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Forum/The Substance of Style/Spring 2009

R od e s SPRING ’09 FASHION: LIGHTEN UP! CLASSICS ARE FOREVER HOW TO DRESS SLIM


888.880.3462 zegna.com


Rodes

OUR HOME… YOUR HOME!

We are rolling out the red carpet for you. Derby is just around the corner. So, after a winter of gloomy weather and news, it’s time to go out and celebrate as the world comes to Louisville. Whether you bet the long shots or the chalk, we will make you look like the favorite. Come into our home, see what’s new and exciting, enjoy our hospitality and let us make your Spring a memorable one.

SEE YOU SOON The Rodes Family

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian Sprague PROJECT MANAGER

Contents

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean Nicole Venditti

RODES SPRING 2009

CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Fran Salamon PRODUCTION MANAGER

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

Hugh K. Stanton BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

F E AT U R E S 1

Welcome Letter

4

National Honors for Rodes

Stuart Nifoussi PRESIDENT AND CEO

Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton

10 Rodes Happenings

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

60 First Person: Bad Guys in Great Clothes

Christine Sullivan APPAREL FORUM

FA S H I O N

Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO

16 Fashionably Fun

Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN

Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA

Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH

30 Fashion Vibes for Her

Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA

36 Footwear: If the Shoe Fits

Malouf’s LUBBOCK, TX, BURLINGAME, CA

38 Furnishings: Pick Your Pocket

Mario’s PORTLAND, OR, SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY

46 The New Fit

Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT

52 Escape to Spring

Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA

D E PA R T M E N T S

Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX

34 Ask Forum Fashion Forum Magazine is published in 13 regional editions for

40 Shopping: The Power of Appointments Rodes For Him & For Her 502-753-RODES (7633) 1-800-866-3112 www.rodes.com

44 Humor: Glory Days 64 Travel: It Happened in Naples 70 Art: Wet Dreams

member stores of the Apparel Forum Copyright 2009. Published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, NY, NY 100186108, 212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers claims, unsolicited

4938 Brownsboro Road, Louisville, KY 40222

72 End Page: The Church of Slim

manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 12, Issue 1. Printed In The U.S.A.

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Recognition by Jillian Sprague

National Honors for Rodes In 2008, Rodes was honored by MR Magazine, the leading men’s fashion trade publication, with a prestigious Uptown/Downtown award. These achievement awards are presented to retailers who demonstrate extraordinary innovation in merchandising and marketing. In addition to being recognized with a full page article in MR, the store was formally presented with the award at a gala dinner in New York City. Howard Vogt and Jim Porter were on hand to accept the honors at The Four Seasons Restaurant. MR praised Rodes for the exceptional customer service and merchandise selection that has made it the outfitter of choice for Derby spectators, and called the store the most successful luxury retailer in the region. “Rodes is an amazing store that has survived for over 95 years because they understand the concept of change,” says Karen Alberg Grossman, Editor in Chief of MR Magazine. “From selling corporate uniforms at their start to selling the finest men’s and women’s designer fashions, Howard and Susan Vogt have built one of the top specialty stores in America. They know how to edit assortments to the best of the best, and they live and breathe customer service. No one does it better.” Howard Vogt and Jim Porter with Karen Alberg Grossman and MR publisher Stu Nifoussi.

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Pa^gmak^Z]l\hngm'


Exclusively at Rodes For Her

“I have two purposes in life: people recognizing their own magnificence and leaving our planet more beautiful, diverse and sustainable than it was when we found it. I strive to create jewelry that enhances a woman’s true and natural beauty, reflecting the harmony of our earth in balance.” Toby Pomeroy

www.tobypomeroy.com


BEAUTY. BALANCE. LUXURY.

Orlanda Olsen crafts her pieces with quality and wearability in mind, using only the finest materials. Her equine collection is internationally recognized and she has many new designs, including the iguana bracelet featured above. Come view Orlanda’s exciting new collection. . . exclusively at Rodes For Her.

“I think my jewelry is a blend of Edge and Elegance. The difference between something nice and something sensational is in the details and using the finest materials. I like to give everyone something to buy and create jewelry that evokes an emotional response.”

WWW.ORLANDAOLSEN.COM


Rodes

HAPPENINGS

FASHION EVENTS

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Rodes

HAPPENINGS

Rodes For Him and For Her hosts and participates in many events both inside and outside our store. Here is a look at some of our trunk shows, benefits and fashion outings from the past year.

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Rodes

HAPPENINGS

ALL AMERICAN CASUAL SATURDAY

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Rodes

HAPPENINGS

Rodes For Him hosted its first All American Casual Saturday on November 1st with friends from Bills Khakis, Agave Jeans, and Torino Leathers. Mr. Scott Barber and Mrs. Kentucky also made personal appearances. All enjoyed FABD Smokehouse Barbecue and Ale from BBC Brewery, watched the games on our HD-TV, received massages from professional therapists, and enjoyed a “casual” fun time with old friends.

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Rodes

HAPPENINGS

RODES DAY AT THE DOWNS The Rodes family enjoyed the hospitality at the Churchill Downs Turf Club on June 29, 2008. The “Rodes Day at the Downs” was a memorable experience and a great time was had by all. Rodes’employees and their families enjoyed the grandeur of the Turf Club and may have actually broke even for the day.

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SPRING 2009—FASHIONABLY FUN

MARISA BARATELLI FOR HER AND ISAIA FOR HIM Whether it’s a festive ball or the neighborhood pub, Rodes has you covered for all your spring and Derby activities. Look inside to see what’s exciting in fashion for the season.


DARINGLY DISTINCTIVE

ZEGNA FOR HIM & M SIAMO FOR HER He is fashioned completely in clothing and accessories by Ermenegildo Zegna, shoes by Santoni. She is wearing a 2-piece outfit from M Siamo with jewelry by Rachel Rinehardt.


REMARKABLY RIGHT

ARMANI COLLEZIONI FOR HER Georgio Armani designs represent discrete lines, feminine cut and sleek silhouette. Come see the exciting spring collection.


VIVIDLY VIBRANT

LELA ROSE FOR HER Classic, elegant and glamorous silhouette designed by Lela Rose complete with metallic accessories. Pearls by Majorca.


STUPENDOUSLY STRIKING

ZENOBIA FOR HER This designer collection from Zenobia reflects style for the most discerning individual. Hat by Kokin and jewelry from Rebecca Hook.


WONDERFULLY WARM

Ermenegildo Zegna For Him Zegna’s cashmere/cotton/silk blend pullover, cotton flat front trousers and sport shirt. Accessorized with Torino bag and Ferragamo shoes.


PLEASINGLY PERFECT

Canali For Him & Eskandar For Her Featuring a Canali sportcoat, trouser and shirt, with Ferragamo shoes For Him. Eskandar caftan, blouse and slacks, with Tory Burch shoes and handbag For Her.


STUNNINGLY SUPERIOR

PIAZZA SEMPIONE FOR HER Making its distinct mark on the fashion industry, Piazza Sempione designed this little black dress (and silk scarf) with femininity in mind. Rebecca Hook jewelry.


BOLDLY BEAUTIFUL

ST. JOHN FOR HER St. John created this versatile multiknit bolero jacket, sequin tank and bright white pant. Complete with Rebecca Minkoff handbag, Tory Burch shoes, Rebecca Hook Jewelry.


COLORFULLY CREATIVE

ETRO FOR HIM & ETRO FOR HER The New Tradition‌ a combination of classic style, bold colorations and all-natural fabrications. Mark Nason shoes For Him.


SUPPLELY SMOOTH

LUCIANO BARBARA FOR HIM Soft lambsuede shirt-jacket with cool cotton slacks and sport shirt with a fine Italian influence. Shoes by Ferragamo and belt by Torino.


CASUALLY CHIC

NANETTE LAPORE FOR HER Sporty yet fashionable crop jacket, top and shorts designed by Nanette Lepore. Jewelry by Double Happiness.


FESTIVELY FUN

LOVE MOSCHINO FOR HER Tulip duster jacket design with painted enamel buttons over a black catsuit. Simon Sebbag jewelry.


PERFECTLY PATTERNED

LIZ LOGIE FOR HER & NAT NAST FOR HIM Her patterned blouse by Liz Logie, bangles by Alexis Bittar, handbag by Rebecca Minkoff & shoes by Tory Burch. His cotton shirt and denim jeans by Nat Nast, belt by Torino.


Rodes by Susan Vogt

FASHION VIBES FOR HER The spirit of Spring ’09 tells us that we need to invest carefully in pieces that will endure fashion’s seasonal whims. How does one buy wisely? Turn to the designers who have offered perfection in their craft. The goal is to do beauty in a modern way, that pushes to make you original and has a long term rapport in your closet. Our strategy for your wardrobe is beyond building the trends, not just buying for the season, but investing in the right fashion.

LOOKING FORWARD: Fashionable colors include amplified yellows, purples, reds, turquoise and coral. There is distinctive color blocking, beautiful ombré, and creative dip dye. It’s a tactile season for fabrics with shimmery plaids, stripes on the diagonal and retro garden florals. On the other hand, the mood is also relaxed, yet modern, dressing with a nonchalant attitude. There’s a fashion nod to the modern tribal influence with natural linens, earthy prints in easy caftans and drawstring details. The colors here are brown, white, ochre and saffron. Animal prints, always in style, are shown more in a graphic pattern than a literal interpretation.

FINISHING TOUCHES: The trends for accessories are statements in the making. Strands of pearls in all shapes, sizes and colors grace necklines. Bracelets stack up the wrists. Belts pull everything together, whether it’s pretty and polished with a crystal buckle or skinny leather bands to accent the waist. Handbags, oversized soft clutches and satchels, woven color leather, lady-like pocketbooks. The decorative details include pearls, gold hardware, contrast binding and stitching. Watercolor silk squares, rouched oblong wraps, and printed stoles complete every look. There is a subtle dichotomy with the trends this spring. There’s an air of a nononsense approach to dressing to find discreet urban drama. Chic silhouettes versus breezy, loose and earthy. Feminine, flowy tunics versus clean, fitted Americana sportswear. So which way do you go? You have to be comfortable, not fretting over your outfit, to look chic effortlessly. You should be able to walk into your closet and pick out the playful pieces that give you ‘gorgeous’ in an instant.

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Ask Forum Q: I’ve budgeted for only one new suit this season. How can I spruce up the ones I already own?

A:

It’s amazing what a few new shirts and some slightly narrower ties will do for one’s suit wardrobe. Add a couple of dress shirts in spring colors (we love shades of purple, blue and green), or try one with a contrast white collar or French cuffs and add fabulous cufflinks. Don’t forget a new pocket square, which should complement (but not match) the tie. Other ways to give your old suits new life: a great belt, a knit vest, cardigan or polo, fashion socks. A final tip for spring ’09: designers have re-invented the classic white dress shirt. New models are cut slimmer and closer to the body; some have a jacquard weave that creates a white on white patterned effect. Remember, it’s well documented: nothing looks sexier than a perfect white shirt!

Q: How should I be dressing in this “new economy”?

IMAGE COURTESY OF ZEGNA

A:

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Tastefully, and with an emphasis on timeless quality. Clearly, many folks these days are feeling uncomfortable flaunting excess extravagance, but overthe-top bling has never been our modus operandi. Instead, opt for luxury classics, even if it means buying less. And since you probably weren’t planning to purchase an entire new spring wardrobe anyway, let us help you find just the right piece or two to update the clothes you own. It’s amazing how a single sport shirt in a new shade of blue or the perfect lightweight cardigan can make everything you own seem very 2009. Finally, in this very competitive business climate, looking your best has never been more important, whether it’s in suits or sportswear. Come in and we’ll show you how, no purchase required.

T H E S U B S TA N C E O F S T Y L E


Footwear by Hans Gschliesser

Pardon the pun, but I’ve been chomping at the bit to wear these legendary loafers. Yet I feared that on me, these shoes would look like Greek balustrades haphazardly plastered on a suburban raised ranch. Would they upstage my wardrobe? I bought them despite my reservations and was pleasantly surprised: jeans and flat-front chinos achieved a preppy pedigree and immediately became gentrified! And so, in a manner of speaking, did I. Right out of the gate, I had a newfound swagger in my stride. Emblematic of Guccio Gucci’s legacy as the founder of a Florence saddlery shop in 1906, the trademark horsebit hardware had become a company logo and universal status symbol by the 1950s. Over the years, this classic slip-on has made more comebacks than Tom Ford himself. The exquisitly handcrafted horsebit loafer became an icon in the 80s and still retains its trendsetting appeal today. Socks or sans socks, with pinstriped suits or premium jeans, almost any article of clothing is enhanced by this timeless footwear. Wearing Gucci loafers will always place you Best in Show.

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STEVEN CIUCCOLI

If the Shoe Fits


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Since 1884

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Furnishings by Harry Sheff

Pick Your Pocket

If you want to go tieless, fine. But never go squareless. When I see a man in a suit or sport jacket without a piece of linen or silk peeking out from the breast pocket, I see a man not fully dressed. Between my high school prom and last year—a gap of more than 15 years— I wore a pocket square exactly zero times. It seemed so formal, so ceremonial. In actuality, the pocket square occupies a space somewhere between the more useful handkerchief and the fussier necktie. It may once have been a practical item, but today it’s an oft-neglected element of any well-dressed man’s wardrobe. The pocket square can make a tieless man look more professional, a suit and tie look more thoughtful, and a man in jeans more sophisticated. Nervous about how casual your polo shirt looks under a blazer? A pocket square can help this situation in a way a tie never could. Here are some simple guidelines for choosing and wearing one. Pattern and Color: You don’t need to match your pocket square to your shirt or tie. In fact, trying to match will look too fastidious. Rather, it should complement your tie, perhaps echoing a secondary color. If you aren’t wearing a tie, choose a square the way you would a tie. It should be visible against your jacket. Patterns abound, from paisleys to polka dots, geometrics to abstracts. If you’re overwhelmed by the choices, ask a salesperson for advice. Material: Linen and silk are the most common. Raw silk and cotton madras look great in the spring and summer. A silk pocket square will contrast nicely with a wool or cashmere tie in the fall and winter. White linen is almost always appropriate; it is a staple that every man should own in triplicate. The Folds: Folding a pocket square isn’t like knotting a tie, so don’t over-think it. The Puff: Said to be invented by Fred Astaire. With the square folded in quarters, loosely stuff the corner ends of the square in the pocket. Adjust the excess material casually above the top edge of your pocket. Do this with silk, not linen. The Straight Fold: Worn by Ronald Reagan, the characters on AMC’s Mad Men, and anyone wearing a narrow necktie. Fold the square in a rectangle roughly the size of your pocket, so that about a half- to a quarter-inch is revealed above the breast pocket. Looks sharp with a white linen pocket square. The Triangle: The traditional way to wear. Don’t worry about making intricate origami folds. Let a folded corner or a cornered edge reveal itself from the pocket. The more corners you show, the more affected the look. The folded corner can be creased in the case of linen or lightly folded in the case of silk. Other Options: Try stuffing two squares into your pocket at once. Or type in a search for “pocket square folds” on the Internet and you’ll find dozens of variations. Even stuffing the square haphazardly into your pocket can look rakishly fashionable.

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Shopping by Nicola Ruiz

The Power of Appointments “I don’t remember the last time I went shopping for clothes,” says Mark Cohon, 41, principle of a benefits consulting company in Manhattan. “At least not in the traditional sense.” These days, precious free weekends are not spent browsing the racks. Instead Mark calls his favorite sales associate, Paul, tells him he needs a new power suit for an important business meeting, casual wear for an upcoming cruise with his wife, or simply a few basics to update his wardrobe, and he makes an appointment. They meet at the store, or if he’s pressed for time, at Mark’s home or office. Paul has already done the leg work, pre-selecting and laying out a variety of clothing options for the occasion, all in Mark’s size. (It takes a sales associate at least an hour to put together the looks in the correct sizes.) In a fraction of the time it would have taken him to shop alone, Mark leaves his appointment, clothing in hand, or on order if he opted for made-to-measure pieces, feeling confident, efficient and a little bit like a celebrity. Celebrities pay big bucks for personal stylists to ensure they look polished and on trend, ready for anything from a red carpet event to a trip to the grocery store. But most guys don’t realize they can have this VIP treatment and expert advice for free simply by working with their sales associate. What could be better than having your very own personal stylist at absolutely no cost? (Clothes excluded, of course.) And the star treatment doesn’t stop on the sales floor. Having established a good working relationship with your specialist, make an appointment for them to come to your home and critically review your wardrobe. “I have to admit, the first time Paul sorted through my closet, it felt a little bit like my mother was throwing out my old favorites. But ultimately, I needed an expert eye to point out which suits were outdated, which lapels and ties were too wide and which shirts had seen better days,” says Cohon. Specialists will also assess the fit of existing items in your closet, keeping in mind that today’s more fitted, streamlined looks make the older, boxy suits and jackets look outdated. They help you clear out the unwanted items that have been cluttering up your closet (like shirts that have frayed collars or are shiny from being pressed too much) and suggest replacements. They can even organize your closet by color or by season, making it easier and faster for you to put together an outfit in the morning. (continued on page 42)

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Attraction Instant attraction–what causes it? Mercedes-Benz vehicles are among the most desired throughout the world. They have been immortalized in art, literature, and song. And while their initial draw is near irresistible it’s not unusual to find your Mercedes more desirable as time goes by. Proof that a Mercedes-Benz from Tafel Motors not only can spark love at first sight, but inspires enduring passion.

Love What You Drive!

TAFEL MOTOR CO. 4156 Shelbyville Rd. | (502) 896-4411 | www.tafelmotors.com


Celebrities pay big bucks for personal stylists to ensure they look polished and on trend, ready for anything from a red carpet event to a trip to the grocery store. But most guys don’t realize they can have this VIP treatment for free simply by working with their sales associate. Stores often partner with charities and donate men’s gently worn business wear to the less fortunate, once again saving you time and giving you peace of mind that

new suits, you can simply call your associate, place an order and have it delivered to your home or office. Your associate can also mail you fabric swatches so that you can

your unwanted clothes will be put to good use. Your specialist will also keep measurements on file and track your purchases, saving you more time and preventing duplication. As your specialist learns your style and taste, he’ll be in a position to alert you to new items that fit your needs. This service makes future purchases a breeze. If, for example, you’re running low on dress shirts, or have important interviews on the horizon and are in need of a few

pick out new colors, patterns and textures without having to set foot in the store. Wiith so many time saving services at your finger tips is there really any excuse for not looking stylish and well put together? Mark’s non-traditional approach to shopping has been so rewarding that now his wife has followed suit; she also shops by appointment only. “We now treat our wardrobes the way we treat most things in life and in business: we consult an expert.”

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Humor by Gerald Andersen

My wife and I are huge Bruce Springsteen fans. We had never seen him perform, so when we heard that he was touring again last summer and appearing at the Meadowlands, we pounced. Springsteen didn’t come on stage until 9:30. He gave a wonderful performance before a packed house of adoring hometown fans. Of course, I wanted to commemorate the event by purchasing a t-shirt. Unfortunately for me, my wife has a rule: People Over the Age of Fifty Shall Not Wear Apparel Adorned with Pictures or Writing. So at 63, I am clearly disqualified from t-shirt ownership. We did not get home until 3:00 a.m. My wife asked if I could recall the last time we were out that late. I don’t think I was ever out that late. Sorry, I’ve led a quiet life. We had a great time, but we may be getting too old for rock concerts. If you think you might be in the same boat, here are a few warning signs: • You are in your seats at 7:30 p.m., the posted starting time. You are alone. • Everyone else is half naked, but you brought a sweater. • It worries you that you are not allowed to bring an umbrella into the stadium. • You listen carefully to the evacuation plan and take note of your section’s designated exits. • You wonder if the people seated behind you are going to talk through the whole concert. • As soon as the place fills up, you start scanning the crowd for people who are older than you. There are none. • Your wife brings ear plugs in case the music gets too loud. • Though your feet hurt, you stand through the entire concert because you don’t want to be that old guy who sits down. • You mention to the young people seated next to you that Springsteen is starting to resemble Tony Bennett. They don’t know who Tony Bennett is. • You complain that you can’t hear the lyrics over the “damn racket” from the crowd. • You consider saying something to the young lady in front of you about the number of beers she has consumed. • After the third encore, you hear yourself saying: “Oh, no! They’re coming back again?” • Though you have written down your parking location and referenced appropriate landmarks, you still lose your car. If you exhibit any of these symptoms, you should probably stay home, pop a Bruce cassette into your Walkman, and take a snooze in your lounger. Sounds good to me.

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GETTY 1 / HULTON ARCHIVE

Glory Days


W W W. R O B E R T T A L B O T T. C O M


THE NEW FIT

From head to toe... a new, more flattering silhouette has been reshaping the look of men's clothing. Our simple guide offers all you need to know to embrace today's effortlessly stylish new fit. A guide to the perfect fit

Jacket Shoulders were more constructed, padded and wider.

had lower button stance and wider lapels.

old were pleated, baggier, longer and made with notably more fabric.

Shoes were “chunkier” with wider lasts.

Cuffs were shallower, only about 11/4”.

Photographer: Sergio Kurhajec, Stylist: Wendy McNett and John Jones, Hair & Makeup: Landy Dean

Pants

An overall baggier fit is the tell-tale sign of a dated suit.


The Key Features of

The New Slimmer Silhouette

new

Lapel is narrower and button stance is higher.

Jacket is more fitted and jacket length is shorter.

Sleeves

Fabrics Pure, natural nanofibers that are lighter in weight and less rigid lend themselves to more fitted garments.

on jacket and shirt are slightly shorter.

Pants are flat-front, more sculpted and slightly shorter.


• Closer Fit • Narrower Lapel • Higher Button Stance • Slightly Shorter Sleeve & Jacket Lengths

The New Jacket Jackets are trimmer in every way. Shoulders are softer, narrower and less constructed. Armholes are higher and chests are more sculpted, allowing greater range of motion. Higher, thinner lapels and button stance create a slimmer, more elongated look.


To cuff or not to cuff? Trousers may be finished with or without cuffs (often lighter fabric suits without and wool suits with). Cuffs should be a minimum of 1 3/4" or 2" depending on your height.

The New Pant Trousers may be closer fitting, but they are more "giving" and comfortable than ever. Shorter inseams and lower rises are features that add to the ease and comfort of today's pant.

Flat-Front Small break The day of the full break is over. The bottom of the trouser should "kiss" the top of the shoe, creating a very small break.

Flat-front (rather than pleated) trousers complement the trimmer proportions of the new jacket.


The new tie width While ties were often over 4" in width, the new tie is no wider than 3 1â „2" (as pictured above) and may be even narrower.

The New Shirt &Tie The new fit translates across all clothes, and the shirt and tie are no exception. Whether a shirt has French cuffs or buttons, more fitted shoulders, body and arms, and slightly shorter sleeves carry out the look.

The New Shoe Shoes also follow the new silhouette. Narrower lasts are used to create more chiseled, bench-made looking shoes. On loafers, the vamp or top of the shoe is longer, so that it covers the sock.


Cufflinks to Express your Style Whether your style is casual or more formal, no gentleman's wardrobe is complete without a few French cuffed shirts and some wonderful or whimsical cufflinks—perfect for that last minute cocktail party or charity event.

Slim Wallets Wallets and credit card cases are trim, simple and less bulky.

The Indispensable Pocket Square Today, no look is complete without a pocket square. It may be folded with a flourish or as a simple square to suit your personal preference.

Finishing Touches In the past, when suits were wider and less sartorial, the details were less important. Now, today's more refined fit calls for finer detailing in the furnishings and finishes.

Yes, the Belt Should Match the Shoes While it's unnecessary and even preferable not to have a "perfect match," brown shoes call for a brown belt and suede shoes call for a suede belt.

Sleeker Sunglasses A pair of great-looking sunglasses, contoured to your face, complete the look.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY SERGIO KURHAJEC


WHITE SHORTS, painted eggs, bold COLORS, skinny TANKS, SANDPIPERS,pastel plaids, t-shirt DRESSES, butterflies...


LEY CS, EY,


FLORAL WRAPS, BLEACHED PASTELS, STRAPPY SUNDRESSES, PEG-TOP JEANS, SMOOTH COTTON...

Photographer: Sergio Kurhajec, Stylist: Wendy McNett and John Jones, Hair & Makeup: Landy Dean


First Person by Frank A. Schipani

BAD GUYS IN GREAT CLOTHES

The author’s brother Joe, “Cousy” New York City’s unofficial mob greeter and the cousin of godfather Joe Adonis, with Dean Martin and a young Frank Schipani.

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According to state, local and federal authorities, anyone who earns money in an illicit manner is considered a “bad” guy. Be that as it may, several of these bad guys are great fashion icons. Back in the 1930s, when organized crime was nascent, two ambitious tough guys from the Lower East Side of Manhattan started what would become the modern Mafia. They were Charley “Lucky” Luciano and Meyer “The Little Man” Lansky, an Italian and a Jew, who had previously and separately engaged in gambling, bookmaking, looting and other such unsavory activities. Their reputations for success in these enterprises aroused mutual interest and ultimately, the two met and joined forces. As the story goes, the Mafia at the time was controlled by two old-world bosses from Italy, who operated in a way that Charley perceived as antiquated. So, in the manner of Marlon Brando’s “I’ll make him an offer he can’t refuse…” Charley and Meyer (along with their newly unified Italian and Jewish gangsters from the tri-state area) formed a plan to take out the bosses and start their own empire. Upon completing that task, the pair very wisely consulted with a brilliant independent promoter and gambler by the name of Arnold Rothstein (the guy who fixed the 1919 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds and the Chicago White Sox). Rothstein had the amazing ability to glide from New York to Palm Beach to Chicago, always warmly accepted by the social and political elite of each city. Naturally, he dressed in a manner befitting a king. So when they got together for their first meeting, Rothstein took one look at these guys and said: “If you men want to make a real business out of crime, then you must change the way you dress! Get rid of that slick look; you can’t do business with magnates or politicians looking like a sharply dressed thug.” He then went on to recommend specific custom tailors, shirt-makers and the like, people who would help the young godfathers dress in understated but elegant attire—in essence, showing them to the world as the prosperous businessmen they were. From the 1930s through the 1960s, “uomini di rispetto” (men of respect) dressed each day like successful businessmen going to the office. You might say these were the first “metrosexuals” since they, unlike most men, spent a great amount of time and money perfecting their appearances. How well they understood the importance of presenting a professional image! Why am I telling you this? Because my father was one of these men. He dressed in accordance with Lucky’s rules, which were passed along to him by his “Capo” Joe Adonis (Lucky’s right hand man). Until I was in my teens, I thought my

THE SUBSTANCE OF STYLE


At the Latin Quarter Night Club in 1959. Frank Schipani wore his first made-to-measure suit, a wool mohair blend he purchased for $65, along with a $2 custom tie. Standing: Frank Schipani, Manny “the bagel guy” and Joe Schipani Sr., Frank’s father. Seated: Frank’s mother Anne and brother Bob.

dad was in “labor relations,” as he never brought his business home. And because his style of dress was so chic and his demeanor so relaxed, I wanted to dress and move just like him. Once I found out what he really did for a living and learned the power and influence he had, I realized that all my “uncles” were actually “men of respect.” And I now understand that although they were “bad” guys, their style (of dressing and grooming), polite manners and professional smarts certainly served them well in business affairs and in high political circles. Today, I often ask well-dressed guys in the fashion industry who or what most influenced their style. In almost all cases, it was their fathers who were the dapper guys, role models for dressing well. In my presentations as a professional sales trainer and in my book, Frank’s Rules: How to Sell Menswear Extremely Well, I always reference these bad guys from that great era of style. (We now recall it as the Rat Pack or Kennedy look.) Men in the 1930s to 1960s , whether they made laws or broke them, shared the common sense of representing themselves each and every day by dressing in an appropriate and distinctive manner. Decades ago, shipping billionaire Aristotle Onassis was asked, “What can a man do to look successful?” His reply: “Dress exquisitely, always be tan and buy drinks for nice people in nice places.”

The author’s father (third from right) with many of his “uncles” at a political fundraiser in 1948.

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Travel by William Kissel

IT HAPPENED IN NAPLES

Walking along the narrow cobblestone streets of Naples, it’s evident that this city’s artistic diversity and rich architectural heritage still echo the Greeks and Romans, who conquered this southern Italian seaport in the 4th century B.C. One can’t help but notice that the men here, like their ancestors, are small and dark with strong Grecian profiles. So it’s somewhat ironic that Naples has a reputation for producing a particular style of suit that complements men of stature. This paradox is not lost on Ciro Paone (pay-own-y), the 5’4” owner of the much lauded Kiton clothing brand. He points his fingers straight up in the air like a gun to illustrate the difference between suits made in Naples and those produced just about everywhere else; Paone explains how the average suit is built for a tall man with a rather...um...short stick. “But they also appeal to men who are shaped like this,” he says, holding his hand “gun” stretched out front. In other words, for the average man with a bigger than average.... Well, you get the picture. The joke springs to mind while we dine at Paone’s favorite Neapolitan eatery, Da Dora. Between courses of crispy fried sardines and pasta with clams, the restaurant owner’s baritone sister canters a tongue-in-cheek song about the importance of being style-savvy—while ever mindful not to damage the familial “stick.” Clearly, the people of Naples have a sense of humor as good as their sense of style, a by-product of living in a bustling metropolis considered to be Italy’s holy grail of handmade sartorial clothing and accessories. Of Naples’ one million-plus inhabitants, nearly one-fourth dabble in the fashion business, a little-known fact because

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many of these artisan tailors, leather craftsmen and eagle-eyed seamstresses work in nondescript warehouses and basements undetected by the thousands of tourists who traverse the city annually. As one of America’s most influential men’s stores, we carry most of the important Italian luxury brands. This visit to Naples, sponsored by the city’s Chamber of Commerce, offers a rare glimpse inside the factories where some of Italy’s best clothing and leather goods are produced. After all, one can hardly be expected to understand and appreciate the nuances of Neapolitan suit making—characterized by its featherweight and sometimes flamboyant fabrics, trim-cut body, high sleeve-set armholes and softly defined shoulders—without any knowledge of the culture and the people from

Below: Jim Porter and Howard Vogt of Rodes get fitted for made-to-measure jackets. Neapolitan artisans practice their crafts. Right: Jim Porter and Howard Vogt spend time with other Forum retailers in Naples, Italy.

which it came. Unlike other international cities where clothes-making is merely a career choice, in Naples, the perfect setting of a shirt sleeve, the evenly-spaced 27 stitches per side (count them) of a buttonhole, the impossibly high notch on a suit’s lapel, and the unmistakable canoe-shaped chest pocket (the barchetta), on a sport coat are idiosyncratic disciplines passed down from generation to generation and regarded as high art, much the same way a museum curator or collector values a Botticelli painting or a Giacometti sculpture. Neapolitan cutters, sewers, tailors and other specially trained craftsmen don’t simply make menswear; they are constantly reinventing it the way they have reinvented themselves over the 2000 years since the last major eruption of Mount Vesuvius, around which this picturesque city is built. Kiton helped define what Neapolitans call Sartoria, or the art of dress, more than five decades ago when Paone first employed a handful of the country’s most prominent tailors (including his biggest Neapolitan competitor, Cesare Attolini) to produce a kind of handmade

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“artisan” clothing that was fast becoming a dying art form in this modern technological age. Promising to use only the rarest, most exclusive fabrics and produce each Kiton suit one-at-a-time, by hand, and with nothing to guide him but taste, Paone now positions himself as the creator of the handmade mantra echoed by every Italian suit maker today, though the concept has existed for centuries. Among the first things one learns upon entering the city limits is that handmade and hand-finished are the hallmarks of Naples. Just about everything found here— from shirts, suits, neckwear and footwear to the coarse pasta and locally made limoncello served nightly—have the distinctive touch that can only come from human involvement. “There’s a Neapolitan song called Anema Core, or Heart and Soul, and so I always say our jackets are made with the hearts and souls of the people who work in our factory,” says Gianluca Isaia, whose eponymous collection of suits and sportswear is one of Italy’s (and more recently America’s) most sought after luxury brands. “When you wear it you can feel there is something special inside it,” says Isaia, who is fond of wearing his $3500 suits with leather sandals. “There’s

an emotional connection between us and the product.” With all the technical innovations available to clothing makers today, putting so much handwork and heart into a garment may seem like a prehistoric way to make modern menswear. But Isaia, Paone and other Neapolitan suit and shirt makers just don’t see it that way. “When you make a suit by hand, the tailor is able to adjust the tension in the seams where the body moves the most,” Paone explained. The result is a suit that wears with the comfort of a pair of sweats. On the other hand, “Machines are computerized to sew the same stitch with the same tension throughout the jacket,” he added, noting that a Neapolitan suit is designed to showcase the man, not the garment. “In Naples, the buildings, culture, cuisine and the way of life are still deeply rooted in the past. But the fashion brands based here are also very much focused on the future,” says Howard Vogt of Rodes. “They’re still using the tailoring skills taught by previous generations, but they are using those skills to create handmade clothing with a very contemporary point of view.” At the Borrelli factory we were treated to an overview of the century-old shirt maker’s new handmade suit collection, as well as a preview of Luxury Vintage, new sportswear with an old-world look. The line of casual slacks, shirts and jackets is created entirely from pre-washed fabrics. “When you wash a garment after it’s made you destroy the hand stitching,” explains owner Fabio Borrelli. There is actually a technical reason for all the handwork on a Borrelli shirt. “A buttonhole sewn by hand is softer and longer lasting because the

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Planning your own trip to Naples? We can help. In addition to arranging private tours of these and other Neapolitan clothing factories, we know the best places to stay, eat, sightsee and shop while discovering this historic city on the Mediterranean. Check out Grand Hotel Parker’s in the hills above the downtown shopping district for an unparalleled view of the bay of Naples and Mount Vesuvius. Make sure to request a 4th floor view room, which has living space, two bathrooms and an upstairs bedroom. Corso Vittoria Emanuele; 35+39.081.761.2474. Stay at the Excelsior near the sea. This five-star luxury hotel is located across the street from the Castel dell’Ovo, a Roman fortress on a small island that has since been converted into a museum. Via Partenope; 48+39.081.764.0111. If you love fish, don’t miss Da Dora, a family-owned eatery just a few blocks from the water. Via Palasciano; 28+39.081.68.0519.

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needle doesn’t pass through the fabric 120 times and weaken the cloth as it does by machine,” he says. Kiton’s palazzo-style factory is run today by Ciro Paone’s nephews, Antonio Paone and Antonio “Toto” De Matteis. The two Antonios introduced us to the brand’s more youthful, lower-priced collection of half-handmade suits under the Sartorio label that De Matteis calls “a stepping stone from Ermenegildo Zegna to Kiton.” We viewed a prototype in classic blue—the first to come off the assembly line—before enjoying a plate of freshly prepared pasta and pan-seared fish with 250 of the firm’s tailors in the company’s private kitchen. Paone is so passionate about quality, even in his food, that he often selects the ingredients for the staff meals himself and employs a full-time chef to prepare the daily special. Afterward, we were guided through the company’s shirt making facility to understand all the subtle details that differentiate a Kiton shirt and make it among the world’s finest. “Notice how there is no lining in the shirt placket, only folded fabric,” explains Kiton’s shirt manager Sebastiano Borrelli, a cousin of Fabio Borrelli, whose family has been making shirts in Naples for nearly a century under its own name. Their paternal grandmother, Anna Borrelli, is considered the inventor of the three-sided crow’s foot stitch that every Neapolitan shirt maker, including Kiton, has since adopted to crisscross buttons. As anyone might guess, the family dynamic is an integral component of Neapolitan clothing and culture. Companies such as Kiton, Attolini, Sartoria Partenopea, Isaia, Borrelli and Finamore, among other local luxury brands, were all started and are still controlled by first, second, third and even fourth generation family members. They graciously insist on “adopting” every visitor lucky enough to gain access to their factories, and we are among the fortunate few. Case in point: on our arrival in Naples we were immediately invited to an informal lunch inside the splendid 15th century waterfront home of Tramontano owner David DeBlasio, whose living room filled with portrait photography and 20th century artwork is as personal as the handmade leather goods produced at his nearby factory. Likewise, at Isaia, where “technology and tradition” blend together in a sensibly-priced sartorial garment, no tour of the crowded workroom is complete without a raucous dinner afterward at the hilltop restaurant Rosiello. Here, everyone is encouraged to literally leave their mark by scribbling sweet nothings on the pizzeria’s walls. When one American in our party loses a shirt button during the meal, Raphaelo “Lelo” Minervino, head of the company’s shirt production, quickly springs to the rescue with needle and thread in hand. The Neapolitans have a love of life that isn’t easily quantified, explains Gianluca Isaia over a platter of three kinds of octopus, a local favorite. “Maybe it’s the weather or the proximity to the sea, but for some reason we always think everything can be solved tomorrow. Any drama that happens will have a solution tomorrow for sure,” he says, noting that leisure time is celebrated here as much as a perfect-fitting suit or shirt. The word holiday was practically invented around Naples’ beautiful bay bordered by the spectacular Amalfi Coast and the lush islands of Capri and Ischea; even the world’s first vacation home was said to be dug from Vesuvius’ lava during the 2nd century B.C. On Ischia (is-ski-ya), where we spent our final weekend soaking in the sun and thermal waters that surround the island, one can still find houses carved into the lava rock. According to our guide, any of the locals still living in them would be pleased to have you as their guest simply for the asking. Neapolitan style, after all, is not defined simply by the products made here, but also by the warmth of the people.

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Art by Jacquelin Carnegie

It’s something in the water—the unique quality of the light, the effervescent effect of the bubbles, the uncanny reflections. Combined, these elements drew photographer Howard Schatz, choreographer Laurie McLeod and sculptor Jason de Caires Taylor to create work underwater. Each went through patient periods of trial-and-error, trying to bring to reality the underwater images they had imagined. They all felt compelled to do this work. This underwater imagery is so appealing to the viewer because what they’ve created is pure magic. Mind-Blowing Beauty: Underwater Photography Howard Schatz was an eye doctor, a renowned retinal specialist, with a photography hobby. One of his personal projects—a book of photos celebrating redheads—was seen by a Clairol executive who then hired him for a major photo shoot. After that gig, Schatz left medicine for a second career in photography. Since 1995, he has become one of the most in-demand commercial photographers working today. The inspiration to shoot underwater came when Schatz switched his exercise regime from pickup games of basketball to a daily swim. In the pool, Schatz was intrigued by “the beautiful world of light, bubbles and reflections.” But the idea of taking an underwater photo and making it work required months of experimentation. After several failed attempts at getting a decent underwater image, Schatz put his medical training to work. With the methodology of a scientific researcher, he analyzed pool water, studied underwater nature photography, consulted with dive photographers and searched for the right equipment. One by one, he solved the problems of shooting in a pool: color correctness, lighting, buoyancy, clarity, water temperature and the correct pH for eye protection. He shot countless rolls of film using a wide array of human guinea pigs as subjects, but he couldn’t quite achieve the desired outcome. Then Schatz had a big idea. He realized that dancers would make the perfect underwater models. They had near perfect control of their bodies; they could respond instantly to direction, and dance itself was another gravity-defying art form. And that, after all, was what Schatz found so alluring. Not the water itself, but that it allowed him to defy gravity to capture “fluid dynamics.” Images so beautiful they make you want to cry.

“I’m not freezing action; I’m finding moments in a dream,” says photographer Howard Schatz.

Rhapsody in Blue: Underwater Dance Throughout her career, dancer/choreographer Laurie McLeod would swim for relaxation and to relieve muscle tension. One day, she went to a French Dance on Camera festival at BAM in Brooklyn.

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HOWARD SCHATZ, PHOTOGRAPHY: WWW.HOWARDSCHATZ.COM; LAURIE MCLEOD, DANCE VIDEOS: WWW.VICTORYGIRL.COM; JASON DE CAIRES TAYLOR, SCULPTURE: WWW.UNDERWATERSCULPTURE.COM

WET DREAMS


She saw a short film of abstract shapes shot underwater and had an instant inspiration. “In my mind’s eye,” McLeod explains, “I saw a panicked bride hiding in the deep end of a swimming pool to avoid her wedding.” Four months later, McLeod, dancers and a crew were in a pool shooting. That piece, Yes, She Said, has been seen all over the U.S., at Lincoln Center and on PBS. “Initially, I had absolutely no idea what I was doing,” McLeod continues. “I just knew I wanted to make a work on camera—something that would last beyond the moment of performance. I think it’s part of the artistic evolution for a choreographer.” McLeod has gone on to make several gorgeous short underwater videos pairing imaginative dance with beautiful music: Teatro Otana, Teatro Iva, Waterhaven Project (Luo Yong’s Dream). They’ve been shown at prestigious dance festivals all over the country, at Mass MoCA museum in North Adams, Massachusetts, and at The High Line Festival in New York City. “Working underwater is extremely challenging,” McLeod says. “The dancers need to modulate their movements and use their breath in a specific way. And, no matter how warm the water is, they always get cold. So, the performers and crew are often pretty uncomfortable during the creation process. The magic is that the end result is so lyrically beautiful.” “I love working underwater,” McLeod concludes. “I’m a sucker for its mysteries and its endless beauty.” Poseidon’s Paradise: Underwater Sculpture

“Underwater, you give up control for a kind of beauty that could never occur elsewhere,” says choreographer Laurie McLeod. Taylor’s Vicissitudes is an unearthly work of beauty. His UnStill Life, set in the constant flux of a marine environment, reminds us that change is inevitable.

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Growing up in Malaysia and the Caribbean, sculptor Jason de Caires Taylor went snorkeling most days after school. But by the time he’d graduated art school in London some 20 years later, coral reefs worldwide were disappearing due to environmental and manmade onslaughts. Taylor decided to use his talent for a greater good. Taylor’s underwater sculptures, all based on traditional figurative imagery, are stunning works of art created with an ecological purpose: they form artificial reefs, attracting marine life in areas where the natural reefs are under threat. In May 2006, Taylor gained international recognition by creating the world’s first underwater sculpture park in Grenada, West Indies. The sculptures are placed in clear shallow waters to provide easy access to divers, snorkelers and those in glass-bottomed boats. Several dive tour operators in Grenada offer trips to the Sculpture Garden. The work Vicissitudes, a life-size cast of a group of ethnically-diverse children holding hands, is meant to evoke the idea of unity and continuum. And just as the marine environment is in constant flux, so too are the underwater sculptures as they become covered in algae, barnacles and other underwater life forms. Taylor is working on numerous new projects including an installation on a shipwreck in the Virgin Islands and the first phase of an underwater project within the National Marine Park in Cancun, Mexico. “In addition to doing something beneficial for the environment,” says Taylor, “taking art off the white walls of a gallery offers the viewer a sense of discovery and participation.” “The buoyancy and weightlessness of a person in water provides a unique viewing experience,” Taylor explains. “Under the sea, colors change and light from the water’s surface, altered by movement, produces kaleidoscopic effects. The result is a dramatic, personal encounter with the art.”

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End Page by Stuart Cohen

GETTY 1 / RAIMUND KOCH

The Church of Slim

Converting to skinny clothes requires the utmost piety, self-abnegation and devotion. Just like the born-again blonde soon learns she must keep vigil on her roots lest her secret be revealed, so too must the new owner of the fitted suit and the tapered trouser adapt to a rigid regimen and learn to postpone joy. For years, I lamented that my suits, pants and dress shirts hid my proverbial “light under a bushel.” Why did I spend so much time on that cursed treadmill if my body remained shrouded in yards of lumpy gabardine? Flowing pants turned my legs into tree stumps; loose shirts felt like caftans. Was my destiny to be a sartorial schmoo? And then the tide turned. I beheld the return of the fitted suit, with its lithe tapered trousers and flattering form-following dress shirt. Like Moses on the Mountain, I was instantly converted. I forsook all others. Designers gave me back my body—but the price was excruciating. Skinny clothes are vengeful gods. They are not for the undisciplined or weak of will. It takes the asceticism of a Buddhist monk to maintain the body for this super sexy (yet completely unforgiving) apparel. No diet is as severe as a closet full of skinny clothes. One helping too many of crème brulée, scalloped potatoes or even an Andes mint can decimate that silhouette forever. Many times have I wished for Scarlet O’Hara’s Mammy just to yank the corset strings a bit tighter. Is all the self-denial worth it? You betcha! When you walk by a mirror and it throws you back the benediction of a buff physique, all the dieting and sit-ups and emergency liposuction are a zealot’s perfect payback. If that doesn’t work, there’s always the next size up.

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www.canali.it

Rodes Fashion Forum Magazine  

Spring 2009 Issue

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