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set ‘em up: two students of your choice will go on a date

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from murder to meth: the truth about lawrence’s juvenile detention center

february 20, 2014 volume 7. edition 17.

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facing facts: does free state prepare you for life after high school?


ACADEMICS february 20, 2014

bound to seniors secure college admission through early decision page by kristina foster

by sarah lieberman

At 11:14 a.m. on Dec. 14, the day of her ballet performance in the Lawrence Art Center’s production of “The Nutcracker,” senior Devany West clicked on a website that welcomed her to Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s class of 2018. “I screamed and ran and hugged my parents,” West said. As her ballet teacher cried and her friend danced and screamed, West reveled in the acceptance to her top choice school. A select group of seniors wrote essays, collected letters of recommendation and submitted college applications by Nov. 1 to schools across the nation. Some of those who opted for early applications have already secured their plans for next fall. “I wanted to know early on if I got in,” West said, “And also a lot of colleges have a higher acceptance rates if you apply early action or early decision.” “Early action,” which is what MIT offers, is non-binding, meaning that students who are accepted early action have the option of attending a different institution for college. However, many schools offer an “early decision” option, in which admitted students are required to attend that school. West, who plans on majoring in biological engineering, had no reservations about applying early to MIT after visiting the campus. “... I absolutely loved the culture of it,” West said. “There’s lots of crazy, nerdy people there, which is sorta the sort of people I hang around with most of the ime. People seem exuberant and happy and smart.” Binding or non-binding, after her visit, West was prepared to commit. “MIT was, you know, far and beyond my first choice,” West said. “Even if it had been binding I would’ve had no reservations about it.” Senior Tara Sacerdote applied early decision to Reed College. “You have to be sure that’s what you want to do, and I was very sure,” Sacerdote said. She received her notice of admission through an email featuring a video of other students getting accepted. “It was just really exciting,” Sacerdote said. “For a while I was just shocked. I thought, ‘I’m moving to Portland in six months.’” However, a secured future so early on has some drawbacks. Senioritis is real, and early acceptance isn’t a cure. “Obviously you still need to work hard,” Sacerdote said, “but I really don’t want to go to school [or] get out of bed--I’ve already been accepted to college.” While college applications are individual processes, they are certainly not faced alone. Along with taking Enrichment Resource teacher Teena Johnson’s collaborative college application class, Sacerdote has undergone the process alongside her friends. “It is really exciting to see other people and what they are doing,” Sacerdote said. “I’ve known a lot of my classmates for six years, and I remember when we were really dumb and goofy kids.”

free press staff: hannah moran- editor in chief

kaitlyn foster- designer cierra campbell- designer kyra haas- co-online editor in chief rebecca moran- reporter morgan noll- reporter ryan liston- co-online editor in chief fiona mcallister-reporter One of Sacerdote’s friends, senior Carl Palmquist, sarah whipple- design editor sam goodwin- reporter knew he wanted to attend the University of Pennlogan brown- business editor hala hamid- reporter sylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Palmquist kenneth palmer- reporter submitted his binding early decision application and rosemary newsome- copy editor gavin spence- reporter figured he’d wait to receive his admission decision sarah lieberman- copy editor evan frook- reporter before he begun writing other essays. bridget brown- photographer maria carrasco- copy editor “Obviously I was very, very excited because nick popiel- photographer mainly, I say this half jokingly... I hadn’t really gotten kristina foster- photo editor penny zheng- photographer ahead on my applications and decided that I would mary brady- photographer do the rest after I found out what Penn said or not catherine prestoy-social media editor jacob hood- cartoonist because I didn’t want to do all the work,” Palmquist darian koenig- assistant design editor conner aldridge- SIC said. “So, that was the biggest relief.” On Monday, Dec. 16, during a Scholars Bowl practice, Palmquist knew he would be able to access information regarding his application. He debated The Free Press is an open forum that accepts letters to the editor and waiting until he got home to check, but decided guest writings. They must include the writer’s name and telephone against it. numbers. Articles may be edited due to space limitations, libel or “I actually didn’t tell any of my friends that I was inappropriate content. Letters may be submitted to Room 115 or doing it,” Palmquist said, “Because I didn’t really sent in care of Free Press to Free State High School, 4700 Overland want to have to explain to them if I happened to not Drive, Lawrence, KS, 66049. get in.” Staring at the screen of his iPhone, Palmquist The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Free Press was congratulated on his acceptance. staff, the high school administration or that of the USD 497 Board of It was official--in the fall, Palmquist would be Education. required to move to Philadephia. “It’s a little worrying being like ‘oh I have no idea what this place even looks like,’” Palmquist said. “But I did talk to a lot of people who either attend there or at least visited and no one had anything negative to say about Philadelphia or the school.” Senior Sofie Frydman will also be heading to the East Coast in the fall. After years of visiting her sisters at Smith College in Northampton, Mass., Frydman is ready for her turn to attend. One afternoon in December, her sister and mother informed her that admissions decisions had been released. “I checked my email,” Frydman said, “And was super psyched because I did not really have a backup plan.” Frydman is the only student at the school who early-decisioned to an all-women’s college. “The school that I chose is all girls, and that is the only thing that really scares me,” Frydman said. “As far education goes, I think I made the right decision.” For the underclassmen who hope to be attending a top tier school in the near future, an important aspect of the application is an interview. However, they are not always formal, rigid experiences. “[My interview] was at Panera,” West said. “It cover by kaitlyn foster, photo by kristina foster was just like an alumni from MIT, and she was just like ‘yeah, this is a cool school. You should apply.’ And I was like ‘I definitely am going to do that.’’ Despite the level of informality in some college Mon-Sat: 7 am - 6 pm interviews, a certain level of decorum should be maintained. 4821 W. 6th St. “Dress decently, show you care, be interested, 785-841-0386 like act interested in what the interviewer has to say,” Palmquist said. Although senior year is filled with inevitable good-byes and departures for everyone, students accepted early already have a picture painted of the next few years.

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noteworthy news: information to keep updated today

eliminating the fees

NEWS february 20, 2014 page by sarah whipple

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school board takes away elective fees as of next year

by morgan noll

Classes like photography, debate and band give students opportunities for creativity and personal expression, but for a price. The district decided on Jan. 27 to eliminate introductory level course fees for the 2014-2015 school year. According to the USD 497 Assistant Director of the Teaching and Learning department, Sarah Oatsvall, the courses with eliminated fees will be the ones that don’t require a prerequisite or an audition. “One of the things that we identified this year is that course fees sometimes hinder students in both their willingness and their ability to take certain classes,” Oatsvall said, “so we wanted to remove those fees to allow students to be able to participate in all activities.”

In the current course description book, Graphic Design I and Graphic Design II are both listed to have a $25 fee. With the changes for next school year, Graphic Design I will be free for students to take while Graphic Design II will still require the course fee. “We want students to feel comfortable taking a class in an area that they haven’t explored before without having the issue of funding or fees deter them from taking that class,” Oatsvall said. The district has been looking into elimination of course fees for around two years now. “We’ve been looking into the amount of money that we have collected from fees,” Oatsvall said, “[and] The amount of money that programs need, as well as the number of students who sign up for classes and the fees that are associated with that.”

They took their first step at the middle school level by eliminating course fees for this 2013-2014 school year. After seeing success in their action, the district found it logical and necessary to make a change at the high schools as well. For some teachers, like photography teacher Karen Musacchio, the origin of the money doesn’t matter just as long as it’s there. “I just order the supplies,” Musacchio said. “I don’t have any idea how much the kids have given me, I just know I have a budget I have to work around.” Counselor Joel Frederick is enthusiastic about the opportunity that the change in the fees will bring. “I think it’s a great thing that they’re doing,” Frederick said. “It provides opportunity for a lot of kids that maybe wouldn’t have

the opportunity, but whether or not it’s financially prudent, I don’t know.” A sudden lack of course fees could present teachers with a difficult financial situation. Regardless of who pays, each course still requires supplies, which someone must purchase. With the current fee-paying system, students who qualify for free or reduced lunch are exempt from paying course fees. The district doesn’t compensate for these unpaid fees; rather, the fees simply sit unpaid. In 2014-15, when every student who takes introductory level classes doesn’t pay a fee, teachers hope enough funds will be provided by the district. “(The fees) help with purchasing supplies to help run our tournament,” said Jason Moore, debate and forensics coach. “They go toward travel expenses and

purchasing scripts and membership fees to certain websites.” The district claims the courses will in no way be negatively affected by the change, as the district general funds will now cover the fees that were previously covered by the students. The district is making a commitment to cover all these funds. While there may be some skepticism surrounding whether the district can fully compensate for the funds which they didn’t contribute previously, the district is confident with their thoroughly discussed decision. “The programs will actually be financially better off than previously,” Oatsvall said, “And it’s the commitment from the district to use district funds to support those courses so that parents don’t have to pay fees.”

to see the current elective fees infographic, go to fsfreepressonline.com


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EDITORIAL

february 20, 2014

page by sarah whipple

what is high school

staff laments unpreparedness for future despite diploma

by rosemary newsome

A good portion of the senior class will graduate this year knowing how to evaluate an indefinite integral, but not knowing how to sew a button . Consider the fictional student Johnny. Johnny is an intelligent and superb student, who spends his free time studying, and graduates with a 4.08 GPA as valedictorian of his class. After graduation, Johnny is driving when his tire pops. He is stuck on the side of the road because he does not know how to change a tire. Johnny is also outcompeted for a part-time job, because he does not know how to properly write a cover letter or prepare for an interview. Johnny decides to move out of his parents’ house, but he quickly realizes he knows nothing about paying taxes or applying for a loan. Despite Johnny’s pedantic excellency, Johnny is far from prepared for the “real world.” Although Johnny’s extreme situation is made-up, Johnny represents an alarming group of students, mostly legal adults, who will graduate high school without any ability to feasibly survive as individuals.

How can the USD 497 Board of Education justify teaching us how to classify halogens--a skill useless in most professional careers--but not teach us about mortgages--an inevitable aspect of home ownership? Instead of sitting through lectures covering the rise of Sultan Mehmet ll, students could be learning how to plunge a toilet or cook raw meat. Students may recall the school board’s attempt at providing students practical life skills in the required eighth grade class formerly known as Family and Consumer Sciences. “So in middle school there’s a course called Healthy Living, which is about nutrition, basic food preparation, that type of thing,” said Patrick Kelly, USD 497 Director of Career and Technical Education . “... We try to make sure that every student, especially as they come up through middle school, has those rudimentary skills and those come through those required courses in middle school.” The school board needs to expand on this idea of ‘rudimentary,’ because baking cinnamon rolls one time in eighth grade does not translate to a lifelong ability to feed oneself.

Though, if a student is interested, opportunities to garner more knowledge and further skills are offered. “The design of the career pathway courses ... is that each one has an intro level course ... and those provide foundation, introductory skills,” Kelly said. However, approaching these subjects from a career-oriented perspective deters students who are looking more for an overview in basic life skills than a potential job interest. A firsttime car owner should not have to take the semester-long course Automotive Service 1 to simply recognize when their oil needs to be changed. Courses, such as Business Essentials, teach students valuable money management techniques that will undoubtedly be useful to students when they begin supporting themselves. But investing in stocks, balancing a budget and doing taxes-all vital aspects of independent adult life--should be skills taught to students regardless of whether they are interested in pursuing a career in business. Instead of forcing students to pass a course such as Business Essentials, which, while useful, may contain superfluous infor-

mation, the school board should require a supplementary course to the middle school’s Healthy Living that encompasses a range of life skills. In order to give students flexibility in elective choices the school board does not mandate a “Life Skills” class. “... I’m pretty sure you don’t want to take an entire course about balancing your checkbook or how to vote,” Kelly said, “and I’m pretty sure you don’t want to take an entire course called Life Skills, either.” Most students don’t want to take courses titled Survey of U.S. History or Algebra II either. If the information in a “Life Skills” class is truly beneficial to students for post-high school success, then students should be obtaining this knowledge. Kelly instead proposes that students and teachers take advantage of the preexisting requisite courses by applying the information to real life situations. “It’s difficult to have a class specifically focused on that [life skills], but there are specific assignments that can happen within a required class that you currently have.” Kelly said. “... Students ask all the time, ‘When am I going to need to know this?’ And we better

be able to answer that.” For example, registering to vote can easily be incorporated into government classes and how to balance a budget can be taught at the same time the basic algebra functions are introduced. Arguably, some life skills are best taught by parents. But each family is different, so drawing the line between whose role it is to teach what lesson is a gray area. The school board is underestimating their duty as educators by not covering all the basics. Not every parent, especially if they haven’t mastered the skill themselves, is able to teach their children the tools to become productive adults. Students will become more than just the employees or post-secondary students or interns that high school is preparing them to be. Students will also be mothers, fathers, drivers, citizens, laundry-doers, cookers, owners, cleaners and free-thinking individuals. While high school, of course, can’t feasibly prepare students for every role they may ever take on, it should at least begin preparing them to be the most successful adults they can.


are teachers using new technology effectively?

OPINION february 20, 2014 page by jacob hood

keepin’ it old school

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cost, integration of new technology could be overwhelming for teachers

by evan frook

Later this semester, teachers will receive some type of mobile device, be it laptop or tablet. Given that some teachers still struggle with using their SMART Boards, there’s some concern surrounding teachers’ ability to effectively use their new devices. All classrooms are equipped with at least one desktop, laptops can be checked out by the cart and projectors are hung from the ceiling. In the math classes, the Smart Boards are utilized to teach anything from basic algebra to polynomial functions to complex differential equations. “I think of a lot of, if not all of, the math teachers teach their lessons on the SMART Board using SMART Notebook software instead of powerpoints or writing on the whiteboard,” said Laura O’Neil, math de-

partment chair and teacher. She notes many other tools, like a TI 89 calculator, can be projected onto the board. O’Neil is looking towards the future too, saying she would be excited for laptops because most teachers are required to move and share classrooms throughout the day. A mobile device would let them simply carry their work with them. With a tablet, she could move it around the room, and it could be written on directly, then projected up to the SMART Board remotely. Physics teacher Oather Strawderman utilizes technology both in the classroom and in the laboratory. “He draws examples [on the SMART Board] of how the experiments we’re doing are going to go or how they should have gone,” said Henry Ohse, junior advanced physics student. “He doesn’t do Power-

points … He makes it up as he goes and does it all by hand.” In the lab, students employ graphing and data collection software, and AP physics students get the opportunity to create electric circuits in the lab. Many of Strawderman’s students consider him to be the most “tech-savvy” of all the instructors at the school. With new tech--including tablets, smartphones and computers--making its way to classrooms all around the globe, the district is adapting with the curve. For example, many teachers have websites on which they post assignments or homework. Many even have registered twitter accounts that they use to keep students up to date with assignments and class work. Spanish teacher Paul Rosen recently tweeted “The SpanMan will be back in action tomorrow… we will have vocab quizzes

on Tue.” A possible issue with new technology is the cost. In an economy only recently recovering from a serious recession, school districts all across the nation are underfunded. Comparatively, Free State doesn’t have it too bad, but SMART Boards cost a grand total of $5,099, according to Modern Chalkboard, a retailer of the device. Installed in every room in the school, the total cost is certainly substantial. MacBooks cost about $1,175 each and Dell devices cost about $1,168 each. Certainly, tech can help students learn, but only if teachers use it correctly. Training courses teachers are required to attend could certainly help to introduce and train educators, but if it’s not enough, it may not be worth the staggering price tag.

got a response? tweet us @fsfreepress

technology under the hood

by jacob hood

have a story idea? want to comment on the paper? got a question? give us a shout out at @fsfreepress.


locked up

FEATURES february 20, 2014 page by darian koenig

FEATURES february 20, 2014 page by darian koenig

>a look inside the Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center

by hannah moran and kyra haas

At 6 a.m. Junior Adam Taylor* is awoken by a security guard’s crude knock. He rises groggily, as does his roommate, a former methamphetamine addict who is incarcerated for almost beating someone to death. As they brush their teeth and hair, fold their blankets and slip into fresh pairs of sweatpants, the duo doesn’t speak. They aren’t allowed. “You have to ask permission,” Taylor said. “You gotta ask permission for everything. You want to go to the bathroom? You gotta ask permission. You wanna get a drink, you gotta raise your hand. Or if you want to ask somebody something, you gotta raise your hand. It’s like that all the time.” Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center (JDC) serves 13 Northeast Kansas counties. For $150 a day, the center can detain delinquents from other counties or those awaiting their court dates between the ages of 10-18 for up to 90 days. According to Detentions Operations Manager Casey Crane, the facility usually accommodates about 10 juveniles at a time, for an average of 10-15 days. A variety of factors influence whether a juvenile actually gets admitted to JDC, including the severity of the crime as well as the juvenile’s home situation.

Taken In/CINC

However, not everyone who is brought to the Douglas County Department of Youth Services has committed an offense. Juvenile Intake worker, Amy Hill, is one of the first people the police notify when they arrest or pick-up a juvenile. He or she may have committed a felony or misdemeanor, or may be a “Child in The sleeping amenities of the JDC residents include a Need of Care” (CINC). Hill explains juveniles blanket, and a sleeping mat that is placed on a raised are classified as a CINC if their parents are concrete platform. When the residents are woken up arrested and there’s no one to take care of in the morning, they are required to fold their blankets them, if they ran away or if they lived in an and place them in a locker. unsafe home. “The officer will kind of give background information on what went on and why they picked the kid up,” Hill said. “... And then I always ask the kid their side of the story.” So begins the Juvenile Intake Assessment, which typically lasts about an hour. While asking questions about the crime, drug or alcohol abuse and past probations, Hill scores the juvenile using a “Kansas Detention Assessment Instrument,” an assessment sheet that assigns point values to different aspects of a juvenile’s situation. The total score is used to determine the best course of action for the juvenile. “Essentially, they’re looking at the charges and the level it is, whether it’s a felony or a misdemeanor,” Hill said. “And from there, we decide they can be put on what’s called ‘conditions of release.’” Depending on his or her assessment score, the

Residents of JDC earn money in a “token economy system” during their stay in the facility. Residents can use their money to purchase special privileges such as watching TV or a movie, or playing video games.

juvenile could be allowed to return home, or be placed in a shelter, foster home or a drug treatment facility. In the worst of cases, he or she will be admitted to the detention center. “Our facility is used for kids who have committed pretty serious crimes,” Crane said. “We’ve had anything from battery … on a law enforcement officer to murder charges.” When a juvenile is arrested, they have a court hearing within 48 hours to determine if they need to continue being detained. If released, a future court date may be scheduled. As for the CINCs, they’ll usually be placed in Police Protective Custody for 72 hours while an investigation about their home life is conducted. During this 72 hours, Hill contacts foster homes and group homes in attempt to find placement for the juvenile. “They’re not necessarily going to stay here in Lawrence or in Douglas County,” Hill said. “We have to place them wherever there is a home available for them, so they could technically go wherever in the state of Kansas.” Hill contends that out of the 800 juveniles to enter her office last year, about 60 percent of them were CINCs and about 40 percent of them were offenders.

The Routine

Although the average age is lower and the duration of the stay is shorter, the juBoth JDC residents and day school atvenile detention center is no less strict than normal jail. Juveniles wake up at 6:30 a.m. tendees, dress out in a mandatory unito brush their teeth, do physical training and eat breakfast. form of an optional sweatshirt, t-shirt, “Physical training” or “PT” consists of stretches, 10 jumping jacks, 10 push-ups sweatpants with shorts underneath, and 10 sit-ups. Other exercise opportunities arise later in the day, when inmates can socks and rubber shoes. play knock-out or do work-out videos. Games with an element of physical contact like sweatpants and one-on-one basketball are banned. Taylor understands that this physical activity is necessary, “So you’re not like, lazy and being t-shirts. Guards then pat them down to ensure no banned items enter the facility. a bum.” “They can’t even bring a pen,” Henry said. After PT, juveniles grab their silverware for breakfast. On days that USD 497 schools are “We provide them with everything, and it’s in session, meals are driven over from Lawrence High School’s cafeteria. During weekends, on just a security issue because … We go over snow days and during the summer, meals are delivered from Douglas County Jail. there [to the detention side] and eat lunch; we “It’s like school food, but worse,” Taylor said. “It tastes like crap.” go over there and have P.E., and so we can’t have all the stuff getting over there.” Day School Because JDC focuses on reform instead During the day, students attend one of the two educational programs housed at JDC, both of strictly punishment like adult corrections, staffed by certified USD 497 teachers. measures are taken to provide the juveniles One program is for detention center residents. with different programs to help them be The other program is a day school program for kids who are suspended or truant. These successful in the future. Residents of the facilstudents, who are from local school districts, are simply bussed to the JDC building for class. ity have access to substance abuse therapy, Generally, JDC teachers try to provide as much continuity with lesson plans as possible. social skills groups and a religious program. “We use the exact same textbooks, we’ll communicate with the teacher, kind of seeing Teachers at the day school fill out behavwhere they [the students] were, what their grades were,” day school teacher Leah Henry said. ior evaluations each day, and students are The day school typically educates around 15 students daily. Henry and her colleagues deal required to maintain an 85 percent behavior with all levels of learning. score each week. Extended learning time is “... I had a student who was in an AP class last semester, and so he did all of the work for required for students who fail to keep up on that class from that teacher, and the teacher and I just worked together to provide the instructheir work. tion,” Henry said. “So if … a kid hasn’t met my expectations, The goal is to help students earn … they stay until four o’clock, and I contina transition back to regular school, by ue to work with them,” Hill said. “They get Guards use a computerized device to building study skills and becoming convey a resident’s status while they are extended time, and it’s also kind of a conseaccustomed to attending class on a in their room. The information is sent quence to help them.” regular basis. to a computer that records the guards’ Unfortunately, electives are not response. Token Economy A sign labeled offered at the detention center. “Juvenile Detention” To promote responsibility and reward “I don’t know what electives you is located near the good behavior, JDC has a “token economy system,” in which juveniles earn or lose “money” all have nowadays, but I know we entrance of the based on how they conduct themselves. Chores, volunteer work and cleaning merit fake monedon’t have a cooking class,” Crane Douglas County tary rewards, while inappropriate actions are reprimanded with consequences and “fines.” said. Youth Services “If they’re doing good, their checkbook balance will be higher than a kids who’s doing bad,” When students arrive at the day building. Douglas Crane said. school facility each morning, they County’s Juvenile The juveniles’ “checkbook balance” is also an indicator of what behavior “level” they’ve Detention Center are required to change into provided is located off of North 2nd Street in North Lawrence.

photos by: kristina foster

7

reached. “Level five” privileges include longer visits and phone calls, later bedtime and vending machine access. “The highest level you can get up to is a trustee, which is like level 5. That’s when you can pretty much do whatever you want,” Taylor said. Juveniles at level four and above are also allowed to have a pencil, paper and a radio in their room as opposed to the lower levels’ restricted in-room possessions: blankets, toilet paper and two books.

Roommates

While “no talking” is a rule at the center, some residents have roommates, depending on the severity of their offense. The roommate is randomly selected and isn’t there for companionship. While JDC is a coed facility, generally more males are housed at the center than females. Crane has worked at the detention center for 14 years, and he reports that the number of female offenders has recently skyrocketed. “I think [both genders] pretty much commit the same kind of crimes,” Crane said. “ A lot of it is fighting, battery, theft, stealing at Wal-Mart or drugs.”

Suicide Watch

When a juvenile is first admitted to the facility, he or she is put on 24 hour suicide watch. Instead of dressing in the typical JDC juvenile attire, for the first day, the juvenile must wear a padded smock. A guard checks on the juvenile every four minutes when he or she is awake and every 15 minutes when he or she is asleep. If a juvenile is determined to be at risk of suicide, they are put on permanent “0-4” status, and guards continue to check on them at four minute intervals throughout their time detained. “When they’re awake and the door’s secure, we check them every four minutes,” Crane said. “Your first four minutes of being oxygen-deprived [causes] brain damage.” Unlike in a stereotypical prison movie, guards at JDC don’t isolate unruly juveniles for months on end. If a juvenile needs to be separated from other juveniles for behavioral reasons, he or she will be secured in a room, and a guard will view them every 15 minutes until he or she calms down.

Repeat Offenders

Taylor is not interested in returning to JDC, and that’s the idea. Strict rules, a structured schedule and the “no talking” rule are designed to strongly discourage repeated visits. Recidivism, or the rate of repeat offenders, has decreased dramatically for both probation and non-probation JDC residents since 2010. The 2013 probation violation recidivism rate is 18 percent, compared to the 2012 probation violation recidivism which was 26 percent. Non-probation violation recidivism in 2013 was only 5.4 percent. “I was pissed when I went,” Taylor said. “I didn’t want to be there … I was mad. I mean, when I got out, I learned my lesson for getting in trouble, so I know I won’t be going back. *This junior student talked to the newspaper under the condition of anonymity to protect his indentity. His name has been changed.

This locker room is where day school attendees grab their required uniforms and place their street clothes in secured lockers.


locked up

FEATURES february 20, 2014 page by darian koenig

FEATURES february 20, 2014 page by darian koenig

>a look inside the Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center

by hannah moran and kyra haas

At 6 a.m. Junior Adam Taylor* is awoken by a security guard’s crude knock. He rises groggily, as does his roommate, a former methamphetamine addict who is incarcerated for almost beating someone to death. As they brush their teeth and hair, fold their blankets and slip into fresh pairs of sweatpants, the duo doesn’t speak. They aren’t allowed. “You have to ask permission,” Taylor said. “You gotta ask permission for everything. You want to go to the bathroom? You gotta ask permission. You wanna get a drink, you gotta raise your hand. Or if you want to ask somebody something, you gotta raise your hand. It’s like that all the time.” Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center (JDC) serves 13 Northeast Kansas counties. For $150 a day, the center can detain delinquents from other counties or those awaiting their court dates between the ages of 10-18 for up to 90 days. According to Detentions Operations Manager Casey Crane, the facility usually accommodates about 10 juveniles at a time, for an average of 10-15 days. A variety of factors influence whether a juvenile actually gets admitted to JDC, including the severity of the crime as well as the juvenile’s home situation.

Taken In/CINC

However, not everyone who is brought to the Douglas County Department of Youth Services has committed an offense. Juvenile Intake worker, Amy Hill, is one of the first people the police notify when they arrest or pick-up a juvenile. He or she may have committed a felony or misdemeanor, or may be a “Child in The sleeping amenities of the JDC residents include a Need of Care” (CINC). Hill explains juveniles blanket, and a sleeping mat that is placed on a raised are classified as a CINC if their parents are concrete platform. When the residents are woken up arrested and there’s no one to take care of in the morning, they are required to fold their blankets them, if they ran away or if they lived in an and place them in a locker. unsafe home. “The officer will kind of give background information on what went on and why they picked the kid up,” Hill said. “... And then I always ask the kid their side of the story.” So begins the Juvenile Intake Assessment, which typically lasts about an hour. While asking questions about the crime, drug or alcohol abuse and past probations, Hill scores the juvenile using a “Kansas Detention Assessment Instrument,” an assessment sheet that assigns point values to different aspects of a juvenile’s situation. The total score is used to determine the best course of action for the juvenile. “Essentially, they’re looking at the charges and the level it is, whether it’s a felony or a misdemeanor,” Hill said. “And from there, we decide they can be put on what’s called ‘conditions of release.’” Depending on his or her assessment score, the

Residents of JDC earn money in a “token economy system” during their stay in the facility. Residents can use their money to purchase special privileges such as watching TV or a movie, or playing video games.

juvenile could be allowed to return home, or be placed in a shelter, foster home or a drug treatment facility. In the worst of cases, he or she will be admitted to the detention center. “Our facility is used for kids who have committed pretty serious crimes,” Crane said. “We’ve had anything from battery … on a law enforcement officer to murder charges.” When a juvenile is arrested, they have a court hearing within 48 hours to determine if they need to continue being detained. If released, a future court date may be scheduled. As for the CINCs, they’ll usually be placed in Police Protective Custody for 72 hours while an investigation about their home life is conducted. During this 72 hours, Hill contacts foster homes and group homes in attempt to find placement for the juvenile. “They’re not necessarily going to stay here in Lawrence or in Douglas County,” Hill said. “We have to place them wherever there is a home available for them, so they could technically go wherever in the state of Kansas.” Hill contends that out of the 800 juveniles to enter her office last year, about 60 percent of them were CINCs and about 40 percent of them were offenders.

The Routine

Although the average age is lower and the duration of the stay is shorter, the juBoth JDC residents and day school atvenile detention center is no less strict than normal jail. Juveniles wake up at 6:30 a.m. tendees, dress out in a mandatory unito brush their teeth, do physical training and eat breakfast. form of an optional sweatshirt, t-shirt, “Physical training” or “PT” consists of stretches, 10 jumping jacks, 10 push-ups sweatpants with shorts underneath, and 10 sit-ups. Other exercise opportunities arise later in the day, when inmates can socks and rubber shoes. play knock-out or do work-out videos. Games with an element of physical contact like sweatpants and one-on-one basketball are banned. Taylor understands that this physical activity is necessary, “So you’re not like, lazy and being t-shirts. Guards then pat them down to ensure no banned items enter the facility. a bum.” “They can’t even bring a pen,” Henry said. After PT, juveniles grab their silverware for breakfast. On days that USD 497 schools are “We provide them with everything, and it’s in session, meals are driven over from Lawrence High School’s cafeteria. During weekends, on just a security issue because … We go over snow days and during the summer, meals are delivered from Douglas County Jail. there [to the detention side] and eat lunch; we “It’s like school food, but worse,” Taylor said. “It tastes like crap.” go over there and have P.E., and so we can’t have all the stuff getting over there.” Day School Because JDC focuses on reform instead During the day, students attend one of the two educational programs housed at JDC, both of strictly punishment like adult corrections, staffed by certified USD 497 teachers. measures are taken to provide the juveniles One program is for detention center residents. with different programs to help them be The other program is a day school program for kids who are suspended or truant. These successful in the future. Residents of the facilstudents, who are from local school districts, are simply bussed to the JDC building for class. ity have access to substance abuse therapy, Generally, JDC teachers try to provide as much continuity with lesson plans as possible. social skills groups and a religious program. “We use the exact same textbooks, we’ll communicate with the teacher, kind of seeing Teachers at the day school fill out behavwhere they [the students] were, what their grades were,” day school teacher Leah Henry said. ior evaluations each day, and students are The day school typically educates around 15 students daily. Henry and her colleagues deal required to maintain an 85 percent behavior with all levels of learning. score each week. Extended learning time is “... I had a student who was in an AP class last semester, and so he did all of the work for required for students who fail to keep up on that class from that teacher, and the teacher and I just worked together to provide the instructheir work. tion,” Henry said. “So if … a kid hasn’t met my expectations, The goal is to help students earn … they stay until four o’clock, and I contina transition back to regular school, by ue to work with them,” Hill said. “They get Guards use a computerized device to building study skills and becoming convey a resident’s status while they are extended time, and it’s also kind of a conseaccustomed to attending class on a in their room. The information is sent quence to help them.” regular basis. to a computer that records the guards’ Unfortunately, electives are not response. Token Economy A sign labeled offered at the detention center. “Juvenile Detention” To promote responsibility and reward “I don’t know what electives you is located near the good behavior, JDC has a “token economy system,” in which juveniles earn or lose “money” all have nowadays, but I know we entrance of the based on how they conduct themselves. Chores, volunteer work and cleaning merit fake monedon’t have a cooking class,” Crane Douglas County tary rewards, while inappropriate actions are reprimanded with consequences and “fines.” said. Youth Services “If they’re doing good, their checkbook balance will be higher than a kids who’s doing bad,” When students arrive at the day building. Douglas Crane said. school facility each morning, they County’s Juvenile The juveniles’ “checkbook balance” is also an indicator of what behavior “level” they’ve Detention Center are required to change into provided is located off of North 2nd Street in North Lawrence.

photos by: kristina foster

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reached. “Level five” privileges include longer visits and phone calls, later bedtime and vending machine access. “The highest level you can get up to is a trustee, which is like level 5. That’s when you can pretty much do whatever you want,” Taylor said. Juveniles at level four and above are also allowed to have a pencil, paper and a radio in their room as opposed to the lower levels’ restricted in-room possessions: blankets, toilet paper and two books.

Roommates

While “no talking” is a rule at the center, some residents have roommates, depending on the severity of their offense. The roommate is randomly selected and isn’t there for companionship. While JDC is a coed facility, generally more males are housed at the center than females. Crane has worked at the detention center for 14 years, and he reports that the number of female offenders has recently skyrocketed. “I think [both genders] pretty much commit the same kind of crimes,” Crane said. “ A lot of it is fighting, battery, theft, stealing at Wal-Mart or drugs.”

Suicide Watch

When a juvenile is first admitted to the facility, he or she is put on 24 hour suicide watch. Instead of dressing in the typical JDC juvenile attire, for the first day, the juvenile must wear a padded smock. A guard checks on the juvenile every four minutes when he or she is awake and every 15 minutes when he or she is asleep. If a juvenile is determined to be at risk of suicide, they are put on permanent “0-4” status, and guards continue to check on them at four minute intervals throughout their time detained. “When they’re awake and the door’s secure, we check them every four minutes,” Crane said. “Your first four minutes of being oxygen-deprived [causes] brain damage.” Unlike in a stereotypical prison movie, guards at JDC don’t isolate unruly juveniles for months on end. If a juvenile needs to be separated from other juveniles for behavioral reasons, he or she will be secured in a room, and a guard will view them every 15 minutes until he or she calms down.

Repeat Offenders

Taylor is not interested in returning to JDC, and that’s the idea. Strict rules, a structured schedule and the “no talking” rule are designed to strongly discourage repeated visits. Recidivism, or the rate of repeat offenders, has decreased dramatically for both probation and non-probation JDC residents since 2010. The 2013 probation violation recidivism rate is 18 percent, compared to the 2012 probation violation recidivism which was 26 percent. Non-probation violation recidivism in 2013 was only 5.4 percent. “I was pissed when I went,” Taylor said. “I didn’t want to be there … I was mad. I mean, when I got out, I learned my lesson for getting in trouble, so I know I won’t be going back. *This junior student talked to the newspaper under the condition of anonymity to protect his indentity. His name has been changed.

This locker room is where day school attendees grab their required uniforms and place their street clothes in secured lockers.


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PROFILE

february 20, 2014

page by sarah whipple

matchmaker matchmaker who should go on a date with whom? francisco robuschi, junior

star sign? Libra favorite sport? Rugby ideal vacation spot? Iceland Beyoncé or Kendall Jenner?

Beyoncé what is your opinion on body hair? No, thanks. how old were you when you had your first kiss? 6 bungee jumping or white water rafting? Bungee jumping what is your idea of a good first date? Going shopping, eating something, walk around, talk and maybe arrange another date. if you could be any Disney character, who would it be? Olaf any unusual fears? Unknown animals

parkin srisutiva, junior

star sign? Libra favorite sport? Football, soccer favorite One Direction member? Who’s One Direction? introvert or extrovert?

Introvert Beyonce or Kendall Jenner? Kendall Jenner Zac Efron or Drake? Drake what is your opinion on body hair? Nothing excessive please bungee jumping or white water rafting? White water rafting what is your idea of a good first date? Doing something that both people will enjoy would you rather go shopping or take a walk on a nature trail? Take a walk on a nature trail do you like Harry Potter? Yes

the free press wants to set up a date with your help. look for our tweet to vote for your perfect pair, which we will announce at the lhs vs. fs basketball game on Feb. 28. note: students have agreed to the dates regardless of the pairings

molly mccord, senior star sign? Taurus favorite sport? Running ideal vacation spot? The Caribbean favorite One Direction member? Niall Zac Efron or

Drake? Drake what is your opinion on body hair? No thank you. what superhero would you be and why? Superman so that I could fly! how old were you when you had your first kiss? 13 what is your idea of a good first date? Anything involving food if you could be any Disney character, who would it be and why? Dory from Finding Nemo because she is optimistic and funny, and I love the ocean any unusual fears? Blind dates

isabelle haake, junior

star sign? Capricorn favorite sport? Basketball ideal vacation spot? Paris favorite One Direction member? Niall Zac Efron or Drake? Zac Efron what is your opinion on body hair? The less, the better what superhero would you be and why? Flash because I could go anywhere at anytime how old were you when you had your first kiss? 14 what is your idea of a good first date? Going out to eat if you could be any Disney character, who would it be and why? Rapunzel because I want her magical hair powers! any unusual fears? Sharks


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HOMETOWN HUB february 20, 2014 page by cierra campbell

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Fri. March 21, 2014 Arvest Bank Theatre at The local natives Midland Fri. April 25, 2014 Kansas City, MO young the giant buzz under the stars Granada The Queen Bee and her royals Wed. March 19, 2014 Lawrence, KS are headlining their first show. Arvest Bank Theatre at The Wed. April 30, 2014 Indie rock music takes an 17 year old Lorde is stealing the Midland KC Power and Light District art form when it comes to Local spotlight in the music business, Kansas City, MO Kansas City, MO Natives. This Los Angeles based swiping two Grammys and reAnother successful indie rock As the only relatively group is worth its hype, opening ceiving hundreds of other music arcade fi re band will be making it’s way to close music festival in Kanup for big names like The Nanominations for her debut album our neighbor state. Young the Sat. April 26, 2014 sas, 96.5’s Buzz Under the Stars tional and Arcade Fire, and is now Giant is headlining their new tour “Pure Heroine” and catchy single Starlight Theater offers a great lineup. Headlining doing their own headlining tour. “Royals.” Lorde isn’t afraid to with Vance Joy, Australian singKansas City, MO the semi-festival is popular indie With hits like “Breakers” and “Codance to her music, but is often er-songwriter. Their new album The Beatles are to rock n’ rock band Grouplove, known lombia,” Local Natives has built up roll as Arcade Fire is to indie rock. “Mind over Matter” is soaring on criticized for her exorcism-like for their 2011 hit “Tongue Tied.” their fanbase to all age groups. moves. To see such a young, the Billboard Top 10 Alternative Formed in 2001, Arcade Fire was Grouplove is notorious for their Their soft harmonies accompowerful artist would truly be a chart, as is their single “It’s About a developing project between colorful, high energy performancpanied by their captivativating Time.” Young the Giant is the epit- treat. The show quickly sold out, college friends, but after their es. Neon lights fill the stage and drums represent Local Native’s ome of excitement at their shows. but second-hand ticket sites like critically acclaimed, Grammy melodic tempos infiltrate the ingenious sound. Their sound is StubHub are selling Lorde tickets nominated album “Funeral,” their Lead singer, Sameer Gadhia, can audience, causing a riot of fist exemplified in their intimate perfor around $90. be seen soaked in sweat, jumping music became the Holy Grail pumping and singing. formances, showcasing their raw, around with his bandmates. With to all music junkies. Arcade Fire Special guest bands include natural talent. Opening up for every beat of the drum and guitar >show starts at 7 p.m. produced album after album, New York indie pop duo MS MR. Local Natives will be singer-songeven winning Album of the Year at rift, Young the Giant intoxicates Infusion of electronic and pop writer Moses Sumney. all ages welcome the audience into a music euphothe Grammys for “The Suburbs.” scream MS MR, especially with ria. Arcade Fire is back on tour with their hit “Hurricane.” While they their latest album “Reflektor,” and invigorate the audience, their >$23 advance again, have received much notice shows are intimate. Indie pop tickets/$25 at door for another well-crafted album. band Smallpools will also be >$25 advance/$28 at all ages welcome From hit singles like “Reflektor” taking the stage for Buzz Under door and “Afterlife,” it’s is plain to see the Stars. Smallpools can only be that Arcade Fire is still a top con- all ages welcome described as a mixture of Foster tender in the music world. the People and fun. Their innovative lyrics and upbeat vocals are worth checking out, especially in >$30-60 their single “Dreaming.”

>$25 all ages welcome

all ages welcome


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HEALTH february 20, 2014

page by darian koenig

blurring the lines

support for the bisexual

>defining sexuality is more difficult than it seems by becca moran and hala hamid

When senior David Glauner first told his mom, she didn’t believe him. The two were shopping at Plato’s Closet for khaki shorts, when Glauner got “a little too picky” about the clothing. “She was like, ‘you’re never like this, what’s going on?’” Glauner said. “And I was like, ‘Mom, I’m bi.’” Her response was to laugh it off, not thinking anything of it, and he hasn’t mentioned it since. He said her reaction didn’t surprise him. “It’s hard to spring things on my mother and expect them to work,” Glauner said. Despite the fact his father regularly attends LGBT rallies, Glauner said he does not feel comfortable telling his dad about his bisexuality. “He thinks I’m straight … but I know he’s super supportive,” Glauner said. Sophomore Cadence Learned, like Glauner, hasn’t outright told her family. “All my friends [know] but I don’t know about my family; maybe they do, maybe they don’t,” Learned said. “I don’t really think they’d care either way though.” Glauner’s friends are also aware and supportive of his sexuality. “Just the girls see me as one of the gals, and the guys see me as one of the guys,” Glauner said. “Sometimes that’s a little weird from an adult’s perspective, but it works out. I mean if somebody asks me to go on a shopping trip I’ll be like ‘yeah! I’m all along for that!’” For Glauner and Learned, gender couldn’t matter less. “It’s the same as being straight or gay; it’s just who I am,” Learned said. To Glauner, being bisexual simply means that someone is okay with being around and loving everyone. “There’s that sense of ‘everyone;’ not just the

opposite sex, not just the same sex,” Glauner said. “There’s just the feeling of inclusion.” These students have been fortunate to receive support from their peers at school. “When I was younger I used to [go to] a queer support group, but I never felt like I needed support,” Learned said. “I never had trouble with it or anything.” Glauner was in a weights class last semester, and when he told his peers he was bisexual, the reaction was very positive. “Things were a lot easier for me [because] I felt more secure--I didn’t feel like I was on the verge of being picked on,” Glauner said. “Which probably sounds weird since I’m a 6’1”, wide-shouldered senior, but it just felt really good. I felt really close with everyone and just had a good time.” Glauner said he’d always known he was bisexual, but that it “reared its head” when he was in first grade, while Learned didn’t realize until sixth grade. “I was just like ‘girls are cool; I like girls, why not?” Learned said. “It doesn’t really matter.” With 19 million Americans admitting to having engaged in same-sex sexual behavior, but only 9 million identifying as LGBT, according to Gary Gates of the Williams Institute, it is important to recognize the distinction between an experimental phase and actually identifying as bisexual. “Someone experimenting doesn’t quite know what they’re looking for,” Glauner said. “I know I went through this phase like, ‘where am I going with this?...’ but after a while I felt really solid in how I was feeling and it all really made sense.” Glauner thinks experimentation is a vital aspect for those questioning, or who are simply curious, about their sexuality. “I mean, even in science, you don’t know what is going to happen until you try it,” Glauner said.

www.glaad.org/ www.biresource.net/ www.binetusa.org/

tips for the bi-friend 1. believe that they [bisexuals] exist.

6. ask them,, if appropriate, about their other-sex

2. don’t try to talk them into redefining their identity.

relationships and their same-sex relationships.

3. celebrate bisexual culture with them.

7. don’t use news about bisexual scandals as an

4. don’t try to convince them that people who lived

bisexual lives in the past would have been gay.

5. validate their frustrations with the gay and lesbian

community when they ignore bisexuals.

opportunity to make derisive, or snide, remarks about bisexuals generally.

8. speak up when bisexual people are being defamed or

excluded.


valentines silhouettes: couples sing their love

“When I see your face...I get butterflies and it’s like time stands still, we’re the only two people there.” -maddie birdshaw, 10

“Reunited and…I’ll always love you more. It’s kind of an inside joke between me and Maddie.” -nick hocking, 11

“When I see your face... ... my heart smiles, I get butterflies and I poop rainbows.” -paulina colombo, 11

“I just met you and...this ...this is a little difficult to tell you, but, “I just met you and...you’re worth fighting for.” um, you probably shouldn’t -gavin spence, 12 have given me your locker combination.” -siel snowden, 12

buy your talon yearbook before march 6 for $60 and get into the yearbook party for free bring money by room 115 and don’t miss out on the memories!

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GRAPHICS february 20, 2014 page by kristina foster

”I just met you and...here’s my number so please, please call me.” -sean chilcoat, 11

couples finish chart topping hits to express their love photos by: mary brady

check out @fsfreepress for the latest on clubs, scores and important news

check out fsfreepressonline.com

for additional stories on... • • •

The Pajama Game Building Extensions Lawrence Study Locations

Text your lunch order to (785)393-6225. One texter wins a free lunch everyday!


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SPORTS february 20, 2014

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page by cierra campbell

boys basketball 7:00 p.m. @ FS

march

february

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3

1st day spring sports tryouts

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girls swimming 4:00 p.m. @ emporia

committed to excellence student athletes take skills to next level

On February 5, Alexa HarmonThomas, Jessica Ferguson, Maddie Dieker and Olivia Hodison signed their letters of intent to play by ryan liston

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boys jv golf 3:00 p.m.@ shawnee heights

sports in college. However, due to the snow days, the celebration was prolonged to that Friday. photo by sam goodwin

Senior Jessica Ferguson has a great mom--one who’s willing to accompany her talented, soccer-playing daughter on college visits all across the United States. In Boiling Springs, N.C., Ferguson discovered her dream school. She committed to play soccer at Gardner-Webb University. She says that out of all the schools she visited Gardner-Webb suited her best. “... I thought the campus was great, the college size was perfect, the students there were great, and I love the girls on the team,” Ferguson said. “They were so nice to me ... I couldn’t have dreamed of a better school.” Ferguson is one of several students who recently committed to compete in NCAA Division I athletics. Another soccer player, senior Olivia Hodison, committed to the University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC), a school that was originally not on her list. “... I actually hadn’t really heard about [UMKC],” Hodison said. “I was really looking at Creighton and Texas ... UMKC contacted my club coach ... so I looked up some things about their school, and I was very impressed.” She wanted to be able to make her mark on the team while still being challenged by the competition. However, the biggest factor in Hodison’s decision was the scholarship offer she received from UMKC. Hodison hopes that her acceptance onto a college team will help her showcase her abilities. “Being a short defender is going to surprise a lot of people that my coach picked me over maybe a 5’7” girl,” Hodison said. “I think I have a lot to prove, and I’m excited to be able to work my hardest now and throughout the summer to prove that I am able to play at that high level at a Division I school.” Senior Bailey Sullivan committed to run cross country and track at Texas Christian University (TCU). Although she was looking for a college at which to run, Sullivan said her first priority during her college search was academics. “It’s a strong academic school, and it’s on the smaller side which means small class sizes and good teacher to student ratios,” Sullivan said. TCU’s Big 12 membership also played a role in Sullivan’s decision making process.

“... It’s kind of the best of both worlds combining academics and athletics,” Sullivan said. Prior to recruitment visits, senior Alexa Harmon-Thomas had no idea where she would end up, but after conducting research and visiting colleges, she committed to compete in track for the University of Texas in Austin. “... Being around the coaching staff and seeing the team dynamic is really what helped me reach my decision ... It was kind of a toss up until I just got there, and I felt how it would be to be there,” Harmon-Thomas said. “Texas definitely gave me the best feel.” Along with finding the right college, athletes looked for enjoyable environments surrounding the campus. “[Boiling Springs] was like a southern, really nice town,” Ferguson said. “Everyone there was really nice. They all had a cute little accent.” Sullivan was looking to get away from Kansas’ bipolar weather conditions. “When we started searching for colleges ... We went through the areas that I was interested in,” Sullivan said, “So we looked a lot in warm areas like California, Texas, North Carolina, Louisiana.” Forging lasting and valuable relationships was also important to these student-athletes. “One thing that I’m really excited about is that it’s kind of an automatic friend group,” Sullivan said. “Teams usually have really strong, family like relationships, so I’m gonna

have a bunch of really close friends probably right from the start.” For Harmon-Thomas, a strong bond with her event coach is crucial. “If you decide to run post-collegiately [they] will be your coach and your support system for many years after,” Harmon-Thomas said. Although college student-athletes have access to extra academic assistance, each one of the student-athletes interviewed expressed the same concern about time management. “... It’ll be stressful having that big of a responsibility to deal with while at college,” Harmon-Thomas said. Although being a college athlete requires a large time commitment, Ferguson urges any student-athlete to play in college and insists it will be worth the sacrifice. “You can’t look back when you’re 40, you’ll be too old by then to think, ‘Oh, I wish I would have gone and played,’” Ferguson said. “Even if it’s a JUCO [ junior college] or small school, it’s gonna be a great experience, and you’re gonna meet a lot of great people along the way.”

interested in college athletics? start filing for ncaa eligibility now! go to www.eligibilitycenter.org


Free Press, Iss 7 Ed 17