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tupelo Greater

spring bridal 2012

a lifestyle magazine for northeast mississippi

magazine

Wedding Register 2012

free


results

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Gardens

Manning Gardens was created to give brides and their guest that special feeling only the right atmosphere can provide. The cozy and intimate feeling you get from the beautiful inside to the charming wrap around porch on our pier house makes for the perfect wedding setting. We are poised on 10 prestigious acres with beautiful oak, cherry, and cedar trees placed around our large lake. This truly makes us one of the South’s most elegant and private locations and the number one choice for outdoor weddings. We are located just minutes away from Tupelo, Mississippi in the peaceful countryside near Guntown, MS. Manning Gardens offers numerous amenities and is not only a top wedding location, but also a great corporate retreat venue in the Tupelo area.

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contents

spring bridal 2012

Weddings 2011

inside this issue: 12 Mt. Vernon Place & Billie’s Catering................... 15 bridal trends in engagement rings.................... 18 busy lad rent-all................................................... 20 tupelo area weddings........................................... 27 psychotherapy: does it really work?................. 52 create that beautiful smile................................. 53 preventive screening is best defense................ 54 women’s health for young women...................... 56 junior auxiliary ball............................................. 58 cdf open house....................................................... 60 kd christmas tea.................................................... 62 plant shopping tips................................................ 65 Helping Brides Find the Perfect Dress...............

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from the

publisher tupelo Greater

spring bridal 2012

A special thank you to North Mississippi Medical Center Home Health and Comfort keepers

Published By Legend Publishing Company

magazine

Publisher Wesley Wells

I’m doing something in this letter I normally don’t do. I’d like to give personal thanks to a couple of people. As many know, I’ve had to take some time away to help with my elderly mom. She’s had her tough times, but things are hopefully looking up. We’ve had to rely on outside help. Linda, who works for NMMC Home Health and Wanda, who works with Comfort Keepers, both have been a true blessing for me. They have not only done their jobs well, but they truly represent the Tupelo Spirit with their kindness and compassion. People like them are truly what make this city special. Welcome to our 2012 Spring Wedding Register. This edition features some of the area’s most beautiful weddings. We also feature some local businesses that help make the bride’s special day even better. Also, don’t forget the full digital version of the magazine can be seen online at www. tupelomag.com A special thank you goes out to our advertisers. We please ask that you patronize them and let them know you saw their ad in our magazine. They’re the only reason we’re able to distribute this magazine freely. Thanks for picking up our magazine and may God continue to bless each of you. Wesley Wells

Photography Amanda Wadley | Wesley Wells | Katie Hendricks Graphic Design Fran Sherman Advertising Sales Kelly Brewer | Wesley Wells Contributing Writers Cristal Cody | Michael Harrelson | Patricia Neely-Dorsey | Amanda Wadley

on the cover

Chelsey Penson and Vincent Murray, who were united in marriage on August 13, 2011. Photo by STF Studios Greater Tupelo Magazine is published bi-monthly by Legend Publishing Company, Copyright 2011, Legend Publishing Company. Reproduction without written consent from the publisher is strictly prohibited. GTM is not responsible for unsolicited materials. We welcome your comments. Letters to the editor should be mailed to: Greater Tupelo Magazine P.O. Box 1388 | Tupelo, MS 38802

Greater Tupelo Magazine: “Created by Tupelo people for Tupelo people!”

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Spring Bridal 2012


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tupelobridal

Kay’s Kreations:

helping brides find the perfect dress By Amanda Jewel Wadley

I 12

f there is one trusted local name for bridal wear in Tupelo, it is certainly

Kay’s Kreations. After opening its doors in 1984,

Kay’s Kreations has built a reputation of carrying the latest fashions and employing an experienced staff to ensure each bride has exactly the look she desires for her big day.

Spring Bridal 2012


“Floral patterns in ribbon form have become really big, Beaded belts around the waist are popular. And of course, strapless is still in.”

Brides will be happy to know that Kay’s Kreations carries all designer brand names of dresses. Some of their top sellers include Maggie Sottero, Casa Blanca, Allure, Mon Cheri, Mori Lee, Jasmine, Essence of Australia, and Pronovias. They now also offer tuxedo rentals through their own warehouse, as well as the option of ordering tuxedos if the groom would like to buy his own. May and June are still the busiest months for weddings with October running a close third. The month of the wedding, however, does not change one simple fact: brides know what they like. Kay’s manager, Margaret Long, shared what brides are looking for this year. “Floral patterns in ribbon form have become really big,” she said. “Beaded belts around the waist are popular. And of course, strapless is still in.” Brides love to express their own style with their color schemes, especially in bridesmaids’ dresses. “We still do a variety of colors. I don’t know if I can say one color is better than the other. Aquas are still very much out there--pinks, turquoise. And chocolate and black are still very popular.” She added Planning a wedding takes time and Long suggests making sure the bride plans ahead in case changes are needed. “I would say a year in advance is a good time to look,” She said. “Some delivery dates are six months. You don’t need to have a wedding in six months and your dress come in, in six months. You need to have time for alterations and all that.” Kay’s Kreations does alterations in store and usually needs around a six-week time frame to complete the work. When it comes to brides losing weight before the wedding, Long encourages them to take into consideration what their goals are so the original dress they buy fits better and less alterations are needed. Mothers of the bride and groom can also purchase their dresses from Kay’s Kreations. Long said, “They are very important, but mothers of the bride will wait until the last minute to find a dress. Everyone else has to be dressed before because that’s how [we] moms are. We put ourselves on the backburner…so most moms come in here without a lot of reordering time, so they usually buy what’s on the rack.”

Kay’s Kreations offers many choices for the mother of the bride and groom, as well as accessories for the bride and bridal party. “We can fit you from head to toe. From head pieces to earrings to jewelry to shoes,” Long said. Long encourages brides to not let planning the wedding become so stressful they forget to enjoy the process. “We’re here to fix things and make our end work. And most people are--for example, whoever is in the cake business [or] flower business, they’re there to make it work for you. Take a deep breath and enjoy your planning…Enjoy the process. Enjoy your day.” When picking a dress Long suggests brides keep an open mind about dress selections. “Most of the time you might think you found the dress you want in a catalog, but once you actually see it, you might change your mind. Be open to ideas.” She says. With that being said, Long cautions brides to follow their hearts and not try to please anyone else. The final decision should be based on what makes the bride happy. “Do not bring too many people with you to try on dresses,” She says. “You’ll get a hundred opinions and you don’t need that. This is your day…We don’t push dresses on anyone. If they ask for our opinion, we do tell them what we like. We always say, ‘This is your decision.’ You’ve got to feel good in this dress. You’ve got to feel like a bride.” Kay’s Kreations is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. While appointments are not required, they are recommended in order for the staff to better serve the bride and bridal party. GT

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Spring Bridal 2012


tupelobridal

Mt. Vernon Place & Billie’s Catering

providing complete & personal wedding services By Amanda Jewel Wadley

M

t. Vernon

Place, owned by Billie’s Catering, is a versatile location for weddings and receptions, offering several settings for both indoor and outdoor services. It also offers a wide range of services and amenities: tables, chairs, dishes, silverware, serving pieces, flowers, food – and, of course – catering.

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Spring Bridal 2012


“The most stress anybody can get under is to try to run from this one, to this one, to this one, to try to put a wedding together.”

The house at Mt. Vernon Place was built around 1919 and was once the parsonage for First Baptist Church of Tupelo. “It was moved here in 1965,” said owner Billie Robison. “They had to take the upstairs off to move it … The downstairs is original. They moved it in one piece; they did not split it….Then after it had been empty for a while, after Granny passed away, we had to do a lot of remodeling. We added the patio, and I changed the balcony formation.” Now, she says, “we have dressing rooms for the bride and groom up there.” With the catering, she says, “we’ll do any part somewhere else; we’ll do your cakes, we’ll do your flowers, we’ll do your food. But here, because this is a family home and all, we’ll do everything here. We do hors d’oeuvre and we’ll do sit-down meals. They aren’t as popular in this part of the country, but we do sit-down meals or buffets.”

Now more than ever, brides are looking for creative ideas for their wedding cakes. “We can design (the bride’s) cake for her. We’ll help her put some ideas together … so her cake is exclusive,” said Robison. “Cake is one of the first things I did. Less than a year after I started cakes, I began the full catering service. I still love to do the cakes, though.” If a bride wants someone else to make her cake, the policies of Mt. Vernon Place require that it comes from a health-inspected facility. The 12 acres of Mt. Vernon Place allow for several wedding locations. “Ninety percent of our weddings are back (at the pond). … I always tell my brides, ‘We go to Plan B. We have a back-up plan.’ Outdoor weddings, there’s nothing prettier and you get absolutely fantastic pictures. But you’ve got to be willing, if the weather doesn’t cooperate, to do something else at the last minute.” If the ceremony must be moved indoors, up to 75 people can be seated for the wedding. Robison also has permission to use the church around the corner. “If you’re having an outdoor wedding in the summer, usually there are showers, and you can dry your chairs off and go on about your business. But we do have that as a back-up if you need it. You can always do tents at the last minute if you need to.” If couples have picked out a wedding date, Robison advises them to make their reservations at least a year in advance. “Now, I have put a wedding together in a week. As long as I’ve got the date open, I can put the wedding together for you with no problem. … If they’re wanting a lot of specific things, then of course, you need more time.” In order to reduce the stress of planning a wedding, Robison encourages hiring experts. “Turn it over to professionals,” she says. “The most stress anybody can get under is to try to run from this one, to this one, to this one, to try to put a wedding together. Let a professional put it together for you. And stay within your budget. I usually tell my brides to tell me exactly what they want and let me quote it to them that way. Then if they need to cut back, we’ll take away the things that do not mean as much and will be less noticeable.” Robison agrees that late spring into early summer is still the busiest time for weddings, but more people are choosing fall. “September and October are becoming more popular. I think that’s because of the heat in July and August. I think June will always be the most popular month.” GT

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tupelobridal

Bridal Trends in

engagementrings By Heather Hefner

B

2012 have really done their homework. Many have looked online and have already educated themselves on Gold is still very popular in settings. However, we have noticed an increased interest in Yellow and Rose Gold as of late. Round diamonds continue to be the most popular and timeless choice. Cushion cut, pillow-like in shape, and princess or other square cut diamonds come in second place. For quite some time, a “halo” or “crown” of diamonds have been requested daily; this look involves a center stone of any shape surrounded by smaller diamonds. Most recently, there is an interest in solitaire-type settings with small diamonds placed on either side of the center stone on the band, with or without hand engraving. It is a simple but elegant look that is completely timeless.

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rides to be in

diamonds and styles of rings by the time they come in the store. White

Spring Bridal 2012


For the Groom, simple White Gold or Yellow Gold bands still appeals to the traditionalist. These are a classic and never go out of style. But, with the addition of alternative metals, men’s bands are more affordable now; the most popular of the alternative metals being Cobalt Chrome. These have the look of White Gold but are scratch resistant, hypo-allergenic, and cost about a third of the price of Gold. Other alternative metals include Tungsten and Titanium. Whatever your preferences are, one thing is for sure: Romance is not only recession proof, it never goes out of style. GT

Rings and information provided by Van Atkins Jewelers of New Albany

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tupelobusiness

Busylad Rent-All:

Trained Professionals in Wedding Services By Amanda Jewel Wadley

W 20

hether there is a need to rent linens, tables, and cake stands, or to employ wedding coordinators, florists, and after event clean-up, Busylad

Rent-All provides all this and more. Chelsea Thompson and Erin Stubbs of Busylad have helped plan and coordinate numerous weddings. They meet with the caterer, venue, and florist, along with the bride to ensure everything runs smoothly for the big day.

Spring Bridal 2012


“I think the thing that’s different about us too is we’re a rental store that has event coordinators…”

“I guess a lot of people are familiar with Busylad and know our logo. We’ve been around since 1967, but they aren’t as familiar with our coordinating services. When people hear wedding planner or wedding coordinator, they automatically think expensive, when it saves you a lot of money in the end…”says Thompson. “You know you’re having a wedding with 300 people but you may need to know specifics on it. We can help with that.” Erin Stubbs and Chelsea Thompson Staying on budget is a must for wedding planning. Stubbs and Thompson will give the bride and groom a few op“I think the thing that’s different about us too is we’re tions to choose from so they may decide which budget a rental store that has event coordinators…” Thompson is appropriate, then Busylad will do the legwork in adds. “We’re a part of American Rental Association… coordinating the bride and groom’s ideas. The rental industry itself has been official for us because “We’ll call all the people and book everything. We’ll we rent the items, but we also will plan it from start to make sure everybody is going to be there at a certain finish. And I think the thing that’s great about Tupelo is time and make sure the venue is going to allow us acwe have good relationships with a lot of the vendors…” cess the day before…[and] when we’ve got to be out Busylad stays on task even after the reception. For of there…” says Thompson. “There are a lot of details Stubbs one of her favorite things is after the bride and that overwhelm brides and if we can come in the begingroom leave, to see the relief on the parents’ faces when ning, help them set a budget, help them pick a theme, they realize they don’t have to clean up after everyone, help pick out the rentals and other vendors, it’s really because Busylad professionals are already on the job. rewarding in the end…” “And I also like another service that we do: Just come Stubbs agrees “And they get to enjoy the whole in and ask us questions. That’s free…We can help you experience… [A] lot of what we do is take your imagifigure out what you want. And that’s just us doing our nation and how you saw it and communicate that with job,” says Stubbs. the caterer or the florist…so it’s easier for your guests to Due to Busylad’s familiarity with rentals and their see your personality come out at your wedding receptraining in event coordinating, Busylad has become a tion…” name trusted by many. “I guess too that’s the overall While Busylad does help coordinate the bride and message we want to convey is, people trusting our groom’s ideas and offer opinions to go along with what expertise and valuing our professional service. This is is desired, their main focus is on the logistics of what a career and we enjoy it…It is fun but it’s hard work… is required for the event. For instance, if there are 350 The benefit we have at Busylad is we have the rental people invited to the reception, they make sure everyknowledge…”says Thompson. “Because we understand one will fit into the venue selected for that day. Busylad the business and the industry, we can guide you in the professionals such as Thompson and Stubbs are trained right direction…So whether we’re just the rental store or in the process of training for coordinating, in order to or we’re the full-fledged coordinator, tell us our role and ensure the job is done correctly. we’ll be glad to do it.” “We go to courses that involve wedding coordinating. Busylad Rent-All, located at 1818 McCullough BouleWhat’s in-style this year and what’s out? My mom is a vard, is open Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 certified event-rental professional. [Thompson] and I p.m., and Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to noon. For more inforare working on that course…It’s a two-year program… mation on rentals and wedding coordinating call 662That’s what sets us apart from those who just like to do 842-7834 or visit www.busylad.com. GT this…” says Stubbs.

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Spring Bridal 2012


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tupelobusiness

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Spring Bridal 2012


selecting the perfect wedding cake S By Rose McCoy

electing the cake for your wedding reception can be delightful if you follow a few guidelines. Before booking any wedding professional, make sure of the following: date, time, and location. These are the factors that sometimes determine if your decorator can accommodate you on your special day. Most bakers will require a deposit to secure your date, and then

meet with you to assist in designing the cake most appropriate for the setting. When meeting with your decorator, here is a

list of things you will need to consider.

How many guests do you expect? This determines how many tiers your cake will consist of. A three tier round cake with dimensions of 12”, 9”, 6” will serve 100 guests. This is including the top tier. Most brides no longer save the top tier for the first anniversary. A serving size is 1”X 2” with the tier being approximately 3.5” to 4” in height. Who is responsible? Everyone should have a budget in mind prior to meeting with the decorator. The decorator will usually make the cake as simple or as elaborate as you would like. But remember, the more you elaborate the more the costs will be. The person that contracts the decorator is solely responsible for the balance. What flavors are available? The bride may request a cake flavor other than the traditional vanilla layers; however, you should always know how it will taste prior to the special day. How do I know who to choose as a decorator? Most decorators will give you reference of previous brides, and you shouldn’t hesitate to contact some of them. Also, decorators will usually have photographs of previous cakes. Look over these photographs and perhaps order a dessert cake if you should have any doubts.

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What is the trend of cakes? The majority of bridal cakes are tiered directly upon each other (stacked). You can combine stacked with separated layers if you need extra height. Fillings are often used between the layers of the tiers. Rolled fondant is increasing in popularity as it allows the decorator to create bows, swags, and decoration that cannot be made from butter cream icing. Are groom’s cakes necessary? Groom’s cakes are more of a southern tradition, though the treat on a groom’s table isn’t always chocolate cake. The groom may have a favorite pie, cookie, or pudding that may be featured, or the item may reflect some personal theme of the groom.

Who should attend the meeting with the cake decorator? Usually it’s best to first meet with the bride alone to get an idea of what should be designed especially for her. After the initial meeting, having others involved may help in narrowing details. Once the final decisions are made, a contract, including all specifications, should be finalized and both the bride and decorator should have a copy. The final decisions of the cake should make the bride and groom as well as the decorator happy. If you feel confident in the decision, you may then await your wedding day to enjoy the cake. GT

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Spring Bridal 2012


tupelo areaweddings

Leigh Ann Sullivan and Daniel Tanner Whitehead

L

eigh Ann

Sullivan and Daniel Tanner Whitehead were united in marriage at five

May 28, 2011 at West Jackson Street Baptist Church thirty in the afternoon

photos by Amy McCoy

May 28, 2011

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tupelo areaweddings

The bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Sullivan of Tupelo. She is the granddaughter of the late Ernest and the late Florine Rogers of Nettleton and the late Nute Sullivan and JoAnn Sullivan of Mooreville. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Whitehead of Water Valley. He is the grandson of the late John and the late Mabel Anthony of Water Valley, the late John Whitehead of Bolivar, TN and the late Elizabeth McDougal of Memphis, TN. Mr. Dennis Basden, lifelong friend of the bride’s family, performed the double-ring ceremony. Nuptial music was provided by Brian Eads, Tatum Shappley and a trio of violins, The Fiddlers Three. The couple said “I do” under an arbor of white hydrangeas, calla lilies and English tea roses draped in sheer organza fabric. Escorted by her father and given in marriage by her parents, the bride entered the sanctuary to “Trumpet Voluntary”. Leigh Ann was radiant in a custom Modern Trousseau ball gown of Italian Silk Duchess Satin with a handsmocked Chantilly lace bodice atop a multi-layered skirt of tulle complimented by a finger tip length silk illusion veil edged in lace. She was adorned with beautiful Tiffany pearl earrings and drop pearl necklace, both gifts from the groom. The bride carried a bouquet of white peonies and hydrangeas. The bouquet was hand tied with the bride’s first bonnet and her baby ring along with her great grandmother’s wedding band. Attending the bride as her matrons of honor were Casey Alred Jones and Lori Thorn Sullivan. Julie Lynn Lanphere served as maid of honor while Lee Ann Holt, Heather Cayson Kennedy, Brandi Elizabeth Ledbetter, Deanna Wilemon Massey, Erin Renae McGee and Mallory Sullivan accompanied her as bridesmaids. The bridesmaids wore one shouldered floor length navy blue dresses by Mori Lee and carried bouquets of white calla lilies, hydrangeas and peonies wrapped in organza ribbon. The junior bridesmaids, Reagan Alynn Sullivan and Reagan Neely Whitehead, and the flower girls, Carley Breann Sullivan and Edie Parker Whitehead, were all nieces of the bride and groom. Honorary Bridesmaids were Britni Haynes Beasley and Kelly Elizabeth Garvin. Ashley Marie Aldy was the Orator. Kristin Harmon Crow and Jessica Rae Vogel served as the Registrar.

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Spring Bridal 2012


The groom’s brother, Michael Anthony Whitehead, served as best man. The groomsmen included Andrew Mitchell Aldy, Bennett Henry Crow, Christopher Steven Hardy, Michael Tyler McQueen, James Russell Smith, Ryan Cole Taylor, Joshua Wayne Thomas and John Wyllis Walker. John Robert Lucus, III, the groom’s nephew, was the Jr. Groomsman. Ushers included William Jarrod Corlew and Kenan Lee Stewart along with the bride’s brothers, Jon David Sullivan and Mark Brian Sullivan. The groom’s attendants wore classic Ralph Lauren pin stripe suits. The groom wore hand engraved Tiffany cufflinks, a gift from the bride. The groom’s great aunt, Mattie Chrestman, was seated with the bride’s grandmother. The couple departed from the church in a pink classic Cadillac Fleetwood, a surprise from the bride’s father. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at Park Heights Restaurant. Guests were entertained by the music of Brother to Brother of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The wedding cake was a six-tiered cake of alternating layers of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry with butter cream frosting created by Cakes by Rita. Amy McCoy of Sweet Magnolia Photography captured the couple’s memorable day along with Brandon Jernigan Film Studio while Nancy Moody served as wedding director to create the perfect atmosphere for the sacred ceremony and festive reception. On Friday, the bride’s mother and her life-long best friend, Jamie Cheek, hosted a bridesmaid’s brunch at the Sullivan home. That evening, the groom’s parents hosted an elegant dinner at the Tupelo Country Club. During the dinner many members of the two families as well as the wedding party spoke warmly of the couple and toasted them with much happiness. On Saturday morning, the groom enjoyed a round of golf with his attendants at Big Oaks Golf Club. Following a honeymoon to Negril, Jamaica, the couple is at home in Tupelo. The bride is the owner of Sullivan Insurance in Pontotoc and the groom is a Sales Coordinator with Aflac Insurance in Tupelo. GT

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NO MATTER IF IT'S 200 MPH OR 10 MPH, WE'VE GOT THE TIRE TO FIT YOUR NEEDS!

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Spring Bridal 2012


tupelo areaweddings

Margaret Frances White and Adam Dotson Clark

M

argaret Frances

White and Adam Dotson Clark were united

in marriage at six o’clock in

December 17, 2011 at First United Methodist Church in Tupelo. the evening on

December 17, 2011 Greater Tupelo Magazine

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tupelo areaweddings The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Alan White of Tupelo. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. Chad Dotson Clark and Ms. Julienne Best Clark of Jackson. The bride is the granddaughter of Mrs. Haran RollinsYoung,Senior of Aberdeen and the late Mr. Young and the late Mr. and Mrs. F. Hoyle White of Tupelo. The groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Best, Junior of Jackson and the late Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bobby Clark of Drew. The ceremony was officiated by Rev. James R. Curtis, Rev. Charles Poole, and Rev. Stanley Wilson. Ms. Dona Porter and Mrs. Nancy King directed the rehearsal and the wedding. Nuptial music was presented by Beverly Clement, organist and Elizabeth Reid Barnett, Vocalist. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore her sister’s dress which is an ivory, antique strapless lace gown with a sweetheart neckline. The dress is a sheer silhouette with a full, A-lined skirt and small pearls scattered throughout the wedding gown, complemented with a stunning rhinestone belt designed by Molly Gee Waggener. The bride’s ensemble included an heirloom pearl bracelet of her grandmother’s and also the groom’s grandmother’s original wedding garter. Mary Rollins Culpepper of Tupelo, the bride’s sister, served as matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Dorothy Lynn Boone of Nashville; Wendy Edwards Bryant of Jackson; Sarah Maxcy Crosby of Nashville; Margaret Brown Havens of Ridgeland; Emily Caroline Guyton of Tupelo; Margaret Anderson Hillen of London, England; Mary Allyson Lowry of Birmingham; Morgan McMurray Masley of Jackson; Holley Yarber Meriweather of Tupelo; Bonnie Carr Mize of Tupelo; Lynley Anne Shields of Nashville; Anna Kathryn Sloan of Tupelo; and Katy Rose White of Starkville. The attendants wore gowns featuring a fitted crème colored chiffon which fell over into an A-line skirt. The beautiful chandelier style earrings worn by the bridesmaids were a gift from the bride. Their bouquets were a mixture of white roses, hydrangeas, and casablanca lillies. Ring bearer was Bailey Evans Bryant of Jackson. Program attendants were Logan Porter Robinson of Huntsville; Karen Olivia Merriwether of Washington, D.C.; Caroline Doty Miley of Memphis; and Anna Aycock Mims of Meridian. The bride’s proxy was Holli Elaine Hines of Tupelo. The bridegroom’s father was best man. Groomsmen were David Thomas Adcock of Jackson; Benjamin Scott Carlton of Oxford; Donald Clark III of Birmingham; William Tyler Culpepper of Tupelo; Samuel Blanton Harris of Birmingham; Jonathan Jordan Kemp of Jackson; Robert Nicholas Nabors of Knoxville; Joseph Kirkland Sims, Junior of Jackson; John Murray Spencer of Jackson; Brett Cooper Thompson of Birmingham; Andrew Farrell Ueltschey of Jackson; Ralph Brooks

photos by Armosa Studios

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Vance, Junior of Chapel Hill, NC; and David Alan White, Junior, brother of the bride, of West Hollywood, Ca. Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at Park Heights Restaurant where Blaire Hughes and her staff provided a delicious buffet dinner. Mary McGuire Henson’s six-tiered wedding cake and the s’mores bar were very popular desserts among the guests. Erin Stubbs, Event Planner of Busylad Rentals and Flowers by Connie worked together to create a beautiful holiday wedding celebration. Memories of the evening were captured by Wes and Tera Wages, owners of Armosa Studios in Huntsville. The Sharie Bardo Explosion of Nashville provided entertainment and dancing for the guests. On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents and grandparents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Park Heights Restaurant. Following the rehearsal dinner, friends of the couple hosted an after-party also at Park Heights. Karaoke was provided by Casey Hardigree, a friend of the couple. Other weekend events included a bridesmaids’ luncheon hosted by the bride’s attendants and their mothers at the home of Jean Magee, while the groomsmen enjoyed competing in a bowling game at Rebelanes. Following a wedding trip to Playa Del Carmen, the couple is residing in Jackson. GT

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BEST WESTERN PLUS

Tupelo Inn & Suites Shopping is just a minute away at the Mall at Barnes Crossing, or enjoy a night out at the movies, with the Malco 10 Cinema also within walking distance. The hotel’s location also allows for easy access to the Elvis Presley Birthplace, Chapel and Museum, as well as downtown.

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL WEDDING PACKAGES Hotel Amenities: • 100% smoke-free hotel • Complimentary breakfast • Indoor pool • 24-hour exercise facility • Free wireless internet • Business center • Free parking 3158 North Gloster, Tupelo Phone (662) 847-0300 Fax ( 662) 847-0301


tupelo areaweddings

Mary Rollins White and William Tyler Culpepper

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photos by Stephanie Rhea

June 4, 2011

ary Rollins White and William Tyler Culpepper of Tupelo, Mississippi, were united in marriage on June 4, 2011, at First United Methodist Church in Tupelo. Reverend S. Andrew Ray officiated the ceremony. Ms. Dona Porter and Mrs. Nancy King directed the rehearsal and the wedding.

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tupelo areaweddings The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Alan White, Sr. of Tupelo, Mississippi. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Haran Rollins Young of Aberdeen and the late Mr. Young and the late Mr. and Mrs. F. Hoyle White of Tupelo. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Donald Culpepper of Philadelphia, Mississippi. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. William Louis Culpepper, and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Carol Fletcher, all of Philadelphia and the late Ms. Anna Pearl Scott. The bride was given in marriage by her father wearing an ivory, antique strapless lace gown with a sweetheart neckline. The dress is a sheer silhouette with a full, A-lined skirt and chapel length train. The sheath gown is embellished with small pearls scattered throughout the wedding dress. Attending the bride as maid of honor was her sister, Margaret Frances (Maggie) White of Jackson, Mississippi. Bridesmaids were Natalie Lefoldt Arnemann from Jackson, Mississippi; Brooks Anne Berry from West Palm Beach, Florida; Lacy Elizabeth Culpepper, sister of the groom, of Philadelphia, Mississippi ; Afton Jones Byrne of Houston, Texas; Laura Leigh Godwin of Tupelo; Taylor Greenlee Kilgore of Ridgeland, Mississippi; Kristen Cook Kirk of Shreveport, Louisiana; Ashley Jew Markham of Nashville, Tennessee; Sarah Grenfell Pettigrew of Nashville; Martha Virginia Russ of Jackson; Lauren Collins Waldrop of Tupelo; and Lindsey Joy Wamble of Denver, Colorado. Serving the bride as proxy at the rehearsal was Jessica Thrash Byars of Philadelphia, Mississippi. Scripture Reader was Zandria Lajuan Ivy from Richmond, Virginia. Nuptial music was provided by organist, Beverly Jane Clement, and vocalist was Brian Carr McGraw. Luke Carter Maynard, cousin of the bride, served as ring bearer and Sophie Belle Maynard, cousin of the bride, was flower girl. Program attendants were Haley Harris Booker, Kristen Corbett Hayes, Logan Porter Robinson and Morgan Alexis Taylor.

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William Donald Culpepper, father of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen were Robin Samuel Allen of Philadelphia, Mississippi; Jonathan Thomas Booker of Philadelphia; Samuel Gray Deweese of Ridgeland; Jeffrey Leland Kilgore of Ridgeland; Joshua Riley Lewis of Philadelphia; William Montgomery Mars of Philadelphia; Gregory Alan Nowell of Madison; Christopher Lee Owen of Philadelphia; Tyler Rex Rounsaville of Philadelphia; John Kyle Stribling of Atlanta, Georgia; Thomas Dustin Turner of Philadelphia; and David Alan White, Junior, brother of the bride, of West Hollywood, California. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the Goodlett Manor where Dwanna-and Prime Time- Band of Nashville, Tennessee, provided entertainment for the guests. Romie’s Grocery catered a delicious dinner and Mary McGuire Henson’s beautiful, four-tiered strawberry and yellow layered wedding cake was a delectable dessert. The groom’s table offered delightful chocolate cupcakes with the couples‘ initials on the icing made by Sherry Clay. Flowers by Connie of Verona and event planner, Erin Stubbs, of Busylad Rentals, worked together to create a beautiful ambiance and setting for the weekend. Stephanie Rhea was the wedding photographer for the celebration. On the eve of the wedding, the groom’s parents hosted a sit down dinner at Park Heights Restaurant. Being the weekend of the Elvis Festival, it was a special surprise that an Elvis impersonator serenaded the couple with “Love me Tender” and many other songs made famous by Elvis at the rehearsal dinner. An after party, also hosted by the groom’s parents, was enjoyed on the roof of Park Heights. A bridesmaid luncheon and swim party was hosted at the home of Mrs. John Hill. After a trip to Saint Lucia, the couple will make their home in Tupelo where both of them are teachers in the Tupelo Public School System. GT

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Providing Insurance and Financial Services

Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois 61710 102 Enoch Avenue Tupelo, MS 38801-7085 Phone (662) 842-3253 www.tillmoncalvert.com

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CALL TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE. • Auto • Home • Life • Health • Financial Services Tillmon Calvert, Agent


tupelo areaweddings

Jamie Brooke Green and Ronald Benjamin Ferguson

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r. and

Mrs. James Green of Tupelo announce the marriage of

their daughter, Jamie

Brooke Green to Mr. Ronald Benjamin Ferguson, the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Eric Ferguson of Tupelo. The couple exchanged vows at 6 o’clock on November 5, 2011 at the Gumtree Art Gallery in downtown Tupelo with a reception following in the same location. The ceremony was officiated by photos by Stephanie Rhea

November 5, 2011

Robert Reed

of Tupelo.

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tupelo areaweddings

The bride wore a strapless Winnie couture cream/pearl fit and flare gown with pearl and gold beading throughout the gown. The back had a small v neck with beading throughout and onto the train of the dress. The bride wore a shoulder length cream colored veil with pearl and gold beading around the edges, with a curled up do with a flower on the side. Attending the bride as matron of honor was Jennah Gill, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Carlee Morgan of Tupelo; Molly Smithey of Mooreville and Violet Muffi of Tupelo. Stella Gill, niece to the bride, served as the flower girl. John Patrick Ferguson, brother of the groom, served as the best man. Jacob Cameron, Chase Stephens, and Jonathon King, all of Tupelo, served as groomsmen and ushers. Scott “The DJ” Burns, of Jackson provided all the music

for the ceremony and reception. Emily Burns, wife of the DJ, served as the wedding director. Boyd’s Flowers of Tupelo decorated the venue in gorgeous fall colored flowers and gerber daisys. As the ceremony was being transferred into the reception, BBQ by Jim of Tupelo provided the catering service for the event. Stephanie Rhea of Tupelo provided the wedding photography for this gorgeous wedding. After the wedding, the bride and groom returned back to Bryan, Texas. GT

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tupelo areaweddings

Carmen Danielle Walton and Richard Adam Hill October 1, 2011

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Danielle Walton and Richard Adam Hill were married on October 1, 2011, at Concord Inn in New Albany, Mississippi. armen

Parents of the bride are Harry James and Pam Walton and Sandra Willis Frew and her husband, David. Grandparents of the bride are the late Kenneth Carmen Walton and Marie Noe Walton and the late Daniel Willis and Betty Burr Willis, all of Clarksdale, Mississippi. Parents of the groom are Richard and Sonya Hill of Saltillo, Mississippi. Grandparents of the groom are Noris Wayne Hill and Alene Johnson Hill and Hazel Webb Raines and the late Jimmy Carl Raines, all of Saltillo. The bride was escorted by her step-father and her father. Amanda Doster served as maid of honor and Brittany Robison was matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Amanda Brown, Carlee

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Morgan, Kelsea Smith, Brooke Abell, Amanda Kent and Emily Yates. The bride was attended by her daughter Kennedy Tedford as the flower girl. The groom’s best man was Jacob Hardin. Groomsmen were Brandon Baily, Zack Hill, Chase Hill, Austin Burns, Tyler Speck, Jim Roberts and Nash Stanford. Joe Young, Kyle Young and Cosby Repult served as ushers. His nephew Hunter Hill was the ring bearer.

A southern style reception followed the ceremony with the help of Busylad Rentals. The evening started off with the couple’s first dance as husband and wife. They were surrounded with candle light and beautiful flowers created by Brooke Abell and Erin Stubbs. The guest enjoyed a variety of southern style hors d’oeuvres served by BBQ by Jim. The bride and grooms cakes were created by Mary McGuire’s Cakes. Photographer Deanna Knight captured every picture perfect moment throughout the day. Following the couple’s honeymoon in Gatlinburg, Tennessee they share a home in Saltillo, Mississippi. GT

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tupelo areaweddings

Breann Mae Gifford and Wesley Ryan Rhudy

March 12, 2011

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STF Studios

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reann Mae Gifford and Wesley Ryan Rhudy were married March 12, 2011 at Saltillo First United Methodist Church.


The bride is the daughter of Lisa and Dwayne Aldridge of Mooreville and Craig Gifford of Iuka. She is the granddaughter of Robert and Janell Payne of Booneville, John and Virginia Gifford of Saltillo, David and Sarah Johnson of Nettleton, and Jack and Joyce Aldridge of Mooreville. The groom is the son of Randy and Robyn Rhudy of Saltillo. He is the grandson of Richard and Marsha Archibald of Saltillo and G.C. And Jane Rhudy of Nettleton. The vocalist was Mrs. Ricki Hill, the aunt of the groom. Guitar music was provided by close friend, Mikey West. Attending the bride as her maid of honor was Morgan Martin. Bridesmaids were Brittany Hill, Katelyn Holmes, and Kayle Pender, friends of the bride. The flower girls were Sophie Hill and Katie Warrington, cousins of the groom, and Taylor Eaton, cousin of the bride. The program attendants were Maleah Eaton, cousin of the bride, Lauren Aldridge, sister of the bride, and Jessica Grimes, friend of the bride. Serving as best man was the groom’s father, Randy Rhudy. Groomsmen were Justin Rhudy and Drew Rhudy, brothers of the groom, and Ross Browning, friend of the groom. The ushers were Justin Gifford and Kyle Gifford, brothers of the bride. Following the ceremony, a reception was hosted at Mt. Vernon Place in Tupelo by the bride’s parents. On the eve of the wedding, the groom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner for the wedding party, family, and friends at Park Heights Restaurant in Tupelo. The couple honeymooned in Orange Beach, Alabama. They now reside in Sherman, Mississippi. GT

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tupelo areaweddings

Chelsey Penson and Vincent Murray

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August 13, 2011

Penson and Vincent Murray were united 13, 2011 at Lane Chapel C.M.E. Church in Tupelo. The Bride is the daughter of Reverends Charles and Cheryl Penson. The groom is the son of Reverend and Mrs. James Murray. helsey

in marriage on August

The Matron of Honor was the bride’s sister, Candice Penson Williams. Bridesmaids were: Kayla Duncan, Chyla keys, Ashley Murray, Khelsea Holomon, Lindsay Sanford, Shelise Lindsey and Susan Penson. The Best Man was Spencer Murray. Groomsmen were: Charles Penson II, Joshua Williams, Exzell Houseworth, Jr., Dustin Spayde, Jonathan Rudd, and Charles Penson, III. Flowers Girls were Kingston Williams, Kassidy Williams, and Kiyome Penson, all nieces of the bride. Ring Bearer was the bride’s nephew, Terry Penson.

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After the wedding, a reception was held at the BancorpSouth Conference Center in Downtown Tupelo. The menu included chicken strips, meat balls, Chicken Quesadillas, fruit and veggie displays. The bride’s cake was made by Billie’s Catering and the groom’s cake was made by Rosa Lloyd. Decorations for the Church and reception hall were done by the bride’s aunt, Mabel Gayle Davenport. GT

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tupelo areaweddings

Lauren Tabor and Robin Shawn Steward

August 20, 2011

D

r. William Lawrence

Kitchens of

Tupelo announces the marriage of his daughter, Lauren Tabor to Mr. Robin Shawn Steward, son of Mrs. Marjorie Thompson Steward and the late Mr. William Lundy Steward of Pontotoc. The couple exchanged vows at seven o’clock on August 20, 2011 in a private, family ceremony at Rural Hill Methodist Church in McCool, Mississippi. The ceremony was officiated by Pastor Terry R. Garrett of Tupelo and Dr. Laurie V. Jones Jr. of Marks, Mississippi. The bride was escorted by her father to Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell. She wore an Oleg Cassini white, satin, ball gown featuring twisted straps with a v-neck bodice and cummerbund waist. The back boasted an elongated v-neck with a sweeping sash bow that fell from the waist. She wore a fingertip veil and a silver headband in a floral motif, accented with rhinestones & pearls. Attending the bride as Maid of Honor was Olivia Steward, daughter of the groom, and Honorary Maid of Honor, Channing Kitchens Steward, adopted daughter of the bride & groom, both of Tupelo. Tammi Arender of Baton Rouge, LA; Amy Barnett of Paducah, KY; Dana Dorroh, cousin of the bride, of Raleigh, NC; Lorrie Harden of Nashville, TN; Sue & Lanie Head of Branson, MO; Martha Jaggers of Pontotoc, MS; Ashley McAllister, cousin of the bride, of Memphis, TN; Sandra McCarter of Tupelo; Apryl Miller, cousin of the bride, of

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Tupelo; Pamela Nastase of Charlotte, NC; and Jane Yerger of Oxford, MS served as bridesmaids. God-daughters Lia and Laina Sorensen of Dallas, TX served as junior bridesmaids. Emma Katherine & Ella Grace Reeder, great nieces of the groom, served as flower girls. Miller & William Steward, sons of the groom, both of Tupelo, attended their Father as Best Men. Watts Miller, cousin of the bride, of Tupelo, served as Ring Bearer. Shan McAllister of Memphis, TN, Mark McCarter of Tupelo and Jay Nastase of Charlotte, NC served as ushers. Honored guests included Brooke & Maury Ballenger of Memphis, TN; Forrest Ann Daniel, Mary Goodwin & Myra Guyton all of Tupelo; Susan Hunt, Ben Laurro & Kay Ruleman, all of Nashville, TN. Brenda Hunt of Louisville, MS, cousin of the bride, provided all the music for the ceremony. Shirley Hall of Richland, MS, cousin of the bride, served as the Wedding Director and also provided & designed all the flowers for the ceremony & reception. The floral spray behind the altar was in honor and memory of the bride’s Mother, Evelyn Ruth Tabor Kitchens. Following the ceremony, the Tabor family hosted a reception at the family ranch in Lobutcha, Mississippi. Friends of the couple hosted a ceremonial reception in Monrovia, CA on October 1, 2011. Pastor Ken Duron of Placentia, CA and Pastor Marlo Blanford of Redondo Beach, CA presided over the candle-light ceremony. Nancy Kempner-Decman of Lomita, CA served as Matron Of Honor. Jill Deranian of El Segundo, CA; Leah Lewis of Mission Viejo, CA; Pamela Nastase of Charlotte, NC & Vicki Waninger of Fullerton, CA attended the bride. Kirk Jones of Hermosa Beach, CA served as Best Man. Jay Nastase of Charlotte, NC; John Schimke of Pasadena, CA; and Jim Waninger of Fullerton, CA attended the groom. After a brief honeymoon in New Orleans, LA, the couple resides in Tupelo, MS & Brentwood, TN. GT

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tupelo areaweddings

Tiffany Garmon and Bernard Clark

February 13, 2011

B

ernard and Tiffany met as children in their hometown of

Palmetto. She

approached him one day at work

2006, and they soon fell in love. They made the relationship permanent on February 13, 2011 when he proposed to her. in

STF Studios

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Bernard is the youngest of 3. Tiffany is the youngest of 9. Tiffany attended Pontotoc City Schools and graduated from South Pontotoc High School. She attended ICC and graduated with an associate’s degree in 2003, then went on to obtain her Master’s degree in social work from Ole Miss in 2006. She is now employed with the Department of Human Services. Bernard is a graduate from Shannon High School, class of 1996. He also attended ICC. He is currently an employee of Mitchell Distribution. Bernard is the son of the late Luzine Clark and Nathaniel Clark, Jr. Tiffany is the daughter of Shirley Garmon and Sylvester Crump. The two enjoy spending time with each other and their children, Tamaria and Tomaj. The wedding colors were cornflower and chocolate. Tiffany lost a sister on June 25. They would like to thank family and friends for their prayers and gifts. Thanks, with love. GT

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tupelohealth

psychotherapy: does it really work?

By Joy Johnson, outreach manager and licensed professional counselor at the NMMC Behavioral Health Center

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ay is Mental Health Awareness Month. Joy Johnson, outreach manager at the North Mississippi Medical Center Behavioral Health Center, gives us important information about talk therapy.

Ask anyone who has formed a meaningful relationship with a counselor during a painful time in their life and experienced relief – they will tell you it works! They may even go on to say it was the best gift they could have given themselves and that because of therapy they feel a sense of hope and have more insight. Some people you talk to may even tell you it worked better for them than any medication they tried. What is psychotherapy? For starters it has other names that are more commonly used such as talk therapy, counseling and simply therapy. During therapy a licensed mental health provider such as a psychiatrist, psychologist, licensed professional counselor (LPC) or licensed social worker (LCSW) will encourage you to talk about your thoughts and feelings. An effective counselor will provide a safe, nonjudgmental environment that allows you to express emotion, recognize strengths and weakness and ultimately develop the coping skills necessary to move through painful times we are all sure to experience as humans. What are some of the reasons people go to counseling? One in four adults experiences a mental health disorder in a given year. This includes anxiety disorders, mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder, addictions, eating disorders, personality disorders and schizophrenia, all of which psychotherapy can help treat. Not all people who go into therapy have a mental illness. Many seek counseling to relieve stress, resolve conflict, deal with a death, face a serious health problem, recover from trauma, etc. The reasons could go on and on. They are all part of the human experience. How do you find a therapist? Finding a therapist is not hard, but finding the right one for you may take a little time. The phone book and internet will have a listing of area men-

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tal health professionals. A referral from a doctor or health insurance plan is another way of locating a provider. Many employers, as a benefit to their employees, have an employee assistance program (EAP) where counseling is offered. Often, individuals choose a therapist that they have heard of through a friend or family member. An initial phone call can be the first step in connecting with your counselor. It is important to feel a sense of security and comfort with your psychotherapist. If after a visit or two you are not happy try someone else. What should you expect on the first visit? On the first visit you may be asked to give information about your physical and emotional health. Your therapist will want to know about any medications you are on, family history and current living conditions. This is all in an attempt to understand you and your situation better. It is important to remember that you are interviewing them as well. Do not hesitate to ask questions. You might ask how long the sessions last, how often you will meet and what type of therapy the counselor practices. Have them explain the counseling process to you in their own words. Give some thought to how this sounds to you. Will my therapist tell me if I need medication? In the field of mental health it is a psychiatrist who makes medication recommendations. Your counselor may refer you to a doctor or nurse practitioner to be evaluated for medication, but therapists are not trained to make that determination. Counseling can be a wonderful, rewarding experience. One can discover new ways of coping with life’s ups and downs, develop insight and hope while having the support of a trained professional. Counseling is a partnership with someone that has your best interest at heart. If you think you could benefit from a relationship like this, I encourage you to begin your search for the therapist that is right for you! GT


orthodontic treatment

can create that beautiful smile By Dr. John Russell, III, Russell Orthodontics

M

ost adults realize that there are health values associated with having straight teeth and a beautiful smile, yet braces are not always an option they are willing to consider when trying to achieve either of these.

Properly aligned teeth provide a confident smile, but also significantly improve overall dental health by reducing risk of tooth decay and gum disease. Dental health and beauty go hand-in-hand when establishing the best smile possible. Dental restorations alone can improve the esthetics of your smile, but they only cover up the underlying dental imperfections rather than correct them. Merely covering up dental problems can lead to more serious dental and overall health issues. This is why orthodontists team up with restorative dentists, as well as other dental specialists, to create the optimum dental result: a healthy and attractive smile. Fortunately, today there are multiple orthodontic treatment options available to address concerns about the health and esthetics of your smile. One of these options is Invisalign™ treatment. Invisalign™ is flexible enough to allow you to receive the orthodontic treatment you need while continuing to live your life the way you are used to. Invisalign™ takes a modern approach to straightening teeth, consisting of a series of custom-made, clear aligners. The aligners are worn throughout the day and are removed when eating, brushing or flossing, eliminating the need to restrict certain foods from your diet. Because the aligners are virtually invisible, most people won’t even notice they are there, making them ideal for adults and teens with esthetic concerns. For adults, the Invisalign treatment time is approximately one year with

checkup appointments every 6-8 weeks. If the condition of the bite cannot be appropriately treated with Invisalign™, another treatment option could be to utilize The Damon System in order to accomplish the desired orthodontic result. The Damon System incorporates “tieless” brackets which allow faster and more comfortable orthodontic treatment. This system requires fewer appointments and many patients begin to see dramatic results in as little as 10 weeks. The Damon System has been utilized for over 10 years now, allowing improvements in the appliance and treatment process and resulting in an excellent choice for patients today. The key to successful orthodontic treatment is a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. Orthodontic specialists have completed a 2-3 year program beyond dental school and are certified by the American Dental Association, making them uniquely qualified to address orthodontic problems. Investing in yourself is an important proposition, particularly where your health is concerned. With multiple payment options available, it is often more affordable than you think to obtain the smile enhancement you long for. The value of a confident smile can be tremendous. Being self-conscious about your teeth will easily restrict you from being yourself, but it doesn’t have to be that way. GT

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tupelohealth

preventive screening is best defense C By Stephen T. Amann

olorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death despite our technology and access to health care. Colon cancer affects men and women equally. About

75 percent of all new cases of colon cancer can occur in people with no known predisposing factors for the disease. There are generally no early symptoms to warn of the illness. Incidence increases with age, beginning around age 40. Racial differences in survival have been observed: African-American men and women diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a nearly 50% greater probability of dying of the disease.

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Colorectal cancer begins with no symptoms at all.

Because of the growing awareness and increased use of colon cancer screening, the incidence and overall mortality rates have finally decreased, after having consistently increased over the past few decades. However, there is still a long way to go. Despite the convincing evidence supporting colon cancer screening, it is estimated slightly more than half of the Americans considered at risk have been screened.

Colorectal cancer begins with no symptoms at all. Generally, a polyp (benign growth in the colon) forms and over time becomes a cancer. Not all polyp types are a risk for colon cancer. Adenomatous polyps are the dangerous type. Hyperplastic polyps are not a risk factor for cancer. The time period a polyp takes to change to cancer is variable but generally measured in years. As these changes occur, there can be some warning signs. These include rectal bleeding and blood in your stool (bright red, black, or very dark); a change in bowel movements, especially in the shape of the stool (e.g., narrow like a pencil); cramping pain in your lower abdomen or frequent gas pains; and discomfort in or the frequent urge to move your bowels when there is no stool present. Weight loss without dieting and constant fatigue can also occur.

Facts to remember:

• Men and women are considered to be average risk for colon cancer if they are age 50 or older and have no high risk factors. They should get screening testing done starting at age 50. African-Americans should start at age 45. • High-risk factors include a family history of either colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps, especially if below age 60, a personal history of adenomatous polyps or inflammatory bowel disease. Also, a family history of multiple cancers, involving the breast, ovary, uterus and other organs increases risk. If you are high risk, then screening should start at age 40 or sooner. Check with your physician for the time to start. The best way to screen for colon cancer is with a test called a colonoscopy. This endoscopic test evaluates the entire colon with a video scope. The main advantage of colonoscopy over other screening tests is that any polyps found can be removed during the same comfortable and safe procedure. Some sedation is used, and a colon cleansing prep is required the day before. If the test is normal, the next screening colon exam is generally recommended in 10 years. Another screening options is flexible sigmoidoscopy (a shorter endoscopic test) and ACBE (barium enema X-ray) – these tests are used together to evaluate the en-

tire colon. Minimal discomfort is noted as they are performed while awake. A colon cleansing prep is required. Unfortunately, these tests can only detect polyps or cancer. If a lesion is noted, then a colonoscopy is recommended so the area can be treated. If these tests are normal, the next screening exams are recommended in five years. Fecal occult blood tests can be done annually, even with new at-home testing, and if positive a colonoscopy is recommended. CT scan colography is another way to evaluate the colon, and if any lesions are suspected, a colonoscopy is recommended. Take note of these lifestyle recommendations to decrease your risk for colon cancer: • Red meat intake is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer, though the reasons are unclear. • Though the evidence is mixed, a high fiber diet appears to reduce colorectal cancer risk and has other benefits to the gastrointestinal system. • Whole fruits and vegetables are protective against colorectal cancer. • Calcium supplements, in the presence of adequate levels of vitamin D, help protect against colorectal cancer. • With the exception of calcium and folate, there is little reason to recommend supplements (e.g., anti-oxidant vitamins, trace metals). • Smoking increases colorectal cancer risk, in addition to the numerous other reasons to avoid smoking. • Alcohol increases the risk of colorectal cancer, particularly in the presence of low folate levels. • Physical activity reduces risk while obesity increases it; the interaction between diet-exercise-obesity and colorectal cancer is complex. Take the time to discuss with your primary health care provider or local gastroenterologist about colon cancer and screening options. Gastroenterologists are medical specialists with extensive training in diseases of the digestive tract and endoscopy. Unfortunately, in the early stage of colon cancer when it is most curable, there are frequently no symptoms. Screening is the only way to find polyps or the precursors of colon cancer. If the polyp is removed, it cannot develop into cancer and colon cancer has been prevented. Make a choice to be proactive in your health care and when appropriate, obtain colon cancer screening! GT

About the Author: Stephen T. Amann, M.D., F.A.C.G., serves as medical director for the Center for Digestive Health on North Mississippi Medical Center’s campus in Tupelo. For more information, visit tupelogi.com.

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women’s health for young women Why? When? How? Now!

By Lauren Waldrop

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ynecologic healthcare for young women involves several different topics. At some point all women will want or need a

GYN exam, and for many different reasons. Some may think it is just time to start having a yearly check up, others may be interested in contraception, worried about a potential problem, or have a serious complaint.

A very common question for young women is why or when is that initial GYN appointment needed. We are often asked by mothers, at what age does their daughter need an exam, the key word here being “need.” Most teens or young women do not need to see the gynecologist or women’s health nurse practitioner unless they have a problem with periods such as heavy, painful or irregular cycles, or are sexually active. Yearly PAP smears are now considered unnecessary until age 21 due to the fact that most PAP abnormalities resolve as the

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teens immune system matures and the risk of serious abnormalities, such as malignancies, approaches zero in individuals less than 21 years of age. For the young women having period problems, rest assured that visit may not involve a GYN examination, rather a general review of the problem, perhaps some basic blood work, and then discussion of a plan that best fits ones needs in order to manage the problem at hand. Young women who are sexually active or who may be planning to become sexually active


Most teens or young women do not need to see the gynecologist or women’s health nurse practitioner unless they have a problem with periods such as heavy, painful or irregular cycles, or are sexually active.

can expect a simple discussion regarding the need for contraception, contraceptive options, and review of sexually transmitted disease prevention. Young women are offered many new and different options for contraception including contraceptive implants, injections, varied dosages of oral contraceptive pills, intrauterine devices, rings, patches, and numerous barrier methods. The key is finding the right option for each individual and their lifestyle. When discussing prevention, another area of impact for health care providers and young women is the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and its role in precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix and gynecologic structures. Whether or not one is sexually active, the HPV vaccination is now available starting at age 9 and is recommended in order to prevent the types of HPV that can later lead to cervical cancer. Other commonly addressed issues for young women include breast concerns, screening for sexually transmitted diseases, infertility, and menstrual cycle irregu-

larities. Many women are more comfortable discussing these types of issues with a gynecologist or women’s health nurse practitioner than with other providers. Whether you feel like you are in need of a check up, have a concern, or are interested in preventative planning, simply give us a call. All of us in the GYN healthcare community would look forward to being part of your good health. Here at The Woman’s Clinic, you schedule the appointment and leave the rest up to us, we’ll see you promptly, visit with you in a relaxed atmosphere, provide the care you need, and you’ll be glad you made the call. GT

Don’t be caught in our waiting room when you could be busy planning your special day! Your wedding will be the beginning of a new life. Start that new life in a healthy way with a yearly exam at The Woman’s Clinic of Tupelo. Nurse practitioner Lauren Waldrop will make you comfortable, answer your questions, or help you with any problems you are having. And because we practice gynecology only, you’re assured of a timely appointment. That means less time in our waiting room, and more time getting ready for your walk down the aisle!

Office Gynecology n Gynecologic Surgery n Periodic/Annual Exams n GYN Problem Visits n Contraception n Outpatient Surgery n Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Robert A. Kennedy, M.D., FACOG; Laura J. Crecelius, M.D., FACOG; Lauren Waldrop, FNP

www.womansclinicoftupelo.com 1512 Medical Park Circle, Tupelo, Mississippi 38804, 844-0867

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tupeloevents

juniorauxiliary charity ball

George and Rosemary Rutledge

Dave and Karen Irwin

Natalie, Joey, Frieda, and David Carlisle

Sue Jarvis, Becky Hershfelt, Ashley Armstrong, Dwight Mitchell

Lyle and Cindy Harris

Spring Bridal 2012

Harry and Christine Rayburn

Heather Walton, Vanessa Herndon, April Ernst

LeAnn and Greg Hill

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John and Missy Young


Marcus and Yvette Crump

Frances Johnson and Chad Kea

Ann Weir, Meachie Kahlstory, Cindy Sanders

Stephen Miles and Dr. Sonya Miles

Susie Miley and Ms. Vera Dukes

Pat Norman, Lindsey Beasley, and Frank Norman

Greg and Brandy Patterson

Jessica Kelly, Nancy Kelly, and Jane Orr

Keeley Corbett and Ty Hardin

Carrie Haadsma and Emily Nelson

Greater Tupelo Magazine Marty and Mimi Pettit

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tupeloevents

CDF Open House Buffy and Terrance Bolton

Lynn & Gary Beatles

Chauncey Godwin and Shane Hooper

Drew Robertson and Mike Maynard

Johnny Timmons and Joseph T. Geddie Jenny & David Irwin

Rickey Thompson and Nita Westbrook

Michelle Williamson and Tammy Wise

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Spring Bridal 2012

Sonny Holcomb and Brenda Bebout


Sheila Davis and Tonya Rogers

Carol Allen and Vickie Moore

Michael Martin and Kurt Brummett

Beth Burnett and Bill McNutt

Ron Roof and Mitch Waycaster

Donna Rumbarger and Karen Geddie

Billy Joe Holland and Phil Morgan

Craig Helmuth and Tammy Rodgers

Laura Fisher and Bryce Weaver

Zell Long and Grant Meyer

John Byers, James Williams, and Josh West

Greater Tupelo Magazine

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tupelocelebration

KD Christmas tea Northeast Mississippi Kappa Delta Alumnae Association

Some of the collegiate members in attendance that day from Ole Miss, MSU and Birmingham Southern were Caroline Stroud of New Albany, and Allye Neuhaus, Molly Johnson, Lauren Dickey and Chole Weibel of Tupelo.

Three generations of KDs, Julianne Goodwin, Annie Goodwin and Julie Battaile. Annie is a senior at Mississippi State University.

Mother and daughter, Joy and Molly Johnson of Tupelo. Molly attends Birmingham Southern.

Front row: Stacy Deas; Allye Neuhaus, Lauren Dickey, Shannon Ray, second row: Trentice Imbler, Lee McKenzie, Frances Braasfield, Julie Battaile, Frances Williams, Marsha Tapscott, and back row: Annie Goodwin, Chloe Weibel, Lindsey Beasley, Ginger Mark, Julianne Goodwin, Carolyn Livingston, Martha Dale, Billye Jean Stroud, Caroline Stroud, Joy Johnson and Molly Johnson.

Hostesses for the event were Trentice Imbler, Marsha Tapscott and Julianne Goodwin.

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Spring Bridal 2012


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Spring Bridal 2012


tupelogarden

Plant Shopping Tips By Lelia Scott Kelly, Ph.D

M

arden centers and nurseries are full of plants right now. And hopefully, tthe weather is settling down a bit after the recent storms. It is time to get out and purchase some new plants for your yard and garden. With that in mind, here are some plant shopping tips to assist with your selections.

Smart Shopping for Annuals

These are purchased for fast growing, long lasting flowers or foliage. It is important to select healthy plants that have bushy growth that fills the pot. Foliage should be an even green color without obvious disease spots or insect damage. Even though it is tempting to purchase a plant in flower, in many cases, this should be avoided. A plant in flower, in some cases, has been fed a high nitrogen fertilizer to spur rapid growth and development—this can result in a plant that is a heavy feeder. When these plants are transplanted into the garden and their high-maintenance diet is not maintained they can quickly lose vigor. Look for plants that are just beginning to flower or are in bud. Sometimes plants are flowering because they have been in the pot too long and are too mature and leggy. These should be avoided, or if purchases, should be cut back to encourage densely branched new growth. Examples of these are verbena, marigold, salvia, and celosia. Continue pinching these plants to get that bushy plant with many flowering stems. Annuals like petunia and impatiens rarely have to be pinched to get bushy growth.

Smart Shopping for Perennials These are purchased for their longevity in the garden and their season of attractiveness, whether that is foliage color or blooms. Since these plants will be residing in your garden for years to come, selection of well-rooted plants with a good rosette of healthy foliage is important. Most perennials will not be flowering in the pot so you should be familiar with the mature height, width, bloom color and other characteristics of the plant before you make your selection. Sometimes, this is all on the label, but it is a good idea to talk to the nurseryman or garden center help if you have questions about the performance or hardiness of these plants. You may ask their permission to pop the plant out of the pot to examine the roots, or ask them to do it for you. The roots should be a light tan or off white color and be plentiful, but not circling the root ball in a tight mat—this indicates the plant has been held to long in the pot and is pot bound. If you purchase a pot bound plant, before you plant, cut away the circling roots and tease the root ball apart to encourage growth of the new roots outward. GT

About the Author: Lelia Scott Kelly, Ph.D., writes Garden Tips weekly and is a Horticulture Specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. Her office is in the North Mississippi Research & Extension Center, Verona.

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Greater Tupelo Dining

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PIZZA • PASTA SANDWICHES SALADS DESSERTS The Lost Pizza Co. 1203 North Gloster Street, Suite J Tupelo, MS 38804 662-841-7887 Open: Monday-Sunday 11 am - 9 pm Friday and Saturday 11 am - 9 pm

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It’s Good to Know. Cover to cover, the Cancer Center at North Mississippi Medical Center is providing advanced, comprehensive care to patients throughout the region. When people read up on the national accreditations, top rankings, and leading treatments offered at the Cancer Center, they are glad to know that breakthroughs are right around the corner. North Mississippi Medical Center. It’s good to know.

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Greater Tupelo  

lifestyle magazine for Tupelo, Mississippi

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