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contents

closeups 6

tim Ennis ... fxbg fix-it man

9

nurse practitioner ...cathy dixon

23

eddie vernon focus on wellness & prevention

6

porch talk .3

whittingham christmas window reveal

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

On the trails:: dr. andre eglevsky

7

Everything Greens: 20th downhome ball

18

history’s stories.: st. james house our heritage: kate schwartz new city historic planner/preservationist

19

tapestry of arts: flar fall issue

20

Senior Care: family health history

21

emancipated patients: drs. pat & mike stevens mind your mind: no one belongs to me

22

wellness: wondrous vitamin b12

23

poetryman: ella jane

24

art in the burg: childers & cannon

25

mYSTERY hOUSE stories of fredericksburg

27

downtown buzz

28

companions

30

fredericksburg sketches a look inside main street

31

from my porch: gratitude fxbgers: sally cooney anderson

“The Nutcracker” Whittingham reveals Christmas window theme By Emily Hollingsworth

18

...And more!

10

jane howison beal childhood home

11

transition-4-you: empowering families

12

vino: wine for leftovers

13

season’s bounty: craving cranberries

8 “you are not the drop, you are the sea”

14

Cooking with Kyle... swordfish chorizo tequila flambe

15 new way eat: wind up bird & red dragon

16-17

Calendar of events

15

26 the square plate project @artful dimensions 29 cheers to 200 years: famcc re-opening

Cover: “River House” by David C. Kennedy

2

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Whittingham’s is no stranger to creative decoration. From tables that were spread with appropriate black and orange cloths and bowls filled with containers with eyes painted on them for Halloween, Bob Whittingham, the store owner, said they change the place setting once every week and a half to two weeks. A tradition that customers have come to expect, and will visit the store to see the new decorations and to get ideas for their own homes. On Thanksgiving Day at 6 p.m., Whittingham’s will take their interior creativity out into the public view. Its store window on 1021 Caroline St. will have a dazzling, holiday-inspired display built entirely by the store. Whittingham wanted to keep the storefront display a surprise, but said that the theme of the display will be inspired by “The Nutcracker.” Whittingham located the supplies for the window going to the Gift Market in Atlanta, one of the largest markets in the United States. He also chooses many of the supplies that are in the store from the gift market.

“I always try to find something off beat, that is funny, whimsical, that makes people laugh or smile,” Whittingham said. Whittingham will partner with Tom Rainey, who will install the lights and other mechanical aspects of the window and Linda Silk Sviland, an artist who will paint the backgrounds and make new outfits for the figures and dolls in the display. Whittingham, Rainey and Sviland began brainstorming ideas for the window after Christmas last year. At the end of October and the first few weeks in November this year, their work will start in earnest, making sure that the window will be ready on Thanksgiving evening. Their window will also be part of downtown’s window front contest, creating a sense of friendly rivalry. “[The contest] made for more interest and a little more competition, which we hope brings people downtown,” Whittingham said. Whittingham can recall when department stores would have animated window fronts that would mesmerize families, and Whittingham’s goal is for his

store and downtown collectively to recapture the same magic in downtown Fredericksburg for families, longtime residents and newcomers alike, Small Business particularly during Saturday on Nov. 28. "I'd like to see people shopping downtown instead of on the internet,” Whittingham said. “Every time people shop on the internet, it hurts downtown. Small Business Saturday encourages everyone to enjoy the sights and sounds of Fredericksburg." During the fall months, Whittingham runs a cooking class inside of an operating kitchen in the store. A few of the chefs who instruct the classes cook in Fredericksburg area restaurants, including The Kenmore Inn. Last month’s classes ranged from fun to festive, making TV-style dinners and pumpkin-related recipes. Whittingham said November and December are busy months for the store, chefs and customers. They will be taking a break over the holidays, and plan to resume the classes in January. Gift cards for Whittingham’s can be used both for supplies in the store, that

range from helpful, quirky and unique, and for the cooking classes themselves. Public lessons are typically $22 per person, private classes are $50. The most rewarding aspect of the window display, according to Whittingham, is seeing both children and adults’ faces light up. He hopes that the downtown store windows will bring out the kids in everyone in downtown over the holidays. “They are a way to make us all feel like children again.” Whittingham said. Whittingham Holiday Window 1021 Caroine St. Reveal: Thanksgiving Thursday, Nov. 24, 6pm Emily Hollingsworth is a recent graduate of the University of Mary Washington and profiles artists, photographers and members of the Fredericksburg community

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

3


contents

closeups 6

tim Ennis ... fxbg fix-it man

9

nurse practitioner ...cathy dixon

23

eddie vernon focus on wellness & prevention

6

porch talk .3

whittingham christmas window reveal

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

On the trails:: dr. andre eglevsky

7

Everything Greens: 20th downhome ball

18

history’s stories.: st. james house our heritage: kate schwartz new city historic planner/preservationist

19

tapestry of arts: flar fall issue

20

Senior Care: family health history

21

emancipated patients: drs. pat & mike stevens mind your mind: no one belongs to me

22

wellness: wondrous vitamin b12

23

poetryman: ella jane

24

art in the burg: childers & cannon

25

mYSTERY hOUSE stories of fredericksburg

27

downtown buzz

28

companions

30

fredericksburg sketches a look inside main street

31

from my porch: gratitude fxbgers: sally cooney anderson

“The Nutcracker” Whittingham reveals Christmas window theme By Emily Hollingsworth

18

...And more!

10

jane howison beal childhood home

11

transition-4-you: empowering families

12

vino: wine for leftovers

13

season’s bounty: craving cranberries

8 “you are not the drop, you are the sea”

14

Cooking with Kyle... swordfish chorizo tequila flambe

15 new way eat: wind up bird & red dragon

16-17

Calendar of events

15

26 the square plate project @artful dimensions 29 cheers to 200 years: famcc re-opening

Cover: “River House” by David C. Kennedy

2

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Whittingham’s is no stranger to creative decoration. From tables that were spread with appropriate black and orange cloths and bowls filled with containers with eyes painted on them for Halloween, Bob Whittingham, the store owner, said they change the place setting once every week and a half to two weeks. A tradition that customers have come to expect, and will visit the store to see the new decorations and to get ideas for their own homes. On Thanksgiving Day at 6 p.m., Whittingham’s will take their interior creativity out into the public view. Its store window on 1021 Caroline St. will have a dazzling, holiday-inspired display built entirely by the store. Whittingham wanted to keep the storefront display a surprise, but said that the theme of the display will be inspired by “The Nutcracker.” Whittingham located the supplies for the window going to the Gift Market in Atlanta, one of the largest markets in the United States. He also chooses many of the supplies that are in the store from the gift market.

“I always try to find something off beat, that is funny, whimsical, that makes people laugh or smile,” Whittingham said. Whittingham will partner with Tom Rainey, who will install the lights and other mechanical aspects of the window and Linda Silk Sviland, an artist who will paint the backgrounds and make new outfits for the figures and dolls in the display. Whittingham, Rainey and Sviland began brainstorming ideas for the window after Christmas last year. At the end of October and the first few weeks in November this year, their work will start in earnest, making sure that the window will be ready on Thanksgiving evening. Their window will also be part of downtown’s window front contest, creating a sense of friendly rivalry. “[The contest] made for more interest and a little more competition, which we hope brings people downtown,” Whittingham said. Whittingham can recall when department stores would have animated window fronts that would mesmerize families, and Whittingham’s goal is for his

store and downtown collectively to recapture the same magic in downtown Fredericksburg for families, longtime residents and newcomers alike, Small Business particularly during Saturday on Nov. 28. "I'd like to see people shopping downtown instead of on the internet,” Whittingham said. “Every time people shop on the internet, it hurts downtown. Small Business Saturday encourages everyone to enjoy the sights and sounds of Fredericksburg." During the fall months, Whittingham runs a cooking class inside of an operating kitchen in the store. A few of the chefs who instruct the classes cook in Fredericksburg area restaurants, including The Kenmore Inn. Last month’s classes ranged from fun to festive, making TV-style dinners and pumpkin-related recipes. Whittingham said November and December are busy months for the store, chefs and customers. They will be taking a break over the holidays, and plan to resume the classes in January. Gift cards for Whittingham’s can be used both for supplies in the store, that

range from helpful, quirky and unique, and for the cooking classes themselves. Public lessons are typically $22 per person, private classes are $50. The most rewarding aspect of the window display, according to Whittingham, is seeing both children and adults’ faces light up. He hopes that the downtown store windows will bring out the kids in everyone in downtown over the holidays. “They are a way to make us all feel like children again.” Whittingham said. Whittingham Holiday Window 1021 Caroine St. Reveal: Thanksgiving Thursday, Nov. 24, 6pm Emily Hollingsworth is a recent graduate of the University of Mary Washington and profiles artists, photographers and members of the Fredericksburg community

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

3


Vanessa Moncure

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Anne Hunt Emily Hollingsworth Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Trevor McFadden Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Tony Stevevson Anagari Storms Casey Alan Shaw Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher.

The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

On the Trails

November 2016

A Doctor, Daughter, & Grandson~ trails, Turkey Trots, & Tradition

harvest

By Kevin Brown

BY Vanessa Moncure There’s just something special about Fall in Virginia. Not only for the leaf-peepers taking Sunday drives through the leafy switchbacks of the Blue Ridge Parkway, or the legions of football fans who brave the brisk fall weather to roar and cheer for their team. Fall is a time of festivals celebrating the season - farm festivals, folklife and history, oysters or peanuts, fairs, wineries and craft breweries, art shows and bluegrass music. The garden is fallow, it’s time to celebrate the harvest! Fall, to me, ushers in a time of ingathering and indwelling, best represented by Thanksgiving. The annual third Thursday in November represents a time for gratitude, sharing - a pause to reflect on the bounty of life, family, and community here in Fredericksburg. And what a vibrant palette we have colored! Our town, at the falls of the Rappahannock, is central to Virginia’s history and geography, and has been over the last three centuries or so. We’re recognized nationally as an historic landmark of the Colonial and Civil War eras, and have become a mecca for artists and artisans, historians and history buffs, students and shoppers, tourists and those who choose to settle here. Nationally ranked this year in the top 100 US cities for “Livability”, I understand the lure for a conveniencemeets-commerce small city vibe - within an hour’s drive of the Potomac River, the Blue Ridge Mountains, to the north Washington DC, and to the south Richmond, with its cultural charms. I’ve been a member of the Fredericksburg community since being dropped off at Mary Washington College as a freshman in the 1970s, through marriage and raising children, making friends, volunteering and working here. I’ve seen a small town grow into a small city - at the same time managing to maintain a solid sense of

hometown pride and achievement, welcoming new residents and supporting new businesses along the way. I value being able to walk to the downtown library (also nationally ranked), catching up with friends at a local coffee house, having a daily local newspaper, knowing my neighbors and having them know me! Seeing the Farmer’s Market selling pumpkins, gourds, chrysanthemums, beets and kale shows the annual segue of seasons from summer to fall, and makes me proud that we have a market for our farmers! Hosting a knit group for the last eight years hasn’t really improved my needle skills, but I enjoy it more for the connection than the yarn Vanessa circles widen with volunteer or church participation, workplace friends, like-minded groups or programs such as the YMCA, swimming, gym or yoga, even travel. Let the Front Porch calendar be your guide to local events, activities, music, dining, art and education. If you’re a regular reader of my column, I’m sure the love and connection I have for Virginia, and especially Fredericksburg, comes through. There’s a great sense of community here, something I see when neighbors-help-neighbors, when servicebased volunteers put on a drive, when organizations collect for the Food Pantry, when local chapters of national nonprofits meet their annual goal - it’s a feel-good moment, and one you want to share. Columnists in the Front Porch write monthly through a spectrum as wide as our history through art, music, perspective, business and personal journey.

with husband Buzzy and grandchildren The Front Porch presents all of this to us in Fredericksburg, every month. When Virginia asked me to write November’s “On the Porch”, I pulled out old editions, some from 2000 when I first began writing my food column, “Season’s Bounty”, to see what (our sorely missed) Rob Grogan had to say, and how he presented his month-to-month editorials. Reading through them, I began to see a pattern of his true connection to Fredericksburg, a force of optimism, gratitude, humor and inclusion all wrapped up in his monthly take on his adopted community. And the best part is, Fredericksburg adopted the Grogans back - and it’s what you’ll see here every month , cover-to-cover, in Front Porch Fredericksburg.

This month we feature a wellknown fixture on our local trails, Dr. Andre’ Eglevsky, who shares his joy of running with daughter Cristy Reeder and grandson Jakob Reeder. Dr. Eglevsky: “Outside my orthopedic practice, running has always been an activity to escape and improve my quality of life. It has never been a competitive endeavor, although occasional races help make it more fun. I run the Virginia Central Railway trail mostly now since it's near where I live, and also the

Heritage Trail/Canal Path that is convenient to my office. Listening to audio books while I run helps keep me motivated. Most importantly, in my 70s I have learned to take it slow and listen to my body. I’ve had a few interesting experiences on the trails. A goose once attacked me; I stopped an arsonist and helped put out a fire along the canal; I’ve come across unconscious people on the trail; homeless people building fires under gas lines; and tree limbs have fallen close to me. Cristy: “Growing up, my father ran all the time. From a very young age, I remember running being a part of his daily routine. I recall him running several marathons and even traveling to see him complete them. In high school while conditioning for field hockey, I jogged long distances for endurance. In college I continued to

run by myself and with groups of friends. Running is a great way to expend pent-up energy, and of course, experiencing the runner's high. Throughout adulthood I have continued running as much as my body will allow. Our new trails in Fredericksburg are awesome. I can step right out my door and hop on the Heritage Trail and run, or just walk with friends or ride bikes. I enjoy the river and seeing all of the nature along the path. I also like being part of the fitness-oriented Fredericksburg community. My interesting experience on the trails came while walking with a friend along the Canal Path behind the hospital. After hearing a vehicle careening out of control nearby, we ran over and found an elderly man bleeding after crashing his truck into a parked car, so we called 911. Thankfully the man was taken to the hospital and was okay. In the process of it all, the police found out a parked car was stolen and they thanked us for inadvertently solving a crime.

Grandson Jakob Reeder: “When we were young, my grandfather planned family bike trips, and my mom signed my brother and me up for a lot of Fredericksburg city races. I ran in the Great Train Race, several Turkey Trots and a 5-mile run. During my junior year at JMHS, I joined the cross country team and ran for two years. Cross country was a lot of work, but also a lot of fun. Through the years, our family’s running tradition has involved the Great Train Race, Turkey Trots, 4th of July Heritage Runs, and the Historic Half Marathon. Now that I’m away in college, I don’t get to run in Fredericksburg very often, but I’ve already asked my mom to sign us all up this year’s Turkey Trot, because running is our family tradition!” Thanks Dr. Eglevsky, Cristy, and Jakob for showing us that a family that runs together, stays together! Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS SALE

ALL LAMPS 25% OFF It’s the Bright Thing To Do Daily 10 - 5:30 ~ Sunday 12-5 800 Caroline Street Historic Downtown 540.899.2222

Jeff Fitzpatrick, 1965-2016 Jeff, the trailblazer for craft beer in the region, opened Blue & Gray Brewing Co in 2002. He paved the way for other microbreweries to grow in the area over the years. Besides beer, his brewery was known for its annual Oktoberfest and St. Patrick's Day celebration. Proceeds were donated to area volunteer fire departments. Jeff had a lasting impact in the community and had a profound impact on others.He will be missed.

Front porch fredericksburg

“May the road rise up to meet you May the wind be always at your back May the sun shine warm upon your face; the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, May God hold you in the palm of His hand.”

PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

photo by musing over a pint.com front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

5


Vanessa Moncure

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Anne Hunt Emily Hollingsworth Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Trevor McFadden Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Tony Stevevson Anagari Storms Casey Alan Shaw Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher.

The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

On the Trails

November 2016

A Doctor, Daughter, & Grandson~ trails, Turkey Trots, & Tradition

harvest

By Kevin Brown

BY Vanessa Moncure There’s just something special about Fall in Virginia. Not only for the leaf-peepers taking Sunday drives through the leafy switchbacks of the Blue Ridge Parkway, or the legions of football fans who brave the brisk fall weather to roar and cheer for their team. Fall is a time of festivals celebrating the season - farm festivals, folklife and history, oysters or peanuts, fairs, wineries and craft breweries, art shows and bluegrass music. The garden is fallow, it’s time to celebrate the harvest! Fall, to me, ushers in a time of ingathering and indwelling, best represented by Thanksgiving. The annual third Thursday in November represents a time for gratitude, sharing - a pause to reflect on the bounty of life, family, and community here in Fredericksburg. And what a vibrant palette we have colored! Our town, at the falls of the Rappahannock, is central to Virginia’s history and geography, and has been over the last three centuries or so. We’re recognized nationally as an historic landmark of the Colonial and Civil War eras, and have become a mecca for artists and artisans, historians and history buffs, students and shoppers, tourists and those who choose to settle here. Nationally ranked this year in the top 100 US cities for “Livability”, I understand the lure for a conveniencemeets-commerce small city vibe - within an hour’s drive of the Potomac River, the Blue Ridge Mountains, to the north Washington DC, and to the south Richmond, with its cultural charms. I’ve been a member of the Fredericksburg community since being dropped off at Mary Washington College as a freshman in the 1970s, through marriage and raising children, making friends, volunteering and working here. I’ve seen a small town grow into a small city - at the same time managing to maintain a solid sense of

hometown pride and achievement, welcoming new residents and supporting new businesses along the way. I value being able to walk to the downtown library (also nationally ranked), catching up with friends at a local coffee house, having a daily local newspaper, knowing my neighbors and having them know me! Seeing the Farmer’s Market selling pumpkins, gourds, chrysanthemums, beets and kale shows the annual segue of seasons from summer to fall, and makes me proud that we have a market for our farmers! Hosting a knit group for the last eight years hasn’t really improved my needle skills, but I enjoy it more for the connection than the yarn Vanessa circles widen with volunteer or church participation, workplace friends, like-minded groups or programs such as the YMCA, swimming, gym or yoga, even travel. Let the Front Porch calendar be your guide to local events, activities, music, dining, art and education. If you’re a regular reader of my column, I’m sure the love and connection I have for Virginia, and especially Fredericksburg, comes through. There’s a great sense of community here, something I see when neighbors-help-neighbors, when servicebased volunteers put on a drive, when organizations collect for the Food Pantry, when local chapters of national nonprofits meet their annual goal - it’s a feel-good moment, and one you want to share. Columnists in the Front Porch write monthly through a spectrum as wide as our history through art, music, perspective, business and personal journey.

with husband Buzzy and grandchildren The Front Porch presents all of this to us in Fredericksburg, every month. When Virginia asked me to write November’s “On the Porch”, I pulled out old editions, some from 2000 when I first began writing my food column, “Season’s Bounty”, to see what (our sorely missed) Rob Grogan had to say, and how he presented his month-to-month editorials. Reading through them, I began to see a pattern of his true connection to Fredericksburg, a force of optimism, gratitude, humor and inclusion all wrapped up in his monthly take on his adopted community. And the best part is, Fredericksburg adopted the Grogans back - and it’s what you’ll see here every month , cover-to-cover, in Front Porch Fredericksburg.

This month we feature a wellknown fixture on our local trails, Dr. Andre’ Eglevsky, who shares his joy of running with daughter Cristy Reeder and grandson Jakob Reeder. Dr. Eglevsky: “Outside my orthopedic practice, running has always been an activity to escape and improve my quality of life. It has never been a competitive endeavor, although occasional races help make it more fun. I run the Virginia Central Railway trail mostly now since it's near where I live, and also the

Heritage Trail/Canal Path that is convenient to my office. Listening to audio books while I run helps keep me motivated. Most importantly, in my 70s I have learned to take it slow and listen to my body. I’ve had a few interesting experiences on the trails. A goose once attacked me; I stopped an arsonist and helped put out a fire along the canal; I’ve come across unconscious people on the trail; homeless people building fires under gas lines; and tree limbs have fallen close to me. Cristy: “Growing up, my father ran all the time. From a very young age, I remember running being a part of his daily routine. I recall him running several marathons and even traveling to see him complete them. In high school while conditioning for field hockey, I jogged long distances for endurance. In college I continued to

run by myself and with groups of friends. Running is a great way to expend pent-up energy, and of course, experiencing the runner's high. Throughout adulthood I have continued running as much as my body will allow. Our new trails in Fredericksburg are awesome. I can step right out my door and hop on the Heritage Trail and run, or just walk with friends or ride bikes. I enjoy the river and seeing all of the nature along the path. I also like being part of the fitness-oriented Fredericksburg community. My interesting experience on the trails came while walking with a friend along the Canal Path behind the hospital. After hearing a vehicle careening out of control nearby, we ran over and found an elderly man bleeding after crashing his truck into a parked car, so we called 911. Thankfully the man was taken to the hospital and was okay. In the process of it all, the police found out a parked car was stolen and they thanked us for inadvertently solving a crime.

Grandson Jakob Reeder: “When we were young, my grandfather planned family bike trips, and my mom signed my brother and me up for a lot of Fredericksburg city races. I ran in the Great Train Race, several Turkey Trots and a 5-mile run. During my junior year at JMHS, I joined the cross country team and ran for two years. Cross country was a lot of work, but also a lot of fun. Through the years, our family’s running tradition has involved the Great Train Race, Turkey Trots, 4th of July Heritage Runs, and the Historic Half Marathon. Now that I’m away in college, I don’t get to run in Fredericksburg very often, but I’ve already asked my mom to sign us all up this year’s Turkey Trot, because running is our family tradition!” Thanks Dr. Eglevsky, Cristy, and Jakob for showing us that a family that runs together, stays together! Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS SALE

ALL LAMPS 25% OFF It’s the Bright Thing To Do Daily 10 - 5:30 ~ Sunday 12-5 800 Caroline Street Historic Downtown 540.899.2222

Jeff Fitzpatrick, 1965-2016 Jeff, the trailblazer for craft beer in the region, opened Blue & Gray Brewing Co in 2002. He paved the way for other microbreweries to grow in the area over the years. Besides beer, his brewery was known for its annual Oktoberfest and St. Patrick's Day celebration. Proceeds were donated to area volunteer fire departments. Jeff had a lasting impact in the community and had a profound impact on others.He will be missed.

Front porch fredericksburg

“May the road rise up to meet you May the wind be always at your back May the sun shine warm upon your face; the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, May God hold you in the palm of His hand.”

PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

photo by musing over a pint.com front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

5


Tim Ennis

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

FXBG fix-it man to doing that. I started out drafting for modernizing and maintaining the Engineering Department; then helping over 165 miles of potable water the Surveyors; then doing Inspections; and lines and 125 miles of sewer lines finally moving up to Project Management that operate 24/7, 365 days/year and overseeing countless construction underneath the city. Many of the projects for the city. lines were installed during the late As I was just getting started, I 1940s-early 1950s post-war remember designing the Kenmore Plant economic boom. Now that our water system on a napkin as I listened to population has over doubled in the project being discussed, and that size with greatly expanded project was completed just like I sketched business development, public it on that napkin. I could just see in my safety, and environmental mind how it should be done. concerns, the PW “If you would not Several years ago team and I have when Cowan Boulevard was been installing put your name on it, being built, I was larger capacity lines to don’t do it. “ supervising a contractor ensure water and sewer who became aggravated flows properly and safely because I was holding firm on the for years to come. Projects include specifications. “This is not just about a replacement and repair of water lines job”, I told him. “This is about getting along U.S. 1, College Heights, Fall Hill Ave, water to the people safely. There are Eagle Village, Hanover St, the Original 55,000 faucets depending on this job Walker Grant School, and Caroline St; and being done right.” That guy looked at me sewer lines along Kenmore Ave, William St, like I had three heads, but he did what I and Charles St. said and that job was done right. Lastly, I hope to see my legacy Over the past several years, carried forward by a new generation of Fredericksburg has invested over $11M in city engineers who care as much as I do

20th down home ball

The Copper Shop

By kevin brown This month we focus on a hometown Public Works hero, Tim Ennis, as described by Director of Public Works, Doug Fawcett. "Tim Ennis has been here longer than almost any other Public Works City employee. He has seen it all. He has served as the Project Manager on numerous countless capital projects. He is well known and respected by downtown merchants, local contractors and residents of the City." We asked Tim to share a bit more about his life and wisdom attained over an illustrious career. “I grew up on Prince Edward Street and went to James Monroe High School, class of ’79. Because I grew up here, I take everything I do personally. This is my town. When I walk down a street, I don’t just see the street as most people do. I know what is beneath it and feel the pride in knowing I helped build that. I’ve been doing this over 37 years. I sometimes work 17 hours a day, but it is extremely rewarding with never a dull moment. I always had a desire to build things. But I had to work my way up

Everything Greens

THE

By trevor mcfadden

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

and are willing to work hard. Work for the pride of ownership and personal satisfaction. If you would not put your name on it, don’t do it. Every day I wake up and feel like I am personally working for each and every citizen of the City of Fredericksburg.”

Ball noun \?bo?l\. MerriamWebster’s definition includes phrases such as, “A large formal gathering for social dancing” and, “a pleasant experience.” It conjures images of elegant gowns, orderly and polite discourse, and a conservative waltz in the background. That is an exciting prospect for some, I suppose. While others feel something very different: Panic. Perhaps they start planning how long it is necessary to stay. Ruminating on how ridiculous they feel in a tie or heels, as if it were an awkward school dance or wondering, “I support them, they know I do, so do I really need to be there?” With that in mind, a chance to celebrate at the 20 th Down Home Ball is exciting for everyone. Downtown Greens understands. They have worked hard and created something very different. Downtown Greens was forged with the desire to create a space that fostered community growth through creativity and individuality in a unique environment according to Laura Shepherd, one of the co-founders of the organization. These ideals remained a driving force when it

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group.

came time to plan the first Down Home Ball. As Laura and fellow founder Lisa Beaver considered the events and parties already going on around town, they wanted something more accessible, something for everyone. So the “elegant hoedown” began. It still qualifies as a ball by definition, but throw the rules out and expect a lot more than just, “a pleasant experience.” Year after year it has been a meeting ground for the vibrant community Downtown Greens has helped build and loves. It offers a chance for donors, members, children, friends and everything in between to come together and share. The past twenty years have created many fond and truly unique memories. Laura Shepherd remembers the playful dress code as one of her favorite aspects of the Ball. The code is simply: come as you like. Whether that be a tux and tails, a modest potato sack, or a mixture of the two, all are welcomed and encouraged. It is an attitude that clearly conveys the comfort and willingness of everyone involved. The dress code played a role in the memory Lisa Beaver shared

with me about two people finding each other, one in a beautiful red dress and the other in a pair of overalls. Kent Ippolito and Claudia Emerson met at the 1999 Down Home Ball and found love and marriage. Their story is a great example of what the evening offers, “The Ball is a perfect time to share… all sorts of things can happen.” So pull out that lime green tweed blazer and red wing-tip creepers and be part of the celebration and community this year! The Down Home Ball is hosted by Roxbury Garden Center on November 19 th this year with festivities running from 6pm-m midnight. The twentieth anniversary will be quite the to-do with live music, delicious locally catered food, fun activities for the kids and plenty to drink for all from a cash bar with beer to gourmet hot chocolates. Come celebrate 20 years of a fun tradition in support of your local green space, Downtown Greens.

Trevor McFadden is a native to Fredericksburg and a serial hobbyist. If only he had time for them all...

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

7


Tim Ennis

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

FXBG fix-it man to doing that. I started out drafting for modernizing and maintaining the Engineering Department; then helping over 165 miles of potable water the Surveyors; then doing Inspections; and lines and 125 miles of sewer lines finally moving up to Project Management that operate 24/7, 365 days/year and overseeing countless construction underneath the city. Many of the projects for the city. lines were installed during the late As I was just getting started, I 1940s-early 1950s post-war remember designing the Kenmore Plant economic boom. Now that our water system on a napkin as I listened to population has over doubled in the project being discussed, and that size with greatly expanded project was completed just like I sketched business development, public it on that napkin. I could just see in my safety, and environmental mind how it should be done. concerns, the PW “If you would not Several years ago team and I have when Cowan Boulevard was been installing put your name on it, being built, I was larger capacity lines to don’t do it. “ supervising a contractor ensure water and sewer who became aggravated flows properly and safely because I was holding firm on the for years to come. Projects include specifications. “This is not just about a replacement and repair of water lines job”, I told him. “This is about getting along U.S. 1, College Heights, Fall Hill Ave, water to the people safely. There are Eagle Village, Hanover St, the Original 55,000 faucets depending on this job Walker Grant School, and Caroline St; and being done right.” That guy looked at me sewer lines along Kenmore Ave, William St, like I had three heads, but he did what I and Charles St. said and that job was done right. Lastly, I hope to see my legacy Over the past several years, carried forward by a new generation of Fredericksburg has invested over $11M in city engineers who care as much as I do

20th down home ball

The Copper Shop

By kevin brown This month we focus on a hometown Public Works hero, Tim Ennis, as described by Director of Public Works, Doug Fawcett. "Tim Ennis has been here longer than almost any other Public Works City employee. He has seen it all. He has served as the Project Manager on numerous countless capital projects. He is well known and respected by downtown merchants, local contractors and residents of the City." We asked Tim to share a bit more about his life and wisdom attained over an illustrious career. “I grew up on Prince Edward Street and went to James Monroe High School, class of ’79. Because I grew up here, I take everything I do personally. This is my town. When I walk down a street, I don’t just see the street as most people do. I know what is beneath it and feel the pride in knowing I helped build that. I’ve been doing this over 37 years. I sometimes work 17 hours a day, but it is extremely rewarding with never a dull moment. I always had a desire to build things. But I had to work my way up

Everything Greens

THE

By trevor mcfadden

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

and are willing to work hard. Work for the pride of ownership and personal satisfaction. If you would not put your name on it, don’t do it. Every day I wake up and feel like I am personally working for each and every citizen of the City of Fredericksburg.”

Ball noun \?bo?l\. MerriamWebster’s definition includes phrases such as, “A large formal gathering for social dancing” and, “a pleasant experience.” It conjures images of elegant gowns, orderly and polite discourse, and a conservative waltz in the background. That is an exciting prospect for some, I suppose. While others feel something very different: Panic. Perhaps they start planning how long it is necessary to stay. Ruminating on how ridiculous they feel in a tie or heels, as if it were an awkward school dance or wondering, “I support them, they know I do, so do I really need to be there?” With that in mind, a chance to celebrate at the 20 th Down Home Ball is exciting for everyone. Downtown Greens understands. They have worked hard and created something very different. Downtown Greens was forged with the desire to create a space that fostered community growth through creativity and individuality in a unique environment according to Laura Shepherd, one of the co-founders of the organization. These ideals remained a driving force when it

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group.

came time to plan the first Down Home Ball. As Laura and fellow founder Lisa Beaver considered the events and parties already going on around town, they wanted something more accessible, something for everyone. So the “elegant hoedown” began. It still qualifies as a ball by definition, but throw the rules out and expect a lot more than just, “a pleasant experience.” Year after year it has been a meeting ground for the vibrant community Downtown Greens has helped build and loves. It offers a chance for donors, members, children, friends and everything in between to come together and share. The past twenty years have created many fond and truly unique memories. Laura Shepherd remembers the playful dress code as one of her favorite aspects of the Ball. The code is simply: come as you like. Whether that be a tux and tails, a modest potato sack, or a mixture of the two, all are welcomed and encouraged. It is an attitude that clearly conveys the comfort and willingness of everyone involved. The dress code played a role in the memory Lisa Beaver shared

with me about two people finding each other, one in a beautiful red dress and the other in a pair of overalls. Kent Ippolito and Claudia Emerson met at the 1999 Down Home Ball and found love and marriage. Their story is a great example of what the evening offers, “The Ball is a perfect time to share… all sorts of things can happen.” So pull out that lime green tweed blazer and red wing-tip creepers and be part of the celebration and community this year! The Down Home Ball is hosted by Roxbury Garden Center on November 19 th this year with festivities running from 6pm-m midnight. The twentieth anniversary will be quite the to-do with live music, delicious locally catered food, fun activities for the kids and plenty to drink for all from a cash bar with beer to gourmet hot chocolates. Come celebrate 20 years of a fun tradition in support of your local green space, Downtown Greens.

Trevor McFadden is a native to Fredericksburg and a serial hobbyist. If only he had time for them all...

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

7


“You Are Not the Drop...

Cathy Dixon

You Are The Sea”

Nurse Practitioner

By Collette caprara

A Large Selection Available

200 William Street Downtown ,Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Sat: 9-5:30 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

The words above are from the lyrics of a song written by Bob Sima (black shirt above) (a believer in the connectedness of all), who is at the hub of a series of happenings in my life that seem to prove his point. Sometimes all it takes is acting on an intuition when you are thinking about a friend, or talking to a person you may not know. That’s enough to open the threshold to a pathway of connectedness. Several years ago, I attended a house concert where Bob Sima performed. I picked up a couple of his CD’s and discovered that I was addicted to their uplifting spirit and would listen to them over and over. At that time, Rob Grogan

(left above)—with his hallmark courage and positive attitude—was enduring a devastating illness. I felt an urge to send those CD’s to him, thinking he would resonate with their message. He did. He loved them and wrote a note of thanks for them in his Front Porch magazine. Later, when Sima was back in the Fredericksburg area for a garden concert, two friends brought Rob with them and the four of us sat together in chairs on the lawn throughout an enchanted night. The strings of party lights were glowing, the evening air was soft and cool, and Bob

Sima sang directly to Rob. Some circuit of energy was going on between the two of them as if no one else was in that yard, and Rob leaned his head back in delight. A beautiful vision. This summer, Bob Sima was back for another garden concert, but Rob was no longer among us—in the flesh. Sima dedicated a song to him with lyrics that included “You were bathed in the light when you came to this life, you’ll be bathed in the light when you leave.” Many eyes were misty at that moment. Then Sima introduced another song that he had written for and dedicated to a person named Richard Moore. (above) In 1972, Richard was just ten years old and was on his way from school when an event occurred that would change his life—and the lives of many he would touch. As he ran past an army lookout post at the edge of the playground, a British Soldier fired a rubber bullet from ten feet away. He was blinded by that shot, which struck him between the eyes. Richard later recounted that, in that flash and the darkness that followed, his first thought was that he would never see his

8

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

by M.L. Powers

parents’ faces again. Later, and throughout his life, many of his thoughts were about that soldier. He wondered how the incident affected him and if he ever thought of the child whose life he had destined to darkness, and he determined that he would find that man. Decades later, Richard’s search ended in success. Though it was initially difficult for Charles Innes to confront the memory of that day, he eventually agreed to meet with Richard, who embraced him with forgiveness. In the years that followed, the two became close friends. Richard went on to found Children in the Crossfire, a nonprofit organization to support and empower vulnerable and impoverished children in countries throughout the world, including Tanzania and Ethiopia. In 2011 Richard

recounted his story at an event with the Dalai Lama (above), who praised him as a model of compassion, forgiveness and peace. The story of continuing connections moves on. This fall, while attending a conference with my husband in Ireland on conflict resolution, I was talking with a woman who had completed a ten-year project of interviews with men and women who had been affected by the Holocaust in their childhood. I was telling her about Children in the Crossfire, when a man behind us introduced himself as Seamus Farrell, a board member of Richard Moore’s organization! My husband connected Seamus with a representative of his Global Peace Foundation in Tanzania who was also at the conference—and they made plans for collaborating in the future. Since then, we have stayed in touch through emails with both Seamus and Richard. Maybe Rob Grogan, a master of connecting people, is smiling. Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist who does a great deal of “connecting” herself.

I had a conversation with my friend and neighbor, Cathy Duncan who is a Nurse Practitioner. She informed me that November 13 - 19 is the week that is designated as Nurse Practitioners’ Week. We talked about what this meant, as everyone has a week in the professional community. This is a week to celebrate exceptional health care providers, as well as a reminder of laws that need to be addressed in this area. There is legislation in the works to allow for Full Practice Authority, which would give NPs the ability to work independently from a physician. Each state is different, but in Virginia, there is a collaborative agreement which states that there must at least be a physician available by phone. This legislation addresses improving access to care. Most of us have encountered difficulty in scheduling appointments with doctors, and

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

sometimes we see a Nurse Practitioner in lieu of the doctor. These individuals have all of the qualifications that a doctor has. They have acquired a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and then progressed further to earn a Masters in Nursing where they can follow a track in areas of family, pediatric, adult/geriatric, or women’s health. They must continue to take classes to keep their certification. This enables them to be aware of changes and newer practices that are being discovered all the time. Cathy started as a Candy Striper, a volunteer nurse’s aid. We all wanted one of those red and white striped uniforms back then! She then progressed to LPN, and later acquired her nursing degree; and worked for over thirty years in that field. She has since finished her Master’s degree in Nursing and she is board certified in family practice. Her progression to NP was mostly a matter of autonomy. She is able to test, diagnose and treat. Nurse Practitioners tend to be underrated, but their experience and capabilities often equal or exceed those of the doctors they work with. This is not a new career field, but has been in existence since 1965, when the first NP program was started at the University of Colorado by Dr. Loretta Ford, and soon after Boston College instituted a masters program for Nurse Practitioners. The goals include partnering with doctors to bring quality care to patients and allowing more choices in individual health care with an emphasis on prevention and education. There are approximately 220,000 NPs nationwide helping to make the health care system more available to everyone. Cathy is personally interested in integrative medicine, incorporating herbal and homeopathic treatment with, or instead of traditional medications. She has taken a course on homeopathy and hopes to certify next year. Integrative medicine includes oils, exercise, meditation and mindful eating. This is becoming more and more relevant as the costs of pharmaceuticals continue to rise. As we continue to deal with an aging population, and the chronic disease issues, alternative methods are a viable option. So, hats off to these professionals who aid in healing our many ailments. Hope you celebrate your week in November!

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman Mary Lynn Powers writes about the people, places & things that make FXBG great each month for FP

1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

9


“You Are Not the Drop...

Cathy Dixon

You Are The Sea”

Nurse Practitioner

By Collette caprara

A Large Selection Available

200 William Street Downtown ,Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Sat: 9-5:30 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

The words above are from the lyrics of a song written by Bob Sima (black shirt above) (a believer in the connectedness of all), who is at the hub of a series of happenings in my life that seem to prove his point. Sometimes all it takes is acting on an intuition when you are thinking about a friend, or talking to a person you may not know. That’s enough to open the threshold to a pathway of connectedness. Several years ago, I attended a house concert where Bob Sima performed. I picked up a couple of his CD’s and discovered that I was addicted to their uplifting spirit and would listen to them over and over. At that time, Rob Grogan

(left above)—with his hallmark courage and positive attitude—was enduring a devastating illness. I felt an urge to send those CD’s to him, thinking he would resonate with their message. He did. He loved them and wrote a note of thanks for them in his Front Porch magazine. Later, when Sima was back in the Fredericksburg area for a garden concert, two friends brought Rob with them and the four of us sat together in chairs on the lawn throughout an enchanted night. The strings of party lights were glowing, the evening air was soft and cool, and Bob

Sima sang directly to Rob. Some circuit of energy was going on between the two of them as if no one else was in that yard, and Rob leaned his head back in delight. A beautiful vision. This summer, Bob Sima was back for another garden concert, but Rob was no longer among us—in the flesh. Sima dedicated a song to him with lyrics that included “You were bathed in the light when you came to this life, you’ll be bathed in the light when you leave.” Many eyes were misty at that moment. Then Sima introduced another song that he had written for and dedicated to a person named Richard Moore. (above) In 1972, Richard was just ten years old and was on his way from school when an event occurred that would change his life—and the lives of many he would touch. As he ran past an army lookout post at the edge of the playground, a British Soldier fired a rubber bullet from ten feet away. He was blinded by that shot, which struck him between the eyes. Richard later recounted that, in that flash and the darkness that followed, his first thought was that he would never see his

8

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

by M.L. Powers

parents’ faces again. Later, and throughout his life, many of his thoughts were about that soldier. He wondered how the incident affected him and if he ever thought of the child whose life he had destined to darkness, and he determined that he would find that man. Decades later, Richard’s search ended in success. Though it was initially difficult for Charles Innes to confront the memory of that day, he eventually agreed to meet with Richard, who embraced him with forgiveness. In the years that followed, the two became close friends. Richard went on to found Children in the Crossfire, a nonprofit organization to support and empower vulnerable and impoverished children in countries throughout the world, including Tanzania and Ethiopia. In 2011 Richard

recounted his story at an event with the Dalai Lama (above), who praised him as a model of compassion, forgiveness and peace. The story of continuing connections moves on. This fall, while attending a conference with my husband in Ireland on conflict resolution, I was talking with a woman who had completed a ten-year project of interviews with men and women who had been affected by the Holocaust in their childhood. I was telling her about Children in the Crossfire, when a man behind us introduced himself as Seamus Farrell, a board member of Richard Moore’s organization! My husband connected Seamus with a representative of his Global Peace Foundation in Tanzania who was also at the conference—and they made plans for collaborating in the future. Since then, we have stayed in touch through emails with both Seamus and Richard. Maybe Rob Grogan, a master of connecting people, is smiling. Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist who does a great deal of “connecting” herself.

I had a conversation with my friend and neighbor, Cathy Duncan who is a Nurse Practitioner. She informed me that November 13 - 19 is the week that is designated as Nurse Practitioners’ Week. We talked about what this meant, as everyone has a week in the professional community. This is a week to celebrate exceptional health care providers, as well as a reminder of laws that need to be addressed in this area. There is legislation in the works to allow for Full Practice Authority, which would give NPs the ability to work independently from a physician. Each state is different, but in Virginia, there is a collaborative agreement which states that there must at least be a physician available by phone. This legislation addresses improving access to care. Most of us have encountered difficulty in scheduling appointments with doctors, and

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

sometimes we see a Nurse Practitioner in lieu of the doctor. These individuals have all of the qualifications that a doctor has. They have acquired a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and then progressed further to earn a Masters in Nursing where they can follow a track in areas of family, pediatric, adult/geriatric, or women’s health. They must continue to take classes to keep their certification. This enables them to be aware of changes and newer practices that are being discovered all the time. Cathy started as a Candy Striper, a volunteer nurse’s aid. We all wanted one of those red and white striped uniforms back then! She then progressed to LPN, and later acquired her nursing degree; and worked for over thirty years in that field. She has since finished her Master’s degree in Nursing and she is board certified in family practice. Her progression to NP was mostly a matter of autonomy. She is able to test, diagnose and treat. Nurse Practitioners tend to be underrated, but their experience and capabilities often equal or exceed those of the doctors they work with. This is not a new career field, but has been in existence since 1965, when the first NP program was started at the University of Colorado by Dr. Loretta Ford, and soon after Boston College instituted a masters program for Nurse Practitioners. The goals include partnering with doctors to bring quality care to patients and allowing more choices in individual health care with an emphasis on prevention and education. There are approximately 220,000 NPs nationwide helping to make the health care system more available to everyone. Cathy is personally interested in integrative medicine, incorporating herbal and homeopathic treatment with, or instead of traditional medications. She has taken a course on homeopathy and hopes to certify next year. Integrative medicine includes oils, exercise, meditation and mindful eating. This is becoming more and more relevant as the costs of pharmaceuticals continue to rise. As we continue to deal with an aging population, and the chronic disease issues, alternative methods are a viable option. So, hats off to these professionals who aid in healing our many ailments. Hope you celebrate your week in November!

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman Mary Lynn Powers writes about the people, places & things that make FXBG great each month for FP

1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

9


Discover Jane Howison Beale’s Childhood Home 2016 HFFI Candlelight Tour

empowering families

By tony stevenson building was moved from that corner to its current location, one lot southwest on Fauquier Street. While the HFFI report included a history of the Chew family, much less was known about the home’s many tenants beyond a listing of names from tax records. I wanted to know more about all of them but decided to begin at the beginning. Samuel Howison, the first known occupant,

photo by quinn It was long a dream of mine to own a home with colonial, early American, or Civil War history. So what better place to look than Fredericksburg? My wife and I both loved the area already, having graduated together from UMW in 2005. When the opportunity came to relocate, we jumped at the chance for a homecoming. I could not have guessed I was about to reveal previously undiscovered facts about the life of Fredericksburg’s most celebrated Civil War diarist. The house we chose has the all history of a classic Federal dwelling at its core (my preferred style), but modified heavily after construction with the Queen Anne revival embellishments my wife adores. When we first looked at the house, we had only a vague outline of its incredible history. Listing documents said it was built in the early 19th century, confirmed by visible pegged tenon construction. Several rafters still bear the scars of Civil War artillery damage. Victorian finishes throughout evoke the evolution of the home over many generations. I relished the opportunity to start this exciting new research project. I started my search at the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation (HFFI), where I discovered that much of the legwork had already been completed in a historic marker report. Tax records and insurance documents showed the building existed as a split-level house on the corner of Prince Edward and Fauquier Streets since 1813. The neighboring Chew family, whose members held the title of Clerk of Court in Fredericksburg for three generations, constructed the house as a rental property. It would be more than a century and a half before the home was owner-occupied. By 1911, the entire

10

November 2016

photo by stevenson

lived here from 1813 to 1828. My search for Samuel Howison began in the Virginiana Room at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library. This incredible resource for local historians and genealogists contains a wealth of information about a Fredericksburg banker and businessman by that name. Howison was probably best known for his famous daughter, Jane Howison Beale. Jane wrote a highly detailed account of her life in Fredericksburg before and during the Civil War, including her family’s harrowing escape from town during the battle in December 1862. Her diary is considered one of the best records of civilian life during the war, and her story was even portrayed in the 2003 movie Gods and Generals. The common understanding was that the Howisons’ family home was St. James House, one block away on Charles Street. Was this the same Samuel Howison from the HFFI report? Did my house really have a connection to the famous Jane Beale? The Virginiana room’s historical family files contain a reference to an unpublished manuscript, the autobiography of Jane’s brother, Robert Reid Howison. I was able to track down the original handwritten manuscript now preserved in the special collections at the College of William and Mary. Robert describes his childhood home in great detail—fronting Prince Edward Street,

Front porch fredericksburg

Transitions 4 You

running along Fauquier Street, and ending at the Kenmore estate—the original location of my home exactly! The family’s move to St. James House is also mentioned, including details of a loan to Samuel Howison for the purchase price. The conventional story that St. James was the Howison family home wasn’t wrong—it was the first house Jane’s parents owned for themselves and was in the family at the time of their passing. St. James was not, however, where Jane would have grown up as a child. Her likely birthplace in 1815 and the home she knew into her thirteenth year was 502 Fauquier Street, which I purchased more than 200 years later. I worked closely with the HFFI in researching this fascinating development in the history of my home and that of Jane Beale. We have agreed to open her newly rediscovered childhood home as one of several locations on the 2016 HFFI Candlelight Tour this December. In light of this new information, I am honored to share this story with the town and community. I hope you will join me in remembering the civilian toll of the Civil War, families driven from their homes and

By dawn whitmore

Portrait of Jane Howison Beale, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va. displaced in the winter of 1862, as you celebrate the holidays with us here in Fredericksburg. Until then, please excuse me; I have to return to the books. There’s still 188 years of this building’s story left to uncover! To learn more about Jane Beale pick up a copy of her diary, A Woman in a War-T Torn Town, and visit her childhood home on the HFFI Candlelight Tour on December 10 – 11, 2016. The book and tickets are available at HFFI.org. Tony Stevenson enjoys spending time with his wife in their historic home and studying history—whether it is in a book, a field, or under the floor boards of his own house.

A growing number of families are living in motels throughout our area. Yet, depending on which government agency is categorizing these families; they may or may not be considered part of the homeless community. This classification can determine whether the family receives aid. Aid to include deposits (rent and/or utilities), or cash aid for rent. Without the necessary deposits and rental aid these families become part of the growing motel communities in our region. Transitions 4 You, a local organization, who works with displaced families living in area motels, is not concerned with how the government classifies them. Transitions 4 You, an incorporated non-profit, grew from a ministry originally started at River of Life Worship Center in 2014 under the direction of the church’s Mission Pastor Tracy Fulford. Neal and Lisa Harris became the overseers of the ministry when Fulford resigned in 2015. However, Neal Harris had a vision to expand the efforts and outreach to the motel community.

Transitions 4 You, Inc would be birthed in June 2016. In 2014, a Free Lance Star article reported, “a total of about 900 local students lived in motel communities” these displaced families have various circumstances as to how and why. Transitions 4 You’s mission is to empower families to live a life of stability. They provide life skills workshops to the motel community with a focus on finances, education, job preparedness and spiritual growth. Lisa Harris, Transitions 4 You Executive Director states, “Families who complete the workshops and programs are less likely to return to the motel community.” On November 10 th, Transitions 4 You will be holding their first Purses Repurposed event at Rubicon Café., 11120 Gordon Rd, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 The ministry plans to offer gently used purses, scarves, and jewelry for sale the night of the event. The event is $10 per person, which includes dinner, fashion show, and more. The proceeds from the night will benefit the organization’s goal of a transitional home. “Our end goal is to have a transitional home that would enable us to house families, as they go through our program and prepare to transition to independent living” states Lisa Harris. Want to know more about Transitions 4 You? Contact Lisa Harris, Executive Director by email: changingliveslocally@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/transitions4you Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

11


Discover Jane Howison Beale’s Childhood Home 2016 HFFI Candlelight Tour

empowering families

By tony stevenson building was moved from that corner to its current location, one lot southwest on Fauquier Street. While the HFFI report included a history of the Chew family, much less was known about the home’s many tenants beyond a listing of names from tax records. I wanted to know more about all of them but decided to begin at the beginning. Samuel Howison, the first known occupant,

photo by quinn It was long a dream of mine to own a home with colonial, early American, or Civil War history. So what better place to look than Fredericksburg? My wife and I both loved the area already, having graduated together from UMW in 2005. When the opportunity came to relocate, we jumped at the chance for a homecoming. I could not have guessed I was about to reveal previously undiscovered facts about the life of Fredericksburg’s most celebrated Civil War diarist. The house we chose has the all history of a classic Federal dwelling at its core (my preferred style), but modified heavily after construction with the Queen Anne revival embellishments my wife adores. When we first looked at the house, we had only a vague outline of its incredible history. Listing documents said it was built in the early 19th century, confirmed by visible pegged tenon construction. Several rafters still bear the scars of Civil War artillery damage. Victorian finishes throughout evoke the evolution of the home over many generations. I relished the opportunity to start this exciting new research project. I started my search at the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation (HFFI), where I discovered that much of the legwork had already been completed in a historic marker report. Tax records and insurance documents showed the building existed as a split-level house on the corner of Prince Edward and Fauquier Streets since 1813. The neighboring Chew family, whose members held the title of Clerk of Court in Fredericksburg for three generations, constructed the house as a rental property. It would be more than a century and a half before the home was owner-occupied. By 1911, the entire

10

November 2016

photo by stevenson

lived here from 1813 to 1828. My search for Samuel Howison began in the Virginiana Room at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library. This incredible resource for local historians and genealogists contains a wealth of information about a Fredericksburg banker and businessman by that name. Howison was probably best known for his famous daughter, Jane Howison Beale. Jane wrote a highly detailed account of her life in Fredericksburg before and during the Civil War, including her family’s harrowing escape from town during the battle in December 1862. Her diary is considered one of the best records of civilian life during the war, and her story was even portrayed in the 2003 movie Gods and Generals. The common understanding was that the Howisons’ family home was St. James House, one block away on Charles Street. Was this the same Samuel Howison from the HFFI report? Did my house really have a connection to the famous Jane Beale? The Virginiana room’s historical family files contain a reference to an unpublished manuscript, the autobiography of Jane’s brother, Robert Reid Howison. I was able to track down the original handwritten manuscript now preserved in the special collections at the College of William and Mary. Robert describes his childhood home in great detail—fronting Prince Edward Street,

Front porch fredericksburg

Transitions 4 You

running along Fauquier Street, and ending at the Kenmore estate—the original location of my home exactly! The family’s move to St. James House is also mentioned, including details of a loan to Samuel Howison for the purchase price. The conventional story that St. James was the Howison family home wasn’t wrong—it was the first house Jane’s parents owned for themselves and was in the family at the time of their passing. St. James was not, however, where Jane would have grown up as a child. Her likely birthplace in 1815 and the home she knew into her thirteenth year was 502 Fauquier Street, which I purchased more than 200 years later. I worked closely with the HFFI in researching this fascinating development in the history of my home and that of Jane Beale. We have agreed to open her newly rediscovered childhood home as one of several locations on the 2016 HFFI Candlelight Tour this December. In light of this new information, I am honored to share this story with the town and community. I hope you will join me in remembering the civilian toll of the Civil War, families driven from their homes and

By dawn whitmore

Portrait of Jane Howison Beale, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va. displaced in the winter of 1862, as you celebrate the holidays with us here in Fredericksburg. Until then, please excuse me; I have to return to the books. There’s still 188 years of this building’s story left to uncover! To learn more about Jane Beale pick up a copy of her diary, A Woman in a War-T Torn Town, and visit her childhood home on the HFFI Candlelight Tour on December 10 – 11, 2016. The book and tickets are available at HFFI.org. Tony Stevenson enjoys spending time with his wife in their historic home and studying history—whether it is in a book, a field, or under the floor boards of his own house.

A growing number of families are living in motels throughout our area. Yet, depending on which government agency is categorizing these families; they may or may not be considered part of the homeless community. This classification can determine whether the family receives aid. Aid to include deposits (rent and/or utilities), or cash aid for rent. Without the necessary deposits and rental aid these families become part of the growing motel communities in our region. Transitions 4 You, a local organization, who works with displaced families living in area motels, is not concerned with how the government classifies them. Transitions 4 You, an incorporated non-profit, grew from a ministry originally started at River of Life Worship Center in 2014 under the direction of the church’s Mission Pastor Tracy Fulford. Neal and Lisa Harris became the overseers of the ministry when Fulford resigned in 2015. However, Neal Harris had a vision to expand the efforts and outreach to the motel community.

Transitions 4 You, Inc would be birthed in June 2016. In 2014, a Free Lance Star article reported, “a total of about 900 local students lived in motel communities” these displaced families have various circumstances as to how and why. Transitions 4 You’s mission is to empower families to live a life of stability. They provide life skills workshops to the motel community with a focus on finances, education, job preparedness and spiritual growth. Lisa Harris, Transitions 4 You Executive Director states, “Families who complete the workshops and programs are less likely to return to the motel community.” On November 10 th, Transitions 4 You will be holding their first Purses Repurposed event at Rubicon Café., 11120 Gordon Rd, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 The ministry plans to offer gently used purses, scarves, and jewelry for sale the night of the event. The event is $10 per person, which includes dinner, fashion show, and more. The proceeds from the night will benefit the organization’s goal of a transitional home. “Our end goal is to have a transitional home that would enable us to house families, as they go through our program and prepare to transition to independent living” states Lisa Harris. Want to know more about Transitions 4 You? Contact Lisa Harris, Executive Director by email: changingliveslocally@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/transitions4you Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

11


Vino wine for leftovers by scott richards

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

12

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

All the signs are here. Leaves falling, high school football regular season games are wrapping up, and there is one big sign that has occurred that tells me fall is here. The celebration of the wine industry in Virginia in the month of October has passed. Whenever this happens, I hold on tight because I know the whirlwind of the holidays is right around the corner. Looking ahead, as I reflect upon my viewpoint of Virginia's wine industry, I realize that in the past I have been somewhat myopic in my view towards what has become another of the Old Dominion's more popular assets. Maybe it is because I have been involved in the sale of the fruit of my own vineyard to a local Virginia winery (Caret Cellars), I do not know, but I found to my chagrin have ignored other wine producing areas. Recently, I woke up to the fact that there are so many excellent wines in the world today, I cannot help but consider myself fortunate to be a wine consumer at this present time. Quality Virginia wines are among a cornucopia (How's that for a November word?) of excellent international wines to be found on the market. The approaching holidays, with more food being presented to us than we can either imagine or desire, offer a time to try different wines than what we have been drinking all year. My thoughts turn toward two areas that have consistently produced very drinkable wines: Burgundy (Bourgogne), France, and Australia. The red wines from Burgundy are quite different. The Romans began making wine in what was then Gaul around 100 AD. Because of the varying terroir, different parts of the region are known for markedly different wines. In Burgundy, the major wine producing grape is Pinot Noir. They produce an exquisite, fragrant wine. In conducting a sensory evaluation, the wine professional cannot make a cursory appraisal, but must every tool in their arsenal. The taste contains an elegant, tenuously beautiful nature that some devotees say attains close to spirituality. Over the years, this peculiar grape has produced wines that have gone beyond the boundaries of expectation. This is a wine that has food paired to itself, not vice versa. For those looking for a Thanksgiving wine, understand that this wine can have a major effect on the meal. In North America, Pinot Noir has been successfully made in the Northwest part of the United States. From Grochau Cellars in the Willamette Valley Winery in Oregon comes a wine that is said to be

easy on the palate with its smokiness, having an elegant, silky texture The 2014 Grochau Cellars Commuter Cuvee Pinot Noir could be just the wine to bring together the many flavors one experiences at an overloaded holiday table. But what about the day after the holiday feast when the leftovers are the only thing left on the menu. Face it, most of them just do not have the same zing, and are often dry, dry, dry. The only salvation to leftovers is when there is a cranberry relish to bring into the mix, but everyone knows that and it is soon gone. The Australians come to the rescue. Although excellent higher priced wines are made by the Aussies, sometimes in the lower prices, the pickings can be slim. Penfold produces a wine that was one of the first I tasted when I began exploring international wines. The bouquet comes across distinctly with dark berries. The fruit continues on the palate with smooth tannins and a creamy finish. This is a bottle to be consumed when first opened as the quality does not hold for an extended period. For leftovers, it adds a nice freshness that may have disappeared in the fridge over night. I have been eating leftovers from Thanksgiving all my life and have yet to run into a bad batch. The same can be said for the Penfold Shiraz-Cabernet. It is a very nice wine no matter what the season. So here is to a safe and happy Thanksgiving to you all. May the Lord of the Harvest bless you abundantly this year according to His Mercy and Grace. Cheers! Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer Read his blog at fromthevine.wordpress.com or Contact him at bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Season’s Bounty craving cranberries By vanessa moncure Every year, around Halloweentime, I begin making special forays into the produce aisles of local grocery stores, on the hunt for fresh cranberries. Unlike so many other fruit products, commonly available fresh year-round by import companies or through hydroponic culture, cranberry harvest takes place from midSeptember through December. Only. That’s it. When the fresh season is over, it’s over. Grown on evergreen dwarf shrubs in northern acidic bogs, cranberries were originally wild-harvested by American Indians who called them “sasumuneash” - and then introduced to European settlers who were already familiar with the fruit growing in boggy marshes carved by receding glaciers, mostly in England and the low-lying Netherlands - the “craneberry”. The first recorded cultivation and farming of the berry was in 1816 by Captain Henry Hall, a Massachusetts Revolutionary War veteran, who began transplanting vines into local sandy marshes. By 1871, the first association of American growers had formed and today, the US and Canada supply over 95% of the world’s annual market. Fresh berries are harvested by two methods - dry harvest and wet harvest. Pickers follow walkbehind machines which comb the berries off into burlap bags - only 5-10% of the annual harvest is through the dry-harvest method, and these are the fresh berries you find piled in the produce aisles. The remainder of the crop are wet-harvested, where the bogs are flooded through a series of dykes and ditches - cranberries can float because of a unique pocket of air inside the fruit. The water is agitated, the berries break from the vine, and large booms round them up to be harvested. These are the berries for juices, canned sauces, dried berries, frozen fruit and dietary supplements, among other uses. As a child in New Jersey, I recall a bright yellow school bus taking us on an educational trip to a local bog - on that overcast, windy, freezing day we stood, hatted and gloved and with colored cardboard numbers attached to a coat button (to identify us to our momchaperone), watching in fascination as long wooden rakes corralled the fruit. I didn’t know it then, but wet-harvesting had just begun in the 1960s - up until then the harvest was accomplished by backbreaking berry picking. Another later field trip took us to a dairy farm where a classmate was spattered with, well, that’s for another column. I love the exceedingly tart and tangy flavor of raw cranberries - they’re a staple of my Thanksgiving and Christmas menus - compotes, relishes, meat sauces and glazes - and a special fresh cranberry and orange bread that’s a bit addicting.

Freeze some fresh berries as the harvest season winds down - you’ll be glad you did! CRANBERRY BREAD I’m giving you Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins’ “The Silver Palate Cookbook” version as my mother and grandmother just might haunt me if I give out ALL secrets. Preheat oven to 350F and grease an 8”x4”x3” baking pan. In large bowl, sift together 2 c. flour, ½ c. sugar, 1 T. baking powder, ½ tsp. salt. Making a well in the center, pour in ? c. orange juice, 2 beaten eggs, 3 T. melted butter and mix together without overmixing. Fold in ½ c. chopped walnuts (or pecans, or none if you don’t want any),1 ¼ c. fresh cranberries and 2 tsp. grated orange zest. Bake 45-50 minutes or until a tester comes out clean. Let cool in pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to continue cooling. Their recipe says to wrap and put away for 1-2 days before serving, probably because this is a version of fruitcake (OH NO!!) and it slices much better as it ages. I say good luck with that, unless you’re making two. My family can easily demolish one before the cooling process even begins. Great shipper, and great for gift-giving. HOLIDAY CRANBERRY RELISH Too, too easy. And delicious! Keeps for up to a week in the refrigerator - yummy on a turkey and arugula sandwich. Get out your food processor, one bag of fresh cranberries, a completely-seeded whole medium-size navel orange and one cup sugar. Cut the orange into 8-12 pieces, then pulse whole orange in food processor until chopped but not mushy. Add cranberries and continue to pulse until well-blended, still with some shape. Spoon into bowl and pour sugar over fruit. Cover and keep in refrigerator for a day. A few hours before serving, stir the sugar into the fruit mixture and spoon into serving dish. Really, that’s it. CRANBERRY ORANGE SCONES Keep the food processor out - makes it very easy. Preheat oven to 425F. To the bowl of food processor add 2 ¼ c. flour, ½ c. chilled butter, ? c. sugar, ½ tsp. salt, 2 tsp. baking powder. Pulse until the mixture resembles cornmeal. Then add 2 large eggs, 1 T. grated orange zest, a dash of vanilla and ½ c. half and half. Mix just until the mixture comes together, then turn out of the food processor into a bowl and stir in 1-2 cups of dried cranberries or Craisins until they are completely incorporated. Turn out onto floured surface and cut into rounds. Place on parchment-lined baking sheet, then brush the tops with half-and-half and sprinkle with clear sanding sugar. Bake about 2025 minutes until they are light golden brown and cooked through. Cool on rack. Great for breakfast, brunch or teatime. Enjoy! And Happy Thanksgiving!

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

13


Vino wine for leftovers by scott richards

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

12

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

All the signs are here. Leaves falling, high school football regular season games are wrapping up, and there is one big sign that has occurred that tells me fall is here. The celebration of the wine industry in Virginia in the month of October has passed. Whenever this happens, I hold on tight because I know the whirlwind of the holidays is right around the corner. Looking ahead, as I reflect upon my viewpoint of Virginia's wine industry, I realize that in the past I have been somewhat myopic in my view towards what has become another of the Old Dominion's more popular assets. Maybe it is because I have been involved in the sale of the fruit of my own vineyard to a local Virginia winery (Caret Cellars), I do not know, but I found to my chagrin have ignored other wine producing areas. Recently, I woke up to the fact that there are so many excellent wines in the world today, I cannot help but consider myself fortunate to be a wine consumer at this present time. Quality Virginia wines are among a cornucopia (How's that for a November word?) of excellent international wines to be found on the market. The approaching holidays, with more food being presented to us than we can either imagine or desire, offer a time to try different wines than what we have been drinking all year. My thoughts turn toward two areas that have consistently produced very drinkable wines: Burgundy (Bourgogne), France, and Australia. The red wines from Burgundy are quite different. The Romans began making wine in what was then Gaul around 100 AD. Because of the varying terroir, different parts of the region are known for markedly different wines. In Burgundy, the major wine producing grape is Pinot Noir. They produce an exquisite, fragrant wine. In conducting a sensory evaluation, the wine professional cannot make a cursory appraisal, but must every tool in their arsenal. The taste contains an elegant, tenuously beautiful nature that some devotees say attains close to spirituality. Over the years, this peculiar grape has produced wines that have gone beyond the boundaries of expectation. This is a wine that has food paired to itself, not vice versa. For those looking for a Thanksgiving wine, understand that this wine can have a major effect on the meal. In North America, Pinot Noir has been successfully made in the Northwest part of the United States. From Grochau Cellars in the Willamette Valley Winery in Oregon comes a wine that is said to be

easy on the palate with its smokiness, having an elegant, silky texture The 2014 Grochau Cellars Commuter Cuvee Pinot Noir could be just the wine to bring together the many flavors one experiences at an overloaded holiday table. But what about the day after the holiday feast when the leftovers are the only thing left on the menu. Face it, most of them just do not have the same zing, and are often dry, dry, dry. The only salvation to leftovers is when there is a cranberry relish to bring into the mix, but everyone knows that and it is soon gone. The Australians come to the rescue. Although excellent higher priced wines are made by the Aussies, sometimes in the lower prices, the pickings can be slim. Penfold produces a wine that was one of the first I tasted when I began exploring international wines. The bouquet comes across distinctly with dark berries. The fruit continues on the palate with smooth tannins and a creamy finish. This is a bottle to be consumed when first opened as the quality does not hold for an extended period. For leftovers, it adds a nice freshness that may have disappeared in the fridge over night. I have been eating leftovers from Thanksgiving all my life and have yet to run into a bad batch. The same can be said for the Penfold Shiraz-Cabernet. It is a very nice wine no matter what the season. So here is to a safe and happy Thanksgiving to you all. May the Lord of the Harvest bless you abundantly this year according to His Mercy and Grace. Cheers! Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer Read his blog at fromthevine.wordpress.com or Contact him at bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Season’s Bounty craving cranberries By vanessa moncure Every year, around Halloweentime, I begin making special forays into the produce aisles of local grocery stores, on the hunt for fresh cranberries. Unlike so many other fruit products, commonly available fresh year-round by import companies or through hydroponic culture, cranberry harvest takes place from midSeptember through December. Only. That’s it. When the fresh season is over, it’s over. Grown on evergreen dwarf shrubs in northern acidic bogs, cranberries were originally wild-harvested by American Indians who called them “sasumuneash” - and then introduced to European settlers who were already familiar with the fruit growing in boggy marshes carved by receding glaciers, mostly in England and the low-lying Netherlands - the “craneberry”. The first recorded cultivation and farming of the berry was in 1816 by Captain Henry Hall, a Massachusetts Revolutionary War veteran, who began transplanting vines into local sandy marshes. By 1871, the first association of American growers had formed and today, the US and Canada supply over 95% of the world’s annual market. Fresh berries are harvested by two methods - dry harvest and wet harvest. Pickers follow walkbehind machines which comb the berries off into burlap bags - only 5-10% of the annual harvest is through the dry-harvest method, and these are the fresh berries you find piled in the produce aisles. The remainder of the crop are wet-harvested, where the bogs are flooded through a series of dykes and ditches - cranberries can float because of a unique pocket of air inside the fruit. The water is agitated, the berries break from the vine, and large booms round them up to be harvested. These are the berries for juices, canned sauces, dried berries, frozen fruit and dietary supplements, among other uses. As a child in New Jersey, I recall a bright yellow school bus taking us on an educational trip to a local bog - on that overcast, windy, freezing day we stood, hatted and gloved and with colored cardboard numbers attached to a coat button (to identify us to our momchaperone), watching in fascination as long wooden rakes corralled the fruit. I didn’t know it then, but wet-harvesting had just begun in the 1960s - up until then the harvest was accomplished by backbreaking berry picking. Another later field trip took us to a dairy farm where a classmate was spattered with, well, that’s for another column. I love the exceedingly tart and tangy flavor of raw cranberries - they’re a staple of my Thanksgiving and Christmas menus - compotes, relishes, meat sauces and glazes - and a special fresh cranberry and orange bread that’s a bit addicting.

Freeze some fresh berries as the harvest season winds down - you’ll be glad you did! CRANBERRY BREAD I’m giving you Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins’ “The Silver Palate Cookbook” version as my mother and grandmother just might haunt me if I give out ALL secrets. Preheat oven to 350F and grease an 8”x4”x3” baking pan. In large bowl, sift together 2 c. flour, ½ c. sugar, 1 T. baking powder, ½ tsp. salt. Making a well in the center, pour in ? c. orange juice, 2 beaten eggs, 3 T. melted butter and mix together without overmixing. Fold in ½ c. chopped walnuts (or pecans, or none if you don’t want any),1 ¼ c. fresh cranberries and 2 tsp. grated orange zest. Bake 45-50 minutes or until a tester comes out clean. Let cool in pan 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to continue cooling. Their recipe says to wrap and put away for 1-2 days before serving, probably because this is a version of fruitcake (OH NO!!) and it slices much better as it ages. I say good luck with that, unless you’re making two. My family can easily demolish one before the cooling process even begins. Great shipper, and great for gift-giving. HOLIDAY CRANBERRY RELISH Too, too easy. And delicious! Keeps for up to a week in the refrigerator - yummy on a turkey and arugula sandwich. Get out your food processor, one bag of fresh cranberries, a completely-seeded whole medium-size navel orange and one cup sugar. Cut the orange into 8-12 pieces, then pulse whole orange in food processor until chopped but not mushy. Add cranberries and continue to pulse until well-blended, still with some shape. Spoon into bowl and pour sugar over fruit. Cover and keep in refrigerator for a day. A few hours before serving, stir the sugar into the fruit mixture and spoon into serving dish. Really, that’s it. CRANBERRY ORANGE SCONES Keep the food processor out - makes it very easy. Preheat oven to 425F. To the bowl of food processor add 2 ¼ c. flour, ½ c. chilled butter, ? c. sugar, ½ tsp. salt, 2 tsp. baking powder. Pulse until the mixture resembles cornmeal. Then add 2 large eggs, 1 T. grated orange zest, a dash of vanilla and ½ c. half and half. Mix just until the mixture comes together, then turn out of the food processor into a bowl and stir in 1-2 cups of dried cranberries or Craisins until they are completely incorporated. Turn out onto floured surface and cut into rounds. Place on parchment-lined baking sheet, then brush the tops with half-and-half and sprinkle with clear sanding sugar. Bake about 2025 minutes until they are light golden brown and cooked through. Cool on rack. Great for breakfast, brunch or teatime. Enjoy! And Happy Thanksgiving!

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

13


Cooking With Kyle

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Swordfish Chorizo Tequila FlambÈ Tacos

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

A New Way to Eat Wind up bird & red dragon

813 Caroline St.

by james kyle snyder

z AT

It started with the simplest of questions, “how hard is it to make homemade tacos?” I had not toyed with Richard Simpson’s (the king) query before. I thought for a moment and replied, “I don’t know – but I will find out!” I started the investigation with a simple ingredient search. In order to make delicious, soft, pliable corn tortillas, you must use masa flour (also known as masa harina or maize). Masa flour is made from corn which has been dried and then soaked in a lime dust / water solution to break down the hull. Masa, grits (which go through a similar process), and polenta (typically untreated stone ground field corn) should not be confused. Each has its own characteristics and individual place on the table. I went to the market, grabbed flour and a cast iron tortilla press, and set off to the task at hand. Making the basic tortilla proved really easy. Following the instructions, I combined 2 cups of water with 1½ cups of the flour and let rest for 30 minutes to allow the flower to absorb all the water. Using a scale I began testing how big (circumference) and thick I want my tortillas. I quickly learned I needed a nonstick surface. I split a quart freezer bag and lightly spray-applied olive oil to place between the cast-iron and the dough. Next try, tadaaaaa, We have tortillas! Seven tenths of an ounce produced the correct tortilla for me. The first ones needed seasoning and flavor. I replace ¼ cup of the water with lime juice and added 1 tsp of salt. What a difference a little seasoning made. Flavor them with whatever you like – old bay for crab tacos or maybe paprika for hummus lamb tacos. Yummmmmm … Over a medium high heat it only takes 30 seconds per side – just enough time to weight and press out the next

14

November 2016

tortilla – to get the perfect tortilla for a taco. I called his majesty and let him know the progress. So excited, he promised to bring home the protein. He arrived shortly thereafter with swordfish and decased chorizo. We decided the chorizo would act as a topping for heat – no sauce necessary. A light sauté until crumbly and it was perfect. For the swordfish, we coated it with olive oil and a light dusting of S&P, heated cast griddle to high, and cooked for 2 mins per side, spritzing with lime juice a few times to season. Swordfish is such a delicate flavor we decided to caramelized yellow peppers, red onions, make guacamole, use arugula – cilantro - and fresh diced tomatoes, and add some drained sweet corn and black beans. For the assemblage, in the medium high cast iron, we heated the taco on onside for 30 seconds, flipped it, and began layering the created ingredients: guacamole – swordfish – chorizo - corn beans – cilantro – tomatoes. After another 30 seconds, to crisp the tortilla, we used tequila to flambé the entire creation to flavor and ensure everything was heated. “Wow,” is all that was said as we tried the first one. A side of the salady ingredients and served with the feature and an original margarita – tequila, lime and ice. What a treat! Cooking with the king is always fun but this time he knocked the ingredients out of the park! This one may sound complicated but it is made of mostly simple ingredients – even the swordfish since you don’t have to catch it. Keeping it simple in the kitchen with friends and family always makes for the best meals. Until the next culinary adventure, be well!

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and all your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

Front porch fredericksburg

By Kyle Snyder

Fredericksburg, VA

THE

COME JOIN US FOR

Thanksgiving Dinner

C OURTYARD

BY

M ARRIOTT

l

November 24th Thanksgiving Dinner Buffet Service from 12pm-4pm

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Call for reservations 540.373.8300

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

620 Caroline Street

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm photo by k. snyder

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Snead’s Farm

The Sunken Well Tavern

CHRISTMAS TREES A Memorable Family Experience Select & Cut Your Own Tree! Reserve Your Tree Today Until Dec. 6 No Money Down ~ Ribbon Provided

White Pine up to 14 ft. ~ $50 Blue Spruce up to 14 ft.~ $80 NEW: Starting Nov. 25 Blue Spruces, 5 ~ 6 ft, dug up with the root ball wrapped in burlap $50 apiece. Available only while supplies last. Open Daily 9 - 5 p.m thru Christmas Eve 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17

Sneadsfarm.com 540.371.9328

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Have you ever wanted really fresh "take away" food for an office lunch, a hike, a picnic, or day trip that was all natural with an environmentally conscious package? I have memories of going to hike Old Rag and dropping into a convenience store to grab a quick sandwich only to be disheartened by the plastic wrapped offerings with a sell-by-date of over a week into the future. In Fredericksburg, that problem has been solved. Wind Up Bird is the answer in F r e d e r i c k s b u r g . (www.facebook.com/lovewindupbird) Sandra and John Fedowitz saw the need and decided to do something about it. This vivacious couple has a history and passion for food. John, mentored by Shannon Elder, is a 20-year industry expert while Sandra is socially conscious ingredient aficionado. Driven by a shared passion to find the best food for their bodies, they decided to make their offerings as simple as possible, natural, local, and appeal to many demographics. Some of their current Picnic Basket offerings are: Vegan Lover, Italian Romance, and Asian Affair. Although exciting, this endeavor is not without its share of hurdles. In order to expand their offerings, they need to share a commercial kitchen and find more retail outlets for their delicious wholesome meals. Without the commercial kitchen, they are limited to baskets without heavy proteins on the sandwiches. If you have a commercial kitchen you might like to share, please contact them! So where can you get these health meals? Contact them on Facebook or enter Red Dragon Brewery (www.reddragonbrewery.com/). Dan Baker's and Tom Evans' passion is making delicious beers in super small batches. Their business plan included eliminating the kitchen and its huge build out cost to enable them to

focus purely on the beer. Fresh and consistent are some of the tenants of the brewery. With seven 4-barrell fermenters, they have the ability to create many offerings that are exactly what they are trying to achieve. "It easier to throw out a 4-barrel batch if it isn't right, " Dan explained. By not being financially crippled by the need to offer all products produced, Dan and Tom have found their niche. But I want food with my beer! So did Red Dragon's customers. So much so their faithful customers began to solve the problem for themselves. Wind Up Bird and Red Dragon Brewery share many of the same customers. The beer-loving customer's heart-felt endorsements for Wind Up Bird lead Dan and Tom to seekout the picnic basket sultans. Enter food at Red Dragon. After meeting and discussing general food philosophies the group discovered they had many things in common: freshness, great ingredients, a passion for Fredericksburg, and a wanting to make something where the sum of the whole is greater than the sum of the individual parts. The simpatico relationship gave Sandra and John a wider audience for their amazing sandwiches, spreads, and chocolates while Red Dragon Brewery now has food without the offbusiness-plan encumbrances associated. A true hometown team! If you are not a beer lover but need a fresh sandwich now, stop by Red Dragon Brewery and grab one. If you have the time and want a basket, contact Wind Up Bird at (540) 388-7852 or lovewindupbird@gmail.com. If all you need is a beer, check out our latest Fredericksburg brewery, Red Dragon at 1419 Princess Anne St, Fredericksburg, VA 22401. Till next time - Enjoy! Kyle enjoyed both while working on this article!

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

15


Cooking With Kyle

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Swordfish Chorizo Tequila FlambÈ Tacos

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

A New Way to Eat Wind up bird & red dragon

813 Caroline St.

by james kyle snyder

z AT

It started with the simplest of questions, “how hard is it to make homemade tacos?” I had not toyed with Richard Simpson’s (the king) query before. I thought for a moment and replied, “I don’t know – but I will find out!” I started the investigation with a simple ingredient search. In order to make delicious, soft, pliable corn tortillas, you must use masa flour (also known as masa harina or maize). Masa flour is made from corn which has been dried and then soaked in a lime dust / water solution to break down the hull. Masa, grits (which go through a similar process), and polenta (typically untreated stone ground field corn) should not be confused. Each has its own characteristics and individual place on the table. I went to the market, grabbed flour and a cast iron tortilla press, and set off to the task at hand. Making the basic tortilla proved really easy. Following the instructions, I combined 2 cups of water with 1½ cups of the flour and let rest for 30 minutes to allow the flower to absorb all the water. Using a scale I began testing how big (circumference) and thick I want my tortillas. I quickly learned I needed a nonstick surface. I split a quart freezer bag and lightly spray-applied olive oil to place between the cast-iron and the dough. Next try, tadaaaaa, We have tortillas! Seven tenths of an ounce produced the correct tortilla for me. The first ones needed seasoning and flavor. I replace ¼ cup of the water with lime juice and added 1 tsp of salt. What a difference a little seasoning made. Flavor them with whatever you like – old bay for crab tacos or maybe paprika for hummus lamb tacos. Yummmmmm … Over a medium high heat it only takes 30 seconds per side – just enough time to weight and press out the next

14

November 2016

tortilla – to get the perfect tortilla for a taco. I called his majesty and let him know the progress. So excited, he promised to bring home the protein. He arrived shortly thereafter with swordfish and decased chorizo. We decided the chorizo would act as a topping for heat – no sauce necessary. A light sauté until crumbly and it was perfect. For the swordfish, we coated it with olive oil and a light dusting of S&P, heated cast griddle to high, and cooked for 2 mins per side, spritzing with lime juice a few times to season. Swordfish is such a delicate flavor we decided to caramelized yellow peppers, red onions, make guacamole, use arugula – cilantro - and fresh diced tomatoes, and add some drained sweet corn and black beans. For the assemblage, in the medium high cast iron, we heated the taco on onside for 30 seconds, flipped it, and began layering the created ingredients: guacamole – swordfish – chorizo - corn beans – cilantro – tomatoes. After another 30 seconds, to crisp the tortilla, we used tequila to flambé the entire creation to flavor and ensure everything was heated. “Wow,” is all that was said as we tried the first one. A side of the salady ingredients and served with the feature and an original margarita – tequila, lime and ice. What a treat! Cooking with the king is always fun but this time he knocked the ingredients out of the park! This one may sound complicated but it is made of mostly simple ingredients – even the swordfish since you don’t have to catch it. Keeping it simple in the kitchen with friends and family always makes for the best meals. Until the next culinary adventure, be well!

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and all your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

Front porch fredericksburg

By Kyle Snyder

Fredericksburg, VA

THE

COME JOIN US FOR

Thanksgiving Dinner

C OURTYARD

BY

M ARRIOTT

l

November 24th Thanksgiving Dinner Buffet Service from 12pm-4pm

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Call for reservations 540.373.8300

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

620 Caroline Street

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm photo by k. snyder

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Snead’s Farm

The Sunken Well Tavern

CHRISTMAS TREES A Memorable Family Experience Select & Cut Your Own Tree! Reserve Your Tree Today Until Dec. 6 No Money Down ~ Ribbon Provided

White Pine up to 14 ft. ~ $50 Blue Spruce up to 14 ft.~ $80 NEW: Starting Nov. 25 Blue Spruces, 5 ~ 6 ft, dug up with the root ball wrapped in burlap $50 apiece. Available only while supplies last. Open Daily 9 - 5 p.m thru Christmas Eve 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17

Sneadsfarm.com 540.371.9328

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Have you ever wanted really fresh "take away" food for an office lunch, a hike, a picnic, or day trip that was all natural with an environmentally conscious package? I have memories of going to hike Old Rag and dropping into a convenience store to grab a quick sandwich only to be disheartened by the plastic wrapped offerings with a sell-by-date of over a week into the future. In Fredericksburg, that problem has been solved. Wind Up Bird is the answer in F r e d e r i c k s b u r g . (www.facebook.com/lovewindupbird) Sandra and John Fedowitz saw the need and decided to do something about it. This vivacious couple has a history and passion for food. John, mentored by Shannon Elder, is a 20-year industry expert while Sandra is socially conscious ingredient aficionado. Driven by a shared passion to find the best food for their bodies, they decided to make their offerings as simple as possible, natural, local, and appeal to many demographics. Some of their current Picnic Basket offerings are: Vegan Lover, Italian Romance, and Asian Affair. Although exciting, this endeavor is not without its share of hurdles. In order to expand their offerings, they need to share a commercial kitchen and find more retail outlets for their delicious wholesome meals. Without the commercial kitchen, they are limited to baskets without heavy proteins on the sandwiches. If you have a commercial kitchen you might like to share, please contact them! So where can you get these health meals? Contact them on Facebook or enter Red Dragon Brewery (www.reddragonbrewery.com/). Dan Baker's and Tom Evans' passion is making delicious beers in super small batches. Their business plan included eliminating the kitchen and its huge build out cost to enable them to

focus purely on the beer. Fresh and consistent are some of the tenants of the brewery. With seven 4-barrell fermenters, they have the ability to create many offerings that are exactly what they are trying to achieve. "It easier to throw out a 4-barrel batch if it isn't right, " Dan explained. By not being financially crippled by the need to offer all products produced, Dan and Tom have found their niche. But I want food with my beer! So did Red Dragon's customers. So much so their faithful customers began to solve the problem for themselves. Wind Up Bird and Red Dragon Brewery share many of the same customers. The beer-loving customer's heart-felt endorsements for Wind Up Bird lead Dan and Tom to seekout the picnic basket sultans. Enter food at Red Dragon. After meeting and discussing general food philosophies the group discovered they had many things in common: freshness, great ingredients, a passion for Fredericksburg, and a wanting to make something where the sum of the whole is greater than the sum of the individual parts. The simpatico relationship gave Sandra and John a wider audience for their amazing sandwiches, spreads, and chocolates while Red Dragon Brewery now has food without the offbusiness-plan encumbrances associated. A true hometown team! If you are not a beer lover but need a fresh sandwich now, stop by Red Dragon Brewery and grab one. If you have the time and want a basket, contact Wind Up Bird at (540) 388-7852 or lovewindupbird@gmail.com. If all you need is a beer, check out our latest Fredericksburg brewery, Red Dragon at 1419 Princess Anne St, Fredericksburg, VA 22401. Till next time - Enjoy! Kyle enjoyed both while working on this article!

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

15


nov 2016… Be Thankful! Tuesday, November 1

Happy 30th Anniversary Frame Designs Gallery . Celebrating all month ! We will be raffling off a framed Johnny Johnson. He will also be the featured artist for November. We will also have many other specials and treats. 2010 College Ave Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 2

Agora Downtown, 520 Caroline Street hits another milestone as the business turns 1.5! To celebrate, we want you to try something new. Let us know if the drink you're ordering is a drink you're trying for the first time, and if it is, we'll discount it half off! Not applicable on alcoholic drinks. For more information, contact (540) 3698180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com.

CALENDAR of events

First Friday, November 4

Local writer Carolyn O'Neal will be doing a book signing at the Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St 4, 2:00 - 6:00pm. Her book, Kingsley, is a dystopian fiction and eco-thriller with a 5-star rating on Amazon. Free cup of coffee with purchase of a signed book! For more information (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com. The Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center celebration of historic Town Hall's bicentennial 6-8pm at 907 Princess Anne Street. Cheers to 200 Years marks the reopening of the Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center (part-time until April 8) and will feature new exhibitions free, open to the public Showstopper! @ Art First Gallery Jessica Cannon's highly textured abstract paintings will be featured throughout the month. Opening Reception 6-9pm

Jazz4Justice, Dodd Auditorium, UMW, 7:30pm When Jazz and Justice meet to bring you an exhilarating evening of music spotlighting talented student musicians playing alongside professionals and music department faculty, your toes will be tapping to the beat!

Hops & History FAMCC & Adventure Brewing Co.monthly series @Adventure Brewing Co.'s South location on 3300 Dill Smith Dr. 5-8p. free, open to the public. Food and beverages available for sale info contact Melanie Johnson at mjohnson@famcc.org, or at www.famcc.org.

Sunday, November 6

Thanksgiving Family Arts and Crafts Night @ Dorothy Hart Community Center 4 yrs and older. Come and make a Thanksgiving Turkey and enjoy a pizza and popcorn party. Games and just plain fun! Pre-registration required. 5-7p

LuLaRoe Pop Up Boutique at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop ( the most comfortable clothes ever!) by our friend and Independent Fashion Consultant Danielle, enjoy delicious treats 520 Caroline St, 11a-4p. info (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 8

Election Day…exercise your right & responsibility to vote Mary Washington House 1200 Charles St, 9:30 to 11:30am Volunteers needed for our annual Vote and Volunteer day! After voting, please come out and help us clean the historic kitchen at Mary’s House. Students over 12 are encouraged to help, but come with an adult. Letters will be provided to youth needing service hours for school, Scouts, etc. RSVP to MWHouse@WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org

Free Seminar- 6:30-9p.As a small business owner it is critical to understand the impact that online marketing & sales can have on your business growth., reserve seat FREE seminar today! Ted Moffatt, 888-611-0766, Germanna, The Science & Engineering Building and Information Commons 10000 Germanna Point Dr,22408 Bobby Thompson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Grand Opening Reception for the new Alternative Therapies and Spa located on 10508 Wakeman Drive. Locally owned and operated by, Kristen Park of Hilltop Physical Therapy. 540-693-1017. Join us, for your recovery and relaxation and bring a friend to enjoy a wine and cheese reception.

Sixth Annual PONSHOP Jewelry Show showcasing the work of ten jewelry artists. Each artist brings their own unique style to the mix using materials such as semi-precious stones, wood & resin, copper, sterling silver & gold, found objects, stainless steel, and enamel. The opening reception 6-10pm.

Meet Thomas Mon, author of adult storybook "Put Your F***ing Phone Away," at his book signing at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St. 10:00am - 1:00pm. Free cup of coffee with purchase of a signed book! For more information (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com.

Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline Street, "Variations", by Ben Childers. Noted for his beautiful fused glass pieces, Ben is branching out into the arena of 2-D art this month. His multimedia show includes different takes on the same subject in oil painting & glass. Join us from 6-9 pm

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Stage Door Youth Presents “Into The Woods, Jr”. @ Chancellor High School, 7p

Wednesday, November 9

Saturday, November 12

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts the coziest and best sounding open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

FCCA, 813 Sophia St, "Touh of Blue" Exhibit opening reception

Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 3

Velvet Devils Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Artful Dimensions 911 Charles St Opening Recption for the "Square Plate Project" to benefit Veterans Moving Forward. Exhibit thr u Nov 30. People Choice Award to be presented at opening Reception

Saturday, November 5

Hounds of Hazelwild Farm, , 11-3pm.A fun-filled family fair about greyhounds and sighthounds. Talk with adoption groups; enjoy shopping, food, face painting, pony rides; meet reenactors; talk with vets and specialists; and see the greyhounds run! 5325 Harrison Rd 22407

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm . Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 10

Transitions 4 You will be holding their first Purses Repurposed event at Rubicon Café., 11120 Gordon Rd, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 The ministry plans to offer gently used purses, scarves, and jewelry for sale the night of the event. The event is $10 per person, which includes dinner, fashion show, and more. The proceeds from the night will benefit the organization's goal of a transitional home.

Friday, November 11

Veterans Day. Remember those who keep our nation free & safe.

Holiday Open House Weekend Downtown FXBG the official start of Holiday! Windows are decorated, holiday music is playing, and our streets are filled with good cheer. Santa Strolls Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and the Oyster Company of Virginia for an afternoon of oysters, regional wine, local craft beer and live acoustic music in scenic Topping, Va. 1-4p. $ tickets & info www.riverfriends.org or call (540) 373-3448 x. 117 Come join the Blue Star Mothers of Fredericksburg Chapter VA4 at their first "WINTER WHITE PARTY!" @Ristorante Renato, 6-9p. Just Wear White! To purchase tickets contact Teri Reece, trreece@yahoo.com, 540-760-5705

Saturday, November 19

Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing a concert "Autumn Potpourri" Massaponax High School 7:pm - 8:30 pm. fredericksburgcommunityband.com.

Sunday, November 13

Stage Door Youth Presents “Into The Woods, Jr”. @ Chancellor High School, 2p

Tuesday, November 15

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 16

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm . Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Wednesday, November 16

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 17

In partnership with the Children's Museum of Richmond (CMoR), the Yoga Foundation of Fredericksburg (YOFO) is offering a FREE, ParentChild Yoga class at the Fredericksburg branch location 10-10:45a Harry Nilson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18

Open Late Fridays…Look for "Open Late Flags" Downtown Songwriters' Showcase @LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty St, Two Duos Show! Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy, and Stuart Whitford & Tres Seaver, 8pm, still only $10. Note: this is a change away from Thanksgiving weekend and into a handicapped accessible venue. Come enjoy! info at www.burgsongs.org or 540-429-0999.

Santa Pictures at the Richard Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on from 12 to 3pm (Small fee applies.) Merry Market Fredericksburg Area Service League @ Fredericksburg Country Club fun-filled shopping experience one day event will feature a variety of unique and one-of- a-kind artisans and vendors who are carefully selected to ensure a fun holiday shopping experience for all., 9a-5p Local writer Larrie D. Ferreiro book signing new book "Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It" at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop 520 Caroline St., agoradowntown@gmail.com.10a-3p. Down Home Ball is hosted by Roxbury Garden Center festivities running from 6pm-midnight. 20th anniversary live music, delicious locally catered food, fun activities for the kids and plenty to drink for all from a cash bar with beer to gourmet hot chocolates. Come celebrate 20 years of a fun tradition in support of your local green space, Downtown Greens.

The day to support the local businesses. Early Bird Riser event, is back! Expanded hours to take advantage of all the great specials! : 8am to 11am - Early Bird Special Find something exclusive at participating stores; free coffee and pastries (until they run out) starting at 8am at 2 downtown locations at Visitor Center (706 Caroline Street and in front of Raven Hi Fi (214 William Street ) 2pm to 5pm - Enjoy and Relax Specials. At participating restaurants 5pm to closing - Dining Specials Santa Strolls Downtown FXBG Acoustic Onion Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Sunday, November 27

Santa Pictures at the Richard Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on from 1pm to 4pm.(Small fee applies.)

Tuesday, November 29

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Tuesday, November 22

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 30

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Wednesday, November 23

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 24

Thanksgiving Day….be grateful for family, friends & country Whittingham Christmas Window is unveiled 1021 Caroline St.

Small Biz Saturday, November 26

6p.

Friday, November 25

Santa Strolls Downtown FXBG Open Late Fridays…Look for "Open Late Flags"

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

If you are reading this 232nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 20th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for December 2016 issue is November 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

2976 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 16

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

17


nov 2016… Be Thankful! Tuesday, November 1

Happy 30th Anniversary Frame Designs Gallery . Celebrating all month ! We will be raffling off a framed Johnny Johnson. He will also be the featured artist for November. We will also have many other specials and treats. 2010 College Ave Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 2

Agora Downtown, 520 Caroline Street hits another milestone as the business turns 1.5! To celebrate, we want you to try something new. Let us know if the drink you're ordering is a drink you're trying for the first time, and if it is, we'll discount it half off! Not applicable on alcoholic drinks. For more information, contact (540) 3698180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com.

CALENDAR of events

First Friday, November 4

Local writer Carolyn O'Neal will be doing a book signing at the Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St 4, 2:00 - 6:00pm. Her book, Kingsley, is a dystopian fiction and eco-thriller with a 5-star rating on Amazon. Free cup of coffee with purchase of a signed book! For more information (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com. The Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center celebration of historic Town Hall's bicentennial 6-8pm at 907 Princess Anne Street. Cheers to 200 Years marks the reopening of the Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center (part-time until April 8) and will feature new exhibitions free, open to the public Showstopper! @ Art First Gallery Jessica Cannon's highly textured abstract paintings will be featured throughout the month. Opening Reception 6-9pm

Jazz4Justice, Dodd Auditorium, UMW, 7:30pm When Jazz and Justice meet to bring you an exhilarating evening of music spotlighting talented student musicians playing alongside professionals and music department faculty, your toes will be tapping to the beat!

Hops & History FAMCC & Adventure Brewing Co.monthly series @Adventure Brewing Co.'s South location on 3300 Dill Smith Dr. 5-8p. free, open to the public. Food and beverages available for sale info contact Melanie Johnson at mjohnson@famcc.org, or at www.famcc.org.

Sunday, November 6

Thanksgiving Family Arts and Crafts Night @ Dorothy Hart Community Center 4 yrs and older. Come and make a Thanksgiving Turkey and enjoy a pizza and popcorn party. Games and just plain fun! Pre-registration required. 5-7p

LuLaRoe Pop Up Boutique at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop ( the most comfortable clothes ever!) by our friend and Independent Fashion Consultant Danielle, enjoy delicious treats 520 Caroline St, 11a-4p. info (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 8

Election Day…exercise your right & responsibility to vote Mary Washington House 1200 Charles St, 9:30 to 11:30am Volunteers needed for our annual Vote and Volunteer day! After voting, please come out and help us clean the historic kitchen at Mary’s House. Students over 12 are encouraged to help, but come with an adult. Letters will be provided to youth needing service hours for school, Scouts, etc. RSVP to MWHouse@WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org

Free Seminar- 6:30-9p.As a small business owner it is critical to understand the impact that online marketing & sales can have on your business growth., reserve seat FREE seminar today! Ted Moffatt, 888-611-0766, Germanna, The Science & Engineering Building and Information Commons 10000 Germanna Point Dr,22408 Bobby Thompson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Grand Opening Reception for the new Alternative Therapies and Spa located on 10508 Wakeman Drive. Locally owned and operated by, Kristen Park of Hilltop Physical Therapy. 540-693-1017. Join us, for your recovery and relaxation and bring a friend to enjoy a wine and cheese reception.

Sixth Annual PONSHOP Jewelry Show showcasing the work of ten jewelry artists. Each artist brings their own unique style to the mix using materials such as semi-precious stones, wood & resin, copper, sterling silver & gold, found objects, stainless steel, and enamel. The opening reception 6-10pm.

Meet Thomas Mon, author of adult storybook "Put Your F***ing Phone Away," at his book signing at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St. 10:00am - 1:00pm. Free cup of coffee with purchase of a signed book! For more information (540) 369-8180 or agoradowntown@gmail.com.

Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline Street, "Variations", by Ben Childers. Noted for his beautiful fused glass pieces, Ben is branching out into the arena of 2-D art this month. His multimedia show includes different takes on the same subject in oil painting & glass. Join us from 6-9 pm

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Stage Door Youth Presents “Into The Woods, Jr”. @ Chancellor High School, 7p

Wednesday, November 9

Saturday, November 12

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts the coziest and best sounding open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

FCCA, 813 Sophia St, "Touh of Blue" Exhibit opening reception

Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 3

Velvet Devils Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Artful Dimensions 911 Charles St Opening Recption for the "Square Plate Project" to benefit Veterans Moving Forward. Exhibit thr u Nov 30. People Choice Award to be presented at opening Reception

Saturday, November 5

Hounds of Hazelwild Farm, , 11-3pm.A fun-filled family fair about greyhounds and sighthounds. Talk with adoption groups; enjoy shopping, food, face painting, pony rides; meet reenactors; talk with vets and specialists; and see the greyhounds run! 5325 Harrison Rd 22407

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm . Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 10

Transitions 4 You will be holding their first Purses Repurposed event at Rubicon Café., 11120 Gordon Rd, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 The ministry plans to offer gently used purses, scarves, and jewelry for sale the night of the event. The event is $10 per person, which includes dinner, fashion show, and more. The proceeds from the night will benefit the organization's goal of a transitional home.

Friday, November 11

Veterans Day. Remember those who keep our nation free & safe.

Holiday Open House Weekend Downtown FXBG the official start of Holiday! Windows are decorated, holiday music is playing, and our streets are filled with good cheer. Santa Strolls Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and the Oyster Company of Virginia for an afternoon of oysters, regional wine, local craft beer and live acoustic music in scenic Topping, Va. 1-4p. $ tickets & info www.riverfriends.org or call (540) 373-3448 x. 117 Come join the Blue Star Mothers of Fredericksburg Chapter VA4 at their first "WINTER WHITE PARTY!" @Ristorante Renato, 6-9p. Just Wear White! To purchase tickets contact Teri Reece, trreece@yahoo.com, 540-760-5705

Saturday, November 19

Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing a concert "Autumn Potpourri" Massaponax High School 7:pm - 8:30 pm. fredericksburgcommunityband.com.

Sunday, November 13

Stage Door Youth Presents “Into The Woods, Jr”. @ Chancellor High School, 2p

Tuesday, November 15

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 16

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm . Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Wednesday, November 16

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 17

In partnership with the Children's Museum of Richmond (CMoR), the Yoga Foundation of Fredericksburg (YOFO) is offering a FREE, ParentChild Yoga class at the Fredericksburg branch location 10-10:45a Harry Nilson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18

Open Late Fridays…Look for "Open Late Flags" Downtown Songwriters' Showcase @LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty St, Two Duos Show! Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy, and Stuart Whitford & Tres Seaver, 8pm, still only $10. Note: this is a change away from Thanksgiving weekend and into a handicapped accessible venue. Come enjoy! info at www.burgsongs.org or 540-429-0999.

Santa Pictures at the Richard Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on from 12 to 3pm (Small fee applies.) Merry Market Fredericksburg Area Service League @ Fredericksburg Country Club fun-filled shopping experience one day event will feature a variety of unique and one-of- a-kind artisans and vendors who are carefully selected to ensure a fun holiday shopping experience for all., 9a-5p Local writer Larrie D. Ferreiro book signing new book "Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It" at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop 520 Caroline St., agoradowntown@gmail.com.10a-3p. Down Home Ball is hosted by Roxbury Garden Center festivities running from 6pm-midnight. 20th anniversary live music, delicious locally catered food, fun activities for the kids and plenty to drink for all from a cash bar with beer to gourmet hot chocolates. Come celebrate 20 years of a fun tradition in support of your local green space, Downtown Greens.

The day to support the local businesses. Early Bird Riser event, is back! Expanded hours to take advantage of all the great specials! : 8am to 11am - Early Bird Special Find something exclusive at participating stores; free coffee and pastries (until they run out) starting at 8am at 2 downtown locations at Visitor Center (706 Caroline Street and in front of Raven Hi Fi (214 William Street ) 2pm to 5pm - Enjoy and Relax Specials. At participating restaurants 5pm to closing - Dining Specials Santa Strolls Downtown FXBG Acoustic Onion Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Sunday, November 27

Santa Pictures at the Richard Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on from 1pm to 4pm.(Small fee applies.)

Tuesday, November 29

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Tuesday, November 22

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas

Wednesday, November 30

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Wednesday, November 23

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, November 24

Thanksgiving Day….be grateful for family, friends & country Whittingham Christmas Window is unveiled 1021 Caroline St.

Small Biz Saturday, November 26

6p.

Friday, November 25

Santa Strolls Downtown FXBG Open Late Fridays…Look for "Open Late Flags"

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

If you are reading this 232nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 20th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for December 2016 issue is November 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

2976 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 16

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

17


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Tapestry of Arts

preserving our city’s history

Fall FLAR is Full of Features

Interview by kevin brown

By A.E. Bayne

ST. JAMES HOUSE By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

INTERVIEW

WITH

KATE SCHWARTZ,

OUR NEW FREDERICKSBURG HISTORIC RESOURCES PLANNER/HISTORIC PRESERVATIONIST

Q. Why is historic preservation important to Fredericksburg?

It was a rainy Saturday morning with the hurricane stirring off of the coast of North Carolina when Anne said, “let’s go see the Saint James house”. Now you would think after living in Fredericksburg for well over half a century I would have said “been there”. Actually the answer is no I have not been there, probably because it has been a private residence since it was built sometime around 1768. It is said to be one of the older original homes in the city as I had owned and restored one built in the 1760’s on Caroline Street.

We arrived at the home located at 1300 Charles Street with a steady rain falling and were greeted by Anne Haley and Joyce Childress two ladies that I have known for many years. They both are very knowledgeable of Fredericksburg and its history and volunteer for the Washington Heritage Museums. The organization a non-profit 501 c-3 maintains and operates the Saint James house along with Hugh Mercer Apothecary, Rising Sun Tavern and the Mary Washington House with donations and income from the visitors. The St. James home, however, unlike the others is open during Garden Week and the first week in October or by special appointment. The home was built by Fredericksburg attorney James Mercer (no relation to General Hugh Mercer) on property once owned by Fielding Lewis as part of the Kenmore plantation. Fielding Lewis was the brother in law of George Washington. James Mercer is known to have done the will of Mary Washington along with being the first judge of the Fredericksburg General Court and he went on to be in the House of Burgesses. William Tolerton along with Daniel Breslin purchased and restored the home and furnished it with antique furniture of the period. The property was bequeathed along with an endowment for perpetual maintenance to Preservation Virginia. In 2013 Washington Heritage Museums assumed control of the properties. The Saint in the name, there is no explanation other than he signed a letter to his father Saint James. Rain or shine I encourage you to visit this jewel within our city. Thanks Joyce and Ann for a wonderful tour of this historic property. Dedicate to the memory of Joyce Kain, Herbert Cooper, Carol Boyer Lmore, Curtis Brann and Norman Chenault Tuffy Hicks brings us little known facts about FXBG each month in this space.

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

A: Fredericksburg’s historic character is what makes it a unique city with a distinctive sense of place. The built environment and the stories embodied there are how you can tell that you’re not in anywhere America. These physical places tie us to memories and the unique history of the city. Cities are constantly evolving—in fact, the centuries of change you see in Fredericksburg’s buildings are one of the city’s defining features—but it’s vital to balance past and future. This is the primary role that preservation plays, not freezing a place in time, but balancing and managing change. Q. What are the biggest challenges Fredericksburg faces in historic preservation? A: The challenge is certainly not unique to Fredericksburg, but there is a clear desire for development in our downtown. There is a growing desire to live in interesting, pedestrian-friendly, vibrant places. But if development comes at the cost of the historic character here, then we end up sacrificing those exact qualities that make the city attractive to existing and new residents alike. It’s not unusual to hear development and historic preservation pitted against one another, but that’s a false understanding. Historic districts and design review processes exist as tools to help new development projects and changes in historic areas be as compatible as possible with the character there and to enhance the environment. There are many opportunities for new buildings, new businesses, and new residents in the historic area, and through preservation, we can manage those changes to ensure the value, both economic and cultural, of the historic area is not compromised. Q. What do you hope to accomplish during your first year on the job?

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

18

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

A: My focus for this first year is learning and understanding all that I can about Fredericksburg’s history, building relationships with a community that is passionate about that history, and facilitating a consistent Architectural Review Board/design review process within our historic district.

One of my priorities is updating the National Register nomination for Fredericksburg’s Historic District. The district was designated at the federal level in 1971, but only buildings fifty years old at that time (built before 1921) were considered historically significant. If we’re looking at buildings that are fifty years old today, that extends the period of significance for our district up to 1966. It’s vital to include these places in the updated nomination to not only recognize broader aspects of our history, but also to allow more property owners to take advantage of valuable tax credits at the state and federal level for rehabilitation of these buildings. Virginia offers a 25% tax credit that can be combined with a 20% federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic buildings. I’m also working towards the creation of an archaeological ordinance for the city so that we can protect our buried history. There is so much we can learn from these archaeological resources, but they are lost forever once the ground is disturbed for construction. The challenge is determining what areas are most archaeologically important, where the ordinance should apply, and how to administer it. Community support and education will be important in this project as well.

What a doozy of a year! When public life and times are divisive, I turn to the arts for solace. Like many of you, I cherish a well-turned phrase, a compelling piece of writing, or thoughtful verse. I seek composition and design to refine the rough edges of a topsy-turvy world. The visual, literary and performing arts are woven with brilliant thread, resulting in collaboration and inspiration born of diverse creativity. You will find evidence of this artistic web within the pages of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review’s fall edition, as it reveals the live tapestry of arts that surrounds us in our town, our region, and beyond. With a focus on editing and revision within each feature interview in this edition, regional artists and writers share their experiences of craft and process. Our local, national and international contributors offer thought-provoking pieces that inspire empathy, evoke wisdom and channel kinship between themselves and the reader. We are making connections, people! This is outstanding! Meet the Panels Our panel members work

together to choose quality work that will highlight the rich arc of arts in our area. This fall, our art panel was composed of painter and resin artist Joelle Cathleen, photographer Ruth Golden, dancer and community organizer Alex Harvell, painter Maddie Huddle, and photographer and painter Christopher Thomas Limbrick. Our literary panel included poet and writer Mikaela D’Eigh, blogger and features writer Christina Ferber, writer and president of Riverside Writers, Jim Gaines, poet Tramia Jackson, and writer and editor Shayli Lesser. Featured Writers and Artists We’ve packed this 228 page volume full of featured writers and artists from our region. Our literary features Kristen Green, include author of Something Must be Done About Prince Edward County; Jim Hall, author of The Last Lynching in Northern Virginia; Vicky Jasparro, a blogger and explorer who hiked the Te Araroa Trail in New Zealand; Suann Cokal, writer and editor of Broad Street Magazine in Richmond; Beth Spragins, a local poet who writes in the Celtic Bardic tradition; local musicians who share their lyric writing process; and Alaha Ahrar, a

UMW graduate who is an award-winning poet and activist for social justice. O u r featured visual artists include painter Bill Harris, Fall FLAR cover art by Bill Harris Chinese watercolor artist Hsi Mei Yates, painter and sculptor that seems bent on building walls based on Jurgen Brat, painter Sarah Lapp, HAISIX our differences. With so many positive and powerful pieces about the people in our designer, John Williams, fiber artist Lorie area who are engaging with all of us McCown, letterpress artists Susan Carter Morgan and Chris Fritton, video game through the arts, we hope this volume is a designer Grant Ervin, and costume balm to your frazzled nerves, an answer to the daily grind, and that it will leave you designer Nancy Michael. Additionally, we talked with wanting to go out and create something Kenneth and D.D. Lecky of LibertyTown meaningful in the world. You may enjoy Arts for our gallery feature; we got the FLAR free of cost online at our or lowdown on the progress behind a local website fredericksburgwriters.com through a link on our Facebook page woodworking project, The Workshop, LLC; and we say goodbye to Water Street @FredLitArtReview. Many readers have Studio with a feature of their final preferred the print-on-demand feature, show, Verses to Visions, which was held which may be accessed online as well. last spring. Art and literature are important to the fabric of our communities for so many reasons, not least of all being that they highlight our similarities in a world

A.E.Bayne is a writer, visual artist and educator. She is the publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review

Thank you, Kate, for inspiring and educating us about preserving our city’s history. Ms. Schwartz can be reached at ph: ksschwartz@fredericksburgva.gov (540) 372-1179. ~ KB

photo by kevin brown

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

19


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Tapestry of Arts

preserving our city’s history

Fall FLAR is Full of Features

Interview by kevin brown

By A.E. Bayne

ST. JAMES HOUSE By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

INTERVIEW

WITH

KATE SCHWARTZ,

OUR NEW FREDERICKSBURG HISTORIC RESOURCES PLANNER/HISTORIC PRESERVATIONIST

Q. Why is historic preservation important to Fredericksburg?

It was a rainy Saturday morning with the hurricane stirring off of the coast of North Carolina when Anne said, “let’s go see the Saint James house”. Now you would think after living in Fredericksburg for well over half a century I would have said “been there”. Actually the answer is no I have not been there, probably because it has been a private residence since it was built sometime around 1768. It is said to be one of the older original homes in the city as I had owned and restored one built in the 1760’s on Caroline Street.

We arrived at the home located at 1300 Charles Street with a steady rain falling and were greeted by Anne Haley and Joyce Childress two ladies that I have known for many years. They both are very knowledgeable of Fredericksburg and its history and volunteer for the Washington Heritage Museums. The organization a non-profit 501 c-3 maintains and operates the Saint James house along with Hugh Mercer Apothecary, Rising Sun Tavern and the Mary Washington House with donations and income from the visitors. The St. James home, however, unlike the others is open during Garden Week and the first week in October or by special appointment. The home was built by Fredericksburg attorney James Mercer (no relation to General Hugh Mercer) on property once owned by Fielding Lewis as part of the Kenmore plantation. Fielding Lewis was the brother in law of George Washington. James Mercer is known to have done the will of Mary Washington along with being the first judge of the Fredericksburg General Court and he went on to be in the House of Burgesses. William Tolerton along with Daniel Breslin purchased and restored the home and furnished it with antique furniture of the period. The property was bequeathed along with an endowment for perpetual maintenance to Preservation Virginia. In 2013 Washington Heritage Museums assumed control of the properties. The Saint in the name, there is no explanation other than he signed a letter to his father Saint James. Rain or shine I encourage you to visit this jewel within our city. Thanks Joyce and Ann for a wonderful tour of this historic property. Dedicate to the memory of Joyce Kain, Herbert Cooper, Carol Boyer Lmore, Curtis Brann and Norman Chenault Tuffy Hicks brings us little known facts about FXBG each month in this space.

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

A: Fredericksburg’s historic character is what makes it a unique city with a distinctive sense of place. The built environment and the stories embodied there are how you can tell that you’re not in anywhere America. These physical places tie us to memories and the unique history of the city. Cities are constantly evolving—in fact, the centuries of change you see in Fredericksburg’s buildings are one of the city’s defining features—but it’s vital to balance past and future. This is the primary role that preservation plays, not freezing a place in time, but balancing and managing change. Q. What are the biggest challenges Fredericksburg faces in historic preservation? A: The challenge is certainly not unique to Fredericksburg, but there is a clear desire for development in our downtown. There is a growing desire to live in interesting, pedestrian-friendly, vibrant places. But if development comes at the cost of the historic character here, then we end up sacrificing those exact qualities that make the city attractive to existing and new residents alike. It’s not unusual to hear development and historic preservation pitted against one another, but that’s a false understanding. Historic districts and design review processes exist as tools to help new development projects and changes in historic areas be as compatible as possible with the character there and to enhance the environment. There are many opportunities for new buildings, new businesses, and new residents in the historic area, and through preservation, we can manage those changes to ensure the value, both economic and cultural, of the historic area is not compromised. Q. What do you hope to accomplish during your first year on the job?

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

18

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

A: My focus for this first year is learning and understanding all that I can about Fredericksburg’s history, building relationships with a community that is passionate about that history, and facilitating a consistent Architectural Review Board/design review process within our historic district.

One of my priorities is updating the National Register nomination for Fredericksburg’s Historic District. The district was designated at the federal level in 1971, but only buildings fifty years old at that time (built before 1921) were considered historically significant. If we’re looking at buildings that are fifty years old today, that extends the period of significance for our district up to 1966. It’s vital to include these places in the updated nomination to not only recognize broader aspects of our history, but also to allow more property owners to take advantage of valuable tax credits at the state and federal level for rehabilitation of these buildings. Virginia offers a 25% tax credit that can be combined with a 20% federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic buildings. I’m also working towards the creation of an archaeological ordinance for the city so that we can protect our buried history. There is so much we can learn from these archaeological resources, but they are lost forever once the ground is disturbed for construction. The challenge is determining what areas are most archaeologically important, where the ordinance should apply, and how to administer it. Community support and education will be important in this project as well.

What a doozy of a year! When public life and times are divisive, I turn to the arts for solace. Like many of you, I cherish a well-turned phrase, a compelling piece of writing, or thoughtful verse. I seek composition and design to refine the rough edges of a topsy-turvy world. The visual, literary and performing arts are woven with brilliant thread, resulting in collaboration and inspiration born of diverse creativity. You will find evidence of this artistic web within the pages of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review’s fall edition, as it reveals the live tapestry of arts that surrounds us in our town, our region, and beyond. With a focus on editing and revision within each feature interview in this edition, regional artists and writers share their experiences of craft and process. Our local, national and international contributors offer thought-provoking pieces that inspire empathy, evoke wisdom and channel kinship between themselves and the reader. We are making connections, people! This is outstanding! Meet the Panels Our panel members work

together to choose quality work that will highlight the rich arc of arts in our area. This fall, our art panel was composed of painter and resin artist Joelle Cathleen, photographer Ruth Golden, dancer and community organizer Alex Harvell, painter Maddie Huddle, and photographer and painter Christopher Thomas Limbrick. Our literary panel included poet and writer Mikaela D’Eigh, blogger and features writer Christina Ferber, writer and president of Riverside Writers, Jim Gaines, poet Tramia Jackson, and writer and editor Shayli Lesser. Featured Writers and Artists We’ve packed this 228 page volume full of featured writers and artists from our region. Our literary features Kristen Green, include author of Something Must be Done About Prince Edward County; Jim Hall, author of The Last Lynching in Northern Virginia; Vicky Jasparro, a blogger and explorer who hiked the Te Araroa Trail in New Zealand; Suann Cokal, writer and editor of Broad Street Magazine in Richmond; Beth Spragins, a local poet who writes in the Celtic Bardic tradition; local musicians who share their lyric writing process; and Alaha Ahrar, a

UMW graduate who is an award-winning poet and activist for social justice. O u r featured visual artists include painter Bill Harris, Fall FLAR cover art by Bill Harris Chinese watercolor artist Hsi Mei Yates, painter and sculptor that seems bent on building walls based on Jurgen Brat, painter Sarah Lapp, HAISIX our differences. With so many positive and powerful pieces about the people in our designer, John Williams, fiber artist Lorie area who are engaging with all of us McCown, letterpress artists Susan Carter Morgan and Chris Fritton, video game through the arts, we hope this volume is a designer Grant Ervin, and costume balm to your frazzled nerves, an answer to the daily grind, and that it will leave you designer Nancy Michael. Additionally, we talked with wanting to go out and create something Kenneth and D.D. Lecky of LibertyTown meaningful in the world. You may enjoy Arts for our gallery feature; we got the FLAR free of cost online at our or lowdown on the progress behind a local website fredericksburgwriters.com through a link on our Facebook page woodworking project, The Workshop, LLC; and we say goodbye to Water Street @FredLitArtReview. Many readers have Studio with a feature of their final preferred the print-on-demand feature, show, Verses to Visions, which was held which may be accessed online as well. last spring. Art and literature are important to the fabric of our communities for so many reasons, not least of all being that they highlight our similarities in a world

A.E.Bayne is a writer, visual artist and educator. She is the publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review

Thank you, Kate, for inspiring and educating us about preserving our city’s history. Ms. Schwartz can be reached at ph: ksschwartz@fredericksburgva.gov (540) 372-1179. ~ KB

photo by kevin brown

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

19


Senior Care Family Health History By Karl Karch

My daughter surprised me recently for my birthday by organizing a family gathering in Niagara Falls. Besides being an amazing gift, I learned a few new things about our family health history. I now realize the need to document our blood relative family health history and distribute this to our children. A recent survey found that 96 percent of Americans know that family health history is an important way to protect your health. It can give clues to medical conditions that may run in the family. Yet, only one-third of Americans have taken the time to collect and document this important and potential life-saving information. Ideally, according to the National Institute of Health, a complete record includes information from three generations of blood relatives. Healthcare professionals can use this information, even if incomplete, to notice patterns of disorders that can run in families to help determine whether current and future family members are at increased risk of developing a particular condition. Common disorders that run in families are: heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, certain cancers, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Some rare genetic diseases are: hemophilia, cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia. This information can be used to help lower health risks by recommending more frequent screening at earlier ages (such as mammography, colonoscopy, or PSA), regular checkups, and even lifestyle changes. With the holiday season rapidly approaching, a family gathering can be an excellent time to have a family health history conversation. To help organize this information, the U. S. Surgeon General’s office created “My Family Health History Portrait Tool” that can be accessed at www.hhs.gov/programs/prevention-a andwellness/family-h health-h history. You can complete the information online, save it, and share it with family members who can add to what you already entered. The tool

20

November 2016

also creates a family tree diagram. Or, you can download a printable version to complete offline. The website has a document that explains what you need to gather prior to creating your family history. Once developed, the information should be shared with all family members and healthcare professionals and kept upto-date. The time you spend on this will help create a lasting family health legacy for future generations.

Be A Santa to a Senior Speaking of the holiday season, a charitable community give-back program that my company initiated is Be A Santa To A Senior (BASTAS) which is now in its eleventh year. The purpose of BASTAS is to provide gifts to lonely, needy seniors who are often overlooked this time of year. Local Social Services, Area Agency on Aging, and other non-profit organizations provide names and suggest modest gifts they need. Home Instead Senior Care then partners with various companies, groups, and many community-minded individuals who provide these gifts which are then distributed to the seniors. The program kicks off just before Thanksgiving and continues through mid-December. So, please be on the lookout for our BASTAS ornaments and, if you are so moved, purchase a gift or two for the senior on an ornament to help make their holiday brighter.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Mind Your Mind no one belongs to me By Barbara Deal This is that season’s beginning in which people plan holiday r e u n i o n s , activities, menus and presents. Ritual and t r a d i t i o n p r o v i d e structure to the passing of time, reminding us of connections new, old, here, and gone. The payoff of these conventions is membership and belonging, having a meaningful role in an intimate group, shared beliefs and a past and something to do Nowadays, we have a keen awareness of the obviously socially disenfranchised Other, ethnically, culturally, the impoverished, the elderly, the handicapped. We have been challenged to go on fund-raising walks, kindnesses, volunteer at shelters, write checks, take things to Rikki’s Refuge Thrift Store. What of those, who for their own or other’s reasons, do not participate? What about those self-identified ‘misfits’? There is little vocabulary for that invisible group, equally disconnected, lonely. They are unhooked from “natural support groups” that a person inadvertently falls into with automatic membership (e.g. families, churches, sports, political parties). Think of the Tom Petty line “live like a refugee” referring to that alienation of a person who feels without a nation or tribe. The orphan, psychologically. That estrangement, having “divorced one’s family” has left her out-ofsync, most painfully and obviously around now. In the beginning, disengagement comes with a tremendous moment of power, as one realizes the need to detach, usually protectively. Freed of emotional blackmail and obligation, one may initially

be exhilarated. Yet, there still remains the need for structure and routines for the passing of time, relationships, shared experiences and values. Years forward, there can be regret, mourning and ineffably forlorn and alone. Profound emotional cost. Then there is the taboo. Who rejects her mother? Then new conclusions about one’s self, with further condemnation and shame. Dread of recognition or self-disclosure. Flight. Hiding. Maybe cowering. A person who has been shunned, rejected by a daughter, a brother, a cousin, a parent is viewed askew. Roles and their sets of joys, expectations and participations have been denied. Floating anomie. Might this be recognizable? Should that person be lucky, having distanced herself from conventional ties and get-togethers, she finds a community of love and acceptance with which to satisfy those longings unmet. There is recognition. There are celebrations routinely. There is membership. Not everyone has this opportunity. Related to this, I saw a photograph on a coworker’s cell of local artwork, painted images, portraits in shocking colors, near-unrecognizable postures, contorted abstract figures and faces. She intended to depict the perspective of a person with mental illness. Here is where art has meaning beyond the artist’s intention and can say what words cannot. Across categories, for persons who feel different, people look distorted, scary and unapproachable. If you have seen this person, here is your gift. Do something ‘holiday’-ish with her/him. Somehow with subtlety, join with her with dignity. Avoid that selfcongratulatory altruistic energy. Nothing big nor especially costly, maybe. Not even on that holiday celebration, necessarily. Grin. Give him a chance to live, not as a refugee, but as one in plain sight, recognized for being here among us.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Emancipated Patients Going the way of dodo by patrick neustatter, MD It was a moving moment, at the end of my appointment, as I shook hands, signed for a copy of my medical records and joined the thousands of other orphans of Fredericksburg Dermatologic Associates. The occasion was the last visit to my dermatologist, Dr. Pat Stevens. She, together with fellow dermatologist/husband, Dr. Mike Stevens (left) is retiring after 40 years. Dr. Pat and Dr. Mike are a Fredericksburg institution, like Carl’s, like Goolricks. Like the hardware store was. They were always there as an infallible resource when some rash or skin lesion had me stumped. My introduction was a long time back when I went to a health fair where Dr. Mike was giving free advice revelationary in itself, and unlikely to happen these days. I was curious about this awful, intensely itching rash my daughter and I both had around our ankles. He diagnosed / introduced me to what I now know is one of the horrors of country life in Virginia. Chiggers. It didn’t take long for the Stevens’ to suffer the Catch – 22 of being popular. So many people want to come and see you that you very quickly become oversubscribed and have to turn off the spigot. I was lucky enough to get my foot in the door and got to see Dr. Pat every six months to keep on top of the various moles and skin cancers that we lucky fare skinned people get instead of a sexy tan. As I lay on the table and she attacked my various blemishes with her nasty, liquid nitrogen spray, we got into an old farts type conversation, gefortling and lamenting about “the way things are going in medicine”. How young doctors just don’t want to put in the grueling hours we had to – they had many potential buyers of the practice, but “they all only want to work three days a week” she complained We kvetched about how good bedside manner is giving way to innovations like computers (they have resisted the mandate to computerize their medical records, incurring penalties from Medicare – but have thus missed out on one of the true hair tearing experiences of modern medicine. The implementation). We pissed and moaned about how insurance companies rule the world with their discounted fees, restricted panels and preauthorization’s. How practices are being bought up by corporations and hospitals, and run like widget factories (creating the loss of autonomy so many

doctors complain of). How lawyers are terrorizing the profession with threats of malpractice suits; how Obamacare is creating ever more paper work; how OSHA seems to have ever more restrictive privacy policies; how the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services threatening to bust more and more doctors for of fraud and abuse; and the FDA nab you for overprescribing narcotics. Things were different forty years ago when we were both starting out. But Dr. Pat is from the old school – I hesitate to use the term “dinosaur,” though she did describe herself to “a dodo” in her refusal to move with the times, but rather sell up. All in all it was a heartfelt, if maudlin, moment, my last visit. But it’s as serious as the Fredericksburg hardware store closing. Another great institution gone by the board, never to be replaced or replicated. Or am I dodo-ing now? Read Patrick Neustatter's book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

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21


Senior Care Family Health History By Karl Karch

My daughter surprised me recently for my birthday by organizing a family gathering in Niagara Falls. Besides being an amazing gift, I learned a few new things about our family health history. I now realize the need to document our blood relative family health history and distribute this to our children. A recent survey found that 96 percent of Americans know that family health history is an important way to protect your health. It can give clues to medical conditions that may run in the family. Yet, only one-third of Americans have taken the time to collect and document this important and potential life-saving information. Ideally, according to the National Institute of Health, a complete record includes information from three generations of blood relatives. Healthcare professionals can use this information, even if incomplete, to notice patterns of disorders that can run in families to help determine whether current and future family members are at increased risk of developing a particular condition. Common disorders that run in families are: heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, certain cancers, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Some rare genetic diseases are: hemophilia, cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia. This information can be used to help lower health risks by recommending more frequent screening at earlier ages (such as mammography, colonoscopy, or PSA), regular checkups, and even lifestyle changes. With the holiday season rapidly approaching, a family gathering can be an excellent time to have a family health history conversation. To help organize this information, the U. S. Surgeon General’s office created “My Family Health History Portrait Tool” that can be accessed at www.hhs.gov/programs/prevention-a andwellness/family-h health-h history. You can complete the information online, save it, and share it with family members who can add to what you already entered. The tool

20

November 2016

also creates a family tree diagram. Or, you can download a printable version to complete offline. The website has a document that explains what you need to gather prior to creating your family history. Once developed, the information should be shared with all family members and healthcare professionals and kept upto-date. The time you spend on this will help create a lasting family health legacy for future generations.

Be A Santa to a Senior Speaking of the holiday season, a charitable community give-back program that my company initiated is Be A Santa To A Senior (BASTAS) which is now in its eleventh year. The purpose of BASTAS is to provide gifts to lonely, needy seniors who are often overlooked this time of year. Local Social Services, Area Agency on Aging, and other non-profit organizations provide names and suggest modest gifts they need. Home Instead Senior Care then partners with various companies, groups, and many community-minded individuals who provide these gifts which are then distributed to the seniors. The program kicks off just before Thanksgiving and continues through mid-December. So, please be on the lookout for our BASTAS ornaments and, if you are so moved, purchase a gift or two for the senior on an ornament to help make their holiday brighter.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Mind Your Mind no one belongs to me By Barbara Deal This is that season’s beginning in which people plan holiday r e u n i o n s , activities, menus and presents. Ritual and t r a d i t i o n p r o v i d e structure to the passing of time, reminding us of connections new, old, here, and gone. The payoff of these conventions is membership and belonging, having a meaningful role in an intimate group, shared beliefs and a past and something to do Nowadays, we have a keen awareness of the obviously socially disenfranchised Other, ethnically, culturally, the impoverished, the elderly, the handicapped. We have been challenged to go on fund-raising walks, kindnesses, volunteer at shelters, write checks, take things to Rikki’s Refuge Thrift Store. What of those, who for their own or other’s reasons, do not participate? What about those self-identified ‘misfits’? There is little vocabulary for that invisible group, equally disconnected, lonely. They are unhooked from “natural support groups” that a person inadvertently falls into with automatic membership (e.g. families, churches, sports, political parties). Think of the Tom Petty line “live like a refugee” referring to that alienation of a person who feels without a nation or tribe. The orphan, psychologically. That estrangement, having “divorced one’s family” has left her out-ofsync, most painfully and obviously around now. In the beginning, disengagement comes with a tremendous moment of power, as one realizes the need to detach, usually protectively. Freed of emotional blackmail and obligation, one may initially

be exhilarated. Yet, there still remains the need for structure and routines for the passing of time, relationships, shared experiences and values. Years forward, there can be regret, mourning and ineffably forlorn and alone. Profound emotional cost. Then there is the taboo. Who rejects her mother? Then new conclusions about one’s self, with further condemnation and shame. Dread of recognition or self-disclosure. Flight. Hiding. Maybe cowering. A person who has been shunned, rejected by a daughter, a brother, a cousin, a parent is viewed askew. Roles and their sets of joys, expectations and participations have been denied. Floating anomie. Might this be recognizable? Should that person be lucky, having distanced herself from conventional ties and get-togethers, she finds a community of love and acceptance with which to satisfy those longings unmet. There is recognition. There are celebrations routinely. There is membership. Not everyone has this opportunity. Related to this, I saw a photograph on a coworker’s cell of local artwork, painted images, portraits in shocking colors, near-unrecognizable postures, contorted abstract figures and faces. She intended to depict the perspective of a person with mental illness. Here is where art has meaning beyond the artist’s intention and can say what words cannot. Across categories, for persons who feel different, people look distorted, scary and unapproachable. If you have seen this person, here is your gift. Do something ‘holiday’-ish with her/him. Somehow with subtlety, join with her with dignity. Avoid that selfcongratulatory altruistic energy. Nothing big nor especially costly, maybe. Not even on that holiday celebration, necessarily. Grin. Give him a chance to live, not as a refugee, but as one in plain sight, recognized for being here among us.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Emancipated Patients Going the way of dodo by patrick neustatter, MD It was a moving moment, at the end of my appointment, as I shook hands, signed for a copy of my medical records and joined the thousands of other orphans of Fredericksburg Dermatologic Associates. The occasion was the last visit to my dermatologist, Dr. Pat Stevens. She, together with fellow dermatologist/husband, Dr. Mike Stevens (left) is retiring after 40 years. Dr. Pat and Dr. Mike are a Fredericksburg institution, like Carl’s, like Goolricks. Like the hardware store was. They were always there as an infallible resource when some rash or skin lesion had me stumped. My introduction was a long time back when I went to a health fair where Dr. Mike was giving free advice revelationary in itself, and unlikely to happen these days. I was curious about this awful, intensely itching rash my daughter and I both had around our ankles. He diagnosed / introduced me to what I now know is one of the horrors of country life in Virginia. Chiggers. It didn’t take long for the Stevens’ to suffer the Catch – 22 of being popular. So many people want to come and see you that you very quickly become oversubscribed and have to turn off the spigot. I was lucky enough to get my foot in the door and got to see Dr. Pat every six months to keep on top of the various moles and skin cancers that we lucky fare skinned people get instead of a sexy tan. As I lay on the table and she attacked my various blemishes with her nasty, liquid nitrogen spray, we got into an old farts type conversation, gefortling and lamenting about “the way things are going in medicine”. How young doctors just don’t want to put in the grueling hours we had to – they had many potential buyers of the practice, but “they all only want to work three days a week” she complained We kvetched about how good bedside manner is giving way to innovations like computers (they have resisted the mandate to computerize their medical records, incurring penalties from Medicare – but have thus missed out on one of the true hair tearing experiences of modern medicine. The implementation). We pissed and moaned about how insurance companies rule the world with their discounted fees, restricted panels and preauthorization’s. How practices are being bought up by corporations and hospitals, and run like widget factories (creating the loss of autonomy so many

doctors complain of). How lawyers are terrorizing the profession with threats of malpractice suits; how Obamacare is creating ever more paper work; how OSHA seems to have ever more restrictive privacy policies; how the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services threatening to bust more and more doctors for of fraud and abuse; and the FDA nab you for overprescribing narcotics. Things were different forty years ago when we were both starting out. But Dr. Pat is from the old school – I hesitate to use the term “dinosaur,” though she did describe herself to “a dodo” in her refusal to move with the times, but rather sell up. All in all it was a heartfelt, if maudlin, moment, my last visit. But it’s as serious as the Fredericksburg hardware store closing. Another great institution gone by the board, never to be replaced or replicated. Or am I dodo-ing now? Read Patrick Neustatter's book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

21


Wellness

Integrative Medicine Program

It is curious and even a little alarming that such a large part of our population has been turning up deficient in such well known vitamins as D and B12 in recent years. The B vitamins are essential for so many important functions of the body and used in abundance to counteract the ravages of our stressful lifestyle. B12 in particular is vital in normal brain and nervous system function and the formation of red blood cells. The interesting thing about Vitamin B12, or cobalamin is that no plants or animals can make it. Only bacteria have the enzymes necessary for synthesis of B12. With that information we can start to understand epidemic of deficiency of B12. When we look at the deplorable state of intestinal health in many people and the deficiency of beneficial bacteria in our soil and food sources, it is no wonder people are not able to produce B vitamins and especially B12 in sufficient amounts. Add to that the current flagrant use of antibiotics and the persistence of germ-phobia in our culture, and B12 doesn’t stand a chance! Most people supplementing with B12 are taking the synthetic form, cyanocobalamin. The assumption is that it will be converted by the body to the form needed for it to function properly. This is assuming a lot. Many people are so deficient and weakened, they do not adequately convert it and therefore stay relatively deficient in B12 despite supplementation. The form of B12 the cells of the body use and the form our gut bacteria make is methylcobalamin, so why not just supplement with this? Cost and shelf life is the answer. Surprised? According to Kelly Brogan, MD a psychiatrist and author of A Mind of Your Own, “Vitamin B12 is among the most important vitamins when it comes to depression and mental health.” In her book, she quotes a large study done with

3500 adults by researchers at Rush University in 2010 that concluded higher intakes of B6, B9 and B12 was associated with a decreased likelihood of depression for up to 12 years of follow-up. Let’s look at why B12 is so important in mental health. It turns out that B12 is necessary for conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Too much homocysteine causes inflammation in the blood and can lead to brain and nervous system disorders and heart disease. Inflammation, although a natural part of the body’s healing response, when not controlled, becomes the mechanism by which blood vessels deteriorate, whether in the brain, heart or other vital organs. We also know that proton pump inhibitors (Prilosec, Nexium, Omeprazole, etc.) can cause Vitamin B12 deficiency and if you aren’t aware yet, these medications are one of the top two prescribed meds in our country. They are prescribed for acid reflux, heartburn, scratchy throats, coughs and just about anything that can be attributed to excess acid in the esophagus. My question, as usual, is what is causing the burning or irritation in the throat or esophagus? Most of the time it is NOT excess stomach acid. More commonly it is poor stomach function, stress, poor diet or poor habits at mealtime. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, it is very important that you take a B12 supplement and preferably with the methylcobalamin form. I recommend that you have your B12 status checked by blood test regularly and supplement when necessary. Despite the values your lab report says are “normal”, you actually need to be above 600 pg/mL to be sufficient in B12. If you are eating a varied diet including clean animal products and have a healthy gut lining, you should be able to make adequate amounts of B12 with no problem.

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

22

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Regional cancer center @ MWHC

wondrous vitamin b12 By christine H. Thompson, D.C.

Eddie Vernon

By Christine Ferber When people get the diagnosis of cancer, they may think of the traditional routes to healing such as chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation. However patients at Mary Washington Healthcare’s (MWHC) Regional Cancer Center also have the option to add some holistic therapies that can be used in conjunction with those conventional methods. The Regional Cancer Center at MWHC offers a long list of complementary techniques through their Integrative Medicine Program, and patients have been adding them to their cancer care regime for 3 years now. Integrative Therapies combine standard cancer treatments with complementary methods that can aid wellness and help the quality of life for the needs and wants of our patients. My cancer patients during their course of job is to make sure I have a finger on the treatment. These techniques can help pulse of our community and find whatever stem physical side effects and support the opportunities I can to bring patients mind and spirit at the same time. access to holistic healthcare,” says “Patients come to us in a variety Schaffer. of ways, but the goal is the same. We work Recent additions to those to provide them integrative opportunities opportunities include a partnership with that fit in with their the YMCA to provide a treatment plan,” says cancer support Cancer doesn’t happen in Virginia Schaffer, program that is a bubble... we will continue Coordinator of the affordable and open building those relationships and Integrative Medicine to any MWHC cancer growing our network to help our Program. “After a patient, as well as patients find the balance and consultation, I talk workshops held on healing that they need,” about specific symptoms site to give patients that they may be feeling and natural techniques that might ease them. Then they can decide what might work to help them through the treatment process.” Schaffer knows what she is talking about. As a breast cancer survivor, she underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation while utilizing the programs at MWHC to help ease her symptoms, specifically acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy. “I was already knowledgeable about some of these techniques before I was diagnosed, but thought of them as something you would do at a spa. I never made the connection that they would be paramount to my rehabilitation and healing,” says Schaffer. The center offers Healing Touch Therapy, Massage Therapy, Music Therapy, and Yoga on site. Schaffer also helps connect patients with practitioners that provide Acupuncture and Acupressure, Neurofeedback, Reiki and Energy medicine, Life Coaching, Mindfulness and Meditation, and Tai Chi. Providers of Reflexology, Nutrition Counseling, Chiropractic Care, and IonCleanse Foot Detoxification are also on the list. “Our integrative providers all go through a vetting process, and we are continually building a network based on

the chance to understand how some of these natural techniques work. “Cancer doesn’t happen in a bubble. There is a community of providers out there and we will continue building those relationships and growing our network to help our patients find the balance and healing that they need,” says Schaffer. To find out more about the programs offered, visit www.marywashingtonhealthcare.com/Our -Services/Cancer-Center/SpecialPrograms/Integrative-Therapies.aspx

acupuncturist focus on prevention & wellness By Anne Hunt Discovering the opportunity to benefit from Acupuncture and other healthy therapies have expanded locally. A native Virginian welcomed back home in Fredericksburg has a lot of wellness to share. Originally from Spotsylvania, Eddie Vernon, a Licensed Acupuncturist and Herbalist practicing at Total Rehab in the Greenbrier Shopping Center on Plank Road provides flexibility in scheduling and answers to questions about understanding the science of natural healing. There is more to be said about a former Naval Academy graduate with an Engineering degree who is also very educated in the service of offering preventative methods to heal and become or stay well through Natural Medicine. Eddie Vernon not only has a

Master’s of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in San Diego, but he is also certified by the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) and is licensed by the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Acupuncture Licensing Board. After completing a four-year

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

chiropractors, massage therapists, and yoga instructors. Eddie Vernon finds home again the place for continued practice. A Veteran himself, he offers free clinics for our local Veterans on the third Saturday of each month. Newcomers are welcome and most insurance is accepted. Rates are affordable. There are many testimonies of

You come from so many continents and nations of people who voyaged across outlying oceans To be born here with us. Now you begin to grow by a spirit and wonder that each parent and we will share inside you as the years move ahead.

how well it works. Check out his website at acupuncturefredericksburg.com. This is where you will find a video that describes the Acupuncture as a real medicine based on real anatomy working to help every cell of our body. There are other therapies such as Cupping, Acupuncture for Fertility, Chinese Herbs, Moxibustion and QiGong, Message and Chiropractic Services. Total Rehab’s peaceful yet cheerful atmosphere is welcoming. Having helped a friend with acute pain I googled acupuncture in Fredericksburg last June. I made one call and had an appointment the same day. It worked and not only heals but relaxes the mind and body. Eddie Vernon and other staff are dedicated to serving the community with healing, health and wellness not only from the mind but the heart. Acupuncture Fredericksburg acupuncturefredericksburg.com Total Rehab 2358 Plank Road Fredericksburg, VA 22401 (540) 847-6 6985 Anne Hunt lives in Fredericksburg and is a Writer in the Art of Natural Healing, Health, Wellness

A newcomer shall teach the world far beyond us how days derive future when all can comprehend the grace of your being. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 7 years.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Give a Child Something to

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes

degree in Acupuncture and Chinese Pharmacology at Pacific College, he also completed a post-graduate internship in China at the Pacific College Teaching Hospital. While living in San Diego, Eddie gained experience providing acupuncture at Rady Children’s Hospital and San Diego Hospice. He also spent six years apprenticing with Dr. Richard Tan, a master acupuncturist from Taiwan and learned his highly effective method of acupuncture for pain management and stress relief. From 2012 to 2015, he worked for the U.S. Army at Tripler Hospital’s Interdisciplinary Pain Management Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. While there he provided acupuncture to military service members and veterans as part of an integrative team of medical doctors,

Ella Jane Fratoe 9/5/16

Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684 front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

23


Wellness

Integrative Medicine Program

It is curious and even a little alarming that such a large part of our population has been turning up deficient in such well known vitamins as D and B12 in recent years. The B vitamins are essential for so many important functions of the body and used in abundance to counteract the ravages of our stressful lifestyle. B12 in particular is vital in normal brain and nervous system function and the formation of red blood cells. The interesting thing about Vitamin B12, or cobalamin is that no plants or animals can make it. Only bacteria have the enzymes necessary for synthesis of B12. With that information we can start to understand epidemic of deficiency of B12. When we look at the deplorable state of intestinal health in many people and the deficiency of beneficial bacteria in our soil and food sources, it is no wonder people are not able to produce B vitamins and especially B12 in sufficient amounts. Add to that the current flagrant use of antibiotics and the persistence of germ-phobia in our culture, and B12 doesn’t stand a chance! Most people supplementing with B12 are taking the synthetic form, cyanocobalamin. The assumption is that it will be converted by the body to the form needed for it to function properly. This is assuming a lot. Many people are so deficient and weakened, they do not adequately convert it and therefore stay relatively deficient in B12 despite supplementation. The form of B12 the cells of the body use and the form our gut bacteria make is methylcobalamin, so why not just supplement with this? Cost and shelf life is the answer. Surprised? According to Kelly Brogan, MD a psychiatrist and author of A Mind of Your Own, “Vitamin B12 is among the most important vitamins when it comes to depression and mental health.” In her book, she quotes a large study done with

3500 adults by researchers at Rush University in 2010 that concluded higher intakes of B6, B9 and B12 was associated with a decreased likelihood of depression for up to 12 years of follow-up. Let’s look at why B12 is so important in mental health. It turns out that B12 is necessary for conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Too much homocysteine causes inflammation in the blood and can lead to brain and nervous system disorders and heart disease. Inflammation, although a natural part of the body’s healing response, when not controlled, becomes the mechanism by which blood vessels deteriorate, whether in the brain, heart or other vital organs. We also know that proton pump inhibitors (Prilosec, Nexium, Omeprazole, etc.) can cause Vitamin B12 deficiency and if you aren’t aware yet, these medications are one of the top two prescribed meds in our country. They are prescribed for acid reflux, heartburn, scratchy throats, coughs and just about anything that can be attributed to excess acid in the esophagus. My question, as usual, is what is causing the burning or irritation in the throat or esophagus? Most of the time it is NOT excess stomach acid. More commonly it is poor stomach function, stress, poor diet or poor habits at mealtime. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, it is very important that you take a B12 supplement and preferably with the methylcobalamin form. I recommend that you have your B12 status checked by blood test regularly and supplement when necessary. Despite the values your lab report says are “normal”, you actually need to be above 600 pg/mL to be sufficient in B12. If you are eating a varied diet including clean animal products and have a healthy gut lining, you should be able to make adequate amounts of B12 with no problem.

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

22

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Regional cancer center @ MWHC

wondrous vitamin b12 By christine H. Thompson, D.C.

Eddie Vernon

By Christine Ferber When people get the diagnosis of cancer, they may think of the traditional routes to healing such as chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation. However patients at Mary Washington Healthcare’s (MWHC) Regional Cancer Center also have the option to add some holistic therapies that can be used in conjunction with those conventional methods. The Regional Cancer Center at MWHC offers a long list of complementary techniques through their Integrative Medicine Program, and patients have been adding them to their cancer care regime for 3 years now. Integrative Therapies combine standard cancer treatments with complementary methods that can aid wellness and help the quality of life for the needs and wants of our patients. My cancer patients during their course of job is to make sure I have a finger on the treatment. These techniques can help pulse of our community and find whatever stem physical side effects and support the opportunities I can to bring patients mind and spirit at the same time. access to holistic healthcare,” says “Patients come to us in a variety Schaffer. of ways, but the goal is the same. We work Recent additions to those to provide them integrative opportunities opportunities include a partnership with that fit in with their the YMCA to provide a treatment plan,” says cancer support Cancer doesn’t happen in Virginia Schaffer, program that is a bubble... we will continue Coordinator of the affordable and open building those relationships and Integrative Medicine to any MWHC cancer growing our network to help our Program. “After a patient, as well as patients find the balance and consultation, I talk workshops held on healing that they need,” about specific symptoms site to give patients that they may be feeling and natural techniques that might ease them. Then they can decide what might work to help them through the treatment process.” Schaffer knows what she is talking about. As a breast cancer survivor, she underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation while utilizing the programs at MWHC to help ease her symptoms, specifically acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy. “I was already knowledgeable about some of these techniques before I was diagnosed, but thought of them as something you would do at a spa. I never made the connection that they would be paramount to my rehabilitation and healing,” says Schaffer. The center offers Healing Touch Therapy, Massage Therapy, Music Therapy, and Yoga on site. Schaffer also helps connect patients with practitioners that provide Acupuncture and Acupressure, Neurofeedback, Reiki and Energy medicine, Life Coaching, Mindfulness and Meditation, and Tai Chi. Providers of Reflexology, Nutrition Counseling, Chiropractic Care, and IonCleanse Foot Detoxification are also on the list. “Our integrative providers all go through a vetting process, and we are continually building a network based on

the chance to understand how some of these natural techniques work. “Cancer doesn’t happen in a bubble. There is a community of providers out there and we will continue building those relationships and growing our network to help our patients find the balance and healing that they need,” says Schaffer. To find out more about the programs offered, visit www.marywashingtonhealthcare.com/Our -Services/Cancer-Center/SpecialPrograms/Integrative-Therapies.aspx

acupuncturist focus on prevention & wellness By Anne Hunt Discovering the opportunity to benefit from Acupuncture and other healthy therapies have expanded locally. A native Virginian welcomed back home in Fredericksburg has a lot of wellness to share. Originally from Spotsylvania, Eddie Vernon, a Licensed Acupuncturist and Herbalist practicing at Total Rehab in the Greenbrier Shopping Center on Plank Road provides flexibility in scheduling and answers to questions about understanding the science of natural healing. There is more to be said about a former Naval Academy graduate with an Engineering degree who is also very educated in the service of offering preventative methods to heal and become or stay well through Natural Medicine. Eddie Vernon not only has a

Master’s of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in San Diego, but he is also certified by the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) and is licensed by the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Acupuncture Licensing Board. After completing a four-year

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

chiropractors, massage therapists, and yoga instructors. Eddie Vernon finds home again the place for continued practice. A Veteran himself, he offers free clinics for our local Veterans on the third Saturday of each month. Newcomers are welcome and most insurance is accepted. Rates are affordable. There are many testimonies of

You come from so many continents and nations of people who voyaged across outlying oceans To be born here with us. Now you begin to grow by a spirit and wonder that each parent and we will share inside you as the years move ahead.

how well it works. Check out his website at acupuncturefredericksburg.com. This is where you will find a video that describes the Acupuncture as a real medicine based on real anatomy working to help every cell of our body. There are other therapies such as Cupping, Acupuncture for Fertility, Chinese Herbs, Moxibustion and QiGong, Message and Chiropractic Services. Total Rehab’s peaceful yet cheerful atmosphere is welcoming. Having helped a friend with acute pain I googled acupuncture in Fredericksburg last June. I made one call and had an appointment the same day. It worked and not only heals but relaxes the mind and body. Eddie Vernon and other staff are dedicated to serving the community with healing, health and wellness not only from the mind but the heart. Acupuncture Fredericksburg acupuncturefredericksburg.com Total Rehab 2358 Plank Road Fredericksburg, VA 22401 (540) 847-6 6985 Anne Hunt lives in Fredericksburg and is a Writer in the Art of Natural Healing, Health, Wellness

A newcomer shall teach the world far beyond us how days derive future when all can comprehend the grace of your being. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 7 years.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Give a Child Something to

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes

degree in Acupuncture and Chinese Pharmacology at Pacific College, he also completed a post-graduate internship in China at the Pacific College Teaching Hospital. While living in San Diego, Eddie gained experience providing acupuncture at Rady Children’s Hospital and San Diego Hospice. He also spent six years apprenticing with Dr. Richard Tan, a master acupuncturist from Taiwan and learned his highly effective method of acupuncture for pain management and stress relief. From 2012 to 2015, he worked for the U.S. Army at Tripler Hospital’s Interdisciplinary Pain Management Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. While there he provided acupuncture to military service members and veterans as part of an integrative team of medical doctors,

Ella Jane Fratoe 9/5/16

Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684 front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

23


Art in the Burg

Stories

Showstopping Variations

roman schaller

of fredericksburg

by anacari storms Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline Street Variations, by Ben Childers Brush Strokes Gallery presents "Variations" by artist Ben Childers. Noted for his beautiful fused glass pieces, Ben is branching out into the arena of 2-D art this month. His multi-media show includes different takes on the same subject in oil painting and glass. Join us from 6-9 pm on November 4, 2016 for the Artists' reception. See this exploration in diversity and other new works by member artists including photography, beaded jewelry, and original paintings in all media.

Jessica Cannon, “Juxtaposition”

Opening Reception: First Friday, November 4, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: Nov 2 - Nov27 ~ Norma Woodward NormaWood@aol.com

Ben Childers, “#2” Art First Gallery 824 Caroline St. Showstopper! by Jessica Cannon Prolific abstract artist, Jessica Cannon, credits the public's interpretation of her work as a major source of inspiration. Since her highly textured pieces will be featured throughout November, Art First gallery visitors can enjoy, and maybe even influence, her art. Cannon also thrives on exploiting the tactile quality of her materials, including acrylic and oil paint and pastels; various gels and varnishes; plaster; fabric, and feathers. She sculpts with paint to disguise recognizable, and sometimes overlooked, objects. The juxtaposition

24

November 2016

and repetition of color and form, both in a single painting, and in series, clearly captivates her. If her audience feels compelled to touch her paintings, a focus of her process has been achieved. Born and raised in Bowling Green, Cannon acknowledges supportive family, friends and teach-ers as a source for her lifelong passion for art. She graduated from Mary Baldwin College, with degrees in Business Administration and in Art. Her Masters is in Education. Opening Reception: First Friday, November 4, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: Nov 2 - Nov29 ~ Suzanne Scherr Media Contact, suzanne.scherr@att.net

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Roman Schaller 19 years old, has kidney failure. He is now housed and has a stable income to support his needs, but he is in desperate need of a kidney donor. He Lee is blood type B and is in the Hume-L Transplant Program at the VCU Medical Center. Anyone interested in learning the steps to donating a kidney to Roman can contact the Transplant Coordinator for Living Donors- Maureen Bell, at 804-6280711. "I grew up in Russia Smolensk. I know by Russian papers that I officially am supposed to have one sister and one brother who are much older than me, but I have no idea. At 5 years old (for reasons I have no idea why because I was too young to really understand anything) I went to live in St. Petersburg with my biological uncle. I lived with him for a couple years and at 7 I was put into an orphanage. I barely remember my parents or family - I don’t even remember their faces. My childhood is like a memory that is full of faceless people.

empowerhouseva.org

I was in two orphanages during my stay in Russia. I was adopted from there. As a kid, I never had any dreams to be honest with you. I just went with the flow. One day I was just sitting around and minding my own business and all of a sudden they told me that I had American parents coming to visit me and I was like ‘What? Who?’ Literally that’s the way it was. That was the first time I had been considered and I was about 9ish. Part of me was asking ‘Why are they even here? What’s going on?’ And the other part of me I guess I was excited. It was something new instead of mundane life. Coming to Stafford, VA was a better lifestyle. Let’s just say that. I was 10 years old when I came over here. At first everything with my new parents was fine…as well as you can have anyway. I was a troublemaker and my parents kind of got sick of me and I don’t know how to say it nicely…but when I was 18 they put me in a homeless shelter. I don’t want to say anything bad about them, but that’s pretty much what happened. While I was at the homeless shelter I went through a depression for about 2 months-give or take. It was around August-September and I got out of it through a sheer force of will. Literally I don’t know how I did that. My personality changed. I’m no longer the outgoing person I used to be. Eventually this meant I had to leave the shelter. I got a tent from Micah and I stayed in the woods for about a month. While all this was happening I was trying to get with Job Corps to get trained for a job- it has career training and a residence. I went to Job Corps October 7th 2014 and I was there until about mid-January 2015. One day they took an annual blood test and came back to me a week later and told me that my kidneys had completely failed and I needed to go back home. So they took me back home to the cold weather shelter and what they told me is that I had 6 months to take care of the problem and if I went over 6 months I couldn’t come back anymore…I would have to wait a year. The next day I went because I started to feel worse and worse. I went to the hospital and they gave me one look and were like ‘yeah, he needs emergency dialysis right away.’"

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house Identify house address Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck! Correction: Last month gift certificate merchant was City Lights Beauty Salon

Last Month’s House: 720 William St Winner of a Gift Certificate from Irish Eyes at 725 Caroline St Patricia Kent

We two sat together my sister and I, our timbers cut from the same old tree, as the clock turned over to a new century. We sat on a hill inconvenient at best, at least said a few blue-blood ladies of taste. Kenmore was our mother, we both felt the same, but they would not listen, and moved us midst tears of shame. Down the steep hill we went, then crossed the ditch of war, to two empty lots or more. We suffered in silence just a block down the hill, as they rebuilt our foundations our tears flowing still. A huge old magnolia on the corner so proud, welcoming us and the many children who called us their home. The last hundred years of her long life, our mother stands once again grandly on the hill up above.

Story has been written as told to Anacari Storms of Micah Ecumenical Ministries. Micah is a Christ-centered ministry that supports people experiencing homelessness and identifies pathways to permanent housing. Contact Micah at 540-479-4116, on facebook or at 1013 Princess Anne St. ,

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

25


Art in the Burg

Stories

Showstopping Variations

roman schaller

of fredericksburg

by anacari storms Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline Street Variations, by Ben Childers Brush Strokes Gallery presents "Variations" by artist Ben Childers. Noted for his beautiful fused glass pieces, Ben is branching out into the arena of 2-D art this month. His multi-media show includes different takes on the same subject in oil painting and glass. Join us from 6-9 pm on November 4, 2016 for the Artists' reception. See this exploration in diversity and other new works by member artists including photography, beaded jewelry, and original paintings in all media.

Jessica Cannon, “Juxtaposition”

Opening Reception: First Friday, November 4, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: Nov 2 - Nov27 ~ Norma Woodward NormaWood@aol.com

Ben Childers, “#2” Art First Gallery 824 Caroline St. Showstopper! by Jessica Cannon Prolific abstract artist, Jessica Cannon, credits the public's interpretation of her work as a major source of inspiration. Since her highly textured pieces will be featured throughout November, Art First gallery visitors can enjoy, and maybe even influence, her art. Cannon also thrives on exploiting the tactile quality of her materials, including acrylic and oil paint and pastels; various gels and varnishes; plaster; fabric, and feathers. She sculpts with paint to disguise recognizable, and sometimes overlooked, objects. The juxtaposition

24

November 2016

and repetition of color and form, both in a single painting, and in series, clearly captivates her. If her audience feels compelled to touch her paintings, a focus of her process has been achieved. Born and raised in Bowling Green, Cannon acknowledges supportive family, friends and teach-ers as a source for her lifelong passion for art. She graduated from Mary Baldwin College, with degrees in Business Administration and in Art. Her Masters is in Education. Opening Reception: First Friday, November 4, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: Nov 2 - Nov29 ~ Suzanne Scherr Media Contact, suzanne.scherr@att.net

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Roman Schaller 19 years old, has kidney failure. He is now housed and has a stable income to support his needs, but he is in desperate need of a kidney donor. He Lee is blood type B and is in the Hume-L Transplant Program at the VCU Medical Center. Anyone interested in learning the steps to donating a kidney to Roman can contact the Transplant Coordinator for Living Donors- Maureen Bell, at 804-6280711. "I grew up in Russia Smolensk. I know by Russian papers that I officially am supposed to have one sister and one brother who are much older than me, but I have no idea. At 5 years old (for reasons I have no idea why because I was too young to really understand anything) I went to live in St. Petersburg with my biological uncle. I lived with him for a couple years and at 7 I was put into an orphanage. I barely remember my parents or family - I don’t even remember their faces. My childhood is like a memory that is full of faceless people.

empowerhouseva.org

I was in two orphanages during my stay in Russia. I was adopted from there. As a kid, I never had any dreams to be honest with you. I just went with the flow. One day I was just sitting around and minding my own business and all of a sudden they told me that I had American parents coming to visit me and I was like ‘What? Who?’ Literally that’s the way it was. That was the first time I had been considered and I was about 9ish. Part of me was asking ‘Why are they even here? What’s going on?’ And the other part of me I guess I was excited. It was something new instead of mundane life. Coming to Stafford, VA was a better lifestyle. Let’s just say that. I was 10 years old when I came over here. At first everything with my new parents was fine…as well as you can have anyway. I was a troublemaker and my parents kind of got sick of me and I don’t know how to say it nicely…but when I was 18 they put me in a homeless shelter. I don’t want to say anything bad about them, but that’s pretty much what happened. While I was at the homeless shelter I went through a depression for about 2 months-give or take. It was around August-September and I got out of it through a sheer force of will. Literally I don’t know how I did that. My personality changed. I’m no longer the outgoing person I used to be. Eventually this meant I had to leave the shelter. I got a tent from Micah and I stayed in the woods for about a month. While all this was happening I was trying to get with Job Corps to get trained for a job- it has career training and a residence. I went to Job Corps October 7th 2014 and I was there until about mid-January 2015. One day they took an annual blood test and came back to me a week later and told me that my kidneys had completely failed and I needed to go back home. So they took me back home to the cold weather shelter and what they told me is that I had 6 months to take care of the problem and if I went over 6 months I couldn’t come back anymore…I would have to wait a year. The next day I went because I started to feel worse and worse. I went to the hospital and they gave me one look and were like ‘yeah, he needs emergency dialysis right away.’"

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house Identify house address Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck! Correction: Last month gift certificate merchant was City Lights Beauty Salon

Last Month’s House: 720 William St Winner of a Gift Certificate from Irish Eyes at 725 Caroline St Patricia Kent

We two sat together my sister and I, our timbers cut from the same old tree, as the clock turned over to a new century. We sat on a hill inconvenient at best, at least said a few blue-blood ladies of taste. Kenmore was our mother, we both felt the same, but they would not listen, and moved us midst tears of shame. Down the steep hill we went, then crossed the ditch of war, to two empty lots or more. We suffered in silence just a block down the hill, as they rebuilt our foundations our tears flowing still. A huge old magnolia on the corner so proud, welcoming us and the many children who called us their home. The last hundred years of her long life, our mother stands once again grandly on the hill up above.

Story has been written as told to Anacari Storms of Micah Ecumenical Ministries. Micah is a Christ-centered ministry that supports people experiencing homelessness and identifies pathways to permanent housing. Contact Micah at 540-479-4116, on facebook or at 1013 Princess Anne St. ,

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

25


The Square Plate Project

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Fundraiser for “ Veterans Moving Forward”

Downtown Buzz holidays in FXBG

By Collette Caprara base for a unique work of art for the exhibit. The project began with a kick-off at Artful Dimensions at the August 5 First Friday reception, where the plates were first available for purchase. A number of veterans, their four-legged companions, and representatives of VMF were on-site for the launch. Since that time, more than 50 works of art have been submitted with themes ranging from patriotic (such as

Throughout November, the Artful Dimensions Gallery (ADG) will host a unique exhibit & sale, The Square Plate Project, as a fundraiser for Veterans Moving Forward (MFV), a non-profit organization that was created to provide service dogs and canine therapy services for veterans facing physical or mental challenges (www.vetsfwd.org).

former ADG president Bill Richardson’s red-white-and-blue bordered paw print) to an ocean motif (such as one decorated with Christine Lush Rodriquez’s hallmark barnacles). The spectrum of media used in the artwork includes fiber art, stained and fused glass, paint, mosaic, and sculpture. A portion of proceeds from all sales from the exhibit throughout the month will be donated to support VMF. “We are really excited about the level of participation the project has

Artists: Lynn Abbott Jen Callahan Penny A. Parrish, Beverley Coates with and vehicle of support for this important veterans’ organization.” The idea of this partnership was sparked by Richardson’s daughter, Dana, who has served to raise and train puppies for Veterans Moving Forward. “When I was at her home recently, I watched Dana’s latest “trainee,” Eagle, practice opening a refrigerator door with a dishtowel on the handle and retrieve a bottle of water,” said Richardson, “The dogs have to be strong to perform some tasks but also sensitive. If a dog senses its master becoming anxious, it does what it knows will calm him.”

The exhibit involved a call for entries among all experienced and aspiring artists in the area to purchase, for a nominal fee, a square ceramic plate as a

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

26

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

elicited,” said Katherine Aren, ADG board member, “The project has not only made it possible to connect with the Fredericksburg community and provided an opportunity for some artists to display their work publicly for a first time, but it has also helped to establish a relationship

By Ann Glave

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

There are two things for certain in November in Fredericksburg: The Downtown Holiday Open House Weekend and Small Business Saturday. Holiday Open House Weekend continues its tradition of starting on the second Saturday in November with Small Business Saturday always the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Holiday Open House Weekend Nov. 12 and 13 - is the official start of Holiday Shopping in Downtown! Windows are decorated, holiday music is playing, and our streets are filled with good cheer. New this year: Onsite radio promotion with 95.9 from 12 to 3pm on November 12. Santa Strolls begin on Holiday Open House Weekend and continue on Nov. 25, 26, and Dec. 2, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Look for Santa in his toymaker outfit prior to Thanksgiving and his red suit after Thanksgiving. Introduced last year and back again for 2016! Santa Tracker app on Fred Map. A real time Santa Tracker! You'll know where Santa is strolling Downtown. Download the free Fred Map app available at the apple store and google play for the androids. New this Santa Pictures at the Richard year: Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on Nov. 19 from 12 to 3pm and Nov. 27 from 1pm to 4pm.(Small fee applies.) Small Business Saturday - Nov. 26 - is the perfect day to support the local businesses. Last year's Early Bird Riser event, an AMEX Champion promotion, was highly successful and is back again. New this year are expanded hours so there is time for shoppers to take advantage of all the great specials!

8am to 11am - Early Bird Special - Stores are encouraged to open early at 8am and market something exclusive during the 3 hour window. The Economic Development and Tourism Office is suppling free coffee and pastries (until they run out) starting at 8am at 2 downtown locations at Visitor Center (706 Caroline Street and in front of Raven Hi Fi (214 William Street ) on November 26. 11am to 2pm - Refuel Specials - Cafes and restaurants will be urged to offer something special during this 3 hour time span. 2pm to 5pm - Enjoy and Relax Specials. The service sector is encouraged to pamper shoppers for this 3 hour time line. 5pm to closing - Dining Specials - Cafés and restaurants are asked to offer something unique to wrap up Small Business Saturday. Preview the Small Business videos located at Fredericksburgmainstreet.org. It's a great way to get to know the local businesses. Finally, FREE Wrapping stations located at the Galleria (907 Caroline Street) will be manned by nonprofits on Saturdays starting Small Business Saturday, Nov. 26. Open Late Fridays - Starting Nov. 18 (if not earlier), will continue on for the Holidays. Businesses are encouraged to stay open until 8pm for the six Fridays prior to Christmas. Check our website for the list or look for the yellow "Open Late" flags! fredericksburgmainstreet.org for the latest updates. Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street. She can be found at 904 Princess Anne St, Suite 303, or Office: 540-479-1595 Cell: 540-538-7445

The Artful Dimension Gallery itself is a work of art, created by its founding members who transformed an old warehouse to a collection of innovative studios. As a non-profit organization, since it first opened its doors, Artful Dimensions has striven to be an asset to the community, hosting workshops, classes for children, lectures, and cultural events. The Gallery, at 911 Charles Street in Fredericksburg is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 6:00 pm and can be contacted at (540) 899-6319 or artfuldimensionsgallery.com. Three People’s Choice Awards will be presented on the Gallery’s First Friday on November.4th.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

27


The Square Plate Project

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Fundraiser for “ Veterans Moving Forward”

Downtown Buzz holidays in FXBG

By Collette Caprara base for a unique work of art for the exhibit. The project began with a kick-off at Artful Dimensions at the August 5 First Friday reception, where the plates were first available for purchase. A number of veterans, their four-legged companions, and representatives of VMF were on-site for the launch. Since that time, more than 50 works of art have been submitted with themes ranging from patriotic (such as

Throughout November, the Artful Dimensions Gallery (ADG) will host a unique exhibit & sale, The Square Plate Project, as a fundraiser for Veterans Moving Forward (MFV), a non-profit organization that was created to provide service dogs and canine therapy services for veterans facing physical or mental challenges (www.vetsfwd.org).

former ADG president Bill Richardson’s red-white-and-blue bordered paw print) to an ocean motif (such as one decorated with Christine Lush Rodriquez’s hallmark barnacles). The spectrum of media used in the artwork includes fiber art, stained and fused glass, paint, mosaic, and sculpture. A portion of proceeds from all sales from the exhibit throughout the month will be donated to support VMF. “We are really excited about the level of participation the project has

Artists: Lynn Abbott Jen Callahan Penny A. Parrish, Beverley Coates with and vehicle of support for this important veterans’ organization.” The idea of this partnership was sparked by Richardson’s daughter, Dana, who has served to raise and train puppies for Veterans Moving Forward. “When I was at her home recently, I watched Dana’s latest “trainee,” Eagle, practice opening a refrigerator door with a dishtowel on the handle and retrieve a bottle of water,” said Richardson, “The dogs have to be strong to perform some tasks but also sensitive. If a dog senses its master becoming anxious, it does what it knows will calm him.”

The exhibit involved a call for entries among all experienced and aspiring artists in the area to purchase, for a nominal fee, a square ceramic plate as a

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

26

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

elicited,” said Katherine Aren, ADG board member, “The project has not only made it possible to connect with the Fredericksburg community and provided an opportunity for some artists to display their work publicly for a first time, but it has also helped to establish a relationship

By Ann Glave

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

There are two things for certain in November in Fredericksburg: The Downtown Holiday Open House Weekend and Small Business Saturday. Holiday Open House Weekend continues its tradition of starting on the second Saturday in November with Small Business Saturday always the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Holiday Open House Weekend Nov. 12 and 13 - is the official start of Holiday Shopping in Downtown! Windows are decorated, holiday music is playing, and our streets are filled with good cheer. New this year: Onsite radio promotion with 95.9 from 12 to 3pm on November 12. Santa Strolls begin on Holiday Open House Weekend and continue on Nov. 25, 26, and Dec. 2, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Look for Santa in his toymaker outfit prior to Thanksgiving and his red suit after Thanksgiving. Introduced last year and back again for 2016! Santa Tracker app on Fred Map. A real time Santa Tracker! You'll know where Santa is strolling Downtown. Download the free Fred Map app available at the apple store and google play for the androids. New this Santa Pictures at the Richard year: Johnston Inn (711 Caroline Street). Skip the lines at the Mall and visit Santa Downtown on Nov. 19 from 12 to 3pm and Nov. 27 from 1pm to 4pm.(Small fee applies.) Small Business Saturday - Nov. 26 - is the perfect day to support the local businesses. Last year's Early Bird Riser event, an AMEX Champion promotion, was highly successful and is back again. New this year are expanded hours so there is time for shoppers to take advantage of all the great specials!

8am to 11am - Early Bird Special - Stores are encouraged to open early at 8am and market something exclusive during the 3 hour window. The Economic Development and Tourism Office is suppling free coffee and pastries (until they run out) starting at 8am at 2 downtown locations at Visitor Center (706 Caroline Street and in front of Raven Hi Fi (214 William Street ) on November 26. 11am to 2pm - Refuel Specials - Cafes and restaurants will be urged to offer something special during this 3 hour time span. 2pm to 5pm - Enjoy and Relax Specials. The service sector is encouraged to pamper shoppers for this 3 hour time line. 5pm to closing - Dining Specials - Cafés and restaurants are asked to offer something unique to wrap up Small Business Saturday. Preview the Small Business videos located at Fredericksburgmainstreet.org. It's a great way to get to know the local businesses. Finally, FREE Wrapping stations located at the Galleria (907 Caroline Street) will be manned by nonprofits on Saturdays starting Small Business Saturday, Nov. 26. Open Late Fridays - Starting Nov. 18 (if not earlier), will continue on for the Holidays. Businesses are encouraged to stay open until 8pm for the six Fridays prior to Christmas. Check our website for the list or look for the yellow "Open Late" flags! fredericksburgmainstreet.org for the latest updates. Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street. She can be found at 904 Princess Anne St, Suite 303, or Office: 540-479-1595 Cell: 540-538-7445

The Artful Dimension Gallery itself is a work of art, created by its founding members who transformed an old warehouse to a collection of innovative studios. As a non-profit organization, since it first opened its doors, Artful Dimensions has striven to be an asset to the community, hosting workshops, classes for children, lectures, and cultural events. The Gallery, at 911 Charles Street in Fredericksburg is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 6:00 pm and can be contacted at (540) 899-6319 or artfuldimensionsgallery.com. Three People’s Choice Awards will be presented on the Gallery’s First Friday on November.4th.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

27


Companions thanksgiving tips By Alexis grogan

The holidays are upon us once again, and with this food and fun filled time can leave us frazzled, heck you cane barely negotiate a filled grocery store let alone a labels on everything in the store. As we all know overindulging in copious amounts of food can be unhealthy for us all, but it is also unhealthy and dangerous for our pets. Be sure to keep your feast on the table, preferably on your plate, rather than under it, the foods that we eat on a daily basis are actually poisonous to our pets. Eating turkey skin, even a small amount, can cause a life-tthreatening condition in pets known as pancreatitis. Animals cannot digest fatty foods and most food that we eat are poisonous to animals things like onions, raisins and grapes. If you want to include your pet in a thanksgiving feast buy a treat that is specifically for them, the one thing that we all find tempting (yes even your pets) is chocolate. Chocolate is incredibly

28

November 2016

dangerous to animals, specially dogs, the artificial sweetener called xylitol, most commonly seen in gum and sugar free baked goods, is deadly to dogs. Let me tell you a funny story before I continue, one year on thanksgiving we had gotten a new dog a few months prior, he was about three months old on thanksgiving he is a Bichon Frise so he's not very big. All of our family members were in the dining room enjoying dinner, the next thing we see is my little fluffy puppy with a turkey leg double his size in his mouth. First we are laughing as he prances around the table very proud of his prize, then we proceeded to retrieve it from him, with success. Unfortunately, the family member that wanted that turkey leg did not get to enjoy it. He and the dog exchanged some woofs and growls and went about their business. Another thing to do is keep your trash can out of sight and smell of your pets, turkey bones can be very harmful to pets, they are very sharp and can cut through their esophagus which causes them not to breathe and internal bleeding, if you feel like your pet has gotten into any food they should not have, you can actually treat it at home, if you have hydrogen peroxide put a teaspoon amount into water for your pet and make sure they drink it, this combination will make the vomit up anything they may have ingested. Please keep your pets safe this holiday season and I wish you a happy, safe and healthy thanksgiving. Alexis Grogan is the owner of Lexi Grogan's Pet Sitting Services, Contact her at Lexig0892@gmail.com; 540-9030437; or on facebook

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

FAMCC Museum Reopens

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

Cheers to 200 Years

540-898-0737

opening now) and an exhibit space called "What's That?" will house random objects from the Museum's collection (again, coming soon!) The November opening will feature an exhibit on third floor in historic Council Chambers called "The Peoples Street" which highlights the PNC Legacy Collection, recently acquired from the PNC Foundation. These three dimensional objects were housed in the National Bank Building (today FoodE). In addition, the Quarles Gallery will feature an exhibit using the Museum's portraits as well Sara Poore (President and CEO) left, and as loaned contemporary pieces. Melanie Johnson This new design will allow the Museum to constantly rotate exhibits, (Senior Development Officer) highlight different objects from the collection, and bring in traveling exhibits. Kevin Brown Interview with Sara Poore, There will regularly be something new to President and CEO, Fredericksburg Area see! Museum & Cultural Center Q: Please tell us about the Museum reopening and schedule afterwards. A: The Museum will open with a SOFT REOPENING on November 4 at 904 Princess Anne St. The event, Cheers to 200 Years: A Bicentennial Celebration, will be open for members from 5-6 PM and the general public 6-8 PM, and is sponsored free of charge by the PNC Foundation. FoodE is catering the food and Adventure Brewing Co. is releasing a historic ale recipe in celebrate of Town Hall's 200th anniversary. Two Century Ale will also be on tap at several local bars on the 4th, with an eye-catching label honoring our historic Town Hall/Museum. Beginning on November 5, the FAMCC (also known as the Museum) will open Friday and Saturday 12-6 PM and Sun 10 AM-3 PM. Q: What can we expect to see and experience during our Museum visit? A: In February 2016, the Museum sold the Catherine W. McKann Center and relocated operations and the collection into historic Town Hall. This move gave us the opportunity to reconceive the layout of Town Hall and how we want and need to use the space. Visitors will see a very different use of space. An open collection storage concept houses the collection on the first floor. Visitor will have the opportunity to see into collection storage and observe museum staff working. In addition, 'mini exhibits' and objects will rotate in the large cases that surround the space. Every nook and cranny is being creatively used to store objects - even hanging from the ceiling! The second floor of the building houses the Museum's textiles. A glass storefront concept allows visitors, again, to see into textile storage and staff will often change out the mannequins in order to show off the clothing in the collection. Where once lived the permanent decorative arts exhibit, a changing gallery space will be fabricated (still to come, not

Q: What events/activities does the Museum have planned over the upcoming year? A: The Museum and Adventure Brewing Co. South (located in the old Blue and Gray Brewery) have started a series called Hops & History! Every month the Museum exhibit' at the brewery. will feature a 'mini-e On the third Thursday of every month, 58 PM, the Museum will be there for a Hops & History Happy Hour! Pulling from our very popular Cultures & Cocktails, participants will have the opportunity to look at objects from the Museum's collection and talk to staff about the history surrounding them. In addition, the Museum is participating in several upcoming holiday events. Running through the month of December through January 5 2017, Christmas trees decorated by Hugh Mercer Elementary students will grace our halls! This ongoing initiative with the school's art teacher and Hedgerow Art is a great way for students to get involved with the Museum! On December 16 from 5-7 PM, the Museum will be open and families are invited to come tour the Museum and make ornaments as part of Merry Carols in the Market Square. Beginning at 7 PM, the spectacular Spotsylvanians Chorus will lead the community in singing Christmas Carols. This program is in partnership with Main Street. Q: Lastly, how can the public remain informed and support the Museum? A: We have a large need for volunteers! If you are interested in supporting the Museum in this fashion, please contact Carly Boucher at cboucher@famcc.org. We are looking for folks who love the community and want to help us keep moving forward. Follow FAMCC on Twitter & Facebook , or on www.famcc.org.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

29


Companions thanksgiving tips By Alexis grogan

The holidays are upon us once again, and with this food and fun filled time can leave us frazzled, heck you cane barely negotiate a filled grocery store let alone a labels on everything in the store. As we all know overindulging in copious amounts of food can be unhealthy for us all, but it is also unhealthy and dangerous for our pets. Be sure to keep your feast on the table, preferably on your plate, rather than under it, the foods that we eat on a daily basis are actually poisonous to our pets. Eating turkey skin, even a small amount, can cause a life-tthreatening condition in pets known as pancreatitis. Animals cannot digest fatty foods and most food that we eat are poisonous to animals things like onions, raisins and grapes. If you want to include your pet in a thanksgiving feast buy a treat that is specifically for them, the one thing that we all find tempting (yes even your pets) is chocolate. Chocolate is incredibly

28

November 2016

dangerous to animals, specially dogs, the artificial sweetener called xylitol, most commonly seen in gum and sugar free baked goods, is deadly to dogs. Let me tell you a funny story before I continue, one year on thanksgiving we had gotten a new dog a few months prior, he was about three months old on thanksgiving he is a Bichon Frise so he's not very big. All of our family members were in the dining room enjoying dinner, the next thing we see is my little fluffy puppy with a turkey leg double his size in his mouth. First we are laughing as he prances around the table very proud of his prize, then we proceeded to retrieve it from him, with success. Unfortunately, the family member that wanted that turkey leg did not get to enjoy it. He and the dog exchanged some woofs and growls and went about their business. Another thing to do is keep your trash can out of sight and smell of your pets, turkey bones can be very harmful to pets, they are very sharp and can cut through their esophagus which causes them not to breathe and internal bleeding, if you feel like your pet has gotten into any food they should not have, you can actually treat it at home, if you have hydrogen peroxide put a teaspoon amount into water for your pet and make sure they drink it, this combination will make the vomit up anything they may have ingested. Please keep your pets safe this holiday season and I wish you a happy, safe and healthy thanksgiving. Alexis Grogan is the owner of Lexi Grogan's Pet Sitting Services, Contact her at Lexig0892@gmail.com; 540-9030437; or on facebook

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

FAMCC Museum Reopens

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

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Cheers to 200 Years

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opening now) and an exhibit space called "What's That?" will house random objects from the Museum's collection (again, coming soon!) The November opening will feature an exhibit on third floor in historic Council Chambers called "The Peoples Street" which highlights the PNC Legacy Collection, recently acquired from the PNC Foundation. These three dimensional objects were housed in the National Bank Building (today FoodE). In addition, the Quarles Gallery will feature an exhibit using the Museum's portraits as well Sara Poore (President and CEO) left, and as loaned contemporary pieces. Melanie Johnson This new design will allow the Museum to constantly rotate exhibits, (Senior Development Officer) highlight different objects from the collection, and bring in traveling exhibits. Kevin Brown Interview with Sara Poore, There will regularly be something new to President and CEO, Fredericksburg Area see! Museum & Cultural Center Q: Please tell us about the Museum reopening and schedule afterwards. A: The Museum will open with a SOFT REOPENING on November 4 at 904 Princess Anne St. The event, Cheers to 200 Years: A Bicentennial Celebration, will be open for members from 5-6 PM and the general public 6-8 PM, and is sponsored free of charge by the PNC Foundation. FoodE is catering the food and Adventure Brewing Co. is releasing a historic ale recipe in celebrate of Town Hall's 200th anniversary. Two Century Ale will also be on tap at several local bars on the 4th, with an eye-catching label honoring our historic Town Hall/Museum. Beginning on November 5, the FAMCC (also known as the Museum) will open Friday and Saturday 12-6 PM and Sun 10 AM-3 PM. Q: What can we expect to see and experience during our Museum visit? A: In February 2016, the Museum sold the Catherine W. McKann Center and relocated operations and the collection into historic Town Hall. This move gave us the opportunity to reconceive the layout of Town Hall and how we want and need to use the space. Visitors will see a very different use of space. An open collection storage concept houses the collection on the first floor. Visitor will have the opportunity to see into collection storage and observe museum staff working. In addition, 'mini exhibits' and objects will rotate in the large cases that surround the space. Every nook and cranny is being creatively used to store objects - even hanging from the ceiling! The second floor of the building houses the Museum's textiles. A glass storefront concept allows visitors, again, to see into textile storage and staff will often change out the mannequins in order to show off the clothing in the collection. Where once lived the permanent decorative arts exhibit, a changing gallery space will be fabricated (still to come, not

Q: What events/activities does the Museum have planned over the upcoming year? A: The Museum and Adventure Brewing Co. South (located in the old Blue and Gray Brewery) have started a series called Hops & History! Every month the Museum exhibit' at the brewery. will feature a 'mini-e On the third Thursday of every month, 58 PM, the Museum will be there for a Hops & History Happy Hour! Pulling from our very popular Cultures & Cocktails, participants will have the opportunity to look at objects from the Museum's collection and talk to staff about the history surrounding them. In addition, the Museum is participating in several upcoming holiday events. Running through the month of December through January 5 2017, Christmas trees decorated by Hugh Mercer Elementary students will grace our halls! This ongoing initiative with the school's art teacher and Hedgerow Art is a great way for students to get involved with the Museum! On December 16 from 5-7 PM, the Museum will be open and families are invited to come tour the Museum and make ornaments as part of Merry Carols in the Market Square. Beginning at 7 PM, the spectacular Spotsylvanians Chorus will lead the community in singing Christmas Carols. This program is in partnership with Main Street. Q: Lastly, how can the public remain informed and support the Museum? A: We have a large need for volunteers! If you are interested in supporting the Museum in this fashion, please contact Carly Boucher at cboucher@famcc.org. We are looking for folks who love the community and want to help us keep moving forward. Follow FAMCC on Twitter & Facebook , or on www.famcc.org.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

29


A Look Inside Main Street Inc

Fredericksburg Sketches

Creating a thriving community

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

by emily hollingsworth

Ann Glave (above) and Scarlett Pons sit inside a back room of Ponshop Studio on 712 Caroline St. A small container advertising the downtown Scarecrow contest sits in the corner. In between discussing real-time plans for upcoming events, Pons and Glave share how Main Street Inc. came about and how they plan for the initiative to continue to grow downtown Fredericksburg. Main Street Inc. in Fredericksburg started six years ago, when the Fredericksburg's Economic Development Authority attended Virginia Main Street workshops to learn more and possibly start a similar program in downtown Fredericksburg. Main Street in Fredericksburg stuck after establishing a board and gaining nonprofit status. “It takes a village,” Glave said about the volunteers and leaders’ work in the organization. Virginia Main Street is a statewide program that works to increase awareness and revenue in downtown areas. Pons, Main Street Fredericksburg’s president and Glave, executive director, are responsible for organizing downtown’s numerous events, intersecting historic preservation, art, retail and dining. “It has been so fun to work with so many people downtown,” Pons said. “I wouldn’t have met half of the people I know now. Our board is so diverse.” Pons and Glave have owned businesses downtown at different times and hope to help other business owners and the surrounding community make the most of what downtown has to offer. Main Street has helped popularize the late night

initiative and advertises businesses for the Holiday Open House and Small Business Saturday, happening this month on Nov. 12-13 and Nov. 28. “We’re a big believer of working with others,” Glave said. One of Main Street’s first collaborations in downtown, helping plant trees with Tree Fredericksburg, still goes strong today with a loyal group who participates in the events, according to Pons. They also released short videos of 40 businesses at the end of October, adding to the several dozen they had helped release last year, which can be viewed on Main Street Fredericksburg’s website. The group also wants to alert the community to downtown’s historical sites, giving life to the different structures. “These are the stories we’re going to tell throughout the year,” Pons said. Ribbon cutting for new businesses, which Main Street helped to start, has been meaningful to Pons, who said there was no option for ribbon cutting when Ponshop, the business she owns, first opened. In addition to ushering new businesses in a welcoming celebration, city leaders also make an appearance. Main Street, like other organizations downtown, seems to constantly be working. Volunteers for Main Street have given more than 2,500 hours in advertising and involvement in activities, according to Pons and Glave. All of the organization members have given 5,000 total hours of volunteering in the past two years. “All the businesses in downtown have motivation to pursue [the initiative]” Glave said. “If we are all working together for the same thing, it makes it easier.” Glave and Pons ultimately hope that Main Street will help cultivate and preserve an area that has a lot to offer its businesses, residents and visitors in and outside the state. “I know a family in Pennsylvania that comes downtown, and they said they have nothing else like it,” Pons said. Glave said downtown’s vitality allows the city to benefit. “Downtown is the heartbeat of the community,” Glave said. “If it is healthy, then the city does better.”

30

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

FXBG’ERS

Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other." ~Mother Teresa How wonderful it is, to meet another inspiring volunteer and citizen of our little "Burg." Sally Cooney Anderson, works quietly in her art studio, her lifetime obsession and profession, here at Artful Dimensions, 911 Charles St. Sally is a fiber artist. How fortunate we are that Sally decided ten years ago, to retire to Fredericksburg, with her husband Bobby. Together they both give hours from their

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

“Pebbles” by Gemstone Creations Handcrafted Jewelry Featuring Natural Rough Diamonds

373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

By Jo Loving

by georgia Lee Strentz

SKETCH #24: Carl’s Believe it or not, I’ve only drawn Fredericksburg’s iconic Carl’s a couple of times. I’m not sure why. I always enjoy drawing this historic building and visitors to the Gallery always seem to react positively when they see them. I suspect, though, that they’re reacting much more to the family memories they’ve created waiting in line for a treat at this famous ice cream stand than they are to my art work. I’m sure, however, that this won’t be the last time I turn my pen to this subject.You might not instinctively think of ‘November’ and ‘ice cream,’ but one of the charms of Carl’s is that it’s not always open. It closes this month for the winter and doesn’t reopen until February. Hopefully, I’ll have my canvas and paints out there again before that.

the value of gratitude

sally cooney anderson busy lives, to live the words of Mother Teresa, "we belong to each other." Sally was born in New York, raised on Long Island, attended Syracuse University as an art major, and lived in Manhattan for 20 years, working as a commercial artist and photographer. Then adventure caught up with her. She moved for the next ten years to Florida, California, then Annandale, Virginia.

Introducing

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

From My Porch

Supporting All Things Local Since 1997

Sally not only volunteers at the disAbility Resource Center, but also with The Holiday Project, and the Fredericksburg Host Lions Club She is also involved with the local AARP chapter. She is particularly fond of her time spent as a mentor with Rappahannock Big Brother's, Big Sisters, and that is how she discovered the disAbility Resource Center which offered programs with rich experiences for her little brother. Sally was immediately impressed by these programs, which were helping young adults with life and school. The disAbility Resource Center, is located on Progress St.,and is a center of independent living that serves people with disabilities, their families and caretakers and community members. The majority of the staff and board are people with disabilities. Their mission and philosophy is something Mother Teresa would approve lovingly. Mission; "TO assist people with disabilities to achieve the highest potential and benefit of independent living by providing them with those that support them and the community with information, education, and resources. Their wonderful philosophy; EVERY individual has the right ,the opportunity and the choice to maximize their ability to live as independently as possible and to participate in the community as fully as they choose." Mother Teresa would be pleased. Thank you so much Sally, for giving so generously to our community members, through your time spent serving in these wonderful organizations. Numbers you might use; disAbilities Resource Center, voice 540373-2559, video phone, 540-645-5300, CAPTEL, 540-373-5300

Georgia is enjoying the Fall weather. sitting on the porch of her old cottage downtown with her dog, reading local news in our "Front Porch" paper, saying howdy to her neighborsand watching for her grandchildren.

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos into order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. ~Melodie Beattie My father has taken to ironically calling me “lucky,” in light of the maladies and mishaps that have occurred this year. Oddly enough, I DO feel lucky, fortunate, and grateful. It is a state of being, who I am, what makes me tick. When I count my blessings, and they are many, I don’t do it by comparing what I have with that which my family, friends, and neighbors may have. Instead, I’m simply grateful for life, period. Because gratitude is a basic tenet of my existence, November is my favorite month of the year. Of course, it is the month of my birthday and the birthday of my twins, and my favorite thing about November is Thanksgiving. Family gatherings, food and fellowship are wonderful, but what I like most is the focus on being thankful. While it is something I practice all year, I pull out the stops in November! Exactly one month before my birthday, I make a list every day in my journal. It is a form of meditation on what really matters, of being present. Here’s a typical day’s “Gratitude” entry from last year: Today, I awoke to a beautiful, crisp fall morning. The temperature is in the 60’s, the heat wave has broken, and it is the perfect weather for a walk. Seminole (my dog), hopped onto the swing with me today, and we relaxed together, listening to the birds, the children next door playing in the yard, and the distant hum of a leaf blower. His soft fur and warmth felt nice as I rested my hand on him. He is such a good buddy! Dinner tonight was a new recipe: Pineapple Thai Curry. It turned out well, and Ken and I talked about our day as we ate. I love to see his smile! This evening, I caught up with everyone by phone. Isn’t it wonderful that technology is available? Talked with Mom, with Daddy, with all the kids and grandchildren. Does it get any better than this? Sat on the porch before bed tonight, looked at the stars. It was cloudy, and just as I was about to come inside, a sliver of moon appeared between the clouds. It was beautiful,

and bright, and made me think of the beauty of the universe. My miniature rose bush on the porch is still blooming, and the fragrance, especially at night, is full, and heady. It makes me happy. So there it is. Nothing profound. Nothing terribly deep. Just the day’s events, wrapped in a package of gratitude. When I record my grateful thoughts, something interesting occurs: I see so much good that it pushes the other junk out of my head. So I think, starting this year, I’ll make the gratitude journal a 365days-a-year affair. Won’t you join me? Jo Loving is on the porch today, looking at the sweet-natured miniature horse, “Skeeter,” that the neighbor rescued. The birds are quiet, because a Redshouldered hawk is circling overhead. Samuel, the neighbor’s 5-year-old, is waving, “Ms. Jo, would you like to come help me feed Skeeter?” he asks. She grabs an apple from the house, walks over to the fence, and gives Samuel both halves. Jo, Skeeter, and Samuel stand together, as the horse chomps away on the apple. Samuel gives her a big smile, Skeeter gives a big snort, and her face beams with a grin, as she says, “I’m so lucky to know y’all, Samuel.”

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

31


A Look Inside Main Street Inc

Fredericksburg Sketches

Creating a thriving community

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

by emily hollingsworth

Ann Glave (above) and Scarlett Pons sit inside a back room of Ponshop Studio on 712 Caroline St. A small container advertising the downtown Scarecrow contest sits in the corner. In between discussing real-time plans for upcoming events, Pons and Glave share how Main Street Inc. came about and how they plan for the initiative to continue to grow downtown Fredericksburg. Main Street Inc. in Fredericksburg started six years ago, when the Fredericksburg's Economic Development Authority attended Virginia Main Street workshops to learn more and possibly start a similar program in downtown Fredericksburg. Main Street in Fredericksburg stuck after establishing a board and gaining nonprofit status. “It takes a village,” Glave said about the volunteers and leaders’ work in the organization. Virginia Main Street is a statewide program that works to increase awareness and revenue in downtown areas. Pons, Main Street Fredericksburg’s president and Glave, executive director, are responsible for organizing downtown’s numerous events, intersecting historic preservation, art, retail and dining. “It has been so fun to work with so many people downtown,” Pons said. “I wouldn’t have met half of the people I know now. Our board is so diverse.” Pons and Glave have owned businesses downtown at different times and hope to help other business owners and the surrounding community make the most of what downtown has to offer. Main Street has helped popularize the late night

initiative and advertises businesses for the Holiday Open House and Small Business Saturday, happening this month on Nov. 12-13 and Nov. 28. “We’re a big believer of working with others,” Glave said. One of Main Street’s first collaborations in downtown, helping plant trees with Tree Fredericksburg, still goes strong today with a loyal group who participates in the events, according to Pons. They also released short videos of 40 businesses at the end of October, adding to the several dozen they had helped release last year, which can be viewed on Main Street Fredericksburg’s website. The group also wants to alert the community to downtown’s historical sites, giving life to the different structures. “These are the stories we’re going to tell throughout the year,” Pons said. Ribbon cutting for new businesses, which Main Street helped to start, has been meaningful to Pons, who said there was no option for ribbon cutting when Ponshop, the business she owns, first opened. In addition to ushering new businesses in a welcoming celebration, city leaders also make an appearance. Main Street, like other organizations downtown, seems to constantly be working. Volunteers for Main Street have given more than 2,500 hours in advertising and involvement in activities, according to Pons and Glave. All of the organization members have given 5,000 total hours of volunteering in the past two years. “All the businesses in downtown have motivation to pursue [the initiative]” Glave said. “If we are all working together for the same thing, it makes it easier.” Glave and Pons ultimately hope that Main Street will help cultivate and preserve an area that has a lot to offer its businesses, residents and visitors in and outside the state. “I know a family in Pennsylvania that comes downtown, and they said they have nothing else like it,” Pons said. Glave said downtown’s vitality allows the city to benefit. “Downtown is the heartbeat of the community,” Glave said. “If it is healthy, then the city does better.”

30

November 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

FXBG’ERS

Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other." ~Mother Teresa How wonderful it is, to meet another inspiring volunteer and citizen of our little "Burg." Sally Cooney Anderson, works quietly in her art studio, her lifetime obsession and profession, here at Artful Dimensions, 911 Charles St. Sally is a fiber artist. How fortunate we are that Sally decided ten years ago, to retire to Fredericksburg, with her husband Bobby. Together they both give hours from their

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

“Pebbles” by Gemstone Creations Handcrafted Jewelry Featuring Natural Rough Diamonds

373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

By Jo Loving

by georgia Lee Strentz

SKETCH #24: Carl’s Believe it or not, I’ve only drawn Fredericksburg’s iconic Carl’s a couple of times. I’m not sure why. I always enjoy drawing this historic building and visitors to the Gallery always seem to react positively when they see them. I suspect, though, that they’re reacting much more to the family memories they’ve created waiting in line for a treat at this famous ice cream stand than they are to my art work. I’m sure, however, that this won’t be the last time I turn my pen to this subject.You might not instinctively think of ‘November’ and ‘ice cream,’ but one of the charms of Carl’s is that it’s not always open. It closes this month for the winter and doesn’t reopen until February. Hopefully, I’ll have my canvas and paints out there again before that.

the value of gratitude

sally cooney anderson busy lives, to live the words of Mother Teresa, "we belong to each other." Sally was born in New York, raised on Long Island, attended Syracuse University as an art major, and lived in Manhattan for 20 years, working as a commercial artist and photographer. Then adventure caught up with her. She moved for the next ten years to Florida, California, then Annandale, Virginia.

Introducing

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

From My Porch

Supporting All Things Local Since 1997

Sally not only volunteers at the disAbility Resource Center, but also with The Holiday Project, and the Fredericksburg Host Lions Club She is also involved with the local AARP chapter. She is particularly fond of her time spent as a mentor with Rappahannock Big Brother's, Big Sisters, and that is how she discovered the disAbility Resource Center which offered programs with rich experiences for her little brother. Sally was immediately impressed by these programs, which were helping young adults with life and school. The disAbility Resource Center, is located on Progress St.,and is a center of independent living that serves people with disabilities, their families and caretakers and community members. The majority of the staff and board are people with disabilities. Their mission and philosophy is something Mother Teresa would approve lovingly. Mission; "TO assist people with disabilities to achieve the highest potential and benefit of independent living by providing them with those that support them and the community with information, education, and resources. Their wonderful philosophy; EVERY individual has the right ,the opportunity and the choice to maximize their ability to live as independently as possible and to participate in the community as fully as they choose." Mother Teresa would be pleased. Thank you so much Sally, for giving so generously to our community members, through your time spent serving in these wonderful organizations. Numbers you might use; disAbilities Resource Center, voice 540373-2559, video phone, 540-645-5300, CAPTEL, 540-373-5300

Georgia is enjoying the Fall weather. sitting on the porch of her old cottage downtown with her dog, reading local news in our "Front Porch" paper, saying howdy to her neighborsand watching for her grandchildren.

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos into order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. ~Melodie Beattie My father has taken to ironically calling me “lucky,” in light of the maladies and mishaps that have occurred this year. Oddly enough, I DO feel lucky, fortunate, and grateful. It is a state of being, who I am, what makes me tick. When I count my blessings, and they are many, I don’t do it by comparing what I have with that which my family, friends, and neighbors may have. Instead, I’m simply grateful for life, period. Because gratitude is a basic tenet of my existence, November is my favorite month of the year. Of course, it is the month of my birthday and the birthday of my twins, and my favorite thing about November is Thanksgiving. Family gatherings, food and fellowship are wonderful, but what I like most is the focus on being thankful. While it is something I practice all year, I pull out the stops in November! Exactly one month before my birthday, I make a list every day in my journal. It is a form of meditation on what really matters, of being present. Here’s a typical day’s “Gratitude” entry from last year: Today, I awoke to a beautiful, crisp fall morning. The temperature is in the 60’s, the heat wave has broken, and it is the perfect weather for a walk. Seminole (my dog), hopped onto the swing with me today, and we relaxed together, listening to the birds, the children next door playing in the yard, and the distant hum of a leaf blower. His soft fur and warmth felt nice as I rested my hand on him. He is such a good buddy! Dinner tonight was a new recipe: Pineapple Thai Curry. It turned out well, and Ken and I talked about our day as we ate. I love to see his smile! This evening, I caught up with everyone by phone. Isn’t it wonderful that technology is available? Talked with Mom, with Daddy, with all the kids and grandchildren. Does it get any better than this? Sat on the porch before bed tonight, looked at the stars. It was cloudy, and just as I was about to come inside, a sliver of moon appeared between the clouds. It was beautiful,

and bright, and made me think of the beauty of the universe. My miniature rose bush on the porch is still blooming, and the fragrance, especially at night, is full, and heady. It makes me happy. So there it is. Nothing profound. Nothing terribly deep. Just the day’s events, wrapped in a package of gratitude. When I record my grateful thoughts, something interesting occurs: I see so much good that it pushes the other junk out of my head. So I think, starting this year, I’ll make the gratitude journal a 365days-a-year affair. Won’t you join me? Jo Loving is on the porch today, looking at the sweet-natured miniature horse, “Skeeter,” that the neighbor rescued. The birds are quiet, because a Redshouldered hawk is circling overhead. Samuel, the neighbor’s 5-year-old, is waving, “Ms. Jo, would you like to come help me feed Skeeter?” he asks. She grabs an apple from the house, walks over to the fence, and gives Samuel both halves. Jo, Skeeter, and Samuel stand together, as the horse chomps away on the apple. Samuel gives her a big smile, Skeeter gives a big snort, and her face beams with a grin, as she says, “I’m so lucky to know y’all, Samuel.”

front porch fredericksburg

November 2016

31



Front Porch Fredericksburg - November 2016