Page 1


contents

closeups

F AREWELL , B ISTRO B ETHEM

18

history’s stories.: stafford county windows on the world

19

It’s all energy: igniting your joy

making it work ...andi mcconnell

20

Senior Care: i’ll do the remembering

21

wellness: the truth about high blood pressure emancipated patients: skepticism sports physicals

riverfront superhero ...mighty joe young

22

life in motion: cost of the fall renew: let food be your medicine

23

civility: mindful communication

24

art in the ‘burg: Elizabeth & ina Art Attack invades downtown

porch talk

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURg mYSTERY hOUSE

26

fxbg book fest is back!

.

27

5

9

31

4

2nd chance dog rescuers lisa roosa & jesse reeve

5

28

companions: fredSpca

5

casey shaw’s downtown designs

30

fredericksburg sketches

6

Improving the plot: library gardens in fxbg

7

On the trails:: our rappahannock canal

9

by Mary Lynn Powers

an extraordinary life.... edward russell

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

.8

thanks for the excellence

9

I have a friend: kindred spirits another day starlight vigil

...And more!

Poetryman: fall equinox

10

everything greens: an invitation

12

italy in the burg

13

season’s bounty: consider the cabbage

.3

farewell to fxbg restaurant icon

14

cooking with kyle: sicilian swordfish cocktail hour benefit

29

porchlight: celebrating grandparent day

15

sister act: agora downtown coffee shop

31

Rim Vining’s cancer journal

16-17

Calendar of events

31

Cover: “Flowers in a Vase” by Betsy Glassie

2

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Anyone who has lived in and around Fredericksburg knows there is a special charm to downtown. It is big enough that there is anonymity, but small enough that you always see someone you know. Even if you don’t see a familiar face, people are generally friendly and toss a greeting or smile your way. In my experience, there is always somewhere you are drawn to in a town, and calls you back time and again. Bistro Bethem has been that place for me for many years. It’s not hard to say exactly what is so special about

the “Bistro.” The staff for one is always attentive, but not overly so. The artwork is always fascinating, and shows the artistic heart of Fredericksburg. It is difficult to put a descriptor on how satisfying every meal was at Bistro. In case anyone caught the was in the last sentence, that is because Bistro Bethem has sold the business to another local chef. By the time you read this, the local fave will have a new name and owner. Many of us were shocked to hear

the news, but understood that running a great restaurant is a full time plus endeavor. Aby Bethem shared with me her perspective on moving forward. Their main intention is that she and Blake want to spend more time with their family. They have two young boys who many of us have watched grow into precious youngsters. This is an understandable priority. They will still run Vivify, the burger bar across the street. Aby said they will let the dust settle for a year or so before they address any new possibilities. Though knowing the Bethems, Vivify will soon take on a new personality. Hints at serving the free range chicken dish over the counter have already been hitting the rumor mill. Over the 14 years that the Bethems owned Bistro, many people have celebrated special occasions, holidays, weddings and graduations in the quaint eatery. We have watched key players go on to become teachers, nurses, and published writers. Aby and Blake looked

for the best and always pushed their employees to be the best at their job, as well as their futures. We all suffered the loss of Fredericksburg’s favorite bartender, Rob Grogan, who was a permanent fixture at the bar on Friday and Saturday nights for over ten years, and who passed away three years ago due to a rare cancer. Rob was one of the bigger than life characters that made Bistro a special spot. It was a close family affair at the Bistro. So, it is with fondness and many great memories that the Front Porch says farewell to an outstanding part of the community. To one who has supported the Front Porch over the years, you will be missed by many, and in many ways. We wish you the best of success, and look forward to seeing what is in store for the future! Mary Lynn was a server at Bistro many years ago & a frequent customer for 14 years

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

3


contents

closeups

F AREWELL , B ISTRO B ETHEM

18

history’s stories.: stafford county windows on the world

19

It’s all energy: igniting your joy

making it work ...andi mcconnell

20

Senior Care: i’ll do the remembering

21

wellness: the truth about high blood pressure emancipated patients: skepticism sports physicals

riverfront superhero ...mighty joe young

22

life in motion: cost of the fall renew: let food be your medicine

23

civility: mindful communication

24

art in the ‘burg: Elizabeth & ina Art Attack invades downtown

porch talk

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURg mYSTERY hOUSE

26

fxbg book fest is back!

.

27

5

9

31

4

2nd chance dog rescuers lisa roosa & jesse reeve

5

28

companions: fredSpca

5

casey shaw’s downtown designs

30

fredericksburg sketches

6

Improving the plot: library gardens in fxbg

7

On the trails:: our rappahannock canal

9

by Mary Lynn Powers

an extraordinary life.... edward russell

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

.8

thanks for the excellence

9

I have a friend: kindred spirits another day starlight vigil

...And more!

Poetryman: fall equinox

10

everything greens: an invitation

12

italy in the burg

13

season’s bounty: consider the cabbage

.3

farewell to fxbg restaurant icon

14

cooking with kyle: sicilian swordfish cocktail hour benefit

29

porchlight: celebrating grandparent day

15

sister act: agora downtown coffee shop

31

Rim Vining’s cancer journal

16-17

Calendar of events

31

Cover: “Flowers in a Vase” by Betsy Glassie

2

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Anyone who has lived in and around Fredericksburg knows there is a special charm to downtown. It is big enough that there is anonymity, but small enough that you always see someone you know. Even if you don’t see a familiar face, people are generally friendly and toss a greeting or smile your way. In my experience, there is always somewhere you are drawn to in a town, and calls you back time and again. Bistro Bethem has been that place for me for many years. It’s not hard to say exactly what is so special about

the “Bistro.” The staff for one is always attentive, but not overly so. The artwork is always fascinating, and shows the artistic heart of Fredericksburg. It is difficult to put a descriptor on how satisfying every meal was at Bistro. In case anyone caught the was in the last sentence, that is because Bistro Bethem has sold the business to another local chef. By the time you read this, the local fave will have a new name and owner. Many of us were shocked to hear

the news, but understood that running a great restaurant is a full time plus endeavor. Aby Bethem shared with me her perspective on moving forward. Their main intention is that she and Blake want to spend more time with their family. They have two young boys who many of us have watched grow into precious youngsters. This is an understandable priority. They will still run Vivify, the burger bar across the street. Aby said they will let the dust settle for a year or so before they address any new possibilities. Though knowing the Bethems, Vivify will soon take on a new personality. Hints at serving the free range chicken dish over the counter have already been hitting the rumor mill. Over the 14 years that the Bethems owned Bistro, many people have celebrated special occasions, holidays, weddings and graduations in the quaint eatery. We have watched key players go on to become teachers, nurses, and published writers. Aby and Blake looked

for the best and always pushed their employees to be the best at their job, as well as their futures. We all suffered the loss of Fredericksburg’s favorite bartender, Rob Grogan, who was a permanent fixture at the bar on Friday and Saturday nights for over ten years, and who passed away three years ago due to a rare cancer. Rob was one of the bigger than life characters that made Bistro a special spot. It was a close family affair at the Bistro. So, it is with fondness and many great memories that the Front Porch says farewell to an outstanding part of the community. To one who has supported the Front Porch over the years, you will be missed by many, and in many ways. We wish you the best of success, and look forward to seeing what is in store for the future! Mary Lynn was a server at Bistro many years ago & a frequent customer for 14 years

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

3


Ellen Smith Alden

ON THE PORCH

Candice Armstrong Ellen Smith Alden Susan Brown Collette Caprara Ashleigh Chevalier Barbara Deal Frank Fratoe Rich Gaudio Betsy Glassie Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch Jo Loving Patrick Neustatter Barbara Posey Scott Richards Casey Alan Shaw

A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Seth Casana Mike Costa Christina Ferber K. Jeanne Frazer Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Katie Hornung David C. Kennedy Vanessa Moncure Bryn Pavek M.L. Powers Suzanne Scherr Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder

Christine Thompson Rm Vining Tina Will Norma Woodward

Dawn Whitmore Kathyrn Willis

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Casey Shaw

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists

September 2017

Downtown Designs

hidden treasures There are many things we love about Fredericksburg. We are a lovely community with so much to celebrate and enjoy. By far, beyond the architecture, restaurants, history, are the people. But, if I had to pick one thing I love the most, it would be the playgrounds. Our children have so many choices of outdoor spaces to play. If we are feeling riparian, we choose Old Mill Park with its giant open field for kites or bubble blowing, and of course soccer. It can be crowded sometimes, but there are bathrooms, lots of parking, picnic space and it is a beautiful park. Since becoming grandparents, we have had the opportunity to visit and try out the playgrounds all around. We have ventured into the counties which have some very nice parks, but when picking a favorite, our granddaughter has one in particular and we couldn’t agree more. She calls it “her” playground – the Kenmore Park Playground on Washington Avenue. On any given visit with my granddaughter, you will find us skipping along the shadow dappled brick sidewalk to find “her” brick. Of course, it is not actually hers but some other fortunate grandparents bought one in the name of their granddaughter who just happens to have the same first and middle names of our granddaughter. As the years have gone on, our girl has learned to recognize her name, and so each visit begins and ends with this happy ritual. In the shade of tall pines, we have enjoyed everything from her first visit in the baby swings, to our current ones featuring a cacophony of percussion on the musical play instruments. I remember her first visit after she could walk and she was very skeptical of pine cones. Her tiny hands gingerly feeling the spiny fronds. Now, she delights in gathering them for her imaginary forts and castles.

Even on the hottest of days, the shady benches offer a comfortable rest for this grandma, but you will rarely find me on the bench. I’m way too much of a big kid myself, so you will find me climbing up to the twisty slide, and playing pilot in the imaginary cockpit. Recently, our girl has started to explore the big kids section, squealing in delight as I manually teeter totter her into the sky. And soon, I know she will explore beyond, as her own mother did, up the “mountain,” and cliff behind the monument for George’s mother. She even knows a little about George now! Even if I don’t have our granddaughter with me, I will sometimes take a book, a towel or blanket and find a spot to just sit and enjoy this park. I’ll watch tennis players, hand ball players, and teenagers enjoy the park. I must admit it is very nice to see teens have a safe outdoor space to play – instead of in front of a screen. In thinking of the future, I eagerly anticipate this continuing to be the spot we begin our Fredericksburg adventures in learning. Soon, we will venture up the avenue and learn and reflect at the statue commemorating the Statute of Religious Freedom. We will learn about architecture, and Martha, and Hugh. We will run our hands on the craggy bricks at Kenmore and then return to our shady park for a snack and more hours of sliding and swinging and pine cone collecting. Our little rituals that begin at Kenmore have of late, ended in the most indulgent of grandparent activities. “Where will we go next Gigi?” my little cherub will ask. “Paul’s? Duck Donuts? Sugar Shack? Or Carl’s?” It all depends on the date and time, but we are so happy to have all the choices.

messages

and the column by Casey Alan Shaw is always a treat. Can’t wait for the next issue.

Thanks so much for a great publication and platform for our community!

Pete Morelewicz

Margaret Kertess

I love Front Porch -- I have read it cover to cover every month for a decade now.

Great looking issue, Virginia. The cover art is striking (August issue)

Bill Freehling, Director, Fredericksburg Economic Development and Tourism

Front porch fredericksburg

Fairy Godmother Andi McConnell

By A.E.Bayne Casey Shaw was always the kid at the back of the room drawing caricatures of his teacher. Cartooning was his passion, and he put that passion to purpose during his four years at the University of North

BY Ellen Smith Alden

“Rappahanock Evening”

“Just don’t tell mommy, I whisper.” “But, we can bring her a donut!” is my smiley girl responds. Of course, I know my daughter would prefer a slushie. As I reflect on the years visiting this park, I also recall bringing my own daughter to this hidden treasure and the hours spent in quiet observation of her growth, I find myself enjoying it even more watching her daughter grow up loving this idyllic spot in our little town. Back then, the after park always included Carl’s, but now we have even more choices! Enjoy the parks and playgrounds (and donuts!) we are lucky to have and enjoy this issue of Front Porch from cover to cover.

Ellen Smith Alden is a local resident for the past two decades. She is a teacher in Prince William County. Mother of one daughter and Grandmother of one grandaughter.

Dear Virginia; Fredericksburg Visiting Angels was inspired and thrilled at the article that I wrote for Front Porch Magazine that appeared in your May 2017 Issue. It looked so beautiful and tastefull. Thank you & the folks of Front Porch for the outstanding service to our Community. Paulette Johnson

Texas. Drawing the syndicated Benji cartoons during those years helped put him through school, and while other students were only dreaming about what they wanted to do when they graduated, Shaw was sharing his talent internationally through his work on the Benji project. After college, Shaw worked as an illustrator and designer. He took advantage of the advent of advanced computer technology and the Internet in the 1990s and taught himself webpage design. Shaw says, “Designing webpages was as much a way to share my cartoons in the early days as it was to actually build websites.” Shaw has worked with numerous national publications, most notably USA Today where he was the creative director for USA Weekend Magazine for nearly 20 years. The magazine was included in over 800 newspapers nationwide and rivaled Parade for the Sunday readers, including readers here in Fredericksburg through its local newspaper, The Free Lance-Star. Busy as he was with magazine design, Shaw says he missed working with other media. He says, “I hadn’t really painted since college. I had many magazine covers and posters that I had done, but I didn’t have any tangible work that I could hand down or give to someone.” For his fiftieth birthday, Shaw gave himself the gift of Bill Harris's painting class at LibertyTown Arts Workshop. He says, “At that time I was mainly working on portraits. I played around with different styles, including some folk art styles I like for their design aspect. I had always liked 1930s style travel posters, so those influenced the

Making It Work By Katie Hornung

Fredericksburg pieces I painted. I used the paintings to make prints and posters, and they’ve sold really well.” Shaw left USA Today in December 2014, and he’s been hustling ever since with work as a real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Elite, teaching Germanna classes through Community College, and sharing his work as a member through Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg. He’s also been working full-time for almost a year as a page designer for The Free Lance-Star. Shaw says leaving his work in Tysons Corners has freed up time for him to integrate with the arts community here in Fredericksburg. Gone are the long hours and late Friday nights in NOVA, both of which had caused him to miss First Fridays and other networking opportunities in the past. Shaw says Art First has been a great benefit in getting his name out into the community as a practicing artist. He says, “I've been at Art First since 2013. It’s been a good place to experiment with the portraits and design, and the reaction to the Fredericksburg posters has been the strongest in its potential to connect with people. I’m not under pressure like I might be in a more formal gallery where you have to adhere to a certain style. The only limitation I face now is having the time to do the work.” Shaw has a solo show coming up in November of 2017 at Art First. He plans to work in oils and possibly create more large pieces, which take the most time. He also wants to turn his attention to landscapes. He says he’s still in the planning phases for the show. Visit Casey Shaw online at caseyshaw.com . A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. This article was previously published in the spring edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (fredericksburgwriters.com) . NOTE: You can see Casey’s Fredericksburg Sketches each month in Front Porch, p.30

In the village of Webster, New York, which is currently dubbed one of the 50 safest places to live in the state, our resident Fairy Godmother Andrea “Andie” McConnell grew up, dreaming she’d one day leave to experience more of the world. It’s a common dream for many folks to have; however, to know Andie and her work with Fairy Godmother Project (FGP) is to understand that her dream became exceptional. As early as the age of 10, Andie was groomed for a strong worth ethic, setting goals and achieving them, and practicing empathy. She worked summers at her family’s Creative Themes Day Camp until the age of 22, where she said the focus needed to be on customer service and patience. Perhaps those qualities led her to a major in elementary education and English at State University of New York. Certainly, however, they gave her the foundation to build FGP from the ground up. Andie says, “I suppose the moment I decided to do something bigger to help pediatric cancer families was when the first mom I had met asked me to be her daughter’s fairy godmother. It made me pause and wonder if there was a need for support of these families, and it launched me into researching, surveying, and moving forward with my ideas. I still have the papers that I wrote notes on back in 2010 when I thought maybe I could make it work to help pediatric cancer families.” She has made it work; just ask the first family to receive all of FGP’s services. John and Leslie Leahy’s daughter, Ceili, fiercely fought cancer with Andie and FGP staff and volunteers by her side. Ceili passed away in 2016, and her parents and brother, John, are forever grateful for the gift of friendship, memories, and time Andie and the group provided them. Leslie and John, Sr. expressed their collective sentiment about Andie: “If the greatest of engineers from around the world were to get together and design the perfect person to lead FGP, the result would be Andie.” The role that she plays in FGP is never-ending, but it’s the way she wants it. Back in 2010, when her ex-husband was deployed in Afghanistan and she had three young children at home, Andie needed something bigger than herself to bring her a new perspective. Instead of wallowing in self-pity, she actively

searched and worked for validation that she was one of the lucky ones. In fact, her fortune in finding FGP extended to her children, who became some of her first volunteers: “They were in the car for many a meal delivery in those first few years, have represented FGP at events, become friends with some of the children, have grieved the losses of the kids they have known, and seen me face the sadness that comes with my job but also the joys.” Her twin girls also nominated Andie for the Allen and Allen Hometown Hero award this year, and she was selected as the recipient. Andie’s fundraising and outreach continues with projects like “Heart of Gold”, held on September 15th, the Stardust Ball- which is already sold out-, on September 22nd, and writing grants to gain further support for Fredericksburg’s families in need. Please visit FGP’s website, www.fairygodmotherproject.org, to learn about the needs of the non-for-profit group and their services. Also find out how you can participate in any of their events and make a difference in the lives of families living with the devastation of pediatric cancer.

Katie Hornung is a wife, mother, and high school teacher who counts Andie McConnell as one of her personal heroes.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

5


Ellen Smith Alden

ON THE PORCH

Candice Armstrong Ellen Smith Alden Susan Brown Collette Caprara Ashleigh Chevalier Barbara Deal Frank Fratoe Rich Gaudio Betsy Glassie Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch Jo Loving Patrick Neustatter Barbara Posey Scott Richards Casey Alan Shaw

A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Seth Casana Mike Costa Christina Ferber K. Jeanne Frazer Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Katie Hornung David C. Kennedy Vanessa Moncure Bryn Pavek M.L. Powers Suzanne Scherr Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder

Christine Thompson Rm Vining Tina Will Norma Woodward

Dawn Whitmore Kathyrn Willis

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Casey Shaw

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists

September 2017

Downtown Designs

hidden treasures There are many things we love about Fredericksburg. We are a lovely community with so much to celebrate and enjoy. By far, beyond the architecture, restaurants, history, are the people. But, if I had to pick one thing I love the most, it would be the playgrounds. Our children have so many choices of outdoor spaces to play. If we are feeling riparian, we choose Old Mill Park with its giant open field for kites or bubble blowing, and of course soccer. It can be crowded sometimes, but there are bathrooms, lots of parking, picnic space and it is a beautiful park. Since becoming grandparents, we have had the opportunity to visit and try out the playgrounds all around. We have ventured into the counties which have some very nice parks, but when picking a favorite, our granddaughter has one in particular and we couldn’t agree more. She calls it “her” playground – the Kenmore Park Playground on Washington Avenue. On any given visit with my granddaughter, you will find us skipping along the shadow dappled brick sidewalk to find “her” brick. Of course, it is not actually hers but some other fortunate grandparents bought one in the name of their granddaughter who just happens to have the same first and middle names of our granddaughter. As the years have gone on, our girl has learned to recognize her name, and so each visit begins and ends with this happy ritual. In the shade of tall pines, we have enjoyed everything from her first visit in the baby swings, to our current ones featuring a cacophony of percussion on the musical play instruments. I remember her first visit after she could walk and she was very skeptical of pine cones. Her tiny hands gingerly feeling the spiny fronds. Now, she delights in gathering them for her imaginary forts and castles.

Even on the hottest of days, the shady benches offer a comfortable rest for this grandma, but you will rarely find me on the bench. I’m way too much of a big kid myself, so you will find me climbing up to the twisty slide, and playing pilot in the imaginary cockpit. Recently, our girl has started to explore the big kids section, squealing in delight as I manually teeter totter her into the sky. And soon, I know she will explore beyond, as her own mother did, up the “mountain,” and cliff behind the monument for George’s mother. She even knows a little about George now! Even if I don’t have our granddaughter with me, I will sometimes take a book, a towel or blanket and find a spot to just sit and enjoy this park. I’ll watch tennis players, hand ball players, and teenagers enjoy the park. I must admit it is very nice to see teens have a safe outdoor space to play – instead of in front of a screen. In thinking of the future, I eagerly anticipate this continuing to be the spot we begin our Fredericksburg adventures in learning. Soon, we will venture up the avenue and learn and reflect at the statue commemorating the Statute of Religious Freedom. We will learn about architecture, and Martha, and Hugh. We will run our hands on the craggy bricks at Kenmore and then return to our shady park for a snack and more hours of sliding and swinging and pine cone collecting. Our little rituals that begin at Kenmore have of late, ended in the most indulgent of grandparent activities. “Where will we go next Gigi?” my little cherub will ask. “Paul’s? Duck Donuts? Sugar Shack? Or Carl’s?” It all depends on the date and time, but we are so happy to have all the choices.

messages

and the column by Casey Alan Shaw is always a treat. Can’t wait for the next issue.

Thanks so much for a great publication and platform for our community!

Pete Morelewicz

Margaret Kertess

I love Front Porch -- I have read it cover to cover every month for a decade now.

Great looking issue, Virginia. The cover art is striking (August issue)

Bill Freehling, Director, Fredericksburg Economic Development and Tourism

Front porch fredericksburg

Fairy Godmother Andi McConnell

By A.E.Bayne Casey Shaw was always the kid at the back of the room drawing caricatures of his teacher. Cartooning was his passion, and he put that passion to purpose during his four years at the University of North

BY Ellen Smith Alden

“Rappahanock Evening”

“Just don’t tell mommy, I whisper.” “But, we can bring her a donut!” is my smiley girl responds. Of course, I know my daughter would prefer a slushie. As I reflect on the years visiting this park, I also recall bringing my own daughter to this hidden treasure and the hours spent in quiet observation of her growth, I find myself enjoying it even more watching her daughter grow up loving this idyllic spot in our little town. Back then, the after park always included Carl’s, but now we have even more choices! Enjoy the parks and playgrounds (and donuts!) we are lucky to have and enjoy this issue of Front Porch from cover to cover.

Ellen Smith Alden is a local resident for the past two decades. She is a teacher in Prince William County. Mother of one daughter and Grandmother of one grandaughter.

Dear Virginia; Fredericksburg Visiting Angels was inspired and thrilled at the article that I wrote for Front Porch Magazine that appeared in your May 2017 Issue. It looked so beautiful and tastefull. Thank you & the folks of Front Porch for the outstanding service to our Community. Paulette Johnson

Texas. Drawing the syndicated Benji cartoons during those years helped put him through school, and while other students were only dreaming about what they wanted to do when they graduated, Shaw was sharing his talent internationally through his work on the Benji project. After college, Shaw worked as an illustrator and designer. He took advantage of the advent of advanced computer technology and the Internet in the 1990s and taught himself webpage design. Shaw says, “Designing webpages was as much a way to share my cartoons in the early days as it was to actually build websites.” Shaw has worked with numerous national publications, most notably USA Today where he was the creative director for USA Weekend Magazine for nearly 20 years. The magazine was included in over 800 newspapers nationwide and rivaled Parade for the Sunday readers, including readers here in Fredericksburg through its local newspaper, The Free Lance-Star. Busy as he was with magazine design, Shaw says he missed working with other media. He says, “I hadn’t really painted since college. I had many magazine covers and posters that I had done, but I didn’t have any tangible work that I could hand down or give to someone.” For his fiftieth birthday, Shaw gave himself the gift of Bill Harris's painting class at LibertyTown Arts Workshop. He says, “At that time I was mainly working on portraits. I played around with different styles, including some folk art styles I like for their design aspect. I had always liked 1930s style travel posters, so those influenced the

Making It Work By Katie Hornung

Fredericksburg pieces I painted. I used the paintings to make prints and posters, and they’ve sold really well.” Shaw left USA Today in December 2014, and he’s been hustling ever since with work as a real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Elite, teaching Germanna classes through Community College, and sharing his work as a member through Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg. He’s also been working full-time for almost a year as a page designer for The Free Lance-Star. Shaw says leaving his work in Tysons Corners has freed up time for him to integrate with the arts community here in Fredericksburg. Gone are the long hours and late Friday nights in NOVA, both of which had caused him to miss First Fridays and other networking opportunities in the past. Shaw says Art First has been a great benefit in getting his name out into the community as a practicing artist. He says, “I've been at Art First since 2013. It’s been a good place to experiment with the portraits and design, and the reaction to the Fredericksburg posters has been the strongest in its potential to connect with people. I’m not under pressure like I might be in a more formal gallery where you have to adhere to a certain style. The only limitation I face now is having the time to do the work.” Shaw has a solo show coming up in November of 2017 at Art First. He plans to work in oils and possibly create more large pieces, which take the most time. He also wants to turn his attention to landscapes. He says he’s still in the planning phases for the show. Visit Casey Shaw online at caseyshaw.com . A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. This article was previously published in the spring edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (fredericksburgwriters.com) . NOTE: You can see Casey’s Fredericksburg Sketches each month in Front Porch, p.30

In the village of Webster, New York, which is currently dubbed one of the 50 safest places to live in the state, our resident Fairy Godmother Andrea “Andie” McConnell grew up, dreaming she’d one day leave to experience more of the world. It’s a common dream for many folks to have; however, to know Andie and her work with Fairy Godmother Project (FGP) is to understand that her dream became exceptional. As early as the age of 10, Andie was groomed for a strong worth ethic, setting goals and achieving them, and practicing empathy. She worked summers at her family’s Creative Themes Day Camp until the age of 22, where she said the focus needed to be on customer service and patience. Perhaps those qualities led her to a major in elementary education and English at State University of New York. Certainly, however, they gave her the foundation to build FGP from the ground up. Andie says, “I suppose the moment I decided to do something bigger to help pediatric cancer families was when the first mom I had met asked me to be her daughter’s fairy godmother. It made me pause and wonder if there was a need for support of these families, and it launched me into researching, surveying, and moving forward with my ideas. I still have the papers that I wrote notes on back in 2010 when I thought maybe I could make it work to help pediatric cancer families.” She has made it work; just ask the first family to receive all of FGP’s services. John and Leslie Leahy’s daughter, Ceili, fiercely fought cancer with Andie and FGP staff and volunteers by her side. Ceili passed away in 2016, and her parents and brother, John, are forever grateful for the gift of friendship, memories, and time Andie and the group provided them. Leslie and John, Sr. expressed their collective sentiment about Andie: “If the greatest of engineers from around the world were to get together and design the perfect person to lead FGP, the result would be Andie.” The role that she plays in FGP is never-ending, but it’s the way she wants it. Back in 2010, when her ex-husband was deployed in Afghanistan and she had three young children at home, Andie needed something bigger than herself to bring her a new perspective. Instead of wallowing in self-pity, she actively

searched and worked for validation that she was one of the lucky ones. In fact, her fortune in finding FGP extended to her children, who became some of her first volunteers: “They were in the car for many a meal delivery in those first few years, have represented FGP at events, become friends with some of the children, have grieved the losses of the kids they have known, and seen me face the sadness that comes with my job but also the joys.” Her twin girls also nominated Andie for the Allen and Allen Hometown Hero award this year, and she was selected as the recipient. Andie’s fundraising and outreach continues with projects like “Heart of Gold”, held on September 15th, the Stardust Ball- which is already sold out-, on September 22nd, and writing grants to gain further support for Fredericksburg’s families in need. Please visit FGP’s website, www.fairygodmotherproject.org, to learn about the needs of the non-for-profit group and their services. Also find out how you can participate in any of their events and make a difference in the lives of families living with the devastation of pediatric cancer.

Katie Hornung is a wife, mother, and high school teacher who counts Andie McConnell as one of her personal heroes.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

5


Improving the Plot

On the Trails

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

Library Gardens in Fxbg

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room

By Tina Wills

An inspired idea and the caring heart of Martha Hutzel led to action: plant gardens at our libraries and donate the produce to local food banks. A few years ago Martha, Director of our Central Regional Rappahannock Library, sought permission from Spotsylvania and Stafford Counties to use some of the Library property to involve and educate the public by growing a vegetable garden. Porter, England Run, and Salem Church Branches now have gardens that are tended by either Master Gardeners, volunteers, or library staff What a great idea! For the Porter Branch, once permission was granted, Virginia Cooperative Extension Agent Guy Mussey approved the project giving members of our Master Gardener organization (MGACRA) the chance to help get this garden established, and also fulfill our primary goal: that of education. A teaching time at the garden once a month is open to library patrons and the public. Laura Collinsworth (of MGACRA) worked closely with Rhonda Belyea (above with SERVE Vounteers) to bring all the details together. MGs Susan Van de Putte and Phyllis Phillips supervised the installation this year (with the indispensable help of Al Phillips, who Phyllis’s husband, eliminated the ever present wire grass from the plot). Currently these MG’s are in charge of the teaching and discussions centering on the conditions in the garden, basic growth needs of the vegetables, and any observable insect or disease problems. Library patrons and neighbors come out on these teaching nights and help with gardening tasks. A Plant Clinic also hosted by Master Gardeners on the same night insures that all gardening questions can be addressed. No fewer than seven different organizations helped to bring the Porter

6

September 2017

Library Vegetable Garden to life. Eagle Scout, Jacob Phillips, built two raised beds, Stone and Mulch Center brought soil and mulch, a group of neighborhood Air Force men helped spread the soil, two Rotary clubs and Dr. Yvonne Villarreal (and her medical practice) donated funds, and Master Gardeners planted the garden. All the produce is donated to SERVE which distributes to the needy. At England Run Branch, Librarians Joy McIntire and Lee Criscuolo saw the potential for both beauty and education in small spaces and decided to establish a pollinator friendly flower garden in the grassy island adjacent to the drive-in book return lane. Master Gardeners were again invited to install and help tend it, so with the funds donated by Friends of the Library they purchased the soil, perennials, annuals, and mulch. Librarian Holly Schemmer had saved some Liatris spicata seeds which are providing lovely purple flowers that the bees and butterflies enjoy. A soil sample was sent to Virginia Tech for analysis which guided fertilizing choices. Now in its second year, both the flowers and pollinating insects are abundant. Master Gardener Pat Brown oversees the garden. You’ll see it as you return your books at England Run; it’s worth the trip! Additionally, Friends of the Library sponsored the establishment of a SERVE garden at this location that was also built as an Eagle Scout project. It has a lot of healthy looking tomato plants ready to set fruit! Salem Church Branch, in Spotsylvania, also has a terrific looking set of Square Foot Gardens behind its building. The brainchild of Research Assistant Leslie Duvall, the garden grew from its original 3 raised beds in 2014 to 17 beds and window boxes growing a variety of vegetables and flowers year round. These also are tended by staff and volunteers, and the produce is donated weekly to the Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank. It really is quite awesome to realize how many people are volunteering to tend these gardens and help the needy. Many more people than those mentioned here are a part of this effort, and all are doing it for the love of helping and for the love of gardening. VCE Master Gardeners run Plant Clinics throughout the growing season. Information about MGACRA is on our website: mgacra.org. VCE can be reached at 540-658-8000. Tina Wells is a Master Gardener photo by Tina Wells

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

our rappahannock canal By Kevin Brown

AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

371-4455

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Must Have for Fall! Black Faux Leather Drape Collar Jacket 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

#LightUpThePowerPlant

Friday, September 8, 8-10pm Light & Sound Display

Turtles and duck in Canal photo by Thanos Ntounis. Who hasn’t looked at our Rappahannock Canal and imagined it populated with boaters on a warm summer day? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could restore the canal to its original condition? Perhaps, but if too expensive to maintain as a traversable water corridor, the canal’s continued evolution as a wildlife habitat is undoubtedly beneficial. First, a brief recap of our Rappahannock Canal’s history. After planning was initiated in 1816, and many years of planning and construction, the Rappahannock Company-constructed canal was completed in 1849 at a cost of $3M in today’s dollars. Despite this lengthy and costly effort, however, transporting bulk loads of merchandise and raw materials via the Rappahannock canal system proved unable to compete with the burgeoning mid-1800s railroad industry. After 37 years of planning, 20 years of construction, and only four years of operation, the Rappahannock Company declared bankruptcy and ceased canal operations in 1853. Despite its failure to function as originally intended, the Rappahannock Canal was repurposed in 1855 by the Fredericksburg Water Power Company to provide hydroelectric power to nearby mills. Later, this same system provided electricity via the Virginia Electric and Power Company, after which it fed the city’s water treatment plant. Electrical power and water treatment were eventually replaced by other sources, and then the canal ceased to have a commercial use in 1999. In 2004, the

Embrey Dam’s demolition removed the canal’s primary water source. In an attempt to keep the canal viable, the Corps of Engineers installed a water pumping and aeration system, but this system has since fallen into disrepair. So without a commercial purpose, what should we do with our canal? A current Fredericksburg City Council priority is to “Explore solutions to monitor, maintain, and improve our canal to ensure that it is healthy and attractive.” Director of Public Works Dave King and his staff are working hard to achieve this goal. The broken pump system will soon be repaired and employed to once again draw water from the river into the canal. The inoperable aeration system is being evaluated for repair/replacement. The city is vigorously implementing a mosquito control plan, contracting for removal of fallen trees and debris, and coordinating with the Friends of the Rappahannock on volunteer trash removal. From an environmental perspective, the canal has become a superb habitat for wildlife appreciation and education. According to Daria Christian, Friends of the Rappahannock Education Director, “Our canal is an essential part of our FOR education program. Almost every day during the spring field trip season, our students hike along the Canal Path to the Snowden Wetlands, where they are exposed to the human impact on the environment (erosion, littering, pet waste, etc.). These issues are easily observed along the canal, and make for a good learning experience. Also, the length of canal directly behind the FOR office is a superb place to observe and learn about wildlife, especially turtles and ducks.” In summary, our Rappahannock Canal is still a work-in-progress. The city may conclude that it is too costprohibitive, given other priorities, to restore and maintain a canal that supports recreational boating. Nonetheless, our wildlife-laden canal can certainly be safe and visually appealing, and it will always be a nature-lover’s paradise in the heart of Fredericksburg. Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

7


Improving the Plot

On the Trails

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

Library Gardens in Fxbg

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room

By Tina Wills

An inspired idea and the caring heart of Martha Hutzel led to action: plant gardens at our libraries and donate the produce to local food banks. A few years ago Martha, Director of our Central Regional Rappahannock Library, sought permission from Spotsylvania and Stafford Counties to use some of the Library property to involve and educate the public by growing a vegetable garden. Porter, England Run, and Salem Church Branches now have gardens that are tended by either Master Gardeners, volunteers, or library staff What a great idea! For the Porter Branch, once permission was granted, Virginia Cooperative Extension Agent Guy Mussey approved the project giving members of our Master Gardener organization (MGACRA) the chance to help get this garden established, and also fulfill our primary goal: that of education. A teaching time at the garden once a month is open to library patrons and the public. Laura Collinsworth (of MGACRA) worked closely with Rhonda Belyea (above with SERVE Vounteers) to bring all the details together. MGs Susan Van de Putte and Phyllis Phillips supervised the installation this year (with the indispensable help of Al Phillips, who Phyllis’s husband, eliminated the ever present wire grass from the plot). Currently these MG’s are in charge of the teaching and discussions centering on the conditions in the garden, basic growth needs of the vegetables, and any observable insect or disease problems. Library patrons and neighbors come out on these teaching nights and help with gardening tasks. A Plant Clinic also hosted by Master Gardeners on the same night insures that all gardening questions can be addressed. No fewer than seven different organizations helped to bring the Porter

6

September 2017

Library Vegetable Garden to life. Eagle Scout, Jacob Phillips, built two raised beds, Stone and Mulch Center brought soil and mulch, a group of neighborhood Air Force men helped spread the soil, two Rotary clubs and Dr. Yvonne Villarreal (and her medical practice) donated funds, and Master Gardeners planted the garden. All the produce is donated to SERVE which distributes to the needy. At England Run Branch, Librarians Joy McIntire and Lee Criscuolo saw the potential for both beauty and education in small spaces and decided to establish a pollinator friendly flower garden in the grassy island adjacent to the drive-in book return lane. Master Gardeners were again invited to install and help tend it, so with the funds donated by Friends of the Library they purchased the soil, perennials, annuals, and mulch. Librarian Holly Schemmer had saved some Liatris spicata seeds which are providing lovely purple flowers that the bees and butterflies enjoy. A soil sample was sent to Virginia Tech for analysis which guided fertilizing choices. Now in its second year, both the flowers and pollinating insects are abundant. Master Gardener Pat Brown oversees the garden. You’ll see it as you return your books at England Run; it’s worth the trip! Additionally, Friends of the Library sponsored the establishment of a SERVE garden at this location that was also built as an Eagle Scout project. It has a lot of healthy looking tomato plants ready to set fruit! Salem Church Branch, in Spotsylvania, also has a terrific looking set of Square Foot Gardens behind its building. The brainchild of Research Assistant Leslie Duvall, the garden grew from its original 3 raised beds in 2014 to 17 beds and window boxes growing a variety of vegetables and flowers year round. These also are tended by staff and volunteers, and the produce is donated weekly to the Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank. It really is quite awesome to realize how many people are volunteering to tend these gardens and help the needy. Many more people than those mentioned here are a part of this effort, and all are doing it for the love of helping and for the love of gardening. VCE Master Gardeners run Plant Clinics throughout the growing season. Information about MGACRA is on our website: mgacra.org. VCE can be reached at 540-658-8000. Tina Wells is a Master Gardener photo by Tina Wells

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

our rappahannock canal By Kevin Brown

AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

371-4455

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Must Have for Fall! Black Faux Leather Drape Collar Jacket 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

#LightUpThePowerPlant

Friday, September 8, 8-10pm Light & Sound Display

Turtles and duck in Canal photo by Thanos Ntounis. Who hasn’t looked at our Rappahannock Canal and imagined it populated with boaters on a warm summer day? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could restore the canal to its original condition? Perhaps, but if too expensive to maintain as a traversable water corridor, the canal’s continued evolution as a wildlife habitat is undoubtedly beneficial. First, a brief recap of our Rappahannock Canal’s history. After planning was initiated in 1816, and many years of planning and construction, the Rappahannock Company-constructed canal was completed in 1849 at a cost of $3M in today’s dollars. Despite this lengthy and costly effort, however, transporting bulk loads of merchandise and raw materials via the Rappahannock canal system proved unable to compete with the burgeoning mid-1800s railroad industry. After 37 years of planning, 20 years of construction, and only four years of operation, the Rappahannock Company declared bankruptcy and ceased canal operations in 1853. Despite its failure to function as originally intended, the Rappahannock Canal was repurposed in 1855 by the Fredericksburg Water Power Company to provide hydroelectric power to nearby mills. Later, this same system provided electricity via the Virginia Electric and Power Company, after which it fed the city’s water treatment plant. Electrical power and water treatment were eventually replaced by other sources, and then the canal ceased to have a commercial use in 1999. In 2004, the

Embrey Dam’s demolition removed the canal’s primary water source. In an attempt to keep the canal viable, the Corps of Engineers installed a water pumping and aeration system, but this system has since fallen into disrepair. So without a commercial purpose, what should we do with our canal? A current Fredericksburg City Council priority is to “Explore solutions to monitor, maintain, and improve our canal to ensure that it is healthy and attractive.” Director of Public Works Dave King and his staff are working hard to achieve this goal. The broken pump system will soon be repaired and employed to once again draw water from the river into the canal. The inoperable aeration system is being evaluated for repair/replacement. The city is vigorously implementing a mosquito control plan, contracting for removal of fallen trees and debris, and coordinating with the Friends of the Rappahannock on volunteer trash removal. From an environmental perspective, the canal has become a superb habitat for wildlife appreciation and education. According to Daria Christian, Friends of the Rappahannock Education Director, “Our canal is an essential part of our FOR education program. Almost every day during the spring field trip season, our students hike along the Canal Path to the Snowden Wetlands, where they are exposed to the human impact on the environment (erosion, littering, pet waste, etc.). These issues are easily observed along the canal, and make for a good learning experience. Also, the length of canal directly behind the FOR office is a superb place to observe and learn about wildlife, especially turtles and ducks.” In summary, our Rappahannock Canal is still a work-in-progress. The city may conclude that it is too costprohibitive, given other priorities, to restore and maintain a canal that supports recreational boating. Nonetheless, our wildlife-laden canal can certainly be safe and visually appealing, and it will always be a nature-lover’s paradise in the heart of Fredericksburg. Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

7


“I Have A Friend” Kindred Spirits By Laurie Black

By definition, a kindred spirit is that special someone in your life who shares your interests, who has similar thoughts and feelings on most subjects, and who just accepts you for who you are. Senior Visitors Volunteer, Kara Rockwell, and her senior, Nellie, most definitely consider themselves kindred spirits. In 2012, Kara was looking for a volunteer activity when she saw a letter to the editor about the Senior Visitors Program. Kara enjoyed working with seniors and thought the program sounded very rewarding - so she applied and got started. During the first two years, Kara visited two different seniors and she enjoyed them both. However, when they were no longer able to continue with the program, Kara was matched with Nellie. They have been together now for three years. Kara says, "From the beginning, we just clicked. Teresa [Senior Visitors Program Director, Teresa Bowers] does such a great job matching volunteers and seniors." Nellie agrees wholeheartedly, "We enjoy each other very much. We are like sisters. We have loads of fun together!"

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

September 2017

A typical weekly visit for Kara and Nellie includes eating lunch out and then "chatting about anything and everything under the sun." "We have great conversations," Kara declares. "We talk about our cats, the news, what's on television, and books. We both love books!" Kara works for the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, so she regularly brings Nellie books to try. "That's part of what I do at work; I recommend books to readers. So, I find books I think Nellie would enjoy and bring them to her," Kara explains. Nellie laughs, "Oh, she brings me the best books! I read every evening for a couple of hours. I just got a new book from Kara and I can't put it down! I've been reading it all day!" Nellie and Kara's friendliness and cheerfulness are contagious. Twice while they have been out laughing and talking over lunch, anonymous strangers have paid for their lunch. How wonderful to live in a community where we can inspire each other to be kind and generous. When asked how they feel about the Senior Visitors Program, Nellie and Kara both had quick responses. "I love it!" exclaimed Nellie. Kara replies, "I tell Nellie that technically it's volunteering in that I report my hours, but that I would visit with her anyway because we are good friends. I tell anyone looking for volunteer work, you should try Senior Visitors!" If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you would like to volunteer to visit a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Another Day: Starlight Vigil According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate for girls aged 15- 19 has doubled since 2007, and overall suicide rates have gone up 28% since 2000. This national trend has also touched our area, but fortunately Mental Health America of Fredericksburg’s (MHAF) Another Day Suicide Prevention Campaign is hoping to decrease those numbers. Along with their annual Walk for Suicide Prevention, to be held on Oct 21st, Another Day is creating an additional annual event to bring us together for a common cause: A Starlight Vigil. “This is a chance for our community to come together to not only remember those lives lost to suicide, but to build awareness and erase the stigma surrounding suicide,” says August Donahue, an organizer of the event. Another Day’s Starlight Vigil is free and open to the public, and will offer an opportunity to share space and candlelight to remember loved ones lost to suicide. The event will include music, light refreshments, a community speaker, and a candle lighting as a way to honor those lost. There will also be a Memory Wall available for anyone who would like to remember a loved one lost to suicide with pictures or words. “Our goal is to provide suicide prevention education to our community and schools,” says Rita Girard, Director of MHAF. “This event will help to raise awareness about suicide and helps to continue our mission.” The Starlight Vigil will be held at Hurkamp Park, at the corner of Prince Edward and William Streets, on Thursday, September 14th at 7 pm. For updates on the event and to register (which is encouraged, but not required), visit mhafred.org/starlightvigil17 “This is a chance for anyone affected by suicide to come together with compassion and hope as a way to build community and connection,” says Donahue, “because everyday is Another Day.” ~Contributed by Christina Ferber

- By Frank Fratoe

Mighty Joe Young

Fall Equinox

Riverfront SuperHero

THE POETRY MAN

(IN MEMORIUM : ROB GROGAN)

BY Kevin Brown

Here in early autumn before woodlands have turned color where foliage up from soil is again mounting skyward the wind has stroked boughs undulating with each other to improvise a cadence high through hills of sycamore gaurding against their loss when November comes around yet forenoon continues on however brief the sunlight as wind, shadow, and sound disappear within themselves and silence is vanquished in a single bluejay’s call. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

“Find the right people, and empower them to do the right thing.” ~City Manager Tim Baroody “In a few months as the Watershed Manager, Officer Young has energized his co-workers, area residents, and local organizations to preserve and maintain the Rappahannock River’s natural beauty. His enthusiasm and passion are discernible and I am eager to see what his future accomplishments will be.” ~Fredericksburg City Police Chief David Nye

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

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Meet our city’s “Riverfront Superhero”, Fredericksburg City Watershed Management Officer Joe Young! A veteran of the Fredericksburg Police Department, Officer Joe assumed his position this past May and “hit the ground running”. Empowered by City Manager Baroody and Fredericksburg Police Chief Nye who view the Falls of the Rappahannock and adjacent Ficklen Island as the “crown jewels” of Fredericksburg, and the “Face of Fredericksburg” to thousands of outdoor-loving first-time visitors. Officer Joe has remarkably spearheaded a complete rejuvenation of this precious 1.5-mile stretch of waterfront property extending from Old Mill Park to the Virginia Outdoor Center. Prior to Officer Joe’s arrival this summer, our city’s uptown riverfront unfortunately seemed like the “Wild West” to many law-abiding citizens and visitors. This heavily-visited parkland was regularly littered with graffiti and trash, and a haven for criminal activity. After Officer Joe was hired, he made it his first order of business to restore our city’s crown jewel, and like the proverbial “New Sheriff in Town”, he has subsequently demanded and successfully instilled a public attitude of riverfront law and order. First, Officer Joe set out to tackle a seemingly insurmountable problem, pervasive graffiti on hundreds of river side rocks. Coordinating with Public Works and Parks & Recreation, Officer Joe set out to do the impossible - a 100% river graffiti cleanup effort. And he succeeded! He led a team effort involving countless hours of hard physical labor, heavy equipment, and expensive eco-friendly graffiti removal products. Since the massive initial cleanup, Officer Joe and fellow police officers are now patrolling the shoreline every day of the week. Any new graffiti is

immediately noticed and dealt with, with perpetrators punished. Next, Officer Joe attacked the tremendous riverfront trash problem. As featured in a special report on Washington DC’s NBC 4 that gained nationwide attention, Officer Joe’s cleanup efforts include enlisting law-breakers who bend over forwards to assist this dedicated policeman in picking up trash along our riverbanks. Some of these folks become converts of conservation, returning voluntarily for continued cleanup efforts. Officer Joe’s engaging personality and mentoring mindset are at the heart of his success. He sets a firm example that is literally changing public hearts and minds, and establishing a crime-free culture dedicated to keeping our riverbank beautiful and litter free. While fanatically fighting graffiti and litter, Officer Joe and his fellow police officers have also cracked down on riverside alcohol/drug use and after-hours trespassing. Foot patrols along the river have been greatly expanded, driving out the criminals who carelessly ruin the atmosphere for the general public. A noticeable decrease in illegal activity is evidence that word is getting out on the street that our Fredericksburg “Uptown Riverfront Park” is a beautiful place to visit, and no longer a haven for senseless law-breakers. Officer Joe is not satisfied in just polishing and preserving our city’s crown jewel. He’s full of ideas and energy to further improve our riverfront views, access, safety, and more. So stay tuned for the continued adventures of Officer Joe Young, our Fredericksburg City “Riverfront Superhero”! Kevin Brown is the administrator of the ""FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group,

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

9


“I Have A Friend” Kindred Spirits By Laurie Black

By definition, a kindred spirit is that special someone in your life who shares your interests, who has similar thoughts and feelings on most subjects, and who just accepts you for who you are. Senior Visitors Volunteer, Kara Rockwell, and her senior, Nellie, most definitely consider themselves kindred spirits. In 2012, Kara was looking for a volunteer activity when she saw a letter to the editor about the Senior Visitors Program. Kara enjoyed working with seniors and thought the program sounded very rewarding - so she applied and got started. During the first two years, Kara visited two different seniors and she enjoyed them both. However, when they were no longer able to continue with the program, Kara was matched with Nellie. They have been together now for three years. Kara says, "From the beginning, we just clicked. Teresa [Senior Visitors Program Director, Teresa Bowers] does such a great job matching volunteers and seniors." Nellie agrees wholeheartedly, "We enjoy each other very much. We are like sisters. We have loads of fun together!"

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

September 2017

A typical weekly visit for Kara and Nellie includes eating lunch out and then "chatting about anything and everything under the sun." "We have great conversations," Kara declares. "We talk about our cats, the news, what's on television, and books. We both love books!" Kara works for the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, so she regularly brings Nellie books to try. "That's part of what I do at work; I recommend books to readers. So, I find books I think Nellie would enjoy and bring them to her," Kara explains. Nellie laughs, "Oh, she brings me the best books! I read every evening for a couple of hours. I just got a new book from Kara and I can't put it down! I've been reading it all day!" Nellie and Kara's friendliness and cheerfulness are contagious. Twice while they have been out laughing and talking over lunch, anonymous strangers have paid for their lunch. How wonderful to live in a community where we can inspire each other to be kind and generous. When asked how they feel about the Senior Visitors Program, Nellie and Kara both had quick responses. "I love it!" exclaimed Nellie. Kara replies, "I tell Nellie that technically it's volunteering in that I report my hours, but that I would visit with her anyway because we are good friends. I tell anyone looking for volunteer work, you should try Senior Visitors!" If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you would like to volunteer to visit a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Another Day: Starlight Vigil According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate for girls aged 15- 19 has doubled since 2007, and overall suicide rates have gone up 28% since 2000. This national trend has also touched our area, but fortunately Mental Health America of Fredericksburg’s (MHAF) Another Day Suicide Prevention Campaign is hoping to decrease those numbers. Along with their annual Walk for Suicide Prevention, to be held on Oct 21st, Another Day is creating an additional annual event to bring us together for a common cause: A Starlight Vigil. “This is a chance for our community to come together to not only remember those lives lost to suicide, but to build awareness and erase the stigma surrounding suicide,” says August Donahue, an organizer of the event. Another Day’s Starlight Vigil is free and open to the public, and will offer an opportunity to share space and candlelight to remember loved ones lost to suicide. The event will include music, light refreshments, a community speaker, and a candle lighting as a way to honor those lost. There will also be a Memory Wall available for anyone who would like to remember a loved one lost to suicide with pictures or words. “Our goal is to provide suicide prevention education to our community and schools,” says Rita Girard, Director of MHAF. “This event will help to raise awareness about suicide and helps to continue our mission.” The Starlight Vigil will be held at Hurkamp Park, at the corner of Prince Edward and William Streets, on Thursday, September 14th at 7 pm. For updates on the event and to register (which is encouraged, but not required), visit mhafred.org/starlightvigil17 “This is a chance for anyone affected by suicide to come together with compassion and hope as a way to build community and connection,” says Donahue, “because everyday is Another Day.” ~Contributed by Christina Ferber

- By Frank Fratoe

Mighty Joe Young

Fall Equinox

Riverfront SuperHero

THE POETRY MAN

(IN MEMORIUM : ROB GROGAN)

BY Kevin Brown

Here in early autumn before woodlands have turned color where foliage up from soil is again mounting skyward the wind has stroked boughs undulating with each other to improvise a cadence high through hills of sycamore gaurding against their loss when November comes around yet forenoon continues on however brief the sunlight as wind, shadow, and sound disappear within themselves and silence is vanquished in a single bluejay’s call. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

“Find the right people, and empower them to do the right thing.” ~City Manager Tim Baroody “In a few months as the Watershed Manager, Officer Young has energized his co-workers, area residents, and local organizations to preserve and maintain the Rappahannock River’s natural beauty. His enthusiasm and passion are discernible and I am eager to see what his future accomplishments will be.” ~Fredericksburg City Police Chief David Nye

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

Meet our city’s “Riverfront Superhero”, Fredericksburg City Watershed Management Officer Joe Young! A veteran of the Fredericksburg Police Department, Officer Joe assumed his position this past May and “hit the ground running”. Empowered by City Manager Baroody and Fredericksburg Police Chief Nye who view the Falls of the Rappahannock and adjacent Ficklen Island as the “crown jewels” of Fredericksburg, and the “Face of Fredericksburg” to thousands of outdoor-loving first-time visitors. Officer Joe has remarkably spearheaded a complete rejuvenation of this precious 1.5-mile stretch of waterfront property extending from Old Mill Park to the Virginia Outdoor Center. Prior to Officer Joe’s arrival this summer, our city’s uptown riverfront unfortunately seemed like the “Wild West” to many law-abiding citizens and visitors. This heavily-visited parkland was regularly littered with graffiti and trash, and a haven for criminal activity. After Officer Joe was hired, he made it his first order of business to restore our city’s crown jewel, and like the proverbial “New Sheriff in Town”, he has subsequently demanded and successfully instilled a public attitude of riverfront law and order. First, Officer Joe set out to tackle a seemingly insurmountable problem, pervasive graffiti on hundreds of river side rocks. Coordinating with Public Works and Parks & Recreation, Officer Joe set out to do the impossible - a 100% river graffiti cleanup effort. And he succeeded! He led a team effort involving countless hours of hard physical labor, heavy equipment, and expensive eco-friendly graffiti removal products. Since the massive initial cleanup, Officer Joe and fellow police officers are now patrolling the shoreline every day of the week. Any new graffiti is

immediately noticed and dealt with, with perpetrators punished. Next, Officer Joe attacked the tremendous riverfront trash problem. As featured in a special report on Washington DC’s NBC 4 that gained nationwide attention, Officer Joe’s cleanup efforts include enlisting law-breakers who bend over forwards to assist this dedicated policeman in picking up trash along our riverbanks. Some of these folks become converts of conservation, returning voluntarily for continued cleanup efforts. Officer Joe’s engaging personality and mentoring mindset are at the heart of his success. He sets a firm example that is literally changing public hearts and minds, and establishing a crime-free culture dedicated to keeping our riverbank beautiful and litter free. While fanatically fighting graffiti and litter, Officer Joe and his fellow police officers have also cracked down on riverside alcohol/drug use and after-hours trespassing. Foot patrols along the river have been greatly expanded, driving out the criminals who carelessly ruin the atmosphere for the general public. A noticeable decrease in illegal activity is evidence that word is getting out on the street that our Fredericksburg “Uptown Riverfront Park” is a beautiful place to visit, and no longer a haven for senseless law-breakers. Officer Joe is not satisfied in just polishing and preserving our city’s crown jewel. He’s full of ideas and energy to further improve our riverfront views, access, safety, and more. So stay tuned for the continued adventures of Officer Joe Young, our Fredericksburg City “Riverfront Superhero”! Kevin Brown is the administrator of the ""FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group,

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

9


Everything Greens an informal/formal invitation

By mike costa

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

September 2017

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

There are a few holes that need to be punched in your card to claim your status to be a full fledged Fredericksburger. One you get by standing in line in front of Carl’s Ice Cream in February for the first soft serve cone of the year. Another you get by spinning on the stool at the Goolrick’s lunch counter Most certainly on the required list though is attendance at Downtown Green’s annual fall fundraiser, The Down Home Ball, which will be held this year on the evening of Saturday, October 14th. This 21 year old annual event is billed as an “Elegant Hoedown”. Dress is semiformal/agricultural. Think neckties and overalls for the gents, party dresses and farm boots for the ladies. Outlandishness is requested but not required; no one is turned away for being insufficiently eccentric. God knows we already have that in good supply. This year’s soiree (pronounced “swear E” for the miseducated) will be held in the glam rustic environs of the storage building and on the grounds of another Fred institution, Roxbury Mills, right here in town. She may be country but she cleans up well. Live music is always good and eclectic, and this year looks to be no exception, featuring the jazz stylings of Fred’s own, vibraphonist, Harry Wilson and his group, as well as the Fredericksburg debut of Infusion, an r&b and soul cover band out of the Richmond area. There might be dancing if you feel the urge. The hay bales will be moved so there will be plenty of room. Food is provided by a number of local establishments as well as by garden volunteers in the form of heavy hors d’oeuvres (thank you spell check). Beer and wine will be available for purchase, especially if for some reason the urge to dance does not come spontaneously. Craft beer selections will be provided by Spencer Devon Brewing. Kids can come, but farm animals this year can not - goats and nacho platters are just a bad combination, believe me. Singles are welcome too. You might just meet someone there - I can certify, by legal affidavit if you insist, that this very thing has happened in past years. In fact, I imagine that over the decades the Ball has been held, that amidst its gaiety , many a family feud has been ended and huge business deals have been closed with a handshake. Maybe even foreign intrigues have been advanced with the surreptitious slipping of of a coded matchbook cover into a side pocket and a

flashlight signal to a submarine, waiting partially submerged in the Rappahannock just off the city dock. But that’s my imagination… Um, tickets will be sold at the door, as well as ahead of time at Roxbury Mills, Riverby Books, and Libertytown, and if you don’t know where those places are located, you really need find out. Admission is advace purchase $30 per person.; $35 at the door. Tickets go fast.... What’s the reason for all this frivolity? Downtown Greens is a certified 501C-3 charitable entity, located on approximately 3 acres near the train station, maintained as an urban green space, whose focus is on environmental education. It hosts programs to teach children basic gardening skills, including the growing of vegetables which are then sold by the kids at the local farmer’s market. It’s hoped that the Ball will provide up to a quarter of the organization’s shoestring budget. They are also actively soliciting businesses and individuals interested in throwing a bit more into the pot and becoming sponsors of the event in exchange for an extra helping of good karma (and a likely tax deduction too). The director, Sarah P. will even probably give a “yee - ha” in your honor from the stage on the 14th. Contact her at 540-371-7315. I’ve been going to the Ball since its inception,about as long as I’ve been a resident here. Of course, over that span, I’ve seen the town change quite a bit in the enlarging direction, but at the Down Home Fred will forever be a small town to me, where you’ll always see people you know and who know you. And if this will be your first one, you can come back the next year and the place will be full of friends and familiar faces. Mike Costa is a Family Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtown Greens family.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

11


Everything Greens an informal/formal invitation

By mike costa

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

September 2017

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

There are a few holes that need to be punched in your card to claim your status to be a full fledged Fredericksburger. One you get by standing in line in front of Carl’s Ice Cream in February for the first soft serve cone of the year. Another you get by spinning on the stool at the Goolrick’s lunch counter Most certainly on the required list though is attendance at Downtown Green’s annual fall fundraiser, The Down Home Ball, which will be held this year on the evening of Saturday, October 14th. This 21 year old annual event is billed as an “Elegant Hoedown”. Dress is semiformal/agricultural. Think neckties and overalls for the gents, party dresses and farm boots for the ladies. Outlandishness is requested but not required; no one is turned away for being insufficiently eccentric. God knows we already have that in good supply. This year’s soiree (pronounced “swear E” for the miseducated) will be held in the glam rustic environs of the storage building and on the grounds of another Fred institution, Roxbury Mills, right here in town. She may be country but she cleans up well. Live music is always good and eclectic, and this year looks to be no exception, featuring the jazz stylings of Fred’s own, vibraphonist, Harry Wilson and his group, as well as the Fredericksburg debut of Infusion, an r&b and soul cover band out of the Richmond area. There might be dancing if you feel the urge. The hay bales will be moved so there will be plenty of room. Food is provided by a number of local establishments as well as by garden volunteers in the form of heavy hors d’oeuvres (thank you spell check). Beer and wine will be available for purchase, especially if for some reason the urge to dance does not come spontaneously. Craft beer selections will be provided by Spencer Devon Brewing. Kids can come, but farm animals this year can not - goats and nacho platters are just a bad combination, believe me. Singles are welcome too. You might just meet someone there - I can certify, by legal affidavit if you insist, that this very thing has happened in past years. In fact, I imagine that over the decades the Ball has been held, that amidst its gaiety , many a family feud has been ended and huge business deals have been closed with a handshake. Maybe even foreign intrigues have been advanced with the surreptitious slipping of of a coded matchbook cover into a side pocket and a

flashlight signal to a submarine, waiting partially submerged in the Rappahannock just off the city dock. But that’s my imagination… Um, tickets will be sold at the door, as well as ahead of time at Roxbury Mills, Riverby Books, and Libertytown, and if you don’t know where those places are located, you really need find out. Admission is advace purchase $30 per person.; $35 at the door. Tickets go fast.... What’s the reason for all this frivolity? Downtown Greens is a certified 501C-3 charitable entity, located on approximately 3 acres near the train station, maintained as an urban green space, whose focus is on environmental education. It hosts programs to teach children basic gardening skills, including the growing of vegetables which are then sold by the kids at the local farmer’s market. It’s hoped that the Ball will provide up to a quarter of the organization’s shoestring budget. They are also actively soliciting businesses and individuals interested in throwing a bit more into the pot and becoming sponsors of the event in exchange for an extra helping of good karma (and a likely tax deduction too). The director, Sarah P. will even probably give a “yee - ha” in your honor from the stage on the 14th. Contact her at 540-371-7315. I’ve been going to the Ball since its inception,about as long as I’ve been a resident here. Of course, over that span, I’ve seen the town change quite a bit in the enlarging direction, but at the Down Home Fred will forever be a small town to me, where you’ll always see people you know and who know you. And if this will be your first one, you can come back the next year and the place will be full of friends and familiar faces. Mike Costa is a Family Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtown Greens family.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

11


Italy in the ‘Burg este group offers fall events

Monday – Friday at 6 am Saturday – Sunday at 7 am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

12

September 2017

By Kathyrn Willis Locals with a love for Italy will have two events to satisfy that passion this month. First up is Pizza Palooza! On Saturday, September 16, 5-9 PM, local pizza vendors will dish up their tastiest slices to win your vote for Best Pizza. At $1 a slice, you can sample and feast, and then vote for your favorite. The evening also offers up great rock ‘n roll music, Italian wines, beer on tap from Adventure Brewery (both $5 a glass), and lots of other stuff. Bring your lawn chair, your appetite, your dancing shoes, and join in the fun. Admission is just $2. At evening’s end, the winner of Best Pizza, People’s Choice, and Cheese Champion will be announced. It’s a fundraiser for the Fredericksburg-E Este Association, the sister city aligned with Este, Italy (near Venice). The Fredericksburg Area Museum is cosponsoring the event by helping with planning and logistics, public relations and volunteers. Once again, co-sponsor B101.5 is supporting with promotions on its popular radio station.

Front porch fredericksburg

Este's medieval walls once protected the ancient city, and a few of the watchtowers still remain. Visual Love of Italy will be on full display at Orofino’s Restaurant with an opening on Sunday, September 24, from 5-7 PM. Photography by the Este Photo Club will be showcased in two formats. One opening will be a digital photography program, which will feature dozens of photographic images of Este and the Veneto region projected on Orofino’s big digital screen in its Wine Tasting room. A companion opening will be of twenty photos by four of Este’s most accomplished photographers, mounted on the restaurant’s walls. Those images will be on display at Orofino’s for a two-month show. Members of the Este Photo Club have received high honors for their work, have been published in numerous magazines, and have been included in important exhibits both in Italy and in Europe. You are invited to sample a taste of their fine arts photography in this show. Danilo and Alona Orofino are working with the Este group to create an opening that includes an array of Italian wines and Italian small bites. The evening’s gathering will take place throughout Orofino’s newly remodeled interior. Tickets to the opening are $25 for members; $35 for non-members. The Fredericksburg-Este Association, founded in 2015, focuses on all-things-Italian, and offers cultural programming, many of them free, throughout the year. In addition, personal friendships among members with our Este friends are nurtured by arts exchange programs and visits between the two cities by the members. It’s an all-volunteer, member-based non-profit organization. You can find out more, purchase tickets,

and join by visiting the website, www.fred-este.org. The Facebook page is: Fredericksburg-Este, Twinning. Grazie Mille! Kathryn Willis cheers for arts and culture from her Stafford screen porch.

Want to Go? Pizza Palooza! Saturday, September 16 5-9 PM Market Square

Visual Love of Italy Sunday, September 24 5-7pm Orofino Restaurant

About Fredericksburg-Este Sister Cities Fredericksburg was invited by representatives of Este, Italy, to explore creating a sister city relationship with Este, a town in northeast Italy about an hour west of Venice. As Este and Fredericksburg have much in common, several members of the Fredericksburg Sister City Association formed an exploratory committee to create a similar association with Este. In March of 2015, was the offical founding of the Fredericksburg-Este Association specializing in cultural, business, and special friendships with citizens from both countries.. For more info: www.fred-este.org

Season’s Bounty

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

consider the cabbage By vanessa moncure I must admit that, in my home garden, getting a cabbage to maturity just does not happen on a regular basis. Or even an irregular one. Hahaha, laugh the brassicas whisperers of the backyard garden. What's wrong with you? They just grow themselves! These round relatives of cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and Savoy cabbage, the smooth-leafed and multi-layered headed cabbage is a good source of Vitamins C and K and provides plenty of dietary fiber. Red cabbage is also familiar, and some varieties grow in a panorama from deep green to a goldengreen shade. Extremely versatile, cabbage can be eaten raw (as in slaws), steamed, sautéed, boiled, braised or pickled - and don't forget my fermented cabbage known as sauerkraut softly burbling away in a deep crock. Fermented cabbage dishes are eaten around the world - besides sauerkraut, probably the best known side dish is spicy Korean kimchi - Central Europeans ferment the whole sour head and pack it in barrels in the Fall to last through the winter months. So, okay, I know a lot of ways to cook cabbage, but I experience little but perversity in my quest for backyard cabbage. My seedlings fail to grow, small plants wither or rot in the ground, my plants flower without setting the head, my roots rot or the plants turn yellow before completely dying. Worse and worse, I believe all of the local cabbage cutworm, aphids, June beetles, stink bugs, cabbage maggots and webworms rush to our garden spot (hey, pssst, come on guys, no spraying here! Woo-hoo chow time!) as soon as it’s planted. We might harvest a few stunted heads - and I can see my grandmother now, sadly shaking her head while saying “well, they wouldn't win a prize at the county fair!” My grandfather's efforts produced grand basketball-sized orbs, growing so vigorously that they split their layers. No, I didn't inherit that cabbage-growing gene - so I must thank you, farmers of the Farmer’s Market!

TANGY COLE SLAW All of the vegetables in the brassicas family are known as cole crops (betcha never knew why this summer staple was called “cole”). To serve 10-12, quarter a medium-large cabbage, but don't remove the core. Hold on to that as you thinly slice lengths of cabbage, then discard the core (in your compost!). Shred two to three large peeled carrots and toss with cabbage. Place in serving bowl and make dressing - one cup mayonnaise, one-third cup each lemon juice and sugar, one teaspoon each dry mustard, garlic powder, salt and celery seed - and a few turns of the pepper grinder. Mix well and cover cabbage and carrot mixture - you can refrigerate for several hours, but don't toss until you're ready to serve. Some North Carolina slaw recipes substitute their vinegar-based BBQ sauce for the lemon juice. Tastes great and gives the slaw a great color! CABBAGE ROLLS Practically the national dish for several European countries, I learned a few shortcuts from a friend. Her family used to core giant cabbages, steam them in huge boiling pots, then peel them layer by layer to get the best leaves for filling and rolling. Now, she cores a large cabbage, puts about ½ cup water in the bottom of a large glass container, put the cabbage in and covers tightly with cling wrap. Microwave on HI about 10-12 minutes, check for doneness with a skewer and when ready, set aside to cool while making the filling. Mix one pound ground beef or turkey with one cup diced onions, 2 cups cooked long-grain rice, S&P and one-half can condensed tomato soup. Pull off all the cabbage leaves, setting aside the ones which can be stuffed and placing the others in the bottom of a baking dish along with one chopped medium onion. Roll the filling into the leaves, place in pan, tucking the open end on the bottom. Mix together one and one-half cans tomato soup with one fifteen ounce can chopped tomatoes in juice, S&P to taste, and pour

over rolls. Cover tightly and bake 350F 3545 minutes. Enjoy! And they’re even better the next day! BLAUKRAUT Great with bratwurst, pork chops or ham. In a large Dutch oven, melt two tablespoons butter with one tablespoon of sugar and saute slowly until golden brown. Stir in one cup each minced onion and peeled apple. Shred one head of red cabbage and toss together. Pour onequarter cup wine vinegar and mix together. Cover and braise slowly about ten minutes - the cabbage should be tender and a bright purple color. Add S&P to taste and one-quarter cup red currant jelly. Heat through and serve right away great with dumplings, too!

The Sunken Well Tavern

Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

www.oldetownebutcher.com

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Vanessa shares her fabulous recipes , with a bit of southern charm & wit, each month in FPF

Olde Towne BUTCHER 540.370.4105

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

13


Italy in the ‘Burg este group offers fall events

Monday – Friday at 6 am Saturday – Sunday at 7 am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

12

September 2017

By Kathyrn Willis Locals with a love for Italy will have two events to satisfy that passion this month. First up is Pizza Palooza! On Saturday, September 16, 5-9 PM, local pizza vendors will dish up their tastiest slices to win your vote for Best Pizza. At $1 a slice, you can sample and feast, and then vote for your favorite. The evening also offers up great rock ‘n roll music, Italian wines, beer on tap from Adventure Brewery (both $5 a glass), and lots of other stuff. Bring your lawn chair, your appetite, your dancing shoes, and join in the fun. Admission is just $2. At evening’s end, the winner of Best Pizza, People’s Choice, and Cheese Champion will be announced. It’s a fundraiser for the Fredericksburg-E Este Association, the sister city aligned with Este, Italy (near Venice). The Fredericksburg Area Museum is cosponsoring the event by helping with planning and logistics, public relations and volunteers. Once again, co-sponsor B101.5 is supporting with promotions on its popular radio station.

Front porch fredericksburg

Este's medieval walls once protected the ancient city, and a few of the watchtowers still remain. Visual Love of Italy will be on full display at Orofino’s Restaurant with an opening on Sunday, September 24, from 5-7 PM. Photography by the Este Photo Club will be showcased in two formats. One opening will be a digital photography program, which will feature dozens of photographic images of Este and the Veneto region projected on Orofino’s big digital screen in its Wine Tasting room. A companion opening will be of twenty photos by four of Este’s most accomplished photographers, mounted on the restaurant’s walls. Those images will be on display at Orofino’s for a two-month show. Members of the Este Photo Club have received high honors for their work, have been published in numerous magazines, and have been included in important exhibits both in Italy and in Europe. You are invited to sample a taste of their fine arts photography in this show. Danilo and Alona Orofino are working with the Este group to create an opening that includes an array of Italian wines and Italian small bites. The evening’s gathering will take place throughout Orofino’s newly remodeled interior. Tickets to the opening are $25 for members; $35 for non-members. The Fredericksburg-Este Association, founded in 2015, focuses on all-things-Italian, and offers cultural programming, many of them free, throughout the year. In addition, personal friendships among members with our Este friends are nurtured by arts exchange programs and visits between the two cities by the members. It’s an all-volunteer, member-based non-profit organization. You can find out more, purchase tickets,

and join by visiting the website, www.fred-este.org. The Facebook page is: Fredericksburg-Este, Twinning. Grazie Mille! Kathryn Willis cheers for arts and culture from her Stafford screen porch.

Want to Go? Pizza Palooza! Saturday, September 16 5-9 PM Market Square

Visual Love of Italy Sunday, September 24 5-7pm Orofino Restaurant

About Fredericksburg-Este Sister Cities Fredericksburg was invited by representatives of Este, Italy, to explore creating a sister city relationship with Este, a town in northeast Italy about an hour west of Venice. As Este and Fredericksburg have much in common, several members of the Fredericksburg Sister City Association formed an exploratory committee to create a similar association with Este. In March of 2015, was the offical founding of the Fredericksburg-Este Association specializing in cultural, business, and special friendships with citizens from both countries.. For more info: www.fred-este.org

Season’s Bounty

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

consider the cabbage By vanessa moncure I must admit that, in my home garden, getting a cabbage to maturity just does not happen on a regular basis. Or even an irregular one. Hahaha, laugh the brassicas whisperers of the backyard garden. What's wrong with you? They just grow themselves! These round relatives of cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and Savoy cabbage, the smooth-leafed and multi-layered headed cabbage is a good source of Vitamins C and K and provides plenty of dietary fiber. Red cabbage is also familiar, and some varieties grow in a panorama from deep green to a goldengreen shade. Extremely versatile, cabbage can be eaten raw (as in slaws), steamed, sautéed, boiled, braised or pickled - and don't forget my fermented cabbage known as sauerkraut softly burbling away in a deep crock. Fermented cabbage dishes are eaten around the world - besides sauerkraut, probably the best known side dish is spicy Korean kimchi - Central Europeans ferment the whole sour head and pack it in barrels in the Fall to last through the winter months. So, okay, I know a lot of ways to cook cabbage, but I experience little but perversity in my quest for backyard cabbage. My seedlings fail to grow, small plants wither or rot in the ground, my plants flower without setting the head, my roots rot or the plants turn yellow before completely dying. Worse and worse, I believe all of the local cabbage cutworm, aphids, June beetles, stink bugs, cabbage maggots and webworms rush to our garden spot (hey, pssst, come on guys, no spraying here! Woo-hoo chow time!) as soon as it’s planted. We might harvest a few stunted heads - and I can see my grandmother now, sadly shaking her head while saying “well, they wouldn't win a prize at the county fair!” My grandfather's efforts produced grand basketball-sized orbs, growing so vigorously that they split their layers. No, I didn't inherit that cabbage-growing gene - so I must thank you, farmers of the Farmer’s Market!

TANGY COLE SLAW All of the vegetables in the brassicas family are known as cole crops (betcha never knew why this summer staple was called “cole”). To serve 10-12, quarter a medium-large cabbage, but don't remove the core. Hold on to that as you thinly slice lengths of cabbage, then discard the core (in your compost!). Shred two to three large peeled carrots and toss with cabbage. Place in serving bowl and make dressing - one cup mayonnaise, one-third cup each lemon juice and sugar, one teaspoon each dry mustard, garlic powder, salt and celery seed - and a few turns of the pepper grinder. Mix well and cover cabbage and carrot mixture - you can refrigerate for several hours, but don't toss until you're ready to serve. Some North Carolina slaw recipes substitute their vinegar-based BBQ sauce for the lemon juice. Tastes great and gives the slaw a great color! CABBAGE ROLLS Practically the national dish for several European countries, I learned a few shortcuts from a friend. Her family used to core giant cabbages, steam them in huge boiling pots, then peel them layer by layer to get the best leaves for filling and rolling. Now, she cores a large cabbage, puts about ½ cup water in the bottom of a large glass container, put the cabbage in and covers tightly with cling wrap. Microwave on HI about 10-12 minutes, check for doneness with a skewer and when ready, set aside to cool while making the filling. Mix one pound ground beef or turkey with one cup diced onions, 2 cups cooked long-grain rice, S&P and one-half can condensed tomato soup. Pull off all the cabbage leaves, setting aside the ones which can be stuffed and placing the others in the bottom of a baking dish along with one chopped medium onion. Roll the filling into the leaves, place in pan, tucking the open end on the bottom. Mix together one and one-half cans tomato soup with one fifteen ounce can chopped tomatoes in juice, S&P to taste, and pour

over rolls. Cover tightly and bake 350F 3545 minutes. Enjoy! And they’re even better the next day! BLAUKRAUT Great with bratwurst, pork chops or ham. In a large Dutch oven, melt two tablespoons butter with one tablespoon of sugar and saute slowly until golden brown. Stir in one cup each minced onion and peeled apple. Shred one head of red cabbage and toss together. Pour onequarter cup wine vinegar and mix together. Cover and braise slowly about ten minutes - the cabbage should be tender and a bright purple color. Add S&P to taste and one-quarter cup red currant jelly. Heat through and serve right away great with dumplings, too!

The Sunken Well Tavern

Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

www.oldetownebutcher.com

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Vanessa shares her fabulous recipes , with a bit of southern charm & wit, each month in FPF

Olde Towne BUTCHER 540.370.4105

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

13


Cooking With Kyle

Cocktail Hour Benefit

Sister Act

Own a piece of fxbg history

Agora Downtown Coffee Shop

Sicilian swordfish over pasta

by james kyle snyder

It is September – where has 2017 gone? School begins again and this transitions the end of summer, but all things delicious have not perished. We can still enjoy the summer tastes until the first frost. Italian dishes conjure images of warmth, family, and security. Hearty pasta dishes are staples throughout the year, as is the vibrancy of combining simple garden ingredients with fresh fish to make a bright healthy meal. This time we are off to Sicily for an alfresco-inspired special meal to mark the end of summer – Sicilian swordfish over pasta. Swing by The Olde Towne butcher and say hi to Keith while you grab a steak – his shop is always fun! The garden is still producing this time of year and we have a bumper crop of basil! Much of this I will turn into pistachio pesto for portioning and freezing to use throughout the winter. This is the star of next month’s 20-minute meal article for the busy household. For August we are going to use the garden to make a simple pasta sauce and zucchini spaghetti. Start by preheating your grill or cast iron to medium high heat and set the swordfish filets out to warm. I have enjoyed my purple grape tomatoes all year, Cut into halves 1 cup of the tasty treats into a large skillet over medium heat in 2 TBS EVOO. Add 1 Tbs chopped garlic to the mix. Make a ten-leaf basil chiffonade (roll the basil tightly and cut the roll thinly to produce thin ribbons of basil). Add half to the sauce and save the rest for garnish. Cook the sauce for about 15 minutes. Our pasta is not going to be traditional. Spiralize a zucchini or two into spaghetti to add the necessary crunch to the meal. Simple. It will be added at the very end.

14

September 2017

While the sauce is reducing, prepare the fish by: washing it, patting it dry, lightly oil, dust with a pinch of salt and pepper on both sides and then a little lemon zest. Let this marinate. The sauce should be sticking a little to the bottom of the pan now and the tomatoes are reduced but still recognizable. Add ½ cup of white wine to the pan to deglaze all the incredible caramelization you have just created. Set the heat to medium, add the zucchini spaghetti and reduce again for 5 minutes. Time to throw the steaks on the heat! Swordfish can go from perfect to dry quickly. It needs to be cooked rapidly over very high heat. I prefer the cast iron because of the more predictable heat, I can watch it, it leaves great marks, and the burning of the flesh makes an earthier smoke flavor hard to duplicate without wood. A grill works well too if it can get hot enough, and of course, a broiler pan very close to the heat will produce great results but without the grill lines or flavor. Add ½ cup of white wine to the chef here, it’s almost dinnertime! 5-6 minutes per side is all you need for swordfish. Cook the steaks, flip, plate over the pasta, prick the surface of the fish with a fork to allow the sauce to enter, and cover with your al fresco sauce. The meal should be rested by the time you get it to the table. Raise a glass and enjoy this nofrills meal. Hanging onto the last flavors of summer is always a treat (like swordfish). But wait, there are still the fall garden items to enjoy so don’t rush out of the garden too quickly. Keep it simple, easy, and delicious. Be well! Kyle continues to bring us simple, healthy recipes each month edited by word czar jeanne fraser

Front porch fredericksburg

By a.e. bayne Since its inception, FoodE has been a restaurant with strong ties to local Fredericksburg. In 2016, partners Joy Crump, Beth Black and Jeremy Harrison moved FoodE into the historic National Bank Building with an eye toward preserving local history and further building community connections. When the opportunity arose to share a bit of Fredericksburg history with neighboring St. George’s Episcopal Church and the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg, FoodE’s partners were on it. Both churches run wellestablished food programs for the homeless and food insecure in Fredericksburg. St. George’s operates The Table, a market-style food pantry that is open on Tuesdays between 9:30 and 11:00 a.m., and 5:00 and 6:30 p.m.. Their neighbor, the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg, houses a food pantry in its basement that serves those in need on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.. Both programs are volunteer-based and accept monetary donations. Harrison, who is also FoodE's general manager, says, “When we were getting the bank renovated about a year and a half ago, we had the safety deposit boxes taken out of the vault from which we kept the plate numbers. We put some of them around the fireplace below Abraham Lincoln to bring a little bit of the vault into the main dining room, and we also had some of the number plates framed in the vault itself. Then we realized we had over a 100 of them left. We wanted to utilize them in some way, so we thought about the food pantries at our neighboring churches.” According to Harrison, the vault itself was put into the building in the early 1940s. He says, “Over the past year, we’ve had many people come into the bank and ask what we did with the numbered plates. There was a definite interest. When people found out that the boxes were going to become available to the public, they wanted a certain number, perhaps because that’s where their family’s money was. To be fair, we decided not to auction the plates off, but rather place them throughout the restaurant and offer them on a first come, first serve basis so that people would have the opportunity to look for their family’s number in the batch being sold.”

by Scott Richards

Plates will cost $100.00 each and all proceeds will be divided between St. George’s and the Presbyterian Church for their food pantries. Due to the interest from the public, Harrison hopes FoodE will sell out on the 25th. Harrison says, “It wasn’t difficult for Joy, Beth and I to figure out where these proceeds would go. Our neighbors have been so good to us, so the decision to have a benefit for them was easy. We are advocates for the homeless and anyone who is in need, so we thought all of the proceeds from the selling of these historical boxes from our vault should go to our neighbors. It was that simple for us.”

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Want to Go? FoodE Cocktail Hour Benefit for The Table and the Presbyterian Pantry Kitchen Monday, September 25, 2017 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

FoodE 900 Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Free to the public Cocktails and food for purchase $100 per safe deposit plate until they are gone

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm

A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. She publishes the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Book Festival.

Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Call it Sister Act, or more appropriately, All in the Family. Whatever you want to call it, Agora Downtown Coffee Shop at 520 Caroline Street is a coffee shop that carries a distinct atmosphere that sets it aside. Located in a building that was once a residence and is registered as a historic landmark, Agora welcomes customers to a warm, comfortable interior where the commuter can come in and grab a cup of joe for the road, or, for those who have the time to linger, there are several rooms set up so customers have a choice of a small meeting place or a more solitary setting to enjoy the many varieties of coffee and home made items offered. Agora is a small business with a big vision, developed from the pipe dreams of two sisters, MJ Stone and Andi Stone Chitters. Interestingly enough, both sisters will tell of how they did not get along to well growing up. Their relationship jelled in college as they began working on fulfilling both of their dreams. MJ, the older by two years, has an undergraduate degree in art and an MS in business and has longed dreamed of owning a coffee shop. Andi has a bachelor's degree in Food Science and has always wanted to open a bakery. At first they thought of having two businesses side by side, but merged their visions into one. While both were finishing their respective educations, they got together and hammered out a business plan which included the participation of the entire family. Their mother handles the financial end of things and their father is the maintenance man (and very busy they reported). Much of the charm of Agora rests in how they have preserved the residential persona of the building. Built in 1787, it has gone through several phases. In the 1800s, it was a blacksmith shop. The floors are original, with burn marks showing where the smithy practiced his trade. Around the interior are hanging art pieces in addition to shelves of books by local authors, all of which are for sale. Coming from a family of coffee drinkers, both sisters enjoy experimenting with different types of beverages, from non-coffee drinks to a variety of chais, and liquor based drinks. With a wide target market, many of the types of coffee and foods come from customers suggestions. MJ stated it was one of the personal touches they utilize in their marketing. "Customers get excited when they see a suggestion they made actually appear on the menu," said MJ. The use of liquor in some of their menu has been a unique concept for Agora. The Black Mamba Mocha, a dark chocolate mocha with Bowman's Caramel Creme Liquor, or The Naughty Chai, a chai

latte with Black Tattoo Rum, are just two of the many and varied liquor drinks offered. There are others that are more seasonal, such as The Sleigh Ride, which is a white chocolate mocha with Black Tattoo Rum, topped with whipped creme and homemade espresso syrup. In addition to coffee and tea drinks, Andi provides baked goods and sandwiches made fresh every morning. Macaroons are the favorites of many, and a blackboard gives customers an opportunity to suggest their favorite variety. In order to meet the need of the commuters, containers of different flavors of dry oatmeal are offered. Hot water can be added at the time of purchase, or it can be carried to work and hot water added there. Andi stated this is a popular item with a cup of coffee as a breakfast for the customer on the run in the morning. The variety of foods go from sweets to vegan. Chocolate chip or oatmeal cookies are right beside the Garden Sandwich, which is a refreshing combination of hummus, cucumber slices, mushrooms, spinach and artichoke hears, all on organic wheat bread. As their business has grown, so has the number of staff. Originally, with everything dependent on it being solely a family operation, MJ and Andi reportedly worked 120 hours per week. The addition of baristas and bakers have given them more of an opportunity to enjoy their customers and participate in the building of relationships with them, a hallmark of Agora's appeal. It should be noted that when hiring, they do not look for those with barista or baking experience, but individuals with a customer service skill set who are not afraid to display their passion for what they do. The result is happy customers as well as employees. Although construction on Caroline Street caused some inconvenience to patrons, the Agora Downtown Coffee Shop has continued to grow since its inception in 2015. With an idea of change to meet the customers' needs, there appears to be nothing but growth for them on the horizon.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

15


Cooking With Kyle

Cocktail Hour Benefit

Sister Act

Own a piece of fxbg history

Agora Downtown Coffee Shop

Sicilian swordfish over pasta

by james kyle snyder

It is September – where has 2017 gone? School begins again and this transitions the end of summer, but all things delicious have not perished. We can still enjoy the summer tastes until the first frost. Italian dishes conjure images of warmth, family, and security. Hearty pasta dishes are staples throughout the year, as is the vibrancy of combining simple garden ingredients with fresh fish to make a bright healthy meal. This time we are off to Sicily for an alfresco-inspired special meal to mark the end of summer – Sicilian swordfish over pasta. Swing by The Olde Towne butcher and say hi to Keith while you grab a steak – his shop is always fun! The garden is still producing this time of year and we have a bumper crop of basil! Much of this I will turn into pistachio pesto for portioning and freezing to use throughout the winter. This is the star of next month’s 20-minute meal article for the busy household. For August we are going to use the garden to make a simple pasta sauce and zucchini spaghetti. Start by preheating your grill or cast iron to medium high heat and set the swordfish filets out to warm. I have enjoyed my purple grape tomatoes all year, Cut into halves 1 cup of the tasty treats into a large skillet over medium heat in 2 TBS EVOO. Add 1 Tbs chopped garlic to the mix. Make a ten-leaf basil chiffonade (roll the basil tightly and cut the roll thinly to produce thin ribbons of basil). Add half to the sauce and save the rest for garnish. Cook the sauce for about 15 minutes. Our pasta is not going to be traditional. Spiralize a zucchini or two into spaghetti to add the necessary crunch to the meal. Simple. It will be added at the very end.

14

September 2017

While the sauce is reducing, prepare the fish by: washing it, patting it dry, lightly oil, dust with a pinch of salt and pepper on both sides and then a little lemon zest. Let this marinate. The sauce should be sticking a little to the bottom of the pan now and the tomatoes are reduced but still recognizable. Add ½ cup of white wine to the pan to deglaze all the incredible caramelization you have just created. Set the heat to medium, add the zucchini spaghetti and reduce again for 5 minutes. Time to throw the steaks on the heat! Swordfish can go from perfect to dry quickly. It needs to be cooked rapidly over very high heat. I prefer the cast iron because of the more predictable heat, I can watch it, it leaves great marks, and the burning of the flesh makes an earthier smoke flavor hard to duplicate without wood. A grill works well too if it can get hot enough, and of course, a broiler pan very close to the heat will produce great results but without the grill lines or flavor. Add ½ cup of white wine to the chef here, it’s almost dinnertime! 5-6 minutes per side is all you need for swordfish. Cook the steaks, flip, plate over the pasta, prick the surface of the fish with a fork to allow the sauce to enter, and cover with your al fresco sauce. The meal should be rested by the time you get it to the table. Raise a glass and enjoy this nofrills meal. Hanging onto the last flavors of summer is always a treat (like swordfish). But wait, there are still the fall garden items to enjoy so don’t rush out of the garden too quickly. Keep it simple, easy, and delicious. Be well! Kyle continues to bring us simple, healthy recipes each month edited by word czar jeanne fraser

Front porch fredericksburg

By a.e. bayne Since its inception, FoodE has been a restaurant with strong ties to local Fredericksburg. In 2016, partners Joy Crump, Beth Black and Jeremy Harrison moved FoodE into the historic National Bank Building with an eye toward preserving local history and further building community connections. When the opportunity arose to share a bit of Fredericksburg history with neighboring St. George’s Episcopal Church and the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg, FoodE’s partners were on it. Both churches run wellestablished food programs for the homeless and food insecure in Fredericksburg. St. George’s operates The Table, a market-style food pantry that is open on Tuesdays between 9:30 and 11:00 a.m., and 5:00 and 6:30 p.m.. Their neighbor, the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg, houses a food pantry in its basement that serves those in need on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.. Both programs are volunteer-based and accept monetary donations. Harrison, who is also FoodE's general manager, says, “When we were getting the bank renovated about a year and a half ago, we had the safety deposit boxes taken out of the vault from which we kept the plate numbers. We put some of them around the fireplace below Abraham Lincoln to bring a little bit of the vault into the main dining room, and we also had some of the number plates framed in the vault itself. Then we realized we had over a 100 of them left. We wanted to utilize them in some way, so we thought about the food pantries at our neighboring churches.” According to Harrison, the vault itself was put into the building in the early 1940s. He says, “Over the past year, we’ve had many people come into the bank and ask what we did with the numbered plates. There was a definite interest. When people found out that the boxes were going to become available to the public, they wanted a certain number, perhaps because that’s where their family’s money was. To be fair, we decided not to auction the plates off, but rather place them throughout the restaurant and offer them on a first come, first serve basis so that people would have the opportunity to look for their family’s number in the batch being sold.”

by Scott Richards

Plates will cost $100.00 each and all proceeds will be divided between St. George’s and the Presbyterian Church for their food pantries. Due to the interest from the public, Harrison hopes FoodE will sell out on the 25th. Harrison says, “It wasn’t difficult for Joy, Beth and I to figure out where these proceeds would go. Our neighbors have been so good to us, so the decision to have a benefit for them was easy. We are advocates for the homeless and anyone who is in need, so we thought all of the proceeds from the selling of these historical boxes from our vault should go to our neighbors. It was that simple for us.”

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Want to Go? FoodE Cocktail Hour Benefit for The Table and the Presbyterian Pantry Kitchen Monday, September 25, 2017 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

FoodE 900 Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Free to the public Cocktails and food for purchase $100 per safe deposit plate until they are gone

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm

A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. She publishes the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Book Festival.

Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Call it Sister Act, or more appropriately, All in the Family. Whatever you want to call it, Agora Downtown Coffee Shop at 520 Caroline Street is a coffee shop that carries a distinct atmosphere that sets it aside. Located in a building that was once a residence and is registered as a historic landmark, Agora welcomes customers to a warm, comfortable interior where the commuter can come in and grab a cup of joe for the road, or, for those who have the time to linger, there are several rooms set up so customers have a choice of a small meeting place or a more solitary setting to enjoy the many varieties of coffee and home made items offered. Agora is a small business with a big vision, developed from the pipe dreams of two sisters, MJ Stone and Andi Stone Chitters. Interestingly enough, both sisters will tell of how they did not get along to well growing up. Their relationship jelled in college as they began working on fulfilling both of their dreams. MJ, the older by two years, has an undergraduate degree in art and an MS in business and has longed dreamed of owning a coffee shop. Andi has a bachelor's degree in Food Science and has always wanted to open a bakery. At first they thought of having two businesses side by side, but merged their visions into one. While both were finishing their respective educations, they got together and hammered out a business plan which included the participation of the entire family. Their mother handles the financial end of things and their father is the maintenance man (and very busy they reported). Much of the charm of Agora rests in how they have preserved the residential persona of the building. Built in 1787, it has gone through several phases. In the 1800s, it was a blacksmith shop. The floors are original, with burn marks showing where the smithy practiced his trade. Around the interior are hanging art pieces in addition to shelves of books by local authors, all of which are for sale. Coming from a family of coffee drinkers, both sisters enjoy experimenting with different types of beverages, from non-coffee drinks to a variety of chais, and liquor based drinks. With a wide target market, many of the types of coffee and foods come from customers suggestions. MJ stated it was one of the personal touches they utilize in their marketing. "Customers get excited when they see a suggestion they made actually appear on the menu," said MJ. The use of liquor in some of their menu has been a unique concept for Agora. The Black Mamba Mocha, a dark chocolate mocha with Bowman's Caramel Creme Liquor, or The Naughty Chai, a chai

latte with Black Tattoo Rum, are just two of the many and varied liquor drinks offered. There are others that are more seasonal, such as The Sleigh Ride, which is a white chocolate mocha with Black Tattoo Rum, topped with whipped creme and homemade espresso syrup. In addition to coffee and tea drinks, Andi provides baked goods and sandwiches made fresh every morning. Macaroons are the favorites of many, and a blackboard gives customers an opportunity to suggest their favorite variety. In order to meet the need of the commuters, containers of different flavors of dry oatmeal are offered. Hot water can be added at the time of purchase, or it can be carried to work and hot water added there. Andi stated this is a popular item with a cup of coffee as a breakfast for the customer on the run in the morning. The variety of foods go from sweets to vegan. Chocolate chip or oatmeal cookies are right beside the Garden Sandwich, which is a refreshing combination of hummus, cucumber slices, mushrooms, spinach and artichoke hears, all on organic wheat bread. As their business has grown, so has the number of staff. Originally, with everything dependent on it being solely a family operation, MJ and Andi reportedly worked 120 hours per week. The addition of baristas and bakers have given them more of an opportunity to enjoy their customers and participate in the building of relationships with them, a hallmark of Agora's appeal. It should be noted that when hiring, they do not look for those with barista or baking experience, but individuals with a customer service skill set who are not afraid to display their passion for what they do. The result is happy customers as well as employees. Although construction on Caroline Street caused some inconvenience to patrons, the Agora Downtown Coffee Shop has continued to grow since its inception in 2015. With an idea of change to meet the customers' needs, there appears to be nothing but growth for them on the horizon.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

15


september 2017…Welcome Fall! First Friday, Septemebr 1

"Memorable Moments", Ina Moss new show at Art First Reception, 6-9. features her realistic paintings in oil, watercolor and acrylic. Moss's work is known throughout Virginia, and she has also shown in Phoenix, AZ. "Florabundance", new fiber-art show by Elizabeth Woodford. Opening reception, 6-9p PONSHOP Studio and Gallery "Fur-Ever Friends", an exhibition celebrating the love we share with our animal companions. Includes eight participating artists all centered around this theme. include: Connrad Coe, Maddie Huddle, Anna Martin, Shannon Wang, Leah Emerald, Ben Morse, James Walker & Gabriel Pons. Opening Recption, 6-9p Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7pm to 9pm Elby Brass Music Fridays @ Legume, The Transmitters 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, September 2

CALENDAR of events

Wednesday, September 6

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, September 7

CRRL Main Branch, 1201 Caroline St, Going Home: War's End. Dr. Jeff McClurken, UMW Program will explore the return of Confederate soldiers to their homes in Virginia and their difficult transition from Confederates to Americans once again. 7pm

Friday, September 8

"Light Up The Power Plant'. @ Historic Virginia Electric Power Company Plant FREE Family-friendly event, multi-colored light & sound show projected at the city's historic power plant. Visible from the river and ashore. Friends of the Rappahannock will be offering boat rentals for river viewing. Parking at the Old Silk Mill across the street. A must see, unique event. Celebrate the Bright Future of the Mill District, 8-10pm. Light & Sound Display, by Bill Carroll Entertainment

Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 7a-2p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Music Fridays @ Legume, Featured Fish, 715 Caroline St

FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p

Saturday, September 9

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Walnut Hills Upc & Strong Arms Ministry present our annual Fall Fest! Food, games, Live Music, and more. 10a-2p. Walnut Hills UPC, 11560 Brian Dr, 22407 Jeremy Gann Art Reception

@Legume

Sunday, September 3

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, September 4 Labor Day

Tuesday,September 5

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

8-10p,

Art Attack, Local Artist taking it to the Streets! 10a-4p. Downtown FXBG, FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Sunset Kayaking on the Potomac @ Stratford Hall, 5:30-9p.ages 13 and up (with no experience necessary). See & experience the historic Stratford cliffs from the Potomac River. To register for the kayaking event, contact Jon Bachman at jbachman@stratfordhall.org, call 804-493-1972. $ The Adaptations Live at Agora! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop. Join us under the pergola in Agora's outdoor seating area for some delicious treats and live music . No cover. 6-9p Music @ Legume, KingBolts, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Sunday, September 10

Friday, September 15

Grandparent Day

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, September 11

Rappahannock Choral Society Auditions. Openings in all sections 540-412-6152 for info and to schedule an audition or visit www.rappahannockchoral-society.org and click on "Sing with us."

Tuesday, September12

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert. Bring a lunch or buy one at the park and enjoy music by Gerry Maddox. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 13

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Rappahannock Group Sierra Club Fall Open House: BATS! presentation and research by Nancy Stalik. Light refreshments, door prizes. Free. 6:30pm 8:30pm Central Library, 1200 Caroline St

Thursday, September 14

Learn About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Salem Church Library, 6p. “Another Day Starlight Vigil” @ Hurkamp Park, 7p. gathering to remember loved ones lost to suicide and build awareness issues of suicide and prevention. Join us for a candle lighting, a local speaker, and music. Refreshments will be provided. "Grace & Justice on Death Row" The CRRLibrary & St. George's Episcopal Church co-hosting an evening with northern VA attorney/ author, Brian Stolarz.. He will share his personal account of defending an innocent man on Texas's death row. . a topic that tried his conscience, the justice system and the discrimination he found there, as well as his own faith 7-8:30p, CRRL

Heart's of Gold, Fairy Godmother Project Walk of Awareness of Childhood Cancer, Old Mill Park, 6:30-9pm Night Catfishing @Motts Run Reservoir, 7p -1a. Come hook your bait and cast your line to catch catfish in the Reservoir. info call Don Minor 540786-8989.

Saturday, September 16

Art in the Park @ Hurkamp Park.Browse and shop local artists and crafters FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Book Signing by Local Author, Suzanne Ludlum ! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop. 9-10:30a ArtsLIVE! presents 'Wind, Water, and the Moon", James Doering Piano Recital @ Fredericksburg Baptist Church, 1019 Princess Anne Street, 3p. $ Pizza Palozza, @Market Square, 5-9pm. Vote for your favorite pizza, great music, Adventure Brewery Beer, Italian Wine. Presented by Fred Este Assoc. Sponsored by B101.5 & FAM Rappahannock Riverfest @ Farley Vale Farm, 4-8p. a fabulous evening of great food, live music, an open bar, & exciting live auction. Features a steamed crab feast, catfish, barbecue, beer, Overlooking the beautiful river, is just 12 minutes from downtown Fredericksburg! This "Good Party for a Great Cause" supports Friends of the Rappahannock's advocacy, education and restoration programs.

Sunday, September 17

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! 1st Annual Trikes for Tykes Fundraiser @ Hurkamp Park, 10a-4p. a fundraiser to benefit the Children's Museum of Richmond - Fredericksburg. Organize a team of co-workers, family or friends and race your way down Prince Edward Street in front of Hurkamp Park on a big wheel! After the race, join us at Hurkamp Park for a family festival, complete with music, games and activities!

Tuesday, September 19

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 11:30a -1:30p. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. enjoy music by Liam and Laura. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 20

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, September 22

Stardust Ball-, Fairy Godmother Project Gala @Bowman Distillery, 6pm FREE Family Movie Night , "The Lego Movie", Spotsy Courthouse Village 9010 Old Battlefield Blvd, Spotsy fun activities, contests & a grill giveaway. Pre-Show @ 5pm. Movie starts at dusk. Laurie & Peter Live @ Agora, 8pm in our outdoor seating area. No Cover.

Saturday, September 23

2nd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival @ Riverfront Park, 10a-5p Meet, talk with, and buy books from any number of over 120 children's book authors, young adult novelists, poets, and other fiction and nonfictions writers from around the state and country . musical performance, food and snacks, children's activities, author reading and book signings, panel discussions, and four guest speakers. The event is free and family friendly. Guests are encouraged to register. Your tickets qualify you for prizes offered in every raffles held throughout the day, so be sure to register any young readers you have! Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Meet local author, Sandra Manigault, and over one hundred others at the Fredericksburg Book Festival, Riverside Park, 10 AM - 5 PM.

Grand Reopening of Frame Designs 4-7p.105 Hill St, FXBG, 22408 join us for music by Becky and Slam, good food, and celebration. accepting donations of dog food or other necessities to support the Old Dominion Humane Society.

Sunday, September 24

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! "Visual love of Italy" Opening, 5-7pm of photographic display featuring dozens of images of Este and the Veneto region projected on Orofino's big digital screen in its Wine Tasting room. Este's most accomplished photographers mounted on the restaurant's walls will be on full display at Orofino's Restaurant. Fredericksburg Food Co-op Annual Meeting @ CRR Library. Update on the community-owned grocery store coming to FXBG. speaker from Friendly City Food Co-op of Harrisonburg and sampling delicious, healthy, snacks. 3-4p

Monday, September 25,

CRRL Salem Church Branch, Spotsy The Past Living in Them: Veterans Coping with Civil War Frank O'Reilly, FXBG & Spotsy NMP. program will look at how veterans remembered & wrote about their experiences in war. 7pm Take Home a Piece of FXBG History Benefit @ FoodE., Princess Anne St a wine & beer happy hour selling safe deposit box plates from the Historic National Bank Building A benefit to support The Table at St. Georges & the Presbyterian Church Pantry Kitchen. 6:30-8:30p

Tuesday, September 26

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. music by Becky Y Slam. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 27

Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! C Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Plant-Based Cooking Class @ St. George's Episcopal 7:30p. Award-winning cook blends her Italian cooking heritage with seasonal vegetables from the garden. Vegan potluck supper follows Bring a plant-based item to share or make a donation to St. George's food pantry.

Friday, September 29

Fburg Songwriters' Showcase, acoustic concert series original music, fall season opener, LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 8pm. Enjoy local and touring musicians amid works by local artists in an accessible venue. $10 Info at 540-429-0999, and www.burgsongs.org

Saturday, September 30

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p "A Pathway to Civility in Communication," UUFF 25 Chalice Circle, FXBG. 1-5pm. Civil Discourse workshop to teach people to use communication that is mindful, respond without reacting, find common ground, and practice appreciative listening. civildiscourse17@aol.com Hazel Run unplugged No Cover @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, outside area ,9-11am . Hazel Run is a local folk, bluegrass, gospel, & soul band, locals Stephen Hu, Linda LaFave, Karen Richardson, and Stuart Whitford. Free Community Health Fair @ Ressurrection Lutern Church, 6170 Plank Rd, 22407 Live Your Faith Bold and Brave Women's Conference @ Ebenezer United Methodist Church, 161 Embrey Mill Rd., Stafford, VA 22554. For Women of all ages aChildcare is available. information call 540-659-1349. 9a-2p. $ Music @ Legume, Born Crooked, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

If you are reading this 242nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for October 2017 issue is September 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Happy 97th Birthday, Bill Sale

3192 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on Love, Your Fredericksburg Friends 16

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

17


september 2017…Welcome Fall! First Friday, Septemebr 1

"Memorable Moments", Ina Moss new show at Art First Reception, 6-9. features her realistic paintings in oil, watercolor and acrylic. Moss's work is known throughout Virginia, and she has also shown in Phoenix, AZ. "Florabundance", new fiber-art show by Elizabeth Woodford. Opening reception, 6-9p PONSHOP Studio and Gallery "Fur-Ever Friends", an exhibition celebrating the love we share with our animal companions. Includes eight participating artists all centered around this theme. include: Connrad Coe, Maddie Huddle, Anna Martin, Shannon Wang, Leah Emerald, Ben Morse, James Walker & Gabriel Pons. Opening Recption, 6-9p Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7pm to 9pm Elby Brass Music Fridays @ Legume, The Transmitters 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, September 2

CALENDAR of events

Wednesday, September 6

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, September 7

CRRL Main Branch, 1201 Caroline St, Going Home: War's End. Dr. Jeff McClurken, UMW Program will explore the return of Confederate soldiers to their homes in Virginia and their difficult transition from Confederates to Americans once again. 7pm

Friday, September 8

"Light Up The Power Plant'. @ Historic Virginia Electric Power Company Plant FREE Family-friendly event, multi-colored light & sound show projected at the city's historic power plant. Visible from the river and ashore. Friends of the Rappahannock will be offering boat rentals for river viewing. Parking at the Old Silk Mill across the street. A must see, unique event. Celebrate the Bright Future of the Mill District, 8-10pm. Light & Sound Display, by Bill Carroll Entertainment

Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 7a-2p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Music Fridays @ Legume, Featured Fish, 715 Caroline St

FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p

Saturday, September 9

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Walnut Hills Upc & Strong Arms Ministry present our annual Fall Fest! Food, games, Live Music, and more. 10a-2p. Walnut Hills UPC, 11560 Brian Dr, 22407 Jeremy Gann Art Reception

@Legume

Sunday, September 3

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, September 4 Labor Day

Tuesday,September 5

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

8-10p,

Art Attack, Local Artist taking it to the Streets! 10a-4p. Downtown FXBG, FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Sunset Kayaking on the Potomac @ Stratford Hall, 5:30-9p.ages 13 and up (with no experience necessary). See & experience the historic Stratford cliffs from the Potomac River. To register for the kayaking event, contact Jon Bachman at jbachman@stratfordhall.org, call 804-493-1972. $ The Adaptations Live at Agora! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop. Join us under the pergola in Agora's outdoor seating area for some delicious treats and live music . No cover. 6-9p Music @ Legume, KingBolts, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Sunday, September 10

Friday, September 15

Grandparent Day

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, September 11

Rappahannock Choral Society Auditions. Openings in all sections 540-412-6152 for info and to schedule an audition or visit www.rappahannockchoral-society.org and click on "Sing with us."

Tuesday, September12

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert. Bring a lunch or buy one at the park and enjoy music by Gerry Maddox. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 13

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Rappahannock Group Sierra Club Fall Open House: BATS! presentation and research by Nancy Stalik. Light refreshments, door prizes. Free. 6:30pm 8:30pm Central Library, 1200 Caroline St

Thursday, September 14

Learn About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Salem Church Library, 6p. “Another Day Starlight Vigil” @ Hurkamp Park, 7p. gathering to remember loved ones lost to suicide and build awareness issues of suicide and prevention. Join us for a candle lighting, a local speaker, and music. Refreshments will be provided. "Grace & Justice on Death Row" The CRRLibrary & St. George's Episcopal Church co-hosting an evening with northern VA attorney/ author, Brian Stolarz.. He will share his personal account of defending an innocent man on Texas's death row. . a topic that tried his conscience, the justice system and the discrimination he found there, as well as his own faith 7-8:30p, CRRL

Heart's of Gold, Fairy Godmother Project Walk of Awareness of Childhood Cancer, Old Mill Park, 6:30-9pm Night Catfishing @Motts Run Reservoir, 7p -1a. Come hook your bait and cast your line to catch catfish in the Reservoir. info call Don Minor 540786-8989.

Saturday, September 16

Art in the Park @ Hurkamp Park.Browse and shop local artists and crafters FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Book Signing by Local Author, Suzanne Ludlum ! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop. 9-10:30a ArtsLIVE! presents 'Wind, Water, and the Moon", James Doering Piano Recital @ Fredericksburg Baptist Church, 1019 Princess Anne Street, 3p. $ Pizza Palozza, @Market Square, 5-9pm. Vote for your favorite pizza, great music, Adventure Brewery Beer, Italian Wine. Presented by Fred Este Assoc. Sponsored by B101.5 & FAM Rappahannock Riverfest @ Farley Vale Farm, 4-8p. a fabulous evening of great food, live music, an open bar, & exciting live auction. Features a steamed crab feast, catfish, barbecue, beer, Overlooking the beautiful river, is just 12 minutes from downtown Fredericksburg! This "Good Party for a Great Cause" supports Friends of the Rappahannock's advocacy, education and restoration programs.

Sunday, September 17

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! 1st Annual Trikes for Tykes Fundraiser @ Hurkamp Park, 10a-4p. a fundraiser to benefit the Children's Museum of Richmond - Fredericksburg. Organize a team of co-workers, family or friends and race your way down Prince Edward Street in front of Hurkamp Park on a big wheel! After the race, join us at Hurkamp Park for a family festival, complete with music, games and activities!

Tuesday, September 19

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 11:30a -1:30p. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. enjoy music by Liam and Laura. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 20

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, September 22

Stardust Ball-, Fairy Godmother Project Gala @Bowman Distillery, 6pm FREE Family Movie Night , "The Lego Movie", Spotsy Courthouse Village 9010 Old Battlefield Blvd, Spotsy fun activities, contests & a grill giveaway. Pre-Show @ 5pm. Movie starts at dusk. Laurie & Peter Live @ Agora, 8pm in our outdoor seating area. No Cover.

Saturday, September 23

2nd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival @ Riverfront Park, 10a-5p Meet, talk with, and buy books from any number of over 120 children's book authors, young adult novelists, poets, and other fiction and nonfictions writers from around the state and country . musical performance, food and snacks, children's activities, author reading and book signings, panel discussions, and four guest speakers. The event is free and family friendly. Guests are encouraged to register. Your tickets qualify you for prizes offered in every raffles held throughout the day, so be sure to register any young readers you have! Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p Meet local author, Sandra Manigault, and over one hundred others at the Fredericksburg Book Festival, Riverside Park, 10 AM - 5 PM.

Grand Reopening of Frame Designs 4-7p.105 Hill St, FXBG, 22408 join us for music by Becky and Slam, good food, and celebration. accepting donations of dog food or other necessities to support the Old Dominion Humane Society.

Sunday, September 24

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! "Visual love of Italy" Opening, 5-7pm of photographic display featuring dozens of images of Este and the Veneto region projected on Orofino's big digital screen in its Wine Tasting room. Este's most accomplished photographers mounted on the restaurant's walls will be on full display at Orofino's Restaurant. Fredericksburg Food Co-op Annual Meeting @ CRR Library. Update on the community-owned grocery store coming to FXBG. speaker from Friendly City Food Co-op of Harrisonburg and sampling delicious, healthy, snacks. 3-4p

Monday, September 25,

CRRL Salem Church Branch, Spotsy The Past Living in Them: Veterans Coping with Civil War Frank O'Reilly, FXBG & Spotsy NMP. program will look at how veterans remembered & wrote about their experiences in war. 7pm Take Home a Piece of FXBG History Benefit @ FoodE., Princess Anne St a wine & beer happy hour selling safe deposit box plates from the Historic National Bank Building A benefit to support The Table at St. Georges & the Presbyterian Church Pantry Kitchen. 6:30-8:30p

Tuesday, September 26

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. music by Becky Y Slam. Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, September 27

Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fburg! C Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Plant-Based Cooking Class @ St. George's Episcopal 7:30p. Award-winning cook blends her Italian cooking heritage with seasonal vegetables from the garden. Vegan potluck supper follows Bring a plant-based item to share or make a donation to St. George's food pantry.

Friday, September 29

Fburg Songwriters' Showcase, acoustic concert series original music, fall season opener, LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 8pm. Enjoy local and touring musicians amid works by local artists in an accessible venue. $10 Info at 540-429-0999, and www.burgsongs.org

Saturday, September 30

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm FXBG Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-1p "A Pathway to Civility in Communication," UUFF 25 Chalice Circle, FXBG. 1-5pm. Civil Discourse workshop to teach people to use communication that is mindful, respond without reacting, find common ground, and practice appreciative listening. civildiscourse17@aol.com Hazel Run unplugged No Cover @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, outside area ,9-11am . Hazel Run is a local folk, bluegrass, gospel, & soul band, locals Stephen Hu, Linda LaFave, Karen Richardson, and Stuart Whitford. Free Community Health Fair @ Ressurrection Lutern Church, 6170 Plank Rd, 22407 Live Your Faith Bold and Brave Women's Conference @ Ebenezer United Methodist Church, 161 Embrey Mill Rd., Stafford, VA 22554. For Women of all ages aChildcare is available. information call 540-659-1349. 9a-2p. $ Music @ Legume, Born Crooked, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

If you are reading this 242nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for October 2017 issue is September 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Happy 97th Birthday, Bill Sale

3192 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on Love, Your Fredericksburg Friends 16

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

17


history’s stories

STAFFORD COUNT By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

In the July issue of FP, I wrote about one of the more famous residents of Stafford County, Gari Melchers. Since that story I have been asked questions about Stafford County and its formation. Myself having family ties with the Withers Clan on my mother’s side that goes back into the 1600’s, with my great-great Grandfather John Withers having one of the earlier land grants. I decided to research into some past family history that relates to Stafford county. In 1608, John Smith of the Jamestown Settlement had the first recorded encounter with the Indians along the Rappahannock and its tributaries. There were some thirty-two tribes speaking Algonquian including the Patawomeck that were part of the Powhatan Confederacy. Native American population at that time was 100%, compared to todays 0.4% of the total. The capture of Chief Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas was one of the most famous events during the Colonial period. She eventually would marry colonist John Rolfe in 1614, and was the first Native American to die in England. 1664 is recognized as the founding date for Stafford, named in honor of Staffordshire in England. Originally Stafford was created from land that was part of Westmoreland County. Stafford included larger borders than it has today that included land as far north as Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Prince William. We may remember the early 70’s when the bumper stickers would say ‘DON’T FAIRFAX STAFFORD, well if you think about it that was done many years before when the original make-up of the county included those lands. Aquia Church, was built in 1757 and is one of the older land marks still standing in Stafford County. The church is active today with Episcopal services and it is a National Historic Landmark. During the Revolutionary War, the Hunter ironworks helped in supplying arms for the continental Army. During the American Civil War, the county was a camp and battleground with over 100,000 Union Soldiers occupying the land for several years. The damage and plundering caused damage that the area did not completely recover from until the mid-1900’s. Falmouth that borders the Rappahannock River was a major port town during the early colonial period and is a quaint place to visit with its riverfront beach. It was the final Port town on the Rappahannock and produced the first millionaire in America. When we were growing up in the 50’s-60’s we all can recall many of the old names. The route #1 bridge was the Falmouth Bridge and the William Street bridge was known as the Free Bridge or the Chatham bridge. There were areas in Stafford known as Wild Cat Corner, Kelly’s Bottom, Schooler’s Hill, Cranes Corner, White Oak, Sunnyside, Boswell’s Corner, Midway Island, Beagles Store, Mountjoy’s Store, Eskimo Hill, Mitchell’s Ballfield, Ferry Farm, Argyle Heights, Little Whim, etc., just to. name a few from memory. Many of the old family names are still recognized in the county such as: Newton, Sullivan, Withers, Green, Shelton, Truslow, Jett, Cox, Embrey, Jones, Smith and Schooler. Today Stafford County is part of the Washington Metropolitan area ranked in the top 20 in income for counties in America. With a total land area of 280 square miles, it is much larger than the 6 square miles of the City of Fredericksburg, however, not near the size of Spotsylvania County, which is 401 square miles. There are many places of interest such as Ferry Farm, Chatham, White Oak Museum, Aquia Church and Belmont just to name a few. Stafford and Fredericksburg are separated by a common natural boundary, the Rappahannock River. The County and City share a friendly relationship with many families having relatives on both sides of the river. Happy 97th Birthday, Bill Powell, my dear friend DEDICATED TOO THE MEMORY OF DUVAL SULLIVAN, RAY HODGE AND MARY EARLS

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Windows on the World dinner and disscussion group By Susan Brown Would you like to be a part of a group of individuals from all over the world who are interested in meeting to exchange ideas, experience and views on global issues and places? If the answer is yes, then you might want to check out Windows of the World (WOW). WOW is an informal potluck dinner and discussion group initiated by psychology professor Dr. Gayle Wolfe at Germanna Community College (GCC) on October 13, 1989. Originally, WOW stood for “Women of the World” as the focus was on women’s issues. The idea for WOW originated when Gayle attended the United Nations’ Mid-Decade Conference for Women held in Copenhagen in July 1980 when she was a PH.D. student at Florida State University. The United Nations’ conference connected women from around the world who shared common problems, concerns, solutions and ideas. Gayle believed she could start a group with the same concept at FSU and later at GCC. From 1982-1985, Gayle taught college in Beirut Lebanon which enhanced her interest in international issues. The United States Embassy and the Marine Corps barracks were attacked by suicide bombers while she was there. She has been committed to the importance of international education ever since. Over the years the focus of WOW shifted from women’s issues to more global concerns, and the name was changed to “Windows of the World” in 1998. The group has since provided an opportunity to learn about other cultures, travel vicariously, and meet and network with students, faculty, staff and community members. Past topics have included: Marshall Islands, Israel, Russia, Pakistan, Costa Rica, Japan, Kenya, Lebanon, Greece, India, Denmark, Argentina, China, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Spain, Turkey, Switzerland, Belize, Antarctica, Alaska, the Hawaiian shirt, and more!

According to Gayle, “Groups like WOW are important in nurturing greater understanding and respect for our differences. Learning about other cultures, customs and habits allows for stereotyping and prejudices to be challenged and changed. For all these years, I have never had a WOW meeting that was not interesting. For example, one of our past speakers, Sarah LyonsPadilla, Skype’d in from her apartment in a Japanese village where she taught English. I’m so thankful that Germanna Community College has been willing to support this significant component of international education for 29 years.” WOW meetings are held Sunday afternoons from 3-6 pm at the Fredericksburg GCC Campus, twice in the fall semester and four times in the spring semester. After socializing and enjoying the potluck dinner, a speaker presents on a subject of international interest/expertise. Speakers have included students, faculty, staff and community members. It is very informal and friendly. Many attendees are people who have traveled themselves, are from other countries, or they are people who just like learning about the world. What is on tap for WOW Fall 2017/Spring 2018? Presentations by Faizullah and Khan, “Afghanistan,” will be on 17 September; Sandra Lovell, “Denmark,” on 15 October; Danielle M. Harkins, “Cambodia,” on 21 January; 18 February (TBA); Jean and Liz Lauzon, “Latin American Fine Crafts,” on 25 March; and 22 April (TBA). www.germanna.edu/internationaleducation/window-of-the-world/ or contact gwolfe@germanna.edu for more information. Susan is a logistics analyst working in support of the Marine Corps Civilian Police. With her husband Kevin, she is a fan of the community and culture of Fredericksburg.

It’s All Energy Igniting your joy by christina ferber ble at Availa n.com Amazo

We are hard wired for joy, though it may not always feel like it when the daily grind of life happens. Throw in a look at the news, and it's easy to forget that life is supposed to be a happy existence. Fortunately, there is a way to reignite joy and happiness through Eden Energy Medicine techniques that awaken The Radiant Circuits. These energy pathways help us to experience strength, vitality, and exhilaration. When we strengthen this system in our body, we ignite joy, gratitude and love, and working with them on a regular basis can help create new habits that keep us in a healthy and happy place. There are many ways to activate these energies that were first described some 4,500 years ago in Chinese texts. Smiling, laughing, walking in nature, or listening to music naturally activates them, but there are also exercises that can help as well. A great first step is to release any negativity, and a combination of exercises called the Blow Out, Zip Up, and Hook Up will help us. To begin, bring your arms to either side of your body and make fists, imagining that all your frustrations and negative feelings are in your hands. On an inhale, bring your arms above your head, and on an exhale, bring them down quickly and open your fists, either using the "shhh" sound or the name of what is upsetting you. Repeat three times and on the last movement, bring your hands down slowly and deliberately and let it all go. To Zip Up, place both hands over your pubic bone, and trace straight up the center of the front of your body to your bottom lip. Then, imagining a lock and key, lock the meridian you just traced (Central Meridian) at your bottom lip. For the last exercise in the combination, The Hook Up, place one finger in your belly button and the other between your

eyebrows on the bridge of your nose, push in and pull both points up. Breathe a few times and you have not only helped get your Radiant Circuits online, but aided all the other energy systems in your body. The Triple Warmer/ Spleen Hug not only awakens your Radiant Circuits, it also helps anytime you feel overwhelmed. Place your right hand on the left side of the rib cage, and the left hand on the other arm with the pinky finger at the indent at the tip of your elbow. Wrap your hand around the elbow and stay in that position for about two minutes. Switch sides and repeat. Another type of hook up helps to Harmonize Triple Warmer, a meridian that oversees our fight and flight response, and bring it in line with our adrenal response system. Place one hand on your forehead and the other hand above your naval. Hold this for at least a minute and breathe. Heaven Rushing In helps us tap into the bigger picture and bring more inspiration into our lives. Place your hands on your thighs and take a few deep breaths to ground yourself. Then on an inhale, raise your hands to your sides and over your head, touching your hands above it. On an exhale, bring them down to a prayer position in front of your chest. On the next deep breath, open them wide to the sky above your head and stay there as long as you need to. When you are ready, bring your hands to your heart and breathe a few times. All of these exercises should bring a little more lightness and joy to your life by way of the Radiant Circuits. For more information and to watch videos of these exercises visit www.itsallenergywellness.com.

Energy Healing Modalities to Assist You and Your Animals to Improve and Maintain Health in Body, Mind and Spirit 540.656.2201 ~ 877.534.5534 ~ Sherry@healingateway.com ~ facebook

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner.

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

18

September 2017

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

19


history’s stories

STAFFORD COUNT By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

In the July issue of FP, I wrote about one of the more famous residents of Stafford County, Gari Melchers. Since that story I have been asked questions about Stafford County and its formation. Myself having family ties with the Withers Clan on my mother’s side that goes back into the 1600’s, with my great-great Grandfather John Withers having one of the earlier land grants. I decided to research into some past family history that relates to Stafford county. In 1608, John Smith of the Jamestown Settlement had the first recorded encounter with the Indians along the Rappahannock and its tributaries. There were some thirty-two tribes speaking Algonquian including the Patawomeck that were part of the Powhatan Confederacy. Native American population at that time was 100%, compared to todays 0.4% of the total. The capture of Chief Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas was one of the most famous events during the Colonial period. She eventually would marry colonist John Rolfe in 1614, and was the first Native American to die in England. 1664 is recognized as the founding date for Stafford, named in honor of Staffordshire in England. Originally Stafford was created from land that was part of Westmoreland County. Stafford included larger borders than it has today that included land as far north as Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Prince William. We may remember the early 70’s when the bumper stickers would say ‘DON’T FAIRFAX STAFFORD, well if you think about it that was done many years before when the original make-up of the county included those lands. Aquia Church, was built in 1757 and is one of the older land marks still standing in Stafford County. The church is active today with Episcopal services and it is a National Historic Landmark. During the Revolutionary War, the Hunter ironworks helped in supplying arms for the continental Army. During the American Civil War, the county was a camp and battleground with over 100,000 Union Soldiers occupying the land for several years. The damage and plundering caused damage that the area did not completely recover from until the mid-1900’s. Falmouth that borders the Rappahannock River was a major port town during the early colonial period and is a quaint place to visit with its riverfront beach. It was the final Port town on the Rappahannock and produced the first millionaire in America. When we were growing up in the 50’s-60’s we all can recall many of the old names. The route #1 bridge was the Falmouth Bridge and the William Street bridge was known as the Free Bridge or the Chatham bridge. There were areas in Stafford known as Wild Cat Corner, Kelly’s Bottom, Schooler’s Hill, Cranes Corner, White Oak, Sunnyside, Boswell’s Corner, Midway Island, Beagles Store, Mountjoy’s Store, Eskimo Hill, Mitchell’s Ballfield, Ferry Farm, Argyle Heights, Little Whim, etc., just to. name a few from memory. Many of the old family names are still recognized in the county such as: Newton, Sullivan, Withers, Green, Shelton, Truslow, Jett, Cox, Embrey, Jones, Smith and Schooler. Today Stafford County is part of the Washington Metropolitan area ranked in the top 20 in income for counties in America. With a total land area of 280 square miles, it is much larger than the 6 square miles of the City of Fredericksburg, however, not near the size of Spotsylvania County, which is 401 square miles. There are many places of interest such as Ferry Farm, Chatham, White Oak Museum, Aquia Church and Belmont just to name a few. Stafford and Fredericksburg are separated by a common natural boundary, the Rappahannock River. The County and City share a friendly relationship with many families having relatives on both sides of the river. Happy 97th Birthday, Bill Powell, my dear friend DEDICATED TOO THE MEMORY OF DUVAL SULLIVAN, RAY HODGE AND MARY EARLS

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Windows on the World dinner and disscussion group By Susan Brown Would you like to be a part of a group of individuals from all over the world who are interested in meeting to exchange ideas, experience and views on global issues and places? If the answer is yes, then you might want to check out Windows of the World (WOW). WOW is an informal potluck dinner and discussion group initiated by psychology professor Dr. Gayle Wolfe at Germanna Community College (GCC) on October 13, 1989. Originally, WOW stood for “Women of the World” as the focus was on women’s issues. The idea for WOW originated when Gayle attended the United Nations’ Mid-Decade Conference for Women held in Copenhagen in July 1980 when she was a PH.D. student at Florida State University. The United Nations’ conference connected women from around the world who shared common problems, concerns, solutions and ideas. Gayle believed she could start a group with the same concept at FSU and later at GCC. From 1982-1985, Gayle taught college in Beirut Lebanon which enhanced her interest in international issues. The United States Embassy and the Marine Corps barracks were attacked by suicide bombers while she was there. She has been committed to the importance of international education ever since. Over the years the focus of WOW shifted from women’s issues to more global concerns, and the name was changed to “Windows of the World” in 1998. The group has since provided an opportunity to learn about other cultures, travel vicariously, and meet and network with students, faculty, staff and community members. Past topics have included: Marshall Islands, Israel, Russia, Pakistan, Costa Rica, Japan, Kenya, Lebanon, Greece, India, Denmark, Argentina, China, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Spain, Turkey, Switzerland, Belize, Antarctica, Alaska, the Hawaiian shirt, and more!

According to Gayle, “Groups like WOW are important in nurturing greater understanding and respect for our differences. Learning about other cultures, customs and habits allows for stereotyping and prejudices to be challenged and changed. For all these years, I have never had a WOW meeting that was not interesting. For example, one of our past speakers, Sarah LyonsPadilla, Skype’d in from her apartment in a Japanese village where she taught English. I’m so thankful that Germanna Community College has been willing to support this significant component of international education for 29 years.” WOW meetings are held Sunday afternoons from 3-6 pm at the Fredericksburg GCC Campus, twice in the fall semester and four times in the spring semester. After socializing and enjoying the potluck dinner, a speaker presents on a subject of international interest/expertise. Speakers have included students, faculty, staff and community members. It is very informal and friendly. Many attendees are people who have traveled themselves, are from other countries, or they are people who just like learning about the world. What is on tap for WOW Fall 2017/Spring 2018? Presentations by Faizullah and Khan, “Afghanistan,” will be on 17 September; Sandra Lovell, “Denmark,” on 15 October; Danielle M. Harkins, “Cambodia,” on 21 January; 18 February (TBA); Jean and Liz Lauzon, “Latin American Fine Crafts,” on 25 March; and 22 April (TBA). www.germanna.edu/internationaleducation/window-of-the-world/ or contact gwolfe@germanna.edu for more information. Susan is a logistics analyst working in support of the Marine Corps Civilian Police. With her husband Kevin, she is a fan of the community and culture of Fredericksburg.

It’s All Energy Igniting your joy by christina ferber ble at Availa n.com Amazo

We are hard wired for joy, though it may not always feel like it when the daily grind of life happens. Throw in a look at the news, and it's easy to forget that life is supposed to be a happy existence. Fortunately, there is a way to reignite joy and happiness through Eden Energy Medicine techniques that awaken The Radiant Circuits. These energy pathways help us to experience strength, vitality, and exhilaration. When we strengthen this system in our body, we ignite joy, gratitude and love, and working with them on a regular basis can help create new habits that keep us in a healthy and happy place. There are many ways to activate these energies that were first described some 4,500 years ago in Chinese texts. Smiling, laughing, walking in nature, or listening to music naturally activates them, but there are also exercises that can help as well. A great first step is to release any negativity, and a combination of exercises called the Blow Out, Zip Up, and Hook Up will help us. To begin, bring your arms to either side of your body and make fists, imagining that all your frustrations and negative feelings are in your hands. On an inhale, bring your arms above your head, and on an exhale, bring them down quickly and open your fists, either using the "shhh" sound or the name of what is upsetting you. Repeat three times and on the last movement, bring your hands down slowly and deliberately and let it all go. To Zip Up, place both hands over your pubic bone, and trace straight up the center of the front of your body to your bottom lip. Then, imagining a lock and key, lock the meridian you just traced (Central Meridian) at your bottom lip. For the last exercise in the combination, The Hook Up, place one finger in your belly button and the other between your

eyebrows on the bridge of your nose, push in and pull both points up. Breathe a few times and you have not only helped get your Radiant Circuits online, but aided all the other energy systems in your body. The Triple Warmer/ Spleen Hug not only awakens your Radiant Circuits, it also helps anytime you feel overwhelmed. Place your right hand on the left side of the rib cage, and the left hand on the other arm with the pinky finger at the indent at the tip of your elbow. Wrap your hand around the elbow and stay in that position for about two minutes. Switch sides and repeat. Another type of hook up helps to Harmonize Triple Warmer, a meridian that oversees our fight and flight response, and bring it in line with our adrenal response system. Place one hand on your forehead and the other hand above your naval. Hold this for at least a minute and breathe. Heaven Rushing In helps us tap into the bigger picture and bring more inspiration into our lives. Place your hands on your thighs and take a few deep breaths to ground yourself. Then on an inhale, raise your hands to your sides and over your head, touching your hands above it. On an exhale, bring them down to a prayer position in front of your chest. On the next deep breath, open them wide to the sky above your head and stay there as long as you need to. When you are ready, bring your hands to your heart and breathe a few times. All of these exercises should bring a little more lightness and joy to your life by way of the Radiant Circuits. For more information and to watch videos of these exercises visit www.itsallenergywellness.com.

Energy Healing Modalities to Assist You and Your Animals to Improve and Maintain Health in Body, Mind and Spirit 540.656.2201 ~ 877.534.5534 ~ Sherry@healingateway.com ~ facebook

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner.

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

18

September 2017

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

19


Senior Care I’ll do the remembering By Karl Karch stigma associated with the disease. They fear their thoughts or opinions would be “discounted or dismissed” and they would be “treated more positively” if they didn’t reveal their diagnosis. That’s what makes Glen Campbell, Ronald Reagan, and others’ openness about their AD so courageous and significant. Because of the enormity of the statistics, there’s a very good chance that you will encounter a person with the disease, if you haven’t already. So, whether you are a grocery or retail store, bank, restaurant, doctor’s office, emergency responder, police, or any other business or organization interacting with people, you may interact with an adult having difficulty communicating or transacting business.

Glen Campbell, the “Rhinestone Cowboy”, died August 8, 2017 from complications related to Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). He was diagnosed with AD in 2011 and later made his diagnosis public. He and his family produced an awardwinning documentary “Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me” about his life and the impact AD “Home Instead has created a had on him and his family. His song “I’m thoughtful and thorough Alzheimer’s Not Gonna Miss You”, and his daughter Friendly Business program to train Ashley’s song “Remembering”, were also businesses in their communities on how about his AD. Harry Johns, president and to best work with those who have CEO, Alzheimer’s Association said: “Glen Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia” and his family helped to bring said George Vradenburg, Alzheimer’s out of the One in ten people age Chairman and Founder shadows and into the 65 and older has AD. More o f spotlight with openness USAgainstAlzheimer’s. than 15 million Americans and honesty that has To participate in this provide unpaid care for rallied people to take free educational 30action on behalf of the people with AD and other Ronald Reagan dementias....these caregivers minute program and cause.” was another famous provided an estimated 18.2 become an Alzheimer’s Friendly Business, person who went public billion hours of care valued contact Home Instead’s with his AD diagnosis. at over $230 billion. office in Fredericksburg Here are some or Culpeper. eye-opening statistics about this disease Alzheimer’s currently is a disease that has no cure. AD is the 6th leading that has no cure. While significant efforts cause of death in the U.S. Every 66 seconds someone in the U.S. develops the are ongoing, much more research is disease. One in ten people age 65 and needed and that requires money. You can older has AD. More than 15 million help find a cure by participating in Fredericksburg’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s Americans provide unpaid care for people on October 14 at 9:00a.m. at the with AD and other dementias. In 2016, University of Mary Washington campus these caregivers provided an estimated 18.2 billion hours of care valued at over and/or making a financial contribution. $230 billion. Caring for a family member We can’t cure AD yet, but we can cure the with AD can cause physical, emotional, and stigma associated with the disease and educate those who may interact with financial stress. those afflicted with it. As Ashley Campbell Alzheimer’s Disease is an age- said in her song, “Daddy, don’t you worry, related disease and has resulted in I’ll do the remembering.” numerous negative stereotypes. The truth is that there really is no Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of “stereotypical” person living with Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed Alzheimer’s. Each person living with the home care organization providing disease walks their own journey. personal care, companionship and home Unfortunately, according to a 2012 World helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region. Alzheimer’s report, one in four people with dementia say they hide their diagnosis because they are fearful of the

20

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Emancipated Patients skepticism about sports physicals

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

It’s at this time of year that I often find myself in some rank and rowdy school gymnasium examining a string of sweaty, nervous school kids – as we do sports physicals on this seasons potential gladiators. This is the scene when it is one of those production line set ups where schools provide free exams thanks to a bunch of volunteer providers giving them the once-over to fulfill a requirement that every potential athlete be screened to anticipate medical problems and injuries. Even if all the girls didn’t insist on wearing cameo’s, making for an uncomfortable tussle to listen to their hearts, and not have them think you’re trying to cop a feel of their boobs. Or if the boys didn’t fold in two giggling when you try to palpate their

Sports physicals – or “preparticipation examination” (PPE) if you want to be proper – have been a requirement to participate in sport at school forever. But a consensus report in the clinical Journal of Sports Medicine notes “no large-scale prospective controlled tracking programs have examined PPE outcomes.” We all keep doing this because it seems sensible. Seems like it must do some good. The most drastic mishap that screening is meant to guard against is sudden cardiac death from a heart arrhythmia – not very common (total of 66 deaths a year), but not good when it happens. But most PPE’s in the US don’t test for this specifically. A Canadian group says every

Sports Physicals......Are They Necessary? hernial orifices. Even then this would still likely be a futile business – if we are to believe the experts. But a futility that has a message for the medically emancipated patient. Adopted Without Robust Information A couple of years ago, Adam S. Cifu MD Professor of medicine University of Chicago and Vinayak K. Prasad MD, MPH, hematologist-oncologist and internist came out with what I think is an important book - Ending Medical Reversals – Improving Medical Outcomes, Saving Lives. They attribute the many medical reversals – where some innovations that is heralded as the best thing since sliced bread turns out to be useless, or even dangerous – as being due to lack of “robust information.” Innovations are adopted before adequate information has been gathered to prove their efficacy they say. They go on to note this doesn’t stop the medical profession. Not infrequently doctors “continue to use medical practices, sometimes for decades, that are later shown to be of no benefit.”

potential athlete should have an EKG to try to screen for this. They also say just bag the actual physical exam. Others say do both – but there’s no consensus between the American College of Sports Medicine and other learned bodies as to what the PPE should consist of. And if you factor in the cost of an EKG say the critics, with what such a procedure costs in the US (because of our wildly expensive healthcare), the cost per life saved may be as high as $14.4 million. Which poses an interesting question. How much are our child athletes worth? But the take home message is that sports physicals, like so many other interventions, so many other tests and treatments, are foisted on the naïve public, just because “that’s the way we’ve always done it.” Not because there is evidence that it actually does any good. So when your doctor is pushing some intervention the, medically emancipated patient asks “what’s the evidence?” Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

Wellness truth about high blood pressure

By christine H. Thompson, D.C. Why is it that so many people over 50 are on hypertension medication? Even if they are not taking the meds, many have been told they need to be on these meds by their medical doctor. Do the physiological mechanisms that control blood pressure fail after 50? There are many facets to the answer, so let’s explore a few here. Blood pressure changes with time of day, circumstances and different states and functions of the body for the purpose of getting blood, carrying oxygen and nutrients, to each and every cell. It changes by virtue of the contraction and dilation of the arteries. If we need more blood to the brain or large muscles for strenuous activities or emergencies, the blood vessels contract to provide faster transport. Blood pressure is controlled by the automatic or autonomic nervous system which we do not have conscious control over. A stressful thought or event will activate the sympathetic nerves which contract the arteries and cause blood pressure to rise. That’s why we have the “white coat syndrome” which means that your blood pressure will sometimes go up just by virtue of being in the doctor’s office and being nervous about having it checked! Stress reduction is a major factor in reducing blood pressure. Another factor is weight gain. According to the Obesity Action Coalition, it is estimated that for every pound you gain, your body must make a mile of extra blood vessels to supply blood to that tissue. This causes your heart to work harder and your blood pressure go up to supply the extra blood. An extra pound may not cause problems for someone only slightly overweight, but there is a threshold at which the strain on the heart and blood vessels becomes too great and begins to cause lasting health issues, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Losing weight is a primary way to control blood pressure.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

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Yet another factor is atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, which is the formation of plaque on the artery wall. This causes reduced ability of the arteries to expand and inherently increases blood pressure. The deposition of plaque, a combination of cholesterol, calcium and other fatty and mineral substances, has numerous causes. One major cause of atherosclerosis is oxidizing chemicals such as plastics, food additives, trans-fats, sugar and other inflammatory substances in food, water or other products used in or on the body. The artery walls are being damaged by these chemicals and the plaque is laid down as a means of repair and to prevent leaking or failure of the blood vessels. The solution is reducing your chemical exposure by eliminating processed and fast foods and also adding antioxidants to your diet. Antioxidants are nutrients that are found in fruits and vegetables. One more factor is normal aging. If we look at historical data, blood pressure normally rises a little as we get older. It was once thought (before the days of pharmaceutical influence) that this rise in blood pressure was a protective measure taken by the body as the heart muscle ages and loses some contractile strength to assure that the blood still gets to the brain and other tissues. The idea that we should have the same blood pressure when we are 50 or 60 as when we were 20 or 30 is a new idea. Can we have the same blood pressure throughout life? Certainly! Should we maintain the same blood pressure as we age? Should you take prescription hypertension medication? It depends on many individual factors, what the rest of your health picture looks like, what your daily blood pressure readings are and if you are willing to take charge and make some healthy changes to your lifestyle.

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

21


Senior Care I’ll do the remembering By Karl Karch stigma associated with the disease. They fear their thoughts or opinions would be “discounted or dismissed” and they would be “treated more positively” if they didn’t reveal their diagnosis. That’s what makes Glen Campbell, Ronald Reagan, and others’ openness about their AD so courageous and significant. Because of the enormity of the statistics, there’s a very good chance that you will encounter a person with the disease, if you haven’t already. So, whether you are a grocery or retail store, bank, restaurant, doctor’s office, emergency responder, police, or any other business or organization interacting with people, you may interact with an adult having difficulty communicating or transacting business.

Glen Campbell, the “Rhinestone Cowboy”, died August 8, 2017 from complications related to Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). He was diagnosed with AD in 2011 and later made his diagnosis public. He and his family produced an awardwinning documentary “Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me” about his life and the impact AD “Home Instead has created a had on him and his family. His song “I’m thoughtful and thorough Alzheimer’s Not Gonna Miss You”, and his daughter Friendly Business program to train Ashley’s song “Remembering”, were also businesses in their communities on how about his AD. Harry Johns, president and to best work with those who have CEO, Alzheimer’s Association said: “Glen Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia” and his family helped to bring said George Vradenburg, Alzheimer’s out of the One in ten people age Chairman and Founder shadows and into the 65 and older has AD. More o f spotlight with openness USAgainstAlzheimer’s. than 15 million Americans and honesty that has To participate in this provide unpaid care for rallied people to take free educational 30action on behalf of the people with AD and other Ronald Reagan dementias....these caregivers minute program and cause.” was another famous provided an estimated 18.2 become an Alzheimer’s Friendly Business, person who went public billion hours of care valued contact Home Instead’s with his AD diagnosis. at over $230 billion. office in Fredericksburg Here are some or Culpeper. eye-opening statistics about this disease Alzheimer’s currently is a disease that has no cure. AD is the 6th leading that has no cure. While significant efforts cause of death in the U.S. Every 66 seconds someone in the U.S. develops the are ongoing, much more research is disease. One in ten people age 65 and needed and that requires money. You can older has AD. More than 15 million help find a cure by participating in Fredericksburg’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s Americans provide unpaid care for people on October 14 at 9:00a.m. at the with AD and other dementias. In 2016, University of Mary Washington campus these caregivers provided an estimated 18.2 billion hours of care valued at over and/or making a financial contribution. $230 billion. Caring for a family member We can’t cure AD yet, but we can cure the with AD can cause physical, emotional, and stigma associated with the disease and educate those who may interact with financial stress. those afflicted with it. As Ashley Campbell Alzheimer’s Disease is an age- said in her song, “Daddy, don’t you worry, related disease and has resulted in I’ll do the remembering.” numerous negative stereotypes. The truth is that there really is no Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of “stereotypical” person living with Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed Alzheimer’s. Each person living with the home care organization providing disease walks their own journey. personal care, companionship and home Unfortunately, according to a 2012 World helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region. Alzheimer’s report, one in four people with dementia say they hide their diagnosis because they are fearful of the

20

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Emancipated Patients skepticism about sports physicals

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

It’s at this time of year that I often find myself in some rank and rowdy school gymnasium examining a string of sweaty, nervous school kids – as we do sports physicals on this seasons potential gladiators. This is the scene when it is one of those production line set ups where schools provide free exams thanks to a bunch of volunteer providers giving them the once-over to fulfill a requirement that every potential athlete be screened to anticipate medical problems and injuries. Even if all the girls didn’t insist on wearing cameo’s, making for an uncomfortable tussle to listen to their hearts, and not have them think you’re trying to cop a feel of their boobs. Or if the boys didn’t fold in two giggling when you try to palpate their

Sports physicals – or “preparticipation examination” (PPE) if you want to be proper – have been a requirement to participate in sport at school forever. But a consensus report in the clinical Journal of Sports Medicine notes “no large-scale prospective controlled tracking programs have examined PPE outcomes.” We all keep doing this because it seems sensible. Seems like it must do some good. The most drastic mishap that screening is meant to guard against is sudden cardiac death from a heart arrhythmia – not very common (total of 66 deaths a year), but not good when it happens. But most PPE’s in the US don’t test for this specifically. A Canadian group says every

Sports Physicals......Are They Necessary? hernial orifices. Even then this would still likely be a futile business – if we are to believe the experts. But a futility that has a message for the medically emancipated patient. Adopted Without Robust Information A couple of years ago, Adam S. Cifu MD Professor of medicine University of Chicago and Vinayak K. Prasad MD, MPH, hematologist-oncologist and internist came out with what I think is an important book - Ending Medical Reversals – Improving Medical Outcomes, Saving Lives. They attribute the many medical reversals – where some innovations that is heralded as the best thing since sliced bread turns out to be useless, or even dangerous – as being due to lack of “robust information.” Innovations are adopted before adequate information has been gathered to prove their efficacy they say. They go on to note this doesn’t stop the medical profession. Not infrequently doctors “continue to use medical practices, sometimes for decades, that are later shown to be of no benefit.”

potential athlete should have an EKG to try to screen for this. They also say just bag the actual physical exam. Others say do both – but there’s no consensus between the American College of Sports Medicine and other learned bodies as to what the PPE should consist of. And if you factor in the cost of an EKG say the critics, with what such a procedure costs in the US (because of our wildly expensive healthcare), the cost per life saved may be as high as $14.4 million. Which poses an interesting question. How much are our child athletes worth? But the take home message is that sports physicals, like so many other interventions, so many other tests and treatments, are foisted on the naïve public, just because “that’s the way we’ve always done it.” Not because there is evidence that it actually does any good. So when your doctor is pushing some intervention the, medically emancipated patient asks “what’s the evidence?” Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

Wellness truth about high blood pressure

By christine H. Thompson, D.C. Why is it that so many people over 50 are on hypertension medication? Even if they are not taking the meds, many have been told they need to be on these meds by their medical doctor. Do the physiological mechanisms that control blood pressure fail after 50? There are many facets to the answer, so let’s explore a few here. Blood pressure changes with time of day, circumstances and different states and functions of the body for the purpose of getting blood, carrying oxygen and nutrients, to each and every cell. It changes by virtue of the contraction and dilation of the arteries. If we need more blood to the brain or large muscles for strenuous activities or emergencies, the blood vessels contract to provide faster transport. Blood pressure is controlled by the automatic or autonomic nervous system which we do not have conscious control over. A stressful thought or event will activate the sympathetic nerves which contract the arteries and cause blood pressure to rise. That’s why we have the “white coat syndrome” which means that your blood pressure will sometimes go up just by virtue of being in the doctor’s office and being nervous about having it checked! Stress reduction is a major factor in reducing blood pressure. Another factor is weight gain. According to the Obesity Action Coalition, it is estimated that for every pound you gain, your body must make a mile of extra blood vessels to supply blood to that tissue. This causes your heart to work harder and your blood pressure go up to supply the extra blood. An extra pound may not cause problems for someone only slightly overweight, but there is a threshold at which the strain on the heart and blood vessels becomes too great and begins to cause lasting health issues, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Losing weight is a primary way to control blood pressure.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

Yet another factor is atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, which is the formation of plaque on the artery wall. This causes reduced ability of the arteries to expand and inherently increases blood pressure. The deposition of plaque, a combination of cholesterol, calcium and other fatty and mineral substances, has numerous causes. One major cause of atherosclerosis is oxidizing chemicals such as plastics, food additives, trans-fats, sugar and other inflammatory substances in food, water or other products used in or on the body. The artery walls are being damaged by these chemicals and the plaque is laid down as a means of repair and to prevent leaking or failure of the blood vessels. The solution is reducing your chemical exposure by eliminating processed and fast foods and also adding antioxidants to your diet. Antioxidants are nutrients that are found in fruits and vegetables. One more factor is normal aging. If we look at historical data, blood pressure normally rises a little as we get older. It was once thought (before the days of pharmaceutical influence) that this rise in blood pressure was a protective measure taken by the body as the heart muscle ages and loses some contractile strength to assure that the blood still gets to the brain and other tissues. The idea that we should have the same blood pressure when we are 50 or 60 as when we were 20 or 30 is a new idea. Can we have the same blood pressure throughout life? Certainly! Should we maintain the same blood pressure as we age? Should you take prescription hypertension medication? It depends on many individual factors, what the rest of your health picture looks like, what your daily blood pressure readings are and if you are willing to take charge and make some healthy changes to your lifestyle.

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

21


Renew

Life in Motion Cost of the Fall By rich gaudio, pt

We’ve all seen the classic TV commercial for the medical pendent…you know the one that shows the poor, little, old lady laying there on the floor, pitifully exclaiming, “Help! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” That commercial has left an imprint in the minds of TV-watching Americans, but there is a strange truth about life in our country that is imbedded in that advertisement. It turns out that falling, for those 65 and older in the United States, has a significant cost. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) track all kinds of data regarding falls in this group of older adults and the data is surprising! Did you know… Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among persons 65years old and older? 30% (3 of every 10) adults 65 and older report falling at least once every 12 months? This results in approximately 29 million falls and 7 million fall-related injuries each year? “Nice data points Rich, but so what?” If you are thinking this dear reader, you are asking a good question! As it turns out, the United States is spending something like $3.2 trillion PER YEAR on healthcare. That is what is causing all the hub-bub in Washington, DC about healthcare spending and Obamacare. We are talking about A LOT OF MONEY being spent on healthcare. Remember those 29 million falls and 7 million fall injuries I referenced earlier? Turns out the CDC reports the Medicare cost for those falls is currently $31 billion PER YEAR! And, the population of folks 65 and older is expected to grow by 55% in the next 1015 years. At that rate, the number of falls jumps from 29 million to 49 million and the injuries increase from 7 to 12 million

22

September 2017

raising the cost to almost $49 billion PER YEAR. Some falls are accidental, unexpected, and unpreventable as was the experience of some dear friends - a retired couple from our local, Fredericksburg area. Ricky and Lucy (not their real names) took a trip out West to see some of our country’s great national parks. Within the first 24 hours of being in Utah, Lucy accidentally suffered a fall when she stepped back to take a picture of an antique pump organ. Lucy tumbled down a flight of stairs backwards. After an ambulance ride in an unfamiliar state to an unfamiliar hospital, x-rays thankfully revealed limited injury, but the injury included a broken foot. That misstep and fall created a cascade of unexpected costs of time, money and emotions including the spontaneous purchase of a wheelchair; Ricky having to push Lucy along most of the vacation; and learning how ill equipped some hotels are for handling wheelchair-b bound persons. Fortunately, Ricky and Lucy have a strong faith and found blessings in each day of the trip. Lucy specifically mentioned that her trust in the Lord and her exercise and fitness level prior to the trip were the main two attributes that she believed not only allowed them to endure the experience but to be blessed despite her injury! Despite the unexpected, the CDC reports, “Older adult falls are largely preventable…” In answering the ‘so what’ question, I say it is now time for all of us in healthcare, in the fitness industry, and in our local community to realize that we have the power to help control “the uncontrollable costs of healthcare.” Be mindful and intentional in taking a stand in our own lives, to reduce fall risk for ourselves, our families, friends, and neighbors. In so doing, we can better manage our expenses as a nation and make the lives of American, older adults a little easier!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, 4701 Spotsylvania Pkwy Suite 106, Fredericksburg, VA 22407. Rich can be reached on www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100 Or, agewellvirginia@gmail.com

Front porch fredericksburg

Civility mindful communication

let food be your medicine by Joan M. Geisler Thomas Edison said, “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.” Hippocrates said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be your food.” It is no news that food can make or break our health. It goes beyond orange juice and chicken soup to help with a cold and ginger ale for an upset stomach. It is no news that inflammation is the root cause of most diseases. If we will control inflammation in our bodies through our diet, we will be empowered to restore our health. Therefore, dietary changes can prevent and even reverse disease. Do you want to hear something crazy? We often crave the very foods that are making us sick. Health is not the absent of disease. We are not classified as healthy just because we currently are not experiencing any problems. Treating the symptom is not the same as treating the root cause a disease. In Dr. Don Colbert’s new book, “Let Food Be Your Medicine” he chronicles his journey to find relief for his chronic psoriasis. He also used his experiential knowledge to help his patients for the last 20 years. Modern western medicine is needed at times, but if it is not ‘housed’ in a body of good nutrition and healthy life habits, it will be significantly less effective. Here are 5 ‘foods’ that if you eliminate from your diet it will greatly enhance your health. It CAN NOT be overstated that for many people they have an extreme sensitivity to gluten, which is wheat, barley, rye. Eliminating or greatly reducing all breads, cereals & pastas will significantly reduce the inflammation in your body. Experiment for 5 days. Eliminate gluten and see how your bodies feel. However, do not replace it with gluten free pasta and breads. Those are full of chemicals.

foods are processed. Here is a rule of thumb; if it does not rot or will not spoil, it is a processed food. Don’t eat it. Only use olive oil, coconut, avocado, butter or any nut oil. Trans fats are as bad as they say. Trans-fats are sunflower, soy, vegetable, safflon, Crisco, margarine or any oil not mentioned in first sentence. It raises bad cholesterol and lowers good.

by bryn Pavek Facilitators leading an upcoming civil discourse workshop want to teach people to use communication that is mindful, respond without reacting, find common ground, and practice appreciative listening. "I want to help people have honest conversations without worrying constantly about political correctness," says facilitator Iris Coleman. "People want to know what we can say, and what things we cannot say." "Meaningful conversations can happen when people listening give value and validity to differing opinions," said Lena Gonzalez Berrios. Acknowledging that this is also a key in cross cultural and intergenerational communication, Gonzalez Berrios noted that she will go beyond the words spoken. She hopes to get people to think about body language, questioning techniques, and creating a safe place for civic discussion. The free, non-partisan civil discourse workshop, "A Pathway to Civility in Communication," is designed for persons 16 and older who live and/or work in the city of Fredericksburg, Stafford County, Spotsylvania County,

King George County and Caroline County. Five local organizations are bringing the workshop to the community because of their shared interest in civic engagement and community dialogue. Partners are the Central Rappahannock Regional Library (CRRL) and the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RASCB). Sponsors are the Fredericksburg Chapter of the League of Women Voters, the UUFF Social Justice Committee and The Front Porch Magazine The workshop will be held on Saturday, September 30 2017 from 15pm. The event is free to participants but registration is required. Persons may register at civildiscourse17@aol.com, by leaving their name (s) phone number (s) and number of attendees. The location of the workshop is at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (UUFF) building, at 25 Chalice Circle in Fredericksburg, VA 22405. Parking is available onsite and the building is fully accessible. Bryn Pavekis a member of the Publicity Committee

Limit or eliminate sugary drinks. Don’t be fooled, fruit juices, smoothies, energy drinks coffee drinks are calorie and sugar bombs! Read labels. 4 grams = 1 teaspoon. Keep your sugar intake to 6 teaspoons or less a day. Your good health is in your hands. I guarantee you, that nearly any di-e ease with which you are suffering can be controlled or eliminated with the use of your fork. I can help you make the first step. Watch my 6 minute video on my website www.8020lifefitacademy.com/. Sign up for a free nutrition assessment.

It also CAN NOT be overstated how damaging sugar is to our bodies. Sugar has addictive properties. Experiment for 5 days. Eliminate sugar and see how much better you think and feel. Begin to eliminate or greatly reduce processed foods. What is processed foods? Generally, any food in a box, bag or with an expiration date greater than 30 days. Deli meats, frozen foods, prepackaged foods and any convenient front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

23


Renew

Life in Motion Cost of the Fall By rich gaudio, pt

We’ve all seen the classic TV commercial for the medical pendent…you know the one that shows the poor, little, old lady laying there on the floor, pitifully exclaiming, “Help! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” That commercial has left an imprint in the minds of TV-watching Americans, but there is a strange truth about life in our country that is imbedded in that advertisement. It turns out that falling, for those 65 and older in the United States, has a significant cost. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) track all kinds of data regarding falls in this group of older adults and the data is surprising! Did you know… Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among persons 65years old and older? 30% (3 of every 10) adults 65 and older report falling at least once every 12 months? This results in approximately 29 million falls and 7 million fall-related injuries each year? “Nice data points Rich, but so what?” If you are thinking this dear reader, you are asking a good question! As it turns out, the United States is spending something like $3.2 trillion PER YEAR on healthcare. That is what is causing all the hub-bub in Washington, DC about healthcare spending and Obamacare. We are talking about A LOT OF MONEY being spent on healthcare. Remember those 29 million falls and 7 million fall injuries I referenced earlier? Turns out the CDC reports the Medicare cost for those falls is currently $31 billion PER YEAR! And, the population of folks 65 and older is expected to grow by 55% in the next 1015 years. At that rate, the number of falls jumps from 29 million to 49 million and the injuries increase from 7 to 12 million

22

September 2017

raising the cost to almost $49 billion PER YEAR. Some falls are accidental, unexpected, and unpreventable as was the experience of some dear friends - a retired couple from our local, Fredericksburg area. Ricky and Lucy (not their real names) took a trip out West to see some of our country’s great national parks. Within the first 24 hours of being in Utah, Lucy accidentally suffered a fall when she stepped back to take a picture of an antique pump organ. Lucy tumbled down a flight of stairs backwards. After an ambulance ride in an unfamiliar state to an unfamiliar hospital, x-rays thankfully revealed limited injury, but the injury included a broken foot. That misstep and fall created a cascade of unexpected costs of time, money and emotions including the spontaneous purchase of a wheelchair; Ricky having to push Lucy along most of the vacation; and learning how ill equipped some hotels are for handling wheelchair-b bound persons. Fortunately, Ricky and Lucy have a strong faith and found blessings in each day of the trip. Lucy specifically mentioned that her trust in the Lord and her exercise and fitness level prior to the trip were the main two attributes that she believed not only allowed them to endure the experience but to be blessed despite her injury! Despite the unexpected, the CDC reports, “Older adult falls are largely preventable…” In answering the ‘so what’ question, I say it is now time for all of us in healthcare, in the fitness industry, and in our local community to realize that we have the power to help control “the uncontrollable costs of healthcare.” Be mindful and intentional in taking a stand in our own lives, to reduce fall risk for ourselves, our families, friends, and neighbors. In so doing, we can better manage our expenses as a nation and make the lives of American, older adults a little easier!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, 4701 Spotsylvania Pkwy Suite 106, Fredericksburg, VA 22407. Rich can be reached on www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100 Or, agewellvirginia@gmail.com

Front porch fredericksburg

Civility mindful communication

let food be your medicine by Joan M. Geisler Thomas Edison said, “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.” Hippocrates said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be your food.” It is no news that food can make or break our health. It goes beyond orange juice and chicken soup to help with a cold and ginger ale for an upset stomach. It is no news that inflammation is the root cause of most diseases. If we will control inflammation in our bodies through our diet, we will be empowered to restore our health. Therefore, dietary changes can prevent and even reverse disease. Do you want to hear something crazy? We often crave the very foods that are making us sick. Health is not the absent of disease. We are not classified as healthy just because we currently are not experiencing any problems. Treating the symptom is not the same as treating the root cause a disease. In Dr. Don Colbert’s new book, “Let Food Be Your Medicine” he chronicles his journey to find relief for his chronic psoriasis. He also used his experiential knowledge to help his patients for the last 20 years. Modern western medicine is needed at times, but if it is not ‘housed’ in a body of good nutrition and healthy life habits, it will be significantly less effective. Here are 5 ‘foods’ that if you eliminate from your diet it will greatly enhance your health. It CAN NOT be overstated that for many people they have an extreme sensitivity to gluten, which is wheat, barley, rye. Eliminating or greatly reducing all breads, cereals & pastas will significantly reduce the inflammation in your body. Experiment for 5 days. Eliminate gluten and see how your bodies feel. However, do not replace it with gluten free pasta and breads. Those are full of chemicals.

foods are processed. Here is a rule of thumb; if it does not rot or will not spoil, it is a processed food. Don’t eat it. Only use olive oil, coconut, avocado, butter or any nut oil. Trans fats are as bad as they say. Trans-fats are sunflower, soy, vegetable, safflon, Crisco, margarine or any oil not mentioned in first sentence. It raises bad cholesterol and lowers good.

by bryn Pavek Facilitators leading an upcoming civil discourse workshop want to teach people to use communication that is mindful, respond without reacting, find common ground, and practice appreciative listening. "I want to help people have honest conversations without worrying constantly about political correctness," says facilitator Iris Coleman. "People want to know what we can say, and what things we cannot say." "Meaningful conversations can happen when people listening give value and validity to differing opinions," said Lena Gonzalez Berrios. Acknowledging that this is also a key in cross cultural and intergenerational communication, Gonzalez Berrios noted that she will go beyond the words spoken. She hopes to get people to think about body language, questioning techniques, and creating a safe place for civic discussion. The free, non-partisan civil discourse workshop, "A Pathway to Civility in Communication," is designed for persons 16 and older who live and/or work in the city of Fredericksburg, Stafford County, Spotsylvania County,

King George County and Caroline County. Five local organizations are bringing the workshop to the community because of their shared interest in civic engagement and community dialogue. Partners are the Central Rappahannock Regional Library (CRRL) and the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RASCB). Sponsors are the Fredericksburg Chapter of the League of Women Voters, the UUFF Social Justice Committee and The Front Porch Magazine The workshop will be held on Saturday, September 30 2017 from 15pm. The event is free to participants but registration is required. Persons may register at civildiscourse17@aol.com, by leaving their name (s) phone number (s) and number of attendees. The location of the workshop is at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (UUFF) building, at 25 Chalice Circle in Fredericksburg, VA 22405. Parking is available onsite and the building is fully accessible. Bryn Pavekis a member of the Publicity Committee

Limit or eliminate sugary drinks. Don’t be fooled, fruit juices, smoothies, energy drinks coffee drinks are calorie and sugar bombs! Read labels. 4 grams = 1 teaspoon. Keep your sugar intake to 6 teaspoons or less a day. Your good health is in your hands. I guarantee you, that nearly any di-e ease with which you are suffering can be controlled or eliminated with the use of your fork. I can help you make the first step. Watch my 6 minute video on my website www.8020lifefitacademy.com/. Sign up for a free nutrition assessment.

It also CAN NOT be overstated how damaging sugar is to our bodies. Sugar has addictive properties. Experiment for 5 days. Eliminate sugar and see how much better you think and feel. Begin to eliminate or greatly reduce processed foods. What is processed foods? Generally, any food in a box, bag or with an expiration date greater than 30 days. Deli meats, frozen foods, prepackaged foods and any convenient front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

23


Art in the Burg

art attack

Elizabeth Woodford’s (above) new show Florabundance is a celebration of nature in its most captivating beauty.at Artful Dimensions Gallery, at 911 Charles Street. Elizabeth Woodford is a versatile and inventive artist who mostly works in fiber and found materials. Her work ranges from wearable textiles, often created from the level of raw wool up to a richly embellished garment, to books and journals crafted from discarded paper and cardboard, to dimensional paintings incorporating actual plants. Her recent work includes eco-dying, a process that generates patterns and colors from leaves, seeds, and other plant matter; silk scarves produced in this manner have a unique and subtle glow. The garden and the oceanside are major inspirations for Elizabeth’s work. Her eye for detail, and her ability to capture organic energy and balance in various media make each work a delight and a revelation. With a base of delicate handmade felt, embedded lace, hand stitching and meticulous beading, she can bring a tidal pool or a coral reef to life. Or a poppy field, or a spring meadow. Her exuberant sense of color makes all her work lively and fresh. Elizabeth grew up in New England; she learned the art of spinning from her mother and grandmother, and fondly remembers the sheep her mother kept. Florabundance, Opening reception, 6-9 on September 1 at Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles Street. Her show will be on view through October 1; gallery hours are 12-6 Sunday and Tues through Thursday, 12-9 Friday and Saturday. ~By Barbara Posey

Largely self-taught, Moss acknowledges her lifelong admiration for DaVinci and Turner, as reflected in her ability to draw and in her use of subtle color. As a young mother, she redeemed books of S & H Green Stamps for art supplies. Determined to hone her skills and experiment with new media, she attended classes with such well known Fredericksburg instructors as Johnny P. Johnson, Steve Griffin and Bill Harris. While raising a family and creating, Moss also spent 35 years as a nurse and worked locally at Mary Washington Hospital and Pratt Clinic.

“Sifting Sand”, Ina Moss Moss's versatility extends to abstraction and mixed media. Currently, she teaches abstract painting in her home studio. For more of her work, see www.inamossfineart.com. Opening Reception, Sept. 1. For additional details about this show, visit www.artfirstgallery.com or call 540-3717107. ~By Suzanne Scherr

24

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

By Seth Casana We are excited to announce the Sixth Annual "Art Attack" event taking place on Saturday, September 9 from 10am-4pm. For one day, over eighty artists of the Fredericksburg region will be demonstrating their creative talent on the sidewalks of Caroline and William Street in the city's historic district. "Art Attack" is an annual event founded by local artists Bill Harris and Gabriel Pons to encourage the exposure, promotion, and celebration of Fredericksburg's vibrant art community. Throughout the day, volunteer artists will take to the streets with live art demonstrations ranging in painting and ceramics to mosaic art, music and dance. The "recruits" of Art Attack range from students as young as grade school through adults, both professional and amateur, working in their chosen medium. What makes this event special is the inclusivity; participating artists don't require a gallery affiliation or professional status, simply a willingness to execute their craft in the public realm. Art Attack Project turns the city's streets into the artists' creative space and allows the public to peek into their world. It's part

Harr y

dew photography art performance and pop-up street spectacle. There is no fee to participate. Recruits will be on their tour of duty throughout the Caroline Street corridor between Amelia and Charlotte Street (700 Block thru 1000 Block) and William Street between Sophia and Princess Anne (100 block thru 300 block). Support for this year's Art Attack Fredericksburg is provided by the Fredericksburg Arts Commission, Whurk Magazine, the Fredericksburg Center for Creative Arts (FCCA), and Community Bank of the Chesapeake. Contributing partners include PONSHOP and LibertyTown Arts Workshop To enlist in this year's Art Attack Fredericksburg, simply visit www.artattackproject.com.

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Artists: Beverley Coates

Harry is a 62-year-old veteran who spent many years homeless. He has been back in housing for about a year and a half. "I grew up in Caroline County and I remember every holiday. The family would come home, my mother would cook and we would all gather around the table and eat. I miss that. Sunday mornings we always went to church, and on holidays like Easter they would serve meals in church and we would be in church all day long. My father was kind of a comedian. He always made you laugh. On Halloween you would be in your room somewhere and he would come in with a mask on and just scare you. Or for Easter you could come into the house and think that everything was cool and he would have a whole bunch of rabbits that he would let loose in the house. Everywhere you looked you would think that you saw rabbits…and the thing is that you did see rabbits! I miss all that- my sisters and them coming over to the house for the weekends. Those were the fun days. I got family members but they’re not here. I have brothers in Kuwait and one that is in Germany and a sister in Maryland. I am a veteran. I was in the

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish

Army. I stayed in Germany for two years and then I came back here. I stayed in Texas for a while and I’ve been to Coleen and Waco and Ft. Jackson…I’ve been several places but never been stable. I don’t know if it was life itself or if it was just me. I stayed in the army for 6 years and I was homeless for about seven, maybe eight years. My life has been up and down. But the Lord blessed me a lot. He has kept me safe and taken care of me for years. When I did get back on my feet I had some money. I had a house that my sister who had died had left me. So I moved into that house and it was in such bad shape that I spent a lot of money on that house because I was thinking that I would live there for a long period of time. It got to the point that it exhausted every bit of money that I had. It got to the point where I couldn’t keep the bills up, and the house had a lot of problems that I couldn’t fix because I didn’t have any money. I ended up staying from one place to another. I have disability but the disability only goes so far. My life was pretty good. I was just hard-headed. When my dad was teaching me the things he needed to teach me I didn’t pay any attention to him at all. My uncle used to tell me “don’t let society or your peers teach you different values than what you were taught by your father.” I didn’t pay attention to that at all- I didn’t know what he was talking about at that time. I know know exactly what he was talking about because the road I went down…I ended up being disappointed in myself because listen - I didn’t have to be homeless…I put myself in this position by not paying attention and not doing all the right things I should have been doing. I’ve had a lot and lost a lot. So I don’t regret any of my past because I learned a lot. I’ve learned now what it means to be settled in my life and I’ve learned how to hold onto a dollar instead of throwing it away and I’ve learned how to respect other people and to value everything now."

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 1421 Sunken Well. The Winner of a Gift Certificate from Orofino Restaurant is Madeleine Vary

Oh you tiny Miss, bravely sitting on the river bank, old and serene. I remember in horror, many years ago I saw you, clinging to the riverbank while choking. I knew nothing of your history, as I was new to your domain, and had not seen you battle, the monster many times before. To see you on this lovely day, no water in your timbers, your lovely red walls, singing happy songs, makes my day!

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

Name This House

of fredericksburg

invades the downtown streets

Elizabeth Woodford & Ina Moss Sharing her artist's view of the world has always been a compulsion for Ina Moss (below). Throughout September, Memorable Moments, a broad selection of her realist paintings, will be featured at Art First Gallery in downtown The .mood of a landscape, the essence of a still life, or the interactions of people or animals in Nature motivate her to capture a unique moment in oils, acrylics or watercolor.

Stories

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

25


Art in the Burg

art attack

Elizabeth Woodford’s (above) new show Florabundance is a celebration of nature in its most captivating beauty.at Artful Dimensions Gallery, at 911 Charles Street. Elizabeth Woodford is a versatile and inventive artist who mostly works in fiber and found materials. Her work ranges from wearable textiles, often created from the level of raw wool up to a richly embellished garment, to books and journals crafted from discarded paper and cardboard, to dimensional paintings incorporating actual plants. Her recent work includes eco-dying, a process that generates patterns and colors from leaves, seeds, and other plant matter; silk scarves produced in this manner have a unique and subtle glow. The garden and the oceanside are major inspirations for Elizabeth’s work. Her eye for detail, and her ability to capture organic energy and balance in various media make each work a delight and a revelation. With a base of delicate handmade felt, embedded lace, hand stitching and meticulous beading, she can bring a tidal pool or a coral reef to life. Or a poppy field, or a spring meadow. Her exuberant sense of color makes all her work lively and fresh. Elizabeth grew up in New England; she learned the art of spinning from her mother and grandmother, and fondly remembers the sheep her mother kept. Florabundance, Opening reception, 6-9 on September 1 at Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles Street. Her show will be on view through October 1; gallery hours are 12-6 Sunday and Tues through Thursday, 12-9 Friday and Saturday. ~By Barbara Posey

Largely self-taught, Moss acknowledges her lifelong admiration for DaVinci and Turner, as reflected in her ability to draw and in her use of subtle color. As a young mother, she redeemed books of S & H Green Stamps for art supplies. Determined to hone her skills and experiment with new media, she attended classes with such well known Fredericksburg instructors as Johnny P. Johnson, Steve Griffin and Bill Harris. While raising a family and creating, Moss also spent 35 years as a nurse and worked locally at Mary Washington Hospital and Pratt Clinic.

“Sifting Sand”, Ina Moss Moss's versatility extends to abstraction and mixed media. Currently, she teaches abstract painting in her home studio. For more of her work, see www.inamossfineart.com. Opening Reception, Sept. 1. For additional details about this show, visit www.artfirstgallery.com or call 540-3717107. ~By Suzanne Scherr

24

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

By Seth Casana We are excited to announce the Sixth Annual "Art Attack" event taking place on Saturday, September 9 from 10am-4pm. For one day, over eighty artists of the Fredericksburg region will be demonstrating their creative talent on the sidewalks of Caroline and William Street in the city's historic district. "Art Attack" is an annual event founded by local artists Bill Harris and Gabriel Pons to encourage the exposure, promotion, and celebration of Fredericksburg's vibrant art community. Throughout the day, volunteer artists will take to the streets with live art demonstrations ranging in painting and ceramics to mosaic art, music and dance. The "recruits" of Art Attack range from students as young as grade school through adults, both professional and amateur, working in their chosen medium. What makes this event special is the inclusivity; participating artists don't require a gallery affiliation or professional status, simply a willingness to execute their craft in the public realm. Art Attack Project turns the city's streets into the artists' creative space and allows the public to peek into their world. It's part

Harr y

dew photography art performance and pop-up street spectacle. There is no fee to participate. Recruits will be on their tour of duty throughout the Caroline Street corridor between Amelia and Charlotte Street (700 Block thru 1000 Block) and William Street between Sophia and Princess Anne (100 block thru 300 block). Support for this year's Art Attack Fredericksburg is provided by the Fredericksburg Arts Commission, Whurk Magazine, the Fredericksburg Center for Creative Arts (FCCA), and Community Bank of the Chesapeake. Contributing partners include PONSHOP and LibertyTown Arts Workshop To enlist in this year's Art Attack Fredericksburg, simply visit www.artattackproject.com.

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Artists: Beverley Coates

Harry is a 62-year-old veteran who spent many years homeless. He has been back in housing for about a year and a half. "I grew up in Caroline County and I remember every holiday. The family would come home, my mother would cook and we would all gather around the table and eat. I miss that. Sunday mornings we always went to church, and on holidays like Easter they would serve meals in church and we would be in church all day long. My father was kind of a comedian. He always made you laugh. On Halloween you would be in your room somewhere and he would come in with a mask on and just scare you. Or for Easter you could come into the house and think that everything was cool and he would have a whole bunch of rabbits that he would let loose in the house. Everywhere you looked you would think that you saw rabbits…and the thing is that you did see rabbits! I miss all that- my sisters and them coming over to the house for the weekends. Those were the fun days. I got family members but they’re not here. I have brothers in Kuwait and one that is in Germany and a sister in Maryland. I am a veteran. I was in the

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish

Army. I stayed in Germany for two years and then I came back here. I stayed in Texas for a while and I’ve been to Coleen and Waco and Ft. Jackson…I’ve been several places but never been stable. I don’t know if it was life itself or if it was just me. I stayed in the army for 6 years and I was homeless for about seven, maybe eight years. My life has been up and down. But the Lord blessed me a lot. He has kept me safe and taken care of me for years. When I did get back on my feet I had some money. I had a house that my sister who had died had left me. So I moved into that house and it was in such bad shape that I spent a lot of money on that house because I was thinking that I would live there for a long period of time. It got to the point that it exhausted every bit of money that I had. It got to the point where I couldn’t keep the bills up, and the house had a lot of problems that I couldn’t fix because I didn’t have any money. I ended up staying from one place to another. I have disability but the disability only goes so far. My life was pretty good. I was just hard-headed. When my dad was teaching me the things he needed to teach me I didn’t pay any attention to him at all. My uncle used to tell me “don’t let society or your peers teach you different values than what you were taught by your father.” I didn’t pay attention to that at all- I didn’t know what he was talking about at that time. I know know exactly what he was talking about because the road I went down…I ended up being disappointed in myself because listen - I didn’t have to be homeless…I put myself in this position by not paying attention and not doing all the right things I should have been doing. I’ve had a lot and lost a lot. So I don’t regret any of my past because I learned a lot. I’ve learned now what it means to be settled in my life and I’ve learned how to hold onto a dollar instead of throwing it away and I’ve learned how to respect other people and to value everything now."

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 1421 Sunken Well. The Winner of a Gift Certificate from Orofino Restaurant is Madeleine Vary

Oh you tiny Miss, bravely sitting on the river bank, old and serene. I remember in horror, many years ago I saw you, clinging to the riverbank while choking. I knew nothing of your history, as I was new to your domain, and had not seen you battle, the monster many times before. To see you on this lovely day, no water in your timbers, your lovely red walls, singing happy songs, makes my day!

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

Name This House

of fredericksburg

invades the downtown streets

Elizabeth Woodford & Ina Moss Sharing her artist's view of the world has always been a compulsion for Ina Moss (below). Throughout September, Memorable Moments, a broad selection of her realist paintings, will be featured at Art First Gallery in downtown The .mood of a landscape, the essence of a still life, or the interactions of people or animals in Nature motivate her to capture a unique moment in oils, acrylics or watercolor.

Stories

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

25


Fred book fest is back... bigger & better

Rocky Horror picture show hits market square

By mary lynn powers

by A.E.Bayne

We offer private lessons for string, woodwind and brass instruments, as well as guitar, bass, piano and voice. Located in "The House on the Corner at the Crossroads of Music" where Route 3 meets U.S. Highway 1. 540-899-6787 26

September 2017

Fredericksburg Arts Council Fredericksburg and JumpStart!, as well as sponsorships from a number of local businesses including James Noll/PULP!, Jones’s Ready. Write. Launch!, Bayne’s Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (FLAR), Central Author Tasha Fuller returns to this year's Rappahannock Regional festival as a speaker. Library, Fredericksburg Parent Mark your calendars for Magazine, Front Porch Fredericksburg Saturday, September 23, 2017 when the Magazine, Story Collaborative, Minuteman 2nd Annual Fredericksburg Book Festival Press, Children’s Museum of Richmond, will turn Riverfront Park on Sophia Street Washington Romance Writers, Virginia into a book lover’s paradise. This year’s Romance Writers, Graythorn Publishing, festival has grown exponentially and The Digital Reader, Bestselling Author features over 120 writers, book artists, Maryann Jordan, Minnieland Academy, publishers, and book related vendors. Hinkle Ukulele, Frameshifts, Wind Up Bird, Partners James Noll, Chris Jones, and Amy UFO Food Truck, Red Dragon Brewery, and Bayne have been working with area Agora Coffee Downtown. sponsors all year and have lined up some This year’s book festival sponsors of the most exciting up-and-comers in the have a love of reading and business to make this year’s festival a entrepreneurship. Dave Mills of Story blast. Collaborative says that since imagination Organizing partner Chris Jones and writing content is an important part says he’s most looking forward to seeing of marketing, he sees the book festival as people in the community engage with a way of building our culture and exhibiting authors and vendors. “Last community together. year was an exploratory year for us. It For MJ Stone and Andi Stone was about vetting the idea and allowing Chitty of Agora Coffee Downtown, the writing community and the general supporting and promoting public to validate it. This year we’ve entrepreneurship in Fredericksburg grown by just over 200% which speaks motivated them to become involved for a volumes to the concept of an annual second year. MJ says, “At Agora, we carry book festival in Fredericksburg. I enjoyed a variety of local wares by over 100 area seeing some of our authors sell out last artisans, musicians and authors.” year and hope that our festival becomes Rowan Worth, president of synonymous with business growth for Washington Romance Writers, says WRW them.” is supporting the book festival this year as The festival’s growth is a marketing venue for its large number of supported this year by grants from the members in the Fredericksburg region. She sees it as the perfect way to introduce members to the public. Sandra Fedowitz of Wind Up Bird says she and John, her husband and business partner, are supportive of all creative endeavors, whether they be food or art related. She adds, “Maybe you can tell by our company’s name that we love to read, so of course we have to support the book festival in Fredericksburg. What a great idea to bring all those creative minds together.” Lynette L. Reed of Once Upon a Blue Moon Marbling is a returning vendor this year. She says, “I love sharing my art, ideas and techniques with the book loving public. The handmade journals and sketchbooks garnered a lot of

Front porch fredericksburg

curiosity and comments last year. With the expanded festival this year, I am looking forward to more of the same." Organizing partner James Noll, whose personal experience in marketing his own books at festivals has informed the production of the Fredericksburg Book Festival, says, “Authors have to make connections with readers. You have to put on your marketing hat and let people know what you've been writing. People love talking to and interacting with writers. It's magical to them. They also love buying new stories. And they love getting their books signed. Making new fans and starting or adding to your email list is a great way to build an audience.” Attendees should complete a free pre-registration to enter our raffles at fredbookfest.com and follow us on Facebook @FredBookFest for program details and the latest information on exhibitors and sponsors.

Want to Go? 2nd Annual Fredericksburg Book Festival Riverfront Park on Sophia Street Downtown Fredericksburg 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Writers, Speakers, Panel Discussions, Raffles, Food, and Entertainment Free to the Public / Pre-rregister for Raffles at fredbookfest.com A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. She publishes the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Book Festival.

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997

It looks like Fredericksburg is about to hit a “time warp” this fall with a showing of the cult classic Rocky Horror Picture Show. This zany, audience participation film opened in 1975 in a small theatre in California, and can still be found showing somewhere in the US on any given day. For those of us who survived the 70s, there is a fond memory of escapism when we think about the night we first saw this iconic production. The resurgence and revival of this film over the years is curious, but understandable once you see it. The film will air on a blow-up screen in the historic Market Square on October 20th at 9:00 PM. There will be a rain date of November 3rd at 9:00 PM. It is an R rated film, so only for those 18 and older. IDs will be required, as the museum will be offering beer and wine. The museum press release promotes this show quite accurately, as a mature themed film presented in an “immature fashion.” The showing is sponsored by the Fredericksburg Area Museum in conjunction with the Fredericksburg Arts Commission, Parks and Recreation and the UMW Rich Weirdos Club. The Rich Weirdos are a theatrical group that annually presents the Rocky Horror Picture Show to enthusiastic audiences on campus. Their Facebook page displays information on the show, as well as

photographs. This event exhibits and promotes Fredericksburg’s vibrant arts community. The story plot evolves around a young, recently engaged couple who get a flat tire in a ferocious rainstorm. They end up having to call on the spooky abode of Dr. Frank-N-Furter. The doctor is in the midst of a party celebrating a new invention of sorts. Needless to say, wackiness ensues. It is a musical foray into the new age of cinema where anything goes, and crazily enough, anything can be considered art, depending on who is viewing and reviewing. There must be something to this phenomena though, as it is heading towards a half century of people enjoying the production. I talked with Melanie Johnson who is the Sr. Development Officer for the newly re-opened museum. She shared with me some of the motivation in backing the showing. She explained that it is a bridge between the students at Mary Washington and the city. All of those involved would love to bring the campus closer to the community. The show is free to the public (18 and older), but the proceeds from drink sales will benefit the museum. Many of us were sad to see the bank building close up, and glad there is activity to support the new facility. Fredericksburg is good at costumes, so I’m sure this will be an event not to be missed. I’m thinking along the lines of a zombie bride, or a creepy maid, the possibilities are endless…

Want to Go? Rocky Horror Picture Show October 20, 9pm Market Square R Rated....18 & Older Free Beer & Wine sales benefit FAM

Edward Russell An Extraordinary Life By Christina Ferber

Sometimes someone comes into our awareness that can teach us how to make the most of our lives. Edward Russell was one of those people, and the community has an opportunity to get a glimpse into his extraordinary life by stopping by the Central Rappahannock Regional Library (CRRL) during the month of Septemberl. Russell's artwork will be on display at the Headquarters Branch, but the watercolors that visitors can see or purchase are small examples of what he left behind when he passed away in April of last year. "He believed in the 5 'P's' as he called it," says Maria Janney, a longtime family friend who is keeping his story alive. "Painting, Plants, Planes, Prayer, and Piano." Russell was a master horticulturist, avid member of the Model Plane Club who built all of his own planes, and a pianist who received a rare appointment to study under a prominent member of the National Symphony, but his favorite 'P', according to Janney, was the painting part of his life. "He believed that everyone should be able to own original art. His pieces were always well priced so that he could share his joy with the community," says Janney. Russell had art showings at the library at least two times a year and Janney plans to continue that legacy. Though art was a constant passion, it did not always play center stage in his life. After serving in both the European and Asian chapters of World War II, including being in France on DDay, Russell studied at the National Academy of Art. He then became curator of the Army Corps of Engineers Museum in Ft. Belvoir. While at the museum, he was commissioned to paint over 50 paintings of the former and present chiefs of the Army Corp of Engineers.

"He had a love for people and loved listening to everyone else's stories even though he had quite a few of his own," says Janney. Some of the stories that he passed onto her and her family include traveling out to the swampland that eventually became Dulles to find a certain reed which he and his brother cooked down to make charcoal pencils for their art. Another story includes running into Franklin Delano Roosevelt's car as a telegram courier. FDR made sure he was okay before sending him on his way. "He was full of these little snippets of history and they were so powerful," says Janney. "He would encourage my sons and others to hunger for knowledge just like he did. He wanted young people to appreciate history. That appreciation and thirst for knowledge characterized his life."

His paintings capture the beauty of our area, as well as other places around the globe and offer a slightly impressionistic view of the world. "After what he witnessed in the war, he could have taken a different path all together, but instead he continued to look forward and learn new things," Janney says. "He taught us to always look for the positive and good in things, even when you have had setbacks and suffered. He was such a precious man, I hope people sense that when they see his artwork." Russell's works will be showing the entire month of Septemebr at the CRRL Headquarters, located at 1201 Caroline Street. Stop by and honor his legacy. Christina Ferber is a teacher, mother & writer living in FXBG.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

27


Fred book fest is back... bigger & better

Rocky Horror picture show hits market square

By mary lynn powers

by A.E.Bayne

We offer private lessons for string, woodwind and brass instruments, as well as guitar, bass, piano and voice. Located in "The House on the Corner at the Crossroads of Music" where Route 3 meets U.S. Highway 1. 540-899-6787 26

September 2017

Fredericksburg Arts Council Fredericksburg and JumpStart!, as well as sponsorships from a number of local businesses including James Noll/PULP!, Jones’s Ready. Write. Launch!, Bayne’s Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (FLAR), Central Author Tasha Fuller returns to this year's Rappahannock Regional festival as a speaker. Library, Fredericksburg Parent Mark your calendars for Magazine, Front Porch Fredericksburg Saturday, September 23, 2017 when the Magazine, Story Collaborative, Minuteman 2nd Annual Fredericksburg Book Festival Press, Children’s Museum of Richmond, will turn Riverfront Park on Sophia Street Washington Romance Writers, Virginia into a book lover’s paradise. This year’s Romance Writers, Graythorn Publishing, festival has grown exponentially and The Digital Reader, Bestselling Author features over 120 writers, book artists, Maryann Jordan, Minnieland Academy, publishers, and book related vendors. Hinkle Ukulele, Frameshifts, Wind Up Bird, Partners James Noll, Chris Jones, and Amy UFO Food Truck, Red Dragon Brewery, and Bayne have been working with area Agora Coffee Downtown. sponsors all year and have lined up some This year’s book festival sponsors of the most exciting up-and-comers in the have a love of reading and business to make this year’s festival a entrepreneurship. Dave Mills of Story blast. Collaborative says that since imagination Organizing partner Chris Jones and writing content is an important part says he’s most looking forward to seeing of marketing, he sees the book festival as people in the community engage with a way of building our culture and exhibiting authors and vendors. “Last community together. year was an exploratory year for us. It For MJ Stone and Andi Stone was about vetting the idea and allowing Chitty of Agora Coffee Downtown, the writing community and the general supporting and promoting public to validate it. This year we’ve entrepreneurship in Fredericksburg grown by just over 200% which speaks motivated them to become involved for a volumes to the concept of an annual second year. MJ says, “At Agora, we carry book festival in Fredericksburg. I enjoyed a variety of local wares by over 100 area seeing some of our authors sell out last artisans, musicians and authors.” year and hope that our festival becomes Rowan Worth, president of synonymous with business growth for Washington Romance Writers, says WRW them.” is supporting the book festival this year as The festival’s growth is a marketing venue for its large number of supported this year by grants from the members in the Fredericksburg region. She sees it as the perfect way to introduce members to the public. Sandra Fedowitz of Wind Up Bird says she and John, her husband and business partner, are supportive of all creative endeavors, whether they be food or art related. She adds, “Maybe you can tell by our company’s name that we love to read, so of course we have to support the book festival in Fredericksburg. What a great idea to bring all those creative minds together.” Lynette L. Reed of Once Upon a Blue Moon Marbling is a returning vendor this year. She says, “I love sharing my art, ideas and techniques with the book loving public. The handmade journals and sketchbooks garnered a lot of

Front porch fredericksburg

curiosity and comments last year. With the expanded festival this year, I am looking forward to more of the same." Organizing partner James Noll, whose personal experience in marketing his own books at festivals has informed the production of the Fredericksburg Book Festival, says, “Authors have to make connections with readers. You have to put on your marketing hat and let people know what you've been writing. People love talking to and interacting with writers. It's magical to them. They also love buying new stories. And they love getting their books signed. Making new fans and starting or adding to your email list is a great way to build an audience.” Attendees should complete a free pre-registration to enter our raffles at fredbookfest.com and follow us on Facebook @FredBookFest for program details and the latest information on exhibitors and sponsors.

Want to Go? 2nd Annual Fredericksburg Book Festival Riverfront Park on Sophia Street Downtown Fredericksburg 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Writers, Speakers, Panel Discussions, Raffles, Food, and Entertainment Free to the Public / Pre-rregister for Raffles at fredbookfest.com A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and educator from Fredericksburg. She publishes the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Book Festival.

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997

It looks like Fredericksburg is about to hit a “time warp” this fall with a showing of the cult classic Rocky Horror Picture Show. This zany, audience participation film opened in 1975 in a small theatre in California, and can still be found showing somewhere in the US on any given day. For those of us who survived the 70s, there is a fond memory of escapism when we think about the night we first saw this iconic production. The resurgence and revival of this film over the years is curious, but understandable once you see it. The film will air on a blow-up screen in the historic Market Square on October 20th at 9:00 PM. There will be a rain date of November 3rd at 9:00 PM. It is an R rated film, so only for those 18 and older. IDs will be required, as the museum will be offering beer and wine. The museum press release promotes this show quite accurately, as a mature themed film presented in an “immature fashion.” The showing is sponsored by the Fredericksburg Area Museum in conjunction with the Fredericksburg Arts Commission, Parks and Recreation and the UMW Rich Weirdos Club. The Rich Weirdos are a theatrical group that annually presents the Rocky Horror Picture Show to enthusiastic audiences on campus. Their Facebook page displays information on the show, as well as

photographs. This event exhibits and promotes Fredericksburg’s vibrant arts community. The story plot evolves around a young, recently engaged couple who get a flat tire in a ferocious rainstorm. They end up having to call on the spooky abode of Dr. Frank-N-Furter. The doctor is in the midst of a party celebrating a new invention of sorts. Needless to say, wackiness ensues. It is a musical foray into the new age of cinema where anything goes, and crazily enough, anything can be considered art, depending on who is viewing and reviewing. There must be something to this phenomena though, as it is heading towards a half century of people enjoying the production. I talked with Melanie Johnson who is the Sr. Development Officer for the newly re-opened museum. She shared with me some of the motivation in backing the showing. She explained that it is a bridge between the students at Mary Washington and the city. All of those involved would love to bring the campus closer to the community. The show is free to the public (18 and older), but the proceeds from drink sales will benefit the museum. Many of us were sad to see the bank building close up, and glad there is activity to support the new facility. Fredericksburg is good at costumes, so I’m sure this will be an event not to be missed. I’m thinking along the lines of a zombie bride, or a creepy maid, the possibilities are endless…

Want to Go? Rocky Horror Picture Show October 20, 9pm Market Square R Rated....18 & Older Free Beer & Wine sales benefit FAM

Edward Russell An Extraordinary Life By Christina Ferber

Sometimes someone comes into our awareness that can teach us how to make the most of our lives. Edward Russell was one of those people, and the community has an opportunity to get a glimpse into his extraordinary life by stopping by the Central Rappahannock Regional Library (CRRL) during the month of Septemberl. Russell's artwork will be on display at the Headquarters Branch, but the watercolors that visitors can see or purchase are small examples of what he left behind when he passed away in April of last year. "He believed in the 5 'P's' as he called it," says Maria Janney, a longtime family friend who is keeping his story alive. "Painting, Plants, Planes, Prayer, and Piano." Russell was a master horticulturist, avid member of the Model Plane Club who built all of his own planes, and a pianist who received a rare appointment to study under a prominent member of the National Symphony, but his favorite 'P', according to Janney, was the painting part of his life. "He believed that everyone should be able to own original art. His pieces were always well priced so that he could share his joy with the community," says Janney. Russell had art showings at the library at least two times a year and Janney plans to continue that legacy. Though art was a constant passion, it did not always play center stage in his life. After serving in both the European and Asian chapters of World War II, including being in France on DDay, Russell studied at the National Academy of Art. He then became curator of the Army Corps of Engineers Museum in Ft. Belvoir. While at the museum, he was commissioned to paint over 50 paintings of the former and present chiefs of the Army Corp of Engineers.

"He had a love for people and loved listening to everyone else's stories even though he had quite a few of his own," says Janney. Some of the stories that he passed onto her and her family include traveling out to the swampland that eventually became Dulles to find a certain reed which he and his brother cooked down to make charcoal pencils for their art. Another story includes running into Franklin Delano Roosevelt's car as a telegram courier. FDR made sure he was okay before sending him on his way. "He was full of these little snippets of history and they were so powerful," says Janney. "He would encourage my sons and others to hunger for knowledge just like he did. He wanted young people to appreciate history. That appreciation and thirst for knowledge characterized his life."

His paintings capture the beauty of our area, as well as other places around the globe and offer a slightly impressionistic view of the world. "After what he witnessed in the war, he could have taken a different path all together, but instead he continued to look forward and learn new things," Janney says. "He taught us to always look for the positive and good in things, even when you have had setbacks and suffered. He was such a precious man, I hope people sense that when they see his artwork." Russell's works will be showing the entire month of Septemebr at the CRRL Headquarters, located at 1201 Caroline Street. Stop by and honor his legacy. Christina Ferber is a teacher, mother & writer living in FXBG.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

27


Companions volunteer with fredspca! By Candice Armstrong come in regularly to interact with our animals and clean our cat condo doors and windows. We also have Girl Scout troops that put together donation drives and also donate profits made from cookie sales. We are currently working with a young man who is doing his Eagle Scout project with us by building cat scratching posts. Some of our volunteers work exclusively with our foster program, some love to help us by transporting animals to veterinary clinics or picking up new animals as far away as Charlottesville or Richmond. We have volunteers that stay

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Jonah

shelter is at capacity, because it means we are saving lives and sending animals home to live the life they deserve. When space opens up, we often fill it right away by transferring animals from other facilities that are running low on space or resources. Without a dedicated and diverse team of volunteers working just as diligently as our staff, we simply wouldn’t be able to make this kind of impact.

28

September 2017

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

Candi Armstrong, MSW is the Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at FredSPCA. Contact her at 270-250-5455

We have volunteers from all age groups, from tiny tots who come with their parents to read with cats and fold laundry to older generations who help us tremendously with daily cleaning tasks such as washing hundreds of food and water dishes, toys and litter boxes. We have groups of adults with disabilities that

in celebration of grandparent day

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

with us for a season, while they’re home from college for the summer or while they’re working toward a community service project for school. At FredSPCA we’re a community of animal lovers, animal advocates and we believe that compassion starts here - with us. To find out more about volunteering with FredSPCA, please visit our website www.fburgspca.org/volunteer and sign up to help save lives today!

Fez

Stories that shine a light on life

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Whiskers Like so many other organizations, FredSPCA relies heavily on help from community volunteers to continue growing and making a difference. Though it’s true that volunteering at an animal shelter can get messy at times, it’s certainly never mundane! The work of caring for over 400 animals at any given time, keeping the shelter a clean and friendly place for visitors and advocating for our mission are jobs that are never quite “done” and we embrace that as an organization. We actually love when our

Porch Light

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

540-898-0737

By vanessa moncure When I joined this world some sixty-some years ago weighing less than a sack of sugar, I was the first and only child of two loving yet infant-naive parents. My infant images became pictorial family history through Dad’s 35mm Kodachrome slides - oh, there I am, behind the nursery glass, just minutes old. Over four hundred of these transparencies are still stored in a slide box - I see them now in my mind - and there she is, sleeping!! Eating!! Smelling a flower!! In the Gulf wearing her tiny bathing suit! Being strolled in her pram!! Sleeping again!! And photos with all FIVE of my living grandmothers! Those are the photos I cherish the most - both grandmothers were living and active - and three out of a possible four great-grandmothers, active and full of not only baby advice, but life advice as I grew older. I learned so much from all five of them - one came from a family of ten whose toothbrushes were only short, thin limbs of a sassafras tree, with the ends chewed down. She passed away at age 92, with all of her own teeth intact. Pay attention, toothpaste companies! One loved fashion, cosmetics and fragrances - and applied them all generously - being a chaperone for the Miss USA contest was an annual highlight and keep your posture straight, honey, stay out of the sun, honey. She tried SO hard for me to want to love taffeta and chiffon and sashes and tiaras as much as she did -and if I’d just lose a LITTLE bit more weight, honey…. From Mississippi we moved to Virginia - and a quiet little greatgrandmother who never gave up wearing gloves or hats on Sunday and tried, really tried, to teach me to knit, serve tea

properly and how to starch antimacassars. One great-gran was full of family genealogy and lore, and I have her list going back twelve generations through her mother’s side - wouldn’t she have loved the Internet? And my Nana - she was my complete role model as a grandmother. Every summer I spent weeks with her, never bored, learning how to snap beans, make a crisp hospital corner on bedsheets, play carefully with my mother’s china tea set, work on learning crochet, pick out my own box of doughnuts at Knakel’s Bakery; spill out the dress-up box in the attic, pick tart cherries then pit them, hang clothes on the line, learn birds by their call - she introduced me to card games, Scrabble, and most importantly she taught me to cook, she taught patience and she showed me love. I have a keen sense of observation today because she gave me the gift of time; I know that copperplate engraving is THE way it is done; that if you have to miss church because you are frying chicken for a Sunday afternoon picnic on Skyline Drive, you must catch the sermon on the radio; and when you’re learning how to drive, she will be your passenger but ONLY when you’re practicing in the cemetery. I was (unbelievably)almost fifty when she passed away, but she is still in my thoughts and actions every day. Sometimes it’s hard to imagine that I’M a grandmother of six now, a Nana and a Nee-no. And my 2,338 photos on my iPhone put my Dad’s slides in the shade!! Of course I don’t spend as much time with my grandchildren as I would love, but I’m secretly proud when they ask me to make Crunchies (watch out Chick-Fil-A) or a

chocolate pie (I lived in Richmond as a child - does anyone remember the Toddle House pies, there on Broad Street?) - I send monthly small packages, and now that I have twin granddaughters I’m making some of their clothes -when they sleep in the same set of walnut threequarter size beds that were at my Nana’s house and tell me, “these sheets smell just like you, Nee-no!" There are so many ways to be a grandmother today - some families are raising their own grandchildren, there may be many stepchildren, some adopt or foster children to fill up the nest again, many volunteer their time at schools or libraries, after-school language programs, even the arts or sports or neighborhood activities - children bloom and develop attachment under your attentions even if you have no children or grandchildren of your own. My children were “adopted” by a friend of my mother’s as their honorary grandmother - they miss their “real”

grandmother, but adult and child both benefit from this loving relationship. Yes, I was once a sack-of-sugar baby, but am proud to say I learned a bit about grandmothering from those five grandmothers who came before me - Now for myself as a grandmother, I hope I am fostering a sense of curiosity about the world, knowledge of their roots and the family who came before them - to have them love a garden, plants, herbs, and be adventurous with food, and foods of other cultures - to be willing to try new experiences and to celebrate the dates we have throughout the year, birthdays, holidays and even to celebrate the seasons in their turn. The best part about being a grandmother? Well, just about everything!

Vanessa & Buzzy Moncure with all their grandchildren above. Photo from 2016

Kale NOTE: All companions pictured are available for adoption

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

29


Companions volunteer with fredspca! By Candice Armstrong come in regularly to interact with our animals and clean our cat condo doors and windows. We also have Girl Scout troops that put together donation drives and also donate profits made from cookie sales. We are currently working with a young man who is doing his Eagle Scout project with us by building cat scratching posts. Some of our volunteers work exclusively with our foster program, some love to help us by transporting animals to veterinary clinics or picking up new animals as far away as Charlottesville or Richmond. We have volunteers that stay

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Jonah

shelter is at capacity, because it means we are saving lives and sending animals home to live the life they deserve. When space opens up, we often fill it right away by transferring animals from other facilities that are running low on space or resources. Without a dedicated and diverse team of volunteers working just as diligently as our staff, we simply wouldn’t be able to make this kind of impact.

28

September 2017

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

Candi Armstrong, MSW is the Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at FredSPCA. Contact her at 270-250-5455

We have volunteers from all age groups, from tiny tots who come with their parents to read with cats and fold laundry to older generations who help us tremendously with daily cleaning tasks such as washing hundreds of food and water dishes, toys and litter boxes. We have groups of adults with disabilities that

in celebration of grandparent day

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

with us for a season, while they’re home from college for the summer or while they’re working toward a community service project for school. At FredSPCA we’re a community of animal lovers, animal advocates and we believe that compassion starts here - with us. To find out more about volunteering with FredSPCA, please visit our website www.fburgspca.org/volunteer and sign up to help save lives today!

Fez

Stories that shine a light on life

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Whiskers Like so many other organizations, FredSPCA relies heavily on help from community volunteers to continue growing and making a difference. Though it’s true that volunteering at an animal shelter can get messy at times, it’s certainly never mundane! The work of caring for over 400 animals at any given time, keeping the shelter a clean and friendly place for visitors and advocating for our mission are jobs that are never quite “done” and we embrace that as an organization. We actually love when our

Porch Light

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

540-898-0737

By vanessa moncure When I joined this world some sixty-some years ago weighing less than a sack of sugar, I was the first and only child of two loving yet infant-naive parents. My infant images became pictorial family history through Dad’s 35mm Kodachrome slides - oh, there I am, behind the nursery glass, just minutes old. Over four hundred of these transparencies are still stored in a slide box - I see them now in my mind - and there she is, sleeping!! Eating!! Smelling a flower!! In the Gulf wearing her tiny bathing suit! Being strolled in her pram!! Sleeping again!! And photos with all FIVE of my living grandmothers! Those are the photos I cherish the most - both grandmothers were living and active - and three out of a possible four great-grandmothers, active and full of not only baby advice, but life advice as I grew older. I learned so much from all five of them - one came from a family of ten whose toothbrushes were only short, thin limbs of a sassafras tree, with the ends chewed down. She passed away at age 92, with all of her own teeth intact. Pay attention, toothpaste companies! One loved fashion, cosmetics and fragrances - and applied them all generously - being a chaperone for the Miss USA contest was an annual highlight and keep your posture straight, honey, stay out of the sun, honey. She tried SO hard for me to want to love taffeta and chiffon and sashes and tiaras as much as she did -and if I’d just lose a LITTLE bit more weight, honey…. From Mississippi we moved to Virginia - and a quiet little greatgrandmother who never gave up wearing gloves or hats on Sunday and tried, really tried, to teach me to knit, serve tea

properly and how to starch antimacassars. One great-gran was full of family genealogy and lore, and I have her list going back twelve generations through her mother’s side - wouldn’t she have loved the Internet? And my Nana - she was my complete role model as a grandmother. Every summer I spent weeks with her, never bored, learning how to snap beans, make a crisp hospital corner on bedsheets, play carefully with my mother’s china tea set, work on learning crochet, pick out my own box of doughnuts at Knakel’s Bakery; spill out the dress-up box in the attic, pick tart cherries then pit them, hang clothes on the line, learn birds by their call - she introduced me to card games, Scrabble, and most importantly she taught me to cook, she taught patience and she showed me love. I have a keen sense of observation today because she gave me the gift of time; I know that copperplate engraving is THE way it is done; that if you have to miss church because you are frying chicken for a Sunday afternoon picnic on Skyline Drive, you must catch the sermon on the radio; and when you’re learning how to drive, she will be your passenger but ONLY when you’re practicing in the cemetery. I was (unbelievably)almost fifty when she passed away, but she is still in my thoughts and actions every day. Sometimes it’s hard to imagine that I’M a grandmother of six now, a Nana and a Nee-no. And my 2,338 photos on my iPhone put my Dad’s slides in the shade!! Of course I don’t spend as much time with my grandchildren as I would love, but I’m secretly proud when they ask me to make Crunchies (watch out Chick-Fil-A) or a

chocolate pie (I lived in Richmond as a child - does anyone remember the Toddle House pies, there on Broad Street?) - I send monthly small packages, and now that I have twin granddaughters I’m making some of their clothes -when they sleep in the same set of walnut threequarter size beds that were at my Nana’s house and tell me, “these sheets smell just like you, Nee-no!" There are so many ways to be a grandmother today - some families are raising their own grandchildren, there may be many stepchildren, some adopt or foster children to fill up the nest again, many volunteer their time at schools or libraries, after-school language programs, even the arts or sports or neighborhood activities - children bloom and develop attachment under your attentions even if you have no children or grandchildren of your own. My children were “adopted” by a friend of my mother’s as their honorary grandmother - they miss their “real”

grandmother, but adult and child both benefit from this loving relationship. Yes, I was once a sack-of-sugar baby, but am proud to say I learned a bit about grandmothering from those five grandmothers who came before me - Now for myself as a grandmother, I hope I am fostering a sense of curiosity about the world, knowledge of their roots and the family who came before them - to have them love a garden, plants, herbs, and be adventurous with food, and foods of other cultures - to be willing to try new experiences and to celebrate the dates we have throughout the year, birthdays, holidays and even to celebrate the seasons in their turn. The best part about being a grandmother? Well, just about everything!

Vanessa & Buzzy Moncure with all their grandchildren above. Photo from 2016

Kale NOTE: All companions pictured are available for adoption

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS lisa roosa & jesse Reeve by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About “Kindness I've discovered, is everything in life.” ~ Isaac Bashevis Singer

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #35: UMW Chappell Tower It’s September and thoughts turn to students going back to school … leaves turning colors … cooler weather coming. With that in mind, I headed over to the University of Mary Washington. Eventually, I’d love to do a series of drawings of the campus. It’s a lovely gem tucked into the edge of downtown. The Chappell Tower always grabs my eye, so I started there. This particular sketch actually turned into a more involved art piece involving a couple of layers of plexiglass, but I’ve simplified it here so it will reproduce on a newspaper print page. You never really know how a particular art piece will end up when you start. You just have to sort of feel it and let the piece guide you on its path. As I type this, my head is swirling with images as I work on my November featured artist show for Art First. It will be my first “solo” show in three years. Where will these new images lead me? I truthfully have no idea at the moment. I guess I’ll let them guide me on their own path, too, and we’ll both be equally surprised with what finally makes it onto the wall in November. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Cancer Journal

Two people, Lisa Roosa and Jesse Reeve, who are making such a difference in so many peoples lives. Without these remarkable, compassionate people, working together for others, many people in our area would no longer be able to keep their loving pets to comfort them, to love and nurture. "Second Chance Dog Rescue," (started in 2002) Lisa and Jesse, who are guardian angels in my mind, step into these situations either by someone contacting them through Facebook, or finding them sitting at a dog/cat shelter, helping those who may be forced to relinquish their beloved pets. Lisa and Jesse not only rescue dogs who have gotten into desperate situations, but they also find people who through many circumstances, will have to take their dog or cat to one of the local shelters, unless they find funds to feed and vet their pets.. Through funds collected at Petsmart, Facebook, (see below) plus generous donors, (Lisa and Jesse being among the most generous) they are able to struggle through each month, with many mouths to feed. They also make their rounds to the stores that donate dog and cat food for them to distribute. They never seem to have enough cat food, the need is so great. Imagine, one day each week they deliver the pet food directly to peoples homes who have no transportation. This is just so amazing, so time-consuming, so much time out of their personal lives,so kind and generous. Another day is spent collecting the donated food or buying it. They also respond to calls about abandoned animals, which is the rescue

side of their compassionate work, They find homes and care for the overload of homeless, helpless, sweet dogs and cats, young and old, at their home. Lisa was raised in Alexandria, and had an aunt who inspired her with her goodness and kindness to people. She often helped people out by caring for their pets. Lisa said her aunt made things happen. Lisa sounds like her aunt! Lisa was a career police officer,in Arlington, now retired, where she also worked with the F.B.I. Task Force, and responded to 9/11.. She loves her Yorkshire Terrier, and enjoys her trips in her camper. Jesse was raised in Arlington, is a navy veteran, retired as a firefighter, EMT, after 23 years, he also responded to 9/11,and is still working in security. He would like to say, his first rescue was a pitiful cocker-spaniel! Oh wow, what a delightful morning, talking to these wonderful .Fredericksburgers! Is our town lucky or what!!!! Support Second Chancecontact www.secondchancedog.com , 540-752-1741 , lmr735@aol.com

Coolish, Fall coming, kids to school, hoping to see you sitting down by the city dock, reading your Front Porch magazine! ~Georgia Note: Second Chance Dog Rescue, teams with Antioch United Methodist Church, to provide 300 lbs of food monthly for the dogs and cats at Micah in downtown . These pets belong to the men and women who are working to restructure their own lives, and to whom their pets may be their only loving relationship. Second Chance, delivers pet food and vet care to 17 families and 44 pets, who have no transportation. They rescue dogs under 20 lbs., have them medically evaluated, neutered, heart-worm tested, all shots, micro-chipped and groomed. Donations can be made to their website www.secondchancedog.com or through Pay Pal on Facebook. email lm735@aol.com Thanks again Lisa and Jesse, plus Laura Bonner who donates time keeping up your website

Who turned on the light ? by rim vining It used to be that when you came downstairs to the kitchen in the middle of the night and switched on the light all the little creepy crawlies scampered away never to be seen. When I switched on the lights about my Summer of Love and the world of cancer everyone came towards the light and did not run away. Interesting. In this endeavor the bar has been set incredibly high for me by five year olds who get their tonsils out all the time, eat the ice cream and then go back outside to play and a spectacular woman somewhat older than myself who simply said, “Yeah, I did that last year. You’ll be fine.” So I guess I will Rim wrapped in Prayer Shawl during be fine if I do what the pros tell Radiation Treatment me: Rest, fluids, nourishment, and letting those who love you do their coddling in my house. We had aspirin, thing. But no scotch? beef tea & toast, a throw up pan and a The way this neck / throat cancer loving voice that said, “You’ll be fine.” thing seems to go is you find the source, (Yeah, but check out that remove it, treat the affected area with wonderful Prayer Shawl Florence gave me radiation and chemo and that should do from The Methodist Church… now that’s the trick. Lots of survivors out there. I coddling!) Like the new look? Folksinger got books, testimonials, links to blogs and to Tech Geek! ~Rim lots of do’s and don’ts all with “You’ll be fine.” So I plan to be fine. Who wouldn’t? I’m doing all those things that will make it happen. I had my tonsil out which was the source and trust me as an adult it is two weeks and more than just ice cream and you don’t just go out and Bring a little sunshine play. All the cancer is now contained in to a senior’s life! the lymph nodes in the neck and everything else looks clear. There is this Too many seniors feel pesky radiation every day of the week lonely and isolated. until October and the five- hour IV sessions for chemo every three weeks. But I’ll be fine. YOU can make a Oh and for those of you who are difference by volunteering wondering yes, I had the “simple to visit a senior in the procedure” as they call it. I had a feeding Fredericksburg area. tube ‘installed’ so to speak so I can assure myself of proper nourishment should the throat become too difficult a route for Volunteer training is food during treatment. Simple for the provided & no special skills Doc, he was done in twenty minutes. I, on are required. the other hand, couldn’t move for days and transitioning from sitting to lying down brought tears. The Senior Visitors Program I’ll be fine because I have friends, is a FREE community family and faith. I’ll be fine because I’m getting excellent medical care by doctors service program of and nurses and tech staff that are Mental Health America of amazing and really just want you to get Fredericksburg. better. They say they want to cure me. Not help me out but cure me and they will. Visit mhafred.org Some of you may remember my or call 540-371-2701 mother Primrose was a Johns Hopkins nurse trained during WWII. There was no front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS lisa roosa & jesse Reeve by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About “Kindness I've discovered, is everything in life.” ~ Isaac Bashevis Singer

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #35: UMW Chappell Tower It’s September and thoughts turn to students going back to school … leaves turning colors … cooler weather coming. With that in mind, I headed over to the University of Mary Washington. Eventually, I’d love to do a series of drawings of the campus. It’s a lovely gem tucked into the edge of downtown. The Chappell Tower always grabs my eye, so I started there. This particular sketch actually turned into a more involved art piece involving a couple of layers of plexiglass, but I’ve simplified it here so it will reproduce on a newspaper print page. You never really know how a particular art piece will end up when you start. You just have to sort of feel it and let the piece guide you on its path. As I type this, my head is swirling with images as I work on my November featured artist show for Art First. It will be my first “solo” show in three years. Where will these new images lead me? I truthfully have no idea at the moment. I guess I’ll let them guide me on their own path, too, and we’ll both be equally surprised with what finally makes it onto the wall in November. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

September 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Cancer Journal

Two people, Lisa Roosa and Jesse Reeve, who are making such a difference in so many peoples lives. Without these remarkable, compassionate people, working together for others, many people in our area would no longer be able to keep their loving pets to comfort them, to love and nurture. "Second Chance Dog Rescue," (started in 2002) Lisa and Jesse, who are guardian angels in my mind, step into these situations either by someone contacting them through Facebook, or finding them sitting at a dog/cat shelter, helping those who may be forced to relinquish their beloved pets. Lisa and Jesse not only rescue dogs who have gotten into desperate situations, but they also find people who through many circumstances, will have to take their dog or cat to one of the local shelters, unless they find funds to feed and vet their pets.. Through funds collected at Petsmart, Facebook, (see below) plus generous donors, (Lisa and Jesse being among the most generous) they are able to struggle through each month, with many mouths to feed. They also make their rounds to the stores that donate dog and cat food for them to distribute. They never seem to have enough cat food, the need is so great. Imagine, one day each week they deliver the pet food directly to peoples homes who have no transportation. This is just so amazing, so time-consuming, so much time out of their personal lives,so kind and generous. Another day is spent collecting the donated food or buying it. They also respond to calls about abandoned animals, which is the rescue

side of their compassionate work, They find homes and care for the overload of homeless, helpless, sweet dogs and cats, young and old, at their home. Lisa was raised in Alexandria, and had an aunt who inspired her with her goodness and kindness to people. She often helped people out by caring for their pets. Lisa said her aunt made things happen. Lisa sounds like her aunt! Lisa was a career police officer,in Arlington, now retired, where she also worked with the F.B.I. Task Force, and responded to 9/11.. She loves her Yorkshire Terrier, and enjoys her trips in her camper. Jesse was raised in Arlington, is a navy veteran, retired as a firefighter, EMT, after 23 years, he also responded to 9/11,and is still working in security. He would like to say, his first rescue was a pitiful cocker-spaniel! Oh wow, what a delightful morning, talking to these wonderful .Fredericksburgers! Is our town lucky or what!!!! Support Second Chancecontact www.secondchancedog.com , 540-752-1741 , lmr735@aol.com

Coolish, Fall coming, kids to school, hoping to see you sitting down by the city dock, reading your Front Porch magazine! ~Georgia Note: Second Chance Dog Rescue, teams with Antioch United Methodist Church, to provide 300 lbs of food monthly for the dogs and cats at Micah in downtown . These pets belong to the men and women who are working to restructure their own lives, and to whom their pets may be their only loving relationship. Second Chance, delivers pet food and vet care to 17 families and 44 pets, who have no transportation. They rescue dogs under 20 lbs., have them medically evaluated, neutered, heart-worm tested, all shots, micro-chipped and groomed. Donations can be made to their website www.secondchancedog.com or through Pay Pal on Facebook. email lm735@aol.com Thanks again Lisa and Jesse, plus Laura Bonner who donates time keeping up your website

Who turned on the light ? by rim vining It used to be that when you came downstairs to the kitchen in the middle of the night and switched on the light all the little creepy crawlies scampered away never to be seen. When I switched on the lights about my Summer of Love and the world of cancer everyone came towards the light and did not run away. Interesting. In this endeavor the bar has been set incredibly high for me by five year olds who get their tonsils out all the time, eat the ice cream and then go back outside to play and a spectacular woman somewhat older than myself who simply said, “Yeah, I did that last year. You’ll be fine.” So I guess I will Rim wrapped in Prayer Shawl during be fine if I do what the pros tell Radiation Treatment me: Rest, fluids, nourishment, and letting those who love you do their coddling in my house. We had aspirin, thing. But no scotch? beef tea & toast, a throw up pan and a The way this neck / throat cancer loving voice that said, “You’ll be fine.” thing seems to go is you find the source, (Yeah, but check out that remove it, treat the affected area with wonderful Prayer Shawl Florence gave me radiation and chemo and that should do from The Methodist Church… now that’s the trick. Lots of survivors out there. I coddling!) Like the new look? Folksinger got books, testimonials, links to blogs and to Tech Geek! ~Rim lots of do’s and don’ts all with “You’ll be fine.” So I plan to be fine. Who wouldn’t? I’m doing all those things that will make it happen. I had my tonsil out which was the source and trust me as an adult it is two weeks and more than just ice cream and you don’t just go out and Bring a little sunshine play. All the cancer is now contained in to a senior’s life! the lymph nodes in the neck and everything else looks clear. There is this Too many seniors feel pesky radiation every day of the week lonely and isolated. until October and the five- hour IV sessions for chemo every three weeks. But I’ll be fine. YOU can make a Oh and for those of you who are difference by volunteering wondering yes, I had the “simple to visit a senior in the procedure” as they call it. I had a feeding Fredericksburg area. tube ‘installed’ so to speak so I can assure myself of proper nourishment should the throat become too difficult a route for Volunteer training is food during treatment. Simple for the provided & no special skills Doc, he was done in twenty minutes. I, on are required. the other hand, couldn’t move for days and transitioning from sitting to lying down brought tears. The Senior Visitors Program I’ll be fine because I have friends, is a FREE community family and faith. I’ll be fine because I’m getting excellent medical care by doctors service program of and nurses and tech staff that are Mental Health America of amazing and really just want you to get Fredericksburg. better. They say they want to cure me. Not help me out but cure me and they will. Visit mhafred.org Some of you may remember my or call 540-371-2701 mother Primrose was a Johns Hopkins nurse trained during WWII. There was no front porch fredericksburg

September 2017

31


Front Porch Fredericksburg - September 2017  
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