Page 1


contents

closeups 3

from shiloh dc to shiloh fxbg ...lawrence a.davies

6

blue star mothers ... support for our armed services

21

the new guy Troy D. Paino

31

porch talk .

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

On the trails:: springtime on the trails

6

living in the garden...with master gardeners assoc.

7

fxbg antique auto club celebrates 60 years

.8

i have a friend: mothers & daughters virginia vistas: Jones & Bumbrey @uuff

10

downtown buzz...new sights, new sounds

12

youth artists annual show

13

season’s bounty: derby day

14

Cooking with Kyle....huevos escalfados rancheros con aguacate

15

world’s best bourbon

16-17

Calendar of events

18

history’s stories.: rising sun tavern mystery our heritage: 704 prince edward street

19

antibiotics: life-saver or scourge? the silence of intentional sound

20

Senior Care: say what?

21

mind your mind: words as a curse emancipated patients: placentophagia

22

renew: is stevia healthy & safe?

24

art in the burg: flight & arches warsaw & parrish

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURG; ronnie buddington mYSTERY hOUSE

26

on stage: a night on broadway

28

companions: spca courthouse rd

29

It’s all energy: ground yourself inner child meets higher self

30

fredericksburg sketches FREDERICKSBURGERS: frank & carol mauro

from shiloh washington to shiloh fredericksburg By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

23

...And more! 9

.9

the artistry of nursing

23

sophia street pottery throwdown pt 2

27

fxbg sign game Cover: “Railroad Bridge” by David C. Kennedy

2

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

L AWRENCE A . D AVIES Baptist Church in Washington. He received his Doctorate from Wesley Theological Seminary while performing his duties at Shiloh. He met and married his wife Janice during this time. Janice was teaching school in the Washington area which continued until they left Washington to move to Fredericksburg. In 1962, he was selected to become the Minister of Shiloh Old Site church on Sophia Street in Fredericksburg Virginia a position that he would hold until by videomann productions his retirement in 2012 after 50 Growing up in Fredericksburg and the surrounding areas many of the most recognized names had roots in the area for many decades. Last names like Rowe, Ellison, Todd, Sullivan, Scott, Pitts, Hicks, Massey, Shelton, Smith, Newton, etc. were well known for their families being in business, farming and politics. In the 1960's Fredericksburg was about to begin a change that would continue at a rapid pace into the 1990's. The City of Fredericksburg would need strong leadership during this period, little did it know that that leader was about to arrive on the seen as a Minister of a local church. Lawrence Davies was born in Houston, Texas and after graduating high school attended Prairie View A & M University wanting to be a Physician and with a major in Biology, he graduated in 1949. He went to Washington D.C to live with his godmother so that he could attend Howard University to be a Physician. When he was about to begin studies at the University he was drafted into the United States Army. While in the Army he decided that he would become a Minister instead of a Medical Doctor. He explained that his Godmothers husband was a well-respected Minister at Shiloh Church in Washington D.C. and this influenced his decision on becoming a minister. Rev. Davies who is an expert on Shiloh's history told me that Shiloh church in Washington was formed by members (former slaves) from the Shiloh Church in Fredericksburg after the War Between the States. Using the G. I. bill Lawrence received his Master of Divinity from Howard University. After graduation, he served as Associate Pastor of Shiloh

had the honor of being on City Council with him for 16 of those years, four of which was Vice-Mayor. My respect for him and his ability to govern increased during those difficult times. He earned praise as one of the best Presidents of the Virginia Municipal League. I still greet him "Mister" Mayor, he is still quite active in the community as he is a member of the FRED Transit Board, Rappahannock Community Service's Board and several other organizations. He and Janice raised three daughters one of which is currently a teacher in the Fredericksburg community and another is in Public Relations in the Roanoke area. Lauren died at the age of

Pastor Emeritus Davies Celebration of 50 years photo courtesy of Shiloh Old Site years of service. We both smiled as I said, "from Shiloh Washington to Shiloh Fredericksburg". Rev. Davies said that in those early days that he became involved in the community as Chairman of the PTA at Walker Grant and as a member of the BiRacial Commission. He spoke of working with Mary Washington Hospital as back in the 1960's Blacks were only allowed on the fourth floor, however, that was soon changed after several meetings with people of goodwill in the community. He spoke of Gladys Todd and her efforts that even today influence the community. Doris Buffet has funded the Gladys Todd Academy that assist young people that want to go to continue their education in college. He was encouraged to make a run for City Council and in 1966 he was elected being the first Black Council member. He is credited with the smooth segregation and the good race relations that the community has enjoyed. In 1976, the Bi-Centennial year of the nation he was elected Mayor a position that he would hold until his retirement in 1996. I

36 with Sickle-Cell Anemia. Mrs. Davies (Janice) is still active in the Sickle-Cell group. Mrs. Davies a wonderful lady was always involved in church activities and a friend to all. We both shared much about past city affairs, he said that the 1984 annexation was a major accomplishment with Central Park that added much needed addition revenue for the City. We

remembered those long evenings that stretched into early morning hours as we both had to work the next day with little sleep. He smiled as he said, "We both had the City and its residents at heart". Between the two of us 53 years of public service for the City of Fredericksburg. Rev. Davies is proud of the firstclass status of the Fredericksburg School System, and is still friends with Richard Garnett the former Superintendent. He says that he thinks that all our History is important to the City along with the Transit system that has the main station named after him, Commuter Rail and affordable housing. The transportation improvements and the walking trails many of which have been recently started or completed the concepts that were started back in the 1980's-1990's with future planning in mind by the than City Council. With 30 years of public service as Councilman and Mayor he continues to be involved after retirement and 50 years as the Pastor of Shiloh Old Site. Reverend Lawrence A. Davies is the most visible and beloved Mayor's in Fredericksburg's long history from its founding in 1728, with one of the oldest Council forms of government in the United States. I consider it an honor and privilege to have been elected to serve Fredericksburg and its citizens at his side. "Mister Mayor" thank you and God bless.

Tuffy Hicks continues to bring us of the rich heritage of our community every month in Front Porch

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

3


contents

closeups 3

from shiloh dc to shiloh fxbg ...lawrence a.davies

6

blue star mothers ... support for our armed services

21

the new guy Troy D. Paino

31

porch talk .

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

On the trails:: springtime on the trails

6

living in the garden...with master gardeners assoc.

7

fxbg antique auto club celebrates 60 years

.8

i have a friend: mothers & daughters virginia vistas: Jones & Bumbrey @uuff

10

downtown buzz...new sights, new sounds

12

youth artists annual show

13

season’s bounty: derby day

14

Cooking with Kyle....huevos escalfados rancheros con aguacate

15

world’s best bourbon

16-17

Calendar of events

18

history’s stories.: rising sun tavern mystery our heritage: 704 prince edward street

19

antibiotics: life-saver or scourge? the silence of intentional sound

20

Senior Care: say what?

21

mind your mind: words as a curse emancipated patients: placentophagia

22

renew: is stevia healthy & safe?

24

art in the burg: flight & arches warsaw & parrish

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURG; ronnie buddington mYSTERY hOUSE

26

on stage: a night on broadway

28

companions: spca courthouse rd

29

It’s all energy: ground yourself inner child meets higher self

30

fredericksburg sketches FREDERICKSBURGERS: frank & carol mauro

from shiloh washington to shiloh fredericksburg By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

23

...And more! 9

.9

the artistry of nursing

23

sophia street pottery throwdown pt 2

27

fxbg sign game Cover: “Railroad Bridge” by David C. Kennedy

2

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

L AWRENCE A . D AVIES Baptist Church in Washington. He received his Doctorate from Wesley Theological Seminary while performing his duties at Shiloh. He met and married his wife Janice during this time. Janice was teaching school in the Washington area which continued until they left Washington to move to Fredericksburg. In 1962, he was selected to become the Minister of Shiloh Old Site church on Sophia Street in Fredericksburg Virginia a position that he would hold until by videomann productions his retirement in 2012 after 50 Growing up in Fredericksburg and the surrounding areas many of the most recognized names had roots in the area for many decades. Last names like Rowe, Ellison, Todd, Sullivan, Scott, Pitts, Hicks, Massey, Shelton, Smith, Newton, etc. were well known for their families being in business, farming and politics. In the 1960's Fredericksburg was about to begin a change that would continue at a rapid pace into the 1990's. The City of Fredericksburg would need strong leadership during this period, little did it know that that leader was about to arrive on the seen as a Minister of a local church. Lawrence Davies was born in Houston, Texas and after graduating high school attended Prairie View A & M University wanting to be a Physician and with a major in Biology, he graduated in 1949. He went to Washington D.C to live with his godmother so that he could attend Howard University to be a Physician. When he was about to begin studies at the University he was drafted into the United States Army. While in the Army he decided that he would become a Minister instead of a Medical Doctor. He explained that his Godmothers husband was a well-respected Minister at Shiloh Church in Washington D.C. and this influenced his decision on becoming a minister. Rev. Davies who is an expert on Shiloh's history told me that Shiloh church in Washington was formed by members (former slaves) from the Shiloh Church in Fredericksburg after the War Between the States. Using the G. I. bill Lawrence received his Master of Divinity from Howard University. After graduation, he served as Associate Pastor of Shiloh

had the honor of being on City Council with him for 16 of those years, four of which was Vice-Mayor. My respect for him and his ability to govern increased during those difficult times. He earned praise as one of the best Presidents of the Virginia Municipal League. I still greet him "Mister" Mayor, he is still quite active in the community as he is a member of the FRED Transit Board, Rappahannock Community Service's Board and several other organizations. He and Janice raised three daughters one of which is currently a teacher in the Fredericksburg community and another is in Public Relations in the Roanoke area. Lauren died at the age of

Pastor Emeritus Davies Celebration of 50 years photo courtesy of Shiloh Old Site years of service. We both smiled as I said, "from Shiloh Washington to Shiloh Fredericksburg". Rev. Davies said that in those early days that he became involved in the community as Chairman of the PTA at Walker Grant and as a member of the BiRacial Commission. He spoke of working with Mary Washington Hospital as back in the 1960's Blacks were only allowed on the fourth floor, however, that was soon changed after several meetings with people of goodwill in the community. He spoke of Gladys Todd and her efforts that even today influence the community. Doris Buffet has funded the Gladys Todd Academy that assist young people that want to go to continue their education in college. He was encouraged to make a run for City Council and in 1966 he was elected being the first Black Council member. He is credited with the smooth segregation and the good race relations that the community has enjoyed. In 1976, the Bi-Centennial year of the nation he was elected Mayor a position that he would hold until his retirement in 1996. I

36 with Sickle-Cell Anemia. Mrs. Davies (Janice) is still active in the Sickle-Cell group. Mrs. Davies a wonderful lady was always involved in church activities and a friend to all. We both shared much about past city affairs, he said that the 1984 annexation was a major accomplishment with Central Park that added much needed addition revenue for the City. We

remembered those long evenings that stretched into early morning hours as we both had to work the next day with little sleep. He smiled as he said, "We both had the City and its residents at heart". Between the two of us 53 years of public service for the City of Fredericksburg. Rev. Davies is proud of the firstclass status of the Fredericksburg School System, and is still friends with Richard Garnett the former Superintendent. He says that he thinks that all our History is important to the City along with the Transit system that has the main station named after him, Commuter Rail and affordable housing. The transportation improvements and the walking trails many of which have been recently started or completed the concepts that were started back in the 1980's-1990's with future planning in mind by the than City Council. With 30 years of public service as Councilman and Mayor he continues to be involved after retirement and 50 years as the Pastor of Shiloh Old Site. Reverend Lawrence A. Davies is the most visible and beloved Mayor's in Fredericksburg's long history from its founding in 1728, with one of the oldest Council forms of government in the United States. I consider it an honor and privilege to have been elected to serve Fredericksburg and its citizens at his side. "Mister Mayor" thank you and God bless.

Tuffy Hicks continues to bring us of the rich heritage of our community every month in Front Porch

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

3


Mitzi Osterhout

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Melvin Brown Collette Caprara Barbara Deal Roger Engels Christina Ferber Tom Fortune Frank Fratoe K.Jeanne Frazer Mary Beth Geil Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Paulette Johnson Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Doug Makin Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Marty Morris Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Mitzi Osterhout M.L. Powers Ron Singleton Cathy Ambrose Smith Patricia Smith Mark Torgeson Beth Sperlazza Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore Norma Woodward Kristie Woolridge

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher.

The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

May 2017

come here to fredericksburg

On the Trails springtime on the trails! By Kevin Brown

BY Mitzi Osterhout After moving to Fredericksburg, I was introduced to the descriptions of a “come-here” and a “from-here.” A “comehere” is a person who moved to Fredericksburg from somewhere else, whereas a “from-here” is a person whose family has been in Fredericksburg for multiple generations, perhaps dating back as far as George Washington or even the Mayfair. Over twenty years ago, I moved to the Fredericksburg area. Yes, I am a “come-here.” My family is on the other side of the country in Idaho, California, Utah and Canada. I love that part of the country, and I love and miss my family. Realizing this, you might wonder why, at this point in time, I am a “still-here.” What can I say? I like this town. I like the fact that any time I walk through town, I am certain to see someone I know. I like the charm and friendliness of all the individually owned businesses and restaurants. I like the artistic flair of the community and the way restaurants and businesses have embraced the arts, displaying the works of different artists in their buildings. I am impressed with the people in Fredericksburg and with the number of people who are working hard to do good things and to make a difference. As a member of the Rappahannock Rotary, I am surrounded by “come-heres” and “from-heres” who are decisively engaged in helping others, both locally and internationally. People in this club do some impressive things, including, but certainly not limited to: feeding the needy; helping tornado victims in Tappahannock; building homes in Honduras, providing computers to students in Belize, donating dictionaries to school children, and sponsoring the boat

messages Hi Virginia, I was downtown yesterday, everyone downtown brightened up when I mentioned your name and Front Porch magazine, The downtown merchants respect and admire you and the paper you so beautifully publish each month. Most owners pointed to their paper rack in the store, or their copies on

Front porch fredericksburg

for Friends of the Rappahannock to maintain our beloved river. One thing that can be said about Fredericksburg is “people want to be involved with making a difference!” I work with amazing people at a local trade association with a mission to advance roadway safety. Our members work to make roadway infrastructure more forgiving, so that people are less likely to be killed or seriously injured when they are involved in an automobile crash. We are working toward the goal of zero deaths on the roadways, and every single person I work with is making a difference. From Moss Free Clinic to Community catch, we like to do good for others in this town. We, in 22401 are a type one school district. I am told that more than half of our students are eligible for assisted lunches. We still find room to do more for others. Fredericksburg’s own “from-here,” Stacy Horne, is a perfect example. Not only is she president of the the counter and said how glad they are we have the Front Porch available for tourists and citizens alike. I think your paper brings our town alive, and makes it personal, so people who visit feel welcome and almost as though they know the people who live here. Georgia Strentz Virginia, I wanted to let you know how proud I am that my work has graced

board of directors for Moss Free Clinic, she is also on the Executive Board of Fredericksburg Regional Chamber of Commerce, on a citizen review panel for the Rappahannock United Way, involved with Service League, and she coordinates a monthly dinner for those less fortunate. It’s impressive that she also finds time to run her insurance business. As a come-here, I understand why many people choose to stay here. This is a community where people care. People are involved. They are doing good things and making a difference. Front Porch Magazine captures the charm and kindness of Fredericksburg. It is everything local and everything positive. That’s why I read the Front Porch cover to cover!

Mitzi Osterhout lives in Fredericksburg with her “come-here” husband, Kyle Snyder.

your cover ... especially at Christmas! Thanks so much! And thanks to Dawn for the great feature, too! Casey Shaw

Hello Virginia , I think the Front Porch is a great local newspaper, and have always enjoyed reading it. Thank you so much for all the effort you put into your choice of articles. Brian Will

Eagles Over the Rappahannock River photo by Tom Fortune Ahhhh, the welcome renewal of nature and advent of activity that arrives with Springtime in Fredericksburg! Our trails are bustling with walkers, flowers are blooming, and our waterways are thriving with fanatical fishers to include birds swooping and diving to and fro. The best place to experience this outdoor extravaganza of Springtime activity is along our robust city trails system that runs by the Rappahannock River, the Rappahannock Canal, and Hazel Run (creek). Fredericksburg and its surrounding region are full of avid trail enthusiasts who have joined together in a Facebook Group aptly titled “On the Fredericksburg Va Trails.” This group, created in Spring 2015, has since grown to 2,000 members with several new members joining every day. If you are not yet connected to this group and want to keep up with “all things” Fredericksburg trails, please join and you will be kept well informed and entertained. Members enjoy daily access to the following free information: Nature photography/videography: This is by far out most popular subject. We are blessed to have a plethora of talented nature photographers who graciously share the fruits of their labor. Tom Fortune is our undisputed champion photographer, his jaw-dropping posts of Fredericksburg wildlife and nature are by far the most revered and “wow’d”. Other outstanding local photographers who kindly share incredible photos with our group are Nigel Haarstad, Mark Pugh, and Judith Crouse Muffley. And of course,

Steve and Lisa Ott’s “Ott Mountain” local trails videos are a huge hit. Popular local wildlife photography subjects include eagles, osprey, blue heron, geese, ducks, cormorant, cardinals, woodpeckers, turtles, and an occasional beaver. Trails events: From Spring through Fall, community-building events are scheduled on a weekly basis on our local trails. These include Parks & Recreationsponsored events; Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and other agencysponsored trails/riverfront cleanup activities; Fredericksburg Area Trails Maintenance User Group (FATMUG) and Fredericksburg Area Mountain Bike Enthusiast (FAMBE) Quarry and Mott Run Trails mountain biking events; River Rock Outfitter-sponsored hikes and kayak/canoe/standup board adventures; Team Red White & Blue Fredericksburg military-appreciation weekly run/walk/bike events; charity/church walks where hundreds of people gather at Old Mill Park and then circle around the 3.1 mile River Heritage Trail/Canal Path Loop; and competitive races of various lengths that feature members of our Fredericksburg Area Running Club (FARC), area track teams, and other avid runners. Inspiring personal trail stories/experiences: We are a community of thousands of outdoor enthusiasts who traverse the Fredericksburg trails system on a daily basis seeking healthy fun and relaxation. Group members share their most interesting adventures, and are graciously willing to post exciting “trails tales” with accompanying photos. Kirk Walter and his canine best friend Shyenne are the most famous duo in this category, their frequent trails adventures are a joyful celebration. Johnna Hetrick and her rambunctious Golden Retriever Grohl have also share some fabulous photos taken in Alum Springs Park and along the River Heritage Trail. Trails news: We regularly post public service announcements of upcoming trail openings, updates, and closures. Our group has direct links to information from Parks & Recreation, Public Works, the City Manager, and City Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, our city’s #1 trails supporter and active member of the group.

The ART of

GIFTING FIND THAT PERFECT LITTLE SOMETHING 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

In summary, Fredericksburg area citizens love supporting our trails and each other through this Facebook group, and welcome everyone who isn’t a member yet to sign up and join. Until then, see you “On the Trails”! front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

5


Mitzi Osterhout

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Melvin Brown Collette Caprara Barbara Deal Roger Engels Christina Ferber Tom Fortune Frank Fratoe K.Jeanne Frazer Mary Beth Geil Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Paulette Johnson Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Doug Makin Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Marty Morris Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Mitzi Osterhout M.L. Powers Ron Singleton Cathy Ambrose Smith Patricia Smith Mark Torgeson Beth Sperlazza Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore Norma Woodward Kristie Woolridge

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher.

The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

May 2017

come here to fredericksburg

On the Trails springtime on the trails! By Kevin Brown

BY Mitzi Osterhout After moving to Fredericksburg, I was introduced to the descriptions of a “come-here” and a “from-here.” A “comehere” is a person who moved to Fredericksburg from somewhere else, whereas a “from-here” is a person whose family has been in Fredericksburg for multiple generations, perhaps dating back as far as George Washington or even the Mayfair. Over twenty years ago, I moved to the Fredericksburg area. Yes, I am a “come-here.” My family is on the other side of the country in Idaho, California, Utah and Canada. I love that part of the country, and I love and miss my family. Realizing this, you might wonder why, at this point in time, I am a “still-here.” What can I say? I like this town. I like the fact that any time I walk through town, I am certain to see someone I know. I like the charm and friendliness of all the individually owned businesses and restaurants. I like the artistic flair of the community and the way restaurants and businesses have embraced the arts, displaying the works of different artists in their buildings. I am impressed with the people in Fredericksburg and with the number of people who are working hard to do good things and to make a difference. As a member of the Rappahannock Rotary, I am surrounded by “come-heres” and “from-heres” who are decisively engaged in helping others, both locally and internationally. People in this club do some impressive things, including, but certainly not limited to: feeding the needy; helping tornado victims in Tappahannock; building homes in Honduras, providing computers to students in Belize, donating dictionaries to school children, and sponsoring the boat

messages Hi Virginia, I was downtown yesterday, everyone downtown brightened up when I mentioned your name and Front Porch magazine, The downtown merchants respect and admire you and the paper you so beautifully publish each month. Most owners pointed to their paper rack in the store, or their copies on

Front porch fredericksburg

for Friends of the Rappahannock to maintain our beloved river. One thing that can be said about Fredericksburg is “people want to be involved with making a difference!” I work with amazing people at a local trade association with a mission to advance roadway safety. Our members work to make roadway infrastructure more forgiving, so that people are less likely to be killed or seriously injured when they are involved in an automobile crash. We are working toward the goal of zero deaths on the roadways, and every single person I work with is making a difference. From Moss Free Clinic to Community catch, we like to do good for others in this town. We, in 22401 are a type one school district. I am told that more than half of our students are eligible for assisted lunches. We still find room to do more for others. Fredericksburg’s own “from-here,” Stacy Horne, is a perfect example. Not only is she president of the the counter and said how glad they are we have the Front Porch available for tourists and citizens alike. I think your paper brings our town alive, and makes it personal, so people who visit feel welcome and almost as though they know the people who live here. Georgia Strentz Virginia, I wanted to let you know how proud I am that my work has graced

board of directors for Moss Free Clinic, she is also on the Executive Board of Fredericksburg Regional Chamber of Commerce, on a citizen review panel for the Rappahannock United Way, involved with Service League, and she coordinates a monthly dinner for those less fortunate. It’s impressive that she also finds time to run her insurance business. As a come-here, I understand why many people choose to stay here. This is a community where people care. People are involved. They are doing good things and making a difference. Front Porch Magazine captures the charm and kindness of Fredericksburg. It is everything local and everything positive. That’s why I read the Front Porch cover to cover!

Mitzi Osterhout lives in Fredericksburg with her “come-here” husband, Kyle Snyder.

your cover ... especially at Christmas! Thanks so much! And thanks to Dawn for the great feature, too! Casey Shaw

Hello Virginia , I think the Front Porch is a great local newspaper, and have always enjoyed reading it. Thank you so much for all the effort you put into your choice of articles. Brian Will

Eagles Over the Rappahannock River photo by Tom Fortune Ahhhh, the welcome renewal of nature and advent of activity that arrives with Springtime in Fredericksburg! Our trails are bustling with walkers, flowers are blooming, and our waterways are thriving with fanatical fishers to include birds swooping and diving to and fro. The best place to experience this outdoor extravaganza of Springtime activity is along our robust city trails system that runs by the Rappahannock River, the Rappahannock Canal, and Hazel Run (creek). Fredericksburg and its surrounding region are full of avid trail enthusiasts who have joined together in a Facebook Group aptly titled “On the Fredericksburg Va Trails.” This group, created in Spring 2015, has since grown to 2,000 members with several new members joining every day. If you are not yet connected to this group and want to keep up with “all things” Fredericksburg trails, please join and you will be kept well informed and entertained. Members enjoy daily access to the following free information: Nature photography/videography: This is by far out most popular subject. We are blessed to have a plethora of talented nature photographers who graciously share the fruits of their labor. Tom Fortune is our undisputed champion photographer, his jaw-dropping posts of Fredericksburg wildlife and nature are by far the most revered and “wow’d”. Other outstanding local photographers who kindly share incredible photos with our group are Nigel Haarstad, Mark Pugh, and Judith Crouse Muffley. And of course,

Steve and Lisa Ott’s “Ott Mountain” local trails videos are a huge hit. Popular local wildlife photography subjects include eagles, osprey, blue heron, geese, ducks, cormorant, cardinals, woodpeckers, turtles, and an occasional beaver. Trails events: From Spring through Fall, community-building events are scheduled on a weekly basis on our local trails. These include Parks & Recreationsponsored events; Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and other agencysponsored trails/riverfront cleanup activities; Fredericksburg Area Trails Maintenance User Group (FATMUG) and Fredericksburg Area Mountain Bike Enthusiast (FAMBE) Quarry and Mott Run Trails mountain biking events; River Rock Outfitter-sponsored hikes and kayak/canoe/standup board adventures; Team Red White & Blue Fredericksburg military-appreciation weekly run/walk/bike events; charity/church walks where hundreds of people gather at Old Mill Park and then circle around the 3.1 mile River Heritage Trail/Canal Path Loop; and competitive races of various lengths that feature members of our Fredericksburg Area Running Club (FARC), area track teams, and other avid runners. Inspiring personal trail stories/experiences: We are a community of thousands of outdoor enthusiasts who traverse the Fredericksburg trails system on a daily basis seeking healthy fun and relaxation. Group members share their most interesting adventures, and are graciously willing to post exciting “trails tales” with accompanying photos. Kirk Walter and his canine best friend Shyenne are the most famous duo in this category, their frequent trails adventures are a joyful celebration. Johnna Hetrick and her rambunctious Golden Retriever Grohl have also share some fabulous photos taken in Alum Springs Park and along the River Heritage Trail. Trails news: We regularly post public service announcements of upcoming trail openings, updates, and closures. Our group has direct links to information from Parks & Recreation, Public Works, the City Manager, and City Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, our city’s #1 trails supporter and active member of the group.

The ART of

GIFTING FIND THAT PERFECT LITTLE SOMETHING 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

In summary, Fredericksburg area citizens love supporting our trails and each other through this Facebook group, and welcome everyone who isn’t a member yet to sign up and join. Until then, see you “On the Trails”! front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

5


Living in the Garden

antique automobile show Celebrating 60 Years

UMW symposium

By doug makin By ron singleton The public is invited to attend one of the rites of spring in Fredericksburg when the Master Gardener Association of the Central Rappahannock Area (MGACRA) hosts its fifth annual “Living in the Garden Symposium” on the campus of the University of Mary Washington on Saturday, May 20. Featured will be information that both beginner and intermediate gardeners can use to make their home gardens more beautiful. The program’s theme, “Textures and Natives,” emphasizes the use of herbaceous plants for color and texture in the garden and the use of native plants, especially those that attract pollinators.

One of the featured speakers will be Dr. Bob Lyons, (above) former director of the graduate program in horticulture

at Longwood Gardens and the University of Delaware. His presentation, titled “Textural Contracts in the Landscape,” will focus on bold to fine foliage textures, strong to subtle colors, and perfect plant combinations that showcase visually appealing and pragmatic examples that any gardener can create. Dr. Lyons was a faculty member for over 30 years in the horticulture departments of NC State, Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware. His area of expertise is the use of herbaceous plant materials in the garden. He is former director of the J C Ralston Arboretum at NC State and he was co-founder and director of the Hahn Garden at Virginia Tech. He is also a noted garden photographer, whose work has been published in major horticulture publications nationwide. Grace Chapman Elton, (right) who is former director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, will speak on “Native Plants for Pollinators.” In her talk, she will cover the basics of native pollinators in Virginia, including honeybees. She will highlight the new native plant garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Park, showing plant profiles and how to create a pollinator-friendly garden of your own. Ms. Elton was recently named CEO of the Tower Botanical Garden in Massachusetts, just outside Boston. She is a graduate of the Longwood Gardens master of science program in public horticulture and has studied at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew in London and the Chelsea Physic Garden. She served as an adjunct professor and horticulture

Original 1957 Fredericksburg Antique Auto Club Members

supervisor at the Ambler Arboretum of Temple University, prior to being named director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter. The all-day “Living in the Garden” symposium costs $50 and includes a box lunch provided by the University of Mary Washington. The day’s activities will conclude with a tree walk of the University of Mary Washington campus. A downloadable brochure and registration form are available at: www.mgacra.org www.mgacra.org/spring-ssymposium For additional information, contact MGACRA’s president, Ron Singleton, at rsing@umw.edu

Ron Sinleton is current president of Master Gardener Association of the Central Rappahannock Area (MGACRA)

Living in the Garden Symposium May 20, 8:30 am UMW, Lee Hall

The Fredericksburg Antique Automobile Club was formed 60 years ago on August 28, 1957. Local businessman Earl Broyles held the first meeting in the basement of his home. Others in attendance on that day were, Massie Carter, T.P. Johnson, Landon Martin, Thomas McMichael, John Olive, T.R. Passagaluppi, Lloyd Scott, Calvin Scott, Aubrey Snellings, and Whitfield Williams. These original founding members worked hard to promote the club and expand the membership. For two years the club remained independent until 1959 when Jim Ladd from AACA attended the Christmas party and introduced them to the national organization, and the group became The Historic Fredericksburg Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America. The Antique Automobile club of America (AACA) is a national organization of auto enthusiasts who promote the preservation and restoration of antique automobiles to their original factory design. They like all antique cars, but original is key. Modifying old cars from the original is OK, but that is more a form of art which is not what AACA does. Since then the club has gone through a lot of transitions, however the

mission has always been: “To promote friendship of people interested in antique autos, to promote public interest and support, and to assist or benefit members of the club in all phases of antique automobile restoration and operation.”

The founders of the Fredericksburg club were all members of the local community with regular occupations outside of the club. Earl Broyles, the first club president, was owner of Earl’s Supermarket on White Oak Road. Landon and Barbara Martin lived on Lorraine Avenue. Landon was a shift foreman at the old American Viscose Plant, and Barbara was a bookkeeper at Pratt Clinic. John and Marie Olive lived in Falmouth. John worked at Dahlgren Naval Research Center. T.R. Passagaluppi (Pat) operated an Amoco Service Station in Fredericksburg at the corner of George and Charles Streets adjacent to the

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

National Bank Building. Pat’s wife Elizabeth owned and operated a tourist home in the 700 block of Princess Anne Street. Aubrey and Esther Snellings of Falmouth were owners and operators of Snellings Business Machines at 811 Sophia Street. Lloyd and Calvin Scott were brothers. Calvin was a civil servant at Fort A.P.Hill. His wife Eleanor was a secretary at Quantico Marine Base. T.P. Johnson, better known as Penny, owned Johnson’s Auto Parts in Fredericksburg. Penny and wife Verena had three children who attended Spotsylvania County Schools. Massie Carter married his wife Darlene Thamason in 1959, two years after the club started. Whit and Agnes Williams had six children. One of their children Laura Lowe and Husband Jimmy are current club members. Lloyd Scott, still an active member today, drives the same 1923 Model T Ford he had when the club began. Today, as in bygone days, the club has many diverse individuals still joined by a love of cars. To name a few, past president Wally Hunt is a shop teacher for Spotsylvania County. His wife Liz Hunt is a nurse. Current president Doug Makin is a hospital pharmacist at Mary Washington Hospital, and show chairman J. Brown is an architect and president of a residential design firm. Brothers Ben and Lauman Schooler are longtime members, who are retired and once shared a construction business. Ron and Rena Rees operate a Christmas tree farm near Lake Anna. Powel Sale has owned and operated the Jewel Box on William Street for many years. In 1958 the club began holding an annual antique automobile show in

Fredericksburg. It has been held at a few different places around town, and since 2008 the club has been bringing about 150 beautifully restored antique automobiles to Caroline Street in Downtown Fredericksburg for its annual show. The show has expanded to include a time period fashion show, take apart Model T and activities for children. Awards are presented for most original cars and the mayor picks a favorite. This year’s event takes place on Saturday, June 3rd from 8 AM to 3PM rain or shine. As always it is open to the public. Doug Makin is a hospital pharmacist at Mary Washington Hosp. and current president of Historic Fredericksburg Region Antique Automobile Club of America. Historic Fredericksburg Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America Presents: 60th Annual Antique Auto Show Saturday, June 3rd, 8am to 3pm Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! 6

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

May 2017

7


Living in the Garden

antique automobile show Celebrating 60 Years

UMW symposium

By doug makin By ron singleton The public is invited to attend one of the rites of spring in Fredericksburg when the Master Gardener Association of the Central Rappahannock Area (MGACRA) hosts its fifth annual “Living in the Garden Symposium” on the campus of the University of Mary Washington on Saturday, May 20. Featured will be information that both beginner and intermediate gardeners can use to make their home gardens more beautiful. The program’s theme, “Textures and Natives,” emphasizes the use of herbaceous plants for color and texture in the garden and the use of native plants, especially those that attract pollinators.

One of the featured speakers will be Dr. Bob Lyons, (above) former director of the graduate program in horticulture

at Longwood Gardens and the University of Delaware. His presentation, titled “Textural Contracts in the Landscape,” will focus on bold to fine foliage textures, strong to subtle colors, and perfect plant combinations that showcase visually appealing and pragmatic examples that any gardener can create. Dr. Lyons was a faculty member for over 30 years in the horticulture departments of NC State, Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware. His area of expertise is the use of herbaceous plant materials in the garden. He is former director of the J C Ralston Arboretum at NC State and he was co-founder and director of the Hahn Garden at Virginia Tech. He is also a noted garden photographer, whose work has been published in major horticulture publications nationwide. Grace Chapman Elton, (right) who is former director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, will speak on “Native Plants for Pollinators.” In her talk, she will cover the basics of native pollinators in Virginia, including honeybees. She will highlight the new native plant garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Park, showing plant profiles and how to create a pollinator-friendly garden of your own. Ms. Elton was recently named CEO of the Tower Botanical Garden in Massachusetts, just outside Boston. She is a graduate of the Longwood Gardens master of science program in public horticulture and has studied at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew in London and the Chelsea Physic Garden. She served as an adjunct professor and horticulture

Original 1957 Fredericksburg Antique Auto Club Members

supervisor at the Ambler Arboretum of Temple University, prior to being named director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter. The all-day “Living in the Garden” symposium costs $50 and includes a box lunch provided by the University of Mary Washington. The day’s activities will conclude with a tree walk of the University of Mary Washington campus. A downloadable brochure and registration form are available at: www.mgacra.org www.mgacra.org/spring-ssymposium For additional information, contact MGACRA’s president, Ron Singleton, at rsing@umw.edu

Ron Sinleton is current president of Master Gardener Association of the Central Rappahannock Area (MGACRA)

Living in the Garden Symposium May 20, 8:30 am UMW, Lee Hall

The Fredericksburg Antique Automobile Club was formed 60 years ago on August 28, 1957. Local businessman Earl Broyles held the first meeting in the basement of his home. Others in attendance on that day were, Massie Carter, T.P. Johnson, Landon Martin, Thomas McMichael, John Olive, T.R. Passagaluppi, Lloyd Scott, Calvin Scott, Aubrey Snellings, and Whitfield Williams. These original founding members worked hard to promote the club and expand the membership. For two years the club remained independent until 1959 when Jim Ladd from AACA attended the Christmas party and introduced them to the national organization, and the group became The Historic Fredericksburg Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America. The Antique Automobile club of America (AACA) is a national organization of auto enthusiasts who promote the preservation and restoration of antique automobiles to their original factory design. They like all antique cars, but original is key. Modifying old cars from the original is OK, but that is more a form of art which is not what AACA does. Since then the club has gone through a lot of transitions, however the

mission has always been: “To promote friendship of people interested in antique autos, to promote public interest and support, and to assist or benefit members of the club in all phases of antique automobile restoration and operation.”

The founders of the Fredericksburg club were all members of the local community with regular occupations outside of the club. Earl Broyles, the first club president, was owner of Earl’s Supermarket on White Oak Road. Landon and Barbara Martin lived on Lorraine Avenue. Landon was a shift foreman at the old American Viscose Plant, and Barbara was a bookkeeper at Pratt Clinic. John and Marie Olive lived in Falmouth. John worked at Dahlgren Naval Research Center. T.R. Passagaluppi (Pat) operated an Amoco Service Station in Fredericksburg at the corner of George and Charles Streets adjacent to the

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

National Bank Building. Pat’s wife Elizabeth owned and operated a tourist home in the 700 block of Princess Anne Street. Aubrey and Esther Snellings of Falmouth were owners and operators of Snellings Business Machines at 811 Sophia Street. Lloyd and Calvin Scott were brothers. Calvin was a civil servant at Fort A.P.Hill. His wife Eleanor was a secretary at Quantico Marine Base. T.P. Johnson, better known as Penny, owned Johnson’s Auto Parts in Fredericksburg. Penny and wife Verena had three children who attended Spotsylvania County Schools. Massie Carter married his wife Darlene Thamason in 1959, two years after the club started. Whit and Agnes Williams had six children. One of their children Laura Lowe and Husband Jimmy are current club members. Lloyd Scott, still an active member today, drives the same 1923 Model T Ford he had when the club began. Today, as in bygone days, the club has many diverse individuals still joined by a love of cars. To name a few, past president Wally Hunt is a shop teacher for Spotsylvania County. His wife Liz Hunt is a nurse. Current president Doug Makin is a hospital pharmacist at Mary Washington Hospital, and show chairman J. Brown is an architect and president of a residential design firm. Brothers Ben and Lauman Schooler are longtime members, who are retired and once shared a construction business. Ron and Rena Rees operate a Christmas tree farm near Lake Anna. Powel Sale has owned and operated the Jewel Box on William Street for many years. In 1958 the club began holding an annual antique automobile show in

Fredericksburg. It has been held at a few different places around town, and since 2008 the club has been bringing about 150 beautifully restored antique automobiles to Caroline Street in Downtown Fredericksburg for its annual show. The show has expanded to include a time period fashion show, take apart Model T and activities for children. Awards are presented for most original cars and the mayor picks a favorite. This year’s event takes place on Saturday, June 3rd from 8 AM to 3PM rain or shine. As always it is open to the public. Doug Makin is a hospital pharmacist at Mary Washington Hosp. and current president of Historic Fredericksburg Region Antique Automobile Club of America. Historic Fredericksburg Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America Presents: 60th Annual Antique Auto Show Saturday, June 3rd, 8am to 3pm Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! 6

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

May 2017

7


“I Have A Friend” Mothers & Daughters By Laurie Black just felt like it was something we could do together and that it would also help Carmen get out in the community more.” Teresa agreed and suggested they visit Maria since Maria and Carmen were both native Spanish speakers. Becky remembers, “The connection was immediate! From the first visit everyone just felt comfortable, like family.” Becky and Carmen have now been visiting Maria for Carmen, Maria, Becky & Nelly over a year. Pastries, coffee, bingo, hugs, Maria’s daughter, Nelly, is there laughs, and occasional dancing – are just a when Becky and Carmen visit. Nelly says , few of the things that these mothers and “We feel very happy to have Becky and daughters enjoy together. Carmen visit. My sister would say the same Senior Visitors volunteer, Becky thing. It is so helpful to have them visit. Sosa, says she became interested in They are perfect! From our heart, we are volunteering with the Senior Visitors very thankful!” “It is like therapy for us. Program because she relates well to We only wish they could come more.” seniors and the flexible hours worked well A description of their visits is a with her schedule. Early in the process of cultural delight. Becky says she brings the becoming a volunteer, Becky mentioned to sweets and Nelly provides the coffee. They Program Director, Teresa Bowers, that she share family stories, play card games, and would like to volunteer with her mother- Bingo. Maria loves to sing and to dance. On in-law, Carmen Sosa. Becky explained, “I one visit Becky recalls, “Maria serenaded us throughout the visit, and told us as we were leaving that “we are her doctors today” because we made her feel better. This is what Senior Visiting is all about! Sometimes when we visit, Maria starts off feeling kind of “blah”, but within minutes she is singing and laughing. Nelly says we just wouldn’t believe the difference our visits make.” Because Maria loves to dance, they invited Becky’s family over for a Christmas celebration which included music and dancing. Becky smiled, “I said I didn’t know how to dance, so Maria proceeded to show me how. Maria also says that I help her improve her English and that she is helping me learn Spanish.” Becky laughed, “I know my numbers in Spanish now from playing Bingo!” When asked what she enjoys about their visits, Becky’s mother-in-law, Carmen replied, “I have a good time with Maria; she is very loving. I love to play Bingo and sing with her, and I like when she says, ‘I don’t like you, I loovvve you!’” Becky again emphasized, “I am so glad to have my mother-in-law, Carmen, do this with me. Our families have come together.” Becky, Carmen, Maria, and Nelly are a wonderful example of how we can bring sunshine and happiness to each other – and to our community. 200 William Street Happy Mother’s Day to all Downtown mothers and to all those who nurture, uplift, and inspire us! Fredericksburg For more information about the 540.373.4421 Senior Visitors Program, call Mental Mon-Sat: 9:30-5:30 Health America of Fredericksburg at (540) Closed Sun 371-2704 or visit their website at mhafred.org to download volunteer or CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com senior applications.

Virginia Vistas Bumbrey & Jones @ UUFF Gallery by patricia smith

Sheila Jones Dolores and Bumbrey (above with her art) are life-long residents of the Fredericksburg region. They met and became Facebook friends three years ago, meeting at various art v e n u e s . Fredericksburg is a small enough community that when looking at Dolores' Facebook page, Sheila realized she knew Dolores' Mother and other family members. Three years ago, Sheila had just retired from full-time work as a Lieutenant in the Police Department of Fredericksburg, and knew she could develop her hobby as a photographer. She joined the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts, and a few months later Art First. Previously she had taken a Forensic Photography class, teaching her to see and photograph in new ways, such as the micro-photography used in photographing fingerprints at a crime scene. On a happier note, much of her recent photography concerns one of the things on her 'bucket list'--visiting and photographing every wine vineyard in Virginia!

Sheila remains a part-time Deputy Sheriff in Fredericksburg. A percentage of all of her art sales goes to Law Enforcement United, which provides funds to families of officers killed in the line of duty. Dolores knew that art was a major interest of hers while at Courtland High School, and she studied art there for four years. Oil painting and graphite pencil drawing have been her preferred media. Her work is part of her spiritual practice, both in her approach to creation, and to the content addressed in her work. She hopes that viewers will respond to the positive energy central to her art-making process. Sheila Jones (left) and Dolores Bumbrey will exhibit photographs, graphite pencil drawings and oil paintings at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg Gallery, 25

“In the Beginning” by Sheila Jones Chalice Circle, from May 7 through June 25. The opening reception will be from 11:30 AM -2 PM on Sunday, May 7. The event is free and open to the public. The public is welcome to meet the artists at the opening reception. Other visits can be arranged with the Office Administrator Nancy Michael, 540310-4001. Patricia Smith is an Artist and a member of the UUFF Gallery Committee

The Artistry of Nursing A Tribute to Fredericksburg Visiting Angels Nurses By Paulette Johnson

Linda Church, RN Celebration of Nurse’s Appreciation Month Visiting Nurses of Fredericksburg, has celebrated the collective gifts and talents of Registered Nurses, orchestrated like a symphony of song, by Cathy Dickey for over 13 years. The beautiful music that captures their dedication and patient service has resonated across the Fredericksburg Community. Giving life and vitality to they serve that can be best described as a work of Art. The Art of Nursing has remained without clarity over the years within the nursing profession. But, in 1990 nursing was defined as an art in the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). This led Deborah Finfgeld-C Connett, in 2008 to perform and publish a research that determined the meaning of the Art of Nursing. Upon review of research-based clinical outcomes. It was found the, Nursing Assessment is one of many methods or tools that nurses use which not only demonstrates their “mastery,” of the profession. But launches and ultimately guides nursing or patient care interventions. It guides, like a brush to a

pallet, a bow to a violin, a finger to piano keys. Assuring Nursing, as an Art Form, comes to life through the Nursing Assessment process. Revealing the innermost needs of a patient and their family members. Revealing the unspoken words of their suffering. Harvesting their desire for wellness at all costs. Registered Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels, represent a unique tapestry of artists that have gone unsung in our Community. All well as nurses across our Community, Nation and the Globe. The Registered Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels, represent collectively close to 329 years of dedication to the nursing profession. It is with the spirit of admiration, celebration, joy and beauty of their work we wish to offer tribute to: Ann Kane, serving almost 50 years in the nursing career. Ann states, “a RN is like a sculptor.” Molding, balancing work, family and college. Starting in a busy doctor’s office that meant doing everything, blood/urine tests, minor surgeries and more. Each site challenge led the passion to pursue more Education. Working as several area hospitals helped Ann keep the focus, pace and diversify her medical experience. Patricia Peyton, serving in the field 30 years and with Home care over 15 years. Pat has worked in various Administrative capacities. But, her husband and children are a glowing example of her compassion, dedication to positive professional and artistic practices. Five daughters, one an Engineer Major, one planning a career in dentistry and three others doing well in school. Pat is

working to pursue a Master’s Degree in Nursing. Linda Church, starting as a nurse’s aide out of High School. Has been in the field 35 years. Linda states, “ my work is a part of my heart. It’s not how much you do, it how much love you put into what you do. Love and compassion always win. Even through life’s ups and downs.” Linda has a parting message of all of us. “Always wear clean underwear, because you never know when you will have to meet a medical professional. It may be me!”

Patricia Peyton, RN Marcia Mahnowski, graduated as an RN in 1958. Marcia’s has brought her from New Castle, PA of her birth to Erie, PA where she was raised. Marcia retired as a Nursing OR Supervisor. But, still hold true to the passion and artistry of nursing. She volunteers at area hospitals continuing the faith of keeping all she touches healthy and well as possible. Joan Lawler, serving 30 years; began as a Medical Assistant. Received a scholarship at Inova Fairfax. Joan was choosing which department she would first practice her art. But, was touched by a family member that was dying of cancer

on the Oncology Unit. She states, “ I made a promise to work on that floor. I did, and soon I was put on the Bone Marrow Transplant Team.” Over years, Joan worked in many places. Hospitals, clinics and a prison. But, she feels she has found her home in Home Care. “Each family and patient is special. I can finally say. I love my job.” Ann Ellis, graduated from a diploma school in Evansville, Indiana. Started a Home Health Agency in 1973; that in 1975 became one of the first Hospice program in the US. Ann went back to school which ultimately led to her achieving a Master’s in Community Health Nursing. Ann gives us words that serve as the centerpiece of the article, “Nursing is an Art. It is the art of listening with all you heart, soul and senses to the patient and their family. It means incorporating all you have learned in the past and with the patient and family prepare a care plan. This plan must address the personal, physical, psychological, social, financial and pastoral needs of the patient”. It is that music, playing over and over in my head. A rapture that gives life to all that desire to be heard and can’t. Our Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels keep the music and hope alive through their artistry. Let us all be forever grateful. Dedicated to the memory of my mother, Marion Stallworth White and all the wonderful nurses that took care of her when I was not available to Thank you.

Paulette Johnson is the Director of Marketing and Community Relations, Fredericksburg, Visiting Angels. Contact her at : paulettejohnson@fcangels.com

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings.

8

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

9


“I Have A Friend” Mothers & Daughters By Laurie Black just felt like it was something we could do together and that it would also help Carmen get out in the community more.” Teresa agreed and suggested they visit Maria since Maria and Carmen were both native Spanish speakers. Becky remembers, “The connection was immediate! From the first visit everyone just felt comfortable, like family.” Becky and Carmen have now been visiting Maria for Carmen, Maria, Becky & Nelly over a year. Pastries, coffee, bingo, hugs, Maria’s daughter, Nelly, is there laughs, and occasional dancing – are just a when Becky and Carmen visit. Nelly says , few of the things that these mothers and “We feel very happy to have Becky and daughters enjoy together. Carmen visit. My sister would say the same Senior Visitors volunteer, Becky thing. It is so helpful to have them visit. Sosa, says she became interested in They are perfect! From our heart, we are volunteering with the Senior Visitors very thankful!” “It is like therapy for us. Program because she relates well to We only wish they could come more.” seniors and the flexible hours worked well A description of their visits is a with her schedule. Early in the process of cultural delight. Becky says she brings the becoming a volunteer, Becky mentioned to sweets and Nelly provides the coffee. They Program Director, Teresa Bowers, that she share family stories, play card games, and would like to volunteer with her mother- Bingo. Maria loves to sing and to dance. On in-law, Carmen Sosa. Becky explained, “I one visit Becky recalls, “Maria serenaded us throughout the visit, and told us as we were leaving that “we are her doctors today” because we made her feel better. This is what Senior Visiting is all about! Sometimes when we visit, Maria starts off feeling kind of “blah”, but within minutes she is singing and laughing. Nelly says we just wouldn’t believe the difference our visits make.” Because Maria loves to dance, they invited Becky’s family over for a Christmas celebration which included music and dancing. Becky smiled, “I said I didn’t know how to dance, so Maria proceeded to show me how. Maria also says that I help her improve her English and that she is helping me learn Spanish.” Becky laughed, “I know my numbers in Spanish now from playing Bingo!” When asked what she enjoys about their visits, Becky’s mother-in-law, Carmen replied, “I have a good time with Maria; she is very loving. I love to play Bingo and sing with her, and I like when she says, ‘I don’t like you, I loovvve you!’” Becky again emphasized, “I am so glad to have my mother-in-law, Carmen, do this with me. Our families have come together.” Becky, Carmen, Maria, and Nelly are a wonderful example of how we can bring sunshine and happiness to each other – and to our community. 200 William Street Happy Mother’s Day to all Downtown mothers and to all those who nurture, uplift, and inspire us! Fredericksburg For more information about the 540.373.4421 Senior Visitors Program, call Mental Mon-Sat: 9:30-5:30 Health America of Fredericksburg at (540) Closed Sun 371-2704 or visit their website at mhafred.org to download volunteer or CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com senior applications.

Virginia Vistas Bumbrey & Jones @ UUFF Gallery by patricia smith

Sheila Jones Dolores and Bumbrey (above with her art) are life-long residents of the Fredericksburg region. They met and became Facebook friends three years ago, meeting at various art v e n u e s . Fredericksburg is a small enough community that when looking at Dolores' Facebook page, Sheila realized she knew Dolores' Mother and other family members. Three years ago, Sheila had just retired from full-time work as a Lieutenant in the Police Department of Fredericksburg, and knew she could develop her hobby as a photographer. She joined the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts, and a few months later Art First. Previously she had taken a Forensic Photography class, teaching her to see and photograph in new ways, such as the micro-photography used in photographing fingerprints at a crime scene. On a happier note, much of her recent photography concerns one of the things on her 'bucket list'--visiting and photographing every wine vineyard in Virginia!

Sheila remains a part-time Deputy Sheriff in Fredericksburg. A percentage of all of her art sales goes to Law Enforcement United, which provides funds to families of officers killed in the line of duty. Dolores knew that art was a major interest of hers while at Courtland High School, and she studied art there for four years. Oil painting and graphite pencil drawing have been her preferred media. Her work is part of her spiritual practice, both in her approach to creation, and to the content addressed in her work. She hopes that viewers will respond to the positive energy central to her art-making process. Sheila Jones (left) and Dolores Bumbrey will exhibit photographs, graphite pencil drawings and oil paintings at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg Gallery, 25

“In the Beginning” by Sheila Jones Chalice Circle, from May 7 through June 25. The opening reception will be from 11:30 AM -2 PM on Sunday, May 7. The event is free and open to the public. The public is welcome to meet the artists at the opening reception. Other visits can be arranged with the Office Administrator Nancy Michael, 540310-4001. Patricia Smith is an Artist and a member of the UUFF Gallery Committee

The Artistry of Nursing A Tribute to Fredericksburg Visiting Angels Nurses By Paulette Johnson

Linda Church, RN Celebration of Nurse’s Appreciation Month Visiting Nurses of Fredericksburg, has celebrated the collective gifts and talents of Registered Nurses, orchestrated like a symphony of song, by Cathy Dickey for over 13 years. The beautiful music that captures their dedication and patient service has resonated across the Fredericksburg Community. Giving life and vitality to they serve that can be best described as a work of Art. The Art of Nursing has remained without clarity over the years within the nursing profession. But, in 1990 nursing was defined as an art in the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). This led Deborah Finfgeld-C Connett, in 2008 to perform and publish a research that determined the meaning of the Art of Nursing. Upon review of research-based clinical outcomes. It was found the, Nursing Assessment is one of many methods or tools that nurses use which not only demonstrates their “mastery,” of the profession. But launches and ultimately guides nursing or patient care interventions. It guides, like a brush to a

pallet, a bow to a violin, a finger to piano keys. Assuring Nursing, as an Art Form, comes to life through the Nursing Assessment process. Revealing the innermost needs of a patient and their family members. Revealing the unspoken words of their suffering. Harvesting their desire for wellness at all costs. Registered Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels, represent a unique tapestry of artists that have gone unsung in our Community. All well as nurses across our Community, Nation and the Globe. The Registered Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels, represent collectively close to 329 years of dedication to the nursing profession. It is with the spirit of admiration, celebration, joy and beauty of their work we wish to offer tribute to: Ann Kane, serving almost 50 years in the nursing career. Ann states, “a RN is like a sculptor.” Molding, balancing work, family and college. Starting in a busy doctor’s office that meant doing everything, blood/urine tests, minor surgeries and more. Each site challenge led the passion to pursue more Education. Working as several area hospitals helped Ann keep the focus, pace and diversify her medical experience. Patricia Peyton, serving in the field 30 years and with Home care over 15 years. Pat has worked in various Administrative capacities. But, her husband and children are a glowing example of her compassion, dedication to positive professional and artistic practices. Five daughters, one an Engineer Major, one planning a career in dentistry and three others doing well in school. Pat is

working to pursue a Master’s Degree in Nursing. Linda Church, starting as a nurse’s aide out of High School. Has been in the field 35 years. Linda states, “ my work is a part of my heart. It’s not how much you do, it how much love you put into what you do. Love and compassion always win. Even through life’s ups and downs.” Linda has a parting message of all of us. “Always wear clean underwear, because you never know when you will have to meet a medical professional. It may be me!”

Patricia Peyton, RN Marcia Mahnowski, graduated as an RN in 1958. Marcia’s has brought her from New Castle, PA of her birth to Erie, PA where she was raised. Marcia retired as a Nursing OR Supervisor. But, still hold true to the passion and artistry of nursing. She volunteers at area hospitals continuing the faith of keeping all she touches healthy and well as possible. Joan Lawler, serving 30 years; began as a Medical Assistant. Received a scholarship at Inova Fairfax. Joan was choosing which department she would first practice her art. But, was touched by a family member that was dying of cancer

on the Oncology Unit. She states, “ I made a promise to work on that floor. I did, and soon I was put on the Bone Marrow Transplant Team.” Over years, Joan worked in many places. Hospitals, clinics and a prison. But, she feels she has found her home in Home Care. “Each family and patient is special. I can finally say. I love my job.” Ann Ellis, graduated from a diploma school in Evansville, Indiana. Started a Home Health Agency in 1973; that in 1975 became one of the first Hospice program in the US. Ann went back to school which ultimately led to her achieving a Master’s in Community Health Nursing. Ann gives us words that serve as the centerpiece of the article, “Nursing is an Art. It is the art of listening with all you heart, soul and senses to the patient and their family. It means incorporating all you have learned in the past and with the patient and family prepare a care plan. This plan must address the personal, physical, psychological, social, financial and pastoral needs of the patient”. It is that music, playing over and over in my head. A rapture that gives life to all that desire to be heard and can’t. Our Nurses of Fredericksburg Visiting Angels keep the music and hope alive through their artistry. Let us all be forever grateful. Dedicated to the memory of my mother, Marion Stallworth White and all the wonderful nurses that took care of her when I was not available to Thank you.

Paulette Johnson is the Director of Marketing and Community Relations, Fredericksburg, Visiting Angels. Contact her at : paulettejohnson@fcangels.com

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings.

8

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

9


Downtown Buzz

Blue Star Mothers Support for our armed service members

new sights & sounds downtown

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

By Ann Glave NEW WEBSITE/NEW BANNERS Spring. A season we have been waiting for, just as Fredericksburg VA Main Street has been waiting for the release of their new website, fredericksburgdowntown.org. And thankfully, both have finally arrived! This is the first website catering to Downtown, concentrating on Main Street's historic commercial district. It highlights desired information for a visitor, and acts as a resource center for residents, business, and property owners. The information is broken into the 6 assets identified with historic Downtown: Create (studios + galleries), Honor (battlefields + memorials), Navigate (river + recreation), Peruse (shops + services), Reflect (history + landmarks), and Savor (bars + eateries). Each asset map will show locations for parking, ATMs, and public restrooms. One will be able to search different categories in each asset. For example, under Savor, you can search which restaurants are open on Monday, have roof top dining, or serve vegan

dishes. Under Reflect, you can see which places are free and open during the winter. Besides our retail businesses, Peruse will also categorize the numerous services offered Downtown from banking, government, financial, insurance, legal, professional, and real estate. All the information will link up with the business's website. It's a great start! As a business owner, if you desire to make changes to your categories or want to list your business, reach out to the executive director at info@fredericksburgmainstreet.org for all the facts. The new banners are in place for Market Square Alley highlighting the six main assets. Two years in the making, this project was funded by a JumpStart! Grant

Snead’s Asparagus Farm Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

NOW IN!

Fresh Cut Aspara gus Daily At Car por t 9am - 6pm

A S PA R AG U S F E S T I VA L M E M O R I A L D AY W E E K E N D M AY 2 7 - 2 9 ~ 9 A M - 5 P M THE WELL AT SNEAD’S FARM

will be featuring Asparagus Burgers made from Braehead Farm Raised Beef & Snead Farm Blackberry Sasson Beer brewed by Spencer Devon 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on Rt. 17 540/371-9 9328 www.sneadsfarm.com Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias , Olde Town Butcher, Spencer Devon Brewing & Kickshaws Downtown Market

10

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

from Economic Development Authority and a grant from the Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors. The designs of the banners resulted from the branding work by Higashi Glaser Design as part of the Downtown Brand. New color coded open late flags are at the printers. And discussions are in place for banners at strategic locations at the historic downtown gateways.

NEW BUSINESSES We welcome several new businesses and celebrate the re-opening of Sammy T's Restaurant. Stop by and visit our newest additions: Alan Chalmers Fine Menswear, · men's clothing and accessories shop at 205 Hanover Street Italian Station, a European· themed coffee bar and casual eatery at 620 Caroline Street Backdoor Gallery relocated to · Downtown at 819 Caroline Street Pye & Company · An anthropologie-feel women's clothing and home goods at 809 Caroline Thistle & Ash, a furniture and · home goods boutique located at 806 Caroline Street Latitudes Fair Trade's relocation ·

and expansion to 800 Caroline Street Opening of the · Official Re-O Fredericksburg Area Museum · Coming soon: An expansion with the Olde Towne Butcher taking over the Poppy Hill Tuscan Kitchen on 1000 Billiken's BBQ Charles Street, a Smokehouse, a second location for Billiken's BBQ Company, at The Chimneys (623 Caroline Street) and a new venue located at the renovated historic building at 718 Caroline appropriately named 718.

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2701

When you took a shower this morning, I bet that you didn’t think your soap or shampoo was a luxury. Unfortunately for many of our deployed service members, though, a bar of soap, as well as the items we deem necessities aren’t always readily available. Luckily a non-profit in our area, The Blue Star Mothers, comes to the rescue of the country’s service members two times a year, and makes their deployment a little easier to take. The Fredericksburg Chapter of the Blue Star Mothers’ mission is to provide ongoing support to U.S. Armed Service members, and to each other, while promoting patriotism throughout our community. Blue Star Mothers have a son or daughter who is currently serving or has served in the military, but the organization is also open to anyone who may have another family member in the armed services or who simply wants to support our troops. One of the main ventures of the Blue Star Mothers involves sending care packages to deployed service members two times a year in June and November, and they are gearing up for June’s big shipment.

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Enjoy the new sights and sounds of Downtown. Check out the new FredericksburgDowntown.org website. Fredericksburg VA Main Street's Community Downtown Meeting is set for Friday, May 5th at Marriott at 8:30am. Happy Spring, everyone!

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street. She can be found at 904 Princess Anne St, Suite 303, or Office: 540-479-1595 Cell: 540-538-7445

Sunday, May 14, 9am ~ 2pm Adults $19.95

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

By Christina Ferber

12 & Under $10.95

4 & Under Free

Call for Reservations 540-373-8300 ~ marriott.com/fkrcy ~ 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Teri Reece, Blue Star Mothers president, Rhonda Kuebler, Blue Star Mothers member, and Sharon Kendall, Blue Star Mothers member, participate in the Annual Wreaths Across America “People don’t realize that a bar of soap is a luxury for our troops. Many aren’t stationed on a base with a commissary and don’t have the option to get personal supplies,” says Teri Reece, President of the Fredericksburg Chapter. “When we first started eight years ago, we sent 35 boxes the entire year. Last year, we sent over 1,100 boxes to deployed service members. Postage alone cost us almost $21,000.” Each box includes a wide variety of items including personal hygiene products that we may take for granted such as deodorant and toothpaste, snacks, and miscellaneous items such as books and playing cards. The organization relies on local businesses and community members for monetary donations to cover their costs, as well as items to be included in the boxes. They also hold various fundraisers throughout the year, including the popular Wreaths across America, which honors fallen service members during the holidays. “Each box also gets a letter from us and from a local student thanking them for their service. We have heard from many service members who have received our boxes and it means so much to them,” says Reece. Though this is one of the bigger events throughout the year, the group offers many more activities including supporting recruiters through their “Cookies for Recruiters” program, and the “Homeless to Home” program which provides veterans with a basket to welcome them into a new home. “We have a large population of homeless veterans in our area and we want to do all that we can to help them,” says Reece. “This group offers support in

so many areas, it is a very rewarding experience.” The Blue Star Mothers meet on the third Saturday of each month (except during the community care packaging events in June and November) at the Salem Church Library from 10 am to 12 pm. Donation sites are situated throughout our area, and include the Central Park Walmart, Paragon Gymnastics, and the Virginia Employment Commission. The group can also pick up items as needed. For a list of items, to add a deployed service member’s name, or for more information visit their website at http://bluestarmothersva4.org/ or their Facebook page- Blue Star Mothers Of Fredericksburg Chapter 4. You can also email Teri Reece at president@bluestarmothersva4.org.

Christina Ferber is a teacher, mother, & Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner

Supporting All Things Local Since 1997

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

11


Downtown Buzz

Blue Star Mothers Support for our armed service members

new sights & sounds downtown

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

By Ann Glave NEW WEBSITE/NEW BANNERS Spring. A season we have been waiting for, just as Fredericksburg VA Main Street has been waiting for the release of their new website, fredericksburgdowntown.org. And thankfully, both have finally arrived! This is the first website catering to Downtown, concentrating on Main Street's historic commercial district. It highlights desired information for a visitor, and acts as a resource center for residents, business, and property owners. The information is broken into the 6 assets identified with historic Downtown: Create (studios + galleries), Honor (battlefields + memorials), Navigate (river + recreation), Peruse (shops + services), Reflect (history + landmarks), and Savor (bars + eateries). Each asset map will show locations for parking, ATMs, and public restrooms. One will be able to search different categories in each asset. For example, under Savor, you can search which restaurants are open on Monday, have roof top dining, or serve vegan

dishes. Under Reflect, you can see which places are free and open during the winter. Besides our retail businesses, Peruse will also categorize the numerous services offered Downtown from banking, government, financial, insurance, legal, professional, and real estate. All the information will link up with the business's website. It's a great start! As a business owner, if you desire to make changes to your categories or want to list your business, reach out to the executive director at info@fredericksburgmainstreet.org for all the facts. The new banners are in place for Market Square Alley highlighting the six main assets. Two years in the making, this project was funded by a JumpStart! Grant

Snead’s Asparagus Farm Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

NOW IN!

Fresh Cut Aspara gus Daily At Car por t 9am - 6pm

A S PA R AG U S F E S T I VA L M E M O R I A L D AY W E E K E N D M AY 2 7 - 2 9 ~ 9 A M - 5 P M THE WELL AT SNEAD’S FARM

will be featuring Asparagus Burgers made from Braehead Farm Raised Beef & Snead Farm Blackberry Sasson Beer brewed by Spencer Devon 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on Rt. 17 540/371-9 9328 www.sneadsfarm.com Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias , Olde Town Butcher, Spencer Devon Brewing & Kickshaws Downtown Market

10

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

from Economic Development Authority and a grant from the Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors. The designs of the banners resulted from the branding work by Higashi Glaser Design as part of the Downtown Brand. New color coded open late flags are at the printers. And discussions are in place for banners at strategic locations at the historic downtown gateways.

NEW BUSINESSES We welcome several new businesses and celebrate the re-opening of Sammy T's Restaurant. Stop by and visit our newest additions: Alan Chalmers Fine Menswear, · men's clothing and accessories shop at 205 Hanover Street Italian Station, a European· themed coffee bar and casual eatery at 620 Caroline Street Backdoor Gallery relocated to · Downtown at 819 Caroline Street Pye & Company · An anthropologie-feel women's clothing and home goods at 809 Caroline Thistle & Ash, a furniture and · home goods boutique located at 806 Caroline Street Latitudes Fair Trade's relocation ·

and expansion to 800 Caroline Street Opening of the · Official Re-O Fredericksburg Area Museum · Coming soon: An expansion with the Olde Towne Butcher taking over the Poppy Hill Tuscan Kitchen on 1000 Billiken's BBQ Charles Street, a Smokehouse, a second location for Billiken's BBQ Company, at The Chimneys (623 Caroline Street) and a new venue located at the renovated historic building at 718 Caroline appropriately named 718.

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2701

When you took a shower this morning, I bet that you didn’t think your soap or shampoo was a luxury. Unfortunately for many of our deployed service members, though, a bar of soap, as well as the items we deem necessities aren’t always readily available. Luckily a non-profit in our area, The Blue Star Mothers, comes to the rescue of the country’s service members two times a year, and makes their deployment a little easier to take. The Fredericksburg Chapter of the Blue Star Mothers’ mission is to provide ongoing support to U.S. Armed Service members, and to each other, while promoting patriotism throughout our community. Blue Star Mothers have a son or daughter who is currently serving or has served in the military, but the organization is also open to anyone who may have another family member in the armed services or who simply wants to support our troops. One of the main ventures of the Blue Star Mothers involves sending care packages to deployed service members two times a year in June and November, and they are gearing up for June’s big shipment.

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Enjoy the new sights and sounds of Downtown. Check out the new FredericksburgDowntown.org website. Fredericksburg VA Main Street's Community Downtown Meeting is set for Friday, May 5th at Marriott at 8:30am. Happy Spring, everyone!

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street. She can be found at 904 Princess Anne St, Suite 303, or Office: 540-479-1595 Cell: 540-538-7445

Sunday, May 14, 9am ~ 2pm Adults $19.95

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

By Christina Ferber

12 & Under $10.95

4 & Under Free

Call for Reservations 540-373-8300 ~ marriott.com/fkrcy ~ 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Teri Reece, Blue Star Mothers president, Rhonda Kuebler, Blue Star Mothers member, and Sharon Kendall, Blue Star Mothers member, participate in the Annual Wreaths Across America “People don’t realize that a bar of soap is a luxury for our troops. Many aren’t stationed on a base with a commissary and don’t have the option to get personal supplies,” says Teri Reece, President of the Fredericksburg Chapter. “When we first started eight years ago, we sent 35 boxes the entire year. Last year, we sent over 1,100 boxes to deployed service members. Postage alone cost us almost $21,000.” Each box includes a wide variety of items including personal hygiene products that we may take for granted such as deodorant and toothpaste, snacks, and miscellaneous items such as books and playing cards. The organization relies on local businesses and community members for monetary donations to cover their costs, as well as items to be included in the boxes. They also hold various fundraisers throughout the year, including the popular Wreaths across America, which honors fallen service members during the holidays. “Each box also gets a letter from us and from a local student thanking them for their service. We have heard from many service members who have received our boxes and it means so much to them,” says Reece. Though this is one of the bigger events throughout the year, the group offers many more activities including supporting recruiters through their “Cookies for Recruiters” program, and the “Homeless to Home” program which provides veterans with a basket to welcome them into a new home. “We have a large population of homeless veterans in our area and we want to do all that we can to help them,” says Reece. “This group offers support in

so many areas, it is a very rewarding experience.” The Blue Star Mothers meet on the third Saturday of each month (except during the community care packaging events in June and November) at the Salem Church Library from 10 am to 12 pm. Donation sites are situated throughout our area, and include the Central Park Walmart, Paragon Gymnastics, and the Virginia Employment Commission. The group can also pick up items as needed. For a list of items, to add a deployed service member’s name, or for more information visit their website at http://bluestarmothersva4.org/ or their Facebook page- Blue Star Mothers Of Fredericksburg Chapter 4. You can also email Teri Reece at president@bluestarmothersva4.org.

Christina Ferber is a teacher, mother, & Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner

Supporting All Things Local Since 1997

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

11


Young Artists annual show @Fxbg visitor center

Season’s Bounty derby day

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure

By dawn whitmore

“The arts teach students innumerable lessons” - Arts Education Navigator.

a wide range of fine arts and have developed a strong interest in the field of art therapy,” says Ambrose Smith, “This program represents a wonderful opportunity to share my enthusiasm and experience with these students to help them express themselves.” It is through local and national government agency grants such as, the Virginia Commission of the Arts, Economic Development Authority, and the National Endowment of the Arts, as well as the graciousness of private citizens that the supplies are bought and the teachers are compensated.

Sheila Jones, Art Education Director at Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts (FCCA), and a local artist desired for kids in the community to have an alternate to excel in other than sports. Being a local artisan, finding a way to share art was natural for Jones. At the same time, FCCA’s board sought a way to reach out to their community. The Youth Art Program would be the answer. The program is currently in its 3rd year. During the month of May, the Youth Art Program’s artisans are excitedly preparing for their annual art show to be held in June at the Fredericksburg Visitor’s Center. Melissa Scott, Resident Services Coordinator at Heritage Park Apartments expressed her sentiments of how the Youth Art Program benefits her community; “The children in our community have a high risk of being in or from traumatic situations. Having art classes gives them the opportunity to use their imagination and art to express themselves. As well, the opportunity to learn about different types of art and the background of the different artist that they may be able to relate to.” Cathy Ambrose Smith, a local professional artisan, teaches at the Heritage Park and Hazel Hill communities during the school year. Adrian Loving, a Stafford County teacher teaches the Summer Program. “As a professional artist, I have a passion and long history of working in

12

May 2017

Melissa Scott explained, “Without the continued support of FCCA providing teachers and supplies, our resident services programming would not be able to fund the class. Therefore, the children would lose out on the opportunity to explore art in depth.”

Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. Learn more by visiting her own FB: facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

photos by Sheila Jones and Cathy Ambrose-Smith

Front porch fredericksburg

The annual “Run for the Roses” in Louisville, Kentucky isn’t just a one-anddone horse race, but the culmination of two weeks of festivities known as the Kentucky Derby Festival - Kentucky’s largest annual event - and the first race in the American Triple Crown. Visit Louisville to see America’s largest fireworks display, the Thunder Over Louisville, the Pegasus Parade (one of America’s largest parades), a hot air balloon race, a steamboat race, a marathon road race, and a sponsored Basketball Classic, as well as many other events and attractions leading up to Derby Day. Just 80 miles to the east, Lexington, Kentucky is known as “The Horse Capital of the World” due to the number of exceptional horse farms and equine facilities in the area. My son-in-law’s family, from Lexington, have been in the horse breeding business for years - his father is often interviewed on television, especially on the day of the Breeder’s Cup, held annually in Southern California. The Derby is exciting to attend, especially when you’re able to ride the luxury Governor’s Train to Churchill Downs and to quaff mint juleps under an exclusive finish-line tent. Maybe we can’t socialize with the breeders and owners of these magnificent thoroughbreds - but it’s easy to prepare and share a buffet with traditional Bluegrass favorites at home. KENTUCKY MINT JULEPS I know spring has sprung when tiny mint leaves begin to appear in my herb garden. Mint is quite hardy and will attempt to take over the whole garden - it can be contained if grown in pots. In pre-chilled cup, muddle 2-3 mint leaves with 2 tablespoons simple syrup (make ahead and chill - bring one cup sugar and one cup water to a boil in a saucepan - simmer gently until the sugar is dissolved, about one minute - keeps well), fill cup with pebble-sized or chipped ice, then add Kentucky bourbon and garnish with a mint sprig. For non-alcoholic imbibers, MINT TEA is great. Make simple syrup after removing it from heat pour immediately over one packed cup of mint leaves. Let it steep until the syrup is cool, then strain and chill. This is your mint extract - add to taste to sweeten brewed tea, pour over ice and garnish with a mint sprig. WATERCRESS SANDWICHES A delicious tea sandwich for your buffet. You can also make using smoked salmon or smoked trout. Combine 3 ounces cream cheese with one tablespoon lemon juice, one-half cup sour cream, one tablespoon minced chives, salt and cayenne pepper to taste, a dash of Worcestershire sauce and one cup chopped watercress (or fish). Blend

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

together. Spread on slice of thin-sliced white bread (like Pepperidge Farm), then top with another slice - cut bread into rectangles or triangles. Garnish top with a sprig of watercress. OR cut bread into English cucumber-sized rounds. Spread with filling, then top with a thin slice of cucumber. Garnish with watercress. HOT BROWNS This Kentucky sandwich was first introduced in the 1920s at the Brown Hotel in Louisville. The authentic recipe can be found at www.brownhotel.com It’s a delicious, open-faced turkey sandwich smothered with a rich mornay sauce, crisp bacon and sliced tomatoes. This makes a quick dinner when paired with a salad. Yum. CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD Dice 2-3 cups cooked chicken breast - add to taste sliced celery, golden raisins, diced sour apples(with skin - gives a nice color), slivered almonds, S&P. Mix several teaspoonsful chutney along with one tablespoon (or more to taste) curry powder into enough mayonnaise to bind the chicken mixture. Serve over Bibb lettuce - Kentucky Limestone Bibb Lettuce was developed by John Bibb of Frankfort, KY in the 1860s - very authentic! ALMOST KENTUCKY DERBY PIE I don’t want to become involved in any copywrite scuffle! “Derby Pie” is a federally regulated trademark of Kern’s Kitchen in Louisville, who began serving this rich concoction of chocolate, buttery pecans and Kentucky bourbon whiskey in the 1950s. No matter the name, delicious! Line a buttered 9” pie pan with an unsweetened pie crust. Preheat oven to 325F. Mix together by hand one and onehalf cups each lightly toasted pecans and semisweet chocolate bits, four beaten eggs, one cup packed light brown sugar, one cup dark Karo syrup (I use King syrup), one-quarter cup each bourbon and melted butter, one tablespoon white corn meal, a dash of salt and one tablespoon vanilla. Spoon filling into pie shell and bake for about one hour or until browned and set. The addition of the corn meal gives a consistency similar to the fillings of chess pies - buttermilk, lemon and chocolate are all traditional favorites. Here’s hoping your favorite is a WIN, PLACE or SHOW!

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

13


Young Artists annual show @Fxbg visitor center

Season’s Bounty derby day

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure

By dawn whitmore

“The arts teach students innumerable lessons” - Arts Education Navigator.

a wide range of fine arts and have developed a strong interest in the field of art therapy,” says Ambrose Smith, “This program represents a wonderful opportunity to share my enthusiasm and experience with these students to help them express themselves.” It is through local and national government agency grants such as, the Virginia Commission of the Arts, Economic Development Authority, and the National Endowment of the Arts, as well as the graciousness of private citizens that the supplies are bought and the teachers are compensated.

Sheila Jones, Art Education Director at Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts (FCCA), and a local artist desired for kids in the community to have an alternate to excel in other than sports. Being a local artisan, finding a way to share art was natural for Jones. At the same time, FCCA’s board sought a way to reach out to their community. The Youth Art Program would be the answer. The program is currently in its 3rd year. During the month of May, the Youth Art Program’s artisans are excitedly preparing for their annual art show to be held in June at the Fredericksburg Visitor’s Center. Melissa Scott, Resident Services Coordinator at Heritage Park Apartments expressed her sentiments of how the Youth Art Program benefits her community; “The children in our community have a high risk of being in or from traumatic situations. Having art classes gives them the opportunity to use their imagination and art to express themselves. As well, the opportunity to learn about different types of art and the background of the different artist that they may be able to relate to.” Cathy Ambrose Smith, a local professional artisan, teaches at the Heritage Park and Hazel Hill communities during the school year. Adrian Loving, a Stafford County teacher teaches the Summer Program. “As a professional artist, I have a passion and long history of working in

12

May 2017

Melissa Scott explained, “Without the continued support of FCCA providing teachers and supplies, our resident services programming would not be able to fund the class. Therefore, the children would lose out on the opportunity to explore art in depth.”

Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. Learn more by visiting her own FB: facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

photos by Sheila Jones and Cathy Ambrose-Smith

Front porch fredericksburg

The annual “Run for the Roses” in Louisville, Kentucky isn’t just a one-anddone horse race, but the culmination of two weeks of festivities known as the Kentucky Derby Festival - Kentucky’s largest annual event - and the first race in the American Triple Crown. Visit Louisville to see America’s largest fireworks display, the Thunder Over Louisville, the Pegasus Parade (one of America’s largest parades), a hot air balloon race, a steamboat race, a marathon road race, and a sponsored Basketball Classic, as well as many other events and attractions leading up to Derby Day. Just 80 miles to the east, Lexington, Kentucky is known as “The Horse Capital of the World” due to the number of exceptional horse farms and equine facilities in the area. My son-in-law’s family, from Lexington, have been in the horse breeding business for years - his father is often interviewed on television, especially on the day of the Breeder’s Cup, held annually in Southern California. The Derby is exciting to attend, especially when you’re able to ride the luxury Governor’s Train to Churchill Downs and to quaff mint juleps under an exclusive finish-line tent. Maybe we can’t socialize with the breeders and owners of these magnificent thoroughbreds - but it’s easy to prepare and share a buffet with traditional Bluegrass favorites at home. KENTUCKY MINT JULEPS I know spring has sprung when tiny mint leaves begin to appear in my herb garden. Mint is quite hardy and will attempt to take over the whole garden - it can be contained if grown in pots. In pre-chilled cup, muddle 2-3 mint leaves with 2 tablespoons simple syrup (make ahead and chill - bring one cup sugar and one cup water to a boil in a saucepan - simmer gently until the sugar is dissolved, about one minute - keeps well), fill cup with pebble-sized or chipped ice, then add Kentucky bourbon and garnish with a mint sprig. For non-alcoholic imbibers, MINT TEA is great. Make simple syrup after removing it from heat pour immediately over one packed cup of mint leaves. Let it steep until the syrup is cool, then strain and chill. This is your mint extract - add to taste to sweeten brewed tea, pour over ice and garnish with a mint sprig. WATERCRESS SANDWICHES A delicious tea sandwich for your buffet. You can also make using smoked salmon or smoked trout. Combine 3 ounces cream cheese with one tablespoon lemon juice, one-half cup sour cream, one tablespoon minced chives, salt and cayenne pepper to taste, a dash of Worcestershire sauce and one cup chopped watercress (or fish). Blend

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

together. Spread on slice of thin-sliced white bread (like Pepperidge Farm), then top with another slice - cut bread into rectangles or triangles. Garnish top with a sprig of watercress. OR cut bread into English cucumber-sized rounds. Spread with filling, then top with a thin slice of cucumber. Garnish with watercress. HOT BROWNS This Kentucky sandwich was first introduced in the 1920s at the Brown Hotel in Louisville. The authentic recipe can be found at www.brownhotel.com It’s a delicious, open-faced turkey sandwich smothered with a rich mornay sauce, crisp bacon and sliced tomatoes. This makes a quick dinner when paired with a salad. Yum. CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD Dice 2-3 cups cooked chicken breast - add to taste sliced celery, golden raisins, diced sour apples(with skin - gives a nice color), slivered almonds, S&P. Mix several teaspoonsful chutney along with one tablespoon (or more to taste) curry powder into enough mayonnaise to bind the chicken mixture. Serve over Bibb lettuce - Kentucky Limestone Bibb Lettuce was developed by John Bibb of Frankfort, KY in the 1860s - very authentic! ALMOST KENTUCKY DERBY PIE I don’t want to become involved in any copywrite scuffle! “Derby Pie” is a federally regulated trademark of Kern’s Kitchen in Louisville, who began serving this rich concoction of chocolate, buttery pecans and Kentucky bourbon whiskey in the 1950s. No matter the name, delicious! Line a buttered 9” pie pan with an unsweetened pie crust. Preheat oven to 325F. Mix together by hand one and onehalf cups each lightly toasted pecans and semisweet chocolate bits, four beaten eggs, one cup packed light brown sugar, one cup dark Karo syrup (I use King syrup), one-quarter cup each bourbon and melted butter, one tablespoon white corn meal, a dash of salt and one tablespoon vanilla. Spoon filling into pie shell and bake for about one hour or until browned and set. The addition of the corn meal gives a consistency similar to the fillings of chess pies - buttermilk, lemon and chocolate are all traditional favorites. Here’s hoping your favorite is a WIN, PLACE or SHOW!

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

13


Cooking With Kyle

Huevos escalfados rancheros

con aguacate by james kyle snyder

The Soup & Taco,

Cheers to Spring Fresh

Local

Etc.

Organic

Since 2004

813 Caroline St.

309 William Street

Fredericksburg, VA

World’s Best Bourbon John J. Bowman Single Barrel takes honors

By Kristie wooldridge

540.371.9999 BISTROBETHEM.COM

Will Be Back in July & August! Call for Info

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

374-0443 Sometimes improvisation is required to get the flavors and nutrition you crave. Such was the case for this meal. I was “jonesing” for old school huevos rancheros – a flour tortilla crisped in a cast iron pan on one side, then flipped and covered in fresh, well drained homemade salsa, topped with a raw egg, cilantro, and hot sauce then set in a 500degree oven for 10-ish minutes until the egg is cooked to perfection. Simple, easy, and delicious! The only problem is the main salsa ingredients– local tomatoes, sweet onions, jalapeños, cilantro…,are not in season yet and I am currently avoiding carbs. The best part about cooking is “there are no rules.” Time to improvise! After ballooning to over 310 pounds (I am 6’6” and was told I carried it well LOL!), I took an inventory of what I was eating and decided to reduce the carbs to 50g or less a day and learn what portions actually look like. I choose my carbs more carefully. Now at 268 (on the way to a resting weight of 250 – doesn’t sound that small, does it?), I am enjoying the rewards of the lower carb diet. This is a long way around to say the flour tortilla is out. I want to add some more protein too, but how? I settled on the dish you see – a poached egg over turkey chili with sliced avocado - huevos escalfados rancheros con aguacate. Beans add protein, but are a high carb item. Use discretion. There are relatively few beans per cup in the finished product so I leave them in. Turkey chili is straight forward: caramelize 2 large diced onions and 1 TBS garlic in a large pot. Deglaze with 1/3 bottle red wine. Add: 1 - 6 lb 6 oz can of partially drained diced tomatoes, 2 oz 60% chocolate, 2 jalapeños, 1/3 habañero,

14

May 2017

if you want more heat, 1 TBS thyme, 2 tbs chili powder, 1 Tbs cumin, 1 - 15.5 oz can black beans, 1 - 15.5 oz can black-eyed peas, and 2 - 15.5 oz cans kidney beans. It’s chili – Make it your own! While that is cooking down, in a separate pan, crumble and lightly brown 2- 3 lbs ground turkey until just pink. It will finish cooking in the tomato sauce. Drain the meat in a colander, break-up larger pieces, and add to the tomato mixture. Let the chili cook down for a couple hours. If there’s time, refrigerate overnight and reheat for the meal; the flavors will be better combined. The leftover chili can be frozen for future use. This can be a great hip pocket meal when friends stop by unexpectedly. Now, all you need is a poached egg and a sliced avocado. Poaching an egg is one of the easiest ways to cook an egg. Fun factoid – the folds in a chef’s hat once represented the number of ways they could cook an egg. Legend has it some chef hats had over 100 pleats in their crown. Pretty impressive! In a medium saucepan, bring water to just under a boil (small bubbles rising). Carefully add the eggs (up to four) and let them cook for two minutes at sea level (this is an entire article by itself). Layer a bowl with fresh spinach or kale, to make sure you are getting your greens for the day, add the chili, and then rest the egg in the chili! Slice an avocado and season the entire dish with S&P. Tasty doesn’t always mean difficult. As in this meal, tasty is simple, easy, and delicious. Be well!

www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

soupntaco@yahoo.com

The Sunken Well Tavern

For the second year in a row A. Smith Bowman Distillery was awarded the honor of “World’s Best Bourbon” by Whisky Magazine. However, this year’s award was given to a different A. Smith Bowman bourbon, and was presented to John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon Whiskey. The Distillery’s Abraham Bowman Port Finished Bourbon was awarded “World’s Best Bourbon” in 2016. The Distillery received this award at the Whisky Magazine Awards America presentation in New York City where Master Distiller Brian Prewitt accepted the award. “We could not be more excited to receive this honor for the second year in a row,” Prewitt said. “For our small distillery in Virginia, receiving the title of “World’s Best Bourbon” two years in a row for two different bourbons is something truly special for us. We’re very thankful for this recognition.”

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Edited by K. Jeanne Fraser

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Front porch fredericksburg

Phone: 540-899-0969

Whiskies in each category were subject to rigorous blind taste testing to determine the very best. For more information about the World Whiskies Awards visit www.worldwhiskiesawards.com. As a small and privately owned company, A. Smith Bowman Distillery continues the time-honored traditions on which it was founded. Considered a micro-distillery by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of hand-crafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. This microdistillery focuses on the production of premium spirits honoring the legacy of Virginia's first settlers. For more information on A. Smith Bowman, please visit www.asmithbowman.com. Kristie Wooldridge is the Public Relations Manager for Bowman Distilley

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

15


Cooking With Kyle

Huevos escalfados rancheros

con aguacate by james kyle snyder

The Soup & Taco,

Cheers to Spring Fresh

Local

Etc.

Organic

Since 2004

813 Caroline St.

309 William Street

Fredericksburg, VA

World’s Best Bourbon John J. Bowman Single Barrel takes honors

By Kristie wooldridge

540.371.9999 BISTROBETHEM.COM

Will Be Back in July & August! Call for Info

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

374-0443 Sometimes improvisation is required to get the flavors and nutrition you crave. Such was the case for this meal. I was “jonesing” for old school huevos rancheros – a flour tortilla crisped in a cast iron pan on one side, then flipped and covered in fresh, well drained homemade salsa, topped with a raw egg, cilantro, and hot sauce then set in a 500degree oven for 10-ish minutes until the egg is cooked to perfection. Simple, easy, and delicious! The only problem is the main salsa ingredients– local tomatoes, sweet onions, jalapeños, cilantro…,are not in season yet and I am currently avoiding carbs. The best part about cooking is “there are no rules.” Time to improvise! After ballooning to over 310 pounds (I am 6’6” and was told I carried it well LOL!), I took an inventory of what I was eating and decided to reduce the carbs to 50g or less a day and learn what portions actually look like. I choose my carbs more carefully. Now at 268 (on the way to a resting weight of 250 – doesn’t sound that small, does it?), I am enjoying the rewards of the lower carb diet. This is a long way around to say the flour tortilla is out. I want to add some more protein too, but how? I settled on the dish you see – a poached egg over turkey chili with sliced avocado - huevos escalfados rancheros con aguacate. Beans add protein, but are a high carb item. Use discretion. There are relatively few beans per cup in the finished product so I leave them in. Turkey chili is straight forward: caramelize 2 large diced onions and 1 TBS garlic in a large pot. Deglaze with 1/3 bottle red wine. Add: 1 - 6 lb 6 oz can of partially drained diced tomatoes, 2 oz 60% chocolate, 2 jalapeños, 1/3 habañero,

14

May 2017

if you want more heat, 1 TBS thyme, 2 tbs chili powder, 1 Tbs cumin, 1 - 15.5 oz can black beans, 1 - 15.5 oz can black-eyed peas, and 2 - 15.5 oz cans kidney beans. It’s chili – Make it your own! While that is cooking down, in a separate pan, crumble and lightly brown 2- 3 lbs ground turkey until just pink. It will finish cooking in the tomato sauce. Drain the meat in a colander, break-up larger pieces, and add to the tomato mixture. Let the chili cook down for a couple hours. If there’s time, refrigerate overnight and reheat for the meal; the flavors will be better combined. The leftover chili can be frozen for future use. This can be a great hip pocket meal when friends stop by unexpectedly. Now, all you need is a poached egg and a sliced avocado. Poaching an egg is one of the easiest ways to cook an egg. Fun factoid – the folds in a chef’s hat once represented the number of ways they could cook an egg. Legend has it some chef hats had over 100 pleats in their crown. Pretty impressive! In a medium saucepan, bring water to just under a boil (small bubbles rising). Carefully add the eggs (up to four) and let them cook for two minutes at sea level (this is an entire article by itself). Layer a bowl with fresh spinach or kale, to make sure you are getting your greens for the day, add the chili, and then rest the egg in the chili! Slice an avocado and season the entire dish with S&P. Tasty doesn’t always mean difficult. As in this meal, tasty is simple, easy, and delicious. Be well!

www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

soupntaco@yahoo.com

The Sunken Well Tavern

For the second year in a row A. Smith Bowman Distillery was awarded the honor of “World’s Best Bourbon” by Whisky Magazine. However, this year’s award was given to a different A. Smith Bowman bourbon, and was presented to John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon Whiskey. The Distillery’s Abraham Bowman Port Finished Bourbon was awarded “World’s Best Bourbon” in 2016. The Distillery received this award at the Whisky Magazine Awards America presentation in New York City where Master Distiller Brian Prewitt accepted the award. “We could not be more excited to receive this honor for the second year in a row,” Prewitt said. “For our small distillery in Virginia, receiving the title of “World’s Best Bourbon” two years in a row for two different bourbons is something truly special for us. We’re very thankful for this recognition.”

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Edited by K. Jeanne Fraser

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Front porch fredericksburg

Phone: 540-899-0969

Whiskies in each category were subject to rigorous blind taste testing to determine the very best. For more information about the World Whiskies Awards visit www.worldwhiskiesawards.com. As a small and privately owned company, A. Smith Bowman Distillery continues the time-honored traditions on which it was founded. Considered a micro-distillery by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of hand-crafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. This microdistillery focuses on the production of premium spirits honoring the legacy of Virginia's first settlers. For more information on A. Smith Bowman, please visit www.asmithbowman.com. Kristie Wooldridge is the Public Relations Manager for Bowman Distilley

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

15


CALENDAR of events

@ Art First Gallery, 6-9pm. Linda sustains her creativity by remaining open to inspiration in unlikely places and juxtapositions. Exhibit continues thru the month.

The Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing its annual Spring Fling concert , 7pm @Massaponax High School. $. For more information, go to fredericksburgcommunityband.com.

Ponshop opening reception for “Art of Recovery”

Sunday, May 7

may 2017… National Mental Health Awareness, Mother’s Day, Memorials to the Fallen Monday, May 1

Chancellor HS Class of 1998 - 20 Year Class Reunion - CLASSMATE TRACKING @ The Reunion Committee is Tracking Down our classmates for our 20 year class reunion! SAVE THE DATE ** The Reunion will be held on July 21, 2018

Tuesday, May 2

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, Free, live lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Will Gravatt and Jimbo Byram. There will also be children's activities. 11:30-1pm.

Wednesday, May 3

Spotsylvania Farmers Market Opening Day at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 26pm. t o kick off the 2017 Farmers Market at the Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, Thunder 104.5 will be BROADCASTING LIVE from the Market. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. See you there! If you are a mother or had a mother or know a mother, come shop for her. LulaRue, 31 Gifts, Do Terra Essential Oils, Gold Canyon Candles, Chole & Isabel Jewelry and MORE. at Truong Rehab Center 10340 Spotsylvania Ave Lee's Hill- Next to Hooters. For more infor call 540-374-3164 ask for Joan 20 in 42 Challenge @ Truong Rehab Center, learn how you can Lose 20 lbs in 42 Days Truong MedFit 10340 Spotsylvania Ave next to Hooters. Call to reserve your seat. 540-374-3164 ask for Joan, 6:30-7:30pm Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

First Friday, May 5

Tres Amigos - Fiber Art Show @ Artful Dimensions Gallery, Join us for a Cinco de Mayo Party on First Friday May 5 and throughout May to see fiber art by Skeeter Scheid, Mary Lazar and Sally Cooney Anderson. All Day. 911 Charles St. "2D, 3D and What's in Between"., Painter and assemblage artist, Linda Warsaw opening reception

810 Weekend Gallery, celebrates First Friday 68:30pm. Stop by to see new art by Beverley Coates (watercolor), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). Hazel Run will be performing in Agora Downtown Coffee Shop's outside seating area 6-8pm. a local band that draws on folk, bluegrass, gospel, and soul. FXBG locals Stephen Hu, Linda LaFave, Karen Richardson, and Stuart Whitford form Hazel Run. Come listen to some wonderful music while enjoying an evening beverage, or maybe even a spiked one! 520 Caroline St Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, May 6

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Spring Concert Series/The Fred.String Quartet @ Haydn Hall in Wm Mason II Violin Shop., 509 Jackson St.Reception beforehand and Music starts at 7: p.m. Spotsy Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot Rte 3/Gordon Road the largest farmers market in the region! Shop local, meet your community producers and growers. all freshly picked, all local. 8a-1p. Cash, credit cards & SNAP/EBT Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park Farmers Market. shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May 12

Mother & Son Dance Boys 4 years -12 years old take their moms, grandmas, aunts, sisters or beloved friends on a special Mother's Day date. Sorry no Dads allowed. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 6:30-8:30pm

Virginia Vistas @ Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fred Gallery, 25 Chalice Circle. Sheila Jones & Dolores Bumbrey exhibit photographs, graphite pencil drawings and oil paintings ,11:30 AM -2 .

Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Mary Washington House instruction for tea and etiquette for children in the 18th century. Participants will also craft a flower arrangement in a tea cup. Pre-registration is required for the event. (540)373-1569. 1-3pm.

Mother & Son Tea, In today's society spending time with your son of any age can be limited. An afternoon tea is a wonderful opportunity for Mother and Son to spend quality t,ime together making new memories. 2-4pm Library Headquarters, 1201 Caroline Street,

The Sibling Rivalry Fiddle Band @ Wm Mason II Violin Shop, These 4 young players (brothers and sister) will be performing Classical, Celtic and Fiddle Tunes. 509 Jackson St, 2:30-5:30p

Monday, May 8

Panel Discussion: Climate Control - Global Warming and the Environment @ Rappahannock Central Library Theater, @ 7:00 pm - 8:45 pm Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer

Tuesday, May 9

Picnic in the Park@Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Karen Jonas and Tim Bray.

Wednesday, May 10

Eagles, Beetles and Wild Edibles! @ Friends of the Rappahannock office, 9-12p,noon explore birds, plants, insects & natural edibles along the Rappahannock River. All ages and families are invited. $ www.riverfriends.org/event/eaglesbeetles-and-wild-edibles/

Spotsyvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, Beautiful farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, ice cold lemonade, hot popcorn and more! Fresh, affordable, and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. 2-6pm

Join us at the Mary Washington House Garden to make colonial & garden crafts inspired by the Mary Washington House. Crafts include fan painting and watercolors. 11a-2p $. Contact (540)373-1569 or mwhouse@washingtonheritagemuseums.org.

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Saturday, May 13

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

1781 Brewing Co. Grand Opening. 11a-8p.1109 Plank Road, Spotsylvania, VA 22553. one of the first farm breweries in the great state of Virginia. brewery will be showcasing/ sampling, "The Portrait Collection." Live entertainment with Quinto Son at 5pm Food truck, Ocean Meets Land will be on site at 12 p.m. www.1781brewing.com/portrait-collection Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road, Shop local, meet your community producers and growers, and pick up some of the healthiest, freshest ingredients the area has to offer. 8a-1p

Organ Recital by Weston Jennings, The public is invited to this concert to honor the retirement of the Church's Music Director, Bill McCoy. Fredericksburg United Methodist Church, 2pm Rappahannock Choral Society spring concertat Chancellor High School, 6300 Harrison Road,, 3pm. www.rappahannock-choral-society.org

Tuesday, May 16

Picnis in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 11:30-1:30pm, lunchtime concert Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Pete Mealy and Laurie Rose Griffith. Story time Tuesday with local author Judy Zummo! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St. 12:30-1:30p ArtsLive! (Formerly Fred.Festival of the Performing Arts) 30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Avenue, . Tkts online at artsliveva.org/chamber-musicfestival, or by calling 540-374-5040

Wednesday, May 17

Spring Plant Sale sponsored by Ressurrection Luthern Church All Day Sponsor by Youth Group. Ebenezer United Methodist Church is hosting its second annual kNOw Hunger event . full day of serving and learning opportunities for all ages, focused on combating hunger globally and locally. 161 Embrey Mill Rd, Stafford, VA 22554, 8a-5p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road, 8a-1p. Shop local, meet your community producers and growers, and pick up some of the healthiest, freshest ingredients the area has to offer.

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Thursday, May18

Trolley Winery Tour,visit local wineries Eden Try Estate & Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Wilderness Run Vineyard, and enjoy a day of fun, wine & a little history. Reservations @ Fredericksburg Trolley.com, or 800-979-3370

Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park Farmers Market. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, Prizes!!

Rappahannock Choral Society spring concert @ Choral Society Spring Concert at Chancellor High School, 6300 Harrison Road,, 8pm. www.rappahannock-choral-society.org

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Master Gardener Assoc of the Central Rappahannock Area fifth annual "Living in the Garden Symposium" UMW, 8:30a-3:30p. Registration required at www.mgagra.org.

Folk Musicians Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy live at Agora @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, outdoor seating area , 520 Caroline St.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Mother' Day

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC. farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, and more! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT accepted. 2-6p

10th Annual Walk for Mental Wellness @ Hurkamp Park, 9am-12noon Fun activities

Sunday, May 14

Saturday, May 20

Sunday, May 21

Trolley Winery Tour,visit local wineries Eden Try Estate & Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Wilderness Run Vineyard, enjoy a day of fun, wine & a little history. Reservations required @ Fredericksburg Trolley.com, or 800-979-3370

Wednesday, May 24

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6p. perfect place to visit with family and friends and get your mid-week shopping done. Beautiful farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, ice cold lemonade, and more! Fresh, affordable and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May 26

Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, May 27

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road. 8a-1p. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. Fresh, local produce

Monday, May 29 Memorial Day

Wednesday, May 31

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, all Day, Fresh, affordable and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Avenue, The world class talent of the Muir Quartet returns Tkts online at artsliveva.org/chamber-music-festival,

Tuesday, May 23

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, Free, live lunchtime concert Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Jason Masi., 11:30-1:30p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May19

Felicity Book Club @ Rising Sun Tavern, Young ladies are invited to join us for a discussion of 3 American Girl Felicity books adies will also complete a craft from the Felicity Craft book. Registration is required by calling the Rising Sun Tavern at (540)371-1494 . $ 6-7pm

If you are reading this 238th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 20th year of continuous publication!

30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, The world class talent of the Muir Quartet returns to Fredericksburg for this 30th anniversary event. Tkts may be purchased online at artsliveva.org/chamber-music-festival, or by calling 540-374-5040 Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for June 2017 issue is May 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

3111 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

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May 2017

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May 2017

17


CALENDAR of events

@ Art First Gallery, 6-9pm. Linda sustains her creativity by remaining open to inspiration in unlikely places and juxtapositions. Exhibit continues thru the month.

The Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing its annual Spring Fling concert , 7pm @Massaponax High School. $. For more information, go to fredericksburgcommunityband.com.

Ponshop opening reception for “Art of Recovery”

Sunday, May 7

may 2017… National Mental Health Awareness, Mother’s Day, Memorials to the Fallen Monday, May 1

Chancellor HS Class of 1998 - 20 Year Class Reunion - CLASSMATE TRACKING @ The Reunion Committee is Tracking Down our classmates for our 20 year class reunion! SAVE THE DATE ** The Reunion will be held on July 21, 2018

Tuesday, May 2

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, Free, live lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Will Gravatt and Jimbo Byram. There will also be children's activities. 11:30-1pm.

Wednesday, May 3

Spotsylvania Farmers Market Opening Day at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 26pm. t o kick off the 2017 Farmers Market at the Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, Thunder 104.5 will be BROADCASTING LIVE from the Market. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. See you there! If you are a mother or had a mother or know a mother, come shop for her. LulaRue, 31 Gifts, Do Terra Essential Oils, Gold Canyon Candles, Chole & Isabel Jewelry and MORE. at Truong Rehab Center 10340 Spotsylvania Ave Lee's Hill- Next to Hooters. For more infor call 540-374-3164 ask for Joan 20 in 42 Challenge @ Truong Rehab Center, learn how you can Lose 20 lbs in 42 Days Truong MedFit 10340 Spotsylvania Ave next to Hooters. Call to reserve your seat. 540-374-3164 ask for Joan, 6:30-7:30pm Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

First Friday, May 5

Tres Amigos - Fiber Art Show @ Artful Dimensions Gallery, Join us for a Cinco de Mayo Party on First Friday May 5 and throughout May to see fiber art by Skeeter Scheid, Mary Lazar and Sally Cooney Anderson. All Day. 911 Charles St. "2D, 3D and What's in Between"., Painter and assemblage artist, Linda Warsaw opening reception

810 Weekend Gallery, celebrates First Friday 68:30pm. Stop by to see new art by Beverley Coates (watercolor), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). Hazel Run will be performing in Agora Downtown Coffee Shop's outside seating area 6-8pm. a local band that draws on folk, bluegrass, gospel, and soul. FXBG locals Stephen Hu, Linda LaFave, Karen Richardson, and Stuart Whitford form Hazel Run. Come listen to some wonderful music while enjoying an evening beverage, or maybe even a spiked one! 520 Caroline St Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, May 6

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Spring Concert Series/The Fred.String Quartet @ Haydn Hall in Wm Mason II Violin Shop., 509 Jackson St.Reception beforehand and Music starts at 7: p.m. Spotsy Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot Rte 3/Gordon Road the largest farmers market in the region! Shop local, meet your community producers and growers. all freshly picked, all local. 8a-1p. Cash, credit cards & SNAP/EBT Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park Farmers Market. shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May 12

Mother & Son Dance Boys 4 years -12 years old take their moms, grandmas, aunts, sisters or beloved friends on a special Mother's Day date. Sorry no Dads allowed. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 6:30-8:30pm

Virginia Vistas @ Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fred Gallery, 25 Chalice Circle. Sheila Jones & Dolores Bumbrey exhibit photographs, graphite pencil drawings and oil paintings ,11:30 AM -2 .

Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Mary Washington House instruction for tea and etiquette for children in the 18th century. Participants will also craft a flower arrangement in a tea cup. Pre-registration is required for the event. (540)373-1569. 1-3pm.

Mother & Son Tea, In today's society spending time with your son of any age can be limited. An afternoon tea is a wonderful opportunity for Mother and Son to spend quality t,ime together making new memories. 2-4pm Library Headquarters, 1201 Caroline Street,

The Sibling Rivalry Fiddle Band @ Wm Mason II Violin Shop, These 4 young players (brothers and sister) will be performing Classical, Celtic and Fiddle Tunes. 509 Jackson St, 2:30-5:30p

Monday, May 8

Panel Discussion: Climate Control - Global Warming and the Environment @ Rappahannock Central Library Theater, @ 7:00 pm - 8:45 pm Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer

Tuesday, May 9

Picnic in the Park@Hurkamp Park. Free, lunchtime concert in Hurkamp Park. Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Karen Jonas and Tim Bray.

Wednesday, May 10

Eagles, Beetles and Wild Edibles! @ Friends of the Rappahannock office, 9-12p,noon explore birds, plants, insects & natural edibles along the Rappahannock River. All ages and families are invited. $ www.riverfriends.org/event/eaglesbeetles-and-wild-edibles/

Spotsyvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, Beautiful farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, ice cold lemonade, hot popcorn and more! Fresh, affordable, and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. 2-6pm

Join us at the Mary Washington House Garden to make colonial & garden crafts inspired by the Mary Washington House. Crafts include fan painting and watercolors. 11a-2p $. Contact (540)373-1569 or mwhouse@washingtonheritagemuseums.org.

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Saturday, May 13

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

1781 Brewing Co. Grand Opening. 11a-8p.1109 Plank Road, Spotsylvania, VA 22553. one of the first farm breweries in the great state of Virginia. brewery will be showcasing/ sampling, "The Portrait Collection." Live entertainment with Quinto Son at 5pm Food truck, Ocean Meets Land will be on site at 12 p.m. www.1781brewing.com/portrait-collection Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road, Shop local, meet your community producers and growers, and pick up some of the healthiest, freshest ingredients the area has to offer. 8a-1p

Organ Recital by Weston Jennings, The public is invited to this concert to honor the retirement of the Church's Music Director, Bill McCoy. Fredericksburg United Methodist Church, 2pm Rappahannock Choral Society spring concertat Chancellor High School, 6300 Harrison Road,, 3pm. www.rappahannock-choral-society.org

Tuesday, May 16

Picnis in the Park @Hurkamp Park, 11:30-1:30pm, lunchtime concert Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Pete Mealy and Laurie Rose Griffith. Story time Tuesday with local author Judy Zummo! @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 520 Caroline St. 12:30-1:30p ArtsLive! (Formerly Fred.Festival of the Performing Arts) 30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Avenue, . Tkts online at artsliveva.org/chamber-musicfestival, or by calling 540-374-5040

Wednesday, May 17

Spring Plant Sale sponsored by Ressurrection Luthern Church All Day Sponsor by Youth Group. Ebenezer United Methodist Church is hosting its second annual kNOw Hunger event . full day of serving and learning opportunities for all ages, focused on combating hunger globally and locally. 161 Embrey Mill Rd, Stafford, VA 22554, 8a-5p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road, 8a-1p. Shop local, meet your community producers and growers, and pick up some of the healthiest, freshest ingredients the area has to offer.

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Thursday, May18

Trolley Winery Tour,visit local wineries Eden Try Estate & Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Wilderness Run Vineyard, and enjoy a day of fun, wine & a little history. Reservations @ Fredericksburg Trolley.com, or 800-979-3370

Art in the Park @Hurkamp Park Farmers Market. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, Prizes!!

Rappahannock Choral Society spring concert @ Choral Society Spring Concert at Chancellor High School, 6300 Harrison Road,, 8pm. www.rappahannock-choral-society.org

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Master Gardener Assoc of the Central Rappahannock Area fifth annual "Living in the Garden Symposium" UMW, 8:30a-3:30p. Registration required at www.mgagra.org.

Folk Musicians Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy live at Agora @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, outdoor seating area , 520 Caroline St.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Mother' Day

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC. farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, and more! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT accepted. 2-6p

10th Annual Walk for Mental Wellness @ Hurkamp Park, 9am-12noon Fun activities

Sunday, May 14

Saturday, May 20

Sunday, May 21

Trolley Winery Tour,visit local wineries Eden Try Estate & Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Wilderness Run Vineyard, enjoy a day of fun, wine & a little history. Reservations required @ Fredericksburg Trolley.com, or 800-979-3370

Wednesday, May 24

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6p. perfect place to visit with family and friends and get your mid-week shopping done. Beautiful farm fresh produce, locally raised meat and eggs, artisanal breads and pastries, ice cold lemonade, and more! Fresh, affordable and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May 26

Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

Saturday, May 27

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3/Gordon Road. 8a-1p. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted. Fresh, local produce

Monday, May 29 Memorial Day

Wednesday, May 31

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, all Day, Fresh, affordable and local! Open rain or shine. Cash, credit cards and SNAP/EBT are accepted Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Avenue, The world class talent of the Muir Quartet returns Tkts online at artsliveva.org/chamber-music-festival,

Tuesday, May 23

Picnic in the Park @Hurkamp Park, Free, live lunchtime concert Bring a lunch to enjoy while listening to the music by Jason Masi., 11:30-1:30p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, May19

Felicity Book Club @ Rising Sun Tavern, Young ladies are invited to join us for a discussion of 3 American Girl Felicity books adies will also complete a craft from the Felicity Craft book. Registration is required by calling the Rising Sun Tavern at (540)371-1494 . $ 6-7pm

If you are reading this 238th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 20th year of continuous publication!

30th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church, The world class talent of the Muir Quartet returns to Fredericksburg for this 30th anniversary event. Tkts may be purchased online at artsliveva.org/chamber-music-festival, or by calling 540-374-5040 Music @ Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for June 2017 issue is May 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

3111 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 16

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

17


history’s stories

RISING SUN TAVERN By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks I recently presented my Dentist Dr. Derek Galatro a needle point of the Rising Sun Tavern for his office. The Snowden Park office is decorated with many pictures of Fredericksburg. I was sitting there reminiscing about growing up in Fredericksburg and the school trips to the Rising Sun with my class mates. I have an early brochure that says LaFayette and his staff visited the Rising Sun Tavern on November 11, 1781 on his way to Philadelphia. LaFayette again was given a reception at the Rising Sun Tavern on December 1824. This is supported in Quinns History of Fredericksburg 1908. In John Goolrick’s 1921 book “Historic Fredericksburg”, he writes, one well known place for the meeting of “Revolutionists” was the Rising Sun tavern. I would begin my research into the Rising Sun…. Wow!

I contacted Glenn Hyatt, a local historian who recently retired as a volunteer with the Rising Sun Tavern,. knows much of the history of the building. Glenn has been involved in many local projects including being President of the Post 55 American Legion (Viet-Nam Vet.) and he assisted in setting up many of the displays at the Marine Corp Museum. Glenn and I met recently along with Katie King the Manager of the Rising Sun Tavern. Rising Sun Tavern, Mary Washington House, Saint James House and Hugh Mercer Apothecary shop are all under the management of Washington Heritage Museums. Katie advised me at the beginning of the meeting that they are doing updates on the Rising Sun Tavern tours and that a new tour is in the works about Tavern Keepers. She added that much of the old information is being researched and updated. Charles Washington, brother of George purchased lots 87 & 88 and built a residence on lot 88 in 1762, today known as 1304 Caroline Street. Charles lived in the home up until 1780-81, when he left without any recorded reason to move to Berkley County. Next available records show that on October 6, 1786, recorded in Deed Book A page 315 H.C. Charles and Mildred Washington conveyed the property for the sum of Five Shillings to their son George Augustine Washington. The property on July 6, 1791 was conveyed to Larkin Smith by George A. Washington, who sold the property less than a year later to on April 28, 1792 too Gustavus B. Wallace. The property would remain in the Wallace family for over a century until it was sold to the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities in 1907.

In September 1792, Wallace, LEASED the former home of Charles Washington to John Frazer. On September 27, 1792, the local Newspaper Virginia Herald “The subscriber will open a Tavern in this town on 29th instant, at the sign of the Golden Eagle to the house formerly occupied by Charles Washington, Esq. as a private dwelling, and now the property of Col. G. B. Wallace.” This is the first time I have seen in print of the building being a tavern. In 1795, it was under a different lease and the name was Eagle Tavern. On January 25, 1823, the Virginia Herald Advertising “Doctor Merwin has removed his shop of medicines to the upper end of Main (Caroline) Street, opposite Verone’s Tavern, or the Sign of Rising Sun”. This is the first written documentation of the Rising Sun (1823) tavern at that location. We may never know the correct location of the 1700’s Rising Sun Tavern that was used as a tavern and meeting place prior to the Revolution, because there were so many Tavern’s and Ordinary’s in those early days. The question arises what is the difference between an Ordinary and Tavern? The British often referred to them both as one in the same, however, the Tavern was a place where you could obtain alcohol and lodging. The ordinary was a place where you could obtain a regular meal at a fixed price not always lodging. The word Ordinary had disappeared by the end of the 1800’s. Just like the tunnels beneath Fredericksburg the early 1770’s Rising Sun Tavern still is one of Fredericksburg’s unsolved mysteries. My gratitude to both Glenn Hyatt and Katie King for their assistance.

Dedicated to the memory of Diane Beverly, Carlton Crump and Bob Hicks

Tuffy Hicks unearths little known facts about FXBG each month in this space

18

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE 704 Prince Edward Street By Roger Engels

The Civil War was a horrific experience for many Fredericksburg residents. The battle in December 1862 inflicted tremendous damage on the buildings, as seen in wartime photos, and the military cemeteries bear witness to the human cost of that and other area battles. The few residents who remained in town feared for their lives. After the battle, the city struggled to recover. The citizens were understandably angry at the Union because of looting, and diaries (such as the Woman in a War-Torn Town and The Circle Unbroken, both available from Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. http://hffi.org/product-category/publications/ reveal their personal ill feelings. Instances of more positive interactions are found less frequently. Recently, while conducting research for a historic marker for the house at 704 Prince Edward Street, HFFI found an example of more cordial relations at that time. When it was built in 1855, this brick house and Federal Hill on Hanover Street were the only buildings beyond Prince Edward and south of Hanover. The house must have survived the battle without significant damage, because it was purchased in April 1863 by Kaufman Hirsh, a recent immigrant from Germany and one of the earliest Jewish residents of the city. The war continued with periodic fighting in or near the city. In May 1864, the Battle of Wilderness produced massive casualties, and Fredericksburg became a virtual military hospital, with wounded in every available building. While we automatically think of churches and other

semipublic buildings, in this case, all substantial buildings, including private residences, were pressed into service. One was at 704 Prince Edward Street. We know — thanks to an item in the Free Lance newspaper of Aug 18, 1910— that “Adjutant Wm. Wright of Utica, N.Y., spent several days here last week as guest of the family of Mr. H. Kaufman. He was a member of Duryea’s Zouaves and was wounded at Wilderness fight in 1864. He was brought to Fredericksburg, and his arm was amputated in the parlor of Mr. Kaufman’s house and cared for by the daughters of Mr. Kaufman Hirsh for three weeks.” . Although the medical capabilities and “hospital” accommodations at the time were primitive, the stay at the Hirsh home must have been a welcome relief from the privations of combat. While amputation was often the only treatment for badly injured limbs, the attention of several young women for 3 weeks would certainly have been pleasant. (The Hirshes had five daughters ranging in age from 22 to 7 years of age in 1864.) That the feelings were reciprocal is demonstrated by the newspaper’s description of Mr. Wright’s return visit for a 3-day stay as a family guest 46 years later. We know of many battlefield reunions of former comrades-in-arms as well as those including former opponents, but stories of individual encounters between soldiers and civilians provide insight into the human interactions that occurred during the conflict and the sometimes pleasant outcomes that resulted. This is but one example of the additional information that is sometimes found when HFFI volunteers research properties for the bronze plaques placed on buildings in Fredericksburg. The current owners of 704 Prince Edward Street were recently awarded HFFI’s Executive Director’s Special Recognition Award for their efforts in historic preservation. Roger Engels is a member of HFFI’s Marker Committee

Wellness Antibiotics: Life-Saver or Scourge? By christine H. Thompson, D.C. Of course the short answer is poor planting practices that don’t allow both. Penicillin, first widely used to the soil to replenish itself. combat infections in the 1940’s, was a Our gut bacteria are responsible true miracle drug and allowed doctors to for protecting our gut lining and our gut cure infections caused by wound lining is responsible for being the firewall contamination that had previously been a between our delicate cells and the death sentence. Since the American motto dangerous toxins we filter out from the seems to be, “if a little is good, more must air, water and food intake. Plainly, our gut be better”, penicillin and subsequent bacteria are intimately, inseparably and derivations of this original antibiotic foundationally tied to our health and wellbegan to be prescribed not only as a being. As just one example among dozens precaution but also prophylactically. of this important relationship, only Scientists have known since the bacteria and some fungus can make 1950’s that the indiscriminate and vitamin B12 which is so necessary for our widespread use of antibiotics was causing physical and mental well-being. mutation of bacteria into antibiotic A major problem today is that resistant forms. It is people believe they Scientists have known alarming to note that cannot fight and the vast majority of overcome persistent since the 1950’s that the antibiotics produced by upper respiratory, indiscriminate and pharmaceutical sinus or ear infections widespread use of antibiotics companies are actually without antibiotics. was causing mutation of used in the raising of This is reinforced by livestock. If you think general medical bacteria into antibiotic this is mainly to treat prescribing practices resistant forms. or prevent disease in and consequently farm animals, think again. there is great fear around “Sub-therapeutic” dosages of antibiotics not taking antibiotics after a couple of are commonly used in the feed of livestock weeks of illness. It does seem that people for “growth promotion”. Farmers found are struggling to conquer these illnesses out long ago that using antibiotics in the on their own or with natural means. This raising of livestock made them grow fat could be due to a weakened immune quickly. system from chronic stress or overuse of Why would antibiotics make antibiotics, which as I stated above, results livestock grow faster and fatter? There is in more virulent strains of microbes. much research and epidemiological data Our bodies contain an estimated today that is linking gut flora to weight 10 trillion human cells and about 90 gain and incidence of diseases such as trillion microbial cells. Not only do we diabetes. It is becoming evident that house nearly 10 times more microbes proper gut flora is essential to health and than human cells, but if you take into wellness in many ways. Unfortunately, not account the DNA contained therein, we only do we decimate our gut flora with have about 350 times more microbial DNA antibiotic use, but we also have depleted than human DNA. This is an astounding fact the normal bacterial content of our soils and the implications related to what it says through worldwide use of pesticides and about who we are and how we function is even more astounding. This fact alone bears witness to how important it is that we stop our slaughter of the microflora inhabiting our planet. They are us! Whatever the cause of the growing difficulty people are having fighting off common illness and minor infections, we are nearing a crisis in healthcare. It has been many decades since infectious diseases were the leading cause of death in our country. Are we headed for another era of even more virulent and deadly infectious diseases? Only time and our ability to see the writing on the wall will tell. Christine Thompson is the owner of Whole Health Solutions. Contact her at 540-899-9421

The Silence of Intentional Sound Sound's Effect on Consciousness By Mark Torgeson

Throughout recorded history Intentional Sound has played a significant role in the shifting and transformation of consciousness. Indigenous and modern cultures of consciousness have used specific instruments to achieve states of non-ordinary reality. Petroglyphs in Australia 50,000 years old depict Aborigines playing dijeridus, (wind instrument) entering the Dreamtime during three day ceremonies. Tibetan bowls and bells have been used in the Himalayas for 4,000 years to invoke deep states of meditation. Frame drums are found in all traditional cultures and are played by the village shaman or medicine woman to enter underworlds or invoke healing states. Gongs are positioned in most eastern temples and are used to activate spiritual connection. Intoning mantras, or sacred sounds, has been foundational in Hindu traditions for over three thousand years as tools of manifestation and accessing cosmic unity. Studies have shown that devotional Gregorian chants have healing effects on physical and mental health. More recently used is the Crystal Singing Bowl, comprised of pure quartz crystal, working on the same principles as the silicon chip in your smartphone: storing data (through stating one's desire) and amplifying it (through projecting one's intent). The crystalline structure of human molecular physiology - such as DNA, which has enormous capacity for information storage resonates sympathetically with quartz bowls, and responds dramatically to the frequencies generated by them. Tuning forks are calibrated to specific frequencies and access ancient modalities such as the Solfeggio Scale and Chinese Meridian system to entrain the body-mind to higher states of resonance. Changing one's brain wave patterns deliberately is key to shifting consciousness. We normally drive around, scheme, and behave in the Beta wave range of consciousness, about 13 - 30 Hz (frequency in cycles per second) Slow those rhythms down to achieve the Alpha state at 8 - 12 Hz, and we become calmer and less swayed by emotion, more intuitive, and increase our ability for athletic peak performance.

Research has proven that drum circles entrain participants into alpha brain wave states, and therapies using this modality have decisive effects on treating alcohol addiction. Slow those brainwaves further and we enter the Theta state of 4 -7 Hz. Here we find ourselves in the highly creative state of deep reverie and mental imagery, where buried memories and raw emotions are accessed. Usually referred to as the light sleep state of REM (rapid eye movement) where lucid dreaming occurs, it is also where active visualization is strongest. This state is the one most accessed when using Intentional Sound. Delta is the deepest state, from .2 - 4 Hz. Rejuvenation and restorative sleep needed for maintaining the immune system and deep physical healing happen here. Intentional Sound coupled with the feeling of safety and trust allows the psyche to expand and bathe in the nurturing frequencies of this stillness, where no thought or mental activity enters. Above the Beta range is the Gamma wave state of 30 - 100 Hz. Tibetan Buddhist meditators enter this realm and achieve high states of compassion and unity consciousness. In our rapidly changing global society, when every aspect of culture, economy, and sense of stability is challenged daily, employing a proven modality to garner centeredness and entrain inner stillness should be a compelling consideration. The practice of using Intentional Sound could be that modality. Our ancestors would probably agree. Mark Torgeson delights in playing unusual sound to make people feel good. Most days you'll find him in his Sound Therapy practice at 111 Amelia Street slipping into the Silence of dijeridu or gong. www.HealingSoundImmersion.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

19


history’s stories

RISING SUN TAVERN By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks I recently presented my Dentist Dr. Derek Galatro a needle point of the Rising Sun Tavern for his office. The Snowden Park office is decorated with many pictures of Fredericksburg. I was sitting there reminiscing about growing up in Fredericksburg and the school trips to the Rising Sun with my class mates. I have an early brochure that says LaFayette and his staff visited the Rising Sun Tavern on November 11, 1781 on his way to Philadelphia. LaFayette again was given a reception at the Rising Sun Tavern on December 1824. This is supported in Quinns History of Fredericksburg 1908. In John Goolrick’s 1921 book “Historic Fredericksburg”, he writes, one well known place for the meeting of “Revolutionists” was the Rising Sun tavern. I would begin my research into the Rising Sun…. Wow!

I contacted Glenn Hyatt, a local historian who recently retired as a volunteer with the Rising Sun Tavern,. knows much of the history of the building. Glenn has been involved in many local projects including being President of the Post 55 American Legion (Viet-Nam Vet.) and he assisted in setting up many of the displays at the Marine Corp Museum. Glenn and I met recently along with Katie King the Manager of the Rising Sun Tavern. Rising Sun Tavern, Mary Washington House, Saint James House and Hugh Mercer Apothecary shop are all under the management of Washington Heritage Museums. Katie advised me at the beginning of the meeting that they are doing updates on the Rising Sun Tavern tours and that a new tour is in the works about Tavern Keepers. She added that much of the old information is being researched and updated. Charles Washington, brother of George purchased lots 87 & 88 and built a residence on lot 88 in 1762, today known as 1304 Caroline Street. Charles lived in the home up until 1780-81, when he left without any recorded reason to move to Berkley County. Next available records show that on October 6, 1786, recorded in Deed Book A page 315 H.C. Charles and Mildred Washington conveyed the property for the sum of Five Shillings to their son George Augustine Washington. The property on July 6, 1791 was conveyed to Larkin Smith by George A. Washington, who sold the property less than a year later to on April 28, 1792 too Gustavus B. Wallace. The property would remain in the Wallace family for over a century until it was sold to the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities in 1907.

In September 1792, Wallace, LEASED the former home of Charles Washington to John Frazer. On September 27, 1792, the local Newspaper Virginia Herald “The subscriber will open a Tavern in this town on 29th instant, at the sign of the Golden Eagle to the house formerly occupied by Charles Washington, Esq. as a private dwelling, and now the property of Col. G. B. Wallace.” This is the first time I have seen in print of the building being a tavern. In 1795, it was under a different lease and the name was Eagle Tavern. On January 25, 1823, the Virginia Herald Advertising “Doctor Merwin has removed his shop of medicines to the upper end of Main (Caroline) Street, opposite Verone’s Tavern, or the Sign of Rising Sun”. This is the first written documentation of the Rising Sun (1823) tavern at that location. We may never know the correct location of the 1700’s Rising Sun Tavern that was used as a tavern and meeting place prior to the Revolution, because there were so many Tavern’s and Ordinary’s in those early days. The question arises what is the difference between an Ordinary and Tavern? The British often referred to them both as one in the same, however, the Tavern was a place where you could obtain alcohol and lodging. The ordinary was a place where you could obtain a regular meal at a fixed price not always lodging. The word Ordinary had disappeared by the end of the 1800’s. Just like the tunnels beneath Fredericksburg the early 1770’s Rising Sun Tavern still is one of Fredericksburg’s unsolved mysteries. My gratitude to both Glenn Hyatt and Katie King for their assistance.

Dedicated to the memory of Diane Beverly, Carlton Crump and Bob Hicks

Tuffy Hicks unearths little known facts about FXBG each month in this space

18

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE 704 Prince Edward Street By Roger Engels

The Civil War was a horrific experience for many Fredericksburg residents. The battle in December 1862 inflicted tremendous damage on the buildings, as seen in wartime photos, and the military cemeteries bear witness to the human cost of that and other area battles. The few residents who remained in town feared for their lives. After the battle, the city struggled to recover. The citizens were understandably angry at the Union because of looting, and diaries (such as the Woman in a War-Torn Town and The Circle Unbroken, both available from Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. http://hffi.org/product-category/publications/ reveal their personal ill feelings. Instances of more positive interactions are found less frequently. Recently, while conducting research for a historic marker for the house at 704 Prince Edward Street, HFFI found an example of more cordial relations at that time. When it was built in 1855, this brick house and Federal Hill on Hanover Street were the only buildings beyond Prince Edward and south of Hanover. The house must have survived the battle without significant damage, because it was purchased in April 1863 by Kaufman Hirsh, a recent immigrant from Germany and one of the earliest Jewish residents of the city. The war continued with periodic fighting in or near the city. In May 1864, the Battle of Wilderness produced massive casualties, and Fredericksburg became a virtual military hospital, with wounded in every available building. While we automatically think of churches and other

semipublic buildings, in this case, all substantial buildings, including private residences, were pressed into service. One was at 704 Prince Edward Street. We know — thanks to an item in the Free Lance newspaper of Aug 18, 1910— that “Adjutant Wm. Wright of Utica, N.Y., spent several days here last week as guest of the family of Mr. H. Kaufman. He was a member of Duryea’s Zouaves and was wounded at Wilderness fight in 1864. He was brought to Fredericksburg, and his arm was amputated in the parlor of Mr. Kaufman’s house and cared for by the daughters of Mr. Kaufman Hirsh for three weeks.” . Although the medical capabilities and “hospital” accommodations at the time were primitive, the stay at the Hirsh home must have been a welcome relief from the privations of combat. While amputation was often the only treatment for badly injured limbs, the attention of several young women for 3 weeks would certainly have been pleasant. (The Hirshes had five daughters ranging in age from 22 to 7 years of age in 1864.) That the feelings were reciprocal is demonstrated by the newspaper’s description of Mr. Wright’s return visit for a 3-day stay as a family guest 46 years later. We know of many battlefield reunions of former comrades-in-arms as well as those including former opponents, but stories of individual encounters between soldiers and civilians provide insight into the human interactions that occurred during the conflict and the sometimes pleasant outcomes that resulted. This is but one example of the additional information that is sometimes found when HFFI volunteers research properties for the bronze plaques placed on buildings in Fredericksburg. The current owners of 704 Prince Edward Street were recently awarded HFFI’s Executive Director’s Special Recognition Award for their efforts in historic preservation. Roger Engels is a member of HFFI’s Marker Committee

Wellness Antibiotics: Life-Saver or Scourge? By christine H. Thompson, D.C. Of course the short answer is poor planting practices that don’t allow both. Penicillin, first widely used to the soil to replenish itself. combat infections in the 1940’s, was a Our gut bacteria are responsible true miracle drug and allowed doctors to for protecting our gut lining and our gut cure infections caused by wound lining is responsible for being the firewall contamination that had previously been a between our delicate cells and the death sentence. Since the American motto dangerous toxins we filter out from the seems to be, “if a little is good, more must air, water and food intake. Plainly, our gut be better”, penicillin and subsequent bacteria are intimately, inseparably and derivations of this original antibiotic foundationally tied to our health and wellbegan to be prescribed not only as a being. As just one example among dozens precaution but also prophylactically. of this important relationship, only Scientists have known since the bacteria and some fungus can make 1950’s that the indiscriminate and vitamin B12 which is so necessary for our widespread use of antibiotics was causing physical and mental well-being. mutation of bacteria into antibiotic A major problem today is that resistant forms. It is people believe they Scientists have known alarming to note that cannot fight and the vast majority of overcome persistent since the 1950’s that the antibiotics produced by upper respiratory, indiscriminate and pharmaceutical sinus or ear infections widespread use of antibiotics companies are actually without antibiotics. was causing mutation of used in the raising of This is reinforced by livestock. If you think general medical bacteria into antibiotic this is mainly to treat prescribing practices resistant forms. or prevent disease in and consequently farm animals, think again. there is great fear around “Sub-therapeutic” dosages of antibiotics not taking antibiotics after a couple of are commonly used in the feed of livestock weeks of illness. It does seem that people for “growth promotion”. Farmers found are struggling to conquer these illnesses out long ago that using antibiotics in the on their own or with natural means. This raising of livestock made them grow fat could be due to a weakened immune quickly. system from chronic stress or overuse of Why would antibiotics make antibiotics, which as I stated above, results livestock grow faster and fatter? There is in more virulent strains of microbes. much research and epidemiological data Our bodies contain an estimated today that is linking gut flora to weight 10 trillion human cells and about 90 gain and incidence of diseases such as trillion microbial cells. Not only do we diabetes. It is becoming evident that house nearly 10 times more microbes proper gut flora is essential to health and than human cells, but if you take into wellness in many ways. Unfortunately, not account the DNA contained therein, we only do we decimate our gut flora with have about 350 times more microbial DNA antibiotic use, but we also have depleted than human DNA. This is an astounding fact the normal bacterial content of our soils and the implications related to what it says through worldwide use of pesticides and about who we are and how we function is even more astounding. This fact alone bears witness to how important it is that we stop our slaughter of the microflora inhabiting our planet. They are us! Whatever the cause of the growing difficulty people are having fighting off common illness and minor infections, we are nearing a crisis in healthcare. It has been many decades since infectious diseases were the leading cause of death in our country. Are we headed for another era of even more virulent and deadly infectious diseases? Only time and our ability to see the writing on the wall will tell. Christine Thompson is the owner of Whole Health Solutions. Contact her at 540-899-9421

The Silence of Intentional Sound Sound's Effect on Consciousness By Mark Torgeson

Throughout recorded history Intentional Sound has played a significant role in the shifting and transformation of consciousness. Indigenous and modern cultures of consciousness have used specific instruments to achieve states of non-ordinary reality. Petroglyphs in Australia 50,000 years old depict Aborigines playing dijeridus, (wind instrument) entering the Dreamtime during three day ceremonies. Tibetan bowls and bells have been used in the Himalayas for 4,000 years to invoke deep states of meditation. Frame drums are found in all traditional cultures and are played by the village shaman or medicine woman to enter underworlds or invoke healing states. Gongs are positioned in most eastern temples and are used to activate spiritual connection. Intoning mantras, or sacred sounds, has been foundational in Hindu traditions for over three thousand years as tools of manifestation and accessing cosmic unity. Studies have shown that devotional Gregorian chants have healing effects on physical and mental health. More recently used is the Crystal Singing Bowl, comprised of pure quartz crystal, working on the same principles as the silicon chip in your smartphone: storing data (through stating one's desire) and amplifying it (through projecting one's intent). The crystalline structure of human molecular physiology - such as DNA, which has enormous capacity for information storage resonates sympathetically with quartz bowls, and responds dramatically to the frequencies generated by them. Tuning forks are calibrated to specific frequencies and access ancient modalities such as the Solfeggio Scale and Chinese Meridian system to entrain the body-mind to higher states of resonance. Changing one's brain wave patterns deliberately is key to shifting consciousness. We normally drive around, scheme, and behave in the Beta wave range of consciousness, about 13 - 30 Hz (frequency in cycles per second) Slow those rhythms down to achieve the Alpha state at 8 - 12 Hz, and we become calmer and less swayed by emotion, more intuitive, and increase our ability for athletic peak performance.

Research has proven that drum circles entrain participants into alpha brain wave states, and therapies using this modality have decisive effects on treating alcohol addiction. Slow those brainwaves further and we enter the Theta state of 4 -7 Hz. Here we find ourselves in the highly creative state of deep reverie and mental imagery, where buried memories and raw emotions are accessed. Usually referred to as the light sleep state of REM (rapid eye movement) where lucid dreaming occurs, it is also where active visualization is strongest. This state is the one most accessed when using Intentional Sound. Delta is the deepest state, from .2 - 4 Hz. Rejuvenation and restorative sleep needed for maintaining the immune system and deep physical healing happen here. Intentional Sound coupled with the feeling of safety and trust allows the psyche to expand and bathe in the nurturing frequencies of this stillness, where no thought or mental activity enters. Above the Beta range is the Gamma wave state of 30 - 100 Hz. Tibetan Buddhist meditators enter this realm and achieve high states of compassion and unity consciousness. In our rapidly changing global society, when every aspect of culture, economy, and sense of stability is challenged daily, employing a proven modality to garner centeredness and entrain inner stillness should be a compelling consideration. The practice of using Intentional Sound could be that modality. Our ancestors would probably agree. Mark Torgeson delights in playing unusual sound to make people feel good. Most days you'll find him in his Sound Therapy practice at 111 Amelia Street slipping into the Silence of dijeridu or gong. www.HealingSoundImmersion.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

19


Senior Care Say What? By Karl Karch

One study of interest to me involved being able to understand and recall medical instructions given during a doctor visit. Doctors may talk to the patient while looking down and updating Hearing loss is the third most information in their computer. There prevalent chronic medical condition, after may be background music. The doctor arthritis and hypertension. The American may speak too fast, too softly, mumble, or Medical Association (AMA) recently have an accent requiring more effort released a study on hearing loss. More which may cause an older adult to miss than two-thirds of seniors 70 and older important instructions or diagnoses. Even have hearing problems which they called a a conversational tone can be difficult with major public health issue. The AMA found a hearing loss. The patient may be too that women with moderate hearing embarrassed to keep asking the doctor to problems were more likely repeat him/herself. It is More than twothan men to suffer from particularly important depression. While there thirds of seniors for doctors, lawyers, are genetic factors that 70 and older have financial planners, or affect hearing, the more other professionals to hearing problems... common factors are: speak clearly, enunciate ...compelling evidence exposure to noise, certain properly, speak at a m e d i c a t i o n s , that hearing loss can normal volume (unless cardiovascular disease, predict cognitive decline the person has a known cigarette smoking, and hearing issue), and make diabetes. Older adults certain the person process information slower which impacts understands what is being communicated. listening comprehension. They may hear Families should encourage someone to a word, but not recognize it until the accompany an older adult who has even sentence is finished. Comprehension is mild hearing loss. also affected by the rate of speech and the The quality and size of hearing complexity of the sentence structure. The more complex the sentence, the more an aids have improved dramatically. There older adult’s limited working memory are even applications for your cell phone resources are required to comprehend. If to selectively adjust one or both hearing However, there is still a stigma sentence length and structure are aids. associated with an older adult wearing simplified, an older adult’s comprehension improves. If too much information is hearing aids. It’s another visible sign of presented too quickly, parts of the getting old. Educating older adults on the conversation will be missed and less detrimental effects of hearing loss on information retained. Older adults have socializing and cognitive functioning is difficulty filtering out background noise. important, and may be effective in Listening to someone over the sound of overcoming their resistance to using hearing aids. Researching this topic traffic, in a noisy restaurant, or at a cocktail party or networking function helped me overcome my resistance.

20

May 2017

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

The two most talked about negative stereotypes of older adults are memory loss and hearing loss. Surprisingly, hearing can influence memory, and negative views of aging can influence both memory and hearing performance. Some studies provided compelling evidence that hearing loss can predict cognitive decline. One possible explanation is that people who are hard-of-hearing may withdraw from socializing with others which reduces opportunities for mental and physical activity that are important to healthy cognitive aging. On the flip side, better hearing performance is associated with better memory performance.

becomes even more difficult if they have hearing loss. Hearing loss can have an adverse effect on couple relationships. My wife and I often bicker about the volume while watching TV.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients

Mind Your Mind

placentophagia

words as a curse

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

For this month, what you might consider a slightly yucky offshoot of what I was writing about last month. Then I wrote about Mandy Restivo-W Walsh, the doula. I had also, incidentally, been reading about placentas (such are the quirks of the medically inquisitive) and how some mothers eat their “afterbirth.” You may be like me. A bit put off by the idea of eating some bloody, slimy thing that has just popped out of the vagina. But people do it – albeit with a bit of preparation. When I was talking to Mandy, she blithely mentioned she had to go to the hospital to pick up a placenta. It turns out part of her doula service is that she will dry out your placenta, grind it up and put in to capsules – if you think consuming it will do you good. Now there’s the rub. Be Like an Animal Almost all non human animals eat their placentas. And there have been waves of enthusiasm, (in particular in the 60’s and 70’s, at the height of the hippy movement) when humans decided to get in on the act. And according to the Huffington Post, there is something of a fashion for it at the present. It’s by no means exclusively a western, “hippy” practice. Chinese herbal medicine uses dried placenta to treat various conditions, as unlikely as impotence, and tinnitus. In Jamaica, somewhat more flamboyantly, it has been used to treat “convulsions caused by ghosts.” Mandy told me some 30 percent of her clients choose to do it. The placenta does contain a lot of valuable minerals. But it also produces hormones that are claimed to help with post partum depression and milk production. Then there’s stuff called Placental Opiod-E Enhancing Factor that helps with pain relief. And Corticotrophin

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

Releasing Hormone, that is an anti-sstress hormone (something of a boon to anxious new mums). CRH also stimulates the release of oxytocin – which both causes the uterus to contract and is the “bonding hormone” (which, incidentally is released when you have sex. So men with entrapment anxieties - beware). There is much cynicism amongst the experts who claim all these beneficial hormones will be destroyed in the cooking or freezing process – though some people take their placenta raw. And if you don’t like the idea of chowing down on a whole placenta in the delivery room, there are recipes for making uncooked placenta into smoothies which placentaremediesnetwork.org assures us will taste of “nothing but fruit and berries.”

Testimonial Jill Laiacona is one of Mandy’s clients who had her placenta encapsulated after her second pregnancy. She notes her second delivery was very different to the first (where her son had meconium aspiration and was in the NICU), but she had much less trouble with depression, cramping, lochia and milk production. And it contributed “to my emotional wellbeing” she told me. I asked her about the “ick factor.” It was only a problem for the first dose she told me, and she drank a lot of water and ate a snack with it. There is no logical reason why we should be revulsed by placentas of course, when we eat animal muscle with such alacrity. In her wonderful book ‘Gulp’ Mary Roach points out our illogical resistance to organ meats – or “variety meats” as they became christened in WWII to make them more acceptable. Jill hasn’t exactly broadcast what she did amongst her friends. “People might think it sounds, like, really strange.” And her husband was a little antsy and insisted she consult Dr. Google before deciding. There is no doubt, placentophagia – to give it its proper name – is a bit controversial. And like so many other “alternative” treatments has not been subject to formal clinical trials. But my take is, if it’s not doing any harm, and the spirit moves you, why not?

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, “Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient’s Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare”, available at Amazon.com

By Barbara Deal Having worked as a psychotherapist for nearly 40 years, this Mental Health Month of May, I thought I would give a little context for the current way of thinking about emotional, behavioral and cognitive "different-ness." Here follows a quick history of some US changes, many of which I have seen during my career. Suffering persons deemed "disturbed", "retarded","mentally ill" were chained, locked up, out of sight, and shamed. Stays in institutions were cruel (the use of cold baths with ice, lobotomies etc.). Many (and my patients too) were raped and/or physically mistreated. Early treatment did not exist or had inconsistent to poor outcomes. Neither advocacy, nor victim rights laws existed, leaving them lost, forgotten. In Jesus's day, uncommon behaviors were considered possession, needing "demons cast out", still practiced in some religions. Activism for humane treatment (Dorothy Dix among others) began in the 1800's. Even in 1970's, that "different-ness" was vague (epilepsy, deafness, cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, an unmarried woman, mental illness) were herded, locked in state "psychiatric" or other facilities throughout their lives. Alcohol misuse was not a disease but a moral deficit. At that time, being LGBTQ or "homosexual" was considered psychiatrically "deviant." After World War II, returning soldiers suffering were labeled pejoratively, "shell shocked" or "war neurosis." That was not extended to Vietnam veterans, viewed as already damaged, delinquent or drug users prior to drafting. In 1979, the medical community introduced the term "posttraumatic stress disorder". The discovery in the 50's that thorazine could arrest the progression of schizophrenia changed everything. Now, severe chronic conditions such as catatonia and hebephrenia are almost unseen. Complicating this success, 25 years later, the finding of side effects of permanent neurological damage (TD) was apparent.

Since then, psychotropic medicines for many conditions contribute to freedom from, or less suffering. Electro-convulsive shock therapy (ECT) has continued with lower dosing and success in treating chronically suicidally depressed patients. 1960's challenges to the "establishment" notion that individuals must be separated from societal "normals" led to closing psychiatric hospitals, discharging individuals home to their communities (de-iinstitutionalized) to participate with other citizens for successful and happier lives, with the less costly support of small outpatient programs. While good in many ways, with insufficient funding, society is now faced with many social problems such as homelessness, victimization of the vulnerable and crime. Some are disorganized and unable to make their way alone, resorting to substances, living in tents, suicide and desperation of other sorts. As a result, many are in prisons, untreated. Other conceptual changes: federal law and funding for (mental "health" not "illness") community centers; psychiatrist Thomas Szaz challenged the accuracy of the term "mental" illness to rephrase as just a way of being different, not a brain dysfunction; sociologist Goffman described brainwashing into the "role" of being mentally ill person in hospitals; psychiatrist and researcher, Kay Jamison, admittedly with bipolar disorder, and treated with ECT, has written “Touched with Fire” linking emotional suffering with extraordinary creativity. Yet the stigma remains. Despite living in society labeled and disregarded, coping, resisting unseen troubles, some transform those differences in beauty and honesty. Under the rubric of "The Art of Recovery" these artists present a window into their hurts, lives and joys at The PONSHOP Gallery again this year. Barbara Deal is a psychotherapist at Alliance Therapy Center (540-373-9577)

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4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

21


Senior Care Say What? By Karl Karch

One study of interest to me involved being able to understand and recall medical instructions given during a doctor visit. Doctors may talk to the patient while looking down and updating Hearing loss is the third most information in their computer. There prevalent chronic medical condition, after may be background music. The doctor arthritis and hypertension. The American may speak too fast, too softly, mumble, or Medical Association (AMA) recently have an accent requiring more effort released a study on hearing loss. More which may cause an older adult to miss than two-thirds of seniors 70 and older important instructions or diagnoses. Even have hearing problems which they called a a conversational tone can be difficult with major public health issue. The AMA found a hearing loss. The patient may be too that women with moderate hearing embarrassed to keep asking the doctor to problems were more likely repeat him/herself. It is More than twothan men to suffer from particularly important depression. While there thirds of seniors for doctors, lawyers, are genetic factors that 70 and older have financial planners, or affect hearing, the more other professionals to hearing problems... common factors are: speak clearly, enunciate ...compelling evidence exposure to noise, certain properly, speak at a m e d i c a t i o n s , that hearing loss can normal volume (unless cardiovascular disease, predict cognitive decline the person has a known cigarette smoking, and hearing issue), and make diabetes. Older adults certain the person process information slower which impacts understands what is being communicated. listening comprehension. They may hear Families should encourage someone to a word, but not recognize it until the accompany an older adult who has even sentence is finished. Comprehension is mild hearing loss. also affected by the rate of speech and the The quality and size of hearing complexity of the sentence structure. The more complex the sentence, the more an aids have improved dramatically. There older adult’s limited working memory are even applications for your cell phone resources are required to comprehend. If to selectively adjust one or both hearing However, there is still a stigma sentence length and structure are aids. associated with an older adult wearing simplified, an older adult’s comprehension improves. If too much information is hearing aids. It’s another visible sign of presented too quickly, parts of the getting old. Educating older adults on the conversation will be missed and less detrimental effects of hearing loss on information retained. Older adults have socializing and cognitive functioning is difficulty filtering out background noise. important, and may be effective in Listening to someone over the sound of overcoming their resistance to using hearing aids. Researching this topic traffic, in a noisy restaurant, or at a cocktail party or networking function helped me overcome my resistance.

20

May 2017

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

The two most talked about negative stereotypes of older adults are memory loss and hearing loss. Surprisingly, hearing can influence memory, and negative views of aging can influence both memory and hearing performance. Some studies provided compelling evidence that hearing loss can predict cognitive decline. One possible explanation is that people who are hard-of-hearing may withdraw from socializing with others which reduces opportunities for mental and physical activity that are important to healthy cognitive aging. On the flip side, better hearing performance is associated with better memory performance.

becomes even more difficult if they have hearing loss. Hearing loss can have an adverse effect on couple relationships. My wife and I often bicker about the volume while watching TV.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients

Mind Your Mind

placentophagia

words as a curse

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

For this month, what you might consider a slightly yucky offshoot of what I was writing about last month. Then I wrote about Mandy Restivo-W Walsh, the doula. I had also, incidentally, been reading about placentas (such are the quirks of the medically inquisitive) and how some mothers eat their “afterbirth.” You may be like me. A bit put off by the idea of eating some bloody, slimy thing that has just popped out of the vagina. But people do it – albeit with a bit of preparation. When I was talking to Mandy, she blithely mentioned she had to go to the hospital to pick up a placenta. It turns out part of her doula service is that she will dry out your placenta, grind it up and put in to capsules – if you think consuming it will do you good. Now there’s the rub. Be Like an Animal Almost all non human animals eat their placentas. And there have been waves of enthusiasm, (in particular in the 60’s and 70’s, at the height of the hippy movement) when humans decided to get in on the act. And according to the Huffington Post, there is something of a fashion for it at the present. It’s by no means exclusively a western, “hippy” practice. Chinese herbal medicine uses dried placenta to treat various conditions, as unlikely as impotence, and tinnitus. In Jamaica, somewhat more flamboyantly, it has been used to treat “convulsions caused by ghosts.” Mandy told me some 30 percent of her clients choose to do it. The placenta does contain a lot of valuable minerals. But it also produces hormones that are claimed to help with post partum depression and milk production. Then there’s stuff called Placental Opiod-E Enhancing Factor that helps with pain relief. And Corticotrophin

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

Releasing Hormone, that is an anti-sstress hormone (something of a boon to anxious new mums). CRH also stimulates the release of oxytocin – which both causes the uterus to contract and is the “bonding hormone” (which, incidentally is released when you have sex. So men with entrapment anxieties - beware). There is much cynicism amongst the experts who claim all these beneficial hormones will be destroyed in the cooking or freezing process – though some people take their placenta raw. And if you don’t like the idea of chowing down on a whole placenta in the delivery room, there are recipes for making uncooked placenta into smoothies which placentaremediesnetwork.org assures us will taste of “nothing but fruit and berries.”

Testimonial Jill Laiacona is one of Mandy’s clients who had her placenta encapsulated after her second pregnancy. She notes her second delivery was very different to the first (where her son had meconium aspiration and was in the NICU), but she had much less trouble with depression, cramping, lochia and milk production. And it contributed “to my emotional wellbeing” she told me. I asked her about the “ick factor.” It was only a problem for the first dose she told me, and she drank a lot of water and ate a snack with it. There is no logical reason why we should be revulsed by placentas of course, when we eat animal muscle with such alacrity. In her wonderful book ‘Gulp’ Mary Roach points out our illogical resistance to organ meats – or “variety meats” as they became christened in WWII to make them more acceptable. Jill hasn’t exactly broadcast what she did amongst her friends. “People might think it sounds, like, really strange.” And her husband was a little antsy and insisted she consult Dr. Google before deciding. There is no doubt, placentophagia – to give it its proper name – is a bit controversial. And like so many other “alternative” treatments has not been subject to formal clinical trials. But my take is, if it’s not doing any harm, and the spirit moves you, why not?

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, “Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient’s Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare”, available at Amazon.com

By Barbara Deal Having worked as a psychotherapist for nearly 40 years, this Mental Health Month of May, I thought I would give a little context for the current way of thinking about emotional, behavioral and cognitive "different-ness." Here follows a quick history of some US changes, many of which I have seen during my career. Suffering persons deemed "disturbed", "retarded","mentally ill" were chained, locked up, out of sight, and shamed. Stays in institutions were cruel (the use of cold baths with ice, lobotomies etc.). Many (and my patients too) were raped and/or physically mistreated. Early treatment did not exist or had inconsistent to poor outcomes. Neither advocacy, nor victim rights laws existed, leaving them lost, forgotten. In Jesus's day, uncommon behaviors were considered possession, needing "demons cast out", still practiced in some religions. Activism for humane treatment (Dorothy Dix among others) began in the 1800's. Even in 1970's, that "different-ness" was vague (epilepsy, deafness, cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, an unmarried woman, mental illness) were herded, locked in state "psychiatric" or other facilities throughout their lives. Alcohol misuse was not a disease but a moral deficit. At that time, being LGBTQ or "homosexual" was considered psychiatrically "deviant." After World War II, returning soldiers suffering were labeled pejoratively, "shell shocked" or "war neurosis." That was not extended to Vietnam veterans, viewed as already damaged, delinquent or drug users prior to drafting. In 1979, the medical community introduced the term "posttraumatic stress disorder". The discovery in the 50's that thorazine could arrest the progression of schizophrenia changed everything. Now, severe chronic conditions such as catatonia and hebephrenia are almost unseen. Complicating this success, 25 years later, the finding of side effects of permanent neurological damage (TD) was apparent.

Since then, psychotropic medicines for many conditions contribute to freedom from, or less suffering. Electro-convulsive shock therapy (ECT) has continued with lower dosing and success in treating chronically suicidally depressed patients. 1960's challenges to the "establishment" notion that individuals must be separated from societal "normals" led to closing psychiatric hospitals, discharging individuals home to their communities (de-iinstitutionalized) to participate with other citizens for successful and happier lives, with the less costly support of small outpatient programs. While good in many ways, with insufficient funding, society is now faced with many social problems such as homelessness, victimization of the vulnerable and crime. Some are disorganized and unable to make their way alone, resorting to substances, living in tents, suicide and desperation of other sorts. As a result, many are in prisons, untreated. Other conceptual changes: federal law and funding for (mental "health" not "illness") community centers; psychiatrist Thomas Szaz challenged the accuracy of the term "mental" illness to rephrase as just a way of being different, not a brain dysfunction; sociologist Goffman described brainwashing into the "role" of being mentally ill person in hospitals; psychiatrist and researcher, Kay Jamison, admittedly with bipolar disorder, and treated with ECT, has written “Touched with Fire” linking emotional suffering with extraordinary creativity. Yet the stigma remains. Despite living in society labeled and disregarded, coping, resisting unseen troubles, some transform those differences in beauty and honesty. Under the rubric of "The Art of Recovery" these artists present a window into their hurts, lives and joys at The PONSHOP Gallery again this year. Barbara Deal is a psychotherapist at Alliance Therapy Center (540-373-9577)

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4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

21


Renew

Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown festival featuring local & regional artists

Is Stevia Healthy and Safe?

By beth sperlazza

by Joan M. Geisler

“Hey Joan, do you think Stevia is okay to eat?” I get this question often. My answer has been, “If you have to question whether a food is ‘safe’ or ‘okay’ then chances are it is not. It is the same premise with which I use when I shop with my teenage daughters. If they have to ask me if the dress is too short…hmmmm, than it probably is. So is Stevia a safe alternative to table sugar? I do hope that no one is consuming the poison called “artificial sweeteners.” What was once touted as the savior of our taste buds in the 80’s has been filed under the title of “oops, we were wrong about the health safety of this product.” FenFen anyone? Where does Stevia come from? Stevia is a small shrub in the chrysanthemum family. It is native to Paraguay and Brazil. It has been around since ancient times, used primarily as a low-calorie sweetener but also for medicinal purposes, such as increasing

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

22

May 2017

glucose tolerance (think: your tissues’ ability to absorb glucose, a sugar, from the bloodstream and use it for energy). It is nearly 200 times sweeter than table sugar, won’t raise your blood sugar, is widely available and doesn’t leave much of an aftertaste. Score! You may have seen stevia on store shelves under brand names like Truvia and Pure Via. But is it natural and healthy? Yes and yes — but Stevia and Truvia or Pure Via are not the same thing. The stevia plant has two sweet compounds, stevioside and Rebaudioside A (Reb A or rebiana). While studies show that the former may help reduce blood sugar and blood pressure, there is limited evidence to date on the health benefits of Reb A. The FDA banned stevia in 1991 due to preliminary studies suggesting that it may lead to cancer. This was revoked in 1995 when the FDA ruled it safe to be sold as a food supplement. They then granted GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status to Reb A in 2008 after the makers of Pure Via and Truvia submitted research supporting its safety. Whole-leaf stevia and stevia extracts, however, are still considered dietary supplements. Joan’s note: In what other product or activity do you engage that you are confident it is safe if it had the label, “Generally recognized as safe”. If the airplane or car had the label would you fly or drive in it? If the hotel had that label, would you stay there? Let’s not be so careless with our health. If we would not fly, drive or sleep in it, why would you eat it? So back to my weekly question. “Is Stevia a safe alternative to sugar?” My answer is always, “the only thing worse than sugar is fake sugar”. We gobbled up the Nutri-Sweet and Sweet & Low and where did it land us? On a one way flight to Diabetes land. We trusted too much and did not use our intuition or common sense.. So is Stevia safe? The plant is, but it has to go through a lot of processing to get into that little packet and into your food or coffee. Bottom line, Stevia has not been around long enough to evaluate the effects on humans. My advice: Train your brain to not want sweet foods all the time. When you do, keep it small and real.

would like to feature three additional, of the over two dozen, throwdown festival’s artists.

Nancy Ross at her wheel The First Annual Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown will take place on the 1100 block of Sophia Street, Downtown on June 10th. The Throwdown will feature local and regional artists working with clay. The festival will give the community to meet local potters, see demonstrations, and let the kids (and adults) get their hands dirty working with clay. Last month Front Porch featured two of the Throwdown Potters, Trista Chapman and Dan Finnegan. This month I

using the ancient technique of sgraffito (carving through one layer of clay to the layer beneath), and his designs are Steven Summerville has been inspired by nature and by the artists that making functional pottery since his time have come before him. He currently works as a student at Berea College, where he at his studio at LibertyTown Arts Workshop in Fredericksburg, Virginia, graduated in the class of 1978 with a BA in Studio Art. Since then, he has where he also teaches. Nancy Ross is a studio potter and participated in educator n u m e r o u s from Free exhibitions, and U n i o n , his work has Virginia. She earned many holds a BA in awards across the studio art US. He enjoys from the making forms University of that are simple, Maryland, functional and and a MA in useful while also ceramics interesting and from James beautiful. M a d i s o n N e a l University. Reed is a potter Steven Summerville in his studio She has been who enjoys making working in clay since 1973, and specializes both functional and decorative works in clay. Born in Virginia, he has studied clay in altering wheel thrown pots. Her work ranges from functional in Minnesota, North Carolina and Virginia. stoneware pottery, to raku-fired one of a Neal's functional works are decorated kind altered vases and bowls.

Neal Reed You won’t want to miss this interactive event, held rain or shine Music, provided by Larry Hinkle & Friends, raffle drawing for a piece of collaborative work by Trista Chapman and Dan Finnegan, and a variety of the potters work will also be on sale.

Joan is the Director of MedFit, Medically Integrated Nutrition and Exercise at Truong Rehabilitation Center.

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

23


Renew

Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown festival featuring local & regional artists

Is Stevia Healthy and Safe?

By beth sperlazza

by Joan M. Geisler

“Hey Joan, do you think Stevia is okay to eat?” I get this question often. My answer has been, “If you have to question whether a food is ‘safe’ or ‘okay’ then chances are it is not. It is the same premise with which I use when I shop with my teenage daughters. If they have to ask me if the dress is too short…hmmmm, than it probably is. So is Stevia a safe alternative to table sugar? I do hope that no one is consuming the poison called “artificial sweeteners.” What was once touted as the savior of our taste buds in the 80’s has been filed under the title of “oops, we were wrong about the health safety of this product.” FenFen anyone? Where does Stevia come from? Stevia is a small shrub in the chrysanthemum family. It is native to Paraguay and Brazil. It has been around since ancient times, used primarily as a low-calorie sweetener but also for medicinal purposes, such as increasing

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

22

May 2017

glucose tolerance (think: your tissues’ ability to absorb glucose, a sugar, from the bloodstream and use it for energy). It is nearly 200 times sweeter than table sugar, won’t raise your blood sugar, is widely available and doesn’t leave much of an aftertaste. Score! You may have seen stevia on store shelves under brand names like Truvia and Pure Via. But is it natural and healthy? Yes and yes — but Stevia and Truvia or Pure Via are not the same thing. The stevia plant has two sweet compounds, stevioside and Rebaudioside A (Reb A or rebiana). While studies show that the former may help reduce blood sugar and blood pressure, there is limited evidence to date on the health benefits of Reb A. The FDA banned stevia in 1991 due to preliminary studies suggesting that it may lead to cancer. This was revoked in 1995 when the FDA ruled it safe to be sold as a food supplement. They then granted GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status to Reb A in 2008 after the makers of Pure Via and Truvia submitted research supporting its safety. Whole-leaf stevia and stevia extracts, however, are still considered dietary supplements. Joan’s note: In what other product or activity do you engage that you are confident it is safe if it had the label, “Generally recognized as safe”. If the airplane or car had the label would you fly or drive in it? If the hotel had that label, would you stay there? Let’s not be so careless with our health. If we would not fly, drive or sleep in it, why would you eat it? So back to my weekly question. “Is Stevia a safe alternative to sugar?” My answer is always, “the only thing worse than sugar is fake sugar”. We gobbled up the Nutri-Sweet and Sweet & Low and where did it land us? On a one way flight to Diabetes land. We trusted too much and did not use our intuition or common sense.. So is Stevia safe? The plant is, but it has to go through a lot of processing to get into that little packet and into your food or coffee. Bottom line, Stevia has not been around long enough to evaluate the effects on humans. My advice: Train your brain to not want sweet foods all the time. When you do, keep it small and real.

would like to feature three additional, of the over two dozen, throwdown festival’s artists.

Nancy Ross at her wheel The First Annual Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown will take place on the 1100 block of Sophia Street, Downtown on June 10th. The Throwdown will feature local and regional artists working with clay. The festival will give the community to meet local potters, see demonstrations, and let the kids (and adults) get their hands dirty working with clay. Last month Front Porch featured two of the Throwdown Potters, Trista Chapman and Dan Finnegan. This month I

using the ancient technique of sgraffito (carving through one layer of clay to the layer beneath), and his designs are Steven Summerville has been inspired by nature and by the artists that making functional pottery since his time have come before him. He currently works as a student at Berea College, where he at his studio at LibertyTown Arts Workshop in Fredericksburg, Virginia, graduated in the class of 1978 with a BA in Studio Art. Since then, he has where he also teaches. Nancy Ross is a studio potter and participated in educator n u m e r o u s from Free exhibitions, and U n i o n , his work has Virginia. She earned many holds a BA in awards across the studio art US. He enjoys from the making forms University of that are simple, Maryland, functional and and a MA in useful while also ceramics interesting and from James beautiful. M a d i s o n N e a l University. Reed is a potter Steven Summerville in his studio She has been who enjoys making working in clay since 1973, and specializes both functional and decorative works in clay. Born in Virginia, he has studied clay in altering wheel thrown pots. Her work ranges from functional in Minnesota, North Carolina and Virginia. stoneware pottery, to raku-fired one of a Neal's functional works are decorated kind altered vases and bowls.

Neal Reed You won’t want to miss this interactive event, held rain or shine Music, provided by Larry Hinkle & Friends, raffle drawing for a piece of collaborative work by Trista Chapman and Dan Finnegan, and a variety of the potters work will also be on sale.

Joan is the Director of MedFit, Medically Integrated Nutrition and Exercise at Truong Rehabilitation Center.

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

23


Art in the Burg Flight & Arches

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Artist Suzanne Scherr is a member of Art First

2D, 3D and What’s in Between

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

ARCHitecture

“Sunrise Flight”, Linda Warsaw horses might be used in her work. The book, When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi, led to a desire to paint airborne birds. The reuse of earthy materials became more intriguing when contrasted with glitter. In her words, she is always willing to "play with shapes, both 2D and 3D; play with realism or abstraction, and play with color". As a child, Warshaw was discouraged from spending time “Pont du Gard”, Penny Parrish on art. As a result, she studied economics and sociology at Rutgers University. Soon after graduation, Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St she moved to the Fredericksburg area and Opening Reception: First Friday, May 5th taught fourth graders. A second degree in from 6 pm to 9 pm art from Mary Washington enabled her to Exhibit Showing: May 1 - May 28 become a recognized, practicing artist in 1984, and a middle school art teacher in Norma Woodward is a photographer & Stafford. Her lifelong interest in the arts a member of Brush Strokes Gallery extended to teaching drama and to May 2017

Artists: Beverley Coates

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays

Penny Parrish (above) presents a unique photo exhibit, entitled "ARCHitecture" of beautiful arches captured during her recent trip to France. With an eye for detail, Penny focuses on some famous landmarks like the Arc de Triumph and Pont du Gard, (still standing after 2000 years), as well as some more obscure arches found inside remote cathedrals and shops.

24

of fredericksburg

Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish

Artist Linda Warshaw (above) sustains her creativity by remaining open to inspiration in unlikely places and juxtapositions,. Since its founding 25 years ago, she has been an active member of Art First Gallery. Her local following has come to expect, and continue to be delighted by, the unexpected in her work. Her current show results from reading a moving memoir, as well as considering how the larger, usually discarded, wood pieces in shavings for

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Ronnie Buddington

working on local theatre productions and costuming. Warshaw's work can also be found at The Loft in Culpeper and Changing Reins in Ashland. She is featured by the Virginia Equine Artist Association and has also written and illustrated a humorous horse driving manual for the James River Driving Association. Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St. Opening Reception: First Friday, May 5th from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: May 3rd ~ May 29th

Stories

Ronnie Buddington, 54, spent most of his early life in the construction business. He became homeless in 2015, but is now housed. "I grew up in Fairfax County in Lorton. I spent about 25 years in Stafford. My mom passed away and my step father tried to take the house and everything we had. Finally the judge told him that the will my mom wrote was what was going to be done. I got $23,000. They took it all for child support and I became homeless. I got eight brothers and one sister. Lost my sister…lost two brothers, but family's still sticking together. My brother, he died from cirrhosis of the liver- he bled to death. My other brother drowned in Fountainhead Regional Park in Fairfax. My sister got killed in a Jeep accident. She was on her way to see the Judge (country music singers) concert in Manassas and a guy ran off the road, flipped the jeep and killed her. Yup. Bad memories…but there are also good memories. I got locked up because I didn't have money for child support. I couldn't work after I broke my neck falling down a

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

540~479~4116

flight of stairs. I went to get up and fell down another flight of stairs. Laid there for days before somebody found me. Spent a month in the hospital before I realized where I was, and then I woke up and was homeless and couldn't pay child support without a job. When I got out of jail I found out that they threw away my ID and my birth certificate because they only keep your property for two months. It took me a year to get my birth certificate. Then they locked me up again because I didn't have no ID to get to work to do anything. I couldn't get a job without ID. Couldn't make no money to pay the child support. I was 25 when I had my kid... That puts a heck of a hole in my heart…not being there for her. Not being a father. While I was out working trying to pay the bills and everything…my baby's mother was with someone else. She broke up with me when I got locked up. That was 27 years ago and I ain't been right since. It took me 10 years to get to where I am today. I was housed by Micah last June. Before I was housed I was living up under Chatham Bridge until the flood came around and washed my tent out. Micah got me a place after that. I was living under that bridge for six months. Micah has helped me out a whole lot. I got a roof over my head, got my disability goin'. I'm doing pretty well now- better than I was. I feel a whole lot better. My mind ain't right. I got a lot of worries. One time, they caught me on the railroad tracks getting ready to jump in front of a train- you know.cause my mind was going crazy and I didn't know what to do with life. I'm on a lot of medication now and it helps a lot. I can sleep better because my mind was wandering at nighttime and I couldn't sleep."

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house Identify house address Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck! Last Month’s House: 402 Hanover Street Bill & Lynne Wood is the Winner of a Gift Certificate from City Lights Hair Studio For so many years I passed your countenance, so odd and yet so proud, while Mary Washington looked down upon you like a cloud. What were you saying for years and years, as your 1901 mixture of styles, Craftsmen and Victorian spoke, to all who wandered by? One day an open house sign I saw, so I wandered through that same odd door, I had seen for years and more. You do not disappoint me, we greet as old friends, the sign marking your new beginnings and of hope. Oh this is so wonderful,your sign says sold, someone has looked upon your face with love, and their dream. To see you now brings tears to my eyes, your new windows are so bold, through which you now can see so clearly,no longer old. The beautiful modern architecture blended with your old bones, show the bold vision, love and respect for you, of those who have bonded to you now. I am happy for you grand lady,I throw a kiss today.

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

25


Art in the Burg Flight & Arches

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Artist Suzanne Scherr is a member of Art First

2D, 3D and What’s in Between

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

ARCHitecture

“Sunrise Flight”, Linda Warsaw horses might be used in her work. The book, When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi, led to a desire to paint airborne birds. The reuse of earthy materials became more intriguing when contrasted with glitter. In her words, she is always willing to "play with shapes, both 2D and 3D; play with realism or abstraction, and play with color". As a child, Warshaw was discouraged from spending time “Pont du Gard”, Penny Parrish on art. As a result, she studied economics and sociology at Rutgers University. Soon after graduation, Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St she moved to the Fredericksburg area and Opening Reception: First Friday, May 5th taught fourth graders. A second degree in from 6 pm to 9 pm art from Mary Washington enabled her to Exhibit Showing: May 1 - May 28 become a recognized, practicing artist in 1984, and a middle school art teacher in Norma Woodward is a photographer & Stafford. Her lifelong interest in the arts a member of Brush Strokes Gallery extended to teaching drama and to May 2017

Artists: Beverley Coates

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays

Penny Parrish (above) presents a unique photo exhibit, entitled "ARCHitecture" of beautiful arches captured during her recent trip to France. With an eye for detail, Penny focuses on some famous landmarks like the Arc de Triumph and Pont du Gard, (still standing after 2000 years), as well as some more obscure arches found inside remote cathedrals and shops.

24

of fredericksburg

Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish

Artist Linda Warshaw (above) sustains her creativity by remaining open to inspiration in unlikely places and juxtapositions,. Since its founding 25 years ago, she has been an active member of Art First Gallery. Her local following has come to expect, and continue to be delighted by, the unexpected in her work. Her current show results from reading a moving memoir, as well as considering how the larger, usually discarded, wood pieces in shavings for

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Ronnie Buddington

working on local theatre productions and costuming. Warshaw's work can also be found at The Loft in Culpeper and Changing Reins in Ashland. She is featured by the Virginia Equine Artist Association and has also written and illustrated a humorous horse driving manual for the James River Driving Association. Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St. Opening Reception: First Friday, May 5th from 6 pm to 9 pm Exhibit on View: May 3rd ~ May 29th

Stories

Ronnie Buddington, 54, spent most of his early life in the construction business. He became homeless in 2015, but is now housed. "I grew up in Fairfax County in Lorton. I spent about 25 years in Stafford. My mom passed away and my step father tried to take the house and everything we had. Finally the judge told him that the will my mom wrote was what was going to be done. I got $23,000. They took it all for child support and I became homeless. I got eight brothers and one sister. Lost my sister…lost two brothers, but family's still sticking together. My brother, he died from cirrhosis of the liver- he bled to death. My other brother drowned in Fountainhead Regional Park in Fairfax. My sister got killed in a Jeep accident. She was on her way to see the Judge (country music singers) concert in Manassas and a guy ran off the road, flipped the jeep and killed her. Yup. Bad memories…but there are also good memories. I got locked up because I didn't have money for child support. I couldn't work after I broke my neck falling down a

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

540~479~4116

flight of stairs. I went to get up and fell down another flight of stairs. Laid there for days before somebody found me. Spent a month in the hospital before I realized where I was, and then I woke up and was homeless and couldn't pay child support without a job. When I got out of jail I found out that they threw away my ID and my birth certificate because they only keep your property for two months. It took me a year to get my birth certificate. Then they locked me up again because I didn't have no ID to get to work to do anything. I couldn't get a job without ID. Couldn't make no money to pay the child support. I was 25 when I had my kid... That puts a heck of a hole in my heart…not being there for her. Not being a father. While I was out working trying to pay the bills and everything…my baby's mother was with someone else. She broke up with me when I got locked up. That was 27 years ago and I ain't been right since. It took me 10 years to get to where I am today. I was housed by Micah last June. Before I was housed I was living up under Chatham Bridge until the flood came around and washed my tent out. Micah got me a place after that. I was living under that bridge for six months. Micah has helped me out a whole lot. I got a roof over my head, got my disability goin'. I'm doing pretty well now- better than I was. I feel a whole lot better. My mind ain't right. I got a lot of worries. One time, they caught me on the railroad tracks getting ready to jump in front of a train- you know.cause my mind was going crazy and I didn't know what to do with life. I'm on a lot of medication now and it helps a lot. I can sleep better because my mind was wandering at nighttime and I couldn't sleep."

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house Identify house address Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck! Last Month’s House: 402 Hanover Street Bill & Lynne Wood is the Winner of a Gift Certificate from City Lights Hair Studio For so many years I passed your countenance, so odd and yet so proud, while Mary Washington looked down upon you like a cloud. What were you saying for years and years, as your 1901 mixture of styles, Craftsmen and Victorian spoke, to all who wandered by? One day an open house sign I saw, so I wandered through that same odd door, I had seen for years and more. You do not disappoint me, we greet as old friends, the sign marking your new beginnings and of hope. Oh this is so wonderful,your sign says sold, someone has looked upon your face with love, and their dream. To see you now brings tears to my eyes, your new windows are so bold, through which you now can see so clearly,no longer old. The beautiful modern architecture blended with your old bones, show the bold vision, love and respect for you, of those who have bonded to you now. I am happy for you grand lady,I throw a kiss today.

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

25


On Stage!

FXBG Sign Game how well do you know downtown?

Stafford High School fine arts Department hosts 10th annual “A night on broadway” by Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Enjoy an entertaining evening of songs from some of the most renowned musicals performed by chorus students at the 10th Annual “A Night on Broadway” at Stafford High School in Falmouth, June 10. The award-winning Choir Department’s talented students will feature songs, such as “Cell Block Tango” from “Chicago”; “There are Worse Things I Could Do” from “Grease”; “You Can’t Stop the Beat” from “Hairspray”; and “Guys and Dolls” from “Guys and Dolls.” The evening will include a choice of dinner and show or show only. What began as a suggestion from a high school student in 2008 has turned into an annual event that’s also the biggest fundraiser for the Stafford High School Choir Department. Now marking its tenth year, participants begin practicing and donning costumes that complement the musicals s e v e r a l months in advance to bring the bright lights and allure of Broadway to the high school stage.

Supporting The Arts Since 1997 26

May 2017

“Stafford High School c h o i r students have the platform to perform and showcase their musical abilities at ‘A Stafford High School Night on student Diana Bloom Broadway,’ the sings "Nothing" from and audience is "A Chorus Line" a l w a y s amazed at the talent that’s right here in our community,” said Stafford High School Choral Director Joseph Eveler. “The students enjoy performing at the event, which is one of the most anticipated each year. It’s an opportunity to encourage the students and support the music department’s many activities.” Erin Pugh, who is a senior at Stafford High School, has participated in “A Night on Broadway” for three years. She’ll take center stage with five of her classmates to sing “Cell Block Tango” from the musical, “Chicago.” Pugh enjoys being in the show, because she feels that “belting out” Broadway songs is empowering and a lot of fun.

Front porch fredericksburg

compiled by kevin brown Take a walk around Downtown. Can you find these signs? Answer Key on page 31

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 Rebecca Austin and Caitlin Sherman, of Stafford High School, perform "The Grass is Always Greener" from "Woman of the Year" Pugh enjoys bringing her favorite songs to a wider audience. She currently plans to attend George Mason University for theater and communications in the fall. Eveler said many students who’ve participated in the show previously have continued their love of music and study it in colleges, including Indiana University, the Peabody Conservatory, Westminster Choir College, James Madison University and Catholic University. He said former students have enjoyed successful musical careers in children’s theater and offBroadway. “The students practice and work hard to bring a show that’s top-notch,” said Eveler. “I enjoy the journey we take and the work that goes into producing an event we can all be proud of.” Guests can opt for either the dinner and show or the show only. The dinner, which includes lasagna and vegetarian lasagna, salad, bread and dessert, begins at 5:30 p.m. The show begins at 7 p.m. Tickets for dinner and the show are $20 for adults and $17 for children, students and senior citizens. Tickets for the show only are $10 for adults and $7 for children, students and senior citizens. Dinner and show tickets must be pre-purchased by emailing evelerja@staffordschools.net. Show-only tickets can be purchased at the door. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the high school’s choir program. Stafford High School is located at 63 Indians Lane in Falmouth, Va. “A Night on Broadway” Stafford H.S. Stafford June 10th, 5:30 pm Tkts: evelerja@staffordschools.net or at the door

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is the president of Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Public Relations/Writing.

#7 #8 #9 #10

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Daybreak Affirming earthly paradise I hear songsparrows chant to encourage the sunlight and banish darkness again. Emanations of color flex through ascending clouds in a universe without end that our journey has found I behold the air dancing this daybreak in eternity summoning a history within and know it is a part of me. A new heaven has replaced the storms of yesterday. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 7 years.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

27


On Stage!

FXBG Sign Game how well do you know downtown?

Stafford High School fine arts Department hosts 10th annual “A night on broadway” by Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Enjoy an entertaining evening of songs from some of the most renowned musicals performed by chorus students at the 10th Annual “A Night on Broadway” at Stafford High School in Falmouth, June 10. The award-winning Choir Department’s talented students will feature songs, such as “Cell Block Tango” from “Chicago”; “There are Worse Things I Could Do” from “Grease”; “You Can’t Stop the Beat” from “Hairspray”; and “Guys and Dolls” from “Guys and Dolls.” The evening will include a choice of dinner and show or show only. What began as a suggestion from a high school student in 2008 has turned into an annual event that’s also the biggest fundraiser for the Stafford High School Choir Department. Now marking its tenth year, participants begin practicing and donning costumes that complement the musicals s e v e r a l months in advance to bring the bright lights and allure of Broadway to the high school stage.

Supporting The Arts Since 1997 26

May 2017

“Stafford High School c h o i r students have the platform to perform and showcase their musical abilities at ‘A Stafford High School Night on student Diana Bloom Broadway,’ the sings "Nothing" from and audience is "A Chorus Line" a l w a y s amazed at the talent that’s right here in our community,” said Stafford High School Choral Director Joseph Eveler. “The students enjoy performing at the event, which is one of the most anticipated each year. It’s an opportunity to encourage the students and support the music department’s many activities.” Erin Pugh, who is a senior at Stafford High School, has participated in “A Night on Broadway” for three years. She’ll take center stage with five of her classmates to sing “Cell Block Tango” from the musical, “Chicago.” Pugh enjoys being in the show, because she feels that “belting out” Broadway songs is empowering and a lot of fun.

Front porch fredericksburg

compiled by kevin brown Take a walk around Downtown. Can you find these signs? Answer Key on page 31

#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 Rebecca Austin and Caitlin Sherman, of Stafford High School, perform "The Grass is Always Greener" from "Woman of the Year" Pugh enjoys bringing her favorite songs to a wider audience. She currently plans to attend George Mason University for theater and communications in the fall. Eveler said many students who’ve participated in the show previously have continued their love of music and study it in colleges, including Indiana University, the Peabody Conservatory, Westminster Choir College, James Madison University and Catholic University. He said former students have enjoyed successful musical careers in children’s theater and offBroadway. “The students practice and work hard to bring a show that’s top-notch,” said Eveler. “I enjoy the journey we take and the work that goes into producing an event we can all be proud of.” Guests can opt for either the dinner and show or the show only. The dinner, which includes lasagna and vegetarian lasagna, salad, bread and dessert, begins at 5:30 p.m. The show begins at 7 p.m. Tickets for dinner and the show are $20 for adults and $17 for children, students and senior citizens. Tickets for the show only are $10 for adults and $7 for children, students and senior citizens. Dinner and show tickets must be pre-purchased by emailing evelerja@staffordschools.net. Show-only tickets can be purchased at the door. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the high school’s choir program. Stafford High School is located at 63 Indians Lane in Falmouth, Va. “A Night on Broadway” Stafford H.S. Stafford June 10th, 5:30 pm Tkts: evelerja@staffordschools.net or at the door

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is the president of Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Public Relations/Writing.

#7 #8 #9 #10

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Daybreak Affirming earthly paradise I hear songsparrows chant to encourage the sunlight and banish darkness again. Emanations of color flex through ascending clouds in a universe without end that our journey has found I behold the air dancing this daybreak in eternity summoning a history within and know it is a part of me. A new heaven has replaced the storms of yesterday. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 7 years.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

27


Companions S.P.C.a. courthouse road By georgia strentz

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

It’s All Energy Ground yourself by christina ferber

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

The Grounding Thump (part of the Daily Energy Routine- Front Porch, Jan. and Feb. 2017) is a quick way to get grounded and can also help relieve any feelings of worry. Simply tap on your cheekbones while taking two to three deep breaths.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

One of my favorites is the Quickie Grounder, and aside from grounding you, it just makes you feel good. Do a Hook-Up by placing one finger in your belly button, and another finger in the middle of your forehead. Take a few breaths. Next, place your hands on your waist with your thumbs in the front and hands in the back. Slide them down your legs with pressure and then squeeze the sides of your feet. Take two breaths while holding the sides of your feet and then trace up the inside of your feet and legs.

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Laura Donnell with “Edward” a large, gorgeous, part manx cat available for adoption

“Patsy”

“Sharpie” are waiting for you to come say hi and perhaps fall in love! I do want to mention a darling baby puppy at the shelter, who had to have his badly injured leg amputated, and is waiting for his forever home. He is so brave, and was in a basket, healing in Ali's office. She takes him everywhere with her,

28

May 2017

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

Do you ever feel spacey or disconnected? What about feeling tired for no reason or having trouble staying focused? Luckily, there may be a simple fix that can help us reconnect, invigorate us, and according to some studies, even help with inflammation. It is called grounding, or earthing, and just like we ground an outlet for better functionality, it can help us feel more connected and improve our emotional and physical well-being. One of the best ways to ground is through nature. Simply walking barefoot in the grass (especially wet grass) can do wonders by pulling in the healing energy of Mother Earth through acupressure points on the bottoms of your feet. If getting outside is not an option, Eden Energy Medicine offers some do-it-yourself techniques to help us ground, so that we can live healthier lives.

Here we are back at this wonderful animal shelter, visiting some precious dogs and cats, with their dedicated, temporary caretakers. Laura Donnell, our volunteer for last month is here again, along with the director and volunteer director, Ali Carlin, to show off some of their new arrivals who

The beautiful and mysterious Sharpie,a black long-haired cat that Laura is holding in the picture is gorgeous and friendly. So pale, sweet, and loving, our unusual white dog with the beautiful eyes,described as "a love bug.". Next month in Front Porch, there will be some very interesting information about some new programs they have created,to help get their dogs out in the community, perhaps to meet you.. Want to help? fburgspca.org(volunteer) ; Youth volunteers needed: alifredspca@gmail,com, Foster a cat or dog? www.fburgspca.org . All pictured animals are available for adoption.

Front porch fredericksburg

Art from the heart

the energy from each finger.

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

please come see him. I did not want to include his picture, as his wound is still quite new. He is such a brave little soul, his eyes will melt your heart. Check out "Patsy," a unique personality-plus cat, with her stylish sweater. She has some special needs, but is so smart and playful, you will be as charmed as I was.

Inner Child Meets Higher Self

Our feet are powerful grounding tools, and rocking back and forth by raising up on your toes and back on your heels is a great grounding technique. You can also open your foot ‘gaits’ by massaging in between the bones on the top of your feet, rubbing the bottom of your feet by pushing in and stretching the heels away from the balls of your feet, and squeezing down the sides. You can work your hand ‘gaits’ as well, by rubbing the palms of each hand with your thumb and massaging in between the bones on the back side of the hand. Finish by pulling off

Taking Down the Flame is also great to do before bed for a better night’s sleep, and can lower blood pressure if done on a regular basis. Take a deep breath in and out with your hands on your thighs. On the next inhale, raise your hands on either side of your body and connect them above your head so that your fingers and thumbs meet. Bring them down to your head, touching your thumbs to the top of your head, and exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to the middle of your forehead, exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to your heart, exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to your naval, exhale. On the next inhale, flatten your hands on your thighs and move them down your legs, and off your toes. Then trace your hands up the inside of your legs, finishing in the same spot you started. To see videos of these techniques, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com. Whatever tool that you use, studies have shown that maintaining your grounding can improve your circulation, reduce inflammation, and helps the nervous system function properly. It is also a fantastic way to maintain a healthier emotional outlook, so get grounded!

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

By mary beth geil Have you ever had the opportunity to finger paint? If so, it was likely during childhood and you may not have been tuned into your higher self. Luckily, a few people from the Fredericksburg area and a Marylander had the opportunity to let the inner child meet the higher self through participation in an Intuitive Art Messaging Meditation. Melinda Radcliffe Roseman (right) facilitated the meditative art sessions just recently, and for the first time in Fredericksburg. Thanks to Will and Christie for use of a space at their business, Renewal Massage, to hold the session. According to MerriamWebster.com, intuition is “quick and ready insight” and the definition for meditate is “to engage in mental exercise (as concentration on one's breathing or repetition of a mantra) for the purpose of reaching a heightened level of spiritual awareness”. For this class, meditation

Mary Beth’s Intuitive Art facilitated our intuitive expression into an art form. Meditation and art by themselves are therapeutic. Together, they rock. One of the class participants described it as a lot of fun and great experience. Melinda started by demonstrating various techniques to apply the paint to the canvas. A sixteen inch by twelve inch canvas and a large color selection of acrylic paints and supplies (brushes, sponges, string, feathers, etc.) were provided to create the artwork. She led us in a guided mediation in which we walked down a path that led around a hotel to a point where an easel was set up. We began to paint on that easel in our meditation. We were then brought back to the room while still in a light meditative state and started to manifest our painting. After that, we were led back to our easels and walked back the

path to our starting point where we came out of our meditative state. We then finished our paintings. When everyone was finished, those who were comfortable doing so explained their painting. The other participants were then asked to share what they saw in other’s pictures. In most cases, a feature was pointed out that the artist was unaware of. In my case, there was an angel. There were dragonflies in another. Each painting was unique. It was truly art from the heart. Melinda lives in North Carolina. She is a professional artist. Her artwork has been exhibited in art galleries in North Carolina and South Carolina. She started painting at the age of three. She only used her gifts personally up until recently. In the last few years, she was led to share her gift through leading workshops and performing private readings. This is her third visit to our area and hopefully not the last. She also performs private readings during her visits. During the private reading, she draws pictures or symbols she receives from spirit. While she draws, messages come through for you through the art. To contact her, visit www.intuitive-art.org. If you would be interested in participating in this session when offered in Fredericksburg in the future, please contact me at mbethgeil@gmail.com.

Mary Beth Geil was a participant in the art session. She lives in Spotsylvania and works at Dahlgren.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

29


Companions S.P.C.a. courthouse road By georgia strentz

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

It’s All Energy Ground yourself by christina ferber

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

The Grounding Thump (part of the Daily Energy Routine- Front Porch, Jan. and Feb. 2017) is a quick way to get grounded and can also help relieve any feelings of worry. Simply tap on your cheekbones while taking two to three deep breaths.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

One of my favorites is the Quickie Grounder, and aside from grounding you, it just makes you feel good. Do a Hook-Up by placing one finger in your belly button, and another finger in the middle of your forehead. Take a few breaths. Next, place your hands on your waist with your thumbs in the front and hands in the back. Slide them down your legs with pressure and then squeeze the sides of your feet. Take two breaths while holding the sides of your feet and then trace up the inside of your feet and legs.

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Laura Donnell with “Edward” a large, gorgeous, part manx cat available for adoption

“Patsy”

“Sharpie” are waiting for you to come say hi and perhaps fall in love! I do want to mention a darling baby puppy at the shelter, who had to have his badly injured leg amputated, and is waiting for his forever home. He is so brave, and was in a basket, healing in Ali's office. She takes him everywhere with her,

28

May 2017

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

Do you ever feel spacey or disconnected? What about feeling tired for no reason or having trouble staying focused? Luckily, there may be a simple fix that can help us reconnect, invigorate us, and according to some studies, even help with inflammation. It is called grounding, or earthing, and just like we ground an outlet for better functionality, it can help us feel more connected and improve our emotional and physical well-being. One of the best ways to ground is through nature. Simply walking barefoot in the grass (especially wet grass) can do wonders by pulling in the healing energy of Mother Earth through acupressure points on the bottoms of your feet. If getting outside is not an option, Eden Energy Medicine offers some do-it-yourself techniques to help us ground, so that we can live healthier lives.

Here we are back at this wonderful animal shelter, visiting some precious dogs and cats, with their dedicated, temporary caretakers. Laura Donnell, our volunteer for last month is here again, along with the director and volunteer director, Ali Carlin, to show off some of their new arrivals who

The beautiful and mysterious Sharpie,a black long-haired cat that Laura is holding in the picture is gorgeous and friendly. So pale, sweet, and loving, our unusual white dog with the beautiful eyes,described as "a love bug.". Next month in Front Porch, there will be some very interesting information about some new programs they have created,to help get their dogs out in the community, perhaps to meet you.. Want to help? fburgspca.org(volunteer) ; Youth volunteers needed: alifredspca@gmail,com, Foster a cat or dog? www.fburgspca.org . All pictured animals are available for adoption.

Front porch fredericksburg

Art from the heart

the energy from each finger.

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

please come see him. I did not want to include his picture, as his wound is still quite new. He is such a brave little soul, his eyes will melt your heart. Check out "Patsy," a unique personality-plus cat, with her stylish sweater. She has some special needs, but is so smart and playful, you will be as charmed as I was.

Inner Child Meets Higher Self

Our feet are powerful grounding tools, and rocking back and forth by raising up on your toes and back on your heels is a great grounding technique. You can also open your foot ‘gaits’ by massaging in between the bones on the top of your feet, rubbing the bottom of your feet by pushing in and stretching the heels away from the balls of your feet, and squeezing down the sides. You can work your hand ‘gaits’ as well, by rubbing the palms of each hand with your thumb and massaging in between the bones on the back side of the hand. Finish by pulling off

Taking Down the Flame is also great to do before bed for a better night’s sleep, and can lower blood pressure if done on a regular basis. Take a deep breath in and out with your hands on your thighs. On the next inhale, raise your hands on either side of your body and connect them above your head so that your fingers and thumbs meet. Bring them down to your head, touching your thumbs to the top of your head, and exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to the middle of your forehead, exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to your heart, exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to your naval, exhale. On the next inhale, flatten your hands on your thighs and move them down your legs, and off your toes. Then trace your hands up the inside of your legs, finishing in the same spot you started. To see videos of these techniques, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com. Whatever tool that you use, studies have shown that maintaining your grounding can improve your circulation, reduce inflammation, and helps the nervous system function properly. It is also a fantastic way to maintain a healthier emotional outlook, so get grounded!

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

By mary beth geil Have you ever had the opportunity to finger paint? If so, it was likely during childhood and you may not have been tuned into your higher self. Luckily, a few people from the Fredericksburg area and a Marylander had the opportunity to let the inner child meet the higher self through participation in an Intuitive Art Messaging Meditation. Melinda Radcliffe Roseman (right) facilitated the meditative art sessions just recently, and for the first time in Fredericksburg. Thanks to Will and Christie for use of a space at their business, Renewal Massage, to hold the session. According to MerriamWebster.com, intuition is “quick and ready insight” and the definition for meditate is “to engage in mental exercise (as concentration on one's breathing or repetition of a mantra) for the purpose of reaching a heightened level of spiritual awareness”. For this class, meditation

Mary Beth’s Intuitive Art facilitated our intuitive expression into an art form. Meditation and art by themselves are therapeutic. Together, they rock. One of the class participants described it as a lot of fun and great experience. Melinda started by demonstrating various techniques to apply the paint to the canvas. A sixteen inch by twelve inch canvas and a large color selection of acrylic paints and supplies (brushes, sponges, string, feathers, etc.) were provided to create the artwork. She led us in a guided mediation in which we walked down a path that led around a hotel to a point where an easel was set up. We began to paint on that easel in our meditation. We were then brought back to the room while still in a light meditative state and started to manifest our painting. After that, we were led back to our easels and walked back the

path to our starting point where we came out of our meditative state. We then finished our paintings. When everyone was finished, those who were comfortable doing so explained their painting. The other participants were then asked to share what they saw in other’s pictures. In most cases, a feature was pointed out that the artist was unaware of. In my case, there was an angel. There were dragonflies in another. Each painting was unique. It was truly art from the heart. Melinda lives in North Carolina. She is a professional artist. Her artwork has been exhibited in art galleries in North Carolina and South Carolina. She started painting at the age of three. She only used her gifts personally up until recently. In the last few years, she was led to share her gift through leading workshops and performing private readings. This is her third visit to our area and hopefully not the last. She also performs private readings during her visits. During the private reading, she draws pictures or symbols she receives from spirit. While she draws, messages come through for you through the art. To contact her, visit www.intuitive-art.org. If you would be interested in participating in this session when offered in Fredericksburg in the future, please contact me at mbethgeil@gmail.com.

Mary Beth Geil was a participant in the art session. She lives in Spotsylvania and works at Dahlgren.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS carol & frank mauro by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About I am only one,but I still am someone. I cannot do everything, but I can still do something. Therefore, I will not refuse to do the one thing I can do. ~ Mother Theresa

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #31: View from Brock’s Terrace (Leaving Fredericksburg) This image was a “first” for me in many ways. It was the first painting of Fredericksburg I did in a “1930’s travel poster style.” It was the first painting I did at this larger scale (3 ft. x 4 ft.). It was the first painting that became a limited-edition print for me … something that I do for almost all my Fredericksburg paintings now. It was an inspiring piece to do, right from the beginning as I adapted it from a photo my wife took while we were having an anniversary dinner sitting on the outside terrace at Brock’s. It’s also the first image that I’ve changed the name of over the years (more than a few times). I always wondered why paintings in museum’s sometimes had multiple names. Now I know. The meaning for me of this painting has changed at different times and previous names I gave it no longer seemed to fit. That’s why the prints of this image at the Gallery no longer even carry a name, just the edition number and my signature. That used to bother me, but not too much anymore. I figure, with a little practice, I’ll finally get it right one of these days! Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

the new guy

Carol Mauro gave me this quote. It was such a pleasure to meet Carol and Frank Mauro, two Fredericksburgers who live so similar to the philosophy of Mother Theresa. Many years ago, I met a very inspiring teacher named Carol Mauro at Drew Middle School, where we both taught our little emerging Fredericksburgers. Believe it or not, she and I both observed, middle-schoolers can grow up to be lovely adults!. As the years have passed, Frank was involved in his career in the Marines, and he and Carol raised their two children,in Spotsylvania,worked in their church and charities, helping devotedly in many capacities in our community.. But unexpectedly, their story changed (as they say, life happens) when their daughter Dawn, decided to adopt a baby from Nepal. Carol and her daughter traveled the many miles to Nepal, to the Sagarmatha Children's Home, which provides food,shelter,education and clothing, to a huge population of orphaned, vulnerable children ages 3-15. The population, includes abandoned children and those with special needs who could not hope to survive on the streets without help. Seeing the tremendous needs of the children there, changed Carol and Frank's and their family lives forever. They brought their precious baby girl Sophia, home to America, but also with the memory of the struggling orphanage high in the mountains, with the eyes of

the hungry children burned into their minds and souls. When Carol and Dawn returned,with S o p h i a , f r o m Nepal,they were determined to help the children. I peeked into Carol's sewing room, in which she spends many hours per day sewing beautiful purses,which she sells through the Baby Closet ,(Cathy Love, v o l u n t e e r coordinator) which is in the Breezewood Shopping Center next to St, Vincent Food Distribution Center, where incidentally, Frank is operations manager. Frank and Carol's personal financial support of the home in Nepal, has so far added solar panels to the roof, and a water purification system, so the children have healthful water. Frank retired from the Marine Corps. in 1987, and then went on to work at private companies in our area. He is now retired from this retirement career and devoting his time to the free food distribution Center for St. Vincent De Paul in the Breezewood Shopping Center on Rte 208 in Spotsylvania. Frank says "we turn no one away who needs food or clothing." Frank spends 2-3 hours per day at the store, and says, "charity begins at home," and "I am glad to give my time to someone in need" What an inspirational couple, who have a wonderful partnership with each other and their arms outstretched to the world around them. Lucky them, lucky us, that they chose to become "Fredericksburgers. "

UMW coolest president by marty morris The University of Mary Washington rolled out the red carpet for "America's Coolest College President." The premiere screening of The New Guy, featuring UMW President Troy D. Paino, drew cheers from students, faculty, staff, alumni and the community. The six-part YouTube video series follows the University's 10th president as he discovers uniquely Mary Washington experiences.

bold approaches," ESVC Executive Director Jamie Smith said of the production. "The New Guy is a truly collaborative project about storytelling and authenticity." The camera loves Paino, who grabbed attention in “T-Pain Misses You”, a humorous film about a lonesome university president on a student-less campus during holiday break. The 2013 YouTube sensation, filmed when Paino was president of Missouri's Truman State

Shot over the past several months by Enterprise Screen Video Communications (ESVC), the production took Paino across campus, into the Fredericksburg community and to nearby Washington, D.C., just a train ride away. "The best thing about working on this project was the community support we received," said Assistant Director of Design Services Maria Schultz, who served as lead series producer. "Every single person, inside or outside of UMW, went above and beyond to help." "What stood out was UMW's willingness to be creative and try new,

University, garnered thousands of views and won him a spot among "America's coolest college presidents." Now, at UMW, Paino's YouTube return comes from the context of all firstyear students. "In filming The New Guy, I had a unique perspective from which to see how special Mary Washington is," Paino said. "At times, I felt like I was 18 - until, that is, I went by a mirror."

Marty Morris is the director of media & public relations at UMW

FXBG Sign Game Answer Key:

This downtown girl is greasing up her bike chain, putting the top down on her ancient convertible, summer is here!!

1.H; 2.E; 3.D; 4.F; 5.B; 6.I ; 7.A; 8.G; 9.J; 10.C

"All God's Children International," is a 501 charity which arranges for the sponsorship of children in Nepal (AllGodsChildren,org) Donations made through the St. Mathews Church in Spotsylvania or through Carol, are donated directly to the Sagarmatha Orphanage in Nepal. Carol's work has led to her invitation into the Fredericksburg Catholic Sister Cities Committee.

A. Visitor's Center B. Train Station C. Open Late Sign D. Fredericksburg Jeweler E. Antique Mall F. Fredericksburg Square G. Renwick Building H. Bavarian Chef I. Fredericksburg Brew Exchange J. Post Office front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS carol & frank mauro by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About I am only one,but I still am someone. I cannot do everything, but I can still do something. Therefore, I will not refuse to do the one thing I can do. ~ Mother Theresa

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #31: View from Brock’s Terrace (Leaving Fredericksburg) This image was a “first” for me in many ways. It was the first painting of Fredericksburg I did in a “1930’s travel poster style.” It was the first painting I did at this larger scale (3 ft. x 4 ft.). It was the first painting that became a limited-edition print for me … something that I do for almost all my Fredericksburg paintings now. It was an inspiring piece to do, right from the beginning as I adapted it from a photo my wife took while we were having an anniversary dinner sitting on the outside terrace at Brock’s. It’s also the first image that I’ve changed the name of over the years (more than a few times). I always wondered why paintings in museum’s sometimes had multiple names. Now I know. The meaning for me of this painting has changed at different times and previous names I gave it no longer seemed to fit. That’s why the prints of this image at the Gallery no longer even carry a name, just the edition number and my signature. That used to bother me, but not too much anymore. I figure, with a little practice, I’ll finally get it right one of these days! Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

May 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

the new guy

Carol Mauro gave me this quote. It was such a pleasure to meet Carol and Frank Mauro, two Fredericksburgers who live so similar to the philosophy of Mother Theresa. Many years ago, I met a very inspiring teacher named Carol Mauro at Drew Middle School, where we both taught our little emerging Fredericksburgers. Believe it or not, she and I both observed, middle-schoolers can grow up to be lovely adults!. As the years have passed, Frank was involved in his career in the Marines, and he and Carol raised their two children,in Spotsylvania,worked in their church and charities, helping devotedly in many capacities in our community.. But unexpectedly, their story changed (as they say, life happens) when their daughter Dawn, decided to adopt a baby from Nepal. Carol and her daughter traveled the many miles to Nepal, to the Sagarmatha Children's Home, which provides food,shelter,education and clothing, to a huge population of orphaned, vulnerable children ages 3-15. The population, includes abandoned children and those with special needs who could not hope to survive on the streets without help. Seeing the tremendous needs of the children there, changed Carol and Frank's and their family lives forever. They brought their precious baby girl Sophia, home to America, but also with the memory of the struggling orphanage high in the mountains, with the eyes of

the hungry children burned into their minds and souls. When Carol and Dawn returned,with S o p h i a , f r o m Nepal,they were determined to help the children. I peeked into Carol's sewing room, in which she spends many hours per day sewing beautiful purses,which she sells through the Baby Closet ,(Cathy Love, v o l u n t e e r coordinator) which is in the Breezewood Shopping Center next to St, Vincent Food Distribution Center, where incidentally, Frank is operations manager. Frank and Carol's personal financial support of the home in Nepal, has so far added solar panels to the roof, and a water purification system, so the children have healthful water. Frank retired from the Marine Corps. in 1987, and then went on to work at private companies in our area. He is now retired from this retirement career and devoting his time to the free food distribution Center for St. Vincent De Paul in the Breezewood Shopping Center on Rte 208 in Spotsylvania. Frank says "we turn no one away who needs food or clothing." Frank spends 2-3 hours per day at the store, and says, "charity begins at home," and "I am glad to give my time to someone in need" What an inspirational couple, who have a wonderful partnership with each other and their arms outstretched to the world around them. Lucky them, lucky us, that they chose to become "Fredericksburgers. "

UMW coolest president by marty morris The University of Mary Washington rolled out the red carpet for "America's Coolest College President." The premiere screening of The New Guy, featuring UMW President Troy D. Paino, drew cheers from students, faculty, staff, alumni and the community. The six-part YouTube video series follows the University's 10th president as he discovers uniquely Mary Washington experiences.

bold approaches," ESVC Executive Director Jamie Smith said of the production. "The New Guy is a truly collaborative project about storytelling and authenticity." The camera loves Paino, who grabbed attention in “T-Pain Misses You”, a humorous film about a lonesome university president on a student-less campus during holiday break. The 2013 YouTube sensation, filmed when Paino was president of Missouri's Truman State

Shot over the past several months by Enterprise Screen Video Communications (ESVC), the production took Paino across campus, into the Fredericksburg community and to nearby Washington, D.C., just a train ride away. "The best thing about working on this project was the community support we received," said Assistant Director of Design Services Maria Schultz, who served as lead series producer. "Every single person, inside or outside of UMW, went above and beyond to help." "What stood out was UMW's willingness to be creative and try new,

University, garnered thousands of views and won him a spot among "America's coolest college presidents." Now, at UMW, Paino's YouTube return comes from the context of all firstyear students. "In filming The New Guy, I had a unique perspective from which to see how special Mary Washington is," Paino said. "At times, I felt like I was 18 - until, that is, I went by a mirror."

Marty Morris is the director of media & public relations at UMW

FXBG Sign Game Answer Key:

This downtown girl is greasing up her bike chain, putting the top down on her ancient convertible, summer is here!!

1.H; 2.E; 3.D; 4.F; 5.B; 6.I ; 7.A; 8.G; 9.J; 10.C

"All God's Children International," is a 501 charity which arranges for the sponsorship of children in Nepal (AllGodsChildren,org) Donations made through the St. Mathews Church in Spotsylvania or through Carol, are donated directly to the Sagarmatha Orphanage in Nepal. Carol's work has led to her invitation into the Fredericksburg Catholic Sister Cities Committee.

A. Visitor's Center B. Train Station C. Open Late Sign D. Fredericksburg Jeweler E. Antique Mall F. Fredericksburg Square G. Renwick Building H. Bavarian Chef I. Fredericksburg Brew Exchange J. Post Office front porch fredericksburg

May 2017

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Front Porch Fredericksburg - May 2017  
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