” reads the Politico report. “The immediate impact of the ruling … would be to end a half-century guarantee of federal constitutional protection of abortion rights and allow each state to decide whether to restrict or ban abortion.” Here in Tennessee — where abortion restrictions are enshrined in state law — that effectively means a near total ban. While, as of press time, we don’t know when SCOTUS’ Dobbs v. Jackson ruling will come down, it’s expected to arrive this month. In this week’s issue, we look at the legal ramifications of a Roe reversal in Tennessee, requirements about abortion training at medical schools, abortion providers in our region, and ways to support the right to choose in our state.

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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6/13/22 3:48 PM


ABORTION RESTRICTIONS ARE DEEPLY ENSHRINED IN TENNESSEE LAW

was necessary to prevent the death of the pregnant person — or woman, as the statute says — and prevent serious risk of substantial and irreversible impairment of a major bodily function. At that point, some harm has already occurred to the physician, which is they’ve already been arrested and charged with a [class] C felony. They may ultimately be acquitted if they’re able to show this affirmative defense. But that’s something that a physician who is maybe less risktolerant might be unwilling to undertake.

A legal perspective on how Tennessee’s trigger law would play out in a postRoe v. Wade world

T

BY HANNAH HERNER

ennessee is one of 14 states that will see a near total ban on abortion in the event of the rollback of Roe v. Wade. But it’s still unclear how exactly the state’s trigger law will be enforced. Davidson County District Attorney Glenn Funk stands by his 2020 statement that he would not prosecute anyone who “decides to have a medical procedure to terminate a pregnancy or any medical doctor who performs this procedure at the request of their patient.” Even so, there’s room in the law for Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery to petition the state Supreme Court to appoint a special prosecutor in a district where a DA has said they will not prosecute certain crimes. The Metro Nashville Police Department declined to comment on the matter of enforcing a trigger law. This year, the state legislature passed a law adding repercussions for physicians prescribing a medication abortion via telehealth. The state also attempted to pass legislation similar to a notorious Texas law that would have allowed any individual to sue another who “aids or abets” someone looking to obtain an abortion. That effort failed in Tennessee, but similar laws have already passed in Oklahoma and Idaho. Additionally, bills prohibiting a local

STELLA YARBROUGH, LEGAL DIRECTOR FOR ACLU OF TENNESSEE government from providing assistance to an elective abortion provider, requiring a pregnant person to complete a consultation with the department of health prior to an abortion, and giving a father of an unborn child the right to prohibit an abortion were introduced this year, but failed. Stella Yarbrough is the legal director for ACLU of Tennessee. She sat down with the Scene to evaluate what the 2019-passed trigger law, also known as the Human Life Protection Act, means as it is written.

protections of this right. So in those states that right would be protected under the state constitution. Others have statutory protections of the right. And in places like Tennessee, we actually have a constitutional amendment that says that nothing in our constitution could be interpreted as providing a right to an abortion. If we wanted to have a statutory right, this constitutional amendment doesn’t prohibit the creation of a statute that allows it, but we would have to repeal a number of statutes on the books, including the trigger ban and the six-week ban.

What effect could this trigger law have on physicians? A lot of people use the phrase

So abortion restrictions are deeply enshrined in Tennessee law. That’s a good way of putting it.

that there’s an “exception” to the abortion ban for the sake of the pregnant person’s life or mental condition. And it’s really truly not an exception. Legally speaking, it’s an affirmative defense, and that’s how it’s described in the statute. An affirmative defense is something that a defendant could raise after they’ve already been arrested and charged and are being prosecuted for a crime. It functions in a very similar way to a self-defense claim. They would have to show that in their good-faith medical judgment, [and it’s] unclear exactly what that would mean or how you would show that, that the abortion

OB-GYN RESIDENCY PROGRAMS DON’T REQUIRE ABORTION TRAINING Says Dr. Howard Herrell, ‘A graduate from a residency program should be able to terminate a pregnancy’ BY HANNAH HERNER

L

From a law perspective, what would need to change to protect the right to abortion in Tennessee? Some states have state constitutional

earning how to perform an abortion is not ubiquitous across medical education. A 2020 study from Stanford University found that half of medical schools in the U.S. offer just one lecture or include no formal training on abortion-related topics. And while offering abortion training is required by national accreditation boards, schools sometimes disobey that requirement — and students can opt out of the training, which could affect access to other needed procedures. At Meharry Medical College, students can opt out of abortion education, which happens in the four specialized OB-GYN residency years following medical school. Vanderbilt University refused to comment on the matter, though the presence of a Ryan Residency program (an abortion curriculum provider) at the school suggests that it’s not a part of the curriculum, and must be sought out by students. This falls in line with the American Association of Medical Colleges

simply wouldn’t. And especially for abortion providers and physicians, a felony conviction could mean the loss of their license, so it could mean a loss of their livelihood. In addition, there’s obviously fines and jail time on the line as well.

Although the law states that it won’t prosecute those who are receiving the abortion, could there still be fallout for a pregnant person? The trigger ban does expressly say that this section doesn’t subject the pregnant woman upon whom an abortion is performed or attempted to be performed, so it doesn’t subject them to criminal conviction or penalty. There’s an explicit carve-out. There’s tension in the context of how to interpret the word “performed,” particularly in the context of, let’s say, medication abortions, where the pregnant person is administering medication to themselves. There’s some tension there. But again, I do want to emphasize that ultimately, the law does say on its face that the pregnant woman will be excluded from criminal conviction or penalty.

Where does the abortion pill fall in this?

How does the threat of a class C felony add intensity to this? It’s hugely relevant

What’s going to be more important is what the Supreme Court does with Roe, and that’s going to control any analysis of medication abortion post-Roe. It’s hard for me to speculate about how medication abortion, how that puzzle piece will fit in when the most basic right to an abortion is up for grabs. I can’t really necessarily go into different hypotheticals there.

that it’s a felony charge in the sense that a felony conviction carries with it so many more collateral consequences than a misdemeanor conviction would. … Temporary or permanent loss of the right to vote, denial of a lot of access to public services, like public housing, or loss of school loan funding. Obviously a felony criminal conviction could affect your ability to get a job or be enrolled in a school. A felony conviction has permanent, lifelong consequences in a way that a misdemeanor

Anything else you want to add? Attacks on abortion care have been so enshrined in Tennessee law and in our constitution that it would be it would be incredibly difficult if Roe was overturned and the federal right is lost. It’s going to be a tremendous uphill battle to regain those rights for Tennesseans. The ACLU of Tennessee is committed to doing so, and we’re going to do everything in our power to continue to fight for these rights. ■

Accreditation Council’s stance — requiring access to abortion training for all obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, noting that students can choose not to participate in the training. Dr. Howard Herrell is incoming chair of the Tennessee Chapter of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He says it’s important that students learn the dilation and evacuation procedure, because it’s the same procedure used for a fetus that is no longer alive, a termination to save the life of the mother, or in some cases, to treat excessive bleeding or take a biopsy from the uterus. These scenarios for the termination of a pregnancy are frequently referred to university settings where residents can provide the services, he adds. “Even if they morally object to doing them, they’ll still learn how, because enough women suffer pregnancy losses that need completion, at all gestational ages,” says Herrell. “A graduate from a residency program should be able to terminate a pregnancy.” Pending the overturn of Roe v. Wade and Tennessee’s abortion trigger law going into effect, Herrell is concerned that gynecologists could face criminal charges for performing the dilation and evacuation procedure at all — causing a chilling effect on instruction as well. “That’s a huge, vast gray area that on one hand has things like ectopic pregnancies — am I allowed to … do a surgery to remove an ectopic pregnancy before it ruptures and kills you?” he says. “To grayer areas like babies who are missing their brain, or mothers who have cardiac defects that if they choose to carry the pregnancy will give them a 50, 60, 70 percent chance of death.” If their fetus has died, a pregnant person will still be able to get an abortion no matter the gestation, Herrell says. Even so, it’s hard to prove what the outcome would have been for a pregnancy with medical

“WE HAVE THE HEALTH OF THE PREGNANCY, OF THE FETUS, AND WE HAVE THE HEALTH OF THE MOTHER. SOMETIMES THOSE ARE AT ODDS, AND SOMETIMES WE MAKE DECISIONS THAT FAVOR ONE PARTY OVER THE OTHER, AND WE DO THAT IN A VERY GRAY MURKY AREA.” — DR. HOWARD HERRELL

complications — plus, pregnant people all have different risk tolerance. This puts physicians in a precarious position, at the mercy of how their local district attorney interprets the law. He hopes to see state legislatures leave this decision up to the patient and the physician. “Obstetrics is unique in that we’re balancing two interests,” Herrell says. “We have the health of the pregnancy, of the fetus, and we have the health of the mother. Sometimes those are at odds, and sometimes we make decisions that favor one party over the other, and we do that in a very gray murky area. That also needs to include your own desires and wants and beliefs.” ■

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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A MAP OF AREA ABORTION PROVIDERS

404-284-3200 southeastdekalbgyn.com Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 13 weeks and six days.

KENTUCKY

For now, these clinics within a five-hour drive of Nashville provide abortions

LOUISVILLE

EMW Women’s Surgical Center 136 W. Market St., Louisville, Ky. 800-626-3512 emwwomens.com Abortion pill up to nine weeks and six days, abortion procedure up to 21 weeks and six days.

BY KELSEY BEYELER

A

s the nation awaits a Supreme Court decision on abortion, clinics are preparing as best they can for an unknown future. In the coming days and weeks, clinics’ ability to provide abortions may be hindered for a number of reasons: Laws may change, demand may overwhelm clinics’ schedules, and labor shortages may prevent them from operating at full capacity. But if SCOTUS overturns Roe v. Wade, until that time, the clinics will be there, and if the changing court decision and subsequent trigger laws prevent some abortions from happening, there are still resources to help you plan ahead — whatever that may look like. Below, find a list of abortion clinics within a five-hour drive of Nashville. Note that these are abortion clinics and not what are often called “crisis pregnancy centers” — clinics that purport to present all options to pregnant people, but discourage them from having abortions and do not refer them to abortion providers. (The best way to find out if a clinic is legit is to call and ask if it makes referrals for abortions.) This is not an exhaustive directory of all the clinics in and around Tennessee. The Supreme Court decision may of course change the viability of this list. If it becomes illegal for some of these clinics to provide abortions, they may be able to help you learn about additional options. As you go about researching abortions, be sure to familiarize yourself with different resources, locations, the services they provide and the regulations they must work around. Many surrounding states have some kind of trigger law that would limit their ability to provide services in the event of Roe v. Wade being overturned. Additionally, many surrounding states ban abortions after a certain number of weeks, require a 24- to 72-hour waiting period, or require more than one appointment — these factors might necessitate scheduling several appointments, booking lodging near a clinic or completing preliminary paperwork. Abortion clinics measure the time leading up to an abortion based on a patient’s gestation period, or the amount of time since the start of their last period — many of them also have pregnancy calculators to help individuals figure out how far along they may be. For more resources, visit healthyandfreetn.org or abortionfinder.org.

TENNESSEE NASHVILLE

Carafem Nashville Health Center 5002 Crossings Circle, Suite 260, Mt. Juliet 855-729-2272 carafem.org/nashville Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedures up to 13 weeks.

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KNOXVILLE NASHVILLE

ILLINOIS

FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS Planned Parenthood — Fairview Heights Health Center 317 Salem Place, Fairview Heights, Ill. 618-277-6668 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/illinois Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 26 weeks.

MEMPHIS

GRANITE CITY Hope Clinic for Women 1602 21st St., Granite City, Ill. 618-451-5722 hopeclinic.com Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 23 weeks and six days. Planned Parenthood — Nashville Health Center 412 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville 866-711-1717 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/tennessee Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 19 weeks and six days.

GEORGIA

MEMPHIS

ATLANTA

Choices — Memphis Center for Reproductive Health 1203 Poplar Ave., Memphis 901-274-3550 Memphischoices.org Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 16 weeks and two days. Planned Parenthood — Memphis Health Center 2430 Poplar Ave., Memphis 866-711-1717 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/tennessee Abortion pill up to 11 weeks and procedure up to 19 weeks and six days.

KNOXVILLE Knoxville Center for Reproductive Health 1547 West Clinch Ave., Knoxville 800-325-5357 kcrh.com Abortion pill up to 10 weeks and six days, abortion procedure up to 18 weeks.

ALABAMA HUNTSVILLE

Alabama Women’s Center for Reproductive Alternatives 4831 Sparkman Drive NW, Huntsville, Ala. 866-536-2231 alabamawomensclinic.com Abortion pill up to 10 weeks, surgical abortion up to 21 weeks and six days.

TUSCALOOSA West Alabama Women’s Center 535 Jack Warner Parkway, Suite I, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 800-616-2383 alabortionclinic.com Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 14 weeks.

MARIETTA

Planned Parenthood — Cobb Center 220 Cobb Parkway N., Suite 500, Marietta, Ga. plannedparenthood.org/health-center/georgia 404-688-9300 Abortion pill up to 11 weeks.

Feminist Women’s Health Center 1924 Cliff Valley Way NE, Atlanta 800-877-6013 feministcenter.org Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 21 weeks and five days. Planned Parenthood — East Atlanta Health Center 440 Moreland Ave. SE, Atlanta 404-688-9300 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/georgia Abortion pill up to 11 weeks.

MISSOURI ST. LOUIS

Planned Parenthood — Reproductive Health Services of PPSLR 4251 Forest Park Ave., St. Louis 314-531-7526 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/missouri Abortion procedure up to 21 weeks and six days.

NORTH CAROLINA ASHEVILLE

Planned Parenthood — Asheville Health Center 68 McDowell St., Asheville, N.C. 828-252-7928 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/north-carolina Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 13 weeks and six days

OHIO

CINCINNATI

Summit Medical Associates — Atlanta 1874 Piedmont Ave. NE, Suite 500 E, Atlanta 404-607-0042 summitcenters.com/atlanta-abortion-clinic Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, surgical abortion up to 21 weeks and six days.

Planned Parenthood — Cincinnati Surgical Center 2314 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati 513-287-6488 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/ohio Abortion pill up to 10 weeks, abortion procedure up to 21 weeks and six days.

FOREST PARK

INDIANA

A Preferred Women’s Health Center of Atlanta 519 Forest Parkway, Suite 100, Forest Park, Ga. 888-665-4126 abortionclinicservicesatlantaga.com Abortion pill up to 11 weeks, abortion procedure up to 12 weeks and six days.

LAWRENCEVILLE Planned Parenthood — Gwinnett Health Center 798 Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road, Lawrenceville, Ga. 404-688-9300 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/georgia Abortion pill up to 11 weeks.

DECATUR Southeast Dekalb Gyn 4150 Snapfinger Woods Drive, Decatur, Ga.

BLOOMINGTON Planned Parenthood — Bloomington Health Center 421 S. College Ave., Bloomington, Ind. 317-205-8088 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/indiana Abortion pill up to 10 weeks, abortion procedure up to 13 weeks and six days.

INDIANAPOLIS Planned Parenthood — Georgetown Health Center 8590 Georgetown Road, Indianapolis 317-205-8088 plannedparenthood.org/health-center/indiana Abortion pill up to 10 weeks, abortion procedure up to 13 weeks and six days. ■

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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GET READY TO LAUGH, FUME, ARGUE AND DEBATE THE WINNERS AS WE ASK YOU TO COMPLETE THE MAGIC WORDS:

GET UP, STAND UP

How you can help support the right to choose here in Tennessee BY ERICA CICCARONE

F

olks, we’re well past the point at which writing to U.S. Sens. Marsha Blackburn and Bill Hagerty is a worthwhile endeavor. Our state legislators have carved up the Democratic stronghold of the 5th Congressional District, so our representation in the U.S. House is a big unknown. It’s time to get on the ground and find the grassroots organizations that have been preparing for this fight. Donating money to national organizations is nice, but if you want to see progress in your own community and in the South, here are some options. Healthy and Free Tennessee is a nonprofit made up of agencies, organizations and individuals promoting reproductive justice in our state. They’ve been active in the state legislature, working with lawmakers to view law through a reproductive lens. HFTN was behind the bill that bans the shackling of pregnant women in Tennessee jails, which passed in March. In May, HFTN steeringcommittee member Briana Perry told the Scene that the organization will also start to provide training around self-managed abortion and respond to a potential uptick in criminalization of abortion, potentially providing legal and bail funds. Even if Roe v. Wade is overturned, state laws will still matter as we navigate the criminalization of abortion. We need advocates at the state Capitol, and you can help. HFTN is looking for volunteers to guide the strategy for the coalition’s priorities. With the 2022 legislative session wrapped and state lawmakers at ease for the rest of the year, this is the perfect time to get involved and prepare to fight the criminalization of abortion during the next session. HFTN also arranges meetings with representatives and constituents, so

you can help inform our state leaders why reproductive choice matters to Southerners. The organization also lists opportunities for story sharing, tabling at events, hosting gatherings and more — and they’re always looking for monetary donations to stay afloat. Check out healthyandfreetn.org/ volunteer to get involved. Abortion Care Tennessee, which typically funds abortions by giving money to clinics, is looking to pivot their model to helping with travel costs for out-of-state abortions. Follow their work at abortioncaretn.org to stay up to date on this process. Planned Parenthood does not only provide abortions — the clinics across the U.S. provide mammograms, STI testing and treatment, hormone therapy, prenatal care and a host of other services. Planned Parenthood is an indispensable institution that will still need funding in a potential post-Roe era. Ashley Coffield, CEO of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi, said at a May press conference that the organization is starting a patient navigator program to help people plan and pay for out-of-state abortions. You can get involved by joining the

Tennessee Advocates for Planned Parenthood and taking part in its Rapid Response Team next legislative session. By showing up on Capitol Hill, you not only tell your representatives what matters to you but also buoy the folks who have dedicated their lives to this cause. It’s easy to despair — to feel like we’re at the mercy of nine federal overlords who make decisions that impact every American from the cradle to the grave. It’s hard to take action. But there are smart, strategic folks who are determined to stay active and hold up lanterns in the smog. Do the hard thing. This fight ain’t over. EMAIL EDITOR@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

AT NASHVILLESCENE.COM/YASNI22

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PHOTO: ERIC ENGLAND

NOW ACCEPTING ENTRIES THROUGH JUNE 22

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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ANNE MALIN ALBUM RELEASE FEAT. ABBY JOHNSON & TREVOR NIKRANT

Poet and songsmith Anne Malin’s folkmusic-inclined records are not dark throughout, but consistently feel a bit like they’re from a different planet or plane of existence. She and her partner and bandmate Will Ringwalt-Johnson were already wellestablished musicians in New England, and they got settled in their new adopted home of Music City just in time for the pandemic to swoop down. They worked on Anne Malin’s 2020 album Waiting Song alone at home, but took advantage of some of their newfound relationships in making the next one. Summer Angel was produced and recorded

by Andrija Tokic, who has been involved with a wide variety of roots-oriented records; he’s often collaborated with singer-songwriter Josephine Foster, whose work often has a similar ethereal quality to Anne Malin’s. You can hear for yourself when Summer Angel is out Friday, but you can hear Anne Malin and some of her cohorts play songs from it a little early at Thursday’s release party. Fellow songsmiths Abby Johnson and Trevor Nikrant will join in. 8 p.m. at Drkmttr, 1111 Dickerson Pike STEPHEN TRAGESER

THEATER

ALBUM RELEASE

This week marks the third installment in the Scene’s 28th annual Movies in the Park series. Up Thursday night: 2021’s Black Widow, the 24th film in the everexpanding Marvel Cinematic Universe, starring Scarlett Johansson in her final appearance (for the foreseeable future) as the titular Russian Avenger. Relatively down-to-earth compared to much of the MCU’s galaxy-hopping fare, Black Widow features a stacked cast, including Florence Pugh, David Harbour, William Hurt and the eternally watchable Rachel Weisz. Kids love Marvel movies, but this one has enough compelling fight sequences and nostalgic moments to keep the whole family entertained. Get to Elmington early: As always, the Movies in the Park festivities will include vendors, giveaways and games, with the film beginning at sundown — usually around 8 p.m. The series wraps up next week with Encanto. 5 p.m. at Elmington Park, 3531 West End Ave. D. PATRICK RODGERS

[HIT THE ROAD, JACK]

THAT WOMAN — THE MONOLOGUE SHOW & THAT WOMAN — THE DANCE SHOW

In these debut productions of Tennessee Playwrights Studio, actors and dancers imagine the women in the orbit of JFK during his life and presidency. The Monologue Show gives voice to women of and in the shadows of Camelot, who were involved with (or rumored to be involved with) the notorious womanizer. The actors researched these historical figures and penned the monologues themselves, and the cast features Jennifer Whitcomb-Oliva (playing Marilyn Monroe and sure to be a delight), Mary McCallum, Alicia Haymer and many more. Stephanie Houghton directs. The Monologue Show has been adapted as The Dance Show, featuring more than a dozen performers and original choreography from 10 artists. Molly Breen directs (and produces, dances and performs a monologue). If they pull all this off, it just might be brilliant. Visit tnplaywrights.org for showtimes. June 16-26 at The Darkhorse Theater, 4610 Charlotte Ave.; June 29 at The East Room, 2412 Gallatin Ave.

are headed down to Bonnaroo. Hip-hop star J.Cole, alt-metal champs Tool and rock ’n’ roll legend Stevie Nicks are your headliners; technically dance producer Gryffin isn’t a headliner, but he’s in that 11 p.m. slot on Thursday night, so you might call him a de facto headliner for the day. Tons of other standout players will be there, of course. That includes ace songwriter Joy Oladokun and ’grass-schooled guitar wizard Billy Strings (two of many Nashville artists performing), as well as rockers like Nothing, envelope-pushing jazz group Sons of Kemet, rappers 21 Savage and Tobe Nwigwe, and genre-busting multimedia artist Tierra Whack. Sing along with the majestic pop country of The Chicks, groove along with Garcia Peoples, freak the hell out to King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard — it’s your choice. If you feel a little overwhelmed, see our picks for can’t-miss shows (and our annual Bonnaroo Bingo card) at nashvillescene.com. Tickets were still available online at bonnaroo.com as of press time. June 16-19 at The Bonnaroo Farm, 1500 New Bushy Branch Road, Manchester, Tenn. STEPHEN TRAGESER

BONNAROO

FRIDAY / 6.17

[’ROO TO YOU]

BONNAROO

After getting canceled two years in a row — thanks first to COVID-19 and then to Hurricane Ida — the biggest multigenre music fest in our general area and an OG player in the festival economy is back. Thousands of fans from all over

MUSIC

FESTIVAL

PHOTO: BRITTON STRICKLAND

ERICA CICCARONE

[MORE SPACE]

FAILURE

Since re-forming in 2013, alt-rock cult faves Failure have had a surprising second act that has now yielded as many albums as the band’s original 1990-1997

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRITICS’ PICKS records, vintage clothes, beer and coffee you could want from Grimey’s, Anaconda and Living Waters. This is currently the only Be Good Market scheduled for June, so catch it if you can; if you can’t, keep an eye on the market’s website for upcoming events. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Grimey’s, 1060 E. Trinity Lane KELSEY BEYELER

FESTIVAL

[THE CRAFT: LEGACY]

AMERICAN ARTISAN FESTIVAL

MUSIC

Now in its 46th year, the American Artisan Festival at Centennial Park is a fantastic traditional craft fair. Featuring more than 100 artisans and artists, the fair offers wares in a variety of mediums, such as ceramics, jewelry, apparel, toys, decorative art and much, much more. The park’s bandshell will host 18 singersongwriters throughout the weekend, and food vendors will include Daddy’s Dogs, Califarmia, Lemon Love and more. Bring the kids — they can get crafty at booths that offer butterfly painting, a musical playspace, art workshops and more. June 17-19 at Centennial Park, 2500 West End Ave. ERICA CICCARONE [THE KIDS IN AMERICA]

AMERICAN AQUARIUM W/ HAILEY WHITTERS

​​Since the release of their debut album Antique Hearts in 2006, innovative altcountry outfit American Aquarium has forged a deep connection with their devoted and ever-growing fan base. Helmed by frontman BJ Barham, the North Carolina-based band has gone through many evolutions and lineup changes over the years, but Barham’s raw, heartfelt songwriting is the glue that’s allowed the project to sustain and succeed. That rare lyrical honesty is at the heart of the band’s latest record, Chicamacomico, which takes a deep dive into the emotional turmoil and

AMERICAN AQUARIUM deep reflection that often accompany a great personal loss. Weaved together with lyrics that are as powerful as they are relatable, the tracks on Chicamacomico evoke those dark, mournful moments, along with the hope and healing that can emerge in grief’s wake. American Aquarium’s headlining debut at the Ryman is sure to be a cathartic, joyful celebration of rebirth, marking a pivotal new milestone in the band’s lengthy list of career accomplishments. The night will kick off with a set from burgeoning country singersongwriter Hailey Whitters, fresh off the release of her critically acclaimed record Raised. Over the past decade, Whitters has established herself as one of the genre’s most insightful songwriters, penning tracks cut by country heavyweights including Alan Jackson and Little Big Town. From the flirty “Everything She Ain’t” to the confident “Plain Jane,” Whitters has already proven she has staying power as a solo artist. And if you’re lucky, you might get the rare chance to hear the two acts team up for their stellar small-town anthem “Middle of America.” 7 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. LORIE LIEBIG [WHY NOT DO IT WITH SOME STYLE?]

BACK TO THE FUTURE WITH THE NASHVILLE SYMPHONY

For a pop-culture artifact so closely identified with the time it came from — go to any ’80s theme night and see how many Doc Browns and Marty McFlys you spot — Back to the Future is remarkably timeless. The characters are nuanced and the cast is on-point throughout. The themes driving the plot about a teenager who feels stifled are universal. (Just as importantly, the jokes are, too.) The sci-fi elements are just right, neither too simple to be believed nor too complicated to care about. The soundtrack is great, and the DeLorean is still cool. Composer Alan Silvestri came up with a score that responds to all the complex contours of the plot and the characters while being pretty much instantly memorable — qualities that have helped him remain director Robert Zemeckis’ go-to composer for the past four decades. Back to the Future was only their second collaboration, following Romancing the Stone, but he was given the freedom

to hire a 98-piece ensemble dubbed The Outatime Orchestra to record it (at the time, the largest assembled for a Universal Studios film). Friday through Sunday, you’ll be able to see the film on a massive screen and hear that score with the ultimate fidelity: The Nashville Symphony will play it live. 7 p.m. June 17-18, 2 p.m. June 19 at the Schermerhorn, 1 Symphony Place STEPHEN TRAGESER

SATURDAY / 6.18 SHOPPING

If you’re itching for a taste of the summer festival season but don’t feel like running all the way out to Manchester for Bonnaroo, the annual free weekly fest Musicians Corner is your move this weekend. Rock ’n’ pop dominates Friday evening’s sets, with Liza Anne at the top of the bill joined by well-traveled Twen and Bonnaroo-bound Frances Cone; also, don’t miss out on excellent songsmith Milly Roze, purveyor of excellent hip-hop-schooled R&B. Saturday, your selections run the gamut from The Aquaducks’ infectious funk and Leslie Bowe’s gospel- and country-influenced tunes, to Gabe Dixon’s multifaceted piano-driven pop and Leigh Nash’s widescreen roots-rooted pop songs. It’s the second-to-last installment before the series goes dormant for the summer; whether it’s humid out or not, it’s a chill hang with great tunes, and it’s free. 5-9 p.m. June 17, noon-6 p.m. June 18 at Centennial Park, 2500 West End Ave. STEPHEN TRAGESER

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COMMUNITY

MUSICIANS CORNER FEAT. LIZA ANNE, GABE DIXON & MORE

[A HOLY TRINITY]

THE GREAT TRINITY BAZAAR

Be Good Market is heading back out into the wild to host the Great Trinity Bazaar with Grimey’s New & Preloved Music, Anaconda Vintage and Living Waters Brewing. The market will feature a collection of makers, vendors and entrepreneurs who will set up shop on East Trinity Lane. This go-round will feature books from The Green Ray, rugs from Lost Cause Studio, art from Nicole Atkins, handpainted pottery from Chelsea Faith, silver goods from Black Cloud Metal, wooden wares from Wildland Woodworks and incense from Luke Schneider’s Forestdale. Robbie Stilwell will also set up to take tintype photographs. Plus, of course, all the

[FREEDOM RINGS]

JUNETEENTH

There’s no better place to celebrate Juneteenth — the newly minted federal (and Metro) holiday celebrating the freedom of the formerly enslaved — than Fort Negley Park. The eponymous centerpiece of the park is a re-creation of a Civil War masonry fort (at the time, the largest such inland fort in the country) that was built by and large by the formerly enslaved, including a significant number who escaped to the Union lines in Nashville. After its completion, it was garrisoned by members of the United States Colored Troops. The celebration at the fort will include food trucks, reenactors from the 13th Regiment of the United States Colored Troops Living History Association, activities and fireworks. Out north, the Black on Buchanan Juneteenth event — sponsored by The Equity Alliance and The Nashville Food Project — will feature live music and food and emphasis on the city’s Blackowned businesses. Meanwhile, the National Museum of African American Music is hosting a Community Day — with free admission — on June 18 and a block party on June 19. All events are free. Community Day 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 18 at NMAAM, 510 Broadway; Black on Buchanan 2-6 p.m. June 18 on Buchanan Street; Juneteenth615 5 p.m. June 19 at Fort Negley Park; Juneteenth Block Party 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 19 at NMAAM, 510 Broadway J.R. LIND MUSIC

[AROUND THE CORNER]

MUSIC

MUSIC

run, which was capped with 1996’s brilliant, celestially themed Fantastic Planet. The band’s latest, Wild Type Droid, finds the L.A. trio in top form. The record is quintessential Failure — intricate, slowburning songs, audiophile-quality sound and Ken Andrews’ coolly ambivalent vocals — in an uncharacteristically concise 39-minute package. Live, the band is simultaneously pristine and powerful. The show has no opener; early arrivals will be treated to a preview of an upcoming documentary telling the band’s story. 8 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

[REBOOT SCOOTIN’]

BROOKS & DUNN

Iconic country duo Brooks & Dunn (Kix and Ronnie to their mamas) came out of the gate on a heater when they dropped their debut Brand New Man in 1991. The first four singles all hit No. 1: the title track (one of the strongest country debut tracks of the ’90s), “My Next Broken Heart” (a barroom burner for the lonely on the make), “Neon

BROOKS & DUNN

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Friday, June 17 and Saturday, June 18

Monday, June 27 – Saturday, July 9

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JUL 22

Rubiks Groove

Saturday, June 18

Lauren Conklin

JUN 18

Sam McCrary & The Mix

JUL 23

That 90’s Show

NASHVILLE CATS

1:00 pm · FORD THEATER

JUN 21

Zootopia | Free Sunset Movie Series

AUG 12 Diamond Rio

JUN 24

Britney vs Gaga Pop Divas Dance Party

AUG 26 Michael Franti & Spearhead

JUN 25

Glow Party with DJ Cisco

AUG 30 Coyote Ugly | Free Sunset Movie Series

JUN 17

Nashville Yacht Club Band

JUN 18

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Dave Fleppard + Holy Lightning

JUL 2

Frank Ray

JUL 4

Fireworks Viewing Party feat. Lakeview

JUL 6

Everclear + Fastball + The Nixons

JUL 15

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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SUM MER CON C ERTS AT C H E E KWOOD

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JULY 21

JUNE 23 The Tiger Beats

JULY 28 Shannon LaBrie

JUNE 30 Airshow

AUG 4

Isaia Huron

The Grascals with opening performance by Carley Arrowood

The Stolen Faces

JULY 7

Haiva Ru

AUG 11

Tim Gartland

JULY 14

Jess Nolan

AUG 18

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criticspic


CRITICS’ PICKS

FESTIVAL

“We realized that there was this opportunity here where it’s just like, we could be the freakin’ Cryptkeeper.” When the Scene spoke with the three hosts of famed comedy-slash-true-crime-slashparanormal podcast The Last Podcast on the Left three years ago, that’s how host and comedian Henry Zebrowski explained his and his colleagues’ decision to launch their show back in 2011, before the truecrime boom. Now, a decade and nearly 500 episodes later, Zebrowski & Co. have a veritable empire on their hands — in addition to the flagship show featuring all things dark, weird and creepy, the Last Podcast Network boasts a number of podcasts on everything from pop culture and the history of rock ’n’ roll to politics and comic books. On June 18, a whole slew of those shows will be represented at Nashville’s own Mother Church of Country Music, when The Last Podcast Network Country Jamboree brings “live music and as much laughter as your brain and soul can handle” to the Ryman. Participating podcasts will include LPOTL, Page 7, Wizard and the Bruiser, No Dogs in Space, Fraudsters and more. As I write this, tickets are dwindling, so hop on it while you still have the chance. And remember: Hail yourselves! 7 p.m. at the Ryman, 116 Rep. John Lewis Way N. D. PATRICK RODGERS [OUR CHAMPAGNE AND CAVIAR]

RC COLA-MOONPIE FESTIVAL

The RC Cola-MoonPie Festival in downtown Bell Buckle, about an hour southeast of Nashville, is about as Southern as it gets. It’s a daylong celebration of the combination of a cold glass bottle of RC Cola and a sweet, gooey MoonPie. You’ll obviously see both items in plenty of forms throughout the day — from tiny bite-size

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MoonPies to fried ones (!) to the World’s Largest MoonPie, which will be unveiled near the end of the day. It’s always a thing to behold. They’ll crown an RC Cola-MoonPie King and Queen, and give honors to the oldest and youngest attendees at the event. The festival also includes an impressively gigantic craft fair with vendors from near and far, and the shops in the normally quaint and quiet downtown square typically stay open if you want to grab an ice cream cone, check out the antique shops or dip in for a meal at Bell Buckle Cafe (though you may experience a very long wait at the meat-andthree on this particular day). You can catch a glimpse of some old-timey cloggers as well. The fest is free, so you’ll just have to pay for trinkets, snacks and the gas to get to Bedford County. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Bell Buckle AMANDA HAGGARD [WHERE SERVICE IS STATE OF THE ART]

CIRCUIT CIRCUIT

After a quiet couple years, Murfreesboro is making noise again. The eponymous debut EP from selfproclaimed “glitch-punk” five-piece Circuit Circuit throws it back to the tight-pantsand-Spock-haircuts days of the early 2000s — fans of The Blood Brothers or Glassjaw will love it — with a cyberpunk flair à la Mindless Self Indulgence. For those less tolerant of screamy vocals, an instrumental version of the super-spastic, ultratechnical four-song set can also be heard on the group’s Bandcamp. Post-hardcore newcomers Koleas and sludge-punk sextet Ishikawa support. 9 p.m. at Springwater, 115 27th Ave. N. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

SUNDAY / 6.19

AT H U T T O N H O T E L P R E S E N T S

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Moon” (a barroom ballad for the lonely on the mend and legitimately part of the Great Country Songs pantheon), and “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” (which held up surprisingly well, all things considered). That album went sextuple-platinum. Sextuple. And all they did to follow it up? Blasted out single after single after single that everyone still knows the words to. The duo’s cover of “My Maria” was the bestselling country song of 1996. And 2001’s “Only in America”? It lacks the retrospectively embarrassing jingoism of other country singles of that year (ahem, Toby Keith) and was used as a campaign song by both George W. Bush and Barack Obama during their successful bids for the Oval Office. And the duo’s OK-we-unretire release Reboot topped the charts too, fueled by the almost-trip-hop collaboration with Kacey Musgraves on “Neon Moon” and the revitalizing joint effort on “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” with Midland (a good contender for a band that should be the biggest in country music). Nobody — neither outlaws nor inlaws, crooks nor straights — needs to be sold on Brooks & Dunn. So get down, turnaround, go to town. Trust me. Darius Rucker and Tyler Braden are the official support, but given it’s Nashville and the tour is in support of a collaboration record, don’t count out more guests. 7 p.m. at Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway J.R. LIND

ROBERT FRANCIS DOORS: 6:OO PM SHOW: 7:OO PM 21+ EVENT

[MAN IS THE WARMEST PLACE TO HIDE]

THE THING 40TH ANNIVERSARY

After the success of their 1981 dystopian actioner Escape From New York, director John Carpenter and star Kurt Russell teamed up again for The Thing, the grisly, gory, gleefully gross 1982 adaptation of John W. Campbell’s 1938 novella Who Goes There? (Howard Hawks produced an earlier adaptation, The Thing From Another World, in 1951.) Russell is part of a crew of

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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CRITICS’ PICKS

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WALK THE LINE Antarctica-based researchers who discover a parasitic alien that can turn into any living creature. This makes the crew members even more unsure of each other, as they all start becoming paranoid and bloodthirsty, trying to figure out who isn’t what they seem. A critically reviled bomb upon its release (when it came to alien flicks at the time, people were more inclined to go see E.T., released just two weeks prior), the movie has gone on to become a nasty, nihilistic cult classic, influencing filmmakers like Quentin Tarantino and TV shows like Stranger Things. For the film’s 40th anniversary, Fathom Events will present The Thing this month at multiplexes nationwide. June 19 & 22 at AMC and Regal locations CRAIG D. LINDSEY

FILM

MONDAY / 6.20 [BECAUSE YOU’RE MINE]

MUSIC CITY MONDAYS: WALK THE LINE

Earlier this year, the Belcourt gave music nerds a good laugh when the theater played Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story — that Judd Apatow-produced spoof of award-craving rock star biopics — as a Music City Mondays presentation. So it’s only right that the theater give one of the biopics that film skewered equal screen time. Walk the Line is James Mangold’s 2005 chronicle of Johnny Cash’s younger years, starring Joaquin Phoenix as the Man in Black and Reese Witherspoon in her Oscarwinning role as love of his life, June Carter Cash. It was an obvious source of ridicule for Hard, but it still works as an earnest, entertaining biopic. Mangold hits all the bullet points of Cash’s rise, fall and rise again as country music’s most legendary outlaw, complete with Phoenix and Witherspoon providing authentic musical performances when they’re not playing out moments of romance, recklessness and, of course, redemption from the couple’s life. 8 p.m. at the Belcourt, 2102 Belcourt Ave.

is set to release its self-titled debut LP — a potent slice of metallic hardcore punk with thick riffs and screaming leads for days — next month. The similarly spirited Offhand supports, along with Soot (previously known as Lacquer), whose repertoire of distinctly Southern psych- and grunge-informed originals also includes a mean cover of Drive-By Truckers’ “Lookout Mountain.” 8:30 p.m. at The Basement, 1604 Eighth Ave. S. CHARLIE ZAILLIAN

TUESDAY / 6.21 MUSIC

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TENILLE TOWNES

Canadian singer-songwriter Tenille Townes describes her recently released EP Masquerades as “new music, new emotions, same heart.” It’s a fitting and intriguing teaser from the country artist, whose highly emotive, thoughtfully composed music has swiftly made Townes one of the genre’s fastest rising stars. She’ll celebrate that new collection at a release show at Exit/In on Tuesday, joined by local up-and-comer Avery Ann. Thematically, the EP touches on unity — as on standout Breland collaboration “Shared Walls” — and introspection, especially on the vulnerable “The Sound of Being Alone.” Look for Townes to integrate that new music into a stacked set that should also include hits off 2020’s The Lemonade Stand, like fan favorite “Somebody’s Daughter.” 8 p.m. at Exit/In, 2208 Elliston Place BRITTNEY MCKENNA

MUSIC

CRAIG D. LINDSEY [WAXED ECSTATIC]

WAXED W/OFFHAND & SOOT

Waxed is a contemporary five-piece from Nashville, but the band sounds like something straight out of the Bay Area or Central Florida in the ’80s heyday of thrash. The group, which includes two members of local prog-indie greats Shell of a Shell,

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TENILLE TOWNES

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Pawster Nashville helps temporarily house pets in need BY ALEJANDRO RAMIREZ

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osing a home upends a person’s life, and even when the situation is temporary, the experience can have a lot of long-term effects. Among those is the need to surrender a pet to a shelter, especially if a pet owner moves into a space that doesn’t allow animals. That’s where Pawster Nashville comes in. Founded in 2020, Pawster coordinates temporary foster care for pets whose owners are experiencing a housing crisis. Founder Gabe Horton says the idea stemmed from a neighbor’s experience years ago. His neighbor had a health crisis and wasn’t sure what to do with his beloved dog Lacey during the treatment period. Horton says Lacey clearly had a good life and loving home. But her owner couldn’t

take care of her, and surrendered her to a shelter. “He had this temporary crisis,” says Horton. “And the only solution he had was to surrender her permanently.” Fast-forward to 2020 and the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, which put many people into crisis situations — folks found themselves in hospitals, or suddenly without employment. Horton himself had been furloughed, and he remembered his neighbor and Lacey. “I just wondered what kind of help was available for people with pets,” he says. “And I started calling around to animal welfare organizations in Nashville — I learned that there were so many wonderful organizations doing incredible work.” Eventually Horton spoke with Natalie Corwin, founder of the nonprofit veterinary clinic Pet Community Center, and learned about the need for temporary fostering. Corwin laid out the framework for what would become Pawster, says Horton. “I called up some friends,” he says, “and we founded Pawster in May of 2020 with the mission to end pet homelessness before it begins, by providing crisis foster care for

cats and dogs.” Pawster fostered their first cat in October 2020, and to date they have helped foster 84 pets in crisis in Middle Tennessee. Horton says 93 percent of pets have been reunited with their owners, and 13 pets are currently in foster care. While Pawster formed during the pandemic, Horton notes that issues of housing stability predate COVID-19, and that fostering requests related to housing issues have increased since founding the organization. To that end, Pawster is looking at ways to help owners. Horton says the organization is helping pay for pet deposit fees and approval letters for emotional support animals. They’re also working with other organizations to build a database of petfriendly housing and talking to social services providers to help as housing navigators. “In the beginning, we thought we were just going to foster pets, and we are realizing that it helps the pets if we can help the people,” says Horton. Of course, fostering is a great way to help an animal and also see how a pet fits

into your family. Melissa Dorange and her husband have been fostering with Pawster for more than a month, taking care of an energetic pup named Dominoes, and it’s been a great experience. “It’s psychologically beneficial to have a little creature to take care of and be responsible for,” says Dorange. “All of a sudden, your problems are just minor.” Dominoes, who appears to be a pit mix and is a few months past 1 year old, is very friendly — wagging her tail, rolling around in the grass, and seeking pets and scratches. Dorange says the application process was easy, and Horton encourages anyone interested in fostering to try it out. “Melissa’s doing the work of keeping the family together by taking care of Dominoes, and you can see that the love she has for Dominoes is at least equal to how much she was loved with her owner,” says Horton. “That’s kind of the great part. … Dominoes is the lucky one, she gets all the love from everybody.” “You get attached for sure,” says Dorange. “I’m not letting her go anywhere except to go back to her owner.” EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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P e t P a r ty TORNADO CATS

Getting familiar with East Side skate shop Asphalt Beach’s feline residents

ASPHALT BEACH AFTER THE 2020 TORNADO her down to the vet. At first, the vet wasn’t sure she would make it. “She had everything wrong with her a feral kitten could have,” says Larios. But Fabby is a survivor — she pulled through and has been with the shop ever since. In the old building, she would get up in the ceiling’s joists and swat ping-pong balls that people would toss up to her. Nowadays the ceiling is too high for that, but you can usually find Fabby lounging in the corner on her beach chair, surrounded by plants and overlooking East Nashville. Though Duzy survived the tornado, sadly you won’t find her patrolling Asphalt Beach anymore — she died from oral cancer last year. Larios says Fabby felt the loss; Duzy was like a mother to Fabby, and once she was gone, Fabby lay in all of Duzy’s old spots. Despite her absence, Duzy is still a part of the shop, now reopened in its original location. There are pictures of her all over the place and art that she inspired, and Larios still keeps her toys, couch and ashes in his office. There’s also the “Tornado Cats” mural that immortalizes both Duzy and Fabby in the front entrance. You may notice that Duzy looks a bit chonkier than Fabby in the mural, and that probably isn’t an accident. “She was very foodoriented,” says Larios. “[At] dinner time, she would come get me and I would sing ‘Duzy Dinner Time,’ ” says Larios. A poster reading “It’s Duzy Jr. Dinner Time” commemorates the ritual. Along with the new shop, Larios also acquired a new shop cat. They call him Biggie, named after both another skater and The Big Lebowski. Larios’ wife took Biggie in when his former owner almost took him to the pound. He’s at least part Maine Coon, and though he started off living downstairs, he’s upstairs on the day the Scene visits, checking himself out in the mirror and lounging on skate boxes. Larios says he’s a sweetheart, but his and Fabby’s relationship is “a work in progress.” Asphalt Beach is a gem for many reasons. It’s a longtime local fixture. The staff is welcoming, and will answer all your questions whether you’re a novice or a longtime skater. But it’s the cats who make the shop extra special — it wouldn’t be the same without them. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

FABBY

MURAL OF FABBY AND DUZY AT ASPHALT BEACH

PHOTOS: ERIC ENGLAND

W

hen Asphalt Beach Skate Shop owner Steve Larios realized Nashville’s deadly March 2020 tornado hit his store, his first reaction wasn’t worrying about the inventory or even the building itself — all he could think about were his shop cats. Larios arrived as soon as he could after the tornado passed. The wreckage on Woodland Street was so bad that he couldn’t drive up to Asphalt Beach. He had to get out of his car and walk to the shop — or what was left of it. The building was in ruins. A wall was blown out, and in some places, skate racks were the only things holding up the fallen ceiling. At first, Larios and his employees couldn’t find either of the shop’s two cats, Duzy (aka Duzy Jr.) and Fabiola (aka Fabby). They searched and called for hours with no response. Eventually, around 5 or 6 a.m., Duzy appeared from under one of the remaining skate racks. “She was freaked,” says Larios. After more searching, they still couldn’t find Fabby. They called it and took Duzy home. When Fabby didn’t show up after additional searching, they asked neighbors to keep an eye out for their other shop cat. Later, about 19 hours after the previous night’s tornado, Larios returned with a cat carrier and a flashlight. “It was quiet,” he says. “I started calling to [Fabby]. And I heard a little something, I thought it was the wind.” Larios followed the sound to a pile of rubble, with gridded racks used to display skating accessories. “It was full of these fat roller-derby knee pads that had fallen on top of her, and then the wall [of] cinder blocks fell on top of that, so she was buried. But [the kneepads] kept her alive.” The shop and most of its inventory were destroyed. But unlike beloved pets, skates can be replaced, and these good girls had been a fixture at Asphalt Beach for years. They even lived at the temporary Elm Hill Pike iteration of the skate shop while Larios was rebuilding the East Side location. Duzy, a white shorthair, came to Asphalt Beach first — after a customer told Larios she had some kittens up for grabs. “The hardware store down the street had cats, and I thought, ‘Hey, we could have a cat.’ ” Duzy was named after a former employee and skater. Fabby, named after Brazilian skating champion Fabiola da Silva, arrived at the shop later. A tiny, feral tortoiseshell kitten, Fabby had climbed up into a customer’s car in the heat of August. They eventually found her and brought her into the shop — Larios wrapped her in a towel and skated

PHOTO: STEVE LARIOS

BY KELSEY BEYELER

BIGGIE WITH ASPHALT BEACH EMPLOYEE CHELSEA PEÑA

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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EVEREST RESTAURANT AND BAR 1309 BELL ROAD, SUITE 220 EVERESTRESTAURANTANDBAR.COM CHICKEN THUKPA

BHUTAN MEETS BELL ROAD At Everest Restaurant and Bar, fragrant curries and Himalayan specialties make for a tantalizing experience

F

BY ALIJAH POINDEXTER or dinner in Antioch, the options are seemingly endless: pizza and beer at Slim & Husky’s; Laotian and Thai classics at the legendary King Market; garnachas and tamales at Antigua Cocina Guatemalteca. But on Antioch’s southwest side, Everest Restaurant and Bar is set on taking one of the world’s unsung cuisines to the next dimension. The fact that Himalayan cuisine is not considered one of the great culinary traditions is an explainable tragedy. Himalayan, by definition, does not refer to a specific country, as with Italian or French cuisine. Nor does it refer to a hyper-local regional cuisine, à la Cajun or Cantonese. The Himalayas themselves are of course a geographic feature, dividing more than they link the disparate mountain nations that call the re-

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gion home. So while similarities are strong, it’s unsurprising that the “cousins, not siblings” cuisines of Asia’s most uncompromising region are often drowned out by more prominent fare, like Indian and American Chinese. Everest rises to the challenge, however, putting Nepal, Bhutan and Northern India on a plate (or thali) with aplomb. When entering Everest, you’re treated to a pristine interior, complete with a mirrored bar and a stage whose performances I’ve to date unfortunately missed. The real treat begins when you’re presented with the menu, a sprawling beast that at first glance reveals an Indian influence, all curries and korma and chaat, before Nepalese staples work their way into the picture (think noodle soups and fragrant roasted meats). Bhutanese dishes, coming straight from the world’s happiest and most remote mountain

kingdom, are a welcome closing surprise, and the beverage menu offers a range of ways to help you digest what you’ve devoured. If you’ve brought friends (or a big appetite), you can try them all. First up is Northern India, and while we could go with classics like chicken curry, samosas or aloo gobi, Everest’s lamb thali is the best item on offer, bringing a gauntlet of flavors to the table. Thali — or a selection of small dishes served with rice on a traditional plate — can be found in every region of India, from tangy eggplant curries in Maharashtra to fiery shrimp vindaloos in Goa. At Everest, expect a bold lamb gravy without the gaminess of lesser curries, along with peppery dal (lentil stew), fried potatoes and veggies, various pickles and relishes, and gulab jamun, or doughnut in sweet syrup. If lamb or mutton is not your bag, no worries. Chicken and pork thalis are also available, along with Anglo-Indian staples like butter chicken and chicken tikka masala. But with the quality of traditional Indian food closer to downtown, why play it safe with more common fare? Next up is Nepal, home to Mount Everest

PHOTOS: DANIEL MEIGS

FOOD & DRINK

and the centerpiece of the whole Himalayan enterprise. You’ll immediately notice a heavy Chinese influence on the Nepalese section of the menu. Chinese tourists are not uncommon in Nepal — the mountain nation welcomed almost 200,000 Chinese visitors in 2019 — and dishes like chow mein and vegetable fried rice are ubiquitous in Nepalese cuisine. While these are worthwhile options for newbies, Everest maintains a variety of more traditional dishes on the menu. As an appetizer, go for the chili chicken momo, a dumpling with the shape of a potsticker, the thickness and bounce of a baozi, and a taste unlike anything else in Nashville. While you can get the momos deep-fried, steamed or dunked in an aromatic broth, the chili version sees them pan-fried with hot peppers and onions on a fajita skillet. It’s quite good. For an entrée, the chicken thukpa will do. While this is the quintessential Himalayan dish, India and Tibet also lay claim to this hearty noodle soup — but the Nepalese version at Everest might be the best of the bunch. It’s nothing short of comfort in a bowl, with chilis, herbs and a rich bone broth complimenting starchy noodles with a wonderful

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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chew. It might be melodramatic to say this dish transports you to a distant Himalayan village, but what is life without imagination? Last comes Bhutan, which represents the culinary completionist’s dream. Who can say they’ve sampled Bhutanese food? Famous for its sky-high peace index and a difficult airport situation, Bhutan is not the wonderland that its Indian and Chinese neighbors are when it comes to food. But Bhutanese food is nothing if not quality; it’s a cuisine hell-bent on getting the small stuff right. Case in point: kewa datshi, a hearty dish of potatoes, asparagus and chili stewed with fresh cheese and a boatload of salted butter. It isn’t all that spicy, and the vegetarian aspect keeps the canvas for flavor relatively plain. But it works fabulously when, on paper, it absolutely shouldn’t. It’s unctious, salty, fatty; a hearty dish that wouldn’t be out of place on a long-haul cargo ship or a Grand Canyon mule train. And it does it all without any meat and at a relatively low price point. It might be Antioch’s most obscure dish, but it’s also one of the most satisfying. Wash it all

down with a cup of sweet Nepali milk tea. This isn’t all to say that Everest is a perfect restaurant. It’s not inexpensive — $20 for the thali is a bit high for the portion sizes. You could call the dim interior charming, perhaps, but certainly not flashy. Just down Bell Road a half-mile, the temporarily shuttered Rajdhani Grocery and Cafe does curries and Chinese stuff significantly better. (The grocery part of Rajdhani is still open.) But Everest’s melding of cuisines makes it a great way to spend a lazy Antioch evening. While Rajdhani lays claim to Indian, Chinese and Nepalese cuisines, Everest is truly Himalayan. If you’re heading back north, stop at Central Kirana Store, a small Nepalese grocery near the corner of Nolensville and Haywood Lane. It’s packed to the gills with foodstuffs and novelties, and it’s impossible to leave without finding something worth taking home. But even without a visit to Kirana, you can still make a date at one of South Nashville’s truly unique eateries. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

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nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


“GUAM POLITICAL,” AMBER ROBLES-GORDON

“GUAM SPIRITUAL,” AMBER ROBLES-GORDON

ART

FLAGGED

Amber Robles-Gordon’s polemic quilts balance form and content BY JOE NOLAN

T

racking art-world trends often means simply noting the shifting balance between form and content over time. Midcentury American painting was formalist, elemental AMBER ROBLES-GORDON art for art’s sake. SOVEREIGNTY: ACTS, It was interested in FORMS, AND MEASURES line, shape, space, OF PROTEST AND form, tone, texture, RESISTANCE THROUGH JULY 9 AT pattern, color and TINNEY CONTEMPORARY composition. An TINNEYCONTEMPORARY. important work of COM/SOVEREIGNTY art was something, but nowadays an important work of art is often about something: politics, social causes, various identity expressions. Midcentury art favored abstraction over figuration, but contemporary art is full of figures along with the narrative content they inevitably inspire. Luckily, no matter how the trends swing, we can always look back to the Greeks and remember that there is beauty in balance. And it’s not surprising that some of today’s best art manages to message and signal and narrate after first capturing the eye, drawing attention, and igniting the imagination of the viewer. Even the title of Amber Robles-Gordon’s

Tinney Contemporary exhibition — SoveREIGNty: Acts, Forms, and Measures of Protest and Resistance — expresses an activist message. And it’s emblematic of a display of large-scale, mixed-media quilts brimming with signals and symbolism interrogating U.S. policy toward — and governance of — its populated territories and the District of Columbia. Robles-Gordon’s work highlights how outsized the emphasis on content has become in contemporary art. It’s also a good example of how unique abstract compositions — featuring compelling combinations of materials — can actually appeal to eyes and capture viewers’ curiosities before sparking a conversation about sovereignty and statehood. At Tinney, Robles-Gordon’s large quilts are suspended from the ceiling, which allows viewers to see both sides of the various works while they traverse the space like they’re navigating an archipelago. The exhibition design is both geographic and cartographic, putting viewers in mind of visiting each location, but also reminding them about the often dubious authorities who draw lines on maps where they stab flags into the earth. The designs evoke national flags and banners, forwarding the show’s colonial-exploitation narrative. But this show also reads like a display of abstract painting, full of lines and shapes and bold colors, arranged in the homemade textures of fabric and thread. In the 1940s and ’50s, the American Abstract Expressionists, along with art critic Clement Greenberg, practically

pushed content right off the map in favor of pure formalism. Greenberg’s 1939 essay “Avant-Garde and Kitsch” drew a formalist line in the sand, demarcating the boundaries that came to define American midcentury painting: Modernism is inward-looking and self-critical — art about art; the best painting is unique, two-dimensional and flat; abstraction is more advanced than figuration. But that was before identity, politics and social justice crashed the contemporary art world at the 1993 Whitney Biennial. The exhibition was the breakthrough point for an emerging generation of artist-activists like Daniel Joseph Martinez, Robert Gober and Byron Kim, who ignited conversations about race, sexual orientation and AIDS in galleries and museums, paving the way for much of the American art of the early 21st century. Now, 80 years after Greenberg’s essay was published, content rules. One of the unique aspects of RoblesGordon’s works is how she splits her designs between “political” and “spiritual” iterations on either side of her quilts. “Guam Political” features a palm tree design inside of concentric rings of turquoise, orange, green and yellow. The “political” sides of RoblesGordon’s designs all resemble state flags or even picturesque license plate designs — idealized and bureaucratic. The “spiritual” designs on the other sides of her works all read more like Native handicraft compositions.

Robles-Gordon achieves these looks by mixing and matching elements from national flags, Doppler radar images, Indigenous art, domestic ritual and references to the 1950s-’70s Washington, D.C. Abstract Expressionist art movement known as the Washington Color School. The Washington Color School was also championed by Clement Greenberg. The movement rejected subject matter in favor of a purely formal investigation into color. Artists like Kenneth Noland, Morris Louis and Anne Truitt blazed a path beyond Abstract Expressionism while simultaneously pointing to the rise of minimalism. But at the same time, the group’s ideas were criticized as a dead end, incapable of engaging with the political and cultural tumult of the sexual revolution, the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. Robles-Gordon’s designs speak to sovereignty and social justice, environmentalism and colonial exploitation. They’re displays of traditionally feminine handicraft, and art activist amulets charged with symbolism and story. They’re jammed with identity messages and political criticism, but they’re also colorful compositions full of movement and energy, balanced in symmetrical, circular compositions — kind of meditative and a little iconic. Robles-Gordon wants to convey ideas and even ideologies, and she’s smart and talented enough to grab eyes first. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Tom Perrotta delivers upto-the-minute satire in Tracy Flick Can’t Win BY FERNANDA MOORE

E

very few years, Tom Perrotta does it again. With plots that seem ripped from the headlines and characters who are both emblematic and unique, he weaves together the evergreen and the contemporary, perfectly capturing the suburban Middle American zeitgeist he’s staked an expert claim to in book after book after book. TRACY FLICK CAN’T WIN His latest, Tracy BY TOM PERROTTA Flick Can’t Win, looks SCRIBNER both backward and 257 PAGES, $27 forward. On the one PERROTTA WILL DISCUSS hand, it’s a sequel to HIS NOVEL 6:30 P.M. Election, the 1998 THURSDAY, JUNE 16, novel that director AT PARNASSUS Alexander Payne turned into a wickedly brilliant movie starring Reese Witherspoon and Matthew Broderick. On the other hand, it’s a thoroughly pertinent, up-to-the-minute satire of contemporary mores and concerns, whose eponymous heroine has apparently aged in real time, right alongside her readers and fans. The premise is this: Tracy Flick, whose ferocious ambition to be president of her high school propelled Election’s plot, has grown up to be (of course!) an assistant high school principal determined to become tops in the administrative hierarchy. When the current principal steps down, she naturally assumes she’s headed for the throne. But a constellation of complications intervenes, and Tracy finds herself — again — stymied by colleagues and circumstance. It’s tempting to think that Perrotta wrote Tracy Flick Can’t Win in an attempt to revise and revisit the problematic central premise of Election. Take 16-year-old Tracy’s very first monologue in the earlier book. “All right, so I slept with my English teacher and ruined his marriage,” she says, daring us to judge. “Crucify me. Send me to bad girl prison with Amy Fisher and make TV movies about my pathetic life.” This, it hardly needs saying, hits very differently in 2022. What once looked like pluck (Tracy’s most winning characteristic) now feels like denial. The world has changed, and anyone who uses teacher/ student intercourse as a plot device is setting himself up for big trouble. Authors have been raked over the coals for far less. Right off the bat, and to its credit, Tracy Flick Can’t Win acknowledges Election’s fundamental ickiness. “For months it had been an almost daily occurrence, one powerful man after another toppled from his pedestal, exposed as a sexual predator: Harvey Weinstein in his bathrobe, Bill Cosby with his quaaludes, Matt Lauer and his secret button, the list went on and on,” Tracy tells us on the new novel’s very first page. The world has changed, and teenage Tracy’s insistence that she’s fine, not damaged, certainly not a victim, is beginning — to her dismay — “to feel a little shaky.” Watching the news with her 10-year-old daughter (Tracy, like her mom before her, is

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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a single parent), reading “these stories, one after the other, all these high achieving young women exploited by teachers and mentors and bosses,” she’s forced to reckon with her former self. “It gnawed at me that summer, the possibility that I’d misjudged my own past, that maybe I’d been a little more ordinary than I would have liked to believe,” she thinks. Yet she can’t let go. “The thing you have to understand — it seemed so obvious to me at the time, so central to my own identity — is that I wasn’t a normal high school girl,” she tells the reader firmly. “I felt like an adult long before I came of legal age, and it had always seemed to me that Mr. Dexter simply perceived this truth before anyone else, and had treated me accordingly, which was exactly the way I’d wanted to be treated. How could I blame him for that?” Tracy’s no fool — she knows about denial. “In fact it had become pretty clear to me that that was how it worked — you got tricked into feeling more exceptional than you actually were,” she says. That feeling of specialness, of being singled out among her peers, none of whom appreciated her brilliance and ambition anyway, has colored Tracy’s entire life. So she slept with her English teacher. So what? We see her point while also seeing through her point, and it’s heartbreaking. But Tracy Flick Can’t Win is more than just a hasty rewrite of an outmoded, potentially outrageous book. Perrotta loves nothing more than tossing characters into a moral deep end, sitting back and letting readers watch them thrash and splutter; this builds both sympathy and schadenfreude, since who among us can claim to have all the answers? We’re all damaged by the past, and we’re doing the best we can in the present. If nothing else, his latest book confirms what many of us have always secretly suspected. Adulthood, Perrotta suggests, is forged in the crucible of high school, and we spend the rest of our lives torn between trying to transcend our adolescent selves and trying to preserve them. In that sense, Tracy Flick is, despite her insistence, utterly ordinary, after all. To read an uncut version of this review — and more local book coverage — please visit Chapter16.org, an online publication of Humanities Tennessee. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM


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MUSIC

ONCE BITTEN No longer on the Broadway grind, Heath Haynes revels in power pop BY P.J. KINZER

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or about 14 years, Heath Haynes spent many nights singing and strumming in Lower Broadway honky-tonks, where he and his backing band The Hi-Dollars smuggled the occasional Cheap Trick or Ramones DEMOMANIA IS OUT NOW tune into sets between the Hank Williams and Merle Haggard songs that filled the tip jar with tourist dollars. Haynes had moved to Nashville from Richmond, Va., to write and record his own music, but soon found himself on the bar circuit. He also backed up rockabilly queen Wanda Jackson for a time. On his nights off, Haynes could be found behind the turntables at now-defunct East Nashville haunts like No. 308 (in a space soon to be occupied by Jane’s Hideaway) and Edgefield (which was replaced by Lakeside Lounge), laying the needle down on platinum hits and obscure B-sides. He was one of the most recognizable faces in a neighborhood full of musicians. But Haynes lost his work when the coronavirus closed the doors of bars and venues across Music City. And when tourists were allowed to return to Broadway, he wisely

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decided to stay away until he could play without the fear of catching and spreading COVID-19. So like many musicians here in town, he found himself looking for work. By late summer 2020, Haynes had settled into a new life, guiding boaters down the Harpeth River, being a handyman and livestreaming occasional solo sets of covers for tips via Venmo. He was grateful for the new opportunities, toiling under the burning sun rather than the sizzling neon lights. All the while, the longing for the world to be both open and safe hummed just below the surface of his consciousness. Towing a trailer loaded with canoes through Bellevue, Haynes spotted a few children running around Red Caboose Park. It was almost time for school to start again. His mind turned to thoughts of students and parents wanting to get back to normal, in spite of the dangers of the pandemic. Then, like a cliché from a song about songwriting, a Marc Bolan-esque bubble-glam chorus hit him out of the blue: “Everybody wanna go back to school / Everybody wanna get sick and die.” It was catchy and repetitive, inspiring Haynes to start adding in other activities people missed during lockdown: going to church, pubs and football games. “I came home and I got the guitar out,” Haynes recalls from across a table near the sandwich counter at another East Side watering hole, Duke’s. Not long after he worked out some basic chords, he explains, he downloaded Bandlab, an app for making demo recordings on his phone. “And I made this demo with drums. And recorded electric guitar.”

Haynes knew there was no time to waste, and before long he found himself at a friend’s home studio making a high-fidelity version of “Get Sick and Die.” He released two edits of the song in August 2020 on Bandcamp and various streaming services. Together, they make up his first release under just his own name. Haynes might have stopped there. During his college years in Virginia, Haynes played snotty riffs in the ’90s garage-punk underground with various short-lived bands and wrote songs for his Uncle Tupelo-influenced project Haymaker. But throughout most of his time in Nashville, he had been focused on playing music by other people. That had all changed, thanks to COVID. This new situation reminded him of the glory days of recording in his dorm with a TASCAM four-track. His focus shifted to making new music. His music. “I started goofing around with it,” he says of the app. “And then the next day I came up with another song. That hadn’t happened in almost 20 years! And then within a week I had, like, four songs. … I saw the value in that moment of inspiration as connection to whatever it was that made me write songs in the first fucking place. And I know it’s precious. And I know it’s rare.” Haynes got busy turning his little project into an album. Nearly two years later, “Get Sick and Die” is a highlight of Demomania, a 10-track set of unadulterated power pop, recorded entirely in Bandlab, that really lets listeners inside his head. In the process of writing the songs that would become the al-

bum, Haynes decided to recommit to his love of rock ’n’ roll. No more honky-tonk covers. “Rock ’n’ roll, and power pop, and garage rock,” Haynes says. “This is what I want to do.” The album is a showcase for all the influences that he wears on his rolled-up sleeves. The record opens with “Let It Go Now,” a plodding, buzzy number recalling ’90s indie heroes like Guided by Voices. “Whole Wide World” feels like what the late Cars frontman Ric Ocasek might have done had he gotten ahold of Springsteen’s “Two Hearts.” “Messin’ Around” opens with a big, choppy riff that would feel right at home in a T-Rex hit. All the songs were written in Haynes’ pandemic seclusion, save for “Kelli Ka-POW!,” a Ramones-style rocker written long ago for Saved by the Bell’s Kelly Kapowski. Demomania landed on Bandcamp at the beginning of May, and will be on all streaming services by July 1. The album’s title is a nod to the demo-tape nature of the recording. The word also has a definition that has nothing to do with music — directly at least. As Haynes says: “It means ‘The mental condition of the desire to be in a crowd.’ ” Just what Haynes, and so many of us music fans, had been missing. Currently, however, Haynes has no real plan to play the songs live. He has no band; a physical pressing of the LP is still a ways off, though it’s on the horizon. For the present, it seems like it’s enough to have restored his connection to making music again. EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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aug 8 Black Pistol Fire w/ Lillie Mae and Shooks aug 9 The Dear Hunter w/ The World Is A Beautiful Place & aug 12 aug 13 aug 14 aug 17 aug 18 aug 20 aug 31

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Upcoming shows jun 16 jun 16 jun 17 jun 17 jun 18 jun 20 jun 20 jun 21 jun 22 jun 22 jun 23

Justin Clyde Williams w/ Kayla RayThe (7pm) Flight Attendant, Fortezza, The Shitdels (9PM) The Comancheros w/ Kirstie Lovelady (7pm) Echo Pilot w/ The Absurd & The Eldridge Band (9PM) Garrison Starr w/ Meg Toohey Sophie & The Broken Things w/ Tubey Frank (7pm) Waxed & Offhand & Soot (9PM) Kimberly Kelly & Brit Taylor free! Joe Vann w/ Kassi Valazza (7pm) Mad Welsley & ViB (9PM) Moony 'n' Frens w/ Silvie, Willix, Abby Holliday, Gabrielle Grace, Teddy At Night

jun 24 jun 24 jun 25 jun 26 jun 27 jun 28 jun 30 jun 30 jul 2 jul 7 jul 7 jul 8

Madeline Edwards w/ Oh Jeremiah (7pm) LUTHI w/ Crumbsnatchers (9PM) Zachary Scott Kline w/ James Leprettre & Melissa Erin Leslie Stevens w/ Matt Boyer & Willy Tea Taylor Matt Sahadi & Nite Tides Kimberly Kelly & Brit Taylor free! Nick Boyd w/ Erin Grand (7pm) Suzie Chism w/ The Untamed & Josh Rennie-Hynes (9PM) Wild Love w/ Oceanic, A N X Matthew Fowler (7pm) Liliac (9pm) The Altons (6pm) nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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MUSIC

THE MAN IN THE FOG

Adam Schatz, widely traveled multi-instrumentalist and Japanese Breakfast member, rolls with it BY SEAN L. MALONEY

O

seen that video of him improvising with Nels Cline and Mikael Jorgensen at Wilco’s Solid Sound festival. Expect something in between that Solid Sound gig and a full-on rock show when Schatz drops in at The East Room, with assists from singer-songwriters Becca Mancari and Tristen, steelist extraordinaire Luke Schneider, multi-instrumentalist (and former Those Darlins member) Linwood Regensberg, producer-engineer Dan Knobler and more. “I’ve never done Fallon,” Schatz says. “I’ve done Colbert and I’ve done Corden, but those shows are all the same. They’re fine. SNL was the only one that was on air when we were growing up. We were just engaged with it, and some of the cast members were fans of ours, so they would watch us rehearse. It felt more connected. When you play a late-night show, you’re sort of just shoved in a green room, and then you play, and then you’re done, and you leave. You don’t hang out with Stephen Colbert to vibe.” Schatz, ever the seasoned professional, sings his bandmates’ praises. “Michelle works twice as hard as everyone,” he notes. “She’s always doing press and doing book stuff. … I feel like if I was in her position, I would have lost my mind, because it’s become a monster. I’m very grateful.” Squeezing solo shows into the empty moments between big, international festivals — Bonnaroo, Fuji Rock, Primavera — seems a bit extra. Schatz could relax between JB’s cool-as-hell tour dates with folks like Belle and Sebastian or The Linda Lindas. But there’s a restlessness at the heart of all his

performances that won’t be kept quiet. “I basically regret it until I’m playing the show,” he says, “but I’ve done it a bunch where it’s like, everyone else has a day off, and I’ve booked myself a solo show. And I wake up regretting it. And I don’t regret it. I regret it until I’m first on, and then as soon as I’m playing, it is amazing.” When I caught Schatz in Cambridge, at a tiny venue named The Lilypad — a great place for, ahem, the jumping-off point of a career — his exhaustion seemed to dissipate with that first exhale through his reed, his energy and vitality building with each beat and loop. Soon, it felt like there was a conversation between Sonny Rollins, Tom Lehrer and Klaus Schultz bouncing between piano and sax and effects pedals. But it was just one dude, working out his new songs, dipping into old ones. “If nothing else, the last few years have been really different from every other year in my life,” says Schatz. There’s an optimism in his voice, a relief and touch of catharsis in recognizing that the past few years — the ones when live music just kinda disappeared from our lives — have been more than just total bullshit. They’ve also offered opportunities to grow and move forward. He is rolling with the fog, so to speak. “I’m happy to be doing anything, trying to tone down the part of you that gets upset when things aren’t happening exactly the way you want. That shit just doesn’t happen for anyone.” EMAIL MUSIC@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

PHOTO: SHANE ALLEN

n the phone from the road, somewhere between Vermont and Cambridge, Mass., Adam Schatz is on his way to play a solo show in the room where he saw his first improvised music PLAYING WEDNESDAY, JUNE performance. It’s a poetic symmetry 22, AT THE EAST ROOM that reflects the multi-instrumentalist and composer’s ear for repetition and variation: a return to the root that creates harmony with the explosion happening around his other gig with Japanese Breakfast. It’s a harmony that Schatz is bringing to a short run of shows that includes an appearance at The East Room on Wednesday. “Pretty much this whole year, I’ve just been booking solo things around [Japanese Breakfast] shows,” Schatz tells the Scene. These concerts give him the opportunity to “work out my stuff and start to feel spiritually fulfilled. It’s just stupid, but it’s the type

of stupid I’ve always been, so.” There was a moment during a performance on the season finale of Saturday Night Live a few weeks ago that perfectly encapsulates Adam Schatz. It was during “Paprika,” the second song of the night from Japanese Breakfast. The art-pop “overnight sensations,” the project of singer-songwriter and author Michelle Zauner, have found themselves knee-deep in the zeitgeist after years of intense and intelligent work. In the broadcast, fog rolls over the hallowed stage at 30 Rockefeller Center as singer Zauner shimmers, banging a gong wreathed in flowers and lights. The band goes silent as Schatz, wielding his tenor sax, glides into the spotlight. Zauner duets with the soft swell of the sax melody for what feels like a tender, intimate eternity before Schatz recedes and Zauner’s energy overwhelms the camera again. If you’ve lived around Nashville for a while, there’s a good chance you’ve met Schatz. It seems like he’s always rolling into town, fog at his feet, sax in hand. His Music City connections go back to the days of locally grown and now-disbanded rockers Those Darlins, and he’s been through with his groups Landlady and Father Figures. He’s been through Nashville on tour with Man Man, he’s played solo sets — including a memorable appearance at a 2019 benefit for Jessi Zazu Inc. — and occasionally he’s just hung out for between-show stretches. Maybe you saw him at one of the old, informal Fourth of July parades in East Nashville on Fatherland Street. Or you might have

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NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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or a broad spectrum of creative types — from Nashville comics and bands on the rise, to organizers putting on community-building minifestivals, to musicians from all over the country getting their feet wet with touring — The East Room has been a vital presence during the past decade. While CMA Fest raged along Lower Broad and at Nissan Stadium, the Gallatin Avenue venue celebrated its 10th anniversary with a threenight festival of its own. An all-star group of stand-ups performed Thursday, and the long-running goth dance party Fascination Street kept the beat going until long after the normies went to bed on Saturday.

The energy from Peachy’s set carried over to a stirring set from local rap hopeful Lord Goldie and her live band, who got a small but fierce contingent going apeshit in the front. Around this time, I caught up with Cole, the man of the hour, who bounced around the room like a pinball all night. Wherever you looked, there he was with his blond mane and big grin. Forever in search of ways to make the audience feel like part of the show, Cole asked if I thought Okey Dokey, up next, or Fable Cry, on deck right after, would make the most sense for him to drop a bunch of confetti and balloons on the crowd midset. He ended up doing it for both bands, naturally. Okey Dokey put pop songcraft first, while the seven-piece Fable Cry matched playfully macabre vibes to serious instrumental prowess. The septet’s performance was a 45-minute whirlwind of keyboard pounding, time signature shifting and synchronized headbanging.

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But Friday was all about local musicians who’ve made themselves at home at The East Room — an assortment of indie rockers, punks, rappers and hard rock acts thoughtfully staggered by Taylor Cole, the venue’s general manager and talent buyer. I got inside right as Peachy got going. Since 2018, singer-guitarist Rachel Warrick, bassistvocalist Leah Miller and drummer Benji Coale have been one of Music City’s foremost sources of tight, tuneful, scrappy punk rock. In the four years since their debut EP Squirt on Budding Romance Records, Miller and Warrick have gotten their dualfrontperson approach down to a science. Miller’s bellows are brash and theatrical, while Warrick pushes the melody. When the two sing in unison — like on Squirt’s “Rich Boy” — there’s sort of a Corin-and-Carrie effect that fans of old-school Sleater-Kinney will appreciate. Peachy’s live sets never disappoint, but the trio is overdue for a new release. On Friday, Warrick pledged that their second record will be out by August or September.

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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They summoned memories of Seattle greats Murder City Devils — or as a friend remarked, “the Brothers Grimm, making rock music.” Hip-hop trio Heru Heru shifted the mood dramatically yet naturally with a concise set of forceful beats and rhymes. The threeman juggernaut threw it back to the days of Mos Def & Talib Kweli Are Black Star with their easy rapport and unwillingness to waste a minute. Thoughtful headbangers Oginalii — playing behind their 2020 minialbum Pendulum — even got a minor mosh pit going as they teed up H.A.R.D., the final band of the night. The three shows in general — and Friday’s live-music extravaganza in particular — celebrated the communal spirit that brings people together to make an arts scene. If you’ve been thinking about how independent venues play a key part in creating the culture of a city, you don’t have to look further than this for a concrete example. EMAIL THESPIN@NASHVILLESCENE.COM


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LIKE FATHER, LIKE BOT

Brian and Charles is a surprisingly touching ode to parenthood BY CORY WOODROOF

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ven if you don’t have a kid at home, at some point in your life you’ve likely been responsible for someone or something, be it a puppy, a younger sibling, a class hamster. We’ve all had our lives turned upside-down or at least temporarily rearranged in service to another. It can change you, force you out of your comfort zone, cause you to look inward as others depend on you. After welcoming a new member of his household, the life of lonely tinkerer Brian (British comic David Earl) will never be the same. He’s built Charles, a robot with a head that looks like a Jim Broadbent bust. His body is a washing machine, he sounds like a

NOW IT’S TIME TO GET FUNKY Cha Cha Real Smooth offers a quaint, charming MayDecember love story BY CRAIG D. LINDSEY

A

pparently Apple TV+ loves to pay a lot of money for indie dramedies that are all in their feelings — and will get viewers all in their feelings as well. A year-and-a-half ago, the streaming service went to the Sundance Film Festival and ponied up a whopping $25 million — a Sundance record — for future Best Picture Oscar winner CODA. Apple went back to Sundance this year and snatched up Cooper Raiff’s sophomore feature Cha Cha Real Smooth, which won the U.S. Dramatic Competition Audience Award, for $15 million. Raiff has become something of a film-festival darling. His 2020 debut Shithouse won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Narrative Feature at that year’s SXSW Film Festival. That movie featured writer-director Raiff in the lead role as a lonely college student who wishes he was home

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game of Pong, and he has an appetite for cabbage. Brian and Charles, the feature debut from British television vet Jim Archer, has to be one of the most adorable Frankenstein stories ever told, a film with the dry wit of a Flight of the Conchords episode and the dignified heart of an Aardman cartoon. Funny enough, Brian is a bit like Wallace of Wallace and Gromit, just socially awkward and desperate for companionship. Gromit and Charles couldn’t be further apart, however, with the latter evolving throughout the film — from inquisitive and toddler-like to sassy, like a rebellious teenager VISIT who wants to leave NASHVILLESCENE.COM the house. TO READ OUR REVIEW OF LIGHTYEAR, NOW PLAYING WIDE.

with his family. In Smooth he stars as Andrew, who moves back in with his bipolar mother (Leslie Mann) and stuffy stepdad (Brad Garrett) after graduation. After getting kids to party up at a bat mitzvah he attends, he gets a side gig as a “jig conductor” for bar mitzvahs, bat mitzvahs and other soirees parents throw for their kids. He’s basically following in the footsteps of his first crush, an older party starter he had a brief, heartbreaking crush on, as explained in the prologue. Dude apparently has a thing for older women. At one of these parties he meets Domino (Dakota Johnson), the engaged 30-something mom of autistic teen Lola (Vanessa Burghardt, precocious and poker-faced). Both mother and daughter take a liking to our boy, who starts babysitting Lola and once again becomes smitten with an unattainable mature lady, this time Domino. With Smooth, Raiff presents a star-crossed MayDecember love story. Despite having off-the-charts chemistry that even Domino’s lawyer fiancé (Raúl Castillo) plainly, bitterly recognizes, Raiff and Johnson’s characters know they can’t — to quote Billy Paul in “Me and Mrs. Jones” — have a thing going on. He’s a guy who needs to find some purpose in life, and she’s a girl who needs some stability in hers. So it’s kinda like The Graduate, except the Benjamin Braddock and Mrs. Robinson of this

The comedic moments largely stem from fish-out-of-water situations that Charles finds himself in — if you’ve ever wanted to see a large British android dance in self-made hula garb, this is the movie for you. Archer’s success comes not only from digging into the situation’s inherent humor, but also exploring the way Charles forces Brian out of his shell. A local lady named Hazel (Sherlock alum Louise Brealey) also catches Brian’s eye and helps fill in the areas of companionship that a giant teenage robot son can’t. Brian and Charles make for a delightfully odd couple, but the former learns quickly about the joys and pains of being a dad.

Charles, like many who grew up in a small town, has dreams of seeing the world. We’re never given much information as to how Brian somehow mastered the complexities of artificial intelligence in his homey little tinkering basement, but that’s part of the charm. However he’s managed it, the inventor has brought to life a sweet being who has aims to travel the globe, which conflicts directly with Brian’s concerns regarding the real world. The worry is heightened by a local family of ne’er-do-wells who want to kidnap Charles and make him some sort of butler or plaything. How do you balance a caretaker’s instincts with the desire to let your progeny spread their wings and be their own person? It’s a common conflict, explored here in a fresh way, and that’s part of why Brian and Charles works so well. You feel the film’s heart growing as antics fall to the wayside and the friction between Brian’s expectations and Charles’ hopes mounts. The film never loses sight of how silly Charles looks, or its own generally ridiculous premise, but the sincerity of the approach keeps the tone buoyant and empathetic. This film just wouldn’t work if there was a hint of snark in the material. In the end, both Brian and Charles learn a lot about the deep connection between parents and children, what they owe each other and what they mean to each other. Archer’s film takes itself just seriously enough to blend its outlandish premise with real-world emotional dynamics. Grab a fresh cabbage and someone you love, and visit the world of Brian and Charles. It’s an often hilarious and unexpectedly poignant film about familial bonds and how they can change us in lovely and surprising ways. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

CHA CHA REAL SMOOTH R, 107 MINUTES OPENING FRIDAY, JUNE 17, AT THE BELCOURT AND STREAMING VIA APPLE TV+

film are generally decent people. Raiff — looking like a younger Adam Scott sporting Kenny Loggins’ beard — is all easygoing, extroverted charm as Andrew. Although he’s living the post-collegiate life, working a dead-end job at a corn dog joint and bunking with his little brother (Evan Assante), he’s not letting it get him down. Gen-Z denial has never been personified more adorably. As a filmmaker, Raiff teeters between moving the story along swiftly (he often cuts to the next scene the second a character stops talking) and having it play out in a calm, relaxed manner. While the movie is about a man who’s at his most ecstatic when he’s on a crowded dance floor (it’s like he’s forever chasing the high he experienced when he fell in love with that party starter years ago), Raiff seems to enjoy staging quaint, intimate moments in which two characters are alone in a room, just talking. His rapport with Johnson, who also serves as a pro-

ducer, is a joy to watch. Their characters may be stuck in a complicated romance, but they spend most of it enjoying one another’s company. (It’s been so long since I’ve seen a love story where the central couple acts like they actually like each other.) Between this and her recent role in The Lost Daughter, Johnson appears to be doing her best work playing complicated objects of obsession. Sure, she’s the hot mom whom other moms talk shit about — but she’s also a depressed, wounded soul who finds a kind, kindred spirit in Raiff’s aimless underachiever. Despite being named after a line from a party song — and people on Twitter have complained about the lack of Black faces in a movie whose title references an essential cookout anthem, which does make a slapsticky appearance in this — Cha Cha Real Smooth is about people trying to find the right groove in their lives when they know the party is long over. EMAIL ARTS@NASHVILLESCENE.COM

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 – JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com

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Columbia 1006 Carmack Blvd Columbia, TN 931-398-3350

nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16– JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Marketplace

Rocky McElhaney Law Firm InjuRy Auto ACCIdEnts WRongFul dEAth dAngERous And dEFECtIvE dRugs

Voted Best Attorney in Nashville Call 615-425-2500 for FREE Consultation

www.rockylawfirm.com LEGAL Non-Resident Notice Fourth Circuit Docket No 22D164

Rental Scene

LATREROS J GADDY vs. LATONYA C GADDY In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon LATONYA C GADDY. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after June 16, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on July 18, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville.

In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon LATONYA C GADDY. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after June 16, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on July 18, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: May 19, 2022 Robyn L. Ryan Robert J. Turner Attorneys for Plaintiff NSC 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 & 6/16/2022

Non-Resident Notice Third Circuit Docket No. 12D2965 JEFFREY PHILLIPS ANDREWS vs. ASHLEY GAIL ANDREWS In this cause it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the defendant is a non-resident of the State of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ASHLEY GAIL ANDREWS. It is ordered that said Defendant enter HER appearance herein with thirty (30) days after July 7, 2022 same being the date of the last publication of this notice to be held at the Metropolitan Circuit Court located at 1 Public Square, Room 302, Nashville, Tennessee, and defend or default will be taken on August 8, 2022. It is therefore ordered that a copy of this Order be published for four (4) weeks succession in the Nashville Scene, a newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: June 9, 2022 Trudy Bloodworth Attorney for Plaintiff

newspaper published in Nashville. Richard R. Rooker, Clerk L. Chappell, Deputy Clerk Date: June 9, 2022 Trudy Bloodworth Attorney for Plaintiff NSC 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7/2022

NOTICE OF SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, Ryan Paige (“Grantor”), by that certain Deed of Trust dated December 29, 2021, of record as Instrument No. 20220112-0004512, in the Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee (the “Deed of Trust”), conveyed to Steven P. Disser, as Trustee, certain interests in the Property (as hereinafter defined) to secure the payment of certain indebtedness described in the Deed of Trust (the “Indebtedness”); WHEREAS, default has occurred by Grantor’s failure to comply with the terms and conditions of the Deed of Trust, and the Indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in the Deed of Trust, and the Indebtedness has not been paid; WHEREAS, Lender has demanded that the Property be advertised and sold in satisfaction of the Indebtedness and the costs of foreclosure in accordance with the terms of the Deed of Trust; and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Joshua D. Hankins, or my agent, has been dulyappointed as Successor Trustee in the place and stead of Steven P. Disser, said appointment being of record as Instrument No. 20220523-0059570, said Register’s Office. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that I, Joshua D. Hankins, or my agent, as Successor Trustee, pursuant to the power, duty and authority vested in and imposed upon me in the Deed of Trust, will on Friday, July 8, 2022, at 10:00 a.m., prevailing Central Time, outside the south entrance to the Davidson County Historic Courthouse, located at 1 Public Square, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee 37201, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for immediately available funds, free from all rights which Grantor waived in the Deed of Trust, my interests in the real property situated in Davidson County, Tennessee, described as follows, together with my interests in any and all improvements, tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances, my interests in all easements serving or benefiting the property, and my interests in any or all fixtures and improvements now or hereafter attached to the property (the “Property”): A certain tract or parcel of land locat-

ed in Davidson County, State of Tennessee, described as follows, to wit: Being part of Lot Nos. 1, 2 and 33 on the Plan of Kenmore Place of record in Plat Book 332, Page 32 and 33, in the Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described according to a survey by John Kohl and Company, dated June 24, 1983, as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly margin of McGavock Pike at the southwest corner of a lot conveyed to H.E. Waller and wife, by deed of record in Book 609, Page 126, said Register’s Office; thence with the said Waller’s westerly line and in a northerly direction 106.3 feet to an iron pin; thence in a westerly direction 37 feet to an iron pin; thence in a southerly direction 109.05 feet to the northerly margin of McGavock Pike in an easterly direction 39.6 feet to the point of beginning. Being the same property conveyed to Ryan Paige, a married man, by Warranty Deed from Brian L. Cox and Almeatricee J. Cox, husband and wife, of record in Instrument No. 201602010009310, Register’s Office for Davidson County, Tennessee, dated January 29, 2016 and recorded on February 01, 2016. The Property is improved property known as 1109 McGavock Pike, Nashville, Tennessee 37216. The full legal description of the Property can be found in the Deed of Trust. The Map and Parcel number assigned to the Property is believed to be 072-06-0246.00, but such number is not part of the legal description. In the event of any discrepancy, the legal description in the Deed of Trust shall control. A review of the records at said Register’s Office disclosed that the Property may be subject to certain matters set forth below and that the persons named below may be interested parties, along with the persons named in the first paragraph of this Notice: 1. Any and all unpaid ad valorem taxes payable to Davidson County, Tennessee (plus penalty and interest, if any) that may be a lien against the Property. 2. All plats, easements and restrictions of record in said Register’s Office. 3. Rights and claims of parties in possession, if any. The foregoing matters may or may not take priority over the Deed of Trust. To the extent such matters do take prior-

ity over the Deed of Trust under applicable law, the sale will be subject to them, and to the extent such matters do not take priority over the Deed of Trust under applicable law, the Property will not remain subject to them after the sale. The sale will be subject to any and all unpaid ad valorem taxes (plus penalty and interest, if any) that may be a lien against the Property and subject to any and all liens, defects, encumbrances, conveyances, adverse claims and other matters which take priority over the Deed of Trust upon which this foreclosure sale is had, and subject to any statutory rights of redemption not otherwise waived in the Deed of Trust, including the rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal, which have not been waived by such governmental agency, and matters that take priority over the Deed of Trust which an accurate survey of the Property might disclose. The Property is to be sold AS IS WHERE IS, without representations or warranties of any kind whatsoever, whether express or implied. Without limiting the foregoing, THE PROPERTY IS TO BE SOLD WITHOUT ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR USE OR PURPOSE. Successor Trustee will make no covenant of seisin or warranty of title, express or implied, and will sell and convey his interest in the Property by Successor Trustee’s Deed as Successor Trustee only. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of sale to another day and time certain, without further publication and in accordance with law, upon announcement of said adjournment on the day and time and place of sale set forth above, to sell the Property with or without division if the Property consists of more than one tract or parcel, and to sell to the second highest bidder in the event the highest bidder does not comply with the terms of the sale. Joshua D. Hankins, Esq. Aaron R. Winters, Esq. HANKINS LAW 117 Saundersville Road, Suite 205 Hendersonville, Tennessee 37075 (615) 246-2544 NSC 6/16/2022, 6/23/22, 6/30/22

NSC 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7/2022

Welcome to 2100 Acklen Flats

Richard R. Rooker, Clerk M. De Jesus, Deputy Clerk Date: May 19, 2022

EMPLOYMENT NContracts, LLC has an opening for a Salesforce Admin Manager in Brentwood, TN responsible for managing day to day operations of technical implementations. Related education and/or experience and/or skills required. Remote work permitted. For more information and to apply email resume to recruiter@ncontracts.com. Reference job title and location.

UBS Business Solutions US LLC seeks Associate Director, Tech Engineer in Nashville, TN. Integrate data sources into Splunk. Reqs: Bach or foreign equiv in Comp Sci, IT, Eng or related & 3 yrs exp in job or related occ. Qualified Applicants apply through shprofrecruitingcc@ubs.com. Please reference 001080. NO CALLS PLEASE. EOE/M/F/D/V. UBS Business Solutions US LLC seeks Associate Director, IT Support Analyst in Nashville, TN. Resp for the supp & maintenance of large scale Network & Security Infrastructure. Reqs: Bach or foreign equiv in Comp Sci, Comp Engr or related & 7 yrs exp in job or related occ. Qualified Applicants apply through shprofrecruitingcc@ubs.com. Please reference 000370. NO CALLS PLEASE. EOE/M/F/D/V.

Respiratory Therapist needed for TriStar Skyline Medical Center - Nashville, to Administer respiratory therapy care and life support to patients with deficiencies and abnormalities of cardiopulmonary system, under supervision of physician and by prescription. Full time every other weekend; standard hospital shifts currently (3) 12-hour shifts and 4 days off. Must have an Associate’s in Respiratory Therapy, and CRT or RRT or eligible and Tennessee RT license. Send resumes to: reigen.lemelletuggle@hcahealthcare.com

SERVICES LAWNCARE/LANDSCAPE LOW- VOLTAGE LIGHTING, DRAINAGE, ROCK WALL, BRICK REPAIR, FENCE REPAIR, PRESSURE WASHING, DRIVEWAY SEALING ,IRRIGATION REPAIR ( PH. 6159775970 /LV TEXT)

International Entertainment EARN YOUR HS DIPLOMA Strategic Specialist. TODAY Represent and promote For more info call artists and musicians in 1.800.470.4723 Or visit our dealing with current and website: prospective employers in the www.diplomaathome.com United States and Europe. Employer: Common Grounds Entertainment, LLC. Location: Brentwood, TN. Some international FEATURED travel to Europe required. APARTMENT LIVING Can telecommute from any location in Tennessee. To apply, mail resumé (no calls/e-mails) to J. Nehasil, 6720 Autumn Oaks Drive, Brentwood, TN 37027, and state the requested position..

Robyn L. Ryan Robert J. Turner Attorneys for Plaintiff NSC 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 & 6/16/2022

Your Neighborhood Local Attractions: · Vanderbilt University and Hospital · Belmont University · Hillsboro Village · Music Row Neighborhood Dining and Drinks: · Double Dogs Restaurant · Hopdoddy · Burger Bar · Ruby Sunshine · Biscuit Love · Belcourt Taps · McDougal’s Chicken Fingers and Wings

· Nicoletto’s Italian Kitchen · Fido · Pancake Pantry Enjoy the outdoors: · St. Bernard Park · Fannie Mae Dees Park · Centennial Park · Centennial Dog Park Best places nearby to see a show: · Belcourt Theatre · The Station Inn · The Basement · Ryman Auditorium

Favorite local neighborhood bar: · Double Dogs Restaurant Best local family outing: · Adventure Science Center Your new home amenities: · Green Pet Area · Controlled access parking garage · Outside lounge area with gas grill and TV · Washer and Dryer in each apartment

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2100 Acklen Ave, Nashville TN 37212 | 2100acklenflats.com | 615.499-5979 42

International Entertainment Strategic Specialist. Represent and promote artists and musicians in dealing with current and prospective employers in the United States and Europe. Employer: Common Grounds Entertainment, LLC. Location: Brentwood, TN. Some international travel to Europe required. Can telecommute from any location in Tennessee. To apply, mail resumé (no calls/e-mails) to J. Nehasil, 6720 Autumn Oaks Drive, Brentwood, TN 37027, and state the requested position..

NASHVILLE SCENE | JUNE 16 - JUNE 22, 2022 | nashvillescene.com


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brightonvalley.net | 615.366.5552 nashvillescene.com | JUNE 16 - JUNE 22, 2022 | NASHVILLE SCENE

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Nashville is a diverse city, and we want a pool of freelance contributors who reflect that diversity. We’re looking for new freelancers, and we particularly want to encourage writers of color & LGBTQ writers to pitch us.

Read more at our new pitch guide: nashvillescene.com/pitchguide

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