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NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE

745 Main St, Fryeburg, ME 04037

PAID

www.fryeburgacademy.org

AUGUSTA, ME PERMIT NO. 121

REGISTRATION FORM

Fryeburg Academy

SPRING 2018

Scenes

A MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI, FAMILIES, AND FRIENDS

Please join us for ...

Reunion

2018 Name: _______________________________________ Class Year: __________________ Maiden Name: _________________________________

Name(s) of Guest(s): ____________________________

_____________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________

THE CAMPAIGN TO EXPAND FRYEBURG ACADEMY’S DINING HALL & STUDENT UNION

_____________________________________________ City: ________________________________________ State: _______________________________________

STUDENTS in THE CENTER

Zip code: ___________________ Email Address: ________________________________ Phone number, in case we need to reach you:

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

1 YEAR

(1) Payment of

$1,000

(____)_______________________________________

2 YEAR

(2) Payments of

$ 500

# TICKETS

4 YEAR

(4) Payments of

$ 250

______ Opening Reception (no charge)

$__0.00_____

______ Bird Walk through the Intervale (no charge) $__0.00_____ ______ Breakfast at the Barn ($10 per person)* $__________ ______ Reunion Banquet ($40 per person / includes buffet and two drink tickets)* $__________ *($15 & $45 respectively if purchased after August 13). CONTINUE ON BACK

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Dawn Gale ‘81, Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations P: (207) 935 -2001 ext. 3147 or E: dgale@fryeburgacademy.org

COMMEMORATIVE PAVER INFORMATION Be among the many individuals in the community to donate a personalized commemorative paver for your family, a loved one, your business, or in memoriam. Your legacy paver will be placed behind the Student Center and is unique way to make a lasting tribute to Fryeburg Academy in support of the Students in the Center Campaign. Each approximate 2’ x 2’ inscribed paver may be dedicated with a donation of $1,000.00. To order your paver online, please go to https://fryeburgacademy.org/commemorativepaver. Thank you for your contribution!

FA’S I N T E R N S H I P P R O G R A M : C U LT I VAT I N G C A R E E R E X P O S U R E A N D W O R K P L AC E R E A D I N E S S


Saturday, August 18th BIRD WALK THROUGH THE INTERVALE

with Outdoor Learning and Research Center Director Joel Rhymer (Binoculars Available)

8:30 - 9:30 AM

Reunion

2018

Friday, August 17th

FRYEBURG ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING 5 PM Location: The Bion R. Cram Library OPENING RECEPTION Open to all alumni and friends, honoring FA faculty — present and past. 6-8 PM Location: Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center Complimentary Cocktails & Hors d’oeuvres

Location: Lower field behind Fessenden House

BREAKFAST AT THE BARN

Learn about our new initiatives and enjoy a delicious home-cooked breakfast

9:30 AM

Location: Lower field behind Fessenden House

ALUMNI FIELD HOCKEY GAME & ALUMNI CO-ED SOCCER GAME 10 AM Location: FA Field Hockey Field next to track & FA Soccer Field behind main building SCHOOL STORE OPEN 1:30 - 4 PM Location: Main Building CAMPUS TOURS 1 & 2 PM Location: Leaving from the Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center SENIOR ALUMNI COCKTAIL RECEPTION & CLASS PHOTOS Location: The “Green 4 - 5:30 PM House,” 686 Main St. ALL-YEAR RECEPTION & CLASS PHOTOS Location: Ada Cram 4:30 - 6 PM Wadsworth Arena REUNION BANQUET Presentation of the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award 6 PM Location: Ada Cram Wadsworth Arena

SATURDAY CLASS PHOTO SCHEDULE

FA FACULTY & STAFF

TOTAL DUE =

* LOCATION: Front Steps (686 Main Street, the “Green House”) 4:00 PM 4:15 PM 4:30 PM 4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM

Senior Alums Class of 1948 Class of 1953 Class of 1958 Class of 1963 Class of 1968

* LOCATION: Front Lawn (Ada Cram Wadsworth Arena - behind building) 4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM 5:30 PM 5:45 PM

Class of 1973 Class of 1983 Class of 1993 Class of 2003 Class of 2013

4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM 5:30 PM

______ Discount Golf Coupon / $20 off 18 holes @ Kezar Lake Country Club (no charge) $__0.00_____

Class of 1978 Class of 1988 Class of 1998 Class of 2008

Sunday, August 19th Discount coupons available at the Alumni Office or request on the reunion registration form. Please call (207) 925-2462 to reserve tee times.

Academy Fund The

Our fiscal year is ending, please consider making a gift to the Academy Fund by June 30, 2018 HOW TO GIVE: Online: www.fryeburgacademy.org/give By Mail: Fryeburg Academy Advancement Office, 745 Main Street, Fryeburg, ME 04037 Or Call: Dawn Gale ’81 / Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations, 207-935-2001 ext. 3147 We thank all of you who have already participated in the 2017/18 Academy Fund! Your donations have allowed us to provide the unique and exceptional experience for our students that has become a hallmark of a Fryeburg Academy education. Gifts made to the Academy Fund from alumni, parents, students, and friends, within the fiscal year running from July 1, 2018 - June 30, 2018 will be listed in the Fall 2018 Annual Report of Gifts.

Remembering Ron Hill BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations

R

onald W. Hill, 85, of New London, NH, passed away with family at his side Thursday, May 3, 2018 at the NH Veterans Home in Tilton. Ron was born on July 28, 1932 in North Conway, the third child of Donald W. and Loretta Hatch Hill. In 1958 he married Alice Hurlin Breen in Jackson, NH and they raised a family of four children while residing at various times in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine. Ron graduated from Fryeburg Academy in ’49 and went on to earn a BS from the University of New Hampshire in ’54. He earned his wings from the USAF Jet Fighter Training School in ’56, an MS from Central Connecticut State University in ’68, and completed all coursework for his PhD at the University of Connecticut. As a high school chemistry teacher, a young father, and a student at CCSU, he also served a stint in the Air National Guard. Ron truly was an officer, gentleman, and scholar. His career as an educator began in 1959 and included both teaching and administration. In 1974 Ron was proud to become headmaster of his alma mater, Fryeburg Academy. Later, he returned to his true calling as a teacher at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, CT, where he was Chair of the Science Department during the period in which the school was planning, constructing and moving in to its new science facility. Ron delighted in comparing notes about the project with renowned architect I.M. Pei, who designed the building. Ron was president of the Outing Club at UNH, led ski trips into Tuckerman Ravine, and taught skiing at Black Mountain. He was a graceful skier who enjoyed racing week-

ly in the Mountain Meister Racing League at Mt. Cranmore into his seventies. During his retirement, Ron stayed active volunteering on a number of town committees including serving as Jackson’s Water Commissioner and President of the Jackson Historical Society. He was also active in the Jackson Community Church and served as President of the Protestant Chapel Association. He was a long-time member of the Grey Eagles in North Conway. Of all his accomplishments, Ron was most proud of his Air Force Wings; but above all, he valued his time with Alice and his family. He is survived by his wife of almost 60 years, Alice Hurlin Breen ’53; son Donald ’77, his wife Pixie and children Ronald and Katherine; son Michael ’79, his wife Cindy and children Ali (and husband Andrew Poston), Peter, Kevin and Jenny; daughter Sara ’80, her husband Alastair Caperton and daughter Ora; and daughter Susan, her husband Matt Long and daughters Molly and Eliza. Surviving family also includes his brother and best friend Richard D. Hill, great grandson Jack and numerous nieces and nephews. The family would like to extend heartfelt thanks to the staff at Woodcrest Village in New London and the NH Veterans Home for their tender care of Ron in his decline. A memorial service will be held in Jackson, NH later this summer. Memorial gifts may be made to Fryeburg Academy, which held a very special place in Ron’s heart.

$__________

I am adding $________________________ for my tax deductible gift to the Fryeburg Academy Fund Reunion Challenge!

YES! I plan to participate in the alumni field hockey game! YES! I plan to participate in the alumni co-ed soccer game!

REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MONDAY, AUG. 13, 2018

PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: Fryeburg Academy or fill out the credit card form below. You may also register online at www.fryeburgacademy.org/reunion or call 207-935-2001 ext 3131. RETURN TO: Fryeburg Academy / 745 Main Street / Fryeburg, ME 04037 Call or email alumni@fryeburgacademy.org with any questions.

Please charge my MasterCard/Visa: $________________ Name on Card: ________________________________

_____________________________________________

In Memoriam We are saddened by the loss of members of the Fryeburg Academy community. We honor and remember them here. RAY ABBOTT ’49 on October 3, 2017 TIMOTHY J. BARKER ’66 on February 13, 2018 HAROLD L. BEDARD ’93 on March 7, 2018 PATRICIA HOWARD BELL ’57 on December 19, 2017 PAULINE GRAVES BENSON ’51 on March 2, 2018 JAMES D. BLAKE ’66 on December 26, 2017 ROBERT H. BROWN ’47 on March 10, 2018 JOAN BURGESS BROWN ’49 on May 3, 2018 PHILLIP A. COLE ’50 on February 8, 2018 CHARLES A. DREW ’48 on December 4, 2017 NEAL M. DURGIN JR. ’49 on December 31, 2017 ALBERT J. FOX ’62 on April 5, 2018 THEDA STEARNS GILMAN ’48 on January 17, 2018 AUBREY M. GRAVES JR. ’67 on December 10, 2017 DOROTHY WENTWORTH HAMILTON ’51 on July 10, 2017 RONALD W. HILL ’49 on May 3, 2018 BERYL BASSETT HULL ’45 on April 1, 2018 BETTE-JANE GRIERSON HOUSTON ’49 on December 16, 2017

JOHN LECOEUVRE ’58 on April 23, 2017 JULIE ROBERTSON LEWEY ’58 on December 16, 2017 IAN K. MACDONALD ’08 on November 22, 2017 CLIFFORD E. MANCHESTER ’41 on January 22, 2018 ANTHONY MARTIN ’62 on December 16, 2017 LARRY W. MCALLISTER, SR. ’62 on December 25, 2017 EARLE P. MOORE, JR. ’46 on February 8, 2018 NANCY SMITH MOORE ’67 on January 15, 2018 GAYLE AMES MORRISEY ’54 on October 27, 2017 BRYCE NELSON ’08 on March 31, 2018 WILLIAM E. PITMAN ’55 on January 22, 2018 WILLIAM L. PRENTICE ’59 on April 22, 2017 ALAN L. RANKIN ’69 on November 11, 2017 BEVERLY STEARNS ’53 on December 19, 2017 SHEILA BENNETT TROTT ’50 on August 28, 2017 MARY ANN JONES WALDRON ’59 on February 13, 2018 LOUISE SEAVEY WHIDDEN ’36 on January 14, 2018

Card Number: _________________________________

_____________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________________ CVV Number: ________________________________

_____________________________________________ AUTHORIZATION SIGNATURE

FRYEBURG ACADEMY 745 Main Street Fryeburg, ME 04037


HEAD OF SCHOOL LETTER

Greetings to the Fryeburg Academy Community

I

hope that you enjoy this edition of Scenes Magazine, just in time for your summer reading. In its pages, we highlight academic and campus life developments, commemorate the Academy careers of retiring teachers and staff, and celebrate alumni successes. Last month at Commencement, we bid farewell to 151 students who will move on to pursue a wide variety of careers and degrees. Fryeburg Academy’s Class of 2018—like its predecessors— joins one of America’s largest and oldest high school alumni associations, its membership spanning the U.S. and the rest of the globe. I am honored and proud to have been a part of our graduates’ Academy experiences, which are at once unique to them as individuals and a class,

as well as shared with so many of you who are also graduates of this remarkable school. I look forward to meeting and reconnecting with many of our alumni from the Classes of 1948 through 2013 at our upcoming Reunion, August 17th-19th. With wishes for a wonderful summer,

ERIN P. MAYO Head of School

Fryeburg Academy 745 Main St, Fryeburg, ME 04037 www.fryeburgacademy.org

SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM Head of School: Erin P. Mayo Assistant Head of School: Joseph Manning Director of Studies and Director, Center for International Students: Tracy Weitz Chief Financial Officer & Director of Capital Projects: Jeremy Angell ’99 Dean of Student Life: Charlie Tryder Class of 2019 Dean and Assistant Director of Studies: Joseph McMurdo-Minnich ’01

EDITORIAL BOARD Laura Ayer, Director of Communications Dawn Gale ’81, Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations Erin P. Mayo, Head of School Joseph Manning, Assistant Head of School Lakyn Osgood ’12, Advancement and Alumni Relations Assistant Charlie Tryder, Dean of Student Life

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Christopher M. Gordon ’81, President Steven P. Cote ’85, Vice President Shannon D. McKeen ’81, Treasurer Brenda Thibodeau, Secretary John M. Chandler ’78 Mary Ellen Davey, Ph.D. ’78 John M. Day ’67 Sheila Duane ’82 Samuel P. Harding Heather Pike Hart ’87 Michael H. Hill ’79 Punyu Ho ’95 Kathleen Dekutoski Hunsicker ’89 Bradford Littlefield ’80 Gary MacFarlane ’72 Peter J. Malia, Jr., Esq. Andrea Smith Osgood ’86 Joseph Shaffner ’81 Jessica Russell ’81

TRUSTEES EMERITI

Roy E. Andrews ’56 Alan D. Bennett ’60 Richard R. Cote John A. Dunn, Jr. James H. Dutton ’68 William A. Findeisen ’71 T. Scott Gamwell David R. Hastings III, Esq. ’68 Nancy Schildberg Hogan, RN, Ph.D. ’56 Cooper Campbell Jackson ’85 Bradley B. Nelson ’65 James A. Osgood ’56 Asa O. Pike, IV ’57 Ellen Pope ’68 Henry T. Raymond, III David Rohde ’85 Bretton D. Russell ’56 B. Dean Stearns ’58 Carol S. Sudduth Elaine Weeks-Trueblood ’67

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

David Richardson ’84, President Barbara Gushee ’84, Vice-President Christopher Dutton ’90, Treasurer Heidi Blake ’82, Secretary Jennifer Stacy Bartlett ’93, Past President Anita Craig Barker ’70 Cecil Barker ’65 Dana Charles ’83 Sara Calvert Delaney ’94 Dolores Bresette Deschambeault ’80 Lynn Deschambeault ’78 Sheila Duane ’82 Jodie Barton Hesslein ’83 Mary Grover Jones ’66 Ryan Kelly ’82 Lola Largey Lane ’57 Scott Lovejoy ’77 Travis Perry ’87 Ronald Sanborn ’65 Brylie Walker ’10 Makenzie Walker Woodward ’06

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C ontents

SPRING 2018

LETTER FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL 1 “I am honored and proud to have been a part of our graduates’ Academy experiences, which are at once unique to them as individuals and a class, as well as shared with so many of you who are also graduates of this remarkable school.” FA ACADEMICS 4 FA’s Internship Program: Cultivating Career Exposure and Workplace Readiness by Erin P. Mayo “Now at the end of its second pilot year, the Fryeburg Academy Internship Program is poised to grow and become a defining educational opportunity for more FA students in their junior and senior years.” 7 War is Real by Antonina Zakorchemna ’19 “You know war is a brilliant painter. Of all the colors, it likes crimson, scarlet, maroon. It takes the best your nation has: the younger, the smarter, the braver — the better.” 8 Student Profile: Harry Hongzhuo Yan ’18 by Beth Ross “I feel the knowledge I have learned here can be applied to life by solving real problems. And, I think I can use my knowledge to help other people.” FA NEWS 9 A Tribute to Patricia Fox by Laura Ayer “I’ve enjoyed mentoring and helping other young teachers become more confident in the classroom and instilling in both my students and peers that education is a lifelong process.” 10 A Tribute to Scott Cote-Crosskill by Laura Ayer “Few town academies remain in the New England area, let alone ones that have the unprecedented success and history that Fryeburg Academy proudly boasts. Our school, the area towns, has a proud history that extends from generation to generation and from strength to strength.” 11 FA’s OLRC Erects Low Ropes Course and 30-Foot Climbing Wall by Laura Ayer “...the Academy has had a long history of providing students opportunities for challenge and adventure using ropes and course activities...The new structure is a renewal and stronger commitment to the program.” 12 17th Annual Boston Model UN Conference by Greg Huang-Dale “During the current political climate, tolerance and compromise for the sake of our future are goals of the Model UN conference...we are glad to say that all of the delegates represented this state of mind.”

16 Ece Kaya: New Things by Charlie Tryder “I love meeting new people. In dorm life, you live among people with different cultures and religions and lifestyles. You see their lifestyle up close and learn their culture.” 17 Teammates: Scott Parker and Ryan Hewes by Charlie Tryder “Leaders among a very successful group of junior and senior athletes, Parker and Hewes, have helped establish a culture on their teams where teammates expect a lot of one another...” 19 Southern Region Class A Coach of the Year Goes to Fryeburg Academy’s Head Boys’ Basketball Coach Sedge Saunders by Laura Ayer “This award is a direct reflection of my team this year ...they were an extremely hard working and committed group and were probably the most coachable team I’ve had, so they made my job quite easy.” 19 FA’s Head Football Coach, David Turner, Named Campbell Conference Coach of the Year by Laura Ayer “David understands his athletes as students first and meets individually with kids who need the extra guidance in the classroom.”

FA ATHLETICS 13 FA Girls’ Ski Teams Sweep Nordic and Alpine Maine Class A State Ski Championships by Laura Ayer 14 FA Winter & Spring Sports Photo Gallery Photography by Julian Zhu ’21

FA ARTS 20 FA Jazz Earns Gold at State Jazz Festivals by Mike Sakash “Four outstanding musician awards are presented in each division, and two Fryeburg Academy students received this recognition: Ciara Neidlinger ’18, and Georgia Stafford ’19.”


2018-19 RESIDENTIAL HONOR PROGRAM STUDENTS The Fryeburg Academy Residential Honors program recognizes academically motivated, high-achieving students who actively contribute to the school community and who are exemplary citizens in the school’s residential program. This year the following students were inducted into the program: (front row, left to right): Zack Zhang ’19, Antonina Zackorchemna ’19, Silvia Sanchez ’19, Celine Lyu ’19; (middle row, left to right): Joyce Wang ’19, Jack Liu ’19, Edwin Au Young ’19, and Sophie Federspieler ’19; (back row): Julian Zhu ’21

21 FA Math Teacher, Erik Gustafson, Performs at the 2018 International Blues Challenge Competition by Laura Ayer “In college, I ran into students from back east, and they turned me onto blues and artists like Hound Dog Taylor.” 21 FA’s Award-Winning Vocal Jazz Ensemble Places 3rd at the 50th Annual Berklee High School Jazz Festival by Mimi Rohfling “Fryeburg Academy’s Vocal Jazz Ensemble won the third prize at the 50th Annual Berklee High School Jazz Festival on February 10.” FA ALUMNI 22 A Tribute to Mary Beth “BJ” Grover Jones ’66 by Dawn Gale ’81 “ [My fondest FA memories] are the people who were my coworkers— Scott Kelly, Verona Blake, and Sally Whitaker (to name a few) — we shared great friendships and laughs while working as a team!” 22 Alumni Profile: Dinara Abilova ’06 by Dawn Gale ’81 23 A Tribute to Scott Leach ’71 by Dawn Gale ’81 “Scott made my transition to the Academy so easy, thanks to his experience and expertise, not only in regards to the

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physical plant but also with all of the local, personal connections that keep this place running.” FA Alumni Area Reception Photos/Recaps A Message from the Advancement and Alumni Relations Office by Dawn Gale ’81 Celebrity Chef Marc Murphy ’88: Reflections on FA, Success, and the Art of Cooking by Dawn Gale ’81 Personally, I thought [working in a kitchen] would be all women and was shocked to find mostly burly men swearing, and thought, ‘this is cool’... I don’t have to dress up or wear a tie.” Class News

CONTRIBUTORS A special thank you to the contributors of Scenes Magazine. Your voices and imagery help convey the FA experience and tell our shared story about our vibrant community. Photography credits: Mike Dana, Dawn Gale ’81, Lakyn Osgood ’12, Joel Rhymer, and Julian Zhu ’21. Design by: Marianne Matte, Kennebunk, ME


FA ACADEMICS

Colby Charles ’18 (front, center) with students in the PACE Program at the Molly Ockett Middle School.

FA’s Internship Program:

Cultivating Career Exposure and Workplace Readiness BY ERIN P. MAYO Head of School

I

n the fall of 2016, ten students from the classes of 2017 and 2018 embarked on an important FA curricular initiative: placement in a variety of workplace internships as part of their programs of study. Seventeen further students have joined their number since then, experiencing the real workings in such fields as: outdoor recreation and study; engineering and manufacturing; small business management — (and large!); elementary education; physical therapy; art curation; veterinary science; agriculture; law enforcement; marketing; health occupations. With the intention of providing students with more handson experiences, career exposure, and authentic opportunities to apply their learning, we are placing them in area businesses Olivia Thompson ’17 prepares a lab sample at the Fryeburg Veterinary Hospital.

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Under supervision of the workplace partner, the intern is exposed to a broad range of the business, participates in some aspects of its operation, and frequently has the chance to execute a project that addresses an organizational need. At the end of the semester and upon completion of a presentation about their placements, students receive academic credit for the internship.

and organizations — as well as on campus in areas of Academy operations — a number of times per week during the school day. Under supervision of the workplace partner, the intern is exposed to a broad range of the business, participates in some aspects of its operation, and frequently has the chance to execute a project that addresses an organizational need. At the end of the semester and upon completion of a presentation about their placements, students receive academic credit for the internship. (A note: because interns receive credit, they are unpaid.) A sampling of internship experiences follows: About her semester’s time at the Fryeburg Veterinary Hospital, Olivia Thompson ’17 said, “No doubt it was better than a study hall or just a free period! But what was great was that it gave me a chance to confirm my interest in working with animals.” Olivia’s passion for animals had begun in a Future Farmers of America class offered at her previous high school, and she said she’d always been intrigued by a great-uncle’s career as a large-animal veterinarian. Hunting, Inc. has placed two FA student interns, both of whom worked under the supervision of chief engineer Adam Grace: Ali Fraize ’17, and this year, Henry Flynn, ’19. In addition to shadowing different engineers in numerous areas of

the operation, the interns were guided through measurement labs, word problem sets, and use of testing equipment. Ali enjoyed the experience so much that she stayed on for a second semester. Of his experience, Henry said, “I always have been interested in how things work, and how to help humans fit into the universe better. I’m not sure what direction I’ll take, but it was eye-opening to see what the people in a place like Hunting really are doing.” Jade Fox ’18 discovered a growing love for floral design last summer while working for Alexzandria Regan at Lemon and Tulips in Fryeburg. Jade asked whether she might continue during the first semester of her senior year as an intern there, and Alexzandria agreed, designing a sequence of activities that exposed Jade to the business and marketing aspects of the shop: her business plan, expenses, wholesale vs. retail pricing, floral supply, differentiation strategies, and brand. Jade had opportunities, as well, to contribute to the store’s online floral portfolio, which she described as being “like a visual resume.” Here on campus, students have interned in a number of places. Hannah Frye ’17 and Huxley Lovering ’17 served as interns in Outdoor Learning and Research Center classes and programs; in fact, for the whole school year they attended Joel Rhymer’s and Joy Norkin’s freshman class as teaching

Morgan Seebeck ’18 at the reception desk of the Fryeburg Health Care Center.

Jennifer Huang ’18 works at the Admission Office creating application packets.

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FA ACADEMICS

and expedition assistants. Ebonie Walker ’18 completed an internship in the Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center, beginning a photographed catalogue of the Academy’s art collection. And this year, Jennifer Huang ’18 has spent the full year as an intern in the Office of Admission, where she has overseen its student ambassador and tour guide group, the Daniel Webster Society, and participated extensively in developing new promotional materials. Among competencies for career readiness identified by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), three are at the heart of FA’s internship program aims: clear communication, the cultivation of professionalism and a strong work ethic, and early career management. We are excited to have implemented this new direction at the Academy, and we are especially excited in the coming school year to achieve expanded opportunities given new oversight for the initiative that will be provided by Fryeburg Academy graduate and trustee Kathleen Dekutoski Hunsicker ’89, who has volunteered to serve as internship program coordinator. We need community placement partners! If you and your MWV-area business would be interested in working with an FA student intern, please contact Judy Heininger, executive assistant to the head of school: (207) 256-3116, or jheininger@fryeburgacademy.org.

(back row, center): Colby Charles ’18 plays kick ball with students at the Molly Ockett Middle School.

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The Academy offers abundant thanks to the following community businesses and organizations for hosting FA student interns in the last two years: Ceramco, Inc. Fryeburg Glass Hunting, Inc. Mountain Center Physical Therapy Saco River Recreational Council Fryeburg Veterinary Hospital Lemon and Tulips Green Thumb Farms Memorial Hospital New Suncook Elementary School Molly Ockett School Fryeburg Health and Rehabilitation Center Fryeburg Police Department Quinn’s Jockey Cap Country Store

River Lusky ’19 reads to students in Mrs. Bellerose’s classroom.


“War Is Real” BY ANTONINA ZAKORCHEMNA ’19

Every March, Fryeburg Academy hosts a schoolwide public-speaking competition. Several classroom and grade-level rounds culminate in the Annual Prize-Speaking Night, when 12-15 finalists compete in the Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center in front of a panel of judges, their peers, and teachers and staff. Speech contestants are judged on the content, delivery, and style of their speeches. Antonina Zakorchemna, a junior from the Ukraine, won first place this year. Below is her powerful speech.

“G

(left to right) 1st place: Antonina Zakorchemna ’19, 2nd place: Jessica Frum ’19, 3rd place: Gracie Vaughan ’19, honorable mention: Chianna Thorley ’20 with Ms. Draper, English department chair.

unshots fire rain. Someone bawling ‘Glory to Ukraine.’ A gash of radiant light shrills the basaltblack sky. A blizzard of bullets is wheezing and whistling. A man is falling on the ground. A balefire-red, blood splashes from the open wound. Bomb explosion. Metal clinking merciless. Sniper makes final linking — what a bright future they all had ahead — the trigger is pushed the soldier is dead. I used to see these pictures all the time; they haunted me. People are fighting, people wounded, people dead. Frozen light, a ghost. When the war in Ukraine started, I was 13. Right before it, my country was shaken by the Revolution of Dignity, a protest against the president’s decision to suspend an agreement with the European Union and instead choose closer ties to Russia. Then one day I went to bed in the country where there was a revolution and woke up in a country where there was a war. On February 20th, 2014 Russia launched its well-planned armed aggression against Ukraine. Masked soldiers, called little green men, in uniforms carrying Russian military weapons, crossed Ukrainian border and occupied Crimea. Blocked airport, first shots, explosions, ruins. Hell sudden, the war from the history textbooks opened its bloody theater right in my country. You know war is a brilliant painter. Of all the colors, it likes crimson, scarlet, maroon. It takes the best your nation has: the younger, the smarter, the braver — the better. It’s wicked — it paints battles, death, and roses of blood, but what it also paints are the masterpieces of Courage, Compassion, and Heroism you never saw before. When my friend, who was among the first to volunteer to protect the country, returned from the frontlines, he brought me the war paintings. He told me stories — genuine, alive. He told me that when their military battalion ran out of food and provisions, and they were starving, one man would drive 20 miles through dangerous territory to deliver them watermelons and potatoes

from his garden, and they didn’t even know his name. He told me that when they entered a village that was bombarded a few days ago, they found an old grandma in a half-destroyed house. All she had was a rotten loaf of bread and a pile of clothes that she used as a blanket. He told me how they, serious soldiers in uniforms with machine guns, made soup and spoonfed the old woman. He told me how they risked their lives and ran through the gunfire to help their wounded friends. He told me how their doctors and nurses stayed up for days and nights without sleep, to treat, to save the injured soldiers. He told me how during the fight, in which they were outnumbered, their machine gunner left his hidden position and fired his last bullets to give others the chance to escape. This is the definition of a hero. My friend had many more stories to tell, but I never heard them. He returned to the frontlines and died in June 2015 at the age of 22, while helping the wounded. I see his bright eyes no more, no more. Since Russia started the war, 5,000 Ukrainian soldiers have been killed, 13,000 injured, and 2 million peaceful citizens have become refugees. How senseless it is to use words to try to convey the depth of the scars that war leaves. We must indeed be foolish if thousands of years of history did not prevent this stream of blood from spilling. Oh, dirty-political games, they forget that people aren’t cannon fodder! Today I say my prayers. I pray that children never say “goodbye” watching their fathers leaving to the frontlines. I pray that our grandparents don’t take their final breath in destroyed houses on the background of explosions. I pray that mothers never receive the bodies of the sons all in bullet wounds. The ground is red; our world is bleeding, it is enough! I pray for the end of the fighting; I pray for the end of the dying. I pray for the war to stop. Please value what you have, and wake up, don’t be blind: the war. is. real.”

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FA ACADEMICS

STUDENT PROFILE: HARRY HONGZHUO YAN ’18 BY BETH ROSS Associate Director of Admission

Harry enrolled at Fryeburg Academy during the second semester of his sophomore year. As a senior this year, he was the first international student to receive a college acceptance, and in November, Harry learned he was accepted to the prestigious Kelley School of Business at Indiana University Bloomington.

Q: Where did you grow up and why did you decide to attend Fryeburg Academy? A: I was born in Zhongshan, Guangdong, China. I started high school in the U.S. at Hoosac school in Albany, New York for one trimester, and then transferred to Fryeburg Academy the second semester of my sophomore year. I transferred to FA because I was looking for more AP courses. My counselor knew about Fryeburg and recommended that I come here to challenge myself. After taking the mock test of Zhong Kao, which is the high school entrance exam in China, I discovered I was not as comfortable with the Chinese education system and decided to try school in the U.S. to see if I could be successful here. And, I think I have been! Q: I understand you are a high-achieving student. What kinds of AP classes are you taking? A: Last year I took AP Chemistry and AP Statistics with Mrs. Manning and Mr. Gus, and this year, I am taking college level Organic Chemistry, college photoshop, AP Calculus, AP Environmental Science and AP Physics along with college writing. My goal is to learn from my teachers and gain more knowledge. I appreciate the academic life here. I think Mrs. Manning, Dr.Z., and Mr. Gus are the best. I’ve had these three teachers for two years now. Mrs. Manning taught me AP Chemistry and now is teaching me Organic Chemistry, Dr.Z taught me Physics Honors last and now teaching me AP Physics, and Mr. Gus taught me AP Stats and now is teaching me AP Calc. Their classes are fun that Mr. Gus uses vivid language to help us memorize math functions. I feel the knowledge I have learned here can be applied to life by solving real problems. And, I think I can use my knowledge to help other people. For example, in our AP Environmental Science class, we needed to use statistics and I was able to help other students because I am knowledgeable in this area. Outside of academics, I started the badminton club last year and this will be my third year as captain of the tennis team.

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Q: What are your plans after graduation? A: I am looking at colleges with really great business programs to major in marketing. My father owns a company where there was a serious environmental problem that occurred next to his company that had a negative impact on his business and employees. My wish is to tackle environmental issues by marketing “green products” that can reduce environmental impact so I can change the world indirectly -- I want to make a difference. Producing environmentally-safe products and marketing them well so that people buy them is the best way to make a difference. Q: How has Fryeburg prepared you for your next steps? A: : While I’ve had the opportunity to take many AP and college level courses, I would like to take more courses focused on business and investment, including AP micro and macroeconomics, and some college level classes in this area. During the past two summers, I attended New York University and Cornell University to take classes in economics, business and psychology. I’ve included both universities on my college application list, and I have already been accepted to the University of Indiana Kelley School of Business, which ranked the 11th in the United States among the business schools, and their marketing program is ranked the 6th. I am really appreciative to have been accepted there. Q: What words of wisdom do you have for students who are considering coming to school in the United States? A: Your GPA is really important, so it is essential to stay focused on doing what is expected of you as a student to earn good grades. Activites are also important like volunteering. I think doing great in college-level classes is the best way to prove yourself, not through taking the standardized test. I would recommend students explore their career interests before choosing a college by going to summer pre-college programs for high school students. I attended a program at New York University one summer and Cornell University the next. It is a great way to try college out.


FA NEWS

A Tribute to Pat Fox

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rowing up in the 70’s as an adopted only-child, Patricia Fox lived in Lewiston, Maine and attended high school at Lewiston High. She would later enroll at the University of Maine at Farmington— a huge milestone—as neither of Fox’s loving, adoptive parents had a high school education at the time. “I kind of stumbled upon my current career there, says Fox. “My parents didn’t have a high school education, but they encouraged me to attain a degree. Originally I thought I was going to study to become a special ed teacher, but then followed my passions and switched to English and theater.” It was there at the University of Maine at Farmington that Fox met the man who would later become her future husband. “Rick and I have been married for 40 years now,” exclaims Fox. “I found out that he came from the same hometown, was also studying to be a teacher, and worked at the same summer recreational department, so it was meant to be!” Both Fox and her husband desired to leave Lewiston and begin their teaching careers and family near the lakes and mountains of western Maine. Fox landed her first teaching job in Bridgton where she taught for two years at Lake Region High School and later applied to Fryeburg Academy. FA would become her “home away from home” for 37 years; Rick, her husband, joined the Lake Region School District; he retired in June of 2017. Both Fox’s children, Cory ’01 and Aly ’04, attended the Academy and Fox cites the school’s diversity as an excellent element of education that her children would not have had the opportunity to experience otherwise. During Fox’s lengthy teaching career at Fryeburg Academy, she was instrumental in developing and contributing not only to the performing arts and English program but also overseeing professional development for teachers as a mentor/coach. “I’ve had seven interns during my career at Fryeburg Academy,” says

Fox. “I’ve enjoyed mentoring and helping other young It’s so important [for teachers become teachers] to be aware more confident in the classroom and of each student as an instilling in both my individual and human with students and peers that education is a his/her unique talents and lifelong process. It’s to nurture those talents. so important [for teachers] to be aware of each student as an individual and human with his/her unique talents and to nurture those talents.” Along with her recent role as chair of FA’s Professional Development Team, Fox has accomplished a great deal more during her FA career. She has served as the Arts Department Chair, taught theater and AP English Language and Composition, pioneered a film and Holocaust class, and has attained National Board Certification in Secondary English. “I’m grateful for the many opportunities I’ve had at Fryeburg Academy,” continues Fox. “I’ve had the best journey of selfdiscovery, working with kids, administrators, and my peers, and chairing for a department of some of the most amazing and talented people. What more could I ask for?!” Despite being one of the “youngest teachers ever to retire at the Academy,” Fox’s retirement plans include working parttime as a consultant for the College Board, including travel to various states, and working with colleges and universities on the development of the AP English Language curriculum. She also plans to spend more time with her two grandchildren and to do a lot of kayaking, photography, reading entire books at once, relaxing on the beach, and lounging around the house in her “pajamas because she can.” When asked how she would like to be remembered at FA, Fox jokingly responded: “Well, I would imagine that after four years I will be forgotten. But really, I hope that I was impactful and helped in many ways and that the connections I made with my students showed my passion for life and their lives,” Fox says nostalgically. “I’m grateful for so many days of laughter and camaraderie with a wonderful group of colleagues...colleagues who always commended me on my fashionable footwear to boot!”

BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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FA NEWS

A Tribute to Scott Cote-Crosskill BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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then, we did the driving ourselves, ne of five siblings, Scott Cote-Crosskill, was born in Lewrecalls Cote-Crosskill. “We didn’t have iston, Maine. His father was an industrial engineer and a bus driver to take us to the games like his mother worked at the Lewiston Daily Sun newspaper today. We did it all, including being a and kept very busy raising five children. At the age of five, the mentor to our athletes.” Crosskill family moved to Ohio for his father’s work. SubseWhile teaching at FA, Cotequently, there would be more moves in his young life, eventually Crosskill met his wife, Nicole who has leading the Crosskills back to Maine where he would attend Lisworked at the Academy for 37 years, bon High School and later the University of Maine for his degree and he’s had in Zoology, and the University of Southern the privilege Maine for his Masters degree in 1996. In of teaching his August of 1976 and just one week before children who school started, Crosskill began what would The progress the school both attended turn out to be a 42-year career at Fryeburg FA as well. “My Academy… “and the rest is history.” has made is amazing, son, Mitchell, During this time, Cote-Crosskill observed which now is like a division graduated in 2002 and Ashley graduated a lot of the school’s remarkable growth and in 2005,” says Cote-Crosskill. “It has been change. “I spent over 20 years in room 7 three college regarding a wonderful place to live and raise a family, teaching science in the basement, says Cotethe quality of the facilities especially if you’re an outdoor enthusiast Crosskill. “It’s a lot different now and what and love the four seasons as much as I we refer to today as the Film and Media Lab. and course offerings.” do. The progress the school has made is During this period, I also worked for five difamazing, which now is like a division three ferent Heads of School and administrations.” college regarding the quality of the faciliThe most notable years in Cote-Crosskill’s ties and course offerings.” recollection were during the Academy’s During our interview, Cote-Crosskill also reflected on some recertification in the 1980’s when he was instrumental in updatdifferences and social shifts he’s observed over the years in the ing the science lab with his mentor Scott Kelly (who was both classroom. “Our kids have changed,” reflects Cote-Crosskill. an FA alum and Science Department Chair) and during the fall “There’s been a paradigm shift with our students with the advent of 1995, when he finally was able to move to the new, state-ofof social media and technology. I know a lot of the new techthe-art Science Building. “I made sure I was on the Bicentennial nology has been good for our students and learning, but some Committee,” says Cote-Crosskill. “We needed a new building technology, I’m afraid, has profoundly affected them in a negadesperately for our science program, and I wanted to make sure tive way.” we had the right lab equipment and facility. On that first day in When asked what he hopes will be his legacy at the Academy, my new classroom, I couldn’t help but stare out of those beautiCote-Crosskill responded thoughtfully: “I’ll leave that up to the ful classroom windows at the sun!” hearts and minds of all my students. I did it all for the love of Another highlight for Cote-Crosskill was the two weeks he teaching.” spent at NASA’S Goddard Space Flight Center in 1990. “NASA Cote-Crosskill looks forward to playing some rounds of golf, had a program called NEWMAST (NASA Educational Workvolunteering, and waiting for his wife Nicole’s retirement. He shops for Math And Science Teachers) that I was nominated to also plans to do some traveling (most notably to Australia where attend,” continues Cote-Crosskill. “The workshop afforded me his daughter Ashley resides), spend time with family and friends, opportunities to bring current knowledge into the classroom and welcome his new and first grandchild due in October. “It’s and become licensed to bring moon rocks to the Academy for been a long time coming, but it’s been worth the wait,” says students to view.” Cote-Crosskill excitedly. “The name ‘Opa’ (grandpa) has a nice Cote-Crosskill also coached during his career at FA. He was the ring to it…” tennis coach for 15 years for both boys’ and girls’ tennis. “Back

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A 30-foot climbing wall has been installed near the Academy’s OLRC barn and community garden.

FA’s OLRC Erects Low Ropes Course and 30-Foot Climbing Wall BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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t’s been two years in the planning,” says Joel Rhymer, director of the outdoor learning and research center. “But despite the structure’s recent installation near the school garden and barn, the Academy has had a long history of providing students opportunities for challenge and adventure using ropes and course activities for the past 20 years. The new structure is a renewal and stronger commitment to the program.” The new ropes course includes a 30-foot climbing wall with handholds, two rope ladders, and a ladder swing. Currently, three ‘pods’ of the low ropes course have been installed with plans to add a fourth soon. The pods are designed to become progressively more challenging, and each offers a different activity for students. Fun names like “Whale Watch, “Playpen,” “TP Shuffle,” and “Zig Zag” were given to the pods as a way of distinguishing the structures during use.

Vestals Gap Ventures of Purcellville, VA—one of the oldest and most well-respected ropes course designers in the U.S. — designed and installed the course last summer after consulting with FA staff. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to work with such a prestigious company,” continues Rhymer. “Vestals Gap Ventures have been in business for a long time, not only designing and installing challenge courses but also offering the essential training and certification to ensure safety.” Rhymer went on to explain that activities involving the low ropes course were primarily designed to build teamwork and group leadership whereas the high ropes are designated for individual challenge and adventure. “We look forward to utilizing the ropes course for various courses, which include Rock Climbing, Outdoor Adventure, OLRC Biology as well as for residential life activities and advisory program,” concludes Rhymer. “The opportunities are endless.”

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FA NEWS

17th Annual Boston Model UN Conference

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his past February, Mr. Huang-Dale and 12 FA students traveled to Boston to attend the 17th annual Boston Model UN conference hosted by Boston University. There, Delegates Emily Grzyb ’18, Sophie Duane-Leavitt ’18, Colleen Bullard ’18, Orian Lovering ’19, Cam Ghadfa ’19, Gunnar Gurnis ’19, Casey Kneissler ’19, Sonia Leone ’20, Luke Sekera ’21, and James Pullan ’21 debated history and world issues from the Roman Senate to nuclear conflicts. The weekend featured beautiful weather, heated debates, and late night group bonding. During the current political climate, tolerance and compromise for the sake of our future are goals of the Model UN conference. We are glad to say that all of the delegates represented this state of mind and we are pleased that such prestigious students represented Fryeburg Academy.

FA students with Mr. Huang-Dale attending the Model UN Conference at Boston University.

At the Boston MUN conference, FA Ambassadors (the most experienced level) headed to S. Korea, Mexico, and Wall Street in small, focused meetings called “Crisis Committees.” As the corruption in South Korea settles following the deposition of their president, delegates are negotiating who will take power next? Can corruption truly be eliminated? Meanwhile, on Wall Street, bankers, senators and investment firms negotiate a settlement following the financial collapse of 2008. Can they

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During the current political climate, tolerance and compromise for the sake of our future are goals of the Model UN conference. We are glad to say that all of the delegates represented this state of mind and we are pleased that such prestigious students represented Fryeburg Academy.

BY GREG HUANG-DALE ESOL Teacher

find a better solution than a government-financed recovery? Are banks “too big to fail” or should market forces be allowed to take their toll? And lives are in the balance, just across the southern border in Mexico, where an all-female drug cartel, Las Flakas, plan their next moves in a world of fear and violence. Will they find common ground? Will they agree on a common enemy? Will they turn on one another? Not all MUN committees face such dire conditions, but most are addressing real-world challenges. Many of the FA delegates represented Finland this year on a variety of UN committees addressing nuclear energy on the SPECPOL (Special Political and Decolonization) committee. Our Finland representative on the SOCHUM (Social and Humanitarian) committee worked to protect the rights of domestic workers around the world. And our UNOPS (Office of Project Services) representative from Finland was discussing the ever-worsening conditions in Syria and how the UN might participate in the rebuilding of infrastructure when the fighting subsides. These are challenging questions for anyone, but seeing FA students preparing, listening, cooperating and standing up for the rest of the world, inspires and encourages us all to move forward toward peace.


FA ATHLETICS

FA Girls’ Ski Teams Sweep Nordic and Alpine Maine Class A State Ski Championships BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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t was a winning season for Fryeburg Academy girl’s Nordic and alpine ski teams, earning back-to-back state championships. The championship was the first one for the girls’ Nordic team since 1987. The race was held at Black Mountain in Rumford, ME, utilizing a different format. FA Coach John Weston ’93 cited the race’s new format as a positive change: “Some of the conferences have been doing this format [starting lineups based on the distance from the finish line from the classical race] for a couple of years, and they really wanted to push it through to the state level. It made for some exciting racing.” Coach Weston also contributed the win to the strength of his team, composed of many seasoned racers like Emily Carty ’18 who placed 2nd, Irina Norkin ’18 (sixth) and Zoe Maguire ’19 (eighth). “This year, we had a mix of very experienced skiers and a group of newcomers, with not many racers in the middle,” says Weston. But it was freshman Sasha Maguire that would make her incredible debut during the freestyle finish when she edged her ski out to nip a Leavitt skier by six-tenths of a second and place 22nd in pursuit. “I went all out,” says Maguire. “I knew that every second counted and wanted to show the team that I could finish strong.”

FA girls’ alpine skiers make it a sweep of both Nordic and alpine girls’ Maine Class A State Ski Championships with their team victory and a trophy brought home to the Academy.

The girls’ Nordic ski team finished strong to take home the championship, defeating Deering High School 38-39; Emily Carty ’18 won gold for the Class A freestyle. FA’s girls’ alpine ski team responded in kind. Despite challenging course conditions, the girls’ alpine ski team performed well during the giant slalom race held at Mt. Abram in Greenwood, Maine. Brooke Juneau ’19 placed 2nd, Abigail Novia ’19 (sixth), Sophie Duane-Levitt ’18 (11th) and Mae Milo ’18 (45th) to give Fryeburg Academy a two-point lead over Edward Little High School. The team went on to perform well during the second day of slalom racing on Black Mountain. “We needed to ski well and be aggressive,” says FA coach Sam Dyer ’01. “Everyone skied at their best at states to culminate a great season.” Sophie Duane-Levitt ’18 and Abigail Novia ’19 both qualified in the slalom and giant slalom to earn individual results. Brooke Juneau ’19 took first in both races to earn a spot on the Maine team for the New England Championships held in March. “It was a great way to end an amazing season,” says Juneau. “I couldn’t have asked for a better way to finish my ski The FA girls’ Nordic ski team put an end to the 31-year drought to win the girls’ Maine Class A State Ski Championships. career at Fryeburg Academy.” Fry ebu rg Ac a de m y Scene s

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FA Winter & Spring Sports Photo Gallery PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIAN ZHU ’21

Liam Harriman ’19

Alfie Walker ’19

Liam Chisari ’19 14

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Caroline Condon ’19

Tina LeBlanc ’19


Henry Wang ’18

Faye Taylor ’18

Gunnar Gurnis ’19

(front center): Livia DeVries ’21

Scott Parker ’18

Braydon Bartlett ’19

Emilia DeSantis ’21 and Tina LeBlanc ’19

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Ece Kaya ’18: New Things BY CHARLIE TRYDER Dean of Student Life

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ans in attendance at Fryeburg Academy wrestling matches this winter watched an event that few if any in Maine have witnessed before — a young woman from Turkey on the matt competing against young men. Ece Kaya ’18 arrived at Fryeburg Academy in the fall of 2016 with the intention to gather experiences unavailable to her in Istanbul, Turkey, and she has not allowed anything to keep her from achieving her goal. Although wrestling is popular in her homeland, Ece needed to convince her family that it was a good idea for her to wrestle in the United States. “My family doesn’t like wrestling. They wanted me to cheerlead, but I told them that girls are strong and that they can wrestle too,” Ece said while recalling conversations with her family. “My personality is that when I want to do something, I do it. They are used to it. They didn’t want me to leave home and come to the United States for high school either, but I kept pushing. Eventually, they supported me. It was the same with wrestling.” The experience proved meaningful, like many of Ece’s adventures at FA these past two years. While students at Fryeburg Academy arrive from different cultures, many of the lessons are universal. When asked how the season went, Ece summarizes the experience succinctly, “It was hard, but I didn’t want to give up. After wrestling, I felt so strong and confident. All my friends came to my first match, and they were cheering my name. I felt so good!” Along with her memorable wrestling experience, Ece also played a year of basketball as a junior and two years of field hockey. She loved field hockey and credits this experience with helping her get to know people from the local communities. “I loved my coach and my team. We were really close. Sports helped me make friends with people in town. We had team dinners and I would go out with the team after games.” Ece involved herself in many areas of FA life along with athletics. She was a proctor, a member of the International Club, Interact, CAKE, Raider Patrol, and the Daniel Webster Society. The motivation for getting involved in so many experiences is simple. Ece explains, “I just wanted to try new things.”

Ece learned about FA through an agency where they provided application forms that asked her to list her interests so that they could find the school that fit her. After applying to schools, Ece had several options, and one was FA. After an interview with the FA admission office, Ece felt comfortable, so she did some research. She immediately liked the campus and all the sports offerings. As much as Ece thrived in athletic settings, she credits the annual Dorm Olympic competitions with providing her with the most memorable FA experiences. A kind and compassionate individual who often comforts her friends with kind words and encouragement, Ece acknowledges that she also possesses an intense competitive drive. Those who witnessed Ece help direct and organize Frye Hall’s preparations for their successful defense of the 2017 Dorm Olympics championship saw a focused individual at work. Ece recalls the preparation as a bonding experience. “You want to win so badly that the group dynamic is amazing. You are trying so hard and doing new things. You are getting together with people and having fun at that moment. I have never experienced anything like this in Turkey.” In a broader, more general sense, Ece points to the opportunity to meet people as the most meaningful FA experience. “I love meeting new people. In dorm life, you live among all people with different cultures and religions and lifestyles. You see their lifestyle up close and learn their culture. What they wear, what they eat, and you get to know them. You experience it instead of reading about it. You improve your own character, and you learn how to live with other people.” Ece talks about her role as a proctor, and she humbly acknowledges helping others. “You learn to solve problems with each other. You see different ways that people view situations. People come to me with roommate issues. Their lifestyles aren’t working for one another, and I like giving ideas about how we can talk to one another to solve problems.” The wealth of experiences Ece gathered at FA have prepared her for college next year. At this time, Ece is still considering options and unsure where she will head next fall. She knows that she will study international business, but she still needs to determine whether it will be at the University of Delaware, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Arizona, James Madison, or George Mason. After college Ece hopes to start an international jewelry business.

It was hard, but I didn’t want to give up. After wrestling, I felt so strong and confident. All my friends came to my first match, and they were cheering my name. I felt so good!

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Upon completing her education in the United States, Ece anticipates returning to Istanbul to be with her family. However, her experience in Fryeburg opened her eyes to the tranquility of rural life. “When I got here and saw how small and quiet Fryeburg is, it was weird. When you look around, you see nature. In Istanbul you just see buildings, and it is so crowded and stressful. Here you slow down, and you can relax. My mind is more relaxed, and I can think more clearly. But eventually, I will likely go back to Istanbul. I am a city person. I like to move around and do things.” Ece emerged as a leader in the FA community this year, and she provides valuable advice to younger students regularly. Asked what advice she would like to pass along to students who arrive after her departure, she offers up the following thoughts while recalling her early experiences at FA, “When you are first here, it is hard, but you need to believe in yourself. Enjoy all the new clubs and activities that you want. Talk to people and get to know them. There

are so many opportunities to socialize, and people are friendly. You should not feel alone. People will help you. You will miss home, but you will get used to it and enjoy all the people and experiences.” Ece is a rare combination of seemingly contradictory qualities. Ece embodies youthful exuberance, yet she also exudes wisdom more commonly felt when talking to elders. Ece carries a confidence that is authentic and seen in few adolescents, yet she humbly seeks the opinions and insights of others. The intensity and fierce competitiveness with which she engages in sports and competitions are balanced with calm demeanor and kindness when interacting with others. Always ready for action, Ece also finds time for reflection to establish the value of her experiences and plan her future. The embodiment of contradiction, perhaps Ece is the child of the bustling city life of her youth and now the serene rural existence of her second home in Fryeburg as well.

Teammates: Scott Parker and Ryan Hewes BY CHARLIE TRYDER Dean of Student Life

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lthough Scott Parker arrived in Denmark from Idaho in the eighth grade, he quickly fit into the local scene by joining the Molly Ockett football team when the school opened. Fellow Denmark scholar-athlete and all around good guy, Ryan Hewes, remembers first seeing Parker. Turning to Scott while recalling his first impressions, Ryan demonstrates the good-natured humor that marks many of their exchanges. “I have a picture from Molly Ockett football after you moved here. You looked like a fifth grader.” Hewes quickly follows up the mention of Parker’s slight frame at the time with another friendly insult: “And your Idaho humor was awful.” Recalling his first impression of Hewes and the other players on the Molly Ockett football team, Parker explains he wasn’t particularly impressed either. “The first thing I remember was football and meeting these guys. All I could think was Maine people have weird accents.” The banter flows smoothly between Parker and Hewes while they sit discussing their athletic histories. Despite the deprecating humor, they direct at one another, they clearly share great respect and admiration for one another. Leaders among a very successful group of junior and senior athletes, Parker and Hewes, have helped establish a culture on their teams where teammates expect a lot of one another. Despite their regular practice of challenging one another, they have each other’s back at all times. While the Denmark duo will not hesitate to find humor at the

other’s expense, they are both also capable of self-deprecation. Hewes, while describing his athletic history, recalls an early experience when his shyness almost prevented him from getting involved with athletics. “When I was a kid my parents had to bring me to soccer practice because I didn’t want to go. I was shy. My mother brought me out to the field, but I started bawling my eyes out, and I followed her off the field. Then my father had to carry me out to the field, leave me, and run back to the car so I wouldn’t follow him.” The “tough love” paid off. Athletics quickly became an essential part of Ryan’s life, and he believes that his participation has shaped him as a person. “Athletics have been part of my life since I can remember. I learned to love sports. I have always played sports, and it has made me a really competitive person. I am competitive in everything I do, and that competitiveness has helped me in my grades.” Parker also received an early introduction to athletics from his parents. “I started baseball and football in 4th grade and basketball even earlier.” Parker also credits powerful experiences with shaping who he has become as a person. “They really opened me up. They helped me come out of my shell. I always hang out with the people who I play sports with, and you learn a lot about each other. When you are on the football field or court, you see who people are. You see raw emotion come out.” Parker, now 6’1” and strong after buying in fully to the strength Fry ebu rg Ac a de m y Scene s

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and conditioning program at FA, shares how his size shaped the way he approached high school athletics. “As a freshman going to practice every day I was trying to prove myself to the seniors. I was always the small kid, and nobody expected anything from me.” Parker and Hewes both were captains on the FA Western Maine semi-final football team and quarterfinal basketball team this year. What makes Parker and Hewes special athletes is the way that they shape the culture of their organizations. While both are athletic and have worked hard in the weight room, they play cerebrally as well, and this allows them to execute challenging game plans. Their cerebral approach to athletics would not surprise FA faculty who have seen Hewes and Parker in the classroom. Both are top students in their class and NHS members, and they have taken multiple Advanced Placement classes. Hewes and Parker also provide outstanding leadership to their teams. Football coach Dave Turner explains, “They are the consummate leaders. They always brought a level of consistency — on the field, in the classroom, and in the community at large — to the team. They steadied us. They are calm and relaxed, and that allows their teammates to just go play.” Turner quickly points out that some people mistake consistency for mediocrity, and that is not at all what he means. He emphasizes that they consistently brought a high level in both their performance and their approach. Sedge Saunders shares similar impressions of Hewes and Parker from their basketball experiences. “Ryan always puts the team above himself. He congratulates the guy he platoons playing time with rather than complaining about lost minutes. He is more interested in team success than individual accolades. Scott stepped up when teammates needed to hear from someone other than the coaching staff. His effort on the floor spoke for itself, and that rubbed off on other players. They both calmed us down, but they could get on their teammates when necessary.” Hewes’ first FA athletic experience came as a ninth grader on the cross country team. He ran in the fall after playing football at Molly Ockett, and he qualified for the state meet both years. As a junior, Ryan returned to the fall sport of his childhood — football, where he started as a wide receiver and cornerback. Ryan played four years of basketball and started at guard his junior and senior years. Scott Parker is the only twelve season male athlete in the senior class. Parker started at wide receiver and cornerback in foot-

ball, at forward in basketball, and in the outfield in baseball. He is a rare three-sport captain. Hewes and Parker enjoy winning, as any competitive individual does, but when asked what they value most about their high school athletic experience, they both refer to the relationships and bonds developed. Each Thanksgiving, the FA basketball team, stays at Coach Sedge Saunders’ family hotel when they travel to his hometown on Mount Desert Island to play a series of games against area teams. Parker recalls the trip as one of his favorite athletic experiences. “I really enjoyed the MDI trips in basketball — just hanging out with everybody and bonding.” Hewes’ favorite memories are nearly identical to Parker’s. “It’s more about hanging out with your team. My sophomore year, I didn’t know anyone in the grade below us. Going to MDI, I got to know all my teammates and start some new friendships.” Of course, the winning has been memorable as well. Hewes reminisces about his favorite rivalry. “I remember every Lake Region game. The football games were great, but we always blew them out. The basketball games were great and always close. We lost by 1 the year they won the state championship, and we beat them both games this year.” Each of these scholar athletes has engaged fully in student life at FA, and their insights should be heard by students entering or returning to FA in the fall. Parker’s advice might be best understood by ninth graders facing their earliest challenges in high school. His encouragement and guidance are valuable. “Stick with it when it is tough. Everyone has their time. Most kids are starters in the 8th grade, and you come up, and they need to wait their turn and pay their dues. The people that pay their dues are the ones that make teams good.” Hewes’ advice points to the abundance of opportunity available at FA. “Take advantage of everything that you can. You will realize what you like and don’t like. As you get older pick the things that you really like and excel in them.” Outstanding athletes, NHS students, and hard-working, respectful young men, Scott and Ryan define what it means to be a student-athlete and leader. The FA community will miss them but wishes both the best of luck in their very bright futures. Parker’s life after FA will start this fall when he goes to the University of Maine to study mechanical engineering. The next step for Hewes will begin when he lands on the Bentley campus prepared to study finance.

They are the consummate leaders. They always brought a level of consistency — on the field, in the classroom, and in the community at large — to the team. They steadied us

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Southern Region Class A Coach of the Year:

FA’s Boys’ Basketball Coach Sedge Saunders BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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ach year the Maine Basketball Coaches Association names a coach of the year for each classification and region recognized by the Maine Principals’ Association. The Southern Maine Class A coaches selected FA Boys’ Head Coach Sedge Saunders as the coach of the year for the 2017-18 season. “This award is a direct reflection of my team this year,” says Saunders. “They were an extremely hard working and committed group and were probably the most coachable team I’ve had, so they made my job quite easy. Even more importantly, the team represented Fryeburg Academy with the utmost class...they were great ambassadors for our school.” Now in his 20th year as the boys’ head basketball coach at the Academy, Saunders’ coaching career began under former coach Jay Tilton (now at Phillips Exeter) as the JV coach for three years. This year he led the Raiders to an 8-10 record, advancing to the quarterfinal playoff game at the Portland Expo against #1-seeded Greely — a first for the Academy. “We are the smallest school in the Class A South region,” continues Saunders. “The way the team competed against these schools, some that were almost twice our size, shows how poised and united they were. We had a lot of exciting games and many notable wins...especially against Wells (Class B South Champions) and our win vs. Marshwood in the prelim playoff

game. That game really showcased what a great “team” we had as we executed 20 assists on 24 baskets, which is amazing. They were such a fun team because they shared the ball better than any I’ve coached.” Despite the loss in the quarterfinals of the Class A tournament, Saunders says he’s still very proud of his team for their effort and how much they achieved this year. “We hope to continue our outstanding team play next year, building off our success and challenge for a championship,” concludes Saunders. “Our team chemistry was great this year, so we hope to duplicate that next season, but it won’t be easy because we lose some really exceptional young men to graduation.” As part of the peer recognition, Saunders was invited to coach the Southern Maine Class AA/A/B team at the state McDonald’s All-Star game at Newman Gym on the Husson campus in Bangor on March 10, 2018.

FA’s Head Football Coach, David Turner, Named Campbell Conference Coach of the Year BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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ryeburg Academy’s Head Football Coach David Turner has been named the 2017 Class “C” Campbell Conference Coach of the Year. Turner was recognized on Sunday, November 19 at the All-Star Banquet held each year by the Campbell Conference to recognize outstanding athletes and coaches in each class. “This is a BIG deal,” says Sue Thurston, FA’s athletic director. “These coaches are selected by their peers with whom they work alongside and share game film each week. The significance of the date is also remarkable, as it marks the 5th anniversary of the passing of Turner’s father, Dan, who coached football at Fryeburg Academy for many years alongside Dave.” David Turner graduated from Fryeburg Academy in 1988 and has been a part of the FA football program for over 20 years, serving as the assistant coach from 1995-2007 and later as the head coach from 2007 to present day. Under Turner’s leadership, he has developed a top-notch fitness program with the strength and conditioning coach at the Academy for student-athletes to improve their core conditioning. Before joining FA’s football program,

Turner served as an assistant football coach at Bowdoin College under Head Coach Dan Brown who now coaches at Michigan State. “As a dean and teacher at the Academy,” continues Thurston, “David understands his athletes as students first and meets individually with kids who need the extra guidance in the classroom. He has the tough love for those that need it and a kind heart that assures every player who may need a ride to practice or home has one. He gets to know kids on a very different level, and in doing so, builds relationships that can help kids long after graduation.” Along with Turner’s recognition, several FA students were also recognized at the banquet and named as All-Conference Athletes: Tucker Buzzell ’19, Jared Chisari ’18, Caleb Eklund ’18 and Cody Gullikson ’18.

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FA ARTS

FA Jazz Earns Gold at State Jazz Festivals BY MIKE SAKASH Director of Music

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n April 6 and 7, the Fryeburg Academy jazz ensembles wrapped up another successful season. Under the direction of Mimi Rohlfing, the bands attended the Maine Music Educator’s State Vocal Jazz Festival at Stearns Junior/Senior High School in Millinocket, ME, to compete against other Division I groups. Based on their afternoon performance they received a gold rating and numerous individual awards. Four outstanding musician awards are presented in each division, and two Fryeburg Academy students received this recognition: Ciara Neidlinger ’18, and Georgia Stafford ’19. Sylvia Sanchez Serra ’19, piano, Christian Martin ’18, guitar, Owen Burk ’18, bass, and Matthew Gunther ’20, drums, captured the outstanding rhythm section award. Also receiving recognition with the highest rating as soloists were McKenna McGrath ’19, Ashely Nguyen ’18, Mckenzie Huppe ’18, Arvin Ma ’20, Simon St. Pierre ’21, Owen Burk ’18, Georgia Stafford ’19, Christian Martin ’18, Addison Schwarz ’18, and Ciara Neidlinger ’18. The top two groups were invited to present their program in the evening finals to compete for the honor of first and second place. For the 13th year in a row, Fryeburg came out on top. Also on March 16 and 17, Fryeburg Academy’s Big Band and jazz combos, directed by Mike Sakash participated in the Maine Music Educator’s State Instrumental Jazz Festival. After two days of performance and critique, outstanding musician awards were presented to Georgia Stafford ’18, for her performances with the New Standard Combo and the Fryeburg Academy Big Band, and Ethan Reinbach ’20 for his performance with the Simon and Funky Bunch combo. This year Fryeburg’s Big Band and New Standard Combo earned gold medals for their performances, while the Simon and the Funky Bunch earned an Honorable Mention. Ensemble directors Mimi Rohlfing and Mike Sakash are proud of the students’ hard work and progress. The directors are already preparing for an exciting season next year, beginning with guest artist Kim Nazarian of the Grammy-winning New York Voices as part of the fifth annual Jazz Residency Initiative.

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(front row, left to right): Patrick Malia, Addison Schwarz, Ciara Neidlinger, McKenzie Huppe, McKenna McGrath, Sam Paulding, and Matthew Gunther (back row, left to right): Brendan Simkins, David Marshall, Simon St. Pierre, Christian Martin, Owen Burk, Georgia Stafford, Arvin Ma, Ashley Nguyen, and Silvia Sanchez Serra

(front row, left to right): Christian Martin, Owen Burk, Ciara Neidlinger, McKenna McGrath, Rachel Jensen, and Sharla-Mae Day (back row, left to right): Simon St. Pierre, Patrick Malia, Finn Lane, Jaden Fierman, Marc Ianuzzi, Lexi Parker, Will Marshall, Sam Paulding, Brendan Simkins, and Georgia Stafford

(left to right): Christian Martin, Owen Burk, Ciara Neidlinger, Georgia Stafford, and Addison Schwarz

(left to right): Mark Ianuzzi, Yukon King, Brendan Simkins, Ethan Reinbach, Sam Boorstin, and Simon St. Pierre


FA Math Teacher, Erik Gustafson Performs at the 2018 International Blues Challenge Competition BY LAURA AYER Director of Communications

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or Erik Gustafson, who also goes by the stage names of “Shelterbelt Slim” and the self-proclaimed cowboy name of “Erik Fingers Ray,” competing in the International Blues Challenge (IBC) in Memphis, TN last month was not the first time he received such acclaimed recognition. The IBC— now in its 34th year—is an international stage for burgeoning blues musicians to showcase their talents and to get a chance of being discovered. The five-day competition has two categories: blues bands and solo/duo blues acts which are judged by a panel of professional blues musicians from around the world. Gustafson performed at the IBC for his solo blues act in 2014, reaching the finals for the state of New Hampshire and participated the following year representing Boston. After waiting a few years, Gustafson entered this year’s IBC competition as a solo act representing Maine, advancing to the semi-finals. “It’s like a brotherhood,” says Gustafson. “The musicians who participate in the Blues Society are almost obsessed with the music. This year there were 110 solo acts from all over the world, including Germany, Italy, Australia, Canada, and from all across the United States.” Gustafson cites his first year in college when he first fell in love

with the genre. “In college, I ran into students from back east, and they turned me onto blues and artists like Hound Dog Taylor,” continues Gustafson. “Some of my favorite artists include those who play the delta-blue style such as Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, and Houndwolf.” In his solo act, Gustafson plays the mandolin, harmonica, guitar, and sliding guitar and also writes his own music — by ear. “I can’t read a note,” explains Gustafson. “It’s all by ear. It’s great working with kids [at Fryeburg Academy]. I have to ask them to write the charts out, and I can tell them what notes to play, but they have to write them down for me... so I try to show them how to play by ear and create improvisational music.” Gustafson also performs with a local Fryeburg band called the Blue Bus Band, composed of students from his annual May Term course and fellow teacher, Stephen Pullan. “In the Blue Bus Band everyone gets a lot of solo time,” continues Gustafson. “The talent is quite amazing at Fryeburg Academy. Our music department is extremely well known, and they love what they do.” The band performs five to six gigs a year, including fundraisers for nonprofits like Laura’s Foundation as well as the Fryeburg Fair. Along with his love for music, Gustafson has taught math for over 30 years where he spent the majority of his career in Montana, later teaching at a private high school in Concord, NH for a few years. He’s been teaching at Fryeburg Academy for the past three. “I have to say, Fryeburg has been my favorite place to teach so far,” says Gustafson. “The teachers and students here are just amazing. Where else can you have the freedom to teach students math, the blues, and cryptozoology?”

FA’s Award-Winning Vocal Jazz Ensemble Places 3rd at the 50th Annual Berklee High School Jazz Festival BY MIMI ROHFLING Music Instructor

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ryeburg Academy’s Vocal Jazz Ensemble won the third prize at the 50th Annual Berklee High School Jazz Festival on February 10. The vocal jazz ensemble has won the Berklee Jazz Festival three times and placed in the top three numerous times in the past 26 years. FA’s Instrumental Jazz Ensembles have won twice and earned several top awards as well. This year, the FA Big Band directed by Mike Sakash placed fifth in its division. All three of the Fryeburg Academy ensembles that performed at the Berklee Jazz Festival logged many hours of after school and evening rehearsal in preparation for this event, which included 209 of the top high school jazz ensembles from around the country. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Mimi Rohlfing, performed “So What” by Miles Davis with lyrics by Eddie Jefferson, “Round Midnight” by Thelonius Monk, with lyrics by Bernie Hanighen, and “Don’t You Worry ‘Bout a Thing,” by Stevie Wonder and arranged by Darmon Meader. Members of the group are eligible for 25% scholarships at Berklee summer programs as a result of this achievement. The Berklee music faculty recognize one performer in each ensemble for the Judge’s Choice Award. Senior Ciara Neidlinger received this award for her performance in the Fryeburg Academy’s New Standard Jazz Combo. Neidlinger who has performed with FA’s Vocal Jazz Ensemble all four years of her career at the Academy is no stranger to being recognized

as an exceptional musician at the festival. Last year Neidlinger won one of three Outstanding Musicianship Awards in their vocal jazz division. Junior Georgia Stafford received Judge’s Choice Awards for her performances in the Big Band and Vocal Jazz Ensembles. This year marked Fryeburg Academy’s first entrance into a new category of competition at the Berklee High School Jazz Festival. Ten finalists were selected from videos submitted by vocalists from across the United States. As one of the finalists, junior Georgia Stafford participated in a masterclass with “The Voice” vocal coach Debra Byrd, with the final competition taking place in the afternoon. The Fryeburg Academy community was thrilled to learn that Stafford won first prize. As a result, Stafford was invited to perform for a crowd of six-thousand people at the evening awards ceremony in Veteran’s Memorial Hall of the Hynes Convention Center. She also received a full scholarship to attend the five-week summer program at the Berklee College of Music.

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FA ALUMNI

A Tribute to Mary Beth “BJ” Grover Jones ’66 BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations

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eth Grover Jones ’66 has worn so many different hats at Fryeburg Academy — it is difficult to summarize in one short article! During her student years, Beth was a four-sport athlete playing four seasons of softball, field hockey, and three seasons of basketball. She also skied her freshman year. Beth received All-Star recognition in the field hockey goal and as a catcher in softball. She also enjoyed the arts and was a four-year chorus member. After FA, she went on to graduate from Husson College, again participating in basketball, softball, and field hockey. Beth worked for GE Credit Corp and then Noyes Tire Company, “They told me that I was the first woman tire salesperson on the Eastern Seaboard; I’m not sure if this was true, but I believed it.” While at Noyes, she tutored several executives in math and enjoyed it, and when a teaching job opened at Fryeburg, she applied and was hired by Headmaster Phil Richards. For the next few years, Beth lived in Frye Hall as a dorm parent and taught

math and business law. She then returned to Noyes for a few years, but when Headmaster Harry True asked her to come back to the Academy in 1979, she returned for good. Over the years, Beth has taught math, typing, office practice, business management, and business law. In the early ’90’s she took a one-year sabbatical to complete her MBA at Husson. In addition to teaching, Beth coached field hockey and softball, was a dean, a dorm parent, a bus driver, and an IT department technician. She also served as president of the FA Alumni Association for four years, as well as president of the FA Teachers Union on three separate occasions. In 2012 she was inducted into Fryeburg Academy’s Hall of Excellence in recognition of her athletic and extracurricular achievements. Her son, Luke, graduated from FA in 2005. When asked about her fondest FA memory, she quickly replied,“The people who were my coworkers — Scott Kelly, Verona Blake, and Sally Whitaker (to name a few) — we shared great friendships and laughs while working as a team!” She also reminisced about her 1983 field hockey team and the incredible playoff game against Cape Elizabeth that went into six overtimes. Fryeburg ended up on the losing end, but Beth will always cherish the memory of her exhausted players who gave their all until the final whistle. Coincidentally, the Cape goalie was Sue Hannigan

ALUMNI PROFILE

Dinara Abilova ’06 BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations

“I’m quite sure that I was the first student from Kazakhstan to attend Fryeburg Academy! After FA, I headed to Seattle where I pursued a degree in business administration and marketing at the University of Washington/Foster School of Business. My first job after college was at Microsoft, where I stayed for three years and where I got a taste of working in the digital space. In 2013 Silicon Valley and the tech sector were going through a boom, and I accepted a job at Amazon’s Bay Area subsidiary “A9.” Five years later I am still at Amazon, managing a growing team and learning every day.” A9.com solves some of the most significant challenges in search and advertising, focusing on helping people find the things they want. The team is an eclectic group of amazingly talented, highly motivated and remarkably smart people. Team members who are just starting their careers collaborate with PhDs and industry veterans who

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have expertise in a wide range of disciplines. They are all intent on solving some of the most complex computing problems to be found in industry and academia, and employees get to test out solutions in the real world. Almost half of A9 is based in Palo Alto, California, with additional locations in Seattle, Atlanta, India, Ireland, UK, Germany, Japan, Romania, and China. Dinara lives with her husband, Vlad, and their daughter Ariana (1) and writes, “Maine and FA always hold a special place in my heart, and we’d love to pay a visit sometime soon!”


Thurston (FA’s long-time athletic director)! Beth will keep busy in “retirement” with her long list of volunteer duties. She is the current president of the Oxford County United Parrish and she often stands in as a substitute minister. Beth is the co-chair of the Oxford Union Associated Maine UCC, and the Department Secretary of Daughters of the Union Veterans of Civil War. As one of the “young” members of the Grange, she is the “go to” driver, transporting displays to several of the county fairs throughout the season. Beth lives in Fryeburg and will stay connected to FA as much as possible. She is currently the co-chair of the Hall of Excellence Committee, a member of the FA Alumni Board of Directors, and

will continue to monitor TOEFL testing for boarding students. In 2012, she established the Grover Women’s Athletic Scholarship, awarded to a graduating senior girl. She is committed to growing the award and feels that girls are often overlooked when it comes to athletic recognition and scholarship opportunities. The first recipient of the award was Ellen Bacchiochi ’12. Beth keeps in touch with the recipients as they make their way through college. Beth feels blessed to have had the connection with the school and now feels it is important to give back. We will miss seeing her on a daily basis, but I have a feeling that she will continue to be a busy, productive part of the Fryeburg Academy family for years to come.

A Tribute to Scott Leach ’71 BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations

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cott Leach ’71 is retiring from FA’s Maintenance Department after 21 years. One of Scott’s earliest memories as an employee of the Academy was giving tours of the recently completed, Eastman Science Center in 1997. During his long tenure, he has witnessed a campus transformation, including the addition of the Cram Library, the new Gibson Gymnasium, and the Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center. “There’ve been a lot of changes in the physical plant during my time. Buildings constructed, lost, moved, rehabilitated, and removed to make room for others.” Immediately after the fire that destroyed the Gibson Gym in 2005, Scott, like many other members of the FA family, jumped into action, needing to help out. With Homecoming Weekend just three days away and a big football game scheduled, Scott found two trailers that soon became the home and away teams’ “mobile” locker rooms. Before joining FA, Scott worked for Dearborn, Bailey Mfg. and the State of Maine, but he was happy to come back to his alma mater. Over the years, Scott has juggled numerous responsibilities. For the last several years, he has been in charge of receiving and transportation; tasked with scheduling drivers to help boarding students get to and from doctors appointments, airports, and bus terminals. His phone was busily ringing while we chatted; one student needed a ride to the doctor’s office, another one to schedule a pickup. Scott also supervises the care and operation of all of the Academy vehicles, making sure that everything is licensed, serviced, and inspected. As one of the senior-most members of the maintenance team, Scott, has acted as interim manager from time to time, during transitions. He never wanted the head job, although it was offered to him — he said it wasn’t “his thing.” David Powers, F.A.’s Facilities Manager, wishes Scott well and appreciates his deep knowledge and ties to the Academy. “Scott made my transition to the Acad-

emy so easy, thanks to his experience and expertise, not only in regards to the physical plant but also with all of the local, personal connections that keep this place running. Over the years, he has come up with many solutions to large campus issues.” Some of his favorite memories of his work days at FA are Reunion Weekends. He would often volunteer his time helping out the Alumni Office staff during the busy event. He always enjoyed seeing the folks from his class and other classes, year after year. Scott also served several terms on the Alumni Board of Directors. Some things will not change for him. During the week of the Fryeburg Fair, you will still be able to find him parking cars across from the Main Gate at his friend’s Alan Whitaker’s ’77 rental property. He looks forward to seeing the same folks year after year, and he makes an event out of it! He may continue to work, at least part-time, but he has no set plans. He says he’s not ready to “really” retire; although he may take the winters off and enjoy his new snowmobile with his grandkids. Scott is also a car guru. For years, he has bought, fixed, and sold cars in his large three-bay garage at his home in New Hampshire. He will certainly continue with this “hobby” in his free time. We offer our gratitude for his years of service and commitment to FA and wish him well in his new endeavors — whatever they may be.

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FA ALUMNI

Alumni Area Receptions This fall, we hit the road and enjoyed reconnecting with alumni from different parts of the U.S. and abroad! Area receptions were held in Portland, ME, Boston, MA, NYC, Orlando and Sarasota, FL, Denver and Salida, CO, as well as Shanghai, China. Thanks to all who attended and helped organize these gatherings and we hope to see YOU the next time we are out and about!

HOS Erin Mayo enjoying a lovely luncheon at Marina Jack’s in Sarasota, FL, with alums, Ken Yoder ’67 and his wife, Lynn; Dick Thompson ’61 and his wife, Hazel; Elsie Reuning Fox ’44 and her husband, Rod; and John Kalkanajian ’71 and his wife, Lynne.

Macey Hall ’07, Elsie Russell ’07, Aaron Tripp ’08, Zach Drew ’03, and Alana Landano ’06 at the the reception held at the BBar & Grill in NYC.

Ali Hodge (Sue’s daughter), Melanie Ridlon Eldracher ’81 and Sue Thorman Hodge ’81 in Portland, ME. 24

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Bright Amoako ’13 and Joe Manning in NYC.

Aaron Tripp ’08, Monroe Mann ’95, Zach Drew ’03, Mary Rhymer ’10 and friend in NYC.


Gathering of friends in Orlando, FL, hosted by Chris Gordon-Somers ’75 (front row, left to right): Dawn Gale ’81, HOS Erin Mayo, Elsie Reuning Fox ’44; (back row, left to right): Roger Kiesman ’74, Chris Gordon-Somers ’75, Mark Abbott ’74, Rod Fox, Ellen Hastings Zelman ’76.

New student Chrystal Chen ’22, and Class of 2012 alums, Jonny Tang and Meg Li, with HOS Erin Mayo in Shanghai, China.

Jay Larosa ’08, Forest Edson ’13, Charlotte Lewis ’11, Maddie Egan ’11, Katy Heggie ’11, and Leanne Larosa ’10 in Boston, MA.

Dennis Campbell ’11 and Colette Fritzlen ’11 in NYC.

Pete Gale ’83 and Scott Emery ’87 in Portland, ME.

Alumni Dinner in Salida, CO, hosted by David ’63 and Cathy Buswell Wood ’66. (left to right): Dave Wood ’66, Joan Wilfong, Gary Wilfong ’66, HOS Erin Mayo, Debbie Wood Larson ’71, Eileen Wilfong, Scott Wilfong ’68, and Cathy Buswell Wood ’66.

Alum gathering at Hotel Indigo Denver, CO, in April. (left to right): Connor Patterson ’06, Kendyl Sullivan ’07, HOS Erin Mayo, Carley Warren ’49, Emily and Rich Lambrecht ’85, and Tiamo Wright ’04.

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FA ALUMNI

Assistant HOS Joe Manning at Dillon’s with Stephen Wilson ’62 and FA’s CFO, Jeremy Angell ’99 in Boston, MA.

Sheila Duane ’82, Ryan Kelly ’82, and Heidi Blake ’82 in Portland, ME.

Chris Gordon-Somers ’75 with son, Xavier, and Erin Mayo in Orlando, FL.

Head of School, Erin Mayo, with Jake Iorfino ’08, Chris Burrell ’08, and Katie Shorey ’06, enjoying the Portland, ME, reception at Bull Feeney’s.

A Message from the Office of Advancement and Alumni Relations Hi Everyone! We are busy gearing up for Reunion Weekend, August 17, 18 & 19 and look forward to welcoming you and others back to the Fryeburg Academy campus. This year, Friday’s opening reception will honor our faculty and staff — past and present! Please join us for this celebration, as many of our best Dawn Gale ’81 memories from our FA days include a special teacher, coach, or administrator. For many of us, they were that individual who made the extra effort to ensure our success, inspired us to pursue a particular goal, or gave us that needed bit of encouragement to get through a tough semester or competition. We remember these individuals throughout our lives and are thankful. Reunion invitations were mailed out mid-May, and by now you should have received them. You can also always find information on the weekend’s activities at www.fryeburgacademy.org/reunion. You will find links to purchase tickets and register for Saturday’s barn breakfast as well as the infamous banquet. Reunion classes ending in “3” and “8” are celebrating their five-year milestones, and many have additional weekend events planned as well. 26

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We had some terrific area receptions this past year and are already making plans for 2018/19. If you have ideas or would like to host an event or be involved in any way, I welcome your input and involvement. Many thanks to all of you who showed up at recent gatherings in Portland, Boston, New York City, Sarasota, Orlando, Salida, and Denver. Our events are listed on the website and on the Academy’s Facebook page, so check frequently for one scheduled in your area! And, finally, a goodbye and thanks: since returning to this job in the fall of 2016, I have had the pleasure and good fortune of working alongside Lakyn Osgood ’12. Lakyn served as the Alumni and Advancement Assistant for two and a half years, as well as the yearbook advisor. She recently accepted a new position at Chalmers Insurance in North Conway, NH, and I wish her the very best and know that she will excel in her new role. I know that I speak for all of us in the “Green House” when I say “we will miss you Lakyn!” Keep in touch and keep sending us your news. I hope to see you in August! Warm Regards, DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations


Celebrity Chef Marc Murphy ’88: Reflections on FA, Success, and the Art of Cooking BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations

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id you know that the Food Network’s “Chopped” celebrity chef, Marc Murphy, also happens to be a 1988 graduate of Fryeburg Academy? I had the pleasure of catching up with him while he was making his way to his restaurant in NYC. Marc spent his senior year at Fryeburg Academy as a boarding student, and he remembers the time fondly. “It was a great year, but I wanted to get out of high school and get to work. I was ‘done’ with school!” His father was an American diplomat, and the family had moved multiple times throughout his school years. He recalls being called to the guidance office midway through the year and being told that he might not graduate due to lack of credits. After asking what he could do to rectify the situation, he found himself enrolled in a Home Economics class and reading the Amy Vanderbilt “Book of Etiquette.” Perhaps his education in the culinary arts began in that class at FA; he recalls flipping crepes — poorly! Of course, one of his favorite memories of his time at FA was watching the pig scramble at the Fryeburg Fair. Marc spent most of his childhood in Europe, eating very well. His dad is American and his mom is French but from Milan, Italy. After graduating from FA, Marc landed in NYC, working as a handyman doing odd jobs and living on his brother’s couch. He adds, “I remember that I didn’t mind being homeless, but I didn’t want to be hungry!” Marc followed his brother to the Institute of Culinary Education in New York. Following graduation, he apprenticed at restaurants in France and Italy before returning to NYC. Marc has cooked in some of the finest restaurants in the world for nearly 30 years, and today, is the chef and owner of four outstanding New York City restaurants. His first, Landmarc, opened in 2004, when Marc teamed up with his wife, Pamela Schein Murphy. And in 2012, Ditch Plains restaurant was opened in the West Village. In addition to his restaurant responsibilities, he juggles his gig as a regular judge on Chopped, manages Benchmarc Events (a catering business), and he published his first cookbook, Season With Authority, in 2015. Marc is passionate about finding a solution to food insecurity and childhood hunger. He is interested in how he, as a chef with a bit of a voice, can preach good food and nutritious meals. In 2012, Marc and his wife Pamela created the first-ever Industry Advisory Board to end childhood hunger to help raise awareness and increase local chef involvement. His favorite episode of Chopped is the one featuring public school lunch ladies, or “school chefs,” as he likes to call them. They are the dedicated folks who are trying to feed kids in our public schools something nutritious every day. He is a member of the Leadership

Council for Share our Strength’s/ No Kid Hungry Campaign, and he has been the national spokesperson for their Dine Out For No Kid Hungry Campaign. In June 2013, he received the Humanitarian of the Year award for his outstanding efforts. The Marc Murphy Feed Our Future Fund was created in Marc Murphy ’88 his honor. Now in 2018, Marc is married with two kids, and when not in his restaurants or shooting an episode of Chopped, he spends a great deal of time listening to podcasts, reading, thinking, learning about healthy, nutritious food. He is personally trying to cook healthier, learning more about plant-based diets, concentrating on cooking vegetables and making them more interesting and center of the plate. Marc shared, “YOU are healthy; FOOD is nutritious” and added his concern for the state of this country with the high rate of Type II diabetes and the fact that obesity is now the number one reason recruits fail military enlistment requirements. He sees this as becoming a national security matter. I asked him what advice he has for young people who might want to get into the culinary profession? He offered, “Find a local chef, and stand in the corner for a week and see what a professional kitchen is all about. Personally, I thought it would be all women and was shocked to find mostly burly men swearing, and thought ‘this is cool’ ... I don’t have to dress up or wear a tie.” He laughed and shared, “Now, no one recognizes me unless I’m wearing a tie, dressed in my judge’s outfit.” For the record, Marc still prefers a t-shirt and hoodie. Marc turns 50 next year and is “trying to live his best life.” He, along with his wife and two kids, just returned from a family trip to Uruguay. He also enjoys a varied list of musical genres and can often be found at the opera, ballet, or a symphony. However, he also enjoys Eminem concerts and recently went to Jones Beach to see Little Wayne. So watch for Marc on Chopped and if you are in NYC, be sure to stop by one of his fabulous restaurants to say hello!

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CLASS NEWS

1940s

BEVERLY ANDREWS LAPOINTE ’49 writes, “My husband, Dick, passed away this past February. He always loved coming to the FA alumni reunions even though he graduated from another school!”

1950s

MABEL WELCH ’54 “is living in Groton, CT. “I’m using a walker but still walking!” CAROLYN ROBERTS LIBBY ’58 writes, “I’m home! I now live in Center Fryeburg.”

1960s

BRUCE THURSTON ’61 was presented with a legislative sentiment at Lovell’s annual town meeting by State Representative, Nathan Wadsworth (House District 70), signed by the president of the Maine Senate and by the speaker of the Maine House. The sentiment acknowledged Hoss’ contributions to his community. The Lovell Town Report was also as dedicated to him. OLIVER LEACH ’63 recently took a trip out west to the Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, and the Badlands. He writes, “Our grandson turned two in December and we are expecting a granddaughter in April. We look forward to another busy year.” RALPH BERRY ’65 is still working full-time as a psychologist in the North Country of upstate New York. ROSEMARY BOOTHBY RANKIN ’66 writes, “After my disappointment of missing our 50th reunion because of a fall that resulted in a trip to the ER on reunion day, followed by extensive surgery, I am healed and looking forward to attending our 55th reunion. My husband, FRANCIS ’68, and I sold our home in Baldwin and have moved to a cozy cottage on the coast in Cape Elizabeth. Moving from a home we had occupied for 40 years was an exhausting process, but enjoying our ocean view each day makes for a beautiful reward. I am also very happy to report that our daughter, after living in Massachusetts for over eight years, and our son-in-law, who had never lived in Maine, have bought a home in Scarborough. They are now only 15 minutes from us, rather than over two hours away.” MARYJANE RUGGLES DOW ’69 and her husband are retired, doing a lot of traveling, and best of all, spending as much time as possible with their 18 month-old granddaughter. 28

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John Kalkanajian ’71 and his wife, Lynne, at the Sarasota alumni luncheon.

’77 Classmates (left to right): Debbie Panno Brennan, Kim Sanborn Pelletier, Pam Pingree Hale, and Rita Hale Reutershan.

1970s

ALLISON MCBURNIE LEE ’83 is hoping to make it back to Fryeburg this summer! “Let’s try to rally as many ’83ers as possible! Hi to all from San Diego, CA area!” RACHEL CROCKER ’85 writes, “After living in Fryeburg for my entire life, I recently moved to Pennsylvania to be closer to my brother, CHRIS BUCK ’94, and his family. I’m enjoying spending time with my nephew.” CHRIS KUNKLE ’85 is retired in Florida!! “Now I volunteer in the local schools teaching junior achievement. I am continuing my Buddhist studies at the local Chan Center that I started long ago at the Dharma Jewel Monastery. I am taking restorative yoga classes, recovering from 14 surgeries for broken bones and replacement parts, and replacement parts for replacement parts. I’m still standing and haven’t blown up anything in years. I still DJ from time to time. Look me up on Facebook — DJ Kris Konch.” RICK HENSLEY-BUZZELL ’86 writes, “After living in Stow, ME, for 17 years, my wife, Dawn, two sons, GALEN ’17, JULIAN ’18, and I, moved to Floyd, Virginia. I am a licensed professional counselor working in the New River Valley Juvenile Detention Home working with at-risk teens. We visit Fryeburg often and hope to bump into folks along the way!! Peace.” KELLY MACDONALD TRAPANI ’88 writes, “I’m a mom of three amazing kids; Tina, Bella and Keegan — I’m so proud of them, and I am a grandmother! I’m a hairstylist, a sister, and a friend to many great people. I love life! I’ve lived in Germany with my husband, NINO TRAPANI ’90, for over three years and we’ve traveled through Europe. I spent New Years Eve in Paris — awesome! We’ve also lived out West. Nino is a Master Sargent in the USAF and has been in the service for over 25 plus years. I’m sharing pictures of one of the amazing hobbies I have, hiking! Wow, 30 year reunion for us this year class Kelly MacDonald Trapani ’88 of ’88.

GRETCHEN HUMMEL INGRAM ’71 is retired from teaching. “I have moved from Lees Summit, MO, to Palm Beach Gardens, FL. It is very beautiful here and no cold weather. I have four grandchildren.” MELINDA CHACE BRACKEN ’72 writes, “Chuck and I are enjoying being grandparents! Alexander is lots of fun.” RITA HALE REUTERSHAN, PAM PINGREE HALE, KIM SANBORN PELLETIER, and DEBBIE PANNO BRENNAN all of Class of ’77 got together for a girls’ weekend in chilly Gorham, NH! They get together two or three times a year to catch up and always have a great time. KELLY BELL LLOYD ’78 is graciously hosting a gathering for ’78 classmates at her Fryeburg home over reunion weekend. Contact Kelly for details gklloyd@roadrunner.com.

1980s

SHEILA DUANE ’82 received the Howard Ross Award at FA’s Winter Sports Awards’ Ceremony. This award is given annually to a member of the Fryeburg Ski Community who has provided exceptional contributions to the ski program. MELISSA SMITH HOLDEN ’82 is excited to see the Academy looking to the future for the generations to come. “Best of luck!” BRIAN BARBARY ’83 is getting prepared for his daughter Emily’s graduation from Savannah College of Art and Design in June. She has made the dean’s list every semester for four years. “Very Proud!”

Dawn Gale ’81 and Steve Tripp ’82 at the Boston Alumni Reception.


CASEY SHERMAN ’88 released his latest book with Michael Tougias in April. Above and Beyond is a riveting, deeply human story of President John F. Kennedy and two U-2 pilots, Rudy Anderson and Chuck Maultsby, who risked their lives to save America during the Cuban Missile Crisis. It’s available at most bookstores and on Amazon!

1990s

APRIL THOMPSON ’90 is living in Plymouth, MA, with her 10 year-old daughter. “We have been here for six years now and absolutely love it! I work for the Center for Active Living (Senior Center, Town of Plymouth) as a social/outreach worker, and love my job. In May I will graduate from SNHU with my Bachelor’s degree. It has been a long journey, but worth every bit of it. I hope everyone is doing well.” ERIC ADAMS ’93 “I’m married to an amazing woman and am a father of four. I currently work for a big box retailer in management but I will be pursuing teaching certification in English for grades 7-12 shortly.” KATIE GREGORY THOMAS ’95 “My husband Bret and I are still in Ohio and visit Maine at least once or twice a year to visit family. Our daughter, Hannah (20), is working and our son, Peter (16), is a sophomore in high school and very active in crew as the varsity coxswain. Between sports, jobs, and friends, there is never any down time. Our oldest son, Dan, and his girlfriend are expecting their first child in September. Bret and I are really looking forward to becoming grandparents and the new adventures the little addition will bring. Life is always looking up for us and we are thankful for our blessings everyday!” SARAH CARD ’97 and Ben Patz welcomed their son, Emmett James Patz, born on December 6, 2017. Emmett James joins his older brother, Nathaniel. MATTHEW PERRY ’97 and Ann Ingemi welcomed their daughter, Brooke Ann Perry, on February 4, 2018. She weighed 6 lbs. 8 oz. The maternal grandparents are Lisa Ingemi and James Porter of Center Conway, NH. The paternal grandparents are Patsy and CARL PERRY ’64. HEIDI PARMENTER ’98 “My 10 year old son, Beau, and I live in Phoenix, AZ. I have worked as the business administrator for my Unitarian Universalist Congregation for the past 12 years. Sadly, I don’t think I will make it to the 20th Reunion but I send my love to everyone!” AMBER TUCKER ’98 ”I have been back in Maine now for almost 10 years. After working at the Attorney General’s Office and several law firms in private practice, I opened my own law firm, The Law Office of Amber L. Tucker, LLC, in Portland in April 2017. I practice criminal

defense, family law, and personal injury, and it has been a wonderful experience so far. I look forward to connecting with old friends at the upcoming reunion — 20 years! How has it been that long?!” RICHARD A PERREAULT JR. ’99 and KAYLA WARREN ’08 are the parents of Quinn Richard Allen Perreault, born on Nov 21, 2017. Quinn weighed 5 lbs., 13 oz. He joins Makayli, Melanie, Alyssa, Cameron, and Londyn. The maternal grandparents are REBECCA HAMILTON ADAMS ’84 and Mark Adams of Brownfield, and Michael Warren of Fryeburg. The paternal grandparents are Cristin Perreault and RICHARD A. PERREAULT SR. ’78.

2000s

LISA GOLDENHAR HOLTZMAN ’02 “Our sweet little boy, Andrew Peter Holtzman, was born on December 8, 2017 at 5:40 pm. We love watching him learn and discover new things every day! He is a very happy and aware little baby.” SPRING SMITH MCKENNEY ’02 and husband SILAS MCKENNEY ’00 welcomed their son Brogan Ivory McKenney on Feb 11, 2018. Brogan joins his sister Lydia (3). PATRICK UNDERWOOD ’02 “My wife, Holly (Sumner) Underwood and I were married on July 7, 2017. Our beautiful daughter, Amira (3) was a flower girl in the ceremony held at

Silas McKenney ’00 and Spring Smith McKenney ’02 welcomed son, Brogan, to their family. Pictured here with big sister Lydia.

Andrew Peter Holtzman (son of Lisa and Goldenhar Holtzman ’02)

Renee Strange Farnham ’03, Shannon Miller Dow ’03, and Lori Royer ’03

the Inn at Pinnacle Mountain in West Paris! I’ve been working as a flight paramedic for LifeFlight of Maine for a year and a half at our new Sanford location and still live in North Windham!” RENEE STRANGE FARNHAM ’03 “As many of my friends would confirm, I have always been a “planner” — putting together details for birthday parties, dance, and any other event someone may be having. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that I would take those talents and build something with it. Four years after graduating from Fryeburg Academy in 2003, I moved to Nebraska, where I found myself working on Offutt Air Force Base as a lunch server at the Officers Club. Over time, I moved from Wait-staff to Bartender, to Bar Manager, to Assistant Caterer. The Officers’ Club held functions of every shape and size, from three hundred person weddings to twenty person brunches. During that time, I found my love for planning and event decorating. When I moved back to Maine in 2011, I found myself assisting family and friends with their wedding plans, and following through with the steps it takes to successfully hold a wedding. After getting married in 2015, I decided to start my own Wedding Coordination and Planning business, Strange Events. Since my “official” start in 2016, my business has grown larger than I imagined it would. With the addition of bartending and wait-staff services in 2017, Strange Events has expanded itself beyond just weddings, to reunions, holiday parties and more all over Maine and New Hampshire. Strange Events now contracts with 15 bartenders, many of which are Fryeburg Academy alumni, and we have hired a second coordinator. Many people would not understand the sense of accomplishment and a sigh of relief I get when a bride walks down the aisle. As the night progresses and I watch the families and friends dance and laugh, I know my time and effort was well worth it. Getting hugs from the bride, groom and their guests is worth the sore back and dirty feet. The energy, excitement, love and happiness that comes with a wedding is what I live for. It feels good knowing I am entrusted with a couple’s new beginning — allowing them to relax and enjoy

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their special day with family and friends.Contact me today for any of your event needs! 207-7526747 www.strangeevents.org www.facebook. com/strangeevents207. Renee and her husband, DOUG ’03, live in Poland, ME! SHANNA MILLER DOW ’03 was married on October 21st, 2018 to her boyfriend of seven years, Jonathan Dow. They are currently residing in Plainfield, IL, where they own and operate a 24 lane bowling center with a full bar and grill, arcade, and escape room! My sister, BRITTANY MILLER HAMILTON ’08, was the matron of honor and ANNIE-RAE ROSS MARQUES ’03 was a bridesmaid! JOANNA KINSMAN ’03 is the founder of Kini Bands, a hair accessories brand out of San Diego. She is also working on a new fashion line called KINSMAN, and is a consultant to startup entrepreneurs helping them launch and grow their businesses. “Loving life in California!” ANNIE-RAE ROSS MARQUES ’03 and CHRIS MARQUES ’03 purchased a 96 acre organic farm in Freedom, NH, in the fall of 2015. “Here at Viking Hill Farm we raise chickens and ducks for eggs, broiler hens and pigs for meat, and also have a large garden and a small orchard of fruit trees and berry bushes. We sell produce from our own home, and our eggs are sold at The Local Grocer in North Conway. We hope to start attending farmers markets soon. Chris is currently working as a software engineer at Batchbook although he is ready to be outside working the land full time. I am still working in fiber arts and I quilt with the local ladies guild. We make the quilts for the newborn babies at Memorial Hospital. Our kids are now 11 and 8 and they are enjoying exploring the woods and building forts.”

Shanna Miller Dow ’03’s bridal party, included alums — sister, Brittany Miller Hamilton ’08 and Annie-Rae Ross Marquis ’03

PAHRADA SAPPRASERT ’07 was named to Forbes 30 under 30 in Asia. Pahrada works for a venture capital fund named 500 TukTuks. JESSICA WRIGHT ’07 was named to the 40 under 40 list for New Hampshire. Jessica is a local food systems advocate and office manager for the Upper Saco River Land Trust. PHILLIP ALBONICO ’08 and NICHOLE LANE ’11 welcomed their daughter, Josie Rose Marie Albonico, on October 6, 2017. She weighed 7 lbs. and 3 oz. She joins her big sister with paws, Nala. MEGHAN DUFFY CLEMENTS ’08 recently welcomed her first child into the world! Quinn Kane Duffy was born on January 28, 2018 weighing 7 lbs. and 10.5 oz. “We look forward to making him a future FA alum!” CORRINE HENNESSY ECCLESTON ’08 and ARIEL MCCONKEY ’10 teamed up to coach Fryeburg Academy’s girls’ basketball this past winter. Both women were important players on their FA teams and Corrine was the last Raider to join the 1,000 point club. STACY MCALLISTER ’08 participated in the MS Run the US. She writes, “MS Run the US, Inc. is dedicated to raising awareness and

funds to support MS research while inspiring others to get involved in the fight against MS. My grandfather is the main reason why I not only began to run, but continue to run everyday. He was an amazing man, who loved to be active and a typical ‘Mainer.’ He would work from sunup to sundown on any project that involved his hands. From woodworking to car repairs to everyday household chores, he did it all. I was pretty young when he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, but I still remember the small changes that the disease caused. He slowly began having trouble moving and while lifestyle changes helped curb the disease, his 6’ 4” body had endured a lot. He began to need a wheelchair and while my family tried endlessly to help him do the things he loved (putting in an elevator in the household, wheelchair ramps, homecare), we slowly had to begin transitioning him to living a life with MS. From muscle twitches that made it difficult to hold a fork at times to battling severe depression from the disease to being lost in the woods for over 12 hours because he did not have enough strength to get out on his own. Multiple Sclerosis took a lot from our family and friends, but my grandfather’s positive spirit shined

Stacy McAllister ’06 is running in the MS Run the US Trek

FA girls’ basketball squad with coaches Corrine Hennessy Eccleston ’08 and Ariel McConkey ’10

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Old yearbooks and great memories!

through and he still gave the best bear hugs a guy could give. I began to run because remaining active was something that I COULD control (while my grandfather could not) and continued to run using him as my inspiration. I had been following the MS Run the US for several years (the route passes directly through Steamboat Springs, Colorado where I live) and knew that I had to participate in it one year. When my grandfather passed away from secondary complications of MS in August 2017 and a week later, the applications for MS Run the US opened. I knew this was no coincidence. I had to apply and am so honored to be part of this amazing organization. I have run five marathons in the past and taken several months to train for each one, but I am ready to tackle this challenge of running 26 miles everyday for 6 days straight come May 2018.” For more information on this non-profit, check out msruntheus.org. CODY OSGOOD ’09 moved to Tennessee and is working in construction.

2010s

KATELYN MCGRATH CARVALHO ’10 daughter of DENISE HALLETT MCGRATH ’88 and Sean McGrath, graduated summa cum laude in May of 2017 with her BS in accounting. She then accepted a position as Client Service Manager at Hansen Financial, a financial firm on Martha’s Vineyard. She has lived on Martha’s Vineyard for the past six years with

Katelyn McGrath Carbalho ’10

her husband who is a pharmacist at the Martha’s Vineyard Hospital. NICOLE BODEAU ’11 was named to the Husson University dean’s list for the 2017 fall semester. Nicole is a sophomore who is currently enrolled in criminal justice pursuing a Master of Science in the criminal justice administration program. KATIE HEGGIE ’11 “After graduating from UVM in 2015, I moved to France and taught English to middle school students. I also wrote and spoke for a french radio station while there, worked on a vineyard and learned about wine, and started training for half marathons. After moving back to the states, I moved to Boston and now work for a small B2B branding firm as a copywriter and project manager.” CORINNA ADAMS ’12 is working as a registered nurse at Mclean Hospital in Belmont, MA. LAKYN OSGOOD ’12 started a new job at Chalmer’s Insurance Group in North Conway this May. She now lives in Fryeburg with her boyfriend Jared, his son Bryson, and their two dogs Paxton and Avon. LAURA PULITO ’12 made the dean’s list for the fall 2017 semester at the University of Maine Farmington. SHANNON FRIBERG ’13 graduated from Susquehanna University in 2017 with a BS in luxury brand management and marketing, focusing in international studies, and is the owner and CEO of Krayr LLC, a start up market research and consulting firm. She writes, “Following a ready-to-wear high fashion internship abroad in Shanghai, China, I decided to continue traveling in Asia in 2018. I am currently in pursuit of a market research endeavor for my company, determining the relationship between the luxury industry and fair trade standards, with particular focus on sustainability in the rising economies of Asia. In addition to the professional aspect of my travels, I am also taking the time to explore and understand these cultures by spending time volunteering and living in different areas of Southeast Asia. There is no greater pleasure than to gain wider perspective!” TYLER HILL ’13 “I studied finance at the University of Maine and following graduation, I moved to Atlanta, GA, to pursue my career in aviation. I have been living here for about a year. During this time, I’ve become a commercial pilot as well as a flight instructor. I have recently accepted a job offer in Tacoma, WA, as a flight instructor. If anyone is interesting in becoming a pilot please let me know.” BEN WELCH ’13 was named to the Fall 2017 dean’s list at the University of Rhode Island. JARED SCHRADER ’13 as published in the Bridgton News: “Recently began a 10-month term of service in the National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), an AmeriCorps

Makayla Frost ’14 was awarded the Female Scholar/ Athlete of the Year at UMF.

program. Schrader based out of the regional campus in Denver, CO, is currently completing his first service project. As a corp member, Schrader will be responsible for completing a series of six 12 week-long service projects as part of a 12 to 14 person team. His first service project ended in mid-December (2017), and he began another project in a new location in January.” AMBER DINDORF ’14 made the dean’s list for the Fall 2017 semester at St. Lawrence University, Amber is majoring in global studies. MAKAYLA FROST ’14 made the dean’s list for the Fall 2017 semester at University of Farmington. Makayla was also awarded Female Scholar Athlete of the Year at Farmington! FRANCESCO GALLETTI ’14 was accepted into the Master’s Program in computer science at USC. He was in the top ten of all students admitted. SYDNEY CHARLES ’14 graduated from University of Maine summa cum laude with a degree in Kinesiology. In the fall, she will head to the University of New England to pursue a Doctor of Physical Therapy (Class of 2021). CASEY SIMMONS SUNDGREN ’14 and JUSTIN SUNDGREN ’09 welcomed their son, Asher Michael Sundgren, who was born on Feb 3, 2018. Asher joins older sister Mia Jayden. ASHLEY WISSMANN ’14 made dean’s list for the Fall 2017 semester at Clarkson University. Ashley is a senior, majoring in mechanical engineering. KRISTEN CHIPMAN ’15 was named to the Fall 2017 dean’s list at Husson University. Kristen is a junior who is currently enrolled in healthcare studies pursuing a master of science in occupational therapy program. JOSEPH COFFEY-SLATTERY ’15 excelled during the Fall 2017 semester at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY, achieving a grade

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point average of at least 3.5 to earn a spot on the dean’s list. TREVOR HENSCHEL ’15 was named to the Stonehill College Fall 2017 dean’s list. SHELBY HESSLEIN ’15 made the dean’s list at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, MA for the fall 2017 semester. ALYSON KRUGER ’15 was named to the dean’s list with distinction for the Fall 2017 semester at Grove City College. COLIN MCKEITH ’15 is a junior business administration major and was named to the dean’s list at Saint Michael’s College for the Fall 2017 semester. SAGE VIETS-AUGHTON ’15 made dean’s list for the Fall 2017 semester at Ithaca College. She is is majoring in history. KAYLEE BARBOZA ’16 writes, “I’ll be graduating with my associate’s degree in Culinary Arts from Johnson and Wales University in Providence, RI, in May and will be working towards my bachelor’s degree in Food Service Management next! I just returned from interning at The Rainbow Room — A high end, fine dining event space on the 65th floor of the Rockefeller Center in NYC.” MATT BOUCHER ’16 is currently a sophomore studying mechanical engineering at Boston University. “At BU, I have gotten involved in research, focusing on the effects of injecting a thin structure into frictionless granular media. I am also the Vice President of BU’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders, which is a studentrun organization that works to design and implement simple and sustainable quality-of-life improvements in third world countries. Our current project is in Naluja, Zambia focusing on rainwater catchment. I also serve as a student advisor for a freshman advising seminar. This summer, I will continue my research, as well as working as a summer student advisor for BU’s orientation program. The transition from little Fryeburg Academy to an urban university of almost 35,000 people was substantial, but I always keep FA in my thoughts as I approach the halfway point of my college career!” ERIKA DENNERY ’16 was named to the Stonehill College Fall 2017 dean’s list. NICK LANDANO ’16 was named to the Stonehill College Fall 2017 dean’s list. EMILY MCDERMITH ’16 qualified for the Fall 2017 dean’s list at the University of Rhode Island. ROBERT PRICE ’16 was named to the dean’s list at Champlain College in Burlington, VT. Robert is majoring in game design. ALEXIS CHARLES ’17 finished her first year at St. Joseph’s College. Alexis is studying nursing

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(left to right): Recent alums Patrick Carty ’16 (Emmanuel College), Matt Boucher ’16 (BU), Emma Armington ’17 (Simmons College), Nabeel Ghadfa ’17 (Bentley University), and Makayla Frost ’14 (University of Maine Farmington) met with FA seniors to discuss the transition to college.

and she played field hockey. Her team won the GNAC championship for the second consecutive year. Alexis was recognized by the 2017 Zag Field Hockey Coaches Association Division III National Academic Squad for her effort in the classroom. Alexis is the daughter of Elizabeth and DANA CHARLES ’83. MEREDITH J. PAULDING ’17 is a first-year exploratory major and is the daughter of Heidi (FA faculty) and DANIEL PAULDING ’86. She has been named to the dean’s list at Saint Michael’s College for the Fall 2017 semester. XINGJIAN “TOM” ZHAI ’17 writes “I’m currently studying pharmacology and therapeutics at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. At the same time, my path in college is different

from others, in a good and proud way. I will be the only person (so far) to graduate from my program within two years and three months, considering the fact that I entered in September 2017, and am expecting to graduate with a Bachelor of Science by December 2019. This way, I can minimize the cost of education by shortening the duration of my undergrad and then going to graduate school at the age of 20. I will also have a stipend that covers my entire tuition. In the meantime, I’m doing fitness and mass-gaining training while managing a parttime job as well. Fryeburg Academy has taught me invaluable lessons, and I am so grateful for the experience that I had at FA. I wouldn’t get to where I am today without the support from FA. With much love, I wish FA the best!”

Faculty member, Madame Ghadfa, and class of 2018 French Club students, Zoe Bodwell, Kelita Alarcon, Addison Schwartz, and Seth Johnston, visit alum, Tom Zhai ’17, during a recent French Club trip to Montreal.


Saturday, August 18th BIRD WALK THROUGH THE INTERVALE

with Outdoor Learning and Research Center Director Joel Rhymer (Binoculars Available)

8:30 - 9:30 AM

Reunion

2018

Friday, August 17th

FRYEBURG ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING 5 PM Location: The Bion R. Cram Library OPENING RECEPTION Open to all alumni and friends, honoring FA faculty — present and past. 6-8 PM Location: Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center Complimentary Cocktails & Hors d’oeuvres

Location: Lower field behind Fessenden House

BREAKFAST AT THE BARN

Learn about our new initiatives and enjoy a delicious home-cooked breakfast

9:30 AM

Location: Lower field behind Fessenden House

ALUMNI FIELD HOCKEY GAME & ALUMNI CO-ED SOCCER GAME 10 AM Location: FA Field Hockey Field next to track & FA Soccer Field behind main building SCHOOL STORE OPEN 1:30 - 4 PM Location: Main Building CAMPUS TOURS 1 & 2 PM Location: Leaving from the Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center SENIOR ALUMNI COCKTAIL RECEPTION & CLASS PHOTOS Location: The “Green 4 - 5:30 PM House,” 686 Main St. ALL-YEAR RECEPTION & CLASS PHOTOS Location: Ada Cram 4:30 - 6 PM Wadsworth Arena REUNION BANQUET Presentation of the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award 6 PM Location: Ada Cram Wadsworth Arena

SATURDAY CLASS PHOTO SCHEDULE

FA FACULTY & STAFF

TOTAL DUE =

* LOCATION: Front Steps (686 Main Street, the “Green House”) 4:00 PM 4:15 PM 4:30 PM 4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM

Senior Alums Class of 1948 Class of 1953 Class of 1958 Class of 1963 Class of 1968

* LOCATION: Front Lawn (Ada Cram Wadsworth Arena - behind building) 4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM 5:30 PM 5:45 PM

Class of 1973 Class of 1983 Class of 1993 Class of 2003 Class of 2013

4:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:15 PM 5:30 PM

______ Discount Golf Coupon / $20 off 18 holes @ Kezar Lake Country Club (no charge) $__0.00_____

Class of 1978 Class of 1988 Class of 1998 Class of 2008

Sunday, August 19th Discount coupons available at the Alumni Office or request on the reunion registration form. Please call (207) 925-2462 to reserve tee times.

Academy Fund The

Our fiscal year is ending, please consider making a gift to the Academy Fund by June 30, 2018 HOW TO GIVE: Online: www.fryeburgacademy.org/give By Mail: Fryeburg Academy Advancement Office, 745 Main Street, Fryeburg, ME 04037 Or Call: Dawn Gale ’81 / Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations, 207-935-2001 ext. 3147 We thank all of you who have already participated in the 2017/18 Academy Fund! Your donations have allowed us to provide the unique and exceptional experience for our students that has become a hallmark of a Fryeburg Academy education. Gifts made to the Academy Fund from alumni, parents, students, and friends, within the fiscal year running from July 1, 2018 - June 30, 2018 will be listed in the Fall 2018 Annual Report of Gifts.

Remembering Ron Hill BY DAWN GALE ’81 Director, Academy Fund and Alumni Relations

R

onald W. Hill, 85, of New London, NH, passed away with family at his side Thursday, May 3, 2018 at the NH Veterans Home in Tilton. Ron was born on July 28, 1932 in North Conway, the third child of Donald W. and Loretta Hatch Hill. In 1958 he married Alice Hurlin Breen in Jackson, NH and they raised a family of four children while residing at various times in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine. Ron graduated from Fryeburg Academy in ’49 and went on to earn a BS from the University of New Hampshire in ’54. He earned his wings from the USAF Jet Fighter Training School in ’56, an MS from Central Connecticut State University in ’68, and completed all coursework for his PhD at the University of Connecticut. As a high school chemistry teacher, a young father, and a student at CCSU, he also served a stint in the Air National Guard. Ron truly was an officer, gentleman, and scholar. His career as an educator began in 1959 and included both teaching and administration. In 1974 Ron was proud to become headmaster of his alma mater, Fryeburg Academy. Later, he returned to his true calling as a teacher at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, CT, where he was Chair of the Science Department during the period in which the school was planning, constructing and moving in to its new science facility. Ron delighted in comparing notes about the project with renowned architect I.M. Pei, who designed the building. Ron was president of the Outing Club at UNH, led ski trips into Tuckerman Ravine, and taught skiing at Black Mountain. He was a graceful skier who enjoyed racing week-

ly in the Mountain Meister Racing League at Mt. Cranmore into his seventies. During his retirement, Ron stayed active volunteering on a number of town committees including serving as Jackson’s Water Commissioner and President of the Jackson Historical Society. He was also active in the Jackson Community Church and served as President of the Protestant Chapel Association. He was a long-time member of the Grey Eagles in North Conway. Of all his accomplishments, Ron was most proud of his Air Force Wings; but above all, he valued his time with Alice and his family. He is survived by his wife of almost 60 years, Alice Hurlin Breen ’53; son Donald ’77, his wife Pixie and children Ronald and Katherine; son Michael ’79, his wife Cindy and children Ali (and husband Andrew Poston), Peter, Kevin and Jenny; daughter Sara ’80, her husband Alastair Caperton and daughter Ora; and daughter Susan, her husband Matt Long and daughters Molly and Eliza. Surviving family also includes his brother and best friend Richard D. Hill, great grandson Jack and numerous nieces and nephews. The family would like to extend heartfelt thanks to the staff at Woodcrest Village in New London and the NH Veterans Home for their tender care of Ron in his decline. A memorial service will be held in Jackson, NH later this summer. Memorial gifts may be made to Fryeburg Academy, which held a very special place in Ron’s heart.

$__________

I am adding $________________________ for my tax deductible gift to the Fryeburg Academy Fund Reunion Challenge!

YES! I plan to participate in the alumni field hockey game! YES! I plan to participate in the alumni co-ed soccer game!

REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MONDAY, AUG. 13, 2018

PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: Fryeburg Academy or fill out the credit card form below. You may also register online at www.fryeburgacademy.org/reunion or call 207-935-2001 ext 3131. RETURN TO: Fryeburg Academy / 745 Main Street / Fryeburg, ME 04037 Call or email alumni@fryeburgacademy.org with any questions.

Please charge my MasterCard/Visa: $________________ Name on Card: ________________________________

_____________________________________________

In Memoriam We are saddened by the loss of members of the Fryeburg Academy community. We honor and remember them here. RAY ABBOTT ’49 on October 3, 2017 TIMOTHY J. BARKER ’66 on February 13, 2018 HAROLD L. BEDARD ’93 on March 7, 2018 PATRICIA HOWARD BELL ’57 on December 19, 2017 PAULINE GRAVES BENSON ’51 on March 2, 2018 JAMES D. BLAKE ’66 on December 26, 2017 ROBERT H. BROWN ’47 on March 10, 2018 JOAN BURGESS BROWN ’49 on May 3, 2018 PHILLIP A. COLE ’50 on February 8, 2018 CHARLES A. DREW ’48 on December 4, 2017 NEAL M. DURGIN JR. ’49 on December 31, 2017 ALBERT J. FOX ’62 on April 5, 2018 THEDA STEARNS GILMAN ’48 on January 17, 2018 AUBREY M. GRAVES JR. ’67 on December 10, 2017 DOROTHY WENTWORTH HAMILTON ’51 on July 10, 2017 RONALD W. HILL ’49 on May 3, 2018 BERYL BASSETT HULL ’45 on April 1, 2018 BETTE-JANE GRIERSON HOUSTON ’49 on December 16, 2017

JOHN LECOEUVRE ’58 on April 23, 2017 JULIE ROBERTSON LEWEY ’58 on December 16, 2017 IAN K. MACDONALD ’08 on November 22, 2017 CLIFFORD E. MANCHESTER ’41 on January 22, 2018 ANTHONY MARTIN ’62 on December 16, 2017 LARRY W. MCALLISTER, SR. ’62 on December 25, 2017 EARLE P. MOORE, JR. ’46 on February 8, 2018 NANCY SMITH MOORE ’67 on January 15, 2018 GAYLE AMES MORRISEY ’54 on October 27, 2017 BRYCE NELSON ’08 on March 31, 2018 WILLIAM E. PITMAN ’55 on January 22, 2018 WILLIAM L. PRENTICE ’59 on April 22, 2017 ALAN L. RANKIN ’69 on November 11, 2017 BEVERLY STEARNS ’53 on December 19, 2017 SHEILA BENNETT TROTT ’50 on August 28, 2017 MARY ANN JONES WALDRON ’59 on February 13, 2018 LOUISE SEAVEY WHIDDEN ’36 on January 14, 2018

Card Number: _________________________________

_____________________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________________________ CVV Number: ________________________________

_____________________________________________ AUTHORIZATION SIGNATURE

FRYEBURG ACADEMY 745 Main Street Fryeburg, ME 04037


NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE

745 Main St, Fryeburg, ME 04037

PAID

www.fryeburgacademy.org

AUGUSTA, ME PERMIT NO. 121

REGISTRATION FORM

Fryeburg Academy

SPRING 2018

Scenes

A MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI, FAMILIES, AND FRIENDS

Please join us for ...

Reunion

2018 Name: _______________________________________ Class Year: __________________ Maiden Name: _________________________________

Name(s) of Guest(s): ____________________________

_____________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________

THE CAMPAIGN TO EXPAND FRYEBURG ACADEMY’S DINING HALL & STUDENT UNION

_____________________________________________ City: ________________________________________ State: _______________________________________

STUDENTS in THE CENTER

Zip code: ___________________ Email Address: ________________________________ Phone number, in case we need to reach you:

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

1 YEAR

(1) Payment of

$1,000

(____)_______________________________________

2 YEAR

(2) Payments of

$ 500

# TICKETS

4 YEAR

(4) Payments of

$ 250

______ Opening Reception (no charge)

$__0.00_____

______ Bird Walk through the Intervale (no charge) $__0.00_____ ______ Breakfast at the Barn ($10 per person)* $__________ ______ Reunion Banquet ($40 per person / includes buffet and two drink tickets)* $__________ *($15 & $45 respectively if purchased after August 13). CONTINUE ON BACK

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Dawn Gale ‘81, Director, Academy Fund & Alumni Relations P: (207) 935 -2001 ext. 3147 or E: dgale@fryeburgacademy.org

COMMEMORATIVE PAVER INFORMATION Be among the many individuals in the community to donate a personalized commemorative paver for your family, a loved one, your business, or in memoriam. Your legacy paver will be placed behind the Student Center and is unique way to make a lasting tribute to Fryeburg Academy in support of the Students in the Center Campaign. Each approximate 2’ x 2’ inscribed paver may be dedicated with a donation of $1,000.00. To order your paver online, please go to https://fryeburgacademy.org/commemorativepaver. Thank you for your contribution!

FA’S I N T E R N S H I P P R O G R A M : C U LT I VAT I N G C A R E E R E X P O S U R E A N D W O R K P L AC E R E A D I N E S S

Scenes Magazine, Spring 2018  
Scenes Magazine, Spring 2018  
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