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ANNUAL REPORT


Contents 04

26

05

30

06

37

About FUSA

Student Council & Staff

Student President

Events

Media

40

09

42

22

44

Student Council

Student Assist

Level 1 Student Hub Flinders University Bedford Park (08) 8201 2371 fusa@flinders.edu.au

Financial Report

Clubs

08

Manager, Student Engagement

47

Elections

Student Representation

Development Grants

FB.com/fusassociation Instagram.com/ fusassociation twitter.com/ fusassociation

Flinders University Student Association acknowledges the traditional owners of the various locations that Flinders University operates on and recognises the continued relationship and responsibility to these lands and waters by traditional owners past and present. The following is an indicative (but not exhaustive) list of traditional owners on whose country Flinders University has campuses: Arrernte, Boandik, Bungarla, Gunditjmara, Jawoyn, Kaurna, Larrakia, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Peramangk, Ramindjeri, Wurundjeri, Yolgnu.


ABOUT FUSA Flinders University Student Association (FUSA) is the independent body representing the views and interests of the students of Flinders University. FUSA is charged with the promotion and advancement of the rights, interests, and welfare of students as well as the provision of a vibrant student experience and campus culture that promotes a sense of community and belonging. An elected Student Council provide the governance and direction of FUSA. The services that FUSA provide include: • Student representation • Academic advocacy,

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financial counselling and welfare services • Administration of student clubs, societies and academic associations • Student events and activities and • Student managed communication and media, including the student magazine, Empire Times Under the FUSA Constitution the function and purpose of FUSA is to: • Promote and advance the rights, interests and welfare of students • Represent students within and outside the University • Co-ordinate and support

activities for students, including the provision of support for affiliated clubs • Provide the means for effective communication between students, the Association and the University • Oversee the delivery of student services, which are funded from the Student Services and Amenities Fee and are the responsibility of the Manager, Student Engagement • Deliver other services, amenities and programs for students funded from the membership fee and other income received by the Association


STUDENT COUNCIL

staff

STUDENT PRESIDENT Jordon O’Reilly

MANAGER, STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Chris O’Grady

WOMEN’S OFFICER Grace Hensel

ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANTS Stacy White Nicholas Camac Amy Tschirn

WELFARE OFFICER Hilary Wigg

CLUBS & EVENTS OFFICER Adam Rau

QUEER OFFICER Khyle Milne

EVENTS & PROJECTS OFFICER Kate Donnelly Rachael Pollock

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OFFICER Ashley Sutherland DISABILITIES OFFICER Kate Gallagher MATURE AGE OFFICER Pauline Bullock (until office March 2017) Natasha Malone (from April 2017)

TEAM LEADER, STUDENT ASSIST Vanesa Duran Racero STUDENT FINANCE & ADVOCACY OFFICER Helen Laity E

R S

U N I V E

R I T

Y

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STUDENT ASSIST SUPPORT OFFICERS Elen Shute Michelle Tatyzo

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STUDENT ADVOCACY OFFICER Sue Myatt

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STUDENT REPRESENTATION SUPPORT OFFICER Sophie Amos

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GENERAL COUNCIL MEMBERS Amy Hueppauff Brodie McGee (until July 2017) Sean Cullen-Macaskill Laurence Lacoon-Williamson Meaghan King Sean Lamonby

STUDENT REPRESENTATION & DEVELOPMENT OFFICER Kate Walsh

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ENVIRONMENT OFFICER Jacinta Robinson

MEDIA ASSISTANTS Aaron Harvey Eric Ruehl Jess Nicole Kate Van der Horst Sarah Gates

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INDIGENOUS STUDENTS OFFICER Paige Leedham (until May 2017) Yaritji Green (from June 2017)

MEDIA OFFICER Steph Walker

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS OFFICER Vieshnavee Pandiyan

EVENTS ASSISTANTS Anthea Stanton Celina Rebola

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POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS OFFICER Katt Hatzi

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EDUCATION OFFICER Hamish Richardson

OFFICE COORDINATOR Fay Hart

F L

GENERAL SECRETARY Christopher Norman

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T

A S S O C

I A


student president report KEY INITIATIVES In 2017, the Australian Human Rights Commission released their report on sexual harassment and sexual assault on university campuses. This report found that 52% of Flinders students had been sexually harassed in 2016. Flinders was almost double the national average for the perpetrator being an academic staff member of the university. Most students didn’t think the sexual harassment they experienced at university was serious enough to report and some were unsure of who at the university could provide them with support or assistance. In 2017, the Flinders University Student Association (FUSA) secured an extra fifty thousand dollars in funding from the Student Services and Amenities Fee Advisory Committee towards a FUSA lead campaign around Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment. The campaign is set to launch in 2018 around how to ‘be a better human’. 2017 saw a unique focus by the Student Council to take on alternative revenue streams. We saw under Voluntary Student Unionism that student organisations that had low alternative revenue streams failed to survive. FUSA currently has very little of these streams. Student Council’s first step in building independent revenue was to invest in FUSA branded merchandise for sale. These Hoodies should drop in 2018. FUSA also launched our first Page 6 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

clothing OP shop which raised money for charity. We asked staff and students to donate clothes they no longer needed and then offered the clothes for sale for a gold coin donation. All donations were given to different charities to help support their causes.

as the 10% efficiency dividend and the attempts to lower the repayment threshold. We also had involvement with the NUS welfare department’s campaign to stop the cuts to penalty rates and supporting their student housing survey rollout.

KEY CAMPAIGNS

ADVOCACY

FUSA had great success in 2017 in taking part in the Marriage Equality postal survey. FUSA enrolled over 100 new voters, and also helped hundreds of students update their details to make sure they received their ballots. FUSA also was proud to support the YES! Campaign and encouraged all of its members to vote Yes! Student Council spent a substantial amount of time fighting cuts to staffing and the restructuring implemented in 2017. The 2025 agenda released by the University looked to disestablish a lot of crucial student support roles and amalgamate them. A lot of these changes were poorly planned and thought out and FUSA advocated as best as possible to lower the impact felt by students.

• Student Council representatives, in collaboration with Student Assist, contributed to feedback on proposed changes to the Research Higher Degrees policy • Changes to Flinders One and replacement vendors • The Student President contributed to discussions with Alere to ensure they are more student friendly and with Buildings and property with regards to replacement food vendors for Flinders One outlets • Submission to the South Australian Mental Health Commission

AFFILIATIONS FUSA once again affiliated to the National Union of Students (NUS) in 2017, continuing our long-standing support for the National Union. FUSA stood with NUS to oppose the government cuts to higher education such

FINAL COMMENT It’s been an absolute honour to have served as the 5th Student President at FUSA. The work that FUSA does is incredible and while most of what you see is the big bold important events such as O’Week and OFiesta, this organization is so imperative to not only the social side of your


time at University but also the academic part of your degree. Get involved in your Student Association, because its strength comes through the involvement of students in everything it does! Finally, to the 2017 Student Reps, it’s been a pleasure to work with you all. To the staff of FUSA, you are the lifeblood of this fantastic Student Association, and truly make a lot of the magic happen, I cannot thank you enough for all your help! Lastly, to the future Student Reps I wish you all the best in creating change. In Unity, Jordon O’Reilly 5th Student President 2017

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manager, student engagement report Thank you for taking the time to read the 2017 Annual Report for the Flinders University Student Association (FUSA). A component of my role as Manager, Student Engagement is to oversee and manage the diverse range of services provided by FUSA. Myself and the FUSA staff work in partnership with Student Council (the elected student representatives on FUSA’s governing body) to assist them in achieving their objectives and ensure that we are providing services that are of real value to the students of Flinders University. 2017 was a year of change and transition for Flinders University with the move from Faculties and Schools to six Colleges. A significant focus for Student Council and FUSA staff has been to engage in conversations with key stakeholders across the University with regards to creating support mechanisms for students, to ensure the transition is as smooth as possible. It is important to ensure that all academic student associations continue to operate and flourish within the new academic configuration and that appropriate student representation structures are put in place within each of the Colleges. This work will be ongoing into 2018 with a focus on supporting student representatives to be well equipped and effective in their roles whilst continuing to pilot a topic representative model in some of the Colleges. Student Assist, who provide advocacy and support to students

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on academic, financial and welfare issues had a 5.3% increase in student cases in 2017. Student Assist successfully advocated on a systemic level and provided input into a number of student related policy and procedures that the University is currently reviewing. Financial stress continues to be a huge issue for students. In 2017, Student Assist began working towards establishing a financial literacy program for students which will continue into 2018. FUSA is the primary provider of social events and activities for students on campus. O’Week and O’Fiesta continued to grow in 2017 with higher attendance numbers overall. Student Council provided a diverse range of campaigns and initiatives throughout the year, including new events such as a Vegan Market Day and ‘How to Adult’ Day. In 2017, there was an enhanced focus on ensuring our ‘FUSA Says Relax’ events and Welfare Brunches were well represented at every campus including Sturt, FMC and Tonsley. FUSA also collaborated with the Office of Communication and Engagement and The Tavern to host regular ‘Bring Back the Bands’ evenings to inject more live music on campus. The FUSA affiliated clubs and societies play a huge role in engaging students and providing an opportunity to make friends and connect with fellow students with similar interests. In 2017, the focus was to enhance administrative processes to support clubs to operate more efficiently and to encourage them to engage more students.

Since 2016, there has been a 33% increase in registered club events and activities and a 25% increase in individuals engaged in club event and activities, which is significant. In August 2017, the Australian Human Rights Commission’s report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities was released. In response, FUSA applied for $50,000 in extra Student Services and Amenities Fee funds to create a student led campaign to build awareness, encourage respectful relationships and self-improvement. The FUSA Media Team created a Student Advisory Group made up of thirteen students from diverse backgrounds to inform the campaign and ensure that the messaging is conveyed in an engaging and student friendly manner. The FUSA campaign is titled ‘Be a Better Human’ and will roll out during Semester 1 2018. I look forward to reporting on this in our 2018 Annual Report. I extend a sincere thank you to FUSA staff, Student Council and all of the academic and professional staff across the University that have worked in collaboration with FUSA in 2017. The work that we do together is important and ensures that every Flinders student has the opportunity to have a meaningful and positive university experience that contributes to their success. Chris O’Grady Manager, Student Engagement


student council Reports

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General Secretary CHRISTOPHER NORMAN ROLE

• Preparation of agendas and financial reports to each Student Council meeting and Annual General Meeting • Maintain the financial records of the Association • Chair the Clubs & Societies Sub-Committee and First Year Students Collective

ACTIVITY

• Amended numerous FUSA regulations, including: ○○ Election Regulations (abolishing by-elections) ○○ Clubs and Academic Association Regulations (with a focus on optimising simplicity and efficiency) • Assisted various office bearers with their initiatives, including the Marriage Equality Postal Survey – Enrol to Vote campaign • Worked to obtain FUSA a revenue stream independent of the Student Services and Amenities Fee

• Worked to get more Student Services and Amenities Fee funds spent directly on students • Represented FUSA at multiple conferences and events ○○ National Union of Students – National Conference ○○ National Union of Students – Education Conference ○○ CampusLink 2017 ○○ National Student Partnership Framework Workshop

welfare officer HILARY WIGG ROLE

• Coordinate and implement the Student Council’s welfare campaigns • Liaise and network with State and National welfare and community sector groups and peak bodies • Chair the Welfare Collective and the External and Regional Collective

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ACTIVITY

• In collaboration with the Women’s Officer – implemented a sanitary items initiative to have these available in bathrooms across various Flinders campuses • Collaborated with FUSA staff in the coordination the Welfare Brunch initiative • Promoted awareness of national campaigns: ○○ Make Education Free Again ○○ My Rights at Work, Uni and Home ○○ National Union of Students – National Day of Action • Collaborated with FUSA and Flinders University staff to:

○○ Promote health and counselling services to students ○○ Ensure FUSA involvement in: – R U OK Day – Mental Health Week – Anti-Poverty Week • Assisted the Women’s Officer with International Women’s Day events • Coordinated the ‘How to Adult’ student event – providing students with an opportunity to engage with services crucial to their wellbeing


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education officer Education Officer HAMISH RICHARDSON ACTIVITY ROLE

• Chair the Student Representative Network • Coordinate and implement the Student Council’s education campaigns • Promote and facilitate student activity on education-related issues and liaise with local, national and international organisations

• Re-established the Education Collective • Assisted in reviewing and expanding the FUSA Development Grants • Liaised with national office bearers regarding Students as Partners in collaboration with the Disabilities Officer • Represented students regarding implementation of online content, the restructure, and University communication policies

• Led a workshop at National Union of Students – Education Conference • Spoke at National Union of Students – National Conference ○○ Elected to Education Vice President for National Union of Students SA branch

environment officer Environment Officer JACINTA ROBINSON ROLE

• Coordinate and implement Student Council’s environment campaigns • Develop environmental campaign proposals and promote and facilitate student activity on environmental issues • Chair the Environment Collective

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ACTIVITY

• Promoted awareness of environmental initiatives around campus ○○ Zero-waste ○○ Procured FUSA drink bottles ○○ Procured FUSA keep cups ○○ Smoke-free zones ○○ Alternative transport (carpooling, cycling etc.) • Events ○○ Earth Hour Potluck ○○ Clean up Australia Day

○○ Environment Collective meet & greets ○○ FUSA Op Shops ○○ Environmental Film Festival ○○ Enviro Market Day • Environment Collective – worked to increase cohesiveness between the environmental groups on campus • Worked with Flinders Medical Students Society on recycling petition for the Medical Library


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international officer International Officer VIESHNAVEE PANDIYAN ROLE

• Collect and provide information on the needs of international students to the Student Council • Liaise with other bodies that provide representation and personal and academic support to International students • Coordinate and implement campaigns on issues of importance to International students • Chair the International Students Collective

ACTIVITY

• Coordinated the Multicultural Festival with FUSA staff • Organised International Student ‘Meet & Greet’ events • Represented FUSA at conferences ○○ Communities in Control ○○ Council of International Students Australia

postgraduate officer KATT HATZI ROLE

• Collect and provide information on the needs of postgraduate students for the Student Council • Coordinate and implement campaigns on issues of importance to postgraduate students • Chair the Postgraduate Students Collective

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ACTIVITY

• Established the Flinders University Postgraduate Students Association • Discussions with Flinders University staff regarding: ○○ revisions to the Research Higher Degrees grievance procedure ○○ potential student exemption for costs relating to DCSI clearances for teaching purposes with the Welfare and Education Officers • Organised the Postgraduate Masterclass in conjunction with Careers • Represented students in

meetings of Academic Senate • Attended and presented at multiple conferences and events ○○ National Union of Students – Education conference ○○ Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia seminar ○○ Gender Equitable Leadership Symposium • Investigated affiliation with Council of Australian Postgraduate Associations (CAPA)


women’s officer GRACE HENSEL ROLE

• Act as an advocate and be the spokesperson of women students • Be responsible for the coordination and implementation of campaigns on issues of importance to women students • Chair the Women’s Collective

ACTIVITY

• Coordinated International Women’s Day events • Organised Women’s Health Day events • Continued to update the Women’s Space • Worked with the Welfare Officer on the sanitary items initiative to have these items available in bathrooms across various Flinders campuses • Advocated for students in meetings with University management regarding implementing changes in response to the Australian Human Rights Commission’s

report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities • Assisted Student President and FUSA staff with the Consent Campaign • Chaired meetings of the Women’s Collective to discuss and action issues on campus • Represented Flinders at national conferences ○○ Network of Women Students Australia ○○ National Union of Students – Education Conference

mature age officer NATASHA MALONE ROLE

• Act as an advocate on behalf of mature age students and be the spokesperson for mature age students • Liaise and network with other mature age student organisations and bodies on campus and outside of the University • Coordinate and implement campaigns on issues of importance to mature age students

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ACTIVITY

• Set up Mature Age Collective • Events ○○ O’Week Mature Age Hangout ○○ Mature Age event at Oasis ○○ Co-hosted Oasis’ ‘Breast Cancer Morning Tea’ ○○ Coordinated Mental Health Week stall ○○ SWOTVAC Sizzle barbecue

• Attended the Respect. Now. Always. campaign forum • Procured fridges for each of the Parents Rooms on campus • Attended Mental Health First Aid training


Free pizza and movie screening of “Miss Representation” with guest speaker


social activities officer ASHLEY SUTHERLAND ROLE

• Responsible for the ongoing organisation and management of the activities deemed ‘social’, rather than political, that are run under FUSA’s name • Review, change and add to the FUSA Social Calendar as they deem fit and be the contact point for FUSA members conducting campaigns with a social aspect • Chair the Social Activities Collective

ACTIVITY

• Developed and coordinated the following events in collaboration with FUSA Events staff: ○○ FUSA Pub Crawl (Semester 1 & 2) ○○ O’Glow Party ○○ O’Week Christmas in July Market ○○ FUSA Ball • Represented FUSA at conferences ○○ CampusLink 2017

○○ National Union of Students – Education Conference ○○ Network of Women Students Australia

indigenous officer PAIGE LEEDHAM (until May 2017)

YARITJI GREEN (from June 2017)

ROLE

• Advocate on behalf of Indigenous students on campus and chair the First Nations Collective • Liaise and network with other organisations that provide support to and representation for Indigenous people • Coordinate and implement campaigns on issues of importance to Indigenous students

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ACTIVITY

• Collected ideas from Indigenous students: ○○ Camp in the Flinders Ranges or at Camp Coorong ○○ Indigenous Medical Students would like to have a study camp ○○ Students showed interest in an Indigenous Space in the hub like the Women’s Space and Queer Space • Placed female hygiene products in the student toilets in the Yunggorendi building • Carried out duties for the First

Nation’s Collective ○○ Attended the Papua New Guinean Independence day dinner ○○ Papua New Guinean students are interested in forming a club for next year • Events ○○ Cultural Day event at Wariparinga


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queer officer KHYLE MILNE ROLE

• Act as an advocate on behalf of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex and Queer (GLBTTIQ) students • Coordinate and implement campaigns of importance to GBLTTIQ identifying students • Chair the Queer Collective

ACTIVITY

• Restructured the Queer Collective executive to make it more supportive of the wider LGBTIQ+ community • Collaborated with the Manager, Equal Opportunity and Diversity International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia event and tree planting ceremony • Affiliated Flinders University Queer Society with FUSA

disabilities officer KATE GALLAGHER ROLE

• Advocate for students who live with disability and run campaigns and work with similar advocacy groups, University staff, or others to ensure the best interests of students living with disabilities is taken into account • Advise the Student Council on any practice that may be deemed ablest or may discourage those living with disabilities from joining or attending FUSA events • Chair the Accessibility Collective

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ACTIVITY

• Developed a guide for commencing students with disabilities • Implemented activities for the Disabilities Collective ○○ Launched a peer support platform (via Facebook) ○○ Held numerous lunch event meetings • Maintained working relationship the Health, Counselling and Disability Service ○○ Spoke at Students with Disabilities orientation event ○○ Ensured FUSA involvement in various events:

– Mental Health Week events – R U OK Day – Women’s Health Day • Coordinated Marriage Equality Campaign with the Flinders University Queer Society • Proposed the creation of a Disabilities Space in Oasis • Attended National Union of Students – National Conference


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student ASSIST Report


student assist report In 2017, Student Assist continued to provide support, advice and advocacy services to students on academic, financial and welfare matters. Staff have provided advocacy support to individual students and have advocated for students systemically at the School/Faculty/College and University levels.

flinders.edu.au). This year, staff responded to 268 email queries from students to this address.

Policy reviews

We assisted students to manage 442 Academic issues in 2017, a slight decrease from last year (474). The six most common academic issues, accounting for over two-thirds of Academic casework, were Review of Final Grade, Appeals, Complaints, Enrolment issues, Placement issues, and Academic Integrity issues.

The University began a process of reviewing its student-related policies which will continue into 2018. Student Assist is striving to ensure that all the new policies are based on good practice and in the best interests of students. In 2017, Student Assist completed a submission to the University as part of the consultation process on the new Research Higher Degrees complaints policy. Student Assist also forwarded a written submission on proposed changes to the National Code of Practice for Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students.

CASE MANAGEMENT

Advocacy for groups of students

issue: academic

The number of student cases increased in 2017 to 679, up from 645 in 2016 (5.3% increase). Each student case involves one or more ‘issues’, which are broadly classified as Academic, Financial or Welfare. The 2017 caseload generated 931 issues and involved an investment of 999 hours of staff time. The average staff time devoted per case was 1.5 hours, down slightly from 1.7 hours in 2016.

• We provided feedback to the Student Wellbeing & Professional Committee (College of Medicine & Public Health) to ensure the processes followed by the Committee are fair and transparent to students • We met with Social Work Field Education staff to discuss strategies for more effective and efficient collaboration • College transition ○○ Updating our advocacy resources (e.g. letter templates for students) to reflect the new College structure ○○ Building ties with academics transitioning into new roles within Colleges, to raise awareness of our services and encourage staff to refer students for advocacy support

Student Assist have provided feedback to the University on policy changes that will affect students and have met with key University staff to discuss ways of providing support for students, particularly during the transition to the new College structure.

Financial issues made up 51% of casework, Academic issues 47%, and Welfare 2%. Often, student cases are complex and present a number of compounding issues. In 2017, the number of cases initially presenting as mainly ‘Academic’ also involved a ‘Financial’ component, usually in the form of Emergency Financial Assistance. In addition, Student Assist staffs a dedicated help and support email address (student.assist@ Page 23 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

ACADEMIC ADVOCACY Advocacy for individual students

NUMBER OF CASES

Review of a grade 75 academic appeal 67 complaint about an 57 academic program enrolment placement Academic integrity

41 34 33

FINANCIAL ADVOCACY Staff assisted students with 473 financial issues in 2017, up from 436 last year. The three most common issues, contributing to 60% of the financial caseload, were Emergency Financial Assistance, Second Semester Grants and Interest-free Student Loans. Financial Counselling and assistance with Applications for Remissions of Fees contributed to 17% and 12% of the issues, respectively.


Grants

Loans

This year, 93 students applied for a Second Semester Grant worth $500. Following discussion with the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Student Life), the grants budget was increased by $4,000 in 2017, for a total of $34,000. Student Assist awarded grants to 68 students (73% of applicants) on a needsbasis.

Demand for $500 interest-free student loans increased slightly in 2017, with 86 applications and enquiries (77 in 2016). 69 applications were successful.

Emergency Financial Assistance (EFA) Student Assist stocks food parcels, supermarket and Foodbank vouchers, Metrocards and pharmacy vouchers to help students in short-term financial difficulty. We provided assistance to students on 185 occasions in 2017, to the value of $12,380. In Second Semester we also trialled a parallel EFA campaign, giving away food parcels, emergency lunches, basic toiletries, keep cups and drink bottles, for limited periods during the semester. This proved popular, with around 230 students coming to collect packages, using up all stock. In a new initiative and in association with Oasis, Student Assist provided support and logistic assistance to a final year Master of Nutrition and Dietetics student, who ran a ‘healthy snack-food’ campaign during the November exam period.

ISSUE: financial

NUMBER OF CASES

emergency financial assistance 2nd semester grant student loan financial counselling remission of fees centrelink

102 97 86 83 55 30

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This year we conducted a review of loan data captured since 2013. The aim was to devise a model that predicts the likelihood of students being able to service their loans, ultimately targeting the best financial service for each individual student on a case by case basis. Financial Counselling The number of students attending FUSA for Financial Counselling increased this year, with 83 cases in 2017 (63 in 2016). Anti-Poverty Week Our major event for the year was Anti-Poverty Week. It ran for half a day and featured giveaways, cooking demonstrations by Flinders Nutrition students, and stalls by external welfare agencies. FUSA’s Environment Officer ran a second-hand clothing stall that provided clothes to students for a gold-coin donation. Proceeds were donated to the Magdalene Centre. Student Assist staff distributed free lunch and drinks, and ran a number of stalls with free stationery, toiletries, food parcels and recipe packs. The objective of the event is to provide direct financial relief, tackle the topic of food insecurity and raise awareness of Student Assist’s financial services.

COMPOSITION OF STUDENT ASSIST CASES

51% 47% 2%


Financial literacy We continue to work towards establishing a financial literacy program for students in 2018. In preparation for this, we ran a financial literacy activity at two events during the year, in the form of short quizzes for students to self-test financial knowledge.

COLLABORATION WITH STUDENT COUNCIL Student Assist staff collaborated with Student Council members on various projects during the year, including: • Joint presentations to commencing students about FUSA services during O’Week • Assisted Welfare Officer to develop a sanitary products campaign • Facilitated the Environment Officer’s clothing stall during Anti-Poverty Week • Collaboration on FUSA’s submission to the University on Research Higher Degrees policy • Ran an information stall at the Welfare Officer’s ‘How to Adult Day’ • Collaboration with the Education Officer to respond to the University’s new proposed courses policy HIGHLIGHTS • Won a national award in 2017 at the CampusLink Confernce for ‘Best Marketing Campaign’ for our animated video promoting Student Assist services. GOALS FOR 2018 • Provide input into the review of Flinders University’s

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student-related policies/ procedures, based on our casework experience, benchmarking, and knowledge of good practice • Develop a financial literacy program for students

“I just want to send my biggest thanks to you and the FUSA team for organising these grants. It will truly be the biggest help for me this semester.”

“I cannot thank you enough for all your efforts and support – it is greatly appreciated. I feel a weight has been lifted off my shoulders from our meeting so thank you!”


EVENTS Report

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events report 2017 comprised of a number of successful events that combined fun, information, awareness and acknowledgement. New events such as How to Adult Day, Bringing Back the Bands, Vegan Market Day and the Christmas in July Market combined with recurring events such as Relax Days, Karaoke in the Tavern, International Women’s Day, IDAHOT day, NAIDOC week, pub crawls and the FUSA Ball.

2017 GOALS • Develop a plan for the year early on and in collaboration with Student Council • Be strategic in regards to the quantity and timing of events to increase student participation • Consider how to engage with Tonsley, Victoria Square, Sturt and FMC campuses • Continue to grow O’Week and O’Fiesta

of engaging with the other campuses, we continued the successful Relax events on various campuses and held a roving Movie Month in addition to holding NAIDOC events, Soup-er Swotvac and a Pizza Hut activation at the Sturt Campus. There is still room to improve the reach to the smaller campuses and this will continue to be a focus for FUSA. O’Week and O’Fiesta have continued to grow in both participation and reputation. An increase of 731 tickets were sold for O’Fiesta compared to 2016 and a number of the individual events during O’Week also had increased attendance. Semester 2 O’Week was also a success with a bigger event program and interaction with students. One of the most well received events during the year was How to Adult Day – providing students with an opportunity to engage

with services crucial to their wellbeing and important advice to help them ‘adult’! In 2018, the Student Council are keen to continue developing this idea and to provide even more fun and useful events to students.

GOALS FOR 2018 • Work collaboratively with Student Council to strategically plan an event schedule for the year • Increase the capacity of O’Fiesta and continue to grow the event • Support Student Council in developing their collectives – to increase consultation with the wider student body • Be strategic in regards to the quantity and timing of events to increase student participation

ACHIEVEMENTS Creating an event schedule for the year was one of the first crucial tasks tackled. We wanted to ensure a more consistent spread of diverse events throughout the year whilst allowing more time to work on building events to be successful and to reach higher student participation levels. This forward planning allowed for better curated events and also the opportunity to collaborate with other university departments and stakeholders to improve the quality of each event. In order to meet the goal

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Overall, FUSA offered 167 event shifts to student casuals in 2017


O’WEEK Semester 1 O’Week was a great success and included many activities, entertainment and experiences for the new and continuing students here at Flinders. FUSA is charged with the overall coordination and management of the social events and activities during the week. In addition to the events, we coordinated the student service and external commercial stall holders. A Comedy Afternoon, Outdoor Cinema, Karaoke and Quiz Night were a few of the main events that took place during February 20-23 in various locations across the University including the Plaza, Tavern and Matthew Flinders Theatre. Free lunches, group participation games and live music complimented the activities during the week and continued to bring students together to enrich their experience of transitioning to Flinders. Each year FUSA also creates and distributes the O’Week tote bags

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including sunglasses, pins and other promotional items. In 2017, 5,000 bags were distributed to students.

event outdoor cinema comedy arvo quiz arvo

attendees in 2016

attendees in 2017

300

170

250

350

120

140

Semester 2 O’Week was also a great success and introduced a number of new events and activities for students. Interactive workshops included making jewellery, pompoms and decorating gingerbread. These were well received and added a new element to the usually smaller O’Week event. We also introduced a Christmas themed market and utilised the Humanities courtyard and Flinders Laneway to activate more spaces within the University. Other events included a quiz, karaoke and also a UV Glow party in the Tavern to round out the event.

O’FIESTA O’Fiesta, the grand finale of O’Week, took place on February 24. The 2017 edition featured Ball Park Music, Tkay Maidza, Alex Lahey, Robbie Miller, Flinders’ own The Vandelays and The Cable Kids. The event was officially a sell out with 3,031 tickets sold (an increase from 2,300 in 2016), making the 2017 O’Fiesta the largest event to date. Tickets were $10 for Flinders Students, $15 for non-Flinders students and $30 for the general public, with over half of all sales (1,696 tickets) being sold directly to Flinders University students. Again FUSA engaged 5/4 Entertainment to assist in the coordination of the event both in the lead up to and on the night.


FUSA SAYS RELAX FUSA Says Relax is a weekly event held across four campuses of Flinders University. Locations included the Central Campus, Tonsley Campus, Flinders Medical Centre and Sturt Library. In 2017, 27 Relax events were held. The event offers students free haircuts, massages, stationery, staple food and lunch. This event is an initiative of Student Council and funded through the Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF). It aims to offer students services that will support their wellbeing and academic study. FUSA Says Relax has proven to be valuable to students and aims to alleviate student stress, boost student morale and build upon the communal atmosphere on campus. The event also contributes to the University’s sense of community, provides a platform for student performers, an opportunity to partner with community agencies (i.e. Foodbank), the provision of student employment and a space to communicate FUSA’s services.

Page 29 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

Many express appreciation for the services, such as massages and the haircuts, as well as how they will use the staple food to feed their family or housemates.

WELFARE BRUNCHES An initiative of Student Council that was started in 2014, is providing students with free food and drink to help them get through their day. In 2017, FUSA held 75 Welfare Brunches. 43 were held at various locations on the central campus, 11 held at Tonsley, 12 held at Sturt, and 9 at FMC. $17,021.90 was spent to distribute: • • • • • • •

Muffins Seasonal fruit Breakfast bars Up & Go Juice boxes Pancakes Muesli bars

IN 2017, FUSA PROVIDED STUDENTS WITH:


clubS Report


clubs report FUSA administers all nonsporting student clubs, societies and academic associations. The opening of the Hub & Plaza in 2016 greatly improved upon campus culture and FUSA’s clubs program was no exception with a significant increase in applications for club affiliation. The consequent increase to the size of FUSA’s club program made it clear that improvements with regards to the administration of clubs would need to be made. This is to ensure that we provide effective and timely support for the increased number of student clubs with the aim of maximising student engagement within the program. Consequently, our focus in 2017 was to improve the quality rather than quantity of FUSA’s affiliated clubs. Our objectives were to enhance the ability of clubs to engage the broader student population of Flinders, encourage more effective club management and autonomy and improve upon FUSA’s internal processes to better serve and support its affiliated clubs. These improvements are reflected by the substantial increase in club events & activities and overall engagement with the Flinders community. Improvements to data collation mechanisms have also allowed FUSA to provide more accurate analysis of club engagement within the Flinders community. Our focus in 2018 is to encourage greater engagement from the broader student community in club activities through increased marketing, new promotional

Page 31 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

opportunities for clubs and encouraging awareness of the clubs program within regional campuses. In 2018, FUSA will also encourage clubs to host a more diverse and creative range of events and activities.

KEY FIGURES • 92 affiliated clubs and associations • 11,864 recorded club members • 584 members involved in club committee and executive roles • 32.67% increase in registered club events and activities* • 24.74% increase in patrons engaged in club events & activities* *Since 2016, based on selfreporting via FUSA’s event registration form.

IMPROVEMENTS • Overhaul of club funding processes to increase accessibility and timeliness • Development of Club Finance & Funding Guidelines to outline club responsibilities for the use of SSAF funding • Continued improvements to the processes associated with FUSA’s ‘Pool Funding’ program • Provision of new media resources to provide new opportunities for clubs to promote their activities • Improvements to Club and Academic Association Regulations • Development of a new online application system to increase

efficiency, communication & transparency Improvements to the reaffiliation process to increase club compliance and provide more accurate club data Development of a Clubs Guide and online ‘Wiki’ to increase awareness of club obligations and processes Installation of web conferencing equipment within the Club Space to encourage engagement of off-campus members, livestreaming of activities and collaboration with related clubs from other universities (to be installed in early 2018) Additional event equipment and resources to provide new opportunities for club events and activities

CLUB COMPOSITION FUSA is proud to support a diverse range of clubs and works closely with new clubs to offer new interests to students and greater representation for an ever-changing student population. Clubs continue to engage the Flinders community, with 10,978 student members and an additional 886 non-student members. 584 volunteers are involved in club committee and executive roles, and many more students are engaged in a casual volunteer capacity. In 2017, FUSA received 32 applications for affiliation by new clubs and 29 of these clubs were approved for formal affiliation. 92 FUSA-affiliated clubs currently operate on campus, including: • 39 academic clubs


• 22 cultural/spiritual clubs • 13 political/social/ environmental justice clubs • 15 special interest clubs • 3 sporting/outdoor clubs (these clubs are not eligible to affiliate with Flinders One) Flinders students continue to have a wide range of academic social networks through the FUSA clubs program with many clubs providing additional opportunities for learning and ‘hands on’ projects such as career fairs, guest speaker seminars and academic competitions such as the Formula SAE and Maritime RobotX competitions. FUSA’s first-ever club based outside of South Australia – Flinders Medical Students Society NT affiliated in 2017, operating within Flinders University’s Northern Territory campus in Darwin.

compared to 19,555 attendees in 2016 and 12,889 attendees in 2015

HIGHLIGHTS • Flinders Medical Student Society’s renovation of the Medical School courtyard to create the Indigenous Healing Garden • The first inter-university cultural soccer tournament, hosted by the Indonesian Association (PPIA). Six teams from UniSA, University

of Adelaide and Flinders competed in the event Flinders League of Legend’s inaugural participation in the first official inter-university competition recognised by Riot Games. The club also competed in UniGames for the first time in 2017 Careers Nights held by the Medical, Surgical, Psychology, Business and Law Academic Associations Flinders Motorsport Club’s participation in the Formula SAE Competition for the first time this year The League of Legends Club

breakdown of fusa-affiliated clubs in 2017 3

FUSA continues to encourage cultural and spiritual diversity through its clubs program. At present, FUSA’s clubs program represents students from 21 countries, and across the Islamic, Christian and Bahá’í faiths.

sporting/ outdoor clubs

15 special interest or social

39 academic

CLUB EVENTS, PROJECTS & ACTIVITES FUSA’s clubs have coordinated and executed more events and activities with increased engagement than previous years. • In 2017, clubs ran 743 registered events and activities compared to 560 in 2016, and 425 in 2015 • In 2017, clubs reported a collective attendance of 24,394 attendees within their events and activities;

Page 32 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

TOTAL 92

13 political/ social/ environmental justic

22 cultural/spiritual


• •

• • •

& Digital Gaming Enthusiasts’ LAN Parties, running multiplayer PC gaming from within the Club Space and Hub Gaming on the Super Screen (Mario Kart) on a regular basis in semester one An inter-club quiz night held between the video gaming, board gaming, costuming, film and anime clubs Fortnightly Board Gaming nights and Video Gaming nights held within both the Tavern and Hub Palaeontology ‘Beer & Bones’ events with guest speakers held in the Tavern The Flinders Medical Students Society MedCamp trip Vegan Picnics held by the Vegetarian and Vegan Club

Page 33 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

• Costuming workshops & Japanese language tutorials • The Flinders Evangelical Students annual Bushdance • Creative reading evenings held by Flinders Speakeasy • Student balls held by the Tourism, Queer, History & International Relations, Surgical, Psychology, Business, Law, Education and Chemical & Physical Sciences clubs • The Australian Humanist Convention, hosted for the first time by the Flinders University Secular Society • Caving trips run by the Speleological Society • Multiple large-scale events run by the Indonesian Association (PPIA), such as the Eid Adha and Independence Day

celebrations • Flinders Medical Student Society’s MedRevue 2017 stage performances. Revived in 2016 with assistance from FUSA’s Pool Funding program


fusa affiliated clubs, societies & school associations AHMADIYYA MUSLIM STUDENT ASSOCIATION AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS AMNESTY CLUB ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY AUSTRALIAN YOUTH CLIMATE COALITION CLUB AUTOMOTIVE SOLAR TEAM SOCIAL AND SUPPORT CLUB BAHÁ’Í SOCIETY BANGLADESHI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION BIODIVERSITY AND ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR SOCIETY BIOTECHNOLOGY STUDENT ASSOCIATION BOB HAWKE APPRECIATION SOCIETY BUSINESS STUDENTS ASSOCIATION CHINESE STUDENT AND SCHOLAR ASSOCIATION CINEPHILE SOCIETY COSTUME CLUB CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDENT ASSOCIATION CULTURAL ASSOCIATION OF HONG KONG, MACAU AND TAIWAN CULTURAL CONNECTIONS DIGITAL GAMING ENTHUSIASTS Page 34 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

DOGGO CLUB EAST TIMORESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION EDUCATION STUDENT ASSOCIATION ENGINEERS WITHOUT BORDERS HUMANITARIAN SOCIETY ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION GROUP EVANGELICAL STUDENTS FAIR TRADE COLLECTIVE FANTASTIC BEASTS QUIDDITCH TEAM FIELD ROBOTICS CLUB FILIPINOS AT FLINDERS FRENCH AT FLINDERS CLUB FUSSBALL SOCIETY GOLDEN KEY INTERNATIONAL HONOUR SOCIETY GREENS CLUB HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP HELLENIC ASSOCIATION HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENT ASSOCIATION INDIGENOUS STUDENT ASSOCIATION INDONESIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALIA INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, INNOVATION, & TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY JAPANESE CULTURAL CLUB LABOR CLUB


LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE OF LEGENDS CLUB LIBERAL CLUB LIONS CAMPUS CLUB MARINE BIOLOGY ASSOCIATION MARKET SPECULATION CLUB MEDICAL SCIENCE SOCIETY MEDICAL STUDENTS SOCIETY MEDICAL STUDENTS SOCIETY NT MOTORSPORT CLUB MUSLIM ASSOCIATION MYANMAR STUDENT ASSOCIATION NEPALESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION NURSING AND MIDWIFERY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION NUTRITION CLUB OPTOMETRY STUDENT ASSOCIATION OUTDOOR CLUB OVERSEAS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP PALAEONTOLOGY SOCIETY PASTAFARIANS PERMACULTURE COMMITTEE PERSIAN CLUB PHILOSOPHY CLUB PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS PHYSICS SOCIETY

Page 35 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

PLANT BIOTECH SOCIETY POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION QUEER SOCIETY REACH OUT VOLUNTEERS STUDENT GROUP RURAL HEALTH SOCIETY SCHOOL OF BIOLOGY ASSOCIATION SECULAR SOCIETY SINGAPORE MEDICAL SOCIETY SINGAPORE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION SKYCREW SOCIAL WORK ASSOCIATION SOCIALIST ALTERNATIVE CLUB SPEAKEASY SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY SRI LANKAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION STUDENT EXCHANGE CLUB STUDENT PARAMEDICS AUSTRALASIA SURGICAL SOCIETY TABLETOP UND ROLEPLAYING ENTHUSIASTS THINKING CAPS TOURISM ASSOCIATION VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN CLUB VGEN VIETNAMESE STUDENT ASSOCIATION


MEDIA Report


media report The Media Team provide support to FUSA staff, student representatives, Empire Times editors, student clubs and academic associations through the provision of graphic design solutions, communication and marketing strategies and website development.

WEBSITES In 2017, the use of fusa.edu. au increased by 10% to 83,202 visits compared to 2016. Individual users are up 8% to 46,302 culminating in 167,633 page views. This is due to a combination of refining and improving the copywriting and the new design which was launched in 2016, making it much easier for students to navigate the website on all devices. The Media Team collaborated with the Web Transformation Team within the University to create more links on the Flinders website to FUSA’s website has also contributed to an increase in cross-URL promotion. Data shows that the core age group accessing fusa.edu.au. is 18-34 year olds which in total amounts to 70% of our online users. Organic and direct searching for FUSA on search engines amounts to 66% of how users land on the FUSA website with 25% being clicks from other sites (such as flinders.edu.au) and the final 9% is attributed to social media. Our most frequently visited pages are: (1) Jobs (17%) (2) Clubs (12%) (3) Events (7%) (4) Membership (6%) Page 37 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

7% student assist & grants 17% Jobs

6% about

BREAKDOWN OF MOST FREQUENTLY VISITED PAGES

6% Membership

7% events (5) About (6%) and (6) Student Assist & Grants (3.5% each) with the rest being attributed to the landing page.

SOCIAL MEDIA The social media landscape in Australia continues to evolve with regards to its users and the technology of the platforms. Social media is one of the only digital avenues where organisations like FUSA can have two-way communication, giving us the opportunity to receive feedback, monitor sentiment and build a relatable brand personality. When you consider that three quarters of Australians are now on social media, it’s obviously not a fading fad. Australians are now spending more than

12% CLUBS 18 hours on Facebook alone (per week), an increase of four and a half hours from last year. In 2017, FUSA increased its followers on Facebook by 20% to approximately 8,000. We received just under 724 unique personal messages, averaging 2.9 messages a day, which we generally answer within 10 minutes. Replying, moderating and interacting on social media is becoming more important. In 2017, we had a renewed focus on using secondary social media platforms such as Instagram for specific events or with curated content. The Media Team is custodian of 30+ other social media accounts which include Student Council Collective pages, club pages, group forums and branded pages for large events such as O’Fiesta.


GRAPHIC DESIGN In 2017, the Media Team produced over 150 unique designs for student clubs, societies and academic associations. During the year, the FUSA Media Team developed a Canva account for student clubs, societies and academic associations to use. The Canva account contains sample/ mock designs for clubs to create their own graphic design assets. Consequently, this frees up time for media resources to be devoted to larger scale projects. The move to Canva allows students the ability to build on what the Media Team creates and take ownership of their own designs. In 2017, the Student Services and Amenities Fee Budget Advisory Committee approved $50,000 of SSAF funding to be allocated to FUSA to create a campaign in response to the Australian Human Rights Commission’s report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities and as a compliment to the Universities Australia’s ‘Respect. Now. Always.’ campaign. The campaign is called ‘Be a Better Human’ and focuses on building awareness around matters of sexual consent, rape culture and bystander behavior whilst encouraging the fostering of better relationships and selfimprovement. While the bulk of the campaign was created in 2017, the launch date was set for semester 1 2018.

O’WEEK The theme for 2017 O’Week, ‘Vintage Australiana’ was chosen by the O’Week Student Directors and was well received by students. Branding asset amalgamation designed by the Media Team averages about 100 unique Page 38 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

templates that we create each year. Various posters and digital screen images were created for each of the O’Week events, in addition to a schedule and generic promotional posters and digital signage. Banners were also created to advertise O’Week generally and for specific events. A media package was created and sent out to the various university departments. The 2017 Student Diary was a success, with all stock taken (5,000 units) by the end of O’Week. Our O’Week designs, assets and tote bags were featured in Rip It Up and Vice magazines. They were all designed by the Media Team and very well received by students. The Media Team is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the FUSA O’Week website, which also includes academic and other orientation information for students. Initially, a holding page with a game was put up on the O’Week website before the launch. Activity on the O’Week website started to pick up from February 13 with the peak of activity happening on February 20 (first day of O’Week). In comparison with 2016, there was a 32% increase in activity on the site, with a 26% increase in the amount of individuals visiting the site. There was a 43% increase in the total amount of pages viewed overall and an increase of 8% in the total amount of pages viewed per session.

Since then, Empire Times has increased its brand and engagement on campus, printing 10 issues (52 pages each) over the course of each academic year, with over 120 contributors and subeditors. While most readers prefer Empire Times in physical form, there were approximately 20,000 visits to empiretimes.com.au in 2017, which houses the digital version on ISSUU and other articles that don’t make it into the print edition. We designed magazine stands for Empire Times and distributed 10 around campuses including Tonsley, Sturt, Victoria Square, FMC and the Central Campus. In 2017, print runs ranged between 1500 and 4000, depending on the time of year.

20,000 VISITS EMPIRETIMES.COM.AU

VIEWED AN AVERAGE OF

EMPIRE TIMES While Empire Times had a hiatus from 2006-2013 (caused by Voluntary Student Unionism), it was relaunched by FUSA in 2013 and celebrated its 40th year of publication.

2,833 TIMES PER ISSUE


Page 39 | FUSA Annual Report 2017


Elections Report


fusa annual election 2017 results STUDENT COUNCIL DEC 2017-NOV 2018 STUDENT PRESIDENT Ashley Sutherland

Kathryn Venning Tarmia Klass Alexandra Edhouse Lydia French

NOMINATIONS

EMPIRE TIMES EDITORIAL TEAM, DEC 2017–NOV 2018 Ainsley Ewart, Oli Glenie and Cameron Lowe

WOMEN’S OFFICER Grace Hensel

NUS CONFERENCE DELEGATES 2018 Hamish Richardson Ashley Sutherland Kathryn Venning Jordon O’Reilly Hilary Wigg Kate Gallagher

WELFARE OFFICER Kate Gallagher

ELECTIONS IN 2017

GENERAL SECRETARY Katt Hatzi EDUCATION OFFICER Josh Rayner

POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS OFFICER Satya Venugopal INTERNATIONAL STUDENT OFFICER Keon Simmons INDIGENOUS STUDENTS OFFICER Yaritji Green QUEER OFFICER Sean Henschke

Along with Annual Elections for Student Council held in October, a by-election and casual vacancy appointment occured. Mature Age Officer By-election April 2017 10 nominations Natasha Malone was elected.

We had 59 individual candidates compared with 47 in 2016, 49 in 2015 and 34 in 2014. In 2017, FUSA had the highest number of individual candidates (ever for an annual election) and the highest number of nominations. The Indigenous Students Officer & the Editors of Empire Times were both elected unopposed.

ELECTIONS The elections once again took place online through Big Pulse. Interestingly, we had almost identical voter turnout from last year (8.9%) despite having one less day for voting (three days in 2017, compared with four days in 2016).

Indigenous students Officer Casual Vacancy Appointment June 2017 2 nominations Yaritji Green was appointed.

ENVIRONMENT OFFICER Andy C DISABILITIES OFFICER Louise Nixon

In 2017, we moved our nominations fully online to streamline the election process and significantly reduce administration time. This year we had a record 91 nominations.

NUMBER OF ELECTION NOMINATIONS (2013-2017)

100

91

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OFFICER Bradley Martin

80

MATURE AGE OFFICER Tash Malone

60

GENERAL COUNCIL MEMBERS (SIX POSITIONS) Jesse Stevens Josh Jarvis

40

76 65 59

47

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017


student representation

Page 42 | FUSA Annual Report 2017


STUDENT REPRESENTATION REPORT The Student Representation and Development Officer was involved in the following initiatives in 2017:

TOPIC REPRESENTATIVE PILOT

• Managing Student Council elections and vacancy appointments • Organising Student Council Induction for all incoming Student Council members. • Developing and delivering training for student representatives across the University • Piloting topic level student representation in Biological Sciences • Providing advice and developing support materials regarding strengthening student representation structures in Colleges in 2018 • Reviewing FUSA affiliated and student run Academic Associations (formally School Associations) and developing recommendations for 2018 • Participating in national conversations lead by Office of Learning and teaching (OLT) Fellow, Sally Varnham around the creation of a National Framework for Student Partnership in University Decision-Making and Governance • Creating a database of frameworks, manuals, academic papers and other resources relating to student engagement with a particular focus on student partnership in governance and teaching and learning • Collaborating with University staff to plan and organise a workshop during Teaching & Learning Week around Students as Partners

During Semester 2 2017, a pilot program placing 32 student representatives within 14 Biological Science topics was run at Flinders University. This pilot was a collaboration between FUSA and the College of Science and Engineering and was modelled on the Class Representative system at Victoria University, Wellington.

Page 43 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

The aim of this pilot was to demonstrate that, as current students, Topic Reps and their fellow classmates are ideally placed to provide insight into their experience of teaching and learning and where they feel improvement can be made. By working in collaboration with academic staff, topic reps are not only able to represent the voice of students but also to mutually seek solutions to problems as they arise (or hopefully even before they arise). Topic Reps were asked to: • Act as a point of contact for students in their topic • Provide constructive feedback to academic staff about teaching quality and assessment, course content and university facilities according to the thoughts and opinions of the class • Continuously improve the student learning experience in partnership with academic staff by helping create solutions to problems • Represent fellow classmates’ views and opinions on all

matters relating to learning and teaching • Provide constructive and honest feedback to staff • Act as a communication channel between staff and students All 30 Topic Reps who elected to be involved in the program attended a 1.5 hour training session in weeks 3 and 4 of Semester 2. Once Topic Reps attended training, they were able to receive formal recognition for their role through the Horizon Award (Flinders University’s professional skills development program) and all received a certificate of acknowledgement at the completion of the Semester. The evaluation of this pilot was positive overall, particularly from the Topic Reps themselves. Whilst there is room to improve in communicating roles and responsibilities and how a Topic Rep system can be best supported at the College level, the results showed the Topic Rep structure increases peer to peer engagement and provides a practical avenue for the development of communication skills. The feedback indicates being involved as a Topic Rep gives students the opportunity to gain professional development skills as well as challenge themselves personally. Topic Reps are also able to gain a unique insight into how topics are administered. Within the evaluation there was support amongst Topic Coordinators to continue to develop a topic representative structure within the College.


development grants

Page 44 | FUSA Annual Report 2017


DEVELOPMENT GRANTS REPORT The FUSA Development Grant program gives students the opportunity to attend events or participate in activities linked to their current area of study or campus activities which may not be otherwise possible due to financial constraints. At the same time, students are given valuable experience in applying for and acquitting grants – a useful skill in many professions. FUSA Development Grants are awarded twice a year (semester 1 & semester 2) for amounts of up to $1,000 per grant. Students are invited to apply for FUSA Development Grants for an

Page 45 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

activity focussing on one of the following areas: 1. Professional development linked to the applicant’s area of study 2. Student representation or leadership opportunities that link with the applicant’s current campus activities 3. Cultural or social significance linking to the applicant’s current campus activities Grant applications were assessed according to how well they

match the purpose and selection criteria of the Development Grant Guidelines. Each grant covered no more than 75% of the total costs associated with the proposed activity. The FUSA Development Grant program won a national award in 2017 at the CampusLink Conference for ‘Most Successful Student Development Program’.


DEVELOPMENT GRANT RECIPIENTS EMMA HOBBS

Bachelor of Creative Arts (Digital Media) Awarded $350 in Semester 1 to attend the Melbourne International Animation Festival in Melbourne, Victoria. “A big part of studying...is consuming information and participating in related events and activities outside of uni classes. New independent animation is not something you can buy or stream online, the only way to see them is in film festivals. This experience allowed me to travel and see many films that I normally would not have the opportunity to witness in Adelaide.”

DEANNE TREWARTHA

Bachelor of Science (Animal Behaviour) / Bachelor of Behavioural Science (Psychology) Awarded $500 in Semester 1 to attend a multi-disciplinary scientific expedition to the Nullarbor, SA. “On this trip I have met and worked one-on-one with professionals from DEWNR, SA Museum, and State Survey. I have contributed to research that will be written up in a report for DEWNR, National Parks and for the Aboriginal Commission.”

“Now I come back with a wealth of knowledge and inspiration that will help shape and influence my own creative work I do at Flinders.”

“This experience has enhanced my learning [through] practical application at a professional standard. I have a better insight into the concepts being taught in my course, and more confidence in what is required for research at a professional level.”

– Emma Hobbs, 2017

– Deanne Trewartha, 2017

Page 46 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

ANITA CHAPLIN

Bachelor of Science (Marine Biology and Aquaculture) Awarded $800 to be a summer Research Assistant with aboard a research boat with Blue Planet Marine. “I learnt from researchers and lived with people working on conservation in Fiji, Tonga, and Australia. I chose to study marine biology because to work with humpback whales, and it was amazing to learn what a career researching [them] would be like” “I made useful contacts in the industry and have been invited back next year.” “An unreal, once-in–a-lifetime opportunity!” – Anita Chaplin, 2017


FINANCIAL Report

Page 47 | FUSA Annual Report 2017


FINANCIAL REPORT The majority of the funding FUSA receives is from the Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF). The SSAF is a compulsory fee charged by the University which supports non-academic services and amenities for Flinders students. Student consultation takes place when considering how the income will be used to provide or enhance these services and amenities. Every year, FUSA submits a funding request and budget to the SSAF Budget Advisory Committee which provides a recommendation to the ViceChancellor regarding how the SSAF income should be allocated across the University. This funding request is prepared in consultation with the Executive of Student Council and all FUSA staff. Student Council then approve the final funding request and budget. In 2017, FUSA received $2,172,000 which was approximately 49% of the total SSAF that was distributed across the University. SSAF funds are required to be spent in accordance with the Allowed Amenities and Services as provided for under Section (19-38) if the Higher Education Support Act 2003. Unspent funds for the year are returned to the University’s SSAF holding account to be disbursed as per the above section in the Act.

Page 48 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

SSAF DISTRIBUTION ACROSS THE UNIVERSITY 15% Flinders campus community services

10% Careers & Employment Liaison Centre

12% Health Counselling & Disability

14% Other

49% Flinders University Student Association


breakdown of SSAF funds received by fusa $12,000 STUDENT COUNCIL

$517,000

$320,000 COMMUNICATIONS & MEDIA

STUDENT ADVOCACY & WELFARE

TOTAL $2,172,000

$193,000 CLUBS & SOCIETIES (NON-SPORTING)

$1,130,000 STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

STUDENT ADVOCACY & WELFARE

$517,000 Funding provides independent and confidential academic advocacy, financial counselling, emergency financial assistance and welfare support to students through Student Assist.

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

$1,130,000 • Support for programs and initiatives that enhance student experience, engagement and student representation, including: • O’Week student events and activities • Welfare breakfasts for students • Student Council initiatives, campaigns, events and conference attendance • FUSA Development Grants • FUSA/Student Engagement operational expenses

CLUBS & SOCIETIES (NON-SPORTING)

$193,000 Funding for non-sporting student clubs and societies, including social, political and international clubs, for: • Grants to clubs for events, club leadership initiatives and operating expenses • Club awards night to reward the most active clubs • School-based student associations • Postgraduate support and activities

A BREAKDOWN OF THE 2017 FUSA SSAF DISTRIBUTION COMMUNICATIONS & MEDIA

$320,000 This program delivers FUSA’s communication activities, including: • Production of the Empire Times, FUSA promotion and marketing, including websites and social media presence • Student artistic contribution grants • Student Radio Station • Student Diary • O’Week • Marketing, graphic design and comms for all FUSA affiliates and subsidiaries

STUDENT COUNCIL

$12,000 Administrative costs and professional development of Student Council members.

TOTAL: $2,172,000


INCOME & EXPENDITURE YEAR TO DATE REPORT FROM JAN-DEC 2017

STUDENT ADVOCACY & WELFARE STUDENT ENGAGEMENT CLUBS & SOCIETIES (NON-SPORTING) COMMUNICATIONS & MEDIA STUDENT COUNCIL TOTAL

SSAF TRANSFER

INCOME

EXPENSES

SURPLUS / DEFICIT

517,000

0

516,535

465

1,130,000

71,805

1,111,358

90,447

193,000

1,320

148,551

45,769

320,000

0

325,759

-5,759

12,000

0

9,741

2,259

2,172,000

73,125

2,111,944

133,181

Student Council Bank Account The Student Council has a separate bank account where it receives small amounts of income from the jobs board, pub crawl t-shirt sales and O’Week stall holder fees. This account is completely controlled by the Student Council and the signatories to the account are the Student President and the General Secretary. The major expense occurred from this account in 2017 was the annual affiliation fee to the National Union of Students, which was $16,000.

STUDENT COUNCIL BANK ACCOUNT POSITION Opening balance as of 1 Jan 2017

$11,442.87

Total Debits Total Credits

$35,403.02

Closing balance as at 31 Dec 2017

$1,833.50

Page 50 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

$25,793.65


Level 1 Student Hub Flinders University Bedford Park (08) 8201 2371 fusa@flinders.edu.au Page 51 | FUSA Annual Report 2017

FB.com/fusassociation Instagram.com/ fusassociation twitter.com/ fusassociation

FUSA Annual Report (2017)  
FUSA Annual Report (2017)