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2020 Annual Report Special Projects


MISSION STATEMENT Safeguarding the life, dignity, and liberty of all persons. We

INSIDE FRONT COVER

are dedicated to providing the highest level of service to all

Clinician Danielle White talking with a

communities, including individuals diagnosed with mental

deputy via an iPad. Danielle is part of the

illness or other disabilities as well as those suffering the

award winning Clinician and Officer Remote

adverse consequences of substance abuse and personal

Evaluation telehealth program. The HCSO is

behavioral crises.

a leader in this innovative technology.

COLLABORATION Several of our programs have become state and national models. Our success is due to the teamwork among the personnel working in Special Projects and the collaboration we enjoy with organizations such as the Houston Police Department, The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD, The National Alliance on Mental Illness, and others.

COVER Sergeant Jose Gomez places a Project Guardian sticker on the front door of a residence participating in this program for individuals with autism.


Table of Contents A year of growth and accomplishment

1

Awards and accomplishments

2

Management

3

Units/Teams

4

The year in pictures

5

Behavioral Health Training Unit

7

Persons experiencing homelessness

10

Patrol/Field Training Unit

11

Diverting people from jail when appropriate

13

Behavioral Health Investigations

15

Crisis Intervention Response Team

18

The Data for 2020

19

Suicides

23

University of Houston-Downtown Final Report

24

Acknowledgements

29

Our partners

30

Special mention

31

Helpful Links

32


A year of growth and accomplishment Special Projects was implemented in 2019 to oversee the mental health and jail diversion programs supporting patrol. In addition, Special Projects develops new programs and strategies. The following are the current programs under Special Projects: Patrol Administration, Contract Deputy Program, Jail Diversion Center Security Detail, Cite and Release Program, Homeless Outreach Team, downtown HOT contract, Behavioral Health Training Unit, Clinician and Officer Remote Evaluation (CORE) Telehealth Program, Integrating Communications and Tactics (ICAT) training, Project Guardian, Project Lifesaver, Crisis Intervention Response Team (CIRT), Behavioral Health Investigations Unit, Behavioral Threat Management Unit, Graffiti Abatement, Nuisance Abatement, Patrol Training Unit, Field Training Unit, Taser Control Unit, and patrol inventory.

As you can see, Special Projects is a very robust and innovative branch of the HCSO. The following are a few of the significant developments of Special Projects in 2020.  The allocation of $905k by Harris County Commissioners Court to fund our CORE telehealth program for one year. Our program is the largest of its type in the nation with 150 deputies equipped with an iPad.  CORE won an Achievement Award from the National Association of Counties (NACo) in June.  The implementation of Project Guardian, a new program to help individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 The implementation of the Downtown HOT Contract Program.  The expansion of HOT from six to ten deputies enabling HOT to provide a two-person team for each patrol district.  The creation of the position of Field Training Administrator. Each patrol district has an administrator who coordinates the Field Training Program with that district.

Mike Lee, Major Patrol/Special Projects .

 The implementation of Project Lifesaver, a new program to locate people with cognitive disorders who wander from home.

MIKE LEE Major of the Patrol Bureau

and Special Projects

Major Lee speaking with two senior deputies assigned to the Traffic Enforcement Unit November 15, 2020

1

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Awards Mega n Her r in

Tr a c ey Thom a s

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Foundation Deputy of the Year

Nominated for Harris County Sheriff’s Office Foundation Deputy of the Year

An ton io D ouc et

Chr is top her Ca n o

NAMI Deputy of the Quarter

NAMI Deputy of the Quarter

COR E

COR E

Featured in Police Chief magazine’s “Great Ideas Shaping the Future of Policing” issue

2020 Achievement Award from the National Association of Counties 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

2


Management

Mike Lee Major

Jose Gomez Sergeant Behavioral Health Training Unit/CORE/Projects Lifesaver and Guardian

Raymond Lomelo Sergeant Diversion Center Security Detail/Cite and Release Program 3

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Jorge Gonzalez Lieutenant

Brad Rudolph Manager Behavioral Threat Management Unit

Frank Webb Project Manager

Megan Herrin Sergeant Behavioral Health Investigations Unit/Nuisance and Graffiti Abatement

Willie Hodge Sergeant Crisis Intervention Response Team

Kelly Hudson Sergeant Crisis Intervention Response Team

Shawn Robbennolt Sergeant Patrol/Field Training

John Whitley Sergeant Homeless Outreach Team


Units/Teams

Crisis Intervention Response Team

Homeless Outreach Team

Behavioral Health Training Unit

Behavioral Health Investigations Unit/Behavioral Threat Management Unit

Jail Diversion Center Security Detail

Patrol Training/Field Training 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

4


The year

5

Graffiti Abatement (before)

Graffiti Abatement (after)

Nuisance Abatement (before)

Nuisance Abatement (after)

Homeless Outreach Team

Homeless Outreach Team

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


in photos SJAC

Project Lifesaver

Cite and Release

Crisis Intervention Response Team

Deputy of the Year

Education

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

6


Behavioral Health Training Unit Training The Behavioral Health Training Unit (BHTU) provides the following classes: Call Taker/Dispatcher training to all new personnel (8 hours); CIT Refresher, an eight-hour class for all CIT trained deputies; CIT 40-hour for all certified cadets; CORE Orientation, a two-hour class for all deputies entering the program; ICAT training for all certified and detention personnel (16 hours); Jail Mental Health Officer for all detention personnel (40 hours); Mental Health Officer for certified personnel wanting their state mental health proficiency certification (40 hours).

Project Guardian The BHTU also oversees Project Guardian, a free, voluntary, and confidential database managed and maintained by the Harris

County Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) for residents in the unincorporated areas of Harris County patrolled by the HCSO. The purpose of the program is to help keep individuals with autism safe. The database contains information on the individual with autism to help deputies respond safely and effectively in the event law enforcement is called to the person’s residence. The program is administered by the Training Detail.

Project Lifesaver The BHTU coordinates Project Lifesaver, a tracking system based on radio technology that locates individuals who have wandered from home. Examples of individuals who enroll in the program include individuals with autism, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, or traumatic brain injury who have a history of wandering.

Family members and/or legal guardians may enroll their loved one by submitting an online application. Once completed, the applicant is approved to purchase a transmitter bracelet that is worn by the person who wanders. A tracking device hones in on the bracelet if the person wanders.

CORE The BHTU manages the award winning, innovative telehealth program connecting a patrol deputy with a masters-level clinician from The Harris Center for Mental Health via an iPad. The clinicians conduct assessments on individuals in mental health crisis and provide resource information to the deputies. The HCSO has the largest program of its type with 150 deputies equipped with an iPad.

TRAINING THAT WORKS

7

Deputy Carson McMath teaching a

Computer simulation training. The

Dr. John O’Neill from the Menninger

class to veteran deputies. Deputy

students interact in scenarios

Clinic teaching a class on mental

McMath is the senior trainer in the

projected on a screen. Detention and

health and substance abuse.

Training Detail.

patrol scenarios are available.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Project Guardian/Project Lifesaver Vehicle

THE IDEA: Sergeant Jose Gomez DESIGN/GRAPHICS: Carlos Rangel, HCSO Digital Graphics Coordinator PHOTOS: Deputy Joseph Ramirez, Behavioral Health Investigations 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

8


2020 Data for the Behavioral Health Training Unit ICAT TRAINING

Personnel Receiving Behavioral Health Training by Year

 Integrating Communication and Tactics (ICAT)

2661

 Developed by the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) 872

647

365

777

 Train-the-Trainer class provided to the HCSO December 2020

2017

2018

2019

2020

 Will be provided to all HCSO certified and

Total

detention personnel starting January

NOTE: The HCSO Training Academy was closed from March through August Due to COVID 19. This significantly impacted the number of personnel trained during 2020.

2021  Model research-based training

2020 Behavioral Health Training Contact Hours Course

Hours

Personnel Trained

Contact Hours

40-hour Mental Health Course

40

622

24,880

Dispatch/Call Taker Training

8

22

176

ICAT

16

35

560

2–4

98

196

Miscellaneous

Total

9

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

25,812


Persons experiencing homelessness HOT Deputies Gregory Temple and Ashley Schubert responding to a call at a homeless encampment.

Background The Homeless Outreach Team (HOT) was implemented in October 2015 with two deputies. In 2019, HOT grew to one supervisor and six deputies.

THE COST OF HOMELESSNESS IN HARRIS COUNTY  Annual costs of Harris County services for an individual experiencing

A Year of Growth

homelessness totals $96k. Criminal justice accounts for 7% of this cost, mental

In 2020, the unit grew to 10 deputies and a supervisor. Each patrol district now has a twoperson team assigned to it. Additionally, one deputy and a case manager from The Harris Center for Mental Health were added to the team to work in the downtown business district. These positions are paid for by the business district.

health care 26%, health care and public health 36%, and community programs 31%.

HOT’s Mission HOT collaborates with public and private entities focusing on outreach programs to locate, engage, and assist persons experiencing homelessness with housing, health care, and nutrition needs. HOT also responds to citizen concerns including trespassing, loitering, soliciting in the roadways, and illegal encampments.

(Source: Harris County Commissioners Court’s Analyst’s Office.)

HOMELESSNESS AND MENTAL ILLNESS  According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the percentage of individuals experiencing homelessness in the Harris County region counted in early 2019 who suffered from severe mental illness was 64%.

HOW HOT PERFORMED IN 2020  Responded to 4091 calls for service  Made 2243 homeless contacts  Conducted 95 courtesy transports  Housed 71 individuals  Provided 2010 aid items  Responded to 70 military veterans

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

10


Patrol/Field Training Combining Programs Patrol training and field training are under one supervisor. They are in the Patrol Bureau.

New Position The position of Field Training Administrator was created in 2019. Each patrol district has a deputy who administers and coordinates the program with that district. The administrator provides additional and remedial training to probationary patrol deputies (PPDs), reviews documentation of PPDs, and schedules PPD assignments. Each administrator also serves as a patrol trainer.

Patrol Training The Patrol Training Section (PTS) provides several classes to both PPDs and veteran patrol

The PTS providing training on conducting a high-risk traffic stop.

deputies. The following are some of the classes provided by the PTS: patrol procedures, use of force, sexual assault and family violence, driving, active shooter, firearms, tactics, Taser, de-escalation, report writing, and medical training.

The PTS recently worked with the Basic Peace Officer Curriculum (BPOC) staff to develop a more efficient process of teaching the cadets how to write an offense report. Cadets are now given writing assignments which are graded by patrol training staff and Field Training Officers.

TRAINING THAT WORKS

The PTS provides firearms training

The PTS provides several different

Scenario-based training is a large

to PPDs and veteran patrol deputies.

driver training classes.

part of patrol training.

11

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


2020 Data for the Patrol/Field Training Section

Probationary Patrol Deputies Trained

FIELD TRAINING 518

 47 FTOs were trained in 2019.  30 FTOs were trained in 2020.

202

 In December 2020 there were 85 FTOs.

214

102

 In December 2020 District 1 had the most FTOs with 19. District 5 had the

2018

2019

2020

Total

least with 14.  A goal for 2021 is to provide additional training to the FTOs.

4192 number of hours of training 101,371 number of training contact hours 41 number of different patrol classes taught

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

12


Diverting people from jail when appropriate Jail Diversion Center Harris County opened the Judge Ed Emmett Mental Health Diversion Center (Jail Diversion Center) in September 2018. This is a prearrest/pre-charge program for individuals committing low-level, nonviolent offenses when it is believed mental illness and/or psychosocial issues were a factor in the commission of the crime. These individuals are diverted from jail to the Jail Diversion Center. No criminal charges are filed. The goal is to provide behavioral health treatment to the individual rather than incarceration.

Cite and Release Texas passed legislation in 2007 giving peace officers the authority to issue a citation for a narrow selection of Class A and B misdemeanors rather than arresting the individual. The citation is an order to appear in court. The person is still held accountable for the crime. The program eliminates the arrest and short incarceration of the individual who would be out on bail in a day or two. The Harris County Sheriff’s Office implemented the program, Cite and Release, in February 2020. Crimes involving violence, individuals with warrants, or individuals with a history of criminality are not eligible for the program. The program saves the county money, returns deputies to the field quicker, and eliminates the costly short-term incarceration of individuals innocent until proven guilty.

13

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

JAIL DIVERSION DATA  There was a 50% reduction in subsequent bookings after participants were diverted to the Jail Diversion Center (JDC)  Those diverted with 5+ bookings were 3.1 times less likely to be booked into jail on a new offense than those not served at the JDC  For every $1 spent on diversion, the county avoided spending $5.54 on criminal justice costs Source: The Judge Ed Emmett Mental Health Diversion Center Final Report, Brian Lovins, PhD, Justice System Partners, September 2020  820 people visited the JDC in 2020 making 1133 visits  76% of those brought to the JDC in 2020 were homeless. The homeless represented 79% of visits. 18% were subsequently placed in housing.  31% stayed at the program long enough to have a medical/psychiatric visit as part of their stay. 39% were engaged in the aftercare program and received mental health services as a result. 32% were linked to some Harris Center outpatient or residential service.  Using the cost benefits analysis conducted by Brian Lovins, Ph.D. of Justice Systems Partners, each visit to the JDC saves $9,622 in cost offset (or cost avoidance of law enforcement, jail, and court costs). Applying that figure to this sample: $9,622 x 1,133 visits = $10,901,726 in costs avoided. Source: Dr. Scott Hickey, The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD.


2020 Data for the Cite and Release Program Citations Issued by Agency

40%

The Houston Police Department issued 110 citations which is 40% of the total issued.

10%

The Harris County Sheriff’s Office issued 130 citations which is 48% of the total issued.

The Pasadena Police Department issued 27 citations which is 10% of the total issued.

48%

Harris County Precinct One and Precinct Five Constables’ Offices issued three and two citations respectively which is 2% of the total issued.

Our initiative is modeled after highly effective programs in other jurisdictions that have demonstrated strong results. Sheriff Ed Gonzalez

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

14


Behavioral Health Investigations: Preventing future incidents from occurring

Deputy Joseph Ramirez is the senior investigator for the BHIU.

Case Management The Behavioral Health Investigations Unit (BHIU) reviews all incident reports with a behavioral health component. Appropriate follow-up investigations and referrals are made.

Senior Justice Assessment Center (SJAC) The BHIU collaborates with SJAC, a multi-agency center that addresses the complex and unique needs of seniors who are victims of abuse, neglect, and/or exploitation.

Firearms BHIU investigates all seizures of firearms from individuals in behavioral health crisis according to the legislative mandates of Texas Senate Bill 1189.

Threat Management The Behavioral Threat Management Unit investigates stalking situations and domestic violence incidents that have a behavioral health nexus.

Abatement The Graffiti and Nuisance Abatement programs are placed in the BHIU. Graffiti Abatement is a free service for citizens and businesses in the unincorporated areas of Harris County. The program removes unwanted graffiti. Similarly, Nuisance Abatement responds to complaints involving abandoned vehicles, junked vehicles, and abandoned structures.

Chronic Consumers The BHIU is collaborating with other agencies to develop and implement a program to address consumers our deputies respond to frequently. The goal is to stabilize these individuals through behavioral health case management.

Boarding Homes The BHIU is also working on the development of a unit to help regulate boarding homes, many of which house individuals with behavioral health needs.

HOW THE BHIU PERFORMED IN 2020  388 mental health follow-ups  54 cases involved firearms  3,404 Nuisance and Graffiti Abatement investigations  3,339 behavioral health related reports reviewed  119 cases were referred to SJAC

Most individuals with serious mental illness are not dangerous, most acts of violence are committed by individuals who are not mentally ill, and people with mental illness are more likely to be victims than perpetrators of violent acts. It is also true, however, that violence is more common in people with serious mental illness, especially when psychosis with paranoia or ‘command hallucinations’ are present. Source: Treatment Advocacy Center

15

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


2020 Data for Behavioral Health Investigations Investigations The Behavioral Health Investigations Unit has two Mental Health Follow-Ups

388

investigators who together review an average of 300 incident reports each

Senior Justice Assessment Center

month with a behavioral

119

health component.

Firearms

54

Behavioral Threat Management Unit

The Behavioral Threat Management Unit (BTMU)

Incident Reports

was implemented in April

316

2019. The unit, managed Analytical Queries

1981

by Mr. Brad Rudolph, focuses on stalking situations and specific

Law Enforcement Contacts

2097

domestic violence incidents that have a

Reports Reviewed

1990

stalking nexus. These situations often involve suspects who have a mental illness. .

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

16


2020 Data for the Neighborhood Quality of Life Teams Nuisance Abatement Referrals to Other Agencies Illegal Dumping Incidents

The Nuisance Abatement Unit responds to all

21

nuisance complaints and

9

takes appropriate action,

Vehicles Stickered

2139

Abandoned Vehicle Reports

2145

Supplemental Reports

including referring to Harris County Public Health & Environmental

1969

Reports Made

Services or the Harris

2282

Calls for Service

2853

County District Attorney’s Office.

Graffiti Abatement The Graffiti Abatement Special Assignments

Bandit Signs Removed

Sites Abated

Job Sites

Program is a free service

22

for citizens and businesses in the

158

unincorporated areas of Harris County. The

358

program removes 551

unwanted graffiti which is often perpetrated by gang members who want to mark their territory or send a message to another gang. .

17

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Crisis Intervention Response Team About CIRT

Deputy Aaron Brown Deputy Brown is commended in the letter below. He is currently serving as the department’s Integrating Communications and Tactics (ICAT) instructor.

The Crisis Intervention Response Team (CIRT) was implemented in 2011. This is a co-responder program pairing a CIT trained deputy with a masters-level clinician from The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD, Harris County’s local mental health authority. These teams respond to the most serious calls involving individuals in behavioral health crisis, perform proactive and follow-up investigations, and respond to SWAT calls as a resource. The HCSO currently has nine teams. CIRT responds to calls from other law enforcement agencies in Harris County and to calls in the City of Houston.

HOW CIRT PERFORMED IN 2020  5178 calls for service  1443 emergency detentions  266 jail diversions  5 arrests  11 calls to outside jurisdictions  201 calls within city limits

CITIZEN COMMENDATION – OCTOBER 27, 2020

Sheriff Gonzalez, Yesterday, my girlfriend’s son was in a standoff with your deputies for over three hours in a suicide attempt. HCSO responded quickly deploying CIRT, SWAT and multiple deputies. The CIRT team did an excellent job working with my girlfriend and coaching her through this traumatic experience. Every officer out there put his/her life in danger trying to save her son, which goes beyond the call of duty. I want to extend my thanks for their efforts, their courage and ultimately their efforts to save him from himself. Mark did shoot himself, but had it not been for the swift actions of the responders, he would have surely died by his own hand. I was impressed by the professionalism of your department. I would give an honorable mention to Aaron Brown with CIRT. He was excellent as was the entire CIRT team. We left in a rush after Life Flight arrived to transport Mark to Hermann, so I was unable to thank the officers who put themselves out there yesterday. You have a fine group of people and their actions represent the best of Harris County. 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

18


2020 Data for Dispatched Calls for Service The following data was gleaned from dispatched calls for service to the Harris County Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) between July and December 2020. These are calls with a behavioral health component. The data comes from two behavioral health indicators/questions that were implemented in July 2020. The questions ask if the call involved anyone with mental health issues and if anyone was homeless. The total number of calls for this sixmonth period was 6,999.

Deputy Use of Force

HCSO Calls for Service July – December 2020

2%

4546

1592 861

Mental Health

Homeless

98%

Mental Health & Homeless

No

Yes 6889

110

Requested Suicide by Cop

Deputy Injury

1%

99%

No

Injury

# Deputies on Scenes

Percentage

None

6980

99.72%

Slight

19

0.28%

Consumer Injury

Yes 6947

Injury

# Consumers on Scenes

Percentage

None

6594

94.2%

Prior

365

5.2%

During

40

0.60%

52

19

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


2020 Data for Offense Reports The following data was gleaned from HCSO offense reports between January and December 2020. These are incidents with a behavioral health component. The data comes from a CIT Data Collection Form that was implemented in the offense reporting system in February 2019. The total number of offense reports was 4,964

for 2020.

HCSO Offense Reports w/ Behavioral Health Component

Gender

1372

1238 976

45% 696

682

District 1

District 2

District 3

District4

55%

District 5

Male

Female 2745 2219

CIT Trained Deputy Dispatched to the Scene

Call Disposition Number

% of Total Calls

Emergency Detention

3623

73%

Jail

127

3%

Resolved on Scene

1008

20%

Unable to Locate

138

3%

Other (transported home/shelter)

68

1%

Disposition 29%

71%

No

Yes 3514 1450

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

20


2020 Data on Age, Race, and Veteran Status Veteran

Age Range

5%

4059

95%

726 Juvenile (up to 17)

179 Adult (18-64)

Elderly (65+)

No

Yes 4634 224

Veteran status was unknown for 106 individuals

Race

2962 1753 249

White

21

Black

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Other


2020 Data on Attempted Suicides Suicide Attempt Method  In 2015, there were 1,104,825 Jumper

attempted suicides in the United

75

States. Hanging

115

 Approximately one person Firearm

attempts suicide every 31

193

seconds. Other

374

 It is generally estimated that Overdose

382

there are 25 attempts for one death by suicide.

Edged Weapon

Unknown

424

 Between 25 and 50 percent of 518

people who kill themselves had previously attempted suicide.  Those who have made suicide attempts are at higher risk for actually taking their lives.

U.S.A. Suicide: 2015 Official Final Data

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

22


Data on Completed Suicides

 Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death overall in the United States in 2018, claiming the lives of over 48,000 people. It was the second

The following data was compiled by the HCSO Crime Scene Unit (CSU). The CSU responds to scenes in the HCSO and constable

leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34, and the fourth leading cause

offices not inside the City of Houston. The information does not

of death among individuals between

include overdoses resulting in death.

the ages of 35 and 54.  There were more than two and a

Suicide Scenes by Year

half times as many suicides (48,344) in the United States as

182

there were homicides (18,830). 176 Source: National Institute of Mental Health

165 161

2017

2018

2019

2020

 Males accounted for 77% of all suicides.  63% of all suicides involved a firearm.  32% of all suicides involved asphyxiation.

Suicide Scenes by Method - 2020

 49% of all suicides involved white males.  The youngest decedent was 14-yearsold.

113

 The oldest decedent was 87-yearsold. 57

Gun Shot Wound

Hanging

 The average age at time of death was 41.5 years of age.

2

4

Cutting

Other

 The average age at time of death for males (all races) was 43-years-old.  The average age at time of death for females (all races) was 37-years-old.

Source: HCSO Crime Scene Unit

23

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


University of Houston-Downtown Final Report on CORE The University of Houston-Downtown completed a process evaluation of Phase III of the joint Harris County Sheriff’s Office and the Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD Pilot Telehealth Program, known as the Clinician and Officer Remote Evaluation (CORE) Pilot Program. The evaluation was made possible by a grant from Arnold Ventures. The process evaluation occurred in two stages. Stage 1 involved the collection of data and occurred during the Phase III one-year implementation of the CORE Pilot Program which took place between December 2018 and December 2019. Stage 2 involved analyses of data once collected. Analyses occurred during the ten months following the implementation. For the evaluation, 361 records were examined. These records document calls involving CORE assessments. There were 356 different consumers involved in the 361 CORE calls analyzed. Three consumers were involved in two calls each and one consumer was involved in three calls. All others were involved in only one call each.

Figure 1: Consumer age at time of incident in percentages (N=361)

>49

Roughly half of

19

the consumers 40-49

served fell

12

between the ages 30-39

26

of 20 and 39 (51%).

20-29

<20

25

19

Policy Implications Findings from the CORE process evaluation suggest that use of telehealth as a partnership between law enforcement and mental health providers can be an effective and efficient alternative for managing 911 crisis calls with a mental or behavioral health component. There are, however, areas for consideration in effectively implementing a model similar to CORE. First, community and agency stakeholder buy-in is essential and requires educating the public about mental health needs and the benefits of a telehealth program.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

24


Figure 2: Compliance with medication (N=265)

Of the 265 consumers asked by deputies about 194

medication, 27% (n=71) reported being medication compliant. 73% (n=194) reported they were not 96

compliant. Medication

71

status was unknown for the remaining consumers (n=96).

Medication Compliant

Not Compliant w/Meds

Unknown

Figure 3: Encounters with The Harris Center (N=361)

For 46% of the consumers (n=167), the CORE call was

167

their first known encounter

148

with The Harris Center’s mental health services. About 41% of consumers (n=148) indicated it was 46

not their first encounter.

For the remaining consumers (n=46), First known encounter Had prior encounter with w/The Harris Center the Harris Center services

25

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

Unknown

information on their first encounter was not known. .


Table 1: Time on call with clinicians in minutes (N=186) Range

8 to 60

Mean

21

Median

20

Table 3: Nature of CORE call (N=361)

Table 2: iPad usage (N=183) Deputy reported good signal

98%

Consumer refused use of iPad

.02%

Table 4: Facility consumers transported to (N=213)

Family disturbance

24%

NeuroPsychiatric Center

45%

Welfare Check

28%

Ben Taub Hospital

6%

Person w/mental illness

12%

Memorial Hermann Katy

5%

Disturbance other

10%

VA Hospital (vets only)

5%

Other

31%

Other (20 facilities)

39%

Table 5: Disposition of CORE call (N=361) Resolved on scene

151 (42%)

Transported consumer from scene

210 (58%)

Shelley Smith, LPC, is a masters-level clinician and the Clinical Team Lead of the clinicians working in the CORE program. Shelley is talking with a deputy via his iPad. In addition to conducting assessments on individuals in behavioral health crisis, CORE clinicians assist deputies with resource information.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

26


Figure 4: CORE calls by district in percentages

Jail Diversion Downtown

64 of the 198 individuals

4

transported for an emergency District 5

21

detention (32%) had committed a

District 4

39

District 3

criminal offense but the district attorney’s office diverted criminal charges due to the type of charge

14

and the person’s mental state. District 2

4

District 1

18

Cost Savings  Cost savings due to jail diversion were estimated to be $781,632  In 151 cases, CORE deputies were able to resolve the case on

Figure 5: Type of criminal charges diverted in percentages (N=64)

scene thereby diverting the consumers from emergency rooms. Had these consumers

Other

Criminal Trespass

been transported to an ER, this

24

would have resulted in an average cost of $218,497.

8

Criminal Mischief

 If the 151 consumers were

9

admitted to a psychiatric hospital Terroristic Threat

the cost savings were estimated

28

to be $1,230,650. Assault

31

 CORE deputies reported that for 317 of the calls they would have called a CIRT co-responder unit if not for the iPad. The use of CORE as opposed to CIRT for these calls was estimated to be a cost savings of $76,321.

27

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Table 6: Deputy use of CORE (N=361) Question

% Yes Response

Would you have called CIRT if you did not have an iPad?

88%

If you did not have the assistance of the clinician, would you have transported the consumer to the NPC/hospital/ER?

78%

Did the clinician help you safely deescalate the consumer?

86%

Did the clinician help you decide what course of action to take with the consumer?

93%

Did the clinician help you identify/access resources you would not otherwise have identified/accessed?

89%

Do you believe the clinician helped you handle the call in a shorter periodof-time than if you responded without the clinician?

88%

CORE deputies participating in phase three of the pilot program and their supervisors at an end-of-pilot/awards breakfast.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

28


Acknowledgements Katrina Arnim

Carlos Rangel

COPYING AND BINDING

GRAPHICS

Katrina is the Executive Director of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office Foundation that funded, with the Hamilton Family Foundation, the copying and binding of the annual report.

Carlos is the Digital Graphics Coordinator for the HCSO. Carlos crops, sizes, and adds backgrounds to photographs and provides graphic assistance.

Carolyn Hamilton COPYING AND BINDING The Hamilton Family Foundation provided funds to copy and bind the reports. Carolyn is a long time supporter of law enforcement in Houston/Harris County and programs to respond to individuals with mental illness.

PHOTOGRAPHS Sharon is a Multimedia Specialist in the Executive Bureau of the HCSO. Many of the photographs in this report were taken by Sharon.

Tom Hamilton

Frank Webb

COPYING AND BINDING

PROJECT MANAGER

Tom has also been a long time supporter of law enforcement in Houston/Harris County. Tom served on the first advisory board that helped the Houston Police Department develop and implement its CIT program.

Frank is assigned to the Special Projects section of the Patrol Bureau. Frank researches, writes, coordinates, and desktop publishes the report.

Deputy Joseph Ramirez PHOTOGRAPHS Joseph is a deputy in the Behavioral Health Investigations Unit. He took several of the photographs in the report.

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Sharon Steinmann

2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Our Partners An agency’s success is directly proportional to the extent to which it collaborates with the community. Alzheimer’s Association

Hope Impacts

The leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support, and research. Their vision is a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia.

Seeks to provide hope to persons experiencing homelessness and under resourced individuals in the Katy community through tangible acts of love. They provide information and resources to address physical, emotional, financial, and spiritual needs.

Arnold Ventures A philanthropy dedicated to tackling some of the most pressing problems in the United States. They funded the evaluation by The University of Houston-Downtown of our CORE telehealth program.

Coalition for the Homeless A private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide leadership in the development, advocacy, and coordination of community strategies to prevent and end homelessness.

Harris County District Attorney’s Office The Harris County District Attorney’s Office, under District Attorney Kim Ogg, is integral to the successful jail diversion programs in Harris County. It is one of a few district attorney offices in the nation with assistant district attorneys dedicated to issues involving the mentally ill.

Harris County Sheriff’s Office Foundation Formed in 2010 by a group of community leaders and citizens to assist and support the men and women of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office.

HOPE Center The 1960 HOPE Center was opened to offer basic human services to those in the 1960 area.

H.O.P.E. Haven Their mission is to help persons experiencing homelessness find a path off the streets and to mentor them throughout their life journey to succeed and thrive as contributing members of our community.

Houston Police Department The HCSO started collaborating with the Houston Police Department (HPD) on October 27, 2011, with a joint HCSO/HPD Crisis Intervention Response Team that serves the entire Harris County region. The collaboration has expanded to the Homeless Outreach Team and other initiatives.

Houston Recovery Center The Houston Recovery Center (AKA the Sobering Center and the Houston Center for Sobriety) is an alternative to jail for people whose only offense is public intoxication, allowing them to regain sobriety in a safe, medicallymonitored environment.

Menninger Clinic A premiere mental health facility. Menninger provides instructors for our 40-hour mental health class.

NAMI Greater Houston The National Alliance on Mental Illness Greater Houston sponsors a CIT Deputy Award where they recognize a deputy who has gone above and beyond in responding to individuals in behavioral crisis. NAMI is the nation’s grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness.

Northwest Assistance Ministries (NAM) Formed by 10 Covenant Congregations who agreed to set aside their theological differences and pool their resources to better serve community needs. NAM has served north and northwest Harris County since 1983.

Operation ID Photo ID is a basic need. It provides access to nearly all aspects of business and social life. Operation ID helps persons experiencing homelessness obtain identification.

SEARCH Homeless Services An interfaith, nonprofit organization founded in 1989 to respond to the growing number of people experiencing homelessness in Houston.

H.O.P.E. Haven H.O.P.E. Haven’s mission is to help persons experiencing homelessness find a path off the streets and to mentor them throughout their life journey to succeed and thrive as contributing members of our community.

The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD Harris County’s local mental health authority. HCSO’s primary collaborator. The Harris Center provides the clinicians on HCSO’s co-responder program, the CORE telehealth program, and the downtown Homeless Outreach Team. The collaboration between the HCSO and The Harris Center goes back to 1991.

University of Houston-Downtown Conducted a process evaluation of the HCSO CORE telehealth program.

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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Special Mention Catie Bialick ARNOLD VENTURES Catie helps to identify and manage philanthropic opportunities for the Criminal Justice Team. Catie was the project manager of the grant that funded the evaluation of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office’s Clinician and Officer Remote Evaluation (CORE) telehealth program.

Ashley Blackburn, Ph.D. UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON-DOWNTOWN Ashley led the team that evaluated the HCSO CORE program. Ashley’s team consisted of Lori Brusman-Lovins, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University and Heather Goltz, Ph.D. and Dana Smith, Ph.D. of the University of Houston-Downtown. The evaluation was instrumental in Harris County Commissioners Court’s decision to fund CORE. The evaluation has been sent to law enforcement, behavioral health, academic, and other organizations across the nation.

Neal Sarahan, Ph.D. NAMI GREATER HOUSTON Neal is the Executive Director. NAMI Greater Houston has been a staunch supporter of the CIT Program and law enforcement’s efforts to develop training and programs to respond to individuals in behavioral health crisis. NAMI Greater Houston provides a Deputy of the Quarter Award to deputies who distinguish themselves in their response to individuals in crisis as well as several other awards presented at behavioral health conferences.

Wayne Young, MBA, LPC, FACHE THE HARRIS CENTER FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND IDD Wayne is the Chief Executive Officer. The Harris Center is the HCSO’s closest partner collaborating on several programs, including the Crisis Intervention Response Team, Clinician and Officer Remote Evaluation telehealth program, and the Homeless Outreach Team. Harris County is fortunate to have someone with Mr. Young’s knowledge, expertise, foresight, and collaborative spirit leading his organization.

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2020 ANNUAL REPORT


Helpful Links Harris County Sheriff’s Office

Harris County Sheriff’s Office

Mental Health & Jail Diversion Programs

Mental Health & Jail Diversion Programs

WWW.HARRISCOUNTYCIT.ORG

@HCSO_MHU

The Harris Center for Mental Health & IDD

The Harris Center for Mental Health & IDD

Local Mental Health Authority

Local Mental Health Authority

HTTPS://THEHARRISCENTER.ORG

@THEHARRISCTR

NAMI Greater Houston

NAMI Greater Houston

National Alliance on Mental Illness

National Alliance on Mental Illness

HTTPS://NAMIGREATERHOUSTON.ORG

@NAMIHOUSTON

Houston Police Department

Houston Police Department

Mental Health Division

Official Twitter Account

HTTPS://WWW.HOUSTONCIT.ORG

@HOUSTONPOLICE

2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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Profile for fwebbhcso

2020 Special Projects Annual Report