Page 1

S P E C I A L

R E P O R T

TECHLEARNING.COM

The Just

in Time

Playbook

For

Remote Learning


SPECIAL REPORT: THE JUST IN TIME PLAYBOOK FOR REMOTE LEARNING

CONTENTS DEFINING REMOTE LEARNING

This playbook provides an explanation of remote learning, describes the structured elements necessary for its success, and includes many resources for schools and higher education institutions to get started today.

4 WHY REMOTE LEARNING? 4 WHAT IS REMOTE LEARNING? 6 THE REMOTE LEARNING EXPERIENCE 6 STRUCTURE: • Time • Communication • Technology • Lesson design

DESIGNING A REMOTE LEARNING PLAN Designing a remote learning plan should ideally be done when creating the district’s emergency preparedness plan. This section defines the components of a plan and provides samples from districts with completed and distributed plans.

10 HOME ACCESS SURVEY 14 LESSON CONTENT 18 COMMUNICATIONS

18 TRAINING 24 A DAY IN THE LIFE OF REMOTE LEARNING

SAMPLE TEMPLATES 12 SAMPLE PARENT ACCESS SURVEY LETTER 16 SAMPLE DEVICE LOAN AGREEMENT 20 SAMPLE ELEARNING LESSON FROM LAGRANGE HIGHLANDS DISTRICT 106 (IL) 22 SAMPLE LETTER TO FACULTY FROM ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

ELEARNING RESOURCES

These are just some of the hundreds of resources available to support remote learning. For a regularly updated, curated list featuring hundreds of companies offering free elearning opportunities, visit Tech & Learning.

26 COMPANIES 28 ORGANIZATIONS 29 NO/LOW TECH SOLUTIONS 30 REMOTE LEARNING PLANNING CHECKLIST

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

DR. KECIA RAY After publishing an assessment to measure technology literacy in 1999, Dr. Ray conducted research in the U.S., Canada, and South Africa on the use of technology in the K-12 classroom and the use of distance learning technologies to facilitate engaging learning environments. Dr. Ray’s career includes designing technology within the Frist Center for the Visual Arts and directing technology research through Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Science Outreach programs. As a district administrator for Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, she led the award-winning design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional technology programs, including instructional design for online and blended learning environments, redesigning physical learning environments, redefining school libraries, and establishing the first virtual high school to award a diploma. She has published three books on distance learning strategies, one chapter on online course design for adult learners and several articles and blogs on the impact of technology. Dr. Ray is a member of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) and is past president of the ISTE Board of Directors. In 2013, she was appointed by Governor Haslem to the Advisory Council on Alternative Education and in 2014 was appointed by the Tennessee Commissioner of Education to a Personalized Learning Advisory Committee. In 2015, she was invited to serve on a USDOE technical working group focused on evaluating education technology. Dr. Ray currently serves on the board of Learning Bird Inc. and holds advisory positions with Mackin, Inc. and H Institute Award for Excellence in Education. She is a five-time recipient of the President’s Volunteer Service Award and has earned the ISTE ‘Making IT Happen’ Award. Dr. Ray was named one of the ‘20 to Watch’ by the National School Board Association, Woman of the Year by the National Association of Professional Women, one of the top 10 EdTech Leaders by Tech and Learning magazine, and was most recently named a Top 100 EdTech Influencer by EdTech Digest. She leads K20Connect and other passion projects supporting K20 education around the world.

Link to downloadable Remote Learning Lesson Template here.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM

| S PEC I A L REPO RT : T H E JU S T I N T I ME PLA YBO O K F O R R E M O TE L E A R NI N

|

3


Defining Remote Learning

JGI/JAMIE GRILL/GETTY IMAGES

By Dr. Kecia Ray

Why Remote Learning?

What Is Remote Learning?Â

The officially identified pandemic of COVID-19 is impacting more than 376 million students worldwide (see UNESCO’s website for updated reports of school closures). The number of students that will experience education disruption grows daily. This outbreak comes to the U.S. at the onset of state assessments and spring breaks, which means state departments of education will need to determine what guidance to offer districts related to state testing and attendance. This playbook provides an explanation of remote learning, describes the structured elements necessary for its success, and includes many resources for schools and higher education institutions to get started today.

Remote learning is something a district should be able to switch off and on based on need; however, the efficiency of transitioning to remote learning is dependent on preparedness, technology tools, and overall student support infrastructure. It is different from virtual school or virtual learning programs that typically have gone through an official process of establishing a school, adopting an online curriculum, and creating a dedicated structure to support students enrolled in the school. Remote learning provides an opportunity for students and teachers to remain connected and engaged with the content while working from their homes. Opportunities for remote learning are typically linked to emergency situations that pose a threat to student safety. Transitioning to remote learning can keep students on track so that when they return to physical school environments, they will not need to complete a lot of make-up work to be ready for any scheduled assessments. Many of the requirements in a traditional classroom environment will be in play for remote learning environments, and the goal is to adhere to as many state and local requirements as possible. It is important to note that in remote learning environments, versus virtual learning environments, the learner and teacher are not accustomed to being apart during instruction. This may pose a challenge to both teacher and learner that can be accommodated for through specific support structures.

For regular updates on remote learning resources, visit techlearning.com

4

| S PE C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R R EMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Defining Remote Learning

THE REMOTE LEARNING

EXPERIENCE

The structure of remote learning will determine the success students and teachers will have with the experience. Oftentimes, remote learning is evoked during a time of stress so it is important not to add more duties to teachers and students. To be most effective with remote learning, a well-defined structure needs to be in place so it can support a well-developed instruction plan.

Structure The most significant elements of this type of learning include time, communication, technology, and lesson design. Clearly defining these elements up front helps to remove distractions from learning.

Time is the first thing schools need to consider because it sets expectations and boundaries for both students and teachers. In particular, it’s important to establish when to start the school day and how many hours it will entail. First and foremost, teachers should define a set time period during the day when they will be available to students. Make sure these “office hours” are clearly communicated so students know when the teacher will be available to respond promptly to needs. Sometimes, teachers will want to connect in real time, or synchronously, with a student or groups of students. These types of connections can be done through videoconferencing, chat, or by phone. Apps such as FaceTime, Google Hangouts, Skype, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, or WhatsApp, can be used to provide these synchronous connections. Students should be instructed on how much time they need to spend working on assignments and other activities outlined in lessons. If there is an expectation for students to check in regularly, then that needs to be communicated as well. The “office hour” concept can also be used so that multiple students can communicate in chat sessions simultaneously, enabling more touch points between the teacher and students.

COMMUNICATION Communication is another aspect that needs to be clearly determined at the onset of the remote learning experience. Students should know exactly how and when they are expected to communicate with the teacher. Is email preferred to an online chat? Should all communication be within the designated technology tool? What if that tool is not working? What is the backup plan for communication? Each of these questions should be answered in an introduction document that sets all of the expectations. In addition to how the student should communicate with the teacher, expectations should also be set for how and how frequently the teacher will be in touch with the student. For example, it should be made clear that assignments that would typically have a one- to two-day turnaround in a traditional classroom will have the same turnaround in a remote learning environment.

6

| S PE C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R R EMO T E LEA RN I N G

FIZKES/GETTY IMAGES

TIME

Teachers should be provided 24 to 72 hours to complete grading of assignments, depending on length and complexity. When assignments are returned to students, comments and notes explaining the grading should be included, ideally with more detail than usual since there may be no immediate opportunity for a student to ask questions upon receiving the grade. The more feedback that can be provided during the grading process, the better the student will feel about the work and the more confident they will feel about continuing with future assignments.

TECHNOLOGY Technology can vary in impromptu remote learning environments. If schools allow students to take home devices, then the students should be ready to learn. Some schools do not have devices to send home, so students must find ways to access materials provided through technology systems. Districts that do not typically engage in remote learning or virtual learning in their traditional calendars need to provide alternative ways for students to receive and return assignments. For example, one technology that has stood the test of time is paper. Sending packets of materials home with a stamped and addressed return envelope (either addressed to the school, the teacher or other location) is one way to continue schooling during a crisis situation. (See more in the Low Tech Solutions on page 30.) Schools need to provide very clear information on how to access any online platform during remote learning, especially if students, parents and teachers are not accustomed to using such tools on a regular basis. Technical support also needs to be provided throughout the district and not be the responsibility of the teacher, who will have enough to keep up with in the remote learning environment. Clear information describing steps for troubleshooting and contact information for additional technical support should be easily available for everyone.

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Defining Remote Learning LESSON DESIGN Designing lessons for remote delivery is a little more detailed than creating a lesson that will be delivered in person simply because in person you can read the class and determine if students are understanding and then make adjustments on the fly. In a remote environment, one must assume there will be a lack of understanding and include extensions and remediations in the lesson design. A typical remote lesson might include the following components: ROBERT DALY/GETTY IMAGES

Setting the Lesson • Setting the lesson provides context for the lesson and links it to previous or future lessons. It helps the learner understand what they will be doing and why. Define Lesson Objectives • Objectives would be the same in a remote environment as in a face-to-face environment. But the objectives do need to be written into the lesson and it is a good practice to bold the words that emphasize the action of the learning and the outcome. ˚ Example: Capacity to work theoretically and practically in the processes of disaster management (disaster risk reduction, response, and recovery) and relate their interconnections, particularly in the field of the Public Health aspects of the disasters.

The lesson design template below is a suggestion of how the formatting and flow of a lesson would work remotely. Teachers have already spent time and effort preparing their traditional lessons and now must transition them to a remote experience, but the transition shouldn’t be exacerbating. A simple presentation template could be provided to faculty to modify their current plans for the remote environment. The transition should be made as easy as possible for the teacher and student. Clearly written Learner Objectives should be provided in accessible language that is consistent with the text or other materials being referenced, and should identify an approximate total time on task. The time it will take for a student to complete a lesson will vary and depend on the grade level, subject matter, and teacher. Lesson time will be modified; for example, a 45-minute traditional lesson may only be a 20-minute remote learning lesson. Activities and assignments should have clear directions and a sample should be provided so that students know what the finished product should look like. A rubric is helpful, as are any descriptions/checklists that can be provided related to grading. Ending a lesson with reflective questions allows for students to not only reflect on their experience, but also provides valuable feedback on improving lesson design.

Assess Current Understanding • Create a poll or checklist for students to self assess what they know. This will help them focus on content they aren’t as familiar with as they move through a lesson. Introduce Content • Example: Watch video on disaster management and read pp. 158 – 213 in your text. Then log into Google Hangouts at noon for teacher presentation of content. Assign Application Activity • Example: Create an outline for a disaster management plan that addresses risk reduction, response, and recovery. Follow link to activity rubric. Assess Mastery • Example: Complete 5 question quiz on disaster management planning.

Find a downloadable Remote Learning Lesson Template here.

8

| S PE C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


JOSE LUIS PELAEZ INC/GETTY IMAGES

Designing a Remote Learning Plan

Designing a remote learning plan should ideally be done when creating the district’s emergency preparedness plan. This section will define the components of a plan and provide samples from districts with completed and distributed plans.

10

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

Home Access Survey Hopefully, districts have an idea of what type of access parents may have at home, although they may not know what devices are available. If time allows, a short survey should be administered to determine which families may need support in setting up an online environment in their homes for remote learning (see Sample Parent Access Survey Letter on page 12). This would primarily be the case if the majority of families has access and the district is rolling out an online remote learning plan. Some families may be in need of special assistance, and certain internet providers offer subsidized programs to these families and to schools to support connectivity in homes. Another option is to share wireless hotspots with families through the school library or a centralized district distribution location. In addition to loaner hotspots, districts may need to loan tablets or Chromebooks to students. A procedure should be developed by which students and parents sign a loaner agreement (see Sample Device Loan Agreement on page 16) and take the device home from the school. These devices can be borrowed from classroom sets or roaming carts. A precise inventory should be maintained so that it is clear which devices are going home with students. All devices should work properly and have the latest updates prior to being loaned out. Care and feeding directions should be shared with families so that they know exactly how to manage the devices while in their homes. Cables and power plugs should also accompany every device.

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


SAMPLE PARENT ACCESS SURVEY LETTER

From LaGrange Highlands District 106 (IL) Dear Highlands Families, As you know, schools around the state and around the country are making plans to ensure the education of your children will continue in the event that schools must close due to the Corona Virus. Highlands is no different. To make sure that all of our students have access to the tools they need to participate in meaningful learning activities at home we are asking that ALL families participate in this very brief survey about your ability to support e-Learning at home. If you have children in kindergarten through third grade, you will also be asked to agree to our terms of use for district iPads. This will allow us to send district iPads home with any child who may need one. With the unpredictable path that the virus is spreading, we would like to start sending devices home with our K-4 students nightly just in case. The survey will help us determine individual family needs for support and should only take a few seconds and it is vital that we hear from 100% of District 106 families. Please follow the link below, sign-in to the district website, and take the survey as soon as possible. District 106 Survey Questions For the survey, District 106 included a link that pointed parents to the log-in page for the district website where they looked up all of the children associated with them. * If the child was in a 1-1 grade (2-8), the district didn’t ask parents if they had a device for eLearning as they knew the child already had been provided one through the school. * The district listed students in K–1 by name and asked parents if they had a device available for each child. The district also asked each family if they had internet access available through either Wifi or cell phone, or shared access in an apartment or with a neighbor. If families did not have a device suitable for learning or internet access, the district provided them.

If you have any questions about the survey or are having technical difficulties accessing it, reach out to me. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated. Thank you. Eric Callis, Technology Director LaGrange Highlands School District 106

12

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Designing a Remote Learning Plan Lesson Content Districts should assess what content they have available that can be accessed from home. Recognizing great content is important to a successful transition to remote learning. Content needs to be engaging and align with existing lessons and should be easy to navigate for both teacher and student. Many students are familiar with digital content and elearning but may not be accustomed to using this type of content for remote learning. This is also not the time to try a new product that will require getting accustomed to or that deviates too much from the curriculum currently being covered. Using existing digital resources that are either subscriptions or accompany text adoptions, or using Open Educational Resources (OER), are the best options for remote learning. Remember, the goal is to be as seamless as possible in covering the curriculum and to cause as little disruption as possible to lesson and unit flow. OER include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software and many other tools, materials, and techniques used to support access to knowledge. Additionally, these resources follow the 5R Framework.

The 5Rs of Openness What does it mean for a learning resource to be “open?” The 5R framework defines the major characteristics of “open” content. The 5Rs of OER are: Retain the right to make, own, and control copies of the content Reuse the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video) Revise the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language) Remix the right to combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup) Redistribute the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend) This material was created by David Wiley and published freely under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license at: http://opencontent.org/blog/ archives/3221

14

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

9 WAYS TO SURVIVE AND THRIVE WHILE TEACHING AND LEARNING REMOTELY by Ellen Ullman As the world attempts to try and contain the spread of the coronavirus, both parents and students are setting up to work and learn at home. We asked school administrators that are managing these emerging remote learning systems for their recommendations. 1. Keep track of your passwords. That sticky note on your corkboard with all of your passwords didn’t make it home? No problem, as long as you use a password manager like LastPass or Dashlane. 2. Find the right place to work. Consider lighting, sound, and interruptions such as a dog that barks when the wind blows. If you’ll be doing videoconferencing, be very intentional about your space— especially the background. If you have roommates, housemates, or children, you might want to put up a “Busy Working” sign. 3. Buy good headphones. (Or invest in a masseuse and a chiropractor.) 4. Time management is paramount. Build a schedule for the day and hold yourself to it. Make sure to include breaks and time to stand up. 5. Have a backup internet plan. Whether it’s a hotspot or the nearest Starbucks, know what you’ll do when the guy down the street cuts down a tree and hits the telephone pole. (True story!) 6. Ensure you have access to every resource you need.  Many companies still have internal resources accessible only within the company network. Make sure your laptop has virtual private networking (VPN) software and that you’ve established communication protocol via email, phone, cell phone, and instant messaging. In addition, learn how to use a VPN in case you’ll need to remotely access servers or files while working from home. 7. Understand your home wireless capacity. If you need to engage via Zoom or Google Hangouts, can your in-home wireless support it?  8. Ask for tutorials and other support. Can your company’s IT director create a webpage with “cheat sheets” and other resources? One K-12 technology director made short instructional videos using Screencastify and put them on a private YouTube channel. Another option is to have training sessions using Google Hangouts Meet. 9. Communicate regularly. Use Google Hangouts or other videoconferencing platforms to hold regular meetings. If people are isolated, these will serve as great morale boosters and keep everyone in the loop and on track.

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


SAMPLE DEVICE LOAN AGREEMENT

Name _____________________________________

I agree that I am responsible for returning this laptop on time in the same condition as when I borrowed it. I understand that: 1. If, after an IT staff inspection, it is determined that I damaged the laptop screen, hardware and/or casing, I will be charged repair or replacement costs. 2. If after an IT staff inspection, it is determined that I did not return all cables or accessories, I will be charged replacement costs. 3. If I tamper with the equipment, I will be charged to repair or replace the laptop and any cables or accessories and may also be subject to disciplinary action. 4. If I fail to return the laptop on time, to the same location from which I borrowed it, I will be fined $20 for the first 30 minutes and $20 for each successive 30 minutes after the due time, up to the total cost of a replacement laptop. 5. IT is not responsible for damage to data caused by viruses that may exist on the network or are spread through the network or stem from software malfunctions. 6. IT is not responsible for damage to external drives or any other devices plugged into the laptop. 7. I cannot save files on the laptop’s hard drive and must save my files by copying them to another location (for example a USB flash drive). All files left on the laptop will be erased. IT accepts no responsibility for lost files. 8. I agree to abide by the District Computing Policies. I understand that by borrowing this laptop, I am responsible for its return. I agree never to leave the laptop unattended or in someone else’s care. If the laptop is stolen while on loan to me, I am responsible for the entire replacement cost of the equipment.

Parent Signature _____________________________________

District Official Signature _____________________________________

Date_____________________

16

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Designing a Remote Learning Plan Openly licensed educational resources offer two main benefits: free access to the content, resource, journal article, data, knowledge artifact, software or standard; and a formal grant of rights and permissions giving the user many of the rights and permissions copyright normally

Type of Digital Content

reserves exclusively for the creator or other rights holder. In short, open equals free access and open licensing to retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute. Below is a chart describing the variations of digital learning options:

Flexibility to Use for Remote Learning

Cost

Licensing

Example

Open Educational Resources

Free or minimal cost (non-electronic print costs)

Open licensing (Creative Commons or other)

License permits the free use and repurposing of content by others, although some restrictions may apply.

Creative Commons

Free Digital Learning Resources

Free

Copyright

Owner has the right to control the copying and dissemination of an original work

Smithsonian Education

State Digital Learning Repository

Free (some states require state credentials to access)

Open licensing and copyright

Many state repositories include both open and copyrighted materials. Flexibility depends upon the type of resource.

Tennessee Digital Library

More resources can be found on the Tech & Learning website with live links. See a sample elearning lesson from LaGrange Highlands District 106 (IL) on page 20.

18

Communications

Training

A major component of any plan is how you plan to communicate it to others. Parents need to be reassured and provided clear directions on what to do to support their child’s learning as well as information on where to check to find more information. If using a call out system, be sure to let parents know the time of day to expect a call and be consistent with that time for the duration of the event. Any information sent via a phone message, text message or email should also be saved on the parent portal. This enables parents who may have missed the message to find it in a known location. If you don’t have a parent portal, provide the information on the district website parent page. Using local television news channels and radio news stations are other ways to keep the public informed and provide direction on where parents may find information. The clearer and more concise the information provided, the less stress parents and school staff will experience.

Preparing for emergency situations should be an ongoing practice. That said, if time has not been available to thoroughly train staff in the procedures or practices that will be executed during an emergency, then some type of on-the-fly training may be necessary. Teachers and staff must know what their role is during an emergency event and need to be prepared to teach in an alternative way. Using online training courses is probably the most effective way to inform teachers and provide an ongoing resource. If online training is not available or you do not have time to create a course, then connecting via videoconferencing or participating in webinars are good options. Staff development support should be available to teachers throughout an event, including phone numbers. Staff also need to be updated and informed in a timely manner. See a sample letter for faculty from Atlanta Public Schools on page 22.

| S P E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


TLL04.AD_.indd 12

3/30/20 6:05 PM


SAMPLE ELEARNING LESSON

From LaGrange Highlands District 106 (IL) Hallmarks of a Highlands Elearning Lesson Design 1. Clearly stated Learner Objective(s)­—accessible language. 2. Objective(s) should flow within the current unit. 3. State an approximate total time-on-task for students. a. Time-on-task will vary depending on the grade, class, teacher, and subject area. Teachers will assign approximately 20-30 minutes of elearning material for each class taught. Therefore, the total amount of work a student receives should be approximately 2-3 hours of learning material, depending on the grade level. The following times are a reasonable estimate of the time expectations by grade level: • ECE: 1 hour • K-2: 2 hours • 3-4: 2 ½ hours • 5-8: 3-3 ½ hours 4. Provide clear directions—either written or even a posted video announcement from you. 5. Be explicit about how specific and timely feedback will be provided for the learning experience (instructor- or software-provided). 6. Please include a survey (Schoology quiz or Google Form) at the end of your lesson that asks the following two questions and uses the responses for individual reflection and continuous improvement toward the next elearning day: a. How much time did you spend completing this activity? b. Did this activity help you learn what you were supposed to learn? Other: • Provide your office hours in Schoology or Seesaw for your students. Teacher office hours: ˚ 10:00-11:30 a.m. ˚ 1:00-3:30 p.m. • Staff will have 1 hour during the day for planning/PD to meet the 5-hour minimum as required by ISBE. • Students and parents should know the optimal method for communicating with you during office hours (i.e., email, Schoology, Chat, Seesaw). • Teachers should post lessons to Schoology by 8:30 AM of the elearning day but certainly may post lessons/assignments/information any time leading up to that day. • Students will have a 72-hour window to complete the work for your course. While you may suggest that it is in the student’s best interest to complete the work on elearning day, you may not require that it is due that day. Students are allowed to utilize the entire 72-hour window to submit their work for attendance purposes. • Students are marked present for the day if all required work is submitted within the 72-hour window. Attendance will be marked in PowerSchool. Find a downloadable Remote Learning Lesson Template here.

20

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T: THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Prepare for the new frontier. Make sure your students are coming back to a safer, faster, automated deployment of classroom technology. Available now with Antimicrobial coating *

Simply Better The only 100% Student Managed charging solution offers a dedicated shelf for each student, minimizing their touches and providing a no-touch model for teachers. Now available with an antimicrobial coating and an optional cleaning caddy** that conveniently stores sanitizing wipes for students to clean devices after use. Prepare your classrooms for the new frontier with PowerGistics Towers for education. CLICK HERE TO CONTACT US NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO REQUEST A QUOTE Reclaim 21+ days in the classroom, per year.

PowerGistics puts Education First

21+ DAYS

The Open-Door concept allows teachers to visually inventory returned devices, creating a 100% Student Managed classroom charging solution for students of all ages and abilities. Empower your teachers with regained instructional hours, and empower your students by teaching the important responsibility of caring for their own devices.

Versatile Mounting Options All PowerGistics Towers are wall mountable, with options to transform into a stand or roller. Designed to seamlessly integrate and evolve as your deployment evolves. Mounting versatility ensures your district is always future-ready.

A+

By removing the barrier to STUDENT accessing technology in a REPORT classroom, PowerGistics CARD allows classroom devices to become powerful educational tools with measurable results. Not only do teachers have more time to teach, hours of IT staff time is saved too. The patented cable management gives IT staff the freedom to move forward rather than untangle the decisions of the past.

*Antimicrobial agents kill or slow growth of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, protozoans, and fungi such as mold and mildew. Antimicrobial coating available as an option with all Towers. **Cleaning caddy sold as accessory.

CALL NOW FOR 844.205.1217 PWRG 1041 TNL Playbook April 2020

www.powergistics.com

LIFETIME WARRANTY


SAMPLE LETTER TO FACULTY

From Atlanta Public Schools School Leaders, In an effort to ensure continuous learning for our students, the Department of Instructional Technology has developed a Distance Learning Plan for the District. In case of a District closure, school leaders should look to this plan for guidance on how to move forward with the process of teaching and learning. A detailed task list has been provided to your Media Specialist, Media Administrator and Educational Technology Specialist (ETS). A few points to consider: • Please move forward with sending Tablet2Read devices and chargers home for 1st and 2nd Grade students. • Please move forward with sending Digital Bridge Devices home for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. The Distance Learning Plan builds on the APS WeatherWise lessons that teachers have already created. Teachers should have 3 days’ worth of lessons completed. If the District closes for more than 3 days, teachers will need to add more content to their Google Classroom. While we have a minimum of 3 assignments being created in advance, it is highly recommended that teachers go ahead and begin creating additional assignments. Teachers should also begin pulling together alternative assignments that can be sent home quickly for students who do not have a device or Internet access. Principals should ensure that these assignments/packets are prepared in advance and disseminated on a day that we might have to close a school. Please complete the following survey to determine your readiness for distance learning: http://tinyAPS.com/?Distance_Learning_Survey Example of tasks by grade levels are as follows: Elementary School Preparedness: • Ensure all Pre-K and Kindergarten teachers are familiar with the Pre-K and Kindergarten Flyer of Activities ˚ Link to Pre-K PDF Flyer ˚ Link to Kindergarten PDF Flyer • Ensure teachers have a minimum of three days’ worth of lessons in Google Classroom (ETSs and/or Media Specialists can show you how to monitor this) • Ensure teachers and students can access MyOn online eBook platform and Fulton County Library system via CLASSPass • On Tablet2Read devices: Media Specialists should download 20 eBooks to students devices so they can read off-line. • Ensure students and teachers can access and use TutorATL • Ensure teachers and students can access the eResource folder in myBackPack Middle School Preparedness: • Ensure teachers have a minimum of three days’ worth of lessons in Google Classroom or Microsoft Teams • Media Specialists should ensure that students know how to access their MyOn eBook Dashboard and Fulton County Library system via CLASSPass • Ensure students and teachers can access and use TutorATL • Ensure teachers and students can access the eResource folder in myBackPack High School Preparedness: • Ensure teachers know how to access and assign a course in the Edgenuity system (Atlanta Virtual Academy) • Ensure students and teachers can access and use TutorATL • Ensure teachers and students can access Fulton County Library system via CLASSPass • Ensure teachers and students can access the eResource folder in myBackPack Additional point to consider: • Your teachers should start taking home their laptops and chargers daily in the event that we have to cancel school with little notice. They should also bring home their instructional materials that might be required for creating assignments online. • It is highly recommended that every school do a “practice run” of a virtual learning experience at their schools to ensure that all teachers and students understand how to engage in the virtual learning experience. Teachers should post an assignment, video, or discussion and have students respond. Your ETS and Media Specialists can assist with this. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you need any clarification or additional support.

22

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Remote or in class, ® Lexia Learning has you covered. Lexia® Learning is here to support students, educators, and families as we deal with this global pandemic. We’re living in a changing world, but if we work together we can keep student learning moving forward. • Online, student-driven learning • Embedded progress monitoring • Scripted, skill-specific offline lessons • On-demand data reports for teachers and administrators

visit us at lexialearning.com © 2020 Lexia Learning, a Rosetta Stone company.


Designing a Remote Learning Plan A Day in the Life of Remote Learning The time schedule and use of technology may vary from class to class, but expectations for teacher and student communication and lesson design should be consistent for all remote learning days. All instruction should be available to the students at the time school would normally begin. In other words, if the school day begins at 8 AM, then all instructional content for that day should be available to the student at 8 AM. Students working in more of a correspondence mode will not have to worry as much about this except to know that the teacher will be available in real time at start of school time, but online instruction should be posted by start of school day, if not before. The goal of remote learning is to keep the students in as normal a pattern for learning as possible.

Students should identify a location in their home that is quiet and has the necessary tools (technology, internet, desk, etc.) for learning. When involved in elearning, students should take breaks every 20 to 30 minutes to reduce eye strain. Parents should be available to answer their child’s questions and offer guidance but should not complete the work on behalf of the student. Completing work independently is the goal of remote learning. Assignments should be designed so that students can complete them with little assistance. Instruction and assignments should be modified so less time will be spent working remotely as compared with the traditional setting. Students will also need a place to communicate with their classroom friends and activities related to socializing in a remote environment. Puzzles, online treasure hunts, and discussion questions are some examples of engaging students with one another beyond lessons. Lessons don’t necessarily have to be completed individually, either. Most online platforms allow for collaborative working environments. In addition to students needing to remain connected, parents will need tools to receive regular updates. Districts may use call out systems, online postings, websites, or text messaging to ensure parents are included in daily communication.

TAKING ATTENDANCE Attendance during remote elearning varies from attendance in virtual learning instances. In remote learning, the goal is to simulate the daily activities of a regular school setting as much as possible during a period of time where it is not possible to conduct school as usual. So, regular attendance rules most likely apply as noted in Teachers should communicate availability by noting the times and the manner in which they will be available. It could even vary within the day for the teacher. At 8AM, the teacher may be available in online chat until 10 AM. From 10 to 11 AM, the teacher may be in a Google Hangouts or Microsoft Teams and able to video conference with the students. The teacher can then resume availability between 1 and 2:30 PM via chat, and also be available via email from noon until 3 PM. There should be no expectation to contact the teacher outside of the hours posted. Just as in traditional school settings, time boundaries need to be honored. If the teacher sees students are struggling with a particular assignment, a synchronous (real-time) meeting may be called in Google Hangouts or Microsoft Teams. Either environment allows the teacher to share a screen while providing direct instruction via teleconference.

24

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T: THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

THERE SHOULD BE NO EXPECTATION TO CONTACT THE TEACHER OUTSIDE OF THE HOURS POSTED. JUST AS IN TRADITIONAL SCHOOL SETTINGS, TIME BOUNDARIES NEED TO BE HONORED. each states guidelines. With this in mind, attendance should be taken daily in the student information system. It can be determined based on students logging in to a learning system (LMS), emailing or texting their instructors, participating in a video conference, or communicating in some agreedupon fashion with their teachers. This is necessary during remote learning because it is intended to simulate the practices and policies of the district during traditional schedules.

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Elearning Resources Companies APEX LEARNING

If your district needs to close, Apex Learning has a Learning Continuity Program that can help you continue to provide high-quality education for your 6-12 students and make the transition to a virtual situation as easy and fast as possible. Our implementation experts are providing assistance, at no charge, to help districts plan, prepare and quickly launch their virtual learning programs. Contact Apex for more information: 1-800-453-1454.

AT&T

AT&T’s Control Center features include: a pooling plan moved to threshold; resets at end of bill cycle to original plan; diagnostics and online billing; devices that can be shipped to every student; access for BYOB districts; and built-in filters.

BRAINPOP

Navigating the outbreak of an illness can be difficult for both kids and grown-ups, so BrainPOP has created a number of free coronavirus resources­—in English, Spanish, and French. The Coronavirus topic on BrainPOP has an accompanying lesson plan. BrainPOP is also creating distance learning packets and a variety of tips for parents.

BRITANNICA

Britannica has made available COVID-19 emergency resources to every school in the U.S. Get free access to Britannica LaunchPacks, for social studies and science, being leveraged by schools across the world who are grappling with shutdowns, conducting virtual lessons, and working to minimize the impact on students, families, and staff.

GAGGLE

Gaggle is continuing to support its district partners through this complicated and challenging time. Our student safety tools keep a close eye on how students are doing in this ‘new normal’ of going to school from home, helping districts identify those who may be struggling with being isolated or the dramatic change in their daily routine. Gaggle can give you peace of mind knowing that your students’ mental health and safety are being monitored both during and after school hours in this new distance learning environment. Contact us to discuss how we can help your students stay safe.

GALE, A CENGAGE COMPANY

In response to COVID-19, Gale, a Cengage Company is offering open access to digital resources, training support, and reference materials. We created a resource center to help our educator and librarian partners, as well as community members, find reliable information and materials to go virtual, optimize existing resources, enhance instruction, provide accurate health information, and more. Check back often as more will be added.

GOGUARDIAN

GoGuardian is offering free, full-functional access to its entire suite of tools through the end of the school year. This includes at-home web filtering, classroom management, device management, and student safety tools to support schools as they transition to remote learning. In addition, current GoGuardian customers can receive free access to additional tools and can expand license counts temporarily as needed. Visit GoGuardian here to learn more.

LEXIA LEARNING

Allows teachers to create a free website/blog for your students to access your instructional content.

Lexia Learning, A Rosetta Stone Company, offers Lexia® Core5® Reading, the technology-based reading instruction that provides explicit, systematic, personalized learning on fundamental literacy skills for students of all abilities in grades Pre-K–5. With the addition of Lexia®PowerUp Literacy® for struggling and nearly-proficient readers in grades six and above, and Lexia® RAPID™ Assessment for screening and monitoring reading and language skills for all students in grades K–12, Lexia continues its promise to improve student achievement by leveraging technology to personalize learning and simplify the use of data to drive instruction.

DIGITAL LEARNING COLLABORATIVE

KAHOOT

ELEARNING LEARNING

eLearning Learning provides a robust set of templates that are easy to download as well as instructions on using open or free resources.

EDUBLOGGER

Offers thousands of resources and tips for digital learning.

DISCOVERY EDUCATION

Discovery Education has created a three-pronged response that includes having created a special channel within Discovery Education Experience—the Viruses and Outbreak Channel—that features digital content for educators to discuss the Coronavirus outbreak with students. This content includes timely updates on what the Coronavirus is, information on how infectious diseases spread, and essential guidelines for staying healthy.

Kahoot is offering premium distance learning tools for free.

MICROSOFT EDUCATION

The Microsoft Education Team is offering webinars and preparing resources. Microsoft Teams is available for free to educational institutions through the Office 365 A1 offer. In addition, educators in the U.S., Italy, Japan, and South Korea transition can receive a free sixth-month subscription to Office 365 A5, which provides access to live events and audio conferencing, hosting for meetings for up to 10,000 attendees, and access for students in low-bandwidth areas by including public telephone network dial-in information for their online classes.  CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 ❱

26

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R RE MO T E L E A RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


You don’t have to figure out remote learning on your own. We’ve spent years learning how technology can make education more collaborative. Now, we’re hosting FREE webinars and Q&A sessions to share what we’ve learned — and we’re inviting you to join. Whether you’re a Clear Touch® customer or not, we’re here to help. We’re in this together.

Visit getcleartouch.com/remote-learning

to access interactive resources that will help you connect with your students, their families, and other educators across the country.

TLL04.AD_.indd 14

getcleartouch.com/remote-learning

4/16/20 9:06 AM


Elearning Resources ❱ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

POWERGISTICS TOWERS

PowerGistics Towers are the space, time, and cost saving vertical alternative to traditional laptop charging carts in the classroom. Designed to enhance the learning environment by removing the barrier for students to access their classroom devices, our 100% student managed charging solution returns an average of 55 hours of instructional time to teachers each year.

SOFTCHALK

SoftChalk is offering free access to SoftChalk Cloud from now through May 31, 2020 to anyone who may need it to quickly and easily create online lessons and course materials for delivery to students.

TURNITIN

RoboKind announced the advanced release of their District Enterprise robots4STEM® Avatar Version software to provide virtual coding instruction at no cost for students in districts that are experiencing school closures due to the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak through June 30, 2020. Educators can learn more in this video and this video.

Turnitin offers the following landing pages and whitepapers filled with free instructional and assessment resources that can be adapted to your new remote learning environment: Academic Integrity, Source Credibility, Social Studies, Science/STEM, Turning Plagiarism into Teachable Moments, Advanced Placement, Paraphrasing, and The Plagiarism Spectrum. You can also watch relevant on-demand webinars like The Importance of Teacher Self Care and Teaching Time Management to 6th – 12th Graders.

SMART TECHNOLOGIES

TYPING AGENT

ROBOKIND

SMART Technologies is providing complimentary SMART Learning Suite Online subscriptions and several resources to support educators and the community Sign-up here for full access to SMART Learning Suite Online (www.smarttech.com/slsanywhere) at no cost. This will give you and your students access to powerful tools for active distance learning and lesson creation and delivery on any device including Chromebook™ computers. At https://www.smarttech.com there are also several resources to help quickly train teachers on how to best use SMART Learning Suite Online in a remote learning environment, as well as offer ideas, lesson plans and support.

Typing Agent is a remote ready K12 gamified and self-paced solution that teaches students keyboarding, digital citizenship, and how to type code. They are offering extended free trials of their full version to all new schools and districts for unlimited students until June 2020 who are closing for COVID-19.

Organizations OPEN EDUCATIONAL APPLICATIONS AND PLATFORMS CURATED BY UNESCO

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL RESOURCES

STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION

UNESCO offers a wide variety of links to open resources that can be used to set up an online environment for remote learning. They also have a section for low tech helpful to communities with little or no internet connection.

The U.S. CDC has a robust site offering resources on managing health conditions in schools as well as training and professional development for elearning. The site has links to other resources and downloadable PDFs.

The U.S. DOE website offers guidance to state departments on preparedness for emergency management, cleaning and disinfecting information, and links to CDC Guidance.

The U.S. DOE website offers a comprehensive contact list, including website links, for each state’s department of education and higher education agency. Select your state and find all of the current contact information details.

For a regularly updated, curated list featuring hundreds of companies offering free elearning opportunities, visit Tech & Learning.

28

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R RE MO T E L E A RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


Low/No Tech Solutions Not every district has devices for every student and every student may not have internet access at home. Using paper packets may be an option during this time. Be sure to provide good instructions around pick up and drop off times and directions for mailing, if applicable.

SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN DEALING WITH PAPER PACKETS ARE: Are packets mailed or picked up at the school? If mailed, be sure to send a self-addressed stamped envelope in the packet for the student to return to the school. If picked up, remember the coronavirus can live on inanimate objects for an extended period of time. For precaution, be sure to place a hand sanitizer beside the bin where packets are picked up and dropped off. Send plenty of materials home in packets, but don’t assume students will have access to paper and pencils. All learning materials should be packaged in the packet going home if at all possible. If it is possible for the buildings to be open, teachers can utilize school equipment to create packets and parents can pick up and drop off the packets at the school. If school access is not available, UPS and FedEx each offer mailbox services. District emergency preparedness plans should include establishing a relationship with one of these providers for emergency remote learning situations. HOW CAN INTERACTION BE INCORPORATED? Telephones are an available resource for most people, so if necessary, try to incorporate some phone conversations into your remote learning experience. If possible, include more than one student on the call so they can touch base with one another and feel connected to their classmates. If it isn’t possible to utilize a phone, ask students to keep journals or create collages of what they are doing during their remote time. These can be shared when students return and help students feel connected while they are apart because they are preparing a story to share with their class. UTILIZE EXISTING RESOURCES Send textbooks home to students during this time. Be sure to have a sanitizing procedure in place for when the books return. Send library books home for students and utilize the same sanitizing procedure.

WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM

| S PEC I A L REPO RT : T H E JU S T I N T I ME PLA YBO O K F O R R E M O TE L E A R NI NG |

29


Remote Learning Planning Checklist STRUCTURE DEFINED ❏ The daily time commitments have been decided and agreed upon by all required parties ❏ A communication plan has been developed informing families, teachers, staff, and the public. ❏ The technology plan has been reviewed and hardware and software are ready to be deployed. ❏ Resource materials are ready to be checked out to students. ❏ A process for picking up and dropping off tangible materials has been created. TECHNOLOGY PLANNING ❏ Loaner agreements signed ❏ Devices loaded with necessary software and filters ❏ Wifi configured and included with loaner agreement ❏ Software licenses updated for required users COMMUNICATION PLANNING ❏ Teacher communication plan ready to distribute and staff prepared to update regularly ❏ Parent communication plan ready to distribute and staff prepared to update regularly ❏ Public communications with news and radio scheduled LESSON PLANNING ❏ Five days of lessons are prepared and ready to distribute online ❏ Five days of materials are packaged and ready to distribute ❏ Library books checked out to students ❏ Textbooks sent home with students ❏ Directions for online lessons provided to each child ❏ Directions for correspondence packets have been provided to families STAFF PLANNING ❏ All staff know and understand their role in supporting students and families ❏ All staff understand how they are to receive information and share information with others ❏ All staff have the necessary tools to carry out their respective roles ❏ All staff know who they must communicate with should they become unavailable to work This form was created by K20Connect, a Concierge Consulting Services for K20.

30

| SP E C IA L R E P OR T: THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| WWW.TECHLEARNING.COM


9000

Profile for Future PLC

Tech & Learning.com - Remote Learning 2020  

Tech & Learning.com - Remote Learning 2020

Tech & Learning.com - Remote Learning 2020  

Tech & Learning.com - Remote Learning 2020