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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Music News ....................................3 November Scrapbook...................15 Local Access w/Keith Wilkins.......21

MAgAziNE

Volume 5 • issue 11 • November 2015 WRitERS: terry Canter • Bob Cheesman Corrina Drost  •  Rem Fields Jessica Key  •  Rachael Lamb Dawn Lemay  •  Shobha N. Lizaso Scotti Moore  •  Liz Stokes Keith Wilkins PhotogRAPhERS: Jordan Kruger • Neal Nachman

Album Reviews ...........................23 Club Calendar..............................26 Event Calendar ...........................27 PuBLiShER/EDitoR: Neal Nachman

DiRECtoR oF SALES & PRoMotioNS: Liz Stokes gRAPhiC ARtiSt: Neal Nachman

DiRECtoR oF MuLti-MEDiA PRoDuCtioNS: Kenny Moore ACCouNt EXECutiVES: Liz Stokes LEgAL CouNSEL: Shobha N. Lizaso

EDitoRiAL iNquiRiES: editorial@fullaccessmagazine.com

PuBLiShED By: Full Access Magazine • 4211 E. Busch Blvd., Suite D • tampa, FL 33617 813.400.3110 (office) • 813.200.3916 (Fax) © 2015 ALL RightS RESERVED • No part of Full Access Magazine may be reproduced in any form by any means without prior written consent from Full Access Magazine. ViSit uS oN thE WEB @ www.fullaccessmagazine.com


Phil Collins' 'Warts and All' Autobiography Arriving in 2016 Phil Collins has announced that he'll release his autobiography in October 2016. "Several times over the last few years, I have been asked to write a biography, but never felt that the time was right - until now," Collins said. "Having found the right publisher in Penguin Random House, I am ready to go on record about my life in music with all the highs and all the lows and to tell the story from my point of view, warts and all!" Crown Archetype, a subsidiary of Penguin Random House, will publish Collins' stilluntitled tome in the U.S., ABC News reports. Crown Archetype editorial director Tricia Boczkowski said the "unflinchingly honest" memoir would show "a Phil Collins that not many people know." The memoir will be published by Century in the United Kingdom, and that company's director Ben Dunn said of Collins' book, "The early material is simply breathtaking." Dunn added that the memoir is "one of the last great untold stories" and "something we've all been desperate to read," NME reports. The book will likely cover Collins' stint as one of rock's premier drummers, his ascension to Rock and Roll Hall of Famer as the frontman of Genesis and his own successful, Grammy-winning solo career; Collins remains one of just three singers – including Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney – to sell over 100 million copies as both a solo artist and as part of a group. Collins is also the latest rocker to pen his life story, joining recent rockers-turnedwriters like Morrissey, Johnny Marr, John Fogerty and Patti Smith. Although Collins has finally agreed to pen his memoir, this won't be his first work as an author: In 2012, Collins wrote The Alamo and Beyond: A Collector's Journey, which focused on the singer's museum-sized collection of artifacts from the Battle of the Alamo. Collins donated his entire Alamo collection to the state of Texas in 2014.

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Luke Bryan, Willie Nelson to Anchor New Daytona Speedway Festival More than 40 of the biggest stars in country music are on track to play the firstever Country 500 Festival at Daytona International Speedway next Memorial Day weekend. And the lineup veers all over the country map, with contemporary stars like Luke Bryan and Florida Georgia Line sharing space with traditional-country icons like Willie Nelson and crossovers such as Kid Rock. Lady Antebellum is also scheduled for the inaugural event, suggesting the Grammywinning trio's hiatus while Charles Kelley launches a solo tour won't last all that long. While Bryan is closing out the festival Sunday night, May 29th, and Willie Nelson, Kid Rock and a special homecoming for Florida Georgia Line are all slated for Saturday, Friday night's headliner is yet to be revealed. An announcement is due November 3rd, along with dozens of other acts performing throughout the weekend on three specially designed stages. In a clever twist, fans will be able to camp in the Daytona Speedway infield, placing them at the center of the festival and the racetrack. In addition, festivalgoers will have the opportunity to engage with many of the performers at artist meet-and-greets, which will be located throughout pit road and the garages. The inaugural Country 500 will take place in Daytona, Florida, May 27th to 29th, 2016. Grateful Dead's Phil Lesh Reveals Bladder Cancer Battle Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh canceled a pair of October concerts after revealing that he is battling bladder cancer. In a letter to fans on Facebook, apologizing for the nixed Phil & Friends shows, Lesh wrote, "I was diagnosed with bladder cancer in early October, and have spent the last few weeks at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale doing tests and eventually surgery to remove the tumors."

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However, Lesh calmed fans' concerns by letting them know that his prognosis is positive and that he expects to make a full recovery. "I am very fortunate to have the pathology reports show that the tumors are all non-aggressive, and that there is no indication that they have spread," Lesh said. "So thanks to my local doctor Cliff Sewell, and the incredible team at the Mayo Clinic, all is well and I can return to normal activities in two weeks from my surgery." In recent weeks, Lesh had canceled his scheduled appearances at his Terrapin Crossroads restaurant and venue in San Rafael, California due to "unforeseen circumstances." Lesh's October 24th and 25th dates with Chris Robinson were cancelled due to the bassist's recovery, but he promises "we will reschedule these shows as soon as we can." Lesh previously battled prostate cancer in 2006. "Keep a lookout for a free Grate Room show before I leave for the East Coast shows," Lesh told Bay Area fans. "I also plan to pop in and jam in the bar before we leave, so I hope to see you there at Terrapin." Bobby Brown to Publish 'Raw, Unvarnished' Memoir Next Year Bobby Brown will detail his career in music and marriage to the late singer Whitney Houston in a new memoir, fittingly titled My Prerogative, set to be published next June via Dey Street Books, The Associated Press reports. Brown said that My Prerogative was written after the death of his and Houston's only daughter, Bobbi Kristina, which the singer called in a statement, "one of the most agonizing traumas I had ever experienced." Bobbi Kristina died in July, having been hospitalized after she was found unconscious in a bathtub at her home in Roswell, Georgia in late January. "I was surprised by how therapeutic it was to work on this project, to look at the entire arc of my life and to realize that although there has been considerable pain, I have also been incredibly blessed," Brown said. "I hope my fans and other readers of this book will be entertained by this trip into the crazy, exciting, fascinating

world of Bobby Brown. And I hope they will feel that I have been as honest and open with them in these pages as I have tried to be my entire life." Dey Street Books called the book "raw and unvarnished" and said it would "set the record straight" about Brown's career and tumultuous marriage to Houston from 1992 to 2007. Houston herself was found dead in a bathtub in 2012. In the memoir, Brown will also open up about his own struggles with drugs and alcohol, and his various run-ins with the law over the years. But amidst all the scandal, My Prerogative will feature stories from Brown's sprawling, three decades in music: The singer co-founded the New Jack Swing group New Edition in 1982 before embarking on a massively successful solo career, which included hits like "Girlfriend," "Humpin' Around," "Every Little Step" and, of course, "My Prerogative." My Prerogative was co-written with journalist Nick Chiles, who has also helped pen books with Reverend Al Sharpton and former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick. Reba Named Guest Announcer of Neil Patrick Harris's 'Best Time Ever' Reba McEntire will appeared on Neil Patrick Harris' Best Time Ever on October 20th, as the show's newest celebrity guest announcer. The prime-time series, which features Harris and his guests in a variety of comedy skits, stunts, pranks, musical performances and audience giveaways, airs live on NBC at 8 p.m. ET. Reba joins a list of weekly guests whose names include Reese Witherspoon, Alec Baldwin, Shaquille O’Neal and Jack Black. As fans of the show know, the guest announcer frequently does far more than just announce. During this week's episode, Black brought the show to a close with a circus-worthy performance of Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild," surrounded by acrobats and fire-breathing dancers. Reba could wrap up the show with a song of her own, or take part in a number of other sketches.

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Chase Rice is well prepared for the pressure cooker that is being a professional musician. Born and raised in Daytona Beach, Florida, he grew up playing football and eventually earned a spot at the University of North Carolina as a linebacker. When an injury ended his career in collegiate athletics, Rice traded the pigskin for a six-string; he's been writing music ever since. But there were a couple more stops for Chase before he packed his bags for Nashville to work full-time as a songwriter. Notably, Hendrick Motorsports offered him a position on one of their NASCAR pit crews after graduation. Never afraid to embrace high-stress scenarios, Rice landed himself an audition for Survivor: Nicaragua back in 2010. He proved to be quite the contender, finishing as one of the final three contestants. Even though he had been quietly honing his craft since the pit-crew days, Rice deliberately distanced those aspirations from his Survivor persona. “I did my best to make sure I wasn't the guy who went on TV and tried to play the guitar and sing,” he said. Some might have succumbed to such an opportunistic impulse, but not Chase. “I wanted all of that to disappear, so I could make it all about the music,” he said. Over the last five years, he set out to accomplish exactly that. Chase's trail has been peppered by a series of EPs and LPs, each being more popular than it’s

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by Rem Fields

predecessor. His major-label debut was 2014's “Ignite the Night.” The album reached the top of the Billboard Country chart, as well as the all-inclusive Billboard 200; it’s featured single, “Ready Set Roll,” went platinum. After a successful tour promoting the record, he was invited to open for Kenny Chesney, whose “The Big Revival Tour” played 61 concerts between March and August of this past year. Never one to stay idle, Rice recharged his batteries come September, only to hit the road again in October for his third headlining tour, the aptly named “JD and Jesus Tour.” (If there was ever a pair of icons to replace country's emblematic hat and boots...) I spoke with Chase while he was in Nashville between shows. Already six stops into “JD and Jesus,” he very much respects the heightened expectations of those who go to see him perform as a headliner. “There's more pressure,” he said. “You better bring it even more, because the stakes are higher.” If Chase Rice has proven anything in his 30 years of life, it is that he thrives under a spotlight. The latest to be cast upon him comes from the online media venture Vevo. The company selected Chase to be featured in their LIFT series of videos, which serves as a platform for a behind-the-scenes peek at some of music's most promising artists. A video clip dedicated to exploring Chase's

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influences begins with him pulling up next to a grain silo in his far-from-new Chevy pickup truck. Out walks Rice, clad in a “Reagan/ Bush '84” campaign shirt and a hat featuring his personal brand (and motto), “H.D.E.U.” (head down, eyes up). Before pulling out the Garth Brooks cassette tape he listens to in his truck, before pointing out that two of his idols – Kenny Chesney and Eric Church – are now peers of his, Chase talks about his dad. It soon becomes clear how the youngest of three Rice brothers has done so much in life. No matter what the endeavor, he is guided by a self-awareness founded on the rare combination of a father's wisdom and a son who is receptive enough to appreciate it. This 3-minute segment portrays Chase as an artist on the brighter side of an existential dilemma. He admits to having strayed from his roots in the pursuit of success over the last few years, a wrong turn he is quickly trying to right. “I'm at a point in my life where I don't care what genre my music is,” Chase admitted. He went on to explain how he hadn’t been true to himself when attempting to conform to expectations within country music. “If you're writing songs focused on what people want to hear, it takes away from the creativity,” he said, acknowledging that some of his releases perhaps focused too intently on beers, buddies and babes. “But when you're writing for yourself,” Rice continued, “that's a very dangerous combination for talented songwriters.” Dangerous in the best way possible, of course, like NASCAR. Given his track record, it should come as little surprise that Chase's suggested course of action is applicable to both successful musicians and race-car drivers; “When that happens, you better hold on tight,” he advises. Chase's achievements as a musician owe much to this mentality. He is not only

driven, but is also prepared to change gears at a moment's notice. Like a pilot operating at breakneck speeds, decision making is his greatest ally. Rice is certainly as skilled as he is thoughtful when it comes to his craft, and it was his father who taught him how to have this drive. Not too long ago, while rummaging through the back of a barn situated on the Rice family's old homestead, Chase stumbled upon his dad's old jukebox. “That's the first music I ever heard,” he said. Whether it was Chuck Berry's “Johnny B. Goode,” or Patsy Cline's “Crazy,” he treasures the freedom he had to explore rather than inherit his family's musical preferences. “My dad put the music in front of me,” Rice said, “but let me choose what to play.” The jukebox now sits in his home in Nashville. Though its mechanical parts needed to be restored, all of the records it sheltered were in perfect condition. He speaks of them like old friends. For perhaps the first time in his career, as he propels forward toward country-music stardom, Chase Rice has taken a moment to look in the rear-view mirror. Chase Rice returns to the Tampa Bay area on November 15th, performing with Kip Moore, Cadillac Three and Michael Ray. This show is part of Ribfest and will take place at Vinoy Park in St. Petersburg.

Chase Rice will be performing with Kip Moore, Cadillac Three and Michael Ray during Ribfest at Vinoy Park in St. Petersburg on November 15th. Tickets are still available for this show. Full Access Magazine

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Bobby Blotzer has been the drummer of Ratt for the last 34 years. Despite the group's episodic hiccups and hiatuses, he's made a career out of it that has lasted longer than many marriages. Hell, he's been in the band longer than I've been alive. Bobby and I spoke the day before his 57th birthday and in the midst of Ratt's latest litigious identity crisis. Control of Ratt is maintained through a corporate entity, WBS, Inc., which was founded by Blotzer and two other members of the band, guitarist Warren DeMartini and vocalist Stephen Pearcy. The latter lost his stake in the company after he stopped touring with them back in 2000, leaving Bobby and Warren to split ownership of Ratt as a brand. They carried on through 2014. Pearcy even returned along the way, joining once more in 2006, only to leave again last year. His most recent departure prompted DeMartini to take a step back from touring as well. Bobby, however, wanted to keep rocking – and so he did. For him to be able to do so, Blotzer argues, he had to take the helm of WBS, relegating DeMartini's involvement to non-voting shares since the guitarist was no longer an active participant in business operations. The problem is that Ratt is now a fragmented

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by Rem Fields

band. Bassist Juan Croucier has been performing as Ratt's Juan Croucier: The Other Voice of Ratt without endorsement from WBS. Blotzer, in turn, formed his Bobby Blotzer's Ratt Experience, though having two bands offer the same product ended up clashing and causing confusion among promoters. To make matters worse, Croucier's splinter group was still using the trademarked Ratt logo. After years of litigation, Bobby (as CEO of WBS) was awarded rights to the Ratt trademark in September. This prompted him to reform the Ratt Experience as Ratt proper, which brought DeMartini out of the woodwork to reassert his stake as the band's co-owner. The two are now duking it out in court, with Blotzer winning the first battle in the war; the attempted restraining order that would have prevented him from performing as Ratt was deemed invalid. “I've always been the guy in the band that's trying to keep the group together,” Bobby said, “or even trying to get the guys back together when we'd have our breakups.” No longer interested in serving as the glue that binds the original lineup together, Blotzer has turned to a new modus operandi: to prove to critics and fans alike that his Ratt isn't just the real Ratt, but also the best one.

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Ratt is now the same lineup from his Ratt Experience, consisting of musicians he first jammed with back in March for a one-off show at a club in Vegas. He was only recently recovered from surgery correcting an issue with his neck, one of many lingering ailments brought about by the physicality of banging out bombastic back beats over the four decades he's been behind the drums. Blotzer could feel their chemistry from the very first soundcheck. “We started digging into the deeper Ratt material and everybody, including myself, was blown away at how good it was,” he said. “I knew on stage that night – it was time to get to work.” Bobby has always aimed to treat his band's music as a commodity, and the band itself as an enterprise, something he thinks Ratt's previous iterations lost sight of. To summarize his stance, Blotzer emphasizes, “We should treat it with respect.” This is not to say that there isn't any room to mix business with pleasure. “I love to play drums. Working with this new band has reminded me of that,” he said. “Believe me, I was pretty beat down over the whole thing with Ratt, because it was such a dysfunctional, not-fun situation.” But the Bobby on the other end of my phone call was no longer burdened by the heaviness of inter-band conflict. He was focused on moving forward. He's off to a good start. On October 18th, Bobby joined the Foo Fighters onstage to perform a cover of Queen's “Tie Your Mother Down.” Not only did the performance

earn its fair share of virulent exposure across the world wide web, but it showed that Bobby's more than ready to rock. He kept up with the Foos, after all. This is important to Bobby Blotzer as he approaches his 60th birthday. He sees himself and his contemporaries as next in line for a procession currently led by the great acts of the 60s and 70s. It is important to Bobby that his generation carries on to curate the legacy of rock and roll. “When I was growing up, you didn't see any old, hard rockers. This is the first time,” he said. “Now, it is becoming our turn.” At the end of the day, through all its ups and downs, Bobby Blotzer is no different than he was 42 years ago when he first put stick to cymbal and skin. He has a vision for where his drumming can take him and the drive to get there. Instead of slowing down to accommodate the often discordant demands of his former bandmates, Blotzer intends to let the quality of Ratt's revamped lineup speak for itself. St. Petersburg is set to host one of the band's first shows since Blotzer's Ratt dropped “Experience” off of it’s designation on the marquee. See them on November 6th at Ferg's Concert Courtyard alongside 80s glam-metal staples, Warrant and L.A. Guns, an opportunity he does not take lightly. “I can see and feel the acceptance,” Bobby said. “It was a big deal for me to make this decision; there were lots of sleepless nights and stress. I'm proud of my band – I'm going to be doing this until I can't anymore.”

Ratt will be performing with Warrant & L.A. Guns at Ferg’s Concert Courtyard in St. Pete on November 6th. Show starts at 6 pm.

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Counting Crows, the American alternative rock band with hits, such as “Big Yellow Taxi,” “A Long December,” and “Accidentally In Love,” are back out on the road again as headliners to support their latest album, Somewhere Under Wonderland. The eagerly anticipated record, which debuted at #6 on the Billboard Top 200 charts upon its’ release in late 2014, is the first studio album of original material to be released by the band in six years. The compilation of 9 brand new songs plus 2 demo tracks offers songs, which still have the distinctive sound and lyrical components fans are accustomed to, yet with a touch of reinvigorated confidence. Full Access Magazine spoke with the introspective, dreadlocked lead singer, Adam Duritz, about the bands’ latest artistic achievement, current tour, and projects that have fueled their growth since 2008’s studio release, Saturday Nights & Sunday Mornings. Duritz begins by explaining, “The only reason there was a break was because I was working on a play (Black Sun with playwright Stephen Belber). I didn’t want to take any time off from the band, but I also didn’t want to write for two different things at the same time. That seems really confusing, so I just wrote for the play and we made an album of other

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by Tandra Lamia

people’s songs with the band. We never took any time off and we were still touring so honestly, for us, it never seemed like a break at all.” The album of covers Duritz refers to is Underwater Sunshine (Or What We Did On Our Summer Vacation), released in 2012. “You gotta remember that for a band, there is a period of collaboration that goes on when you turn those little skeletons into actual songs. That’s the same thing we did on the coverage album. They’re other people’s songs, but we took the ideas of those songs and we all got together and built our own versions of them, just like we do on every other record.” Duritz also credits the making of the coverage album with the improvement of the band’s live performances. “When we made the coverage record, everyone took a little more ownership of it, maybe because they weren’t my songs, so people were a little more proprietary themselves. Something happened after that record, when we went out to play it live. Everything had become a little more daring. We’ve always been a pretty good live band, but we took a big leap forward about 3 years ago.” Having been the Counting Crows’ primary songwriter for nearly 25 years, Duritz has widely been known for lyrics which seem

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to touch on the fragility and instability of our emotions as a human race. However, one notable difference in his lyrical approach for Somewhere Under Wonderland, is the conscious shift from autobiographical writing to a more storyteller-type vibe. He comments, “You wanna write things that are true. I felt like I could write about myself, because that was something I knew about and I felt it would be safe. So I’ve always written songs that were just about me, kind of. When I was writing for the play, it was the first time I’d ever written for other characters or for women’s voices, ya know, people who weren’t me. And I discovered, in doing that, that I really liked it, number one, but that it also wasn’t really important that the songs be about me. It was just as important that they be about how I feel. I felt like I wrote some of the best songs of my life in the play. I was able to set them in other characters’ lives and still write passionately about how I feel, just with different stories.” Duritz also explains that the shift was more of a process than an epiphany. “I wanted to write different kinds of songs, but I wasn’t really aware of it at first. I was getting the inspiration to start songs, but then I would look at them and they’d seem wrong somehow. I think it had to do with the fact that they weren’t set in my life. I think it’s like if everything you’ve written has been blue your whole life and you thought of blue as the measure of quality, and then you write something that’s like, red, you might not recognize it as a really good red. It might just look like a shitty blue. I think that’s what was going on.” Having bits and pieces of songs proved frustrating for Duritz, so he and his bandmates would crash at his New York loft for a week every month to bounce ideas off each other. “The first time we did that we went through lots of ideas, excavated stuff from my iphone, my computer, my songbooks…all these notes I had everywhere! A couple days after they left, I finished “God Of Ocean Tides” because we had gone through a lot of it. Then a month later we got together again and in six days we wrote “Earthquake Driver,” “Scarecrow,” “Dislocation,” “Cover Up The

Sun,” and “Elvis Went To Hollywood.” It’s like the lion share of the record. No one should be able to write 5 songs in 6 days like that”, he laughs. “My mind was finally clear. Things were really good and all of a sudden it just poured out. I just couldn’t seem to stop finishing songs.” When asked about the prospect of performing these new songs live, Duritz says, “We’re just all really excited about it! The funny thing is we’ve been all over the world playing this record…New Zealand, Australia, all across Canada, twice in Europe. It feels like The Beatles in reverse. It’s cool that you can go to the other side of the world and people will actually show up to see you play. This will be the first time we’ve played it in America since the record’s come out. It’s great to come home and do it.” Fans can also expect that no two set lists will be the same. As Duritz explains, “I think what happens with a lot of bands is they get bored with what they’re doing because they’re doing the same thing every night. We never went through that because it occurred to me in the beginning that the one thing that would kill you is doing something over and over that you didn’t want to do. So, if we didn’t want to play a song, we just didn’t play it that night. We’ve protected ourselves from getting bored. We’ve been changing the set list every night for 20 some odd years. That way I’m not sick of “Mr. Jones”. I love “Mr. Jones” and one of the reasons I love it is that we don’t play it every night.” For a man who feels songwriting is “my life” and readily admits he’d be unemployed if he weren’t a musician, the talented Duritz and his equally-talented bandmates seem to have found the right recipe for “Hangin’ Around.”

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What does the rubber capital of the world, The National Marble Tournament, Devo, Chrissie Hynde, David Allen Coe and Lebron James all have in common? Akron, Ohio! Better add one more to that list, Red Sun Rising! This five piece “Thread” band consists of Ryan Williams (Guitar), Mike Protich (Vocals, Guitar), Tyler Valendza (Guitar), Ricky Miller (Bass, Vocals) and Pat Gerasia (Drums). With their signing to Razor & Tie Records, it gave them the opportunity to write and record their first major full length release, “Polyester Zeal.” The first single, “The Otherside,” has etched them into the history books in fine fashion, being the only debut single from a band in 2015 to hit number one on Billboard Magazine’s “Mainstream Rock” chart. If you haven't yet picked up or downloaded “Zeal,” I would put it on your to do list, because they have only just begun. While out in support of their first release, I held these five guys captive for just long enough to get the skinny on what's ticking in those musical minds of theirs. Just so you know, we walked away from this with only minor scratches and bruises. All joking aside, we dive right in. We start out by discussing who has been their biggest influence, the push behind them in their quest in music. It comes down to family, with mom being the number one

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by Scotti Moore

answer. Tyler talks about the strength that has been instilled in him by his mother, while Ryan credits his mom with the purchase of his first guitar and always encouraging him to keep pushing forward. Mike says, “I guess we are all momma’s boys. She has given up so much in support of my dream. The financial backing, giving me a place to live when I’m not on the road with the band and that ultimate understanding through the struggle. Now that things are turning around, I can't wait to return that support.” Even with a record deal, it doesn't always mean success. Obviously, it is the first step in getting out there. With “The Otherside” being released, I ask when did it become evident that things were starting to turn around. “I saw the first guitar cover of the single on YouTube and that was unbelievable,” Tyler says. Mike continues, “When people come up and start telling us how “The Otherside” has helped them get through a really hard time. We know what that song has meant to us. But to hear that, it puts a stamp on the fact that we aren't just playing music but we are touching lives and helping to turn a negative into a positive. It's moments like those that allow you to look back at all the hard work we put in to get here and truly puts that justification on it.” One of the most difficult things in the music

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world is to set yourself apart from the rest of the pack. You need to establish an identity; a musical signature. I asked Ryan what went into the process of finding that originality. He says, “When we first started to shop Red Sun Rising, the feedback was that are songs were to different. That we didn't have an identity, even though we thought we did. Now, that seems to be what they are looking for and we got signed on that principal. When you listen to “Polyester Zeal,” you can tell how we don't like just one style; how we love all types of music. Our identity is to be ourselves and to not really be labeled and limit it.” The road is tough place to be, having to be with each other on a constant basis. Being away from the loved ones, finding a shower, diet and all the other things that you take for granted, when at home seem to become elusive. But in the life of a musician, you know this and you focus on the light at the end of tunnel. I asked what is the best part of touring. Ricky says, “I love to see all the different places and meeting so many different people. Getting to hear and see the reaction to what we have invested our lives into is pretty amazing.” Pat adds, “It's great to be able to call up friends that you haven't seen in a while and let them know you will be coming to town. The ability to rekindle those friendships that you have developed over the years. When you are on tour, it makes it that much easier to stay in touch.” They all agree on the fact that being on stage and interacting with the fans, new and old, tops the list though. I have known these guys for a while now, so I have had the pleasure of being able to

watch their evolution. I have seen their sacrifice and putting their all into the fire. But I want to know what is the biggest adjustment they have had to make to accommodate their individual futures in music. Ricky says, “Leaving the security of my family behind and quitting my job.” The soft spoken Tyler says, “The volume of my speaking voice,” as we all laugh. We have been poking fun at how quiet he has been talking throughout the conversation. “Converting the spending habits. You have to adjust to not knowing when you are getting paid and not knowing how much that is,” Ryan says shaking his head. Mike adds, “Scheduling, knowing when it's feasible to go home without it affecting the flow of the band. I have to keep a schedule for the whole family and send it to them in hopes that our schedules can coincide with each other's. We can make the most of it when the opportunity presents itself.” Pat adds, “The comfort level I had been use to in life. Hitting the road, you have to throw that out the window. But to this point it has definitely been worth it.” In order to really do these guys justice, I would need to dedicate an entire issue to them. I guess the easiest way to describe Red Sun Rising is simply. They are the most sincere, hard working and straight forward group of individuals I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. Once I spent three days on the road with them, I honestly can't remember having more fun at any point of my life. Years ago, I seen a big role for them in the music scene and I couldn't be happier for their current success and what the future holds for these gents. “Polyester Zeal” is a must for your listening catalog.

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by Scotti Moore

Now that Pop Evil have released their fourth full length album and have picked up where “Onyx” had left off, they continue their progression in the only direction they know, “Up.” This Grand Rapids, MI based group consists of Leigh Kakaty on Lead Vocals, Dave Grahs on Rhythm and Lead Guitar/Backing Vocals, Matt DiRito on Bass Guitar/ Backing Vocals, Nick Fuelling on Lead and Rhythm Guitar and Chachi Riot on Drums. When the opportunity to have a sit down with Lead Vocalist Leigh Kakaty at the world famous Machine Shop in Flint, MI came about, I didn't hesitate to jump at the chance. We found a place backstage and dove right in. Starting out as a cover band and breaking into the world of original music is not always easy. I ask Leigh what that transition has been like. “It has been a long haul. I think you have those moments where you kind of remember your roots, but it has been awesome. Those cover days helped us appreciate the hard work. While everyone was telling us to move to New York or LA to catch our break, I wanted to stay in Michigan, where it is all about the working class. I figured if we were gonna catch that break, it was going to be here. If not, I would understand that, because I'm a Michigan boy. We are

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loud and proud here in our great state.” Being that Michigan is such a working class state, it's easy for life to get in the way of your passion. You really need a strong support system. Kakaty starts to tell me how much their families have meant to furthering their aspirations in music. “With Pop Evil especially. What people don't see is how instrumental they were in getting us to where we are. Our parents are still really involved to this day. Our first really big festival tour in Europe, I brought my mom. I wanted her to share in it.” When you reach the point of success that Pop Evil has, the opportunity to tour with peers is always a great experience, but it seems there is that one illusive group that you have always wanted to tour with. “Wow, I'm going to have to choose two and first off, it would have to be Pearl Jam,” Leigh says. “We were just out in Seattle for the first time and it was mind blowing. Having to compete with all the iconic bands from there really brings the best out of you. Second would definitely be the man himself, Kid Rock.” There are always two sides to everything and touring is no different. “The best part is the frat party of festival season,” Kakaty says with a smile. “Being outside in the sunshine of summer. Now the other side of it is having to be away from the family.

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Fortunately, we have them with us a lot, so it keeps the downside out of it a bit.” Changes are inevitable as your career progresses. You pick up on the do’s and dont’s. I asked Leigh what was the biggest change he had to make to help his path in music. Leigh explains, “My health for sure. I quit drinking in January. Obviously Matt has been a big inspiration. Him and I use to throw down from an alcoholic stand point. Matt and I were pretty rowdy, but I think that making the decision to be healthy for my voice and responsible for our fans. I have had to be smarter and start taking care of my voice.” When it is all said and done what kind of legacy will you leave behind? When I asked Leigh this question, this is what he had to say, “You are really doing your job Scotti and making me think with these questions. I have never really thought about that. I guess that would be a fans perspective. I feel like we have a lot to prove. Even though we have had three number ones off our last album, I feel we are just tipping the iceberg here as far as our identity goes.” One of the most touching and heartfelt songs I have heard is “Torn To Pieces” and with the footage of Leigh’s father on the TV within the video, it just takes it to the next level. “That is real video of my dad. I didn't want to release that song. When the guys heard it, they really pushed to record it and as fate has it, it became a pretty popular track.” I asked Leigh what were some of the bands that put the drive into him. “We grew up listening to Bob Seger, Kid Rock and Eminem. They really believe in the music they put out,” he says. I hear something different in this latest Pop Evil album. I asked what has changed in the recording process. “Up to this point we have had to walk a fine line, but with “UP,” we finally said that we are going to

do what we want to do, what we feel we need to do. We wanted to write the hooks and have fun with it this time. With the success of “Onyx,” it opened up the door to do that.” Leigh continues, “Listening to the new album, I feel you are going to hear our band finally start to feel confident and start taking risks. We strived to be different and I think you will notice that with the first single ‘Footsteps.’ To me, it doesn't sound like anything over the past 20 years.” With such a focus being put on the live show these days and having the experience at this point with several tours under their belt, I wonder if that influences the writing style. “Absolutely it does,” Kakaty says. “The fans want to be entertained and they notice what is going on up there. With the new songs, we took into consideration the live aspect of Pop Evil and it is really going to show. This is the longest the band has seen a line up stick together, so with that the confidence has grown and it makes it all that much easier for me as the singer.” Sitting down and talking with Leigh Kakaty was a real honor. He is a true class act with an amazing passion for not only his band but music as a whole. He has an appreciation for the fans that is undeniable and always remembers where he comes from. It keeps him focused and ready to work as hard as possible. With something to prove to the world as their motivation, you are guaranteed to get the best of Pop Evil each and every time.

is currently seeking writers. Please call 813-400-3110. Florida’s Largest Entertainment Magazine

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Exploring Gary Schutt's music, and especially reading the lyrics to his songs, reveals that this hard rock artist has an intriguing variety in his style and a spark of genius in his imaginative songwriting. With ten albums out and another about to be released, this is obviously an art and a lifelong passion for the prolific guitarist, singer, and songwriter in Tampa, Florida. "I love the creative process of challenging myself to come up with new material," Gary said. "My songs are random stories drawn from my experiences. Each song is completely different." Take "A Million Miles an Hour," for example. It's the story of a comet hurtling toward earth - written from the comet's perspective. Then there's "Pornipulation," which makes a poignant point about human nature immersed in and exploited by our culture. "I'm in Love with the Girl that I Hate" is one of Gary's favorites, with a relatable theme about relationship misery, confusion, and "excruciating pleasure." He also has a song called "Lost Soul Mate" and a song about the first home computer system. Another fun piece is his electrifying performance of the Star Wars' "Imperial March" from The Empire Strikes Back, which is a nerd favorite of mine.

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by Rachael Lamb

I caught up with Gary for a phone interview as he was traveling home from playing with the band Takara and his longtime friend Jeff Soto. Gary, who was part of the band in the '90s, fills in occasionally, like this time, when their bass player had a prior commitment. Soto and Schutt have kept in touch through the years and continue to write songs together. Playing with Jeff's band is worth a long drive - it invigorates and refreshes Gary, adding diversity to his career experiences. "It lifts my spirits, so I can return to the local scene with a great attitude," he said. Raised in Monticello, NY, Gary took inspiration at a young age from his father, a professional Catskills drummer. He began playing the drums before his feet could reach the pedals, and soon he learned guitar, bass, piano, and singing. After graduating from the Berklee College of Music, Gary started teaching there. One day, Gary got an important telephone call. He had moved home, didn't want to keep teaching lessons, and didn't know exactly what to do with himself and his life. The caller presented a golden opportunity. Jeff's drummer Mark was calling around, looking for a bassist. Gary jumped at it. His parents loaned him money, and he drove

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out to L.A. Once he arrived, he learned a bunch of songs quickly, auditioned, and landed the spot. With Jeff Soto's new band SLAM, Gary traveled around the world, performing in Spain, Germany, Italy, France, Holland, Belgium, England, Ireland, U.S., Brazil and Australia. He found the crowds of fans that thronged to their concerts aweinspiring. Fewer fans turn out in the U.S. tour, but their enthusiasm definitely excited and inspired the band. Many influences have impacted Gary's own music, including Van Halen, Priest, Journey, Foo Fighters, Rush, and Joe Satriani. He has enjoyed the chance to meet and perform with several of his idols. The famous musicians that Schutt has performed with include Billy Idol, Alice Cooper, Journey, Collective Soul, Queen, Transiberian Orchestra, and many more. He once played a Journey cover and Journey came on stage with him during it. So he was actually singing a Journey song with Journey. That was a career highlight for him, a lifetime dream come true. Among his varied achievements, Gary can count the Gary Schutt Band winning the local round of the Hard Rock Rising 2012 global band competition, beating 12,000 bands worldwide to be one of the 86 GLOBAL finalists competing to play at the Hard Rock Calling Festival in London. He's been featured in multiple magazines, with his albums receiving glowing reviews. I wondered what Gary likes and dislikes about being an artist in Tampa Bay, and how that compares with the way he felt about living in LA. He moved to Florida after the 1992 Northridge earthquake. "You're close to everything out in L.A.," he answered. "But it's expensive. And I don't enjoy selling myself. I don't like walking into record labels and trying to convince them, like, 'Hey, I'm the next big shit, and you need to sign me.' Here in Tampa, I have to be my own advertisement, by sharing on social media accounts about concerts and releases. But we have been able to be part of the cover band scene

here in the Tampa area the past twenty years, and that's been awesome." But local performances have challenges also. "Sometimes, we're playing at a sports bar, but no one is really paying attention, and the band is asked to quiet down. We still have to be professionals, play through that, and not be dicks about it." He laughed. One thing he loves about his band, Category Three, is its versatility, because it's three bands in one. It's a cover band, it's his own band, and it's an audio tribute band. There are multiple advantages of this combination. "Set up is easy, for one thing," he said. He explained the audio tribute part of it. " A couple years ago someone turned me on to an Ozzy Osbourne impersonator in the area, and when we checked him out, he impressed us. He does great impersonations and still performs with us." What's next for Gary Schutt and Category Three? "We're very excited. November 11th our first concept album, Under Sedation, is being released. This started taking shape way back in 1990." It will be part rock opera, part musical, part metal, part melodic rock. This promises to be a "rollercoaster ride of a story" with dark and twisted themes. He hopes fans keep up with his productions. "I'm still making music, and still loving what I do, even though I'm not signed with a major label. I hope my fans explore what I'm putting out, spread the word, download the songs, and share with their friends."

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Keith Wilkins is a Syndicated Music Columnist, Songwriter, Promoter and Guest Radio Show Interviewer. You can reach him at keith@fullaccessmagazine.com

BAND/ARTIST NEWS: A documentary film is currently being made about the popular 1960’s Tampa Bay band, The Fabulous Rockers. Formed in the late 1950’s, The Fabulous Rockers became one of Tampa Bay’s most popular bands in the 1960’s, and were recognized by many as the most versatile performing show group in the southeastern United States. The Fabulous Rockers recorded and released two original compositions in 1961, “Would I Still Be Loving You” and “Stranger.” The documentary, entitled “The Fabulouse Rockers Forever!,” is being produced by Emmy award winning documentary producer, Lynn Marvin Dingfelder. The documentary will feature interviews with band members, fans, and several local celebrities including Jack Harris and Tedd Webb of 970 WFLA. “The Fabulouse Rockers Forever!,” is scheduled to premier during the bands reunion concert which will take place on January 23, 2016 at the Charles Davis Event Center at the Florida State Fairgrounds. Orlando pop singer, Ashley Nicole, will make a special guest appearance at the Clermont Comic Con which will be held at the Clermont Performing Arts Center in Clermont, Florida on November 22. Tampa Hard Rock band, Demented Truth, have been hard at work working on new songs. The band plans on debuting their new songs live at their up-and-coming shows. NEW RELEASES: Tampa Bay based progressive metal band, Circle II Circle, released thier new album titled “Reign of Darkness” last month. “Reign of Darkness” is Circle II Circle’s 7th studio album to date, and is also their first album featuring their new drummer, Marcelo Moreira. Moreira recently replaced former Circle II Circle drummer, Adam Sagan, who had departed the band some 21

time ago. To support the release of their new album, Circle II Circle are currently planning an up-coming tour which will run through Europe, South America, and the United States. Orlando pop singer, Ashley Nicole, released her newest song, “I am not Weak,” last month. IN THE STUDIO: Area bands and artists currently in the studio working on new material/albums include Decepcion (Largo), Earl Foote (St. Petersburg), Into the Grave (Brandon), Kenny McGee’s Machine (Tampa), 4Ever Endeavour (Tampa), Maybe If You Hit It (Orlando), Phineas J. Whoopie (Fort Lauderdale), Monstrosity (Fort Lauderdale), Shattered (Hudson), Psykotribe (Tampa), and Geri X (St. Petersburg). UP-COMING EVENTS: The 2015 “Best in the Bay” Battle of the Bands competition will be held next month on December 19 at Quaker Steak and Lube in Clearwater. Some of the area bands that will perform include Undertone, Screaming at the Silence, Provocative Audio, Jack Mantra, Rising Down, The Time Framed, and DevNGrant. Presented by Radio Rejects, the event will help raise money for the 50 Legs 501(c)3 Charity. Admission to the event is free. OTHER NEWS: The historic Porpoise Pub, located in Seminole, burnt down late last month as a result of an early morning fire. Originally built in 1951 as a zoo and mini amusement park, the Porpoise Pub had become one of the major music venues in the Tampa Bay area in recent years. Last month, the Southland Tavern, and the Aging Still both held benefit concerts to help raise money to rebuild the popular venue, and

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help the out-of-work staff. Several more benefit concerts are also currently being planned around the Bay area to help the cause as well, including one that will be held at Jimmy’s Sports Bar in Largo, and one that will take place at the Porpoise Pub property itself. A GoFundMe account has been set up for people who would like to make donations to help rebuild the Porpoise Pub. Donations can be made at: https://www.gofundme.com/wy6vxaek. THIS MONTH IN TAMPA BAY MUSIC SCENE HISTORY: It was 49 years ago this month on November 23rd, 1966 when the St. Petersburg Symphony and and the Tampa Philharmonic agreed to merge in order to form the Florida Gulf Coast Symphony. Representatives from both the St. Petersburg Symphony and the Tampa Philharmonic traveled by boat to the center of Tampa Bay, where they married the two institutions in a symbolic union. It was 47 years ago this month on November 14th, 1968 when The Florida Gulf Coast Symphony kicked off their first season with 43-year-old Irwin Hoffman as it’s music director. Hoffman previously guest conducted the Tampa Philharmonic. It was 32 years ago this month on November 1st, 1983 when Tampa Bay hard rock band, Savatage, released their debut album, “Sirens,” in the UK.

It was 26 years ago this month in November, 1989 when Thrust Magazine made it’s debut. Thrust Magazine would go on to be one of Tampa Bay’s more popular local music scene magazines. It was 25 years ago this month on November 1st, 1990 when Tampa Bay band, Earl Brown and Crosstown, begin their Eastern United States tour. It was 25 years ago this month on November 5th, 1990 when Tampa Bay metal band, Iced Earth, held their last Tampa Bay performance at the Volley Club before embarking on their European tour. It was 25 years ago this month on November 14th, 1990 when Tampa Bay band, Trasid, made their live debut at the Volley Club. It was 25 years ago this month on November 14th, 1990 when Clancy’s began hosting a series of weekly concerts called “The Big Wednesday Concert Series,” showcasing local bands. The first concert featured Tampa Bay band, The Bobby Friss Band. It was 25 years ago this month on November 22nd, 1990 when Biarritz Nightclub hosted their “First Annual Feast of Music,” a benefit concert for the Children’s Home Benefit. The Thanksgiving concert featured performances by area bands The Belle Vue Boyz, Men From Earth, Factory Black, Cry Tough and Cathedral Swing.

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Coheed And Cambria The Color Before The Sun 300 Entertainment gggdf by Terry Canter

After exploring the rich, extensive science fiction saga of The Amory Wars for seven albums, prog rockers Coheed and Cambria are finally ready to make it personal. Where their previous works focused on a fantastical story created by frontman Claudio Sanchez, they lift the sci-fi curtain and shine a spotlight directly onto Sanchez with their eighth album, The Color Before the Sun. No longer hiding behind his creation (the protagonists of which gave his band their name), Sanchez is finally unafraid of how fans might react to a Coheed and Cambria record inspired by the story of Claudio Sanchez of New York rather than Coheed and Cambria Kilgannon of Heaven’s Fence. The result is a refreshingly honest, even inspirational album. In a feature with Team Rock, Sanchez details how The Color Before the Sun was written at a crucial, transitional period in his life. Moving from the wide open spaces of upstate New York to an apartment in Brooklyn, Sanchez and his wife find themselves cramped and compacted into their new home along with the uncertainty of what lies ahead. Written during their time in this apartment, the album accurately portrays that special sense of urban claustrophobia with its tight, confrontational riffs giving way to spacious leads. The album begins with this sort of mindset on opener “Island” and moves in closer with “Eraser”, Sanchez striving for that sense of escape, even wishing for time to be turned backward so that he can live more freely. It’s that essential struggle and desire for more, so present in the post-hardcore records of this decade, that breathes life into this album. 23

Sanchez fights his inner conflict between escapism and acceptance throughout the record. Where “Colors” and “You Got Spirit, Kid” preach the gospel of accepting things as they are and making the best of them, “Eraser” and “Ghost” portray Sanchez with one foot out the door, wanting to be anywhere but where he is at that moment, even on the latter, where he learns he’s going to be a father. “Ghost” is a strippeddown finale to the album’s colorful first half, Sanchez whispering and bearing all to his acoustic guitar. It ends up being the most genuine song on the album, conjuring images of its writing process, Sanchez in the corner of his apartment yearning for little more than the escape of an out-ofbody experience. The next half begins, though, refreshed and vibrant with the arrival of Sanchez’s son, Atlas. Accepting things as they are, good or bad, is a nice mantra to have, but with the pressures of a wife and son at home, Sanchez finds renewed purpose in his work. While “Atlas” itself finds a comfortable post-hardcore color-by-numbers format, its honesty and sentimentality tug at the heartstrings. That formula weighs down the entire album, its predictability buoyed some by genuine emotion. The only song that truly breaks that formula, and ends up being the most interesting on the album, is the one dedicated to us all: “The Audience” is Sanchez at his most spiteful and juvenile, boasting that despite the sort of reaction that this very personal album of his and his band receives, he’ll “still be here when you’re done.” It’s from that aggression that the album pulls its most progressive and listenable moments. And while the ham-fisted push-back of “The Audience” can be somewhat off-putting, the newfound courage that lies therein from gives Sanchez a confident indifference worth praise and recognition. On “Peace to the Mountain,” Sanchez and his family return to their house upstate,

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Sanchez finding closure in the acceptance of his life as it has become. The song is just as bright and inspirational as nearly everything before it, and yet, while many of the songs on The Color Before the Sun do fall into a certain post-hardcore formula that’s used over and over again throughout the album, the journey presented therein makes the difference. The decision to set The Amory Wars aside to make a more personal statement results in a surprisingly rewarding experience, likely as much for the listener as it clearly is for the band. While this sort of autobiographical songwriting can’t be found in the band’s foundation, this new freedom and genuine self-acceptance should be encouraged and even expanded upon in their future works. Janet Jackson Unbreakable Rhythm Nation 33332 by Terry Canter

Janet Jackson is a walking superlative. She can dance routines into legend, infect with her angelic lilt, and preach social ills through Sly and the Family Stone-sampling anthems. An added dose of ambition turns her art into spectacle. The twist is how all of that isn’t what’s at the core of her longevity. It’s her self-awareness, or the search of it. Jackson didn’t become great until she teamed up with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and proclaimed she was Janet rather than just a Jackson. Unbreakable is laced with tempered optimism and nostalgia (the “BURNITUP!” intro isn’t unlike “Miss You Much”; Jackson’s giggles haven’t aged). But rather than a comeback, the album plays like a nighttime invitation from a long-absent acquaintance. A big reason for the atmosphere is how Jackson is again featured as this oxymoron of vulnerability and confidence. She isn’t

too concerned with adapting to 2015; the majority of Jimmy Jam and Lewis’s production sounds within a hop of their work on 1997’s The Velvet Rope. The duo’s reunion with Jackson is exceptional whether they’re dishing a pulsating storm on “No Sleeep” or augmenting “Night” with arena rock sensibilities. That they’re able to collaborate on this level despite a seven-year hiatus is further proof that what happened in 1985 was nothing short of kismet. Unbreakable is structured as a double-sided album, splitting itself between “No Sleeep” and “Dream Maker / Euphoria.” But what’s more notable is that it peaks how a Jackson in-her-prime album would. Its thrills double as catharsis. “Shoulda Known Better” rides atop electro-dance twitches and synthesizers to reach euphoria. But it’s an ephemeral high. “Rhythm Nation” was a determinist’s anthem 26 years ago. Here, it’s a poignant reminder that the issues it was designed to march against still exist: “I had this great epiphany/ And rhythm nation was the dream/ I guess next time I’ll know better.” “Broken Hearts Heal”, a sweet tribute to her late brother Michael, is followed up with infectious jubilation on “Night.” After the nighttime restraint of “No Sleeep”, “Dream Maker / Euphoria” kicks off side two with a Smokey Robinson-like cry before settling into a psychedelic, call-and-response groove. The album’s movements flow like natural metamorphosis rather than wild swings thanks to Jackson’s voice. Unbreakable finds her continuously rediscovering new crevices in her vocal range. It leads to an emotive performance: how she softly pants with yearning on “Lessons Learned”, how her airiness adds an extra velvet layer to the breakdown on “Dammn Baby,” how its fragility gives “After You Fall” a sense of empathy. For someone who’s known to be secretive, Unbreakable is another album that shines because of how she lets us in.

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NOVEMBER

Boz Skaggs

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

Metric

6 6

House of Blues, Orlando

Carnifex & Black tongue The Orpheum, Ybor City

Modern Baseball

The Orpheum, Ybor City

America’s got talent Live Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Prong

The Orpheum, Ybor City

the Psychedelic Furs

Palladium Theater, St. Pete.

America’s got talent Live Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

Suicidegirls

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Chance the Rapper

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

America’s got talent Live

Van Wezel Perf. Arts, Sarasota

Saving Abel

The Haven, Orlando

tracy Lawrence

The Round Up, Tampa

Little River Band & Firefall Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Leftover Salmon

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Corey harris

Skipper’s Smokehouse, Tampa

the Lacs

Dallas Bull, Tampa

Public image Ltd (PiL)

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Love And theft

The Round Up, Tampa

Warrant, Ratt & L.A. guns

Ferg’s Courtyard, St. Petersburg

7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 10

Selwyn Birchwood

House of Blues, Orlando

Salt-N-Pepa, Vanilla ice, Kid N Play, Rob Base, tKA, Color Me Badd & 2 Live Crew CFE Arena, Orlando

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness & New Politics

House of Blues, Orlando

Knuckle Puck & Seaway

Epic Problem, Tampa

Vertical horizon & tonic

Water Works Park, Tampa

Nas & tink

USF Sun Dome, Tampa

Michael English

First Baptist Church, Leesburg

William Michael Morgan

Boots N’ Buckles, Lakeland

Dan Bern

Hideaway Cafe, St. Petersburg

the Devil Wears Prada & Motionless in White

The Beacham, Orlando

Public image Ltd (PiL)

The Plaza Live, Orlando

Frankie Ballard

Joyland, Bradenton

Mary J. Blige & tamar Braxton

CFE Arena, Orlando

Knuckle Puck & Seaway

Backbooth, Orlando

the Devil Wears Prada & Motionless in White

The Ritz Ybor, Ybor City

Mary J. Blige & tamar Braxton

USF Sun Dome, Tampa

Mannheim Steamroller

Mahaffey Theater, St. Pete. Full Access Magazine

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12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 14 14

the Mowgli’s & Lights

House of Blues, Orlando

home Free

The Plaza Live, Orlando

texas in July

The Orpheum, Ybor City

the English Beat

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

Big Smo

The Round Up, Tampa

zac Brown Band

MidFlorida Credit Union Amp, Tampa

38 Special

Bill Breeze Park, Ocoee

Bret Michaels, Stephen Pearcy & Blended Brew

Vinoy Waterfront Park, St. Petersburg

Lewis Black

Van Wezel Perf. Arts, Sarasota

38 Special, Asleep At the Wheel & Spayed Koolie

Bill Breeze Park, Ocoee

Chaka Khan

Mahaffey Theater, St. Pete.

Kip Moore

House of Blues, Orlando

SoMo & Jordan Bratton

The Beacham, Orlando

Wade Bowen & Randy Rogers Band

Dallas Bull, Tampa

Blue oyster Cult

Ferg’s Courtyard, St. Petersburg

Adrian Legg & David Lindley

The Palladium, St. Petersburg

Badfish

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Colt Ford

Venue 578, Orlando

Lewis Black

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater


14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 17 18 18

38 Special, America, three Dog Night & Robby Steinhardt

Vinoy Waterfront Park, St. Petersburg

Adrian Legg & David Lindley The Plaza Live, Orlando

gary Allan, Jon Pardi & Brothers osbourne Bill Breeze Park, Ocoee

Rise Against, Killswitch Engage, hollywood undead, Atreyu & Letlive. Central FL Fairgrounds, Orlando

Slow Magic The Crowbar, Ybor City the Bellamy Brothers

England Bros. Park, Pinellas Park

zac Brown Band

Amway Center, Orlando

Blackjack Billy

Boots N’ Buckles, Lakeland

James McMurty

Skipper’s Smokehouse, Tampa

Kip Moore, Chase Rice, the Cadillac three, Michael Ray

Vinoy Waterfront Park, St. Petersburg

Lewis Black

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

turkuaz The Crowbar, Ybor City Michael Reno harrell

Skipper’s Smokehouse, Tampa

the Faceless

Local 662, St. Petersburg

Jessy J.

W.P. Country Club, Winter Park

Jake Shimabukuro

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

the Wonder years

The Ritz Ybor, Ybor City

Jared & the Mill

Local 662, St. Petersburg

18 18 18 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

20 21 21 21 21 22 22

have Mercy & transit

Backbooth, Orlando

Jake Shimabukuro

The Plaza Live, Orlando

Dallas Smith

Dallas Bull, Tampa

Passafire

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Eli young Band & Cam

House of Blues, Orlando

tobyMac, Britt Nicole & Colton Dixon

USF Sun Dome, Tampa

have Mercy & transit

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Creations & Church tongue

Epic Problem, Tampa

Dumpstaphunk The Crowbar, Ybor City Falling in Reverse & Attila

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

the Wizards of Winter

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

the Sword

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

the Wonder years

House of Blues, Orlando

Cash Cash & tritonal

The Amphitheater, Ybor City

22 22 23 23 24 24 25 25 25 27 27 27 27 27

Sublime With Rome & the Expendables

28

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

28

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Sebastian Maniscalco

the Wizards of Winter

The Plaza Live, Orlando

Curtis Stigers

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Mavis Staples & Joan osborne

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

Full Access Magazine

28 28 29 29

Falling in Reverse & Attila

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Circa Survive & Rx Bandits

House of Blues, Orlando

Parkway Drive

House of Blues, Orlando

the Front Bottoms

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Allan holdsworth

The Plaza Live, Orlando

hate Eternal

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Mayday Parade

House of Blues, Orlando

Billy gibbons

The Plaza Live, Orlando

hate Eternal

West End Trading Co., Sanford

Doyle

Venue 578, Orlando

Aaron Lewis

House of Blues, Orlando

Super troup

Local 662, St. Petersburg

Watain & Mayhem

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Dave Koz, Candy Dulfer & Bill Medley

Van Wezel Perf. Arts, Sarasota

Blind guardian

The Plaza Live, Orlando

Jim gaffigan

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Ciara

House of Blues, Orlando

gWAR & Battlecross

Venue 578, Orlando

Billy gibbons

Mahaffey Theater, St. Pete.

Dave Koz, Candy Dulfer & Bill Medley

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater 28


Full Access Magazine - November 2015  

Florida's Largest Printed Music/Entertainment Magazine. This issue features interviews with Chase Rice, Ratt, Counting Crows, Red Sun Risi...

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