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breaking from the norm: students defy social labels

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we’re not in kansas anymore: mapping regional stereotypes

january 30, 2014 volume 6. edition 17.

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living the lawrence dream: being blue in a sea of red


ACADEMICS january 30, 2014 page by kaitlyn foster

story behind the ‘state more than fifteen years of firebirds

by fiona mcallister

Twenty years ago on Nov. 4, 1994, the citizens of Lawrence voted on whether or not the city needed a second high school. The majority of the city voted yes. In 1994, Lawrence High School was the only high school in Lawrence, and at 2,000 students, it was bursting at its seams. “It was just wall-to-wall people in the halls; you couldn’t see the floor,” science teacher David Reber said. After the 1994 election, a committee was formed to select a location for the new school. The construction began in June, 1995. The $26 million building took over two years to build and A common myth about the construction of Free State is that the arwas completed in August, shortly before the first chitecture firm that designed it also designs jails. Treanor Architects, the firm in charge of Free State, have designed just one jail: Anderson day of school on Aug. 21, 1997. While construction was under way, so was the Co. sheriff’s office and jail (above). process of picking a name and a mascot. students and 100 faculty members filled the hall“The school board chose the name Free State,” ways. The first month presented some challenges. said Steve Grant, former athletic director. “They Some textbooks had yet to arrive and there was solicited people in the community to come up with ongoing construction to finish minor details. Traffic names.” was also an issue on the first day. The name “Free State” possesses historical At the time, the school only had one entrance significance. In the 1850s, pre-civil war era, Kansas because Wakarusa Drive had yet to be extended. was referred to as “Bleeding Kansas” because of There was also no stop light at Folks Road and its internal conflicts with slavery. The Kansans who Sixth Street. opposed slavery were called Free-Staters. A new school meant new traditions. PreviousAfter choosing the name, the school board ly, Lawrence High school had over 2000 students, created a committee of around 30 individuals to which limited the number of opportunities for select a mascot. The committee was composed of students. 7th, 8th and 9th-graders who would be attending “Whether it be athletic teams, music or forenFree State. Parents, school board members and sics, when you have that large of a school, you are future Free State faculty members also contributed going to have cuts because they just can’t accomto the discussion. modate that number of students,” pre med teacher Initially, A member of the committee suggested Jane Rock said. a Firebird after discussing the idea of a phoenix for Rock has been at Free State since it opened. a mascot. “Even in student activities, by adding another “The phoenix is a mythical bird that grew out of school we added so many more opportunities for the ashes,” Grant said, “so that goes back to the pre students,” Rock said. civil war days when the city was burned down and Free State borrowed and shared many of Lawrence rose out of the ashes.” Lawrence High’s traditions the first year. Prom and Among the many mascot contenders, the the annual mud volleyball tournament were done Firebird, phoenix and panther were the top three. in conjunction with Lawrence High. However, the Ultimately, the Firebird, based off the phoenix, was homecoming bonfire was a Free State original. chosen to accompany the school’s historical name. The most important tradition made was Free The Firebird design has only been changed State’s standard of excellence in athletics, academonce since the school opened. After finding out ics, music and clubs. that the artist who created the design, Michael Ur“Our excellence has been around forever,” Rock ish, had copied Temple University’s owl, the school said. district was forced to change the design to avoid a lawsuit. “Initially, the wings were shorter and the body was smaller,” Grant said. “The head has always been the same.” The mascot name, Freddie, has its own history. The first year, student Jody Frederickson was the mascot. Her nickname was “Freddie”, and people began to refer to the mascot as Freddie. Thus, the school mascot became Freddie the Firebird. On the first day of school, Aug. 21, 1997, 920

free press staff: hannah moran- editor in chief

kaitlyn foster- designer cierra campbell- designer kyra haas- co-online editor in chief rebecca moran- reporter morgan noll- reporter ryan liston- co-online editor in chief fiona mcallister-reporter sarah whipple- design editor sam goodwin- reporter logan brown- business editor hala hamid- reporter kenneth palmer- reporter rosemary newsome- copy editor gavin spence- reporter sarah lieberman- copy editor evan frook- reporter bridget brown- photographer maria carrasco- copy editor nick popiel- photographer kristina foster- photo editor penny zheng- photographer catherine prestoy-social media editor mary brady- photographer jacob hood- cartoonist darian koenig- assistant design editor conner aldridge- SIC

our mission: The Free Press is an open forum that accepts letters to the editor and guest writings. They must include the writer’s name and telephone numbers. Articles may be edited due to space limitations, libel or inappropriate content. Letters may be submitted to Room 115 or sent in care of Free Press to Free State High School, 4700 Overland Drive, Lawrence, KS, 66049. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Free Press staff, the high school administration or that of the USD 497 Board of Education.

cover by jacob hood

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noteworthy news: information to keep updated today

the slippery slope

students face challenges with winter weather driving

by sarah lieberman

On Monday Jan. 7, junior Maddie Hill celebrated her extra day of freedom. But her excitement was accompanied by relief. Because her house sits on a hill, the winter weather makes it nearly impossible to leave. Frigid temperatures and winter storms present new obstacles to driving in the already dangerous parking lot. A string of car crashes immediately preceding winter break served as a wake up call to many students to become more vigilant drivers. Accidents are common in the parking lot due to the abundance of new drivers, but even experienced drivers are fazed by the snow. Although sophomore Garrett Hodge has been driving since eighth grade, he hasn’t yet mastered winter driving. “I’m terrible at it,” Hodge said. “My car always slides around and stuff.” However, living in the Midwest, everyone has advice for tackling the slick roads.

“You gotta stop early and use the brakes early,” Hodge said. Maddie Hill’s dad, realizing the potential danger, taught her to drive in the snow. While practice can increase one’s snow driving abilities, caution does not always prevent mishaps. Senior Rachel Miller experienced the risks of winter driving first-hand. “I fishtailed and I was headed towards a car,” Miller said, “I missed the car and I ended up going on someone’s yard.” The accident luckily resulted in no damage. When her parents came to handle the ordeal, Miller and her friends left to go sledding, but some complications arose. “The woman threatened to call the police because it was a hit and run, or whatever, for her grass,” Miller said. Junior Mersadees Sampson has also had her fair share of winter driving debacles. “My car doesn’t do very

well in the snow,” Sampson said. “‘Cause it sits really low, so I get stuck a lot. And it’s very tragic for me.” Her distaste stems from an unpleasant first experience with winter driving. While sitting at a stoplight, she was rear-ended by a car whose driver lost control. But some drivers can be surprisingly polite during these winter months. “I was coming around the corner, and I got stuck,” Sampson said. “And there was just like people outside all over the road shoveling each other out.” Student Resource officer Larry Lindsay notes teen’s distracted driving as the most common mistake. “So, you just need to slow down and pay attention to what’s going on,” Lindsay said. “That’s really it.” In Kansas, unpredictable weather is inevitable, but reckless driving doesn’t have to be. Let’s be careful out there.

NEWS january 30, 2014 page by cierra campbell

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4

EDITORIAL

january 30, 2014

page by darian koenig

what a girl wants

students describe the perfect partner

by becca moran

Bad or good news depending on your gender: the teenage relationship paradigm still favors guys. “Despite seeing themselves a much more liberated in their expression of relationships and sexuality, I think girls still want to see some sense of connectedness in their relationships,” said Dr. Wes Crenshaw, local psychologist. “Guys want to have companionship, sexual contact and intimacy, but they don’t necessarily want to ‘pay’ for it in terms of affiliation or obligation.” This is part of the reason why it is often the boy who avoids a committed, serious relationship, while the girl wants just that. This statement was corroborated by the six students interviewed for this article: three out of the three boys interviewed said that the relationship would at least start out casual, while three out of the three girls interviewed immediately said they wanted serious relationships. “I would never date someone where I didn’t see it going anywhere,” junior Bri Martin said. “What’s the point of that?” Dr. Crenshaw said that now, most teens are labeling their relationships as “casual.” But this often puts the girls in asynchronous relationships, which means one person is more into the other person than that person is into them. “You have to remember that the least motivated person in a relationship is always the most powerful, because he or she has the power to care less,” Crenshaw said, “And that defines a lot of today’s teen relationships. One person is ‘up’ and the

other ‘down.’” Since it is often the boy who cares less in high school relationships, he is in the position of power. Most fights between couples are, at their root, power struggles. But ideally, both partners would want to please each other and work with each other to reach a compromise that satisfies both of them. Senior Maddie Woodard recognizes this need for similar visions in relationships. “I look for someone who’s on the same page as me as far as what we’re looking for,” she said. Keep in mind that Crenshaw is basing all of his statements off what is “normal,” meaning falling within the majority of the bell curve. Girls are not at all always at the disadvantage of caring more. In fact, Martin said she avoids “boys who just love you too much.” One thing both sexes tend to agree on is a desire for sex, companionship and support. According to a 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth, Vital and Health Statistics, teenage sex is increasingly more likely to be voluntary. In 2006–2010, first sex was described as “unwanted” by 11 percent of young women aged 18–24 who had had sex before age 20, compared with 13 percent in 2002. For young men in the same age-group, unwanted first sex decreased from 10 to 5 percent between those years. “I would say we are at an all time high on [sexual intimacy],” Crenshaw said. “Young people are typically sexually active by the end of high school and those

by jacob hood

who are not tend to be outside the dating pool. In other words, if one is in the dating pool, one is likely to be sexually active, or as I’ve said it in the paper before, there are a small number of kids who are abstinent by choice. The rest are already having sex or would like to be if given the opportunity.” He cautions against getting into a relationship solely to have a sexual partner, because those relationships often end up empty and disconnected. Outside of sex, every person interviewed said at least once that what they wanted most in a significant other was a

best friend. A best friend encompasses a companion, supporter and confidant. “If I’m in a relationship with somebody, I want them to be a really good friend who I can tell anything to,” freshman Lauren Britain said. “And I want them to know what to say and to be there for me.” Over and over, students echoed her sentiment. “Be there for me, support me and what I do,” Junior June Brooks said, “I’d do the same for her.” Teens want someone to rely on, who will validate and encourage and love them.


Q: how did lawrence become the only blue in a red state?

OPINION january 30, 2014 page by kaitlyn foster

liberal lawrence

5

reporter searches for county’s blue origins

by morgan noll

With a “honk for hemp” sign waving back and forth, an unpaid musician strumming a guitar in the park gazebo and the smell of fresh pizza wafting from the local family owned restaurant, small-town liberalism permeates Lawrence. However, the roots of the liberalism are less obvious. Like a minuscule blueberry at the bottom of a bowl of big red apples, Lawrence is the hopeful yet hopeless group of liberals surrounded by the conservatives filling Kansas’s border. The bleachers at Allen Fieldhouse are more often filled with blue t-shirts rather than crimson, illustrating the fact that we are not only the town of the Jayhawks, but also one of the only politically blue areas in Kansas. Some believe that the two characteristics go hand-in-hand. History and government teacher Kimberly Grinnell believes Lawrence is liberal because it’s a college town. Grinnell explained the trend for people in education, especially higher education like the University of Kansas, is to be liberal.

“I think that when you’re educated you get to see both sides,” photography teacher Marsha Poholsky said, “… and I think that because Lawrence has a large emphasis on education, people are always gathering new information and looking at all sides of an issue.” Of course, the trend is by majority not unanimity. Just as there are conservative families in Lawrence, there are conservative professors and other employees of the university. Of the near 90 thousand people residing in Lawrence, a little over 30 thousand are enrolled at KU. If KU is the root of liberalism in Lawrence, the numbers support the extent of the university’s effect on the democratic-leaning election results. If the numbers aren’t enough to prove the university’s impact on the community, Massachusetts street after a big win might be. The street is packed with fans shoulder to shoulder, some friends and some strangers, all sharing a mutual love for the Jayhawks. Lawrence is different, and that isn’t just a cliche statement coming from a biased

Lawrencian. “I think we also have a large influx of people from both coasts because of the University,” Poholsky said, “and we also have a lot of free-thinking [people] and Lawrence is kind of accepting of that. It always has been.” The hole in this theory is the conservatism of other college towns. If “college” and “liberalism” are synonymous, then there must be a difference between KU and other college towns, especially Division 1 college towns like Manhattan, that are primarily conservative. “Obviously K-State … is more conservative and that might have more to do with the students that are attracted to K-State versus KU,” Grinnell said. If more “liberal” students or a more diverse overall group of students are attracted to KU then that would sensibly contribute to Lawrence being more liberal. K-state is the more agriculturally-focused institution, typically attracting students from smaller towns in Western Kansas where more conservative families reside.

online

Check out morgan noll’s online story, clothing in the halls, at fsfreepress.com under ‘opinions’


avoiding the status quo

FEATURES january 30, 2014 page by sarah whipple

FEATURES january 30, 2014

7

jock frat boy goth social butterfly hipster class clown stairwall kid gangster artsy kid future businessman farmer slacker bully valley girl punk emo wannabes jock frat boy goth social butterfly hipster social elite cheerleader band geek white trash nerd juvenile delinquent computer whiz hippie druggie teacher’s pet prep social outcast skater thespian housewife social elite cheerleader band geek places, the fact the cafeteria is still segregated to some depeople, fromschool the most athletic to the most academic and “I’m the country boy of the school,” Muiller said.break “I don’t outof of by kenneth palmer and rosemary newsome >students high stereotypes and show images arethatjust a perception With his swooped black hair and red plaid pants, sophomore Caleb Woodard admits he is often judged. However, the pot-smoking, scene-affiliated, hooky-playing punk stereotype begins and ends with his eccentric outfit. As with many students, there is more than meets the eye. Woodard’s outward appearance lends itself to fitting the typical “scene/emo punk” faction of the high school hierarchy, but he insists that each person is too unique to fit into a certain preconceived mold. In fact, some of Woodard’s habits directly contradict his label, reinforcing his belief that no person fits a category perfectly. “I actually do my work in school,” Woodard said. “I actually listen to pop sometimes and rap and people don’t actually see me as doing that.” While Woodard takes pride in defying his stereotype, senior Tom Muiller embraces his given label.

mind it. I definitely wear jeans and boots and come from a country family. I live on a farm, [and] I hunt [and] fish.” Muiller believes stereotypes don’t have to have a negative connotation. “Stereotypes are what you like and what you do,” Muiller said. “It’s not supposed to be a bad thing, but people see it as a bad thing and target people for that.” For students with the right attitude who face minimal judgement, dismissing labels comes easily. However, once categories become so restrictive as to isolate and ostracize students, stereotypes cross the line from harmless classifications to methods of discrimination. One won’t see the classic scenario of the brawny football player stealing lunch money from the weak and unassuming mathematics champion. In fact, we are more likely to see groups like the chorus and band filled with a diverse collection

everything in between. According to new student and junior Lindsay Rapp, this is not the case in all high schools. At her last school, a private institution out of state, being different was perceived as taboo. “[At my old school], if you’re not following the same path of everyone else, you are considered an outcast,” Rapp said. Free State operates a little differently. “Here there are people following their own path. It is a lot more open,” Rapp said. Despite the laudable aspects of the school, the issue of negative stereotyping is far from vanquished. When Rapp first began navigating the social scene at Free State, some warned her against associating herself with certain groups of people. “No, don’t talk to them,” Rapp would hear. “They are really crazy.” Even though the school is an improvement over some

page by sarah whipple

gree--one can walk into the commons during any given lunch period and find one table filled with only disheveled, spectacle equipped, awkward kids in one corner; a table filled solely with black kids and other minorities in the next; and kids dressed in expensive clothes and wielding the newest cell phones in another side--illustrates how far we still have to come. These kids insulate themselves in groups all on the basis of appearances in order to avoid facing something new. But if students sought out new people, they may learn something that challenges their worldview. Muiller insightfully points out the crux of the issue. “People go for people that are just like them [because] that’s what they know, [and] that’s what they are comfortable with,” Muiller said. “They don’t branch out because… that might be weird or different.”

? � � y � � � a� � � ects � � � n lity refl � o � s r e s p r u at yo se: to see wh ��ita�ke � iz u q is th you choo r school,

s fo an outfit d torn black jean g in k ic p orts 1. when pknot t-shirt an etball sh ing Company k s a li b S d a n . a ya rad orts jerse r from Arizona T next b. my sp e z bla own the d w e n n o t t t e u e y, a b c. a sw ts one d: a band n a p t a e your own d. sw d consists of m o r f e o om “There are definitely stereotypes; 2. your iPMetallica, plus s ll n est a a. l the Ma it is a natural thing that people do. Kanye W a g d u n t a r o e k P “Because of how involved I am b. Dra Bon Iver end and d k n e a They classify people how they want e y W z a e E u: with the music department, people c. Vampir Chili Peppers, Griday. yo to classify people. I think that’s fine F e t u d o r H e s odle “I actually do try in school, I try a pap may assume I’m kind of stuffy or d. Red as long as you don’t treat people r assignesd with anime do to the game e h c a te r to get good grades, I actually care more free-flowing. I don’t mean to oing 3. you urn it in cover differently because of it.” te after g t u . a in m t s about where I go to college.” be either of those things” n it la >tom muiller, 12 b. work o u >tye carter, 11 >david glauner, 12 all in haik xcuses it e it r w c. d? h oe e weeken g out wit in with n d. turn eityour plans for th ts...maybe hangin r r 4. what a g to some conce y in es Sunda a. go m a g ll a , ids ootb to sketch college k ll saturday, NFL f m u e s u hy m a tb philosop local art n e b. baske o h t lk o a t t r ’s .V. a trip professo s and watching T a c. taking o t g headin friend “I know how to program on and then rk , hanging with wo a computer, savvy with stuff d. home r: on Twitte w o ll like that, but, I guess, you fo u “I just kind of ‘do me’ 4. Yo on ilynmans r a can’t really just tell stuff like m @ and people perceive that . cy a Conspira atmove r ld r lf a o t o W l that about a person from t as being a hipster.” b. @ the socia ics and @ ergency f lP o a t ic u r o o t looking at them.” eEm aying >cale >cale kobler, 12 arel, c. @His nd @Cut ark territories, st lack app a b k k d n lk a ii m ic d >elijiah houk, 11 mus d. @ own : Going d ubble of screamo ’s a ly t s mo ab your ers litter d living in ered a goth. t n s a o p m a t r r o o n to hitting s and sp be consid e m m a ld a e u t g o y r w s e you socc , fanta ball at a : Jerseys e ’s h t b g ly t in s s mo pas lled ck . From being ca is full. jo t e a t e k a s c h a ja u e f r o li e of undister, but y your lett s ll , u n ip f u h r ’s l e a e f n “I don’t believe in the word hom then rds, li aditio “I’ve been called a hippie, an tage reco the next fad...and ’s: The tr I’m on the cheer team, I wear my uniform c in v ly t o t s ‘stereotype.’ I don’t use it. I o s m emo kid, a scene kid, punk make ift shop to school, I’m blond. My car is nice and I From thr s you’re dying to . t believe that every individual a h t rock. Everyone’s like, ‘You’re mix t. ure think a lot of people get the wrong idea you are a els red treas e you liked it firs , e s v human is, in fact, different... e o p c y t o obviously not normal.’” e lab stere ever yon because my parents bought the car for u defy th e typical there’s no certain people o h t y alerting , g s t in n >indigo bahn, 10 e id ’s: Avo me, but I also helped pay for it...I feel like ny stud that are exactly the same, so mostly d ove. Just like ma ab people tend to see, and think what they you can’t group them into a of all the elf. to yours want to think.” category.” and stick >maddie williams, 12 >caleb woodard, 10

to see the rest of the interviews, go to fsfreepressonline.com

photos by nick popiel


avoiding the status quo

FEATURES january 30, 2014 page by sarah whipple

FEATURES january 30, 2014

7

jock frat boy goth social butterfly hipster class clown stairwall kid gangster artsy kid future businessman farmer slacker bully valley girl punk emo wannabes jock frat boy goth social butterfly hipster social elite cheerleader band geek white trash nerd juvenile delinquent computer whiz hippie druggie teacher’s pet prep social outcast skater thespian housewife social elite cheerleader band geek places, the fact the cafeteria is still segregated to some depeople, fromschool the most athletic to the most academic and “I’m the country boy of the school,” Muiller said.break “I don’t outof of by kenneth palmer and rosemary newsome >students high stereotypes and show images arethatjust a perception With his swooped black hair and red plaid pants, sophomore Caleb Woodard admits he is often judged. However, the pot-smoking, scene-affiliated, hooky-playing punk stereotype begins and ends with his eccentric outfit. As with many students, there is more than meets the eye. Woodard’s outward appearance lends itself to fitting the typical “scene/emo punk” faction of the high school hierarchy, but he insists that each person is too unique to fit into a certain preconceived mold. In fact, some of Woodard’s habits directly contradict his label, reinforcing his belief that no person fits a category perfectly. “I actually do my work in school,” Woodard said. “I actually listen to pop sometimes and rap and people don’t actually see me as doing that.” While Woodard takes pride in defying his stereotype, senior Tom Muiller embraces his given label.

mind it. I definitely wear jeans and boots and come from a country family. I live on a farm, [and] I hunt [and] fish.” Muiller believes stereotypes don’t have to have a negative connotation. “Stereotypes are what you like and what you do,” Muiller said. “It’s not supposed to be a bad thing, but people see it as a bad thing and target people for that.” For students with the right attitude who face minimal judgement, dismissing labels comes easily. However, once categories become so restrictive as to isolate and ostracize students, stereotypes cross the line from harmless classifications to methods of discrimination. One won’t see the classic scenario of the brawny football player stealing lunch money from the weak and unassuming mathematics champion. In fact, we are more likely to see groups like the chorus and band filled with a diverse collection

everything in between. According to new student and junior Lindsay Rapp, this is not the case in all high schools. At her last school, a private institution out of state, being different was perceived as taboo. “[At my old school], if you’re not following the same path of everyone else, you are considered an outcast,” Rapp said. Free State operates a little differently. “Here there are people following their own path. It is a lot more open,” Rapp said. Despite the laudable aspects of the school, the issue of negative stereotyping is far from vanquished. When Rapp first began navigating the social scene at Free State, some warned her against associating herself with certain groups of people. “No, don’t talk to them,” Rapp would hear. “They are really crazy.” Even though the school is an improvement over some

page by sarah whipple

gree--one can walk into the commons during any given lunch period and find one table filled with only disheveled, spectacle equipped, awkward kids in one corner; a table filled solely with black kids and other minorities in the next; and kids dressed in expensive clothes and wielding the newest cell phones in another side--illustrates how far we still have to come. These kids insulate themselves in groups all on the basis of appearances in order to avoid facing something new. But if students sought out new people, they may learn something that challenges their worldview. Muiller insightfully points out the crux of the issue. “People go for people that are just like them [because] that’s what they know, [and] that’s what they are comfortable with,” Muiller said. “They don’t branch out because… that might be weird or different.”

? � � y � � � a� � � ects � � � n lity refl � o � s r e s p r u at yo se: to see wh ��ita�ke � iz u q is th you choo r school,

s fo an outfit d torn black jean g in k ic p orts 1. when pknot t-shirt an etball sh ing Company k s a li b S d a n . a ya rad orts jerse r from Arizona T next b. my sp e z bla own the d w e n n o t t t e u e y, a b c. a sw ts one d: a band n a p t a e your own d. sw d consists of m o r f e o om “There are definitely stereotypes; 2. your iPMetallica, plus s ll n est a a. l the Ma it is a natural thing that people do. Kanye W a g d u n t a r o e k P “Because of how involved I am b. Dra Bon Iver end and d k n e a They classify people how they want e y W z a e E u: with the music department, people c. Vampir Chili Peppers, Griday. yo to classify people. I think that’s fine F e t u d o r H e s odle “I actually do try in school, I try a pap may assume I’m kind of stuffy or d. Red as long as you don’t treat people r assignesd with anime do to the game e h c a te r to get good grades, I actually care more free-flowing. I don’t mean to oing 3. you urn it in cover differently because of it.” te after g t u . a in m t s about where I go to college.” be either of those things” n it la >tom muiller, 12 b. work o u >tye carter, 11 >david glauner, 12 all in haik xcuses it e it r w c. d? h oe e weeken g out wit in with n d. turn eityour plans for th ts...maybe hangin r r 4. what a g to some conce y in es Sunda a. go m a g ll a , ids ootb to sketch college k ll saturday, NFL f m u e s u hy m a tb philosop local art n e b. baske o h t lk o a t t r ’s .V. a trip professo s and watching T a c. taking o t g headin friend “I know how to program on and then rk , hanging with wo a computer, savvy with stuff d. home r: on Twitte w o ll like that, but, I guess, you fo u “I just kind of ‘do me’ 4. Yo on ilynmans r a can’t really just tell stuff like m @ and people perceive that . cy a Conspira atmove r ld r lf a o t o W l that about a person from t as being a hipster.” b. @ the socia ics and @ ergency f lP o a t ic u r o o t looking at them.” eEm aying >cale >cale kobler, 12 arel, c. @His nd @Cut ark territories, st lack app a b k k d n lk a ii m ic d >elijiah houk, 11 mus d. @ own : Going d ubble of screamo ’s a ly t s mo ab your ers litter d living in ered a goth. t n s a o p m a t r r o o n to hitting s and sp be consid e m m a ld a e u t g o y r w s e you socc , fanta ball at a : Jerseys e ’s h t b g ly t in s s mo pas lled ck . From being ca is full. jo t e a t e k a s c h a ja u e f r o li e of undister, but y your lett s ll , u n ip f u h r ’s l e a e f n “I don’t believe in the word hom then rds, li aditio “I’ve been called a hippie, an tage reco the next fad...and ’s: The tr I’m on the cheer team, I wear my uniform c in v ly t o t s ‘stereotype.’ I don’t use it. I o s m emo kid, a scene kid, punk make ift shop to school, I’m blond. My car is nice and I From thr s you’re dying to . t believe that every individual a h t rock. Everyone’s like, ‘You’re mix t. ure think a lot of people get the wrong idea you are a els red treas e you liked it firs , e s v human is, in fact, different... e o p c y t o obviously not normal.’” e lab stere ever yon because my parents bought the car for u defy th e typical there’s no certain people o h t y alerting , g s t in n >indigo bahn, 10 e id ’s: Avo me, but I also helped pay for it...I feel like ny stud that are exactly the same, so mostly d ove. Just like ma ab people tend to see, and think what they you can’t group them into a of all the elf. to yours want to think.” category.” and stick >maddie williams, 12 >caleb woodard, 10

to see the rest of the interviews, go to fsfreepressonline.com

photos by nick popiel


8

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PROFILE

january 30, 2014

page by cierra campbell

the new kid in town

sophomore raegan koenig adapts quickly to Lawrence’s culture

by ryan liston

Although it’s not sophomore Raegan Koenig’s first time visiting Lawrence, it is her first time attending school here. During winter break, Raegan moved from Seneca, Kan., where she attended Nemaha Valley High School. On Jan. 7, she made the transition from attending a school of about 200 people to a school of about 1500 people. Instead of having block schedule everyday like Nemaha Valley, Free State only has block twice a week, which has been an adjustment for Koenig. Here, she has to finish all of her homework for the next day. Along with having block schedule everyday, Nemaha Valley had a 30 minute break after the first class of the day. “There would be a short little period where we could eat snacks or just collect our stuff,” Raegan said, “Make sure we had everything, know where we were going and just chat with friends or get on our phones before we had to go to the next [class].” But even with the break, Raegan wasn’t entirely happy at Nemaha Valley. She felt that she didn’t fit into the school’s closely-knit community, since she had only

lived there for about two years after moving from Baileyville, Kan. “It was more intimate because everybody knows everybody,” Raegan said, “But for me, I didn’t really know as many people, so it kind of put me as an outcast.” Here, Raegan feels not knowing everybody doesn’t set her apart since no one knows everybody. Along with fitting in better at Free State, Raegan says that Lawrence is the place for her. “... ‘My kind of town’ really is the best way to describe it,” she said. Raegan feels Lawrence’s pace suits her better than Seneca’s. Her love of art is another reason she feels at home in Lawrence. “There’s a lot more in the city that I can look at to inspire myself,” Raegan said. “See, the graffiti [and] the things that have been drawn out and around, things like that that really catch my eye.” Jewelry teacher Don Stevanov marveled over Raegan’s artistic talent. “From her first design, I see that she has excellent potential,” Stevanov said. “I see that she has a natural gift and skill ... [Her first design] is probably one of the better ones I’ve

fsfreepressonline.com. check it out.

seen so far.” In Seneca, Raegan lived with her dad and younger brother. Now that she is in Lawrence, she lives with her mom and her older sister Darian. Darian agrees that Lawrence is a good environment for Raegan. “She’s very artsy, very outgoing, very crazy, and that’s basically what I feel Lawrence is,” Darian said. “It’s an artsy town ... it’s just outgoing and full of life and full of energy, and that’s what Raegan is.” Darian has also noticed that Lawrence has changed Raegan. “I can just see her coming out of her shell and becoming who she is and who she will be,” Darian said. “... It’s gonna be really cool to see how she’s gonna grow and who she’s gonna become.” Raegan says Lawrence has helped her express herself in a way that wasn’t possible in Seneca. “I can be my own person better here,” Raegan said. “... At Seneca, there wasn’t a whole lot of variety, like I say ‘cookie cutter,’ so being different really separated you and made you feel bad.”

Sophomore Raegan Koenig moved to Lawrence from Seneca, Kan. this winter break. She enjoys drawing anime characters in her free time. Lawrence is “my kind of town,” she said. (art courtesy of Koenig) photo by penny zheng


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HOMETOWN HUB january 30, 2013 page by kaitlyn foster

photo by One Day Closer on flickr

celebrating kansas’s best since 1854

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567 E Cedar St Liberal, Kan. botanica gardens In 1981, the Kansas 701 Amidon St Eisenhower kansas underground Historical Commission hauled Wichita, Kan. a small, ramshackle farm house presidential salt museum The Botanica Gardens to the edge of Liberal, Kan., and 3504 E. Avenue G are nine acres of garden, christened it “Dorothy’s House.” A library Hutchinson, Kan. which contain over 4,000 plant yellow brick road leads visitors up 200 SE 4th St The tour begins upstairs, species, 26 different themed its small porch and into its “WizAbilene, Kan. where visitors are given a quick display gardens and a multitude ard of Oz”-themed rooms. Gallery space is filled world’s largest salt mine safety lecture before of water fountains. Located two The house is only a small with antique tables, old teleentering a descending elevator. and a half hours from Lawrence, ball of twine aspect of a “Wizard of Oz” walkphones and military coats, all The mine resembles a 67 mile through, created by a Kansas Wisconsin St from Eisenhower’s time as World the gardens include an aquatic long parking garage made of 400 native, Linda Windler. The exhibit Cawker City, Kan. War II hero and as President. The collection, rock garden, butterfly feet salt blocks. garden, greenhouse for tropical was located in a shopping mall for In 1953, farmer Frank Stoeber exhibit includes his childhood En route to the museum, remplants and a fish-stocked pond. 10 years before expanding to its began to roll spare bits of sisal home, museum and the Place nants from the mine’s operation Needless to say, the gardens are own location in a storage building twine into a small ball in his barn. of Meditation--the location of days pepper the journey--broken popular for weddings and family near Dorothy’s house. Four years later, the ball weighed his grave. Complete with details down vehicles and trash deposit The walk features familiar 2.5 tons and stood 8 feet tall. By about his life and hobbies as well photos and offer various classes, areas remind visitors of the mine’s such as “Family Nature Crafts” and 1961, when he turned it over to faces like the Scarecrow and the as his presidency, the museum original purpose. There is also a Tin Man, and tour guides are the town, Stoeber had over 1.6 provides a closer look at the pub- “Garden Sprouts.” Admission is cardboard cutout of Mike Rowe, $6 for seniors, $7 for adults and clad in blue gingham dresses and million feet of twine rolled into a lic and private life of Eisenhower. who filmed an episode of Dirty sparkling red slippers. The wizard sphere, which was 11 feet in diAdmission is $10 for adults, $9 for $5 for children under 12. Jobs in the mine. has a throne room, featuring his ameter. To keep the ball growing, seniors and $2 for children ages >Wichita also has Due to its ideal temperature, angry expression from the movie the citizens in the town created a 6-15. the mine houses a variety of mova zoo and the Kan. projected onto a lava-lamp-sur“Twine-A-Thon.” In which any>check out Dish ie memorabilia, such as costumes Sports Hall of Fame. rounded-screen. Take a trip down one could step up and add more from Gone with the Wind and on 207 N Cedar memory lane for $7.00 for adults, twine. In 2003, Twine-A-Thon’s You could have a minimaster prints of The Wizard of $4.50 for children and $5.50 for total length was recorded at a St. for burritos and Oz. Admission prices for adults is vacation only 3 hours seniors. whopping 7,049,191 feet of twine. sandwiches after the $14.00. away!

tour

>like the great outdoors? Cawker City is also home to Waconda Lake

>try the best lasagna in Kan. at Jillian’s Italian Grill while you’re there

>there’s also the International Pancake Day Hall of Fame in Liberal


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by sarah whipple

We’ve all seen the magazines, the motivational posters on Pinterest and the emails from various gyms, claiming with the new year you can come a new person. It seems that everyone this time of year wants to lose 10 pounds, exercise more or get super-organized. However, come February, resolutions are usually shattered, along with any hopes of revising them until next year. That chocolate cake was just too delicious to pass up and watching “Skins” on Netflix instead of working out is just so much easier. This year, though, can be the year of change. By taking baby steps and creating realistic goals, anyone can make a personal change that will have positive effects on their overall lifestyle. Here are some tips on how to create a healthy mantra and stick to it until 2015 rolls around.

lose weight

One of the most common resolutions set by Americans, but also the one that usually ends up broken by the Super Bowl party full of chips and wings. Instead of fretting over one bad meal decision or cutting back on calories dramatically, start small. By eliminating one can of soda per day or choosing a salad instead of a burger at lunch,

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HEALTH january 30, 2014

page by sarah whipple

The school and public library are both teeming with books that can help satiate your learning pleasures. From the Black Plague epidemic in the Middle Ages to Steve Jobs’ career, there are plenty of new sub-

e fall in lov

the desire to shed pounds will become easier as you start to see more ways to realistically stick to this goal. For more dramatic results, try counting calories with an app like “MyFitnessPal” and purge your pantry of any processed foods that could lead to a bad calorie choice. Of course, exercising and sleeping more foster further success.

Instead of relying on your twitter feed or mother for remembering your schedule, try using a planner, a calendar or a desk to keep things in order. Smartphones are great resources for keeping organized,

get organized

from iPhone calendars to task lists that can be seen with a click of a button. Also, it might help to declutter your room and locker so everything needed for the day can be found easily.

jects to learn about and are super easy to research. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find your next big obsession through a little wisdom found in new places.

Unfortunately, this resolution requires something to fall in love with, but it doesn’t have to be a person. Maybe you can fall in love with a new hobby, a sports team or even your future college. Look at things in your life that you really enjoy and consider spending more time and effort in those opportunities. And if

Want to see the rest of the resolutions? check out fsfreepressonline.com

fall in love

finding that special someone is your main priority, just remember to keep your options open. In February, FYI provides a “Matchmaker” compatibility test that students can take to see who they should date within their grade as well as in other grades. Who knows? Maybe one of those matches will be your next date.


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2) Do you live

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3) Have you ever seen a tornado? 4) Do you eat a lot of bread?

check out fsfreepressonline.com

for additional stories on... The Pajama Game Building Extensions Lawrence Study Locations

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page by darian koenig

Amelia Earheart palribera the adisl e Capitol

KU wanna-

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braum’s **locations are approximate

>common questions from out-of-staters

1) Do you ride

• • •

GRAPHICS january 30, 2014

If you’ve heard any of the common questions or have any to add, give us a shout out at @fsfreepress.


february

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by kyra haas

SPORTS january 30, 2014

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page by darian koenig

wrestling @ Osawatomie 9:00 a.m.

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jv basketball vs. Shawnee Mission NW 5:30 p.m.

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girls basketball 5:30 p.m. @ Olathe South

four in 1,500 students look beyond midwestern norms for athletic pursuits

Out of the approximately 1,558 Free State students, the Free Press found only four who play hockey. According to The United States of Hockey website, Kansas had only 314 players registered with USA Hockey during the 1990-91 season. In 2010-11, that number was up 404.3 percent to 1,934 players. In comparison, Minnesota’s registered player count for the 2010-11 season was 54,325. “I know that Kansas is a big football and basketball state, and so it’s kinda hard not being the center of attention for a sports team,” said junior Anthony Hummell, hockey player. “If I was in Minnesota, everyone would be talking about hockey … it’s always hockey instead of football or basketball.” Because ice rinks are not as common in the Midwest as basketball courts and football fields, hockey players often must travel an hour or two to get to practice. Junior Trent Reinardy travels to Kansas City twice a week and St. Louis twice a month for hour or hour-and-ahalf long practices. Others’ practice schedules require even more travel time. Junior Travis Treanor practices for three hours in north Kansas City three times week and senior Matt Main goes to Shawnee four times a week for two hour practices. Games require even further travel. Because not many hockey teams are based in Kansas, local teams often travel to Iowa, Chicago, Minnesota and St. Louis just to play a game. “State” takes place every year in Ames, Iowa, and teams from Kansas and the rest of the Midwest High School Hockey League participate. “We have a

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charter bus,” Hummell said. “…We travel basically every weekend.” Three Free State hockey players started skating at around three or four years old, and then joined teams during their early elementary years. “I was born in Canada, and I had an outdoor rink down the street from me so that was definitely a big factor in [why I started playing hockey early],” Main said. While most began young, the hockey players’ reasons for picking up their stick vary greatly. Reinardy started playing because his dad grew up in Minnesota and wanted him to follow in his footsteps. Treanor, on the other hand, discovered his passion after watching a hockey-centered cartoon. “I started watching the Anaheim Ducks animated cartoon series, and I was like, ‘I’m gonna do that,’” Treanor said. Hummell, who didn’t start playing until his eighth grade year, was inspired to begin by fellow hockey player, Treanor. “Travis [Treanor] actually got me started in hockey,” Hummell said. “… He used to have a barn, and we’d always play roller hockey, and it sparked my interest to start playing ice hockey.” Even though hockey is not as popular as other sports in the Midwest, Treanor believes the effort and passion required to participate are similar to that of any other sport. “It’s the most beautiful game in the world,” Treanor said. “... It’s just like any other sport … You practice; you get good at it.” High school hockey’s rules and regulations are nearly identical to those of the National Hockey League (NHL), but with steeper penalties for fighting and shorter periods of play. “We aren’t allowed to fight, which is unfortunate,” Treanor said. “I mean, like you can, but you get suspended … We get suspended for five games if we fight. [NHL players] get five minutes.” While fighting is technically prohibited, the players all agree it permeates the game. Fights are common, and a couple players said they had participated. “I think it was the third period with like a couple minutes left, and there was this kid who was chirpin’ me all game, and I was just like, ‘Alright. Whatever. I’ll settle it,’” Main said. “… and that’s how I got a 30 day suspension.”

basketball vs. Shawnee Mission West 7:00 p.m.

Trash-talking, referred to by hockey players as “chirping,” is also rampant. “If you’re insulting someone, you’re ‘chirping,’” Hummell said. “There’s a lot of chirping in the hockey community. It’s hard to go a game without getting called something. I mean, I even chirp. Everyone chirps.” In addition to fights and “chirping,” the game is extremely physical in general. In order to protect themselves, players wear shoulder pads, elbow pads, gloves, shin guards, a helmet and “breezers,” protective pads that protect the lower-half of the torso. Not only do the four play a unique sport, but they also have individualized ways of preparing for upcoming games. Some, like Main, eat an apple right before regulation. Others, like Treanor, take a shot of honey. “The semi-pro player that a teammate of mine lived with would take shots of honey before the game, and he was the best player on the team, so now we always do it,” Treanor said. While they are are not on the same team, each expressed a desire to continue playing after high school. “I mean, I’m always going to play hockey,” Treanor said. “I’m gonna play hockey ‘til I die.”

how we STACK up registered hockey players from 2010-11

represents 7,000 players registered

kansas

minnesota

http://unitedstatesofhockey.com/2011/06/03/raw-numbershockeys-growth-in-non-nhl-states-1990-2010/

Free Press, Iss 6 Ed 17  

Examine the reality of common Stereotypes.