Page 1

YOUR GUIDE TO THE LOCAL GOOD LIFE

front porch T H E R E G I O N ' S free C O M M U N I T Y M A G A Z I N E

L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97 YEAR 19 • ISSUE 227 • JUNE 2016

Frontporchfredericksburg.com


contents

closeups 5

Tom Fortune ...doctor, nature photographer

9

Empowering through images ...kerry renee

18

20 companions: ‘tis the season for fleas & ticks 21

5

22 23

Christine Thompson ...celebrating 20 years serving fxbg community

23

porch talk 3

Trista Chapman: veteran artist & businesswoman

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

.6

downtown buzz: quarterly update

8

fxbg photo club celebrates 30 years

10

shouldn’t you be in school?

11

soil & water: working for you

12

va wineries: adult playgrounds

13

season’s bounty: in tune with june

14

Cooking with Kyle...english muffins in season

16-17

Calendar of events

mind your mind: compassion emancipated patients: know your doctors foibles Senior Care: lower fall risks

veteran artist & business Owner

art of aging expo

24

art in the ‘burg: summer @ sophia street studios

25

stories of fredericksburg: Jay Anderson

26

a walk in the woods

27

youth writing clubs

28

first friday openings poetryman: introspections

29

fxbgers: Andora Brady & Kelly Ashley

30

fredericksburg sketches Mindfullness

31

from my porch: time travel & gardenias

forging relationships...juneteenth celebration

7

Trista Chapman

history’s stories.: frederick prince of wales our heritage: diaries & journals

By emily hollingsworth

25

...And more! 15

15

Bistro bethem...an old favorite revisited

19

playgrounds not just for kids

31

then & now

Cover By Kerry rENEE

Maintaining a successful business and art career for more than two decades are not easy endeavors. Trista Chapman, artist and owner of Sophia Street Studios on 1104 Sophia Street, has mastered all of these, and over the past year has experienced rewards and challenges with her business. Chapman has supported herself through her art, primarily pottery, for 21 years, selling her art in and beyond her studio. Chapman often travels on weekends from spring to autumn, vending her pottery at juried fine art and craft shows in Virginia and other locations in the east coast. At home, Chapman drums up business by increasing signs through the area, increasing advertising and preparing for new streams of customers due to new businesses opening near the store. Her success in the studio and out of state have grown in part due to her collaborations with other artists in the community. Neal Reed, who previously worked at LibertyTown Arts Workshop, is

also a potter who shares space and works with Chapman in the studio. He also watches the studio when Chapman travels for shows. Chapman and Reed regularly get clients from LibertyTown, and they both display their work at the LibertyTown gallery. Chapman and Reed also share store space with Pots and Palettes, an area business that rents the first floor of the studio that has also brought in a new set of customers. One of the largest challenges of operating the studio, according to Chapman, has been the studio’s more secluded location. Out of the way from Caroline Street and other popular areas downtown, Sophia Street can sometimes be missed by passerby’s. “Even folks who have lived in town for years sometimes stumble in and think this must be a new business,” Chapman said. “They are surprised to learn that this has been a working studio and gallery since 1982!” Over the past year, Chapman has

worked to attract people to the studio through launching the Annual Spring Studio Celebration and the Annual Ice Cream Contest. The contest, occurring in August this year, awards handcrafted bowls to the most delicious homemade ice cream submitted. The winner is decided through a vote, where customers are given samples of the flavors. Chapman’s vision for increased art exposure in the community is not only limited to her studio, but to the Fredericksburg community as well. She has contemplated uniting artists and businesses in downtown Fredericksburg and planning an outdoor art show that could potentially become an annual event. Though rewarding, being an artist and business owner requires endurance, according to Chapman. “Making a living with your work is not for the faint of heart,” Chapman said. “Even after 21 years of selling pots I am never relaxed or complacent.” Though lacking conventional benefits such as a 9-5 schedule or having weekends off, Chapman said that her

career has been gratifying by allowing her to create with her hands, and to meet and keep in contact with artists and friends within and beyond Fredericksburg. For those interested in starting a business or making a career through art, Chapman says what she has lived for 21 years: “Have an unfailing, unflinching work ethic!” Emily Hollingsworth covers all aspects of life in the ‘Burg every month in Front Porch

Snead’s Farm

Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

June Roadside Stand

NOW IN! Raspberries, Blackberries, Tall Tunnel Tomatoes, Blueberries, Squash, Snow Peas

PLUS Snead Farm Raspberry & Blackberry Preserves, Snead Maranara Sauce & Free Range Eggs

10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

Open 9-5 Daily

540/371-9328

www.sneadsfarm.com

Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias & Olde Town Butcher 2

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

3


contents

closeups 5

Tom Fortune ...doctor, nature photographer

9

Empowering through images ...kerry renee

18

20 companions: ‘tis the season for fleas & ticks 21

5

22 23

Christine Thompson ...celebrating 20 years serving fxbg community

23

porch talk 3

Trista Chapman: veteran artist & businesswoman

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

.6

downtown buzz: quarterly update

8

fxbg photo club celebrates 30 years

10

shouldn’t you be in school?

11

soil & water: working for you

12

va wineries: adult playgrounds

13

season’s bounty: in tune with june

14

Cooking with Kyle...english muffins in season

16-17

Calendar of events

mind your mind: compassion emancipated patients: know your doctors foibles Senior Care: lower fall risks

veteran artist & business Owner

art of aging expo

24

art in the ‘burg: summer @ sophia street studios

25

stories of fredericksburg: Jay Anderson

26

a walk in the woods

27

youth writing clubs

28

first friday openings poetryman: introspections

29

fxbgers: Andora Brady & Kelly Ashley

30

fredericksburg sketches Mindfullness

31

from my porch: time travel & gardenias

forging relationships...juneteenth celebration

7

Trista Chapman

history’s stories.: frederick prince of wales our heritage: diaries & journals

By emily hollingsworth

25

...And more! 15

15

Bistro bethem...an old favorite revisited

19

playgrounds not just for kids

31

then & now

Cover By Kerry rENEE

Maintaining a successful business and art career for more than two decades are not easy endeavors. Trista Chapman, artist and owner of Sophia Street Studios on 1104 Sophia Street, has mastered all of these, and over the past year has experienced rewards and challenges with her business. Chapman has supported herself through her art, primarily pottery, for 21 years, selling her art in and beyond her studio. Chapman often travels on weekends from spring to autumn, vending her pottery at juried fine art and craft shows in Virginia and other locations in the east coast. At home, Chapman drums up business by increasing signs through the area, increasing advertising and preparing for new streams of customers due to new businesses opening near the store. Her success in the studio and out of state have grown in part due to her collaborations with other artists in the community. Neal Reed, who previously worked at LibertyTown Arts Workshop, is

also a potter who shares space and works with Chapman in the studio. He also watches the studio when Chapman travels for shows. Chapman and Reed regularly get clients from LibertyTown, and they both display their work at the LibertyTown gallery. Chapman and Reed also share store space with Pots and Palettes, an area business that rents the first floor of the studio that has also brought in a new set of customers. One of the largest challenges of operating the studio, according to Chapman, has been the studio’s more secluded location. Out of the way from Caroline Street and other popular areas downtown, Sophia Street can sometimes be missed by passerby’s. “Even folks who have lived in town for years sometimes stumble in and think this must be a new business,” Chapman said. “They are surprised to learn that this has been a working studio and gallery since 1982!” Over the past year, Chapman has

worked to attract people to the studio through launching the Annual Spring Studio Celebration and the Annual Ice Cream Contest. The contest, occurring in August this year, awards handcrafted bowls to the most delicious homemade ice cream submitted. The winner is decided through a vote, where customers are given samples of the flavors. Chapman’s vision for increased art exposure in the community is not only limited to her studio, but to the Fredericksburg community as well. She has contemplated uniting artists and businesses in downtown Fredericksburg and planning an outdoor art show that could potentially become an annual event. Though rewarding, being an artist and business owner requires endurance, according to Chapman. “Making a living with your work is not for the faint of heart,” Chapman said. “Even after 21 years of selling pots I am never relaxed or complacent.” Though lacking conventional benefits such as a 9-5 schedule or having weekends off, Chapman said that her

career has been gratifying by allowing her to create with her hands, and to meet and keep in contact with artists and friends within and beyond Fredericksburg. For those interested in starting a business or making a career through art, Chapman says what she has lived for 21 years: “Have an unfailing, unflinching work ethic!” Emily Hollingsworth covers all aspects of life in the ‘Burg every month in Front Porch

Snead’s Farm

Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

June Roadside Stand

NOW IN! Raspberries, Blackberries, Tall Tunnel Tomatoes, Blueberries, Squash, Snow Peas

PLUS Snead Farm Raspberry & Blackberry Preserves, Snead Maranara Sauce & Free Range Eggs

10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

Open 9-5 Daily

540/371-9328

www.sneadsfarm.com

Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias & Olde Town Butcher 2

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

3


Kathy Harrigan

Nancy Bauer Kevin Brown Judy Chaimson Rick Collier Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Joan M. Geisler Ruth Golden

A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara Beverley Coates Tom Conway Todd Drake Frank Fratoe Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Emily Hollinsworth Karl Karch Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Pam Pell Ryan Poe M.L. Powers Amy Raposo Kerry Renee Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Emmett Snead Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz Jeremy Sutton James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

June 2016

On the Trails

engaged and curious

tom fortune, doctor & nature photographer

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists

4

ON THE PORCH

By Kevin Brown

BY kathy harrigan Each of us is a member of multiple communities. I have circles of friends and family, organizations to which I devote my time, my work, and my favorite ‘third places’ (those places I frequent that are neither home nor work). With each, I feel a fellowship with others as we share common attitudes, interests, experiences and goals. Each community gives me a sense of belonging. It has been nearly 40 years since I came to Fredericksburg as a Mary Washington College freshman. In school I built strong friendships, many of which I still have and value today. However, it took me several years to feel like I was part of the broader Fredericksburg community. It wasn’t until I realized that to be part of the community I needed to step from the sidelines and join into the life of the community that was flowing around me. I had chosen to make Fredericksburg my home. Now it was time to learn what that really meant and how to choose to be part of the community. When I did, it felt like ‘the town’ blossomed around me into endless possibilities. In hindsight it was mutual; not only did town open up before me, but the people I met, and experiences I had, enriched my life and I opened up too. Today the term ‘community building’ is used casually and frequently. But there is nothing casual about the process. It is an active and intensely personal process. It is one we do from the inside out. We participate; we offer our selves as part of something larger than our individual beings. In the process we help to build and define that community and in doing so we build and define ourselves. I frequently joke that Fredericksburg is a place of 2 degrees of separation (3 at most) between its

individuals and communities. You just need to be curious, engage in a conversation with the person sitting next to you at the coffee shop or a summer lawn concert – and voila – you realize the common threads; the people you know, the things you love, the places you’ve been. It surprises me sometimes when I realize how my communities overlap with someone else’s – especially when we have only just met. And then, at other times I find great joy in finding no overlap at all, at least until that very moment when you realize that the conversation you are having and the experience you are sharing is the common point of reference on which to build a whole new world of experiences and community. The variety of community is the spice of my life. Where they overlap they reinforce the connections and networks and give me strength. Where they diverge it provides a sense of exploration and adventure. All of it is good. Between the pages of the Front Porch I find yet another community, one I share with all of us who read it. It stretches from this issue back through the decades. When I commuted to Northern Virginia I read it on the train. When I traveled extensively for work it provided a thread back to home base. In its pages I found the spirit of my home town and all of you; a vibrant and diverse membership.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

In the early days of the Front Porch, Rob Grogan was the front man. The baton has passed to Lexi and Virginia. As with many of you, I still miss Rob regularly but wouldn’t trade the sorrow of losing him for the experience of knowing him and learning from him about community. Rob taught me about being engaged and curious, open to wonder about the people and communities around him. You would have to look long and hard to find a better example of a community than the Front Porch and of community builders than the Grogan Family and all of us who share this community with them. Kathy Harrigan will read this issue of the Front Porch from cover-to-cover on the front porch of the Friends of the Rappahannock

messages Front Porch What a great cover (May 2016, Beverley Coates, 2400 Diner) Jo Richardson Grogan

I love the photo of Johnny on the cover of the February issue--and those paintings, which truly capture his heart! Collette Caprara

Front porch fredericksburg

Dear Virginia, Lexi and Staff, I love Front Porch magazinealways have! My watercolor 2400 Diner Corner on May, 2016 cover is a thrilling highlight in my artistic journey. Art can be an uplifting way for people to share talent and ideas. It is inspiring that readers so graciously responded. Thank you Front Porch and writer Collette Caprara for sharing my artwork. Beverley Coates

Front Porch: What a fabulous example of true community spirit and fellowship. I live in the midwest, where we are known for our community spirit. However, even we do not have such a fine publication that celebrates our people. Congrats and keep up te great work. Vince Connoroy, Ill.

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

We are very Tom Fortun(at)e to live here in Fredericksburg, Virginia! Why? Because we have a local doctor named Tom Fortune who takes fabulous, jaw-dropping nature photos and posts them regularly on the “On the Fredericksburg VA Trails” Facebook page. And if you haven’t seen these masterpieces, you… my friend… are very, very un-Tom Fortunate! So this month, we are happy to feature this generous citizen who freely shares images of the natural wonders right outside our front door. We asked Tom to share a bit about how he developed his passion for nature photography. “During our travels, my wife and I have always been awed by the grandeur of landscapes and the beauty of the wildlife. After years of frustration taking poor quality photos, I determined

to acquire enough knowledge and skill to create photographs that were worthy of our experiences. I read books, watched videos, took a number of online courses, and practiced as often as possible. During the course of these efforts, I discovered that I actually enjoyed being outdoors with a camera in my hand even when not visiting some exotic location. Here in Fredericksburg, I have found there are many interesting things to photograph. I like to stake out an area along the river bank with a good view in the early morning or late evening hours when the light is good, and wait for things to happen. When the shad are running in the springtime, heron and osprey display their amazing fishing capabilities. Anglers and kayakers provide ample photographic opportunities. One thing that always astounds me is how people overlook the wildlife and natural beauty around them. I have watched bald eagles soar quite

literally above the heads of folks on the Heritage Trail, completely oblivious to the marvels that a slight tip of the head upward would reveal. My real hope is that m y photographs, and those of the other local n a t u r e photographers Jason like Sosobee, Judy Muffley, and N i g e l Haarstad, will make the trail users more

aware of the excitement that lies within a few hundred feet (or sometimes even closer) to their daily activities. With greater appreciation will hopefully come enhanced preservation of our city’s natural landscape.

Most serious photographers like talking about equipment, so here is my take on that. I use readily available consumer equipment, a midrange DSLR, wide angle zoom, telephoto zoom. Other accessories such as a tripod or monopod are frequently needed. Recently I have been experimenting with off camera flash for some wildlife shots, and neutral density filters for landscapes. I always shoot raw and process my images in Adobe Lightroom. With all that being said, I have come to understand that the most important piece of gear is the brain and eyes of the photographer. Without a creative vision, the best equipment will make only mediocre pictures at best. Finally, Fredericksburg has made great strides in building a first-class trails system. The thousands of locals and tourists who travel our Heritage/Canal Trail Loop every week are proof of high demand for outdoors activity that exists in this community. I am confident that the city will continue enhancing our trails, and to dedicate sufficient city resources to keep them clean!” Thanks for sharing your talents Tom, and we look forward to enjoying more of those fabulous, jaw-dropping photos taken “On the Trails”.

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

5


Kathy Harrigan

Nancy Bauer Kevin Brown Judy Chaimson Rick Collier Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Joan M. Geisler Ruth Golden

A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara Beverley Coates Tom Conway Todd Drake Frank Fratoe Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Emily Hollinsworth Karl Karch Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Pam Pell Ryan Poe M.L. Powers Amy Raposo Kerry Renee Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Emmett Snead Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz Jeremy Sutton James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

June 2016

On the Trails

engaged and curious

tom fortune, doctor & nature photographer

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists

4

ON THE PORCH

By Kevin Brown

BY kathy harrigan Each of us is a member of multiple communities. I have circles of friends and family, organizations to which I devote my time, my work, and my favorite ‘third places’ (those places I frequent that are neither home nor work). With each, I feel a fellowship with others as we share common attitudes, interests, experiences and goals. Each community gives me a sense of belonging. It has been nearly 40 years since I came to Fredericksburg as a Mary Washington College freshman. In school I built strong friendships, many of which I still have and value today. However, it took me several years to feel like I was part of the broader Fredericksburg community. It wasn’t until I realized that to be part of the community I needed to step from the sidelines and join into the life of the community that was flowing around me. I had chosen to make Fredericksburg my home. Now it was time to learn what that really meant and how to choose to be part of the community. When I did, it felt like ‘the town’ blossomed around me into endless possibilities. In hindsight it was mutual; not only did town open up before me, but the people I met, and experiences I had, enriched my life and I opened up too. Today the term ‘community building’ is used casually and frequently. But there is nothing casual about the process. It is an active and intensely personal process. It is one we do from the inside out. We participate; we offer our selves as part of something larger than our individual beings. In the process we help to build and define that community and in doing so we build and define ourselves. I frequently joke that Fredericksburg is a place of 2 degrees of separation (3 at most) between its

individuals and communities. You just need to be curious, engage in a conversation with the person sitting next to you at the coffee shop or a summer lawn concert – and voila – you realize the common threads; the people you know, the things you love, the places you’ve been. It surprises me sometimes when I realize how my communities overlap with someone else’s – especially when we have only just met. And then, at other times I find great joy in finding no overlap at all, at least until that very moment when you realize that the conversation you are having and the experience you are sharing is the common point of reference on which to build a whole new world of experiences and community. The variety of community is the spice of my life. Where they overlap they reinforce the connections and networks and give me strength. Where they diverge it provides a sense of exploration and adventure. All of it is good. Between the pages of the Front Porch I find yet another community, one I share with all of us who read it. It stretches from this issue back through the decades. When I commuted to Northern Virginia I read it on the train. When I traveled extensively for work it provided a thread back to home base. In its pages I found the spirit of my home town and all of you; a vibrant and diverse membership.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

In the early days of the Front Porch, Rob Grogan was the front man. The baton has passed to Lexi and Virginia. As with many of you, I still miss Rob regularly but wouldn’t trade the sorrow of losing him for the experience of knowing him and learning from him about community. Rob taught me about being engaged and curious, open to wonder about the people and communities around him. You would have to look long and hard to find a better example of a community than the Front Porch and of community builders than the Grogan Family and all of us who share this community with them. Kathy Harrigan will read this issue of the Front Porch from cover-to-cover on the front porch of the Friends of the Rappahannock

messages Front Porch What a great cover (May 2016, Beverley Coates, 2400 Diner) Jo Richardson Grogan

I love the photo of Johnny on the cover of the February issue--and those paintings, which truly capture his heart! Collette Caprara

Front porch fredericksburg

Dear Virginia, Lexi and Staff, I love Front Porch magazinealways have! My watercolor 2400 Diner Corner on May, 2016 cover is a thrilling highlight in my artistic journey. Art can be an uplifting way for people to share talent and ideas. It is inspiring that readers so graciously responded. Thank you Front Porch and writer Collette Caprara for sharing my artwork. Beverley Coates

Front Porch: What a fabulous example of true community spirit and fellowship. I live in the midwest, where we are known for our community spirit. However, even we do not have such a fine publication that celebrates our people. Congrats and keep up te great work. Vince Connoroy, Ill.

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

We are very Tom Fortun(at)e to live here in Fredericksburg, Virginia! Why? Because we have a local doctor named Tom Fortune who takes fabulous, jaw-dropping nature photos and posts them regularly on the “On the Fredericksburg VA Trails” Facebook page. And if you haven’t seen these masterpieces, you… my friend… are very, very un-Tom Fortunate! So this month, we are happy to feature this generous citizen who freely shares images of the natural wonders right outside our front door. We asked Tom to share a bit about how he developed his passion for nature photography. “During our travels, my wife and I have always been awed by the grandeur of landscapes and the beauty of the wildlife. After years of frustration taking poor quality photos, I determined

to acquire enough knowledge and skill to create photographs that were worthy of our experiences. I read books, watched videos, took a number of online courses, and practiced as often as possible. During the course of these efforts, I discovered that I actually enjoyed being outdoors with a camera in my hand even when not visiting some exotic location. Here in Fredericksburg, I have found there are many interesting things to photograph. I like to stake out an area along the river bank with a good view in the early morning or late evening hours when the light is good, and wait for things to happen. When the shad are running in the springtime, heron and osprey display their amazing fishing capabilities. Anglers and kayakers provide ample photographic opportunities. One thing that always astounds me is how people overlook the wildlife and natural beauty around them. I have watched bald eagles soar quite

literally above the heads of folks on the Heritage Trail, completely oblivious to the marvels that a slight tip of the head upward would reveal. My real hope is that m y photographs, and those of the other local n a t u r e photographers Jason like Sosobee, Judy Muffley, and N i g e l Haarstad, will make the trail users more

aware of the excitement that lies within a few hundred feet (or sometimes even closer) to their daily activities. With greater appreciation will hopefully come enhanced preservation of our city’s natural landscape.

Most serious photographers like talking about equipment, so here is my take on that. I use readily available consumer equipment, a midrange DSLR, wide angle zoom, telephoto zoom. Other accessories such as a tripod or monopod are frequently needed. Recently I have been experimenting with off camera flash for some wildlife shots, and neutral density filters for landscapes. I always shoot raw and process my images in Adobe Lightroom. With all that being said, I have come to understand that the most important piece of gear is the brain and eyes of the photographer. Without a creative vision, the best equipment will make only mediocre pictures at best. Finally, Fredericksburg has made great strides in building a first-class trails system. The thousands of locals and tourists who travel our Heritage/Canal Trail Loop every week are proof of high demand for outdoors activity that exists in this community. I am confident that the city will continue enhancing our trails, and to dedicate sufficient city resources to keep them clean!” Thanks for sharing your talents Tom, and we look forward to enjoying more of those fabulous, jaw-dropping photos taken “On the Trails”.

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

5


Forging Relationships

Downtown Buzz quarterly update on main street

at the juneteenth celebration

By Ann Glave

By A.E. Bayne

Last year, the Fredericksburg Race Relations Coalition hosted the first Juneteenth celebration in many years at New City Fellowship to commemorate the holiday’s 150th anniversary. Juneteenth is a traditional celebration of the day in June of 1865 when Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed in Galveston, Texas to alert enslaved people there that they were freed. Last year’s celebration in Fredericksburg highlighted the theme of

unity in diversity and sought to introduce the whole community to African American cultural celebrations, such as sign ministry, dance, comedy, and historically significant reenactments. The event was emceed by Minister Sylvia Reynolds Williams as her alter-ego Deaconess Hattie Mae Reynolds Smith Brown Williams, Reverend Hashmel Turner (23rd Regiment reenactor), and Paula Royster of the Center of African American Genealogy Research, Inc.(CAAGRI). It was well attended and enjoyed by all. This year’s theme is Eunice Relationships and Bonding. Haigler, an event organizer and entertainment committee lead, says, “I believe that one of the things that is a hindrance for the African American community is that they are not always privy to a lot of networks, so this event

The Frenchman’s Corner is a premier Chocolate Shop in Fredericksburg. Serving only the best Belgian chocolates available, The Frenchman’s Corner is located on Caroline Street in the heart of downtown Fredericksburg. After you step in, the scent of chocolate immediately hits you and you feel as if you are in a whole other world. We have something for everyone; enjoy handmade chocolates, truffles, fudge, coffee, hot chocolate, and we even have sugar-ffree and gluten-ffree chocolates! Come in for great chocolates we are positive you will come back for the amazing service. We don’t just sell chocolate, we sell an experience. Come see us! 817 Caroline Street 540.899.7655

represents knowledge and hope. I want to put a lot of things out there to the community.” She also hopes the event will bring the whole community together through the spirit of relationship building and communication and will help everyone to learn a bit more about each other and to feel comfort in celebration over food, fun and entertainment. Haigler says this year’s event will commemorate the 75th anniversary of a significant Billie Holiday song, “Strange Fruit.” The song was written as a poem in 1937 by Abel Meerepol in protest of a rise in lynchings of African Americans in the southern United States. Holiday recorded the song in 1939, launching it to fame and making it an inspiration for further protests through art and literature. Many performers from last year’s Juneteenth celebration will return, joined by some new participants, including: Anointed Brothers mime ministry, Radical Praise, the Unitarian Universalist Choir, the Unitarian Universalist Hand Chimes Choir, dancer Alex Harvell, Mrs. Cleo Coleman (Harriet Tubman reenctor), Minister Linda Young: A Pageantry of Worship, God's Anointed Praisers (the Gap Team), and Rev. Hashmel Turner. Virginia Organizing will have booths to assist with voter registration and to give out information about the School to Prison Pipeline, currently an issue for Virginia since the state tops the list for numbers of school expulsions, most directly affecting the African American community. Mothers of Incarcerated Children will also be on hand to inform people about this issue.

David’s Game, which is a mentoring chess program, and Art 180, which is an art mentorship program, will also be on hand with information about ways to get involved with the community. As with last year’s Juneteenth event, this year’s celebration will offer opportunities for the community to eat food together free of charge and to interact with homeless citizens over the common breaking of bread. Haigler explains, “Last year, we had a group that catered to the homeless. They gave them food, clothes and water. We had potato salad, baked beans, hot dogs and chicken. Afterwards, our food went to the homeless shelter and we had some bottled water that we were able to donate to the homeless in D.C. for their community festival. This year we’re going to do something a little bit different with the menu: grilled macaroni and cheese with green beans and barbecued chicken. These are dishes that the homeless seldom get. We hope to donate food afterwards as we did last year.” This year’s celebration will take place on Saturday, June 18, 2016, at New City Fellowship, from 12 p.m. until 7 p.m. New City Fellowship may be reached at (540) 899-5349 and is located at 200 Prince Edward Street. Follow Fredericksburg Juneteenth on Facebook for the most up-to-date event information. A.E. Bayne is a writer, visual artist and educator. She edits and publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings. 200 William Street Downtown Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Sat: 9-5:30 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

Design Committee Updates: “Face the River” with Tom Smith and David Dorsey, the downtown champions, has been actively working with the City on the 900 and 1000 blocks of Sophia Street. Several trees have been removed, vines severed, and 2 truckloads of trash have been removed. Ongoing conversations with various partners continue as the project moves forward. The Holiday Lighting Committee is actively looking for locations for spot laser displays for the 4th quarter. Our spring planting have occurred on the downtown pots. A shout out to North Stafford High School for wintering our ferns from last year! Organization: The Spark Mill was hired to oversee the integration of the new website, marketing and fundraising plans for Main Street. A charrette was held at the May to collect comments and desires of the Community. Surveys on the streets have started and will continue over the next month. After 1+ years of negotiation with the IRS, Main Street has attained its status as a 501c3 nonprofit organization and is therefore eligible for grants and donors can received a write off for their donations. Economic Vitality: Within the past 5 months, 7 new businesses have opened, 2 have closed, and 1 is relocating outside of the Main Street District. Ongoing projects included ribbon cuttings, entrance and exit interviews, data collection, and education classes for business and property owners. Promotions Committee Update: In terms of noise and attendance, Thunder Alley was successful for the Historic Half Marathon. Thank you to all who joined in the fun! In anticipation of the 2016 holiday season, numerous conversations have started with Small

Main Street is actively working on a brand for our Downtown Historic area. From a field of 15 proposals, Higashi Glaser Design was chosen for the work. The task force included Julie Perry, the representative from the City, Bob Whittingham of Whittingham’s, and Gabe Pons of the Pons Shop along with Nick Seay, a downtown resident and co-owner of the Beveridge Seay, a branding firm located in Washington, DC. Higashi Glaser is known locally for their work with Bodyworks, Access Eyes, and Empower House and for their work with national companies such as Hello Kitty and Crabtree & Evelyn. The downtown brand needs to complement Fredericksburg Timeless, a regional brand that covers the City, Stafford, and Spotsylvania. Representatives from Main Street have been busy meeting with various stakeholders, sharing the new brand and plans for implantation. The primary goal is a new website that works for both of our internal audience (the property and business owners) and our external audience (the visitors and residents). A grant has been submitted to offset the expenses of new Open Late flags, banners, gift cards, and the Love FXBG promotion. A Mid-July answer will let us know how soon we can implement the new brand. The brand image will be accessible for the downtown businesses to use at no cost in their marketing this Fall. The more the Downtown brand is seen, the stronger the message. If you have a love for Downtown, an interest in Main Street or are a

stakeholder in the Downtown area, consider making your tax donation now. We are in the final stages of matching the 2016 $25,000 grant with the City’s Economic Development Authority by June 30, 2016. As a small volunteer organization with 1 paid staff-member, we are well on our way to bigger and better things, and we need your financial support to do it! For more information, please feel free to reach out to our Board members, Wilson Greenlaw, Scarlett Pons, DD Lecky, Brian Lam, Judy Nave, and chairs, Mike Carmody (Design), Melissa Okrasinski (Economic Vitality), April Peterson (Promotion), and Ben Wafle (Organization).

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of the Main Street

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair

Business Saturday, Merry Carols, Open Late Fridays, and Holidays promotions. The Sandwich Invitational is morphing into Flavours of Fredericksburg, an event to showcase the FXBG’s culinary talents, on July 28.

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

6

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

7


Forging Relationships

Downtown Buzz quarterly update on main street

at the juneteenth celebration

By Ann Glave

By A.E. Bayne

Last year, the Fredericksburg Race Relations Coalition hosted the first Juneteenth celebration in many years at New City Fellowship to commemorate the holiday’s 150th anniversary. Juneteenth is a traditional celebration of the day in June of 1865 when Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed in Galveston, Texas to alert enslaved people there that they were freed. Last year’s celebration in Fredericksburg highlighted the theme of

unity in diversity and sought to introduce the whole community to African American cultural celebrations, such as sign ministry, dance, comedy, and historically significant reenactments. The event was emceed by Minister Sylvia Reynolds Williams as her alter-ego Deaconess Hattie Mae Reynolds Smith Brown Williams, Reverend Hashmel Turner (23rd Regiment reenactor), and Paula Royster of the Center of African American Genealogy Research, Inc.(CAAGRI). It was well attended and enjoyed by all. This year’s theme is Eunice Relationships and Bonding. Haigler, an event organizer and entertainment committee lead, says, “I believe that one of the things that is a hindrance for the African American community is that they are not always privy to a lot of networks, so this event

The Frenchman’s Corner is a premier Chocolate Shop in Fredericksburg. Serving only the best Belgian chocolates available, The Frenchman’s Corner is located on Caroline Street in the heart of downtown Fredericksburg. After you step in, the scent of chocolate immediately hits you and you feel as if you are in a whole other world. We have something for everyone; enjoy handmade chocolates, truffles, fudge, coffee, hot chocolate, and we even have sugar-ffree and gluten-ffree chocolates! Come in for great chocolates we are positive you will come back for the amazing service. We don’t just sell chocolate, we sell an experience. Come see us! 817 Caroline Street 540.899.7655

represents knowledge and hope. I want to put a lot of things out there to the community.” She also hopes the event will bring the whole community together through the spirit of relationship building and communication and will help everyone to learn a bit more about each other and to feel comfort in celebration over food, fun and entertainment. Haigler says this year’s event will commemorate the 75th anniversary of a significant Billie Holiday song, “Strange Fruit.” The song was written as a poem in 1937 by Abel Meerepol in protest of a rise in lynchings of African Americans in the southern United States. Holiday recorded the song in 1939, launching it to fame and making it an inspiration for further protests through art and literature. Many performers from last year’s Juneteenth celebration will return, joined by some new participants, including: Anointed Brothers mime ministry, Radical Praise, the Unitarian Universalist Choir, the Unitarian Universalist Hand Chimes Choir, dancer Alex Harvell, Mrs. Cleo Coleman (Harriet Tubman reenctor), Minister Linda Young: A Pageantry of Worship, God's Anointed Praisers (the Gap Team), and Rev. Hashmel Turner. Virginia Organizing will have booths to assist with voter registration and to give out information about the School to Prison Pipeline, currently an issue for Virginia since the state tops the list for numbers of school expulsions, most directly affecting the African American community. Mothers of Incarcerated Children will also be on hand to inform people about this issue.

David’s Game, which is a mentoring chess program, and Art 180, which is an art mentorship program, will also be on hand with information about ways to get involved with the community. As with last year’s Juneteenth event, this year’s celebration will offer opportunities for the community to eat food together free of charge and to interact with homeless citizens over the common breaking of bread. Haigler explains, “Last year, we had a group that catered to the homeless. They gave them food, clothes and water. We had potato salad, baked beans, hot dogs and chicken. Afterwards, our food went to the homeless shelter and we had some bottled water that we were able to donate to the homeless in D.C. for their community festival. This year we’re going to do something a little bit different with the menu: grilled macaroni and cheese with green beans and barbecued chicken. These are dishes that the homeless seldom get. We hope to donate food afterwards as we did last year.” This year’s celebration will take place on Saturday, June 18, 2016, at New City Fellowship, from 12 p.m. until 7 p.m. New City Fellowship may be reached at (540) 899-5349 and is located at 200 Prince Edward Street. Follow Fredericksburg Juneteenth on Facebook for the most up-to-date event information. A.E. Bayne is a writer, visual artist and educator. She edits and publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings. 200 William Street Downtown Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Sat: 9-5:30 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

Design Committee Updates: “Face the River” with Tom Smith and David Dorsey, the downtown champions, has been actively working with the City on the 900 and 1000 blocks of Sophia Street. Several trees have been removed, vines severed, and 2 truckloads of trash have been removed. Ongoing conversations with various partners continue as the project moves forward. The Holiday Lighting Committee is actively looking for locations for spot laser displays for the 4th quarter. Our spring planting have occurred on the downtown pots. A shout out to North Stafford High School for wintering our ferns from last year! Organization: The Spark Mill was hired to oversee the integration of the new website, marketing and fundraising plans for Main Street. A charrette was held at the May to collect comments and desires of the Community. Surveys on the streets have started and will continue over the next month. After 1+ years of negotiation with the IRS, Main Street has attained its status as a 501c3 nonprofit organization and is therefore eligible for grants and donors can received a write off for their donations. Economic Vitality: Within the past 5 months, 7 new businesses have opened, 2 have closed, and 1 is relocating outside of the Main Street District. Ongoing projects included ribbon cuttings, entrance and exit interviews, data collection, and education classes for business and property owners. Promotions Committee Update: In terms of noise and attendance, Thunder Alley was successful for the Historic Half Marathon. Thank you to all who joined in the fun! In anticipation of the 2016 holiday season, numerous conversations have started with Small

Main Street is actively working on a brand for our Downtown Historic area. From a field of 15 proposals, Higashi Glaser Design was chosen for the work. The task force included Julie Perry, the representative from the City, Bob Whittingham of Whittingham’s, and Gabe Pons of the Pons Shop along with Nick Seay, a downtown resident and co-owner of the Beveridge Seay, a branding firm located in Washington, DC. Higashi Glaser is known locally for their work with Bodyworks, Access Eyes, and Empower House and for their work with national companies such as Hello Kitty and Crabtree & Evelyn. The downtown brand needs to complement Fredericksburg Timeless, a regional brand that covers the City, Stafford, and Spotsylvania. Representatives from Main Street have been busy meeting with various stakeholders, sharing the new brand and plans for implantation. The primary goal is a new website that works for both of our internal audience (the property and business owners) and our external audience (the visitors and residents). A grant has been submitted to offset the expenses of new Open Late flags, banners, gift cards, and the Love FXBG promotion. A Mid-July answer will let us know how soon we can implement the new brand. The brand image will be accessible for the downtown businesses to use at no cost in their marketing this Fall. The more the Downtown brand is seen, the stronger the message. If you have a love for Downtown, an interest in Main Street or are a

stakeholder in the Downtown area, consider making your tax donation now. We are in the final stages of matching the 2016 $25,000 grant with the City’s Economic Development Authority by June 30, 2016. As a small volunteer organization with 1 paid staff-member, we are well on our way to bigger and better things, and we need your financial support to do it! For more information, please feel free to reach out to our Board members, Wilson Greenlaw, Scarlett Pons, DD Lecky, Brian Lam, Judy Nave, and chairs, Mike Carmody (Design), Melissa Okrasinski (Economic Vitality), April Peterson (Promotion), and Ben Wafle (Organization).

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of the Main Street

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair

Business Saturday, Merry Carols, Open Late Fridays, and Holidays promotions. The Sandwich Invitational is morphing into Flavours of Fredericksburg, an event to showcase the FXBG’s culinary talents, on July 28.

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

6

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

7


FXBG Photo Club

Kerry Renee

celebrates 30 years

empowering through images By emily hollingsworth

By ruth golden

The Fredericksburg Photography Club was started in 1986 by a small group of locals interested in photography. According to current club President Norma Woodward, Robert Williams (who is a founding member and is still a member of the club), mentions that there were times when he went to a meeting and he was the only one there. The first few meetings Norma attended there were maybe 10 people. In contrast, the club has now grown to more than 60 current members. These photo enthusiasts come from all walks of life and experience. That is what makes the club so useful to amateur photographers; the ability to listen and learn from those who have been practicing this art for a long time, some professionally and some as a hobby. And those of us who are amateurs give back by bringing in new technology and ideas to an ever-changing forum. My personal experience with the Club during the few years I’ve been a member has been very positive (I also belong to a photography meet-up group). I learned about basic photography classes and ended up meeting my teacher, Vincent Knaus. I learned that my photography is “ … actually quite good!” from our tech guy and fantastic photographer Mike Fleckenstein, who also offers his own personalized classes. I also learned what to look for in a good photo, which includes framing, composition, color, subject matter, to name just a few requirements. It’s a great educational experience and I learn from everyone. There are even photography field trips to places where you can catch nature in full bloom or

8

June 2016

capture an edgy urban scene. Our monthly meetings are the second Tuesday of each month at 7:00pm at the Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia. The meetings alternate each month between a Program and an Assigned Subject critique. The programs are informative and offer an opportunity to meet local and national experts on photographic issues. There is a membership fee of $30 per year, but please join us for an introductory meeting to see whether joining is something you’d like to pursue. We would be glad to answer any questions you might have. The Club is looking for photo submissions for the 2016 Fredericksburg Amateur Photography Show, sponsored by the Fredericksburg Photography Club with support from Fredericksburg Parks and Rec. The judges have already been chosen and they are waiting to see your work! The actual show will be taking place June 24-26 at the Dorothy Hart Community Center. Entries must be postmarked by June 8. Entry info and forms are available at www.fbgphotoclub.com. If you’re not ready to submit your work for entry, stop by to see the show anyway. There is always a wonderful collection of photos from local photographers. The Fredericksburg Photography Club has several on-line presences; check out the Facebook page ”Fredericksburg Photography Club” and the Club’s official website at www.fbgphotoclub.com. Come visit; we’d love to meet you! What: Amateur Photography Show, sponsored by the Fredericksburg Photography Club with support from Fredericksburg Parks and Rec. Submissions Due By: June 8 Show:: june 24-26

Ruth Golden is Director/Live Music Advocate "House About Tonight" Productions, houseabouttonight.org

Front porch fredericksburg

Kerry Renee, who moved to Fredericksburg with her husband in 2007, never knew her grandfather. He died before her parents got married. However, she saw evidence of his life and love of photography around her growing up, including old cameras and photographs. She developed her ability as a photographer at a young age, inspired by her grandfather’s similar passion. “It’s a neat connection I have, though I never got the chance to meet him,” Renee said. Renee took photography classes in high school in Springfield, Va., where her camera often never left her side. “I always had a camera in hand,” Renee said. Renee carried this ability and part of her identity into Fredericksburg, where she photographs portraits of children and couples, believing that documenting oneself or families can be meaningful in the long run, similar to her grandfather documenting his love for photography. She recently invested in a Mark 5D3 camera, allowing her to give the best photo to her clients. “I want to make sure I give the highest quality image possible,” Renee said. A rewarding aspect of being a photographer in Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania, according to Renee, is collaborating with other artists in the community. Renee recently attended and photographed Spring Makery, an event led by former food editor of Better Homes and Garden, Erin Simpson Lozier, in

Spotsylvania. The event united and showcased baking, needlework and other forms of art in the community. Renee appreciated the encouraging environment in a field that can often become competitive. “It’s community over competition, and I really support that idea,” Renee said about the photography community in Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania. Another rewarding aspects of portrait photography, according to Renee, is working with children, a process that often involves following them and working past their initial shyness or reserve. The end result is watching them come out of their shells, according to Renee. “Just [them] being who they are make the best kind of photos,” Renee said. Renee’s drive to empower young people extends outside photography. She has worked with the Parks and Recs department and plans to hold a camp for girls next summer. The camp will encourage girls to cultivate their self-worth. Renee plans for the week-long camp to include girls writing mission statements about who they are and who they want to be, creating a dream or brand board, and possibly taking a trip to downtown Fredericksburg. At the end of the week, Renee will use her photography skills to take portraits of each of the girls. Renee noted her own struggle with her self-worth growing up, particularly before middle school, and wants young women to learn to be kind to themselves and to others, particularly as Renee has a family of her own. “I have two girls,” Renee said. “They motivate me. I want them to live in a community where girls are kind to each other and kind to themselves.” Renee plans to do a trial run with the camp this summer and launch the official camp the following year. To view Renee’s photography, visit her Facebook page, Kerry Renee Photography, her website, kerryreneephotography.com and her Instagram page, instagram.com/kerryreneephotography/.

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Note: Kerry Renee is this month’s cover artist Emily Hollingsworth is a recent graduate of Mary Washington University and a regular contributor to Front Porch.

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

9


FXBG Photo Club

Kerry Renee

celebrates 30 years

empowering through images By emily hollingsworth

By ruth golden

The Fredericksburg Photography Club was started in 1986 by a small group of locals interested in photography. According to current club President Norma Woodward, Robert Williams (who is a founding member and is still a member of the club), mentions that there were times when he went to a meeting and he was the only one there. The first few meetings Norma attended there were maybe 10 people. In contrast, the club has now grown to more than 60 current members. These photo enthusiasts come from all walks of life and experience. That is what makes the club so useful to amateur photographers; the ability to listen and learn from those who have been practicing this art for a long time, some professionally and some as a hobby. And those of us who are amateurs give back by bringing in new technology and ideas to an ever-changing forum. My personal experience with the Club during the few years I’ve been a member has been very positive (I also belong to a photography meet-up group). I learned about basic photography classes and ended up meeting my teacher, Vincent Knaus. I learned that my photography is “ … actually quite good!” from our tech guy and fantastic photographer Mike Fleckenstein, who also offers his own personalized classes. I also learned what to look for in a good photo, which includes framing, composition, color, subject matter, to name just a few requirements. It’s a great educational experience and I learn from everyone. There are even photography field trips to places where you can catch nature in full bloom or

8

June 2016

capture an edgy urban scene. Our monthly meetings are the second Tuesday of each month at 7:00pm at the Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia. The meetings alternate each month between a Program and an Assigned Subject critique. The programs are informative and offer an opportunity to meet local and national experts on photographic issues. There is a membership fee of $30 per year, but please join us for an introductory meeting to see whether joining is something you’d like to pursue. We would be glad to answer any questions you might have. The Club is looking for photo submissions for the 2016 Fredericksburg Amateur Photography Show, sponsored by the Fredericksburg Photography Club with support from Fredericksburg Parks and Rec. The judges have already been chosen and they are waiting to see your work! The actual show will be taking place June 24-26 at the Dorothy Hart Community Center. Entries must be postmarked by June 8. Entry info and forms are available at www.fbgphotoclub.com. If you’re not ready to submit your work for entry, stop by to see the show anyway. There is always a wonderful collection of photos from local photographers. The Fredericksburg Photography Club has several on-line presences; check out the Facebook page ”Fredericksburg Photography Club” and the Club’s official website at www.fbgphotoclub.com. Come visit; we’d love to meet you! What: Amateur Photography Show, sponsored by the Fredericksburg Photography Club with support from Fredericksburg Parks and Rec. Submissions Due By: June 8 Show:: june 24-26

Ruth Golden is Director/Live Music Advocate "House About Tonight" Productions, houseabouttonight.org

Front porch fredericksburg

Kerry Renee, who moved to Fredericksburg with her husband in 2007, never knew her grandfather. He died before her parents got married. However, she saw evidence of his life and love of photography around her growing up, including old cameras and photographs. She developed her ability as a photographer at a young age, inspired by her grandfather’s similar passion. “It’s a neat connection I have, though I never got the chance to meet him,” Renee said. Renee took photography classes in high school in Springfield, Va., where her camera often never left her side. “I always had a camera in hand,” Renee said. Renee carried this ability and part of her identity into Fredericksburg, where she photographs portraits of children and couples, believing that documenting oneself or families can be meaningful in the long run, similar to her grandfather documenting his love for photography. She recently invested in a Mark 5D3 camera, allowing her to give the best photo to her clients. “I want to make sure I give the highest quality image possible,” Renee said. A rewarding aspect of being a photographer in Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania, according to Renee, is collaborating with other artists in the community. Renee recently attended and photographed Spring Makery, an event led by former food editor of Better Homes and Garden, Erin Simpson Lozier, in

Spotsylvania. The event united and showcased baking, needlework and other forms of art in the community. Renee appreciated the encouraging environment in a field that can often become competitive. “It’s community over competition, and I really support that idea,” Renee said about the photography community in Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania. Another rewarding aspects of portrait photography, according to Renee, is working with children, a process that often involves following them and working past their initial shyness or reserve. The end result is watching them come out of their shells, according to Renee. “Just [them] being who they are make the best kind of photos,” Renee said. Renee’s drive to empower young people extends outside photography. She has worked with the Parks and Recs department and plans to hold a camp for girls next summer. The camp will encourage girls to cultivate their self-worth. Renee plans for the week-long camp to include girls writing mission statements about who they are and who they want to be, creating a dream or brand board, and possibly taking a trip to downtown Fredericksburg. At the end of the week, Renee will use her photography skills to take portraits of each of the girls. Renee noted her own struggle with her self-worth growing up, particularly before middle school, and wants young women to learn to be kind to themselves and to others, particularly as Renee has a family of her own. “I have two girls,” Renee said. “They motivate me. I want them to live in a community where girls are kind to each other and kind to themselves.” Renee plans to do a trial run with the camp this summer and launch the official camp the following year. To view Renee’s photography, visit her Facebook page, Kerry Renee Photography, her website, kerryreneephotography.com and her Instagram page, instagram.com/kerryreneephotography/.

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Note: Kerry Renee is this month’s cover artist Emily Hollingsworth is a recent graduate of Mary Washington University and a regular contributor to Front Porch.

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

9


Shouldn’t You Be In School? Kids you see out & about aren’t playing hooky they’re homeschooled! By meg sneed

Homeschool Prep Work If you think you’re seeing more children out and about during traditional school hours, chances are you aren’t wrong. These students aren’t playing hooky or out sick, although they may actually be on a fieldtrip. They’re most likely homeschoolers – and part of a growing trend not just within the

Living Museum Filed Trip Fredericksburg area, but across the nation. According to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) the counties of King George, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, along with Fredericksburg City, had a combined total of 3,627 students being homeschooled in the 20142015 school year. Compare these statistics to just a decade ago, when our area reported less than half that number, a total of 1,433 homeschooled students, and it’s clear that this is not a mere fad but a consistent trend towards homeschool education. We are not unique in this trend; nationwide, the number of students being homeschooled for grades K-12 increased 18% between 2007-2012, for a total of an estimated 1.77 million students, a number which currently constitutes an estimated 3.4% of the student population in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Why are so many of us choosing to homeschool our children? The answers can be as varied and nuanced as our own children, but in general the top five

10

June 2016

reasons listed by the Department of Education are: 1) A concern about environment of other schools 2) Other reasons (include family time, finances, travel, and distance) 3) A dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools 4) A desire to provide religious and/or moral instruction 5) Child has a physical or mental health problem These certainly run the gamut, and do reflect at least some of the concerns I’ve heard from parents since starting our own homeschooling journey last year. That’s right. I homeschool – not something I’d have ever told you I would even remotely consider doing as little as three years ago. But as our eldest child approached school age, we began to meet more families who had chosen to forego public or private schools in favor of homeschooling. They come from all different backgrounds and religions, and include parents with GED’s and MD’s, single-parent homes, single income families, families in which both parents are working, families dealing with physical, mental, or emotional health problems, and families which simply wanted to find a way to spend more of their time together. Some had wonderful experiences with public schools prior to homeschooling, others did not, and still others never even tried it before making the decision to homeschool. Personally, we decided to try homeschooling for Kindergarten because it seemed to be the best way to meet both his intellectual and his social needs, and allows him to complete his more traditional school work in a fraction of a standard school day (since it would be largely one-on-one without the need to wait for 20 other students to receive the same help) – leaving time for him to explore his interest in science (we’re raising butterflies currently!), go on plenty of field trips, and play out doors as much as the weather will allow. I’ll be going over more detailed information on local homeschooling resources in this space throughout the summer, but if you’re intrigued by the idea of homeschooling and would like to start your own research into it, I’d highly recommend checking out either of the following resources:

Front porch fredericksburg

The Organization of Virginia Homeschoolers - an “ independent, nonprofit, member-driven, statewide organization” that is secular and politically neutral, they serve as a resource for any and all homeschoolers within the state of Virginia, and have a bi-monthly magazine, annual conference, online and Facebook presence, as well as a helpline you can call with any questions you might have. They have extensive information in their Homeschool Guide on the different ways to file as a homeschooler with your county and what access you might have to public school resources while homeschooling. www.vahomeschoolers.org 866-513-6173 (Homeschool Helpline) Home Educators Association of Virginia (HEAV) – a Christian-based, “member-supported, statewide, 501(c)3 non-profit homeschool association,” that serves as a resource for all homeschoolers “regardless of religious or philosophical beliefs.” They also have an online and Facebook presence, annual conference, and a website which covers everything from fieldtrip ideas to forms for filing a Notice of Intent to homeschool with your school board. www.heav.org 804-278-9200 (HEAV’s Richmond office) Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, community outreach coordinator for Fredericksburg Area CSA Project, a homeschooling mom of 3 kids, and an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

Soil & Water

Kid’s Cooking Camp July 12, 13 & 14 11am to 1pm ages 11 & up $90/child

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

working for you, working with you By jeremy sutton and high quality of life, both in ways cultural and practical. And the concerns and initiatives of the Soil and Water Conservation District are nothing if not practical. The Tri-County/City Soil and Water Conservation District was begun in 1944, originally part of FDR’s New Deal programming. Covering Stafford, Spotsylvania and King George counties as well as the City of Fredericksburg, the District has historically focused on agricultural concerns, but has taken on more urban issues as our region and its population grows. This non-profit, selfmandated agency focuses on best conserving and preserving our water resources by providing policy, education and technical assistance to local residents. They offer programs as diverse as local scholarships, tree and rain barrel sales, design competitions for local schools and more. For a full list of events and opportunities, you can visit the website at: www.tccswcd.org One of the most pertinent

Annual Tree Seedling/Rain Barrell Sale If you haven’t noticed, downtown Fredericksburg is growing at a pretty good clip. We’ve got several new blocks of townhomes on Williams St, and a lot of the older homes that were sagging are getting tasteful facelifts. The dining scene is helping “downtown” expand beyond the traditional Historic District boundaries, and they’re now competing more with each other for diners than with Central Park or Cosner’s Corner (an all-around win for everyone). We’re one of the fastest growing communities in the Commonwealth, and it’s pretty easy to understand why: a well-connected community structure with a lot of civic pride and good reason for it; you’re close enough to DC/RVA to make it an easy day trip, but you can still hear (and occasionally feel) the trains running at night from a your bed a few miles away; the mountains are close, the Bay is even closer. But it’s changing who we are and what we need to maintain this vibrant

projects and initiatives you’ll find on the website is the Virginia Conservation Assistance Program (VCAP). VCAP works to provide grants and assistance to local residents and businesses to install Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs range from conservation-conscious landscaping to rain gardens to green roofing to permeable pavement (there are 11 qualifying categories in all ). Whether you recently purchased a home in the area, or you’ve been living here for decades, if you’re looking to re-do or rework an existing structure or space in the District (the program is for retro-fitting only, it should be noted), contact TCCSWCD first, you may just have a helping hand available to you. You can contact Kyle Haynes, the District Manager at kyle.haynes@tccswcd.org and via the website. Tri-County meetings are open to the public and occur at 8:00AM every third Friday (June 17th this month). You can also speak with Ginny Adams from

Walnut Hill Farms (they’re at the Hurkamp and 610 commuter lot markets). Her husband Jeff is one of the Stafford county district directors and along with Kyle and Steve Cameli (a City director) contributed to this article. It’s nice to know that as we change and grow as a region and populace, these often behind the scenes agencies are coming right along with us. It’s their efforts, and the mindfulness for proper and quality growth that comes with them, that allow us to earn our great reputation as a community. There’s a reason everybody wants a Front Porch in Fredericksburg.

Jeremy Sutton can see the tall grass from his front porch, and with the completion of this article no longer has an excuse not to cut it.

Open M-F at 6am Open Sat & Sun at 7 am Serve breakfast, lunch and dinner $5.00 Weekday lunch Specials

620 Caroline Street

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

11


Shouldn’t You Be In School? Kids you see out & about aren’t playing hooky they’re homeschooled! By meg sneed

Homeschool Prep Work If you think you’re seeing more children out and about during traditional school hours, chances are you aren’t wrong. These students aren’t playing hooky or out sick, although they may actually be on a fieldtrip. They’re most likely homeschoolers – and part of a growing trend not just within the

Living Museum Filed Trip Fredericksburg area, but across the nation. According to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) the counties of King George, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, along with Fredericksburg City, had a combined total of 3,627 students being homeschooled in the 20142015 school year. Compare these statistics to just a decade ago, when our area reported less than half that number, a total of 1,433 homeschooled students, and it’s clear that this is not a mere fad but a consistent trend towards homeschool education. We are not unique in this trend; nationwide, the number of students being homeschooled for grades K-12 increased 18% between 2007-2012, for a total of an estimated 1.77 million students, a number which currently constitutes an estimated 3.4% of the student population in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Why are so many of us choosing to homeschool our children? The answers can be as varied and nuanced as our own children, but in general the top five

10

June 2016

reasons listed by the Department of Education are: 1) A concern about environment of other schools 2) Other reasons (include family time, finances, travel, and distance) 3) A dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools 4) A desire to provide religious and/or moral instruction 5) Child has a physical or mental health problem These certainly run the gamut, and do reflect at least some of the concerns I’ve heard from parents since starting our own homeschooling journey last year. That’s right. I homeschool – not something I’d have ever told you I would even remotely consider doing as little as three years ago. But as our eldest child approached school age, we began to meet more families who had chosen to forego public or private schools in favor of homeschooling. They come from all different backgrounds and religions, and include parents with GED’s and MD’s, single-parent homes, single income families, families in which both parents are working, families dealing with physical, mental, or emotional health problems, and families which simply wanted to find a way to spend more of their time together. Some had wonderful experiences with public schools prior to homeschooling, others did not, and still others never even tried it before making the decision to homeschool. Personally, we decided to try homeschooling for Kindergarten because it seemed to be the best way to meet both his intellectual and his social needs, and allows him to complete his more traditional school work in a fraction of a standard school day (since it would be largely one-on-one without the need to wait for 20 other students to receive the same help) – leaving time for him to explore his interest in science (we’re raising butterflies currently!), go on plenty of field trips, and play out doors as much as the weather will allow. I’ll be going over more detailed information on local homeschooling resources in this space throughout the summer, but if you’re intrigued by the idea of homeschooling and would like to start your own research into it, I’d highly recommend checking out either of the following resources:

Front porch fredericksburg

The Organization of Virginia Homeschoolers - an “ independent, nonprofit, member-driven, statewide organization” that is secular and politically neutral, they serve as a resource for any and all homeschoolers within the state of Virginia, and have a bi-monthly magazine, annual conference, online and Facebook presence, as well as a helpline you can call with any questions you might have. They have extensive information in their Homeschool Guide on the different ways to file as a homeschooler with your county and what access you might have to public school resources while homeschooling. www.vahomeschoolers.org 866-513-6173 (Homeschool Helpline) Home Educators Association of Virginia (HEAV) – a Christian-based, “member-supported, statewide, 501(c)3 non-profit homeschool association,” that serves as a resource for all homeschoolers “regardless of religious or philosophical beliefs.” They also have an online and Facebook presence, annual conference, and a website which covers everything from fieldtrip ideas to forms for filing a Notice of Intent to homeschool with your school board. www.heav.org 804-278-9200 (HEAV’s Richmond office) Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, community outreach coordinator for Fredericksburg Area CSA Project, a homeschooling mom of 3 kids, and an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

Soil & Water

Kid’s Cooking Camp July 12, 13 & 14 11am to 1pm ages 11 & up $90/child

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

working for you, working with you By jeremy sutton and high quality of life, both in ways cultural and practical. And the concerns and initiatives of the Soil and Water Conservation District are nothing if not practical. The Tri-County/City Soil and Water Conservation District was begun in 1944, originally part of FDR’s New Deal programming. Covering Stafford, Spotsylvania and King George counties as well as the City of Fredericksburg, the District has historically focused on agricultural concerns, but has taken on more urban issues as our region and its population grows. This non-profit, selfmandated agency focuses on best conserving and preserving our water resources by providing policy, education and technical assistance to local residents. They offer programs as diverse as local scholarships, tree and rain barrel sales, design competitions for local schools and more. For a full list of events and opportunities, you can visit the website at: www.tccswcd.org One of the most pertinent

Annual Tree Seedling/Rain Barrell Sale If you haven’t noticed, downtown Fredericksburg is growing at a pretty good clip. We’ve got several new blocks of townhomes on Williams St, and a lot of the older homes that were sagging are getting tasteful facelifts. The dining scene is helping “downtown” expand beyond the traditional Historic District boundaries, and they’re now competing more with each other for diners than with Central Park or Cosner’s Corner (an all-around win for everyone). We’re one of the fastest growing communities in the Commonwealth, and it’s pretty easy to understand why: a well-connected community structure with a lot of civic pride and good reason for it; you’re close enough to DC/RVA to make it an easy day trip, but you can still hear (and occasionally feel) the trains running at night from a your bed a few miles away; the mountains are close, the Bay is even closer. But it’s changing who we are and what we need to maintain this vibrant

projects and initiatives you’ll find on the website is the Virginia Conservation Assistance Program (VCAP). VCAP works to provide grants and assistance to local residents and businesses to install Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs range from conservation-conscious landscaping to rain gardens to green roofing to permeable pavement (there are 11 qualifying categories in all ). Whether you recently purchased a home in the area, or you’ve been living here for decades, if you’re looking to re-do or rework an existing structure or space in the District (the program is for retro-fitting only, it should be noted), contact TCCSWCD first, you may just have a helping hand available to you. You can contact Kyle Haynes, the District Manager at kyle.haynes@tccswcd.org and via the website. Tri-County meetings are open to the public and occur at 8:00AM every third Friday (June 17th this month). You can also speak with Ginny Adams from

Walnut Hill Farms (they’re at the Hurkamp and 610 commuter lot markets). Her husband Jeff is one of the Stafford county district directors and along with Kyle and Steve Cameli (a City director) contributed to this article. It’s nice to know that as we change and grow as a region and populace, these often behind the scenes agencies are coming right along with us. It’s their efforts, and the mindfulness for proper and quality growth that comes with them, that allow us to earn our great reputation as a community. There’s a reason everybody wants a Front Porch in Fredericksburg.

Jeremy Sutton can see the tall grass from his front porch, and with the completion of this article no longer has an excuse not to cut it.

Open M-F at 6am Open Sat & Sun at 7 am Serve breakfast, lunch and dinner $5.00 Weekday lunch Specials

620 Caroline Street

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

11


Va. Wineries Dine in Casual Elegance Enjoy a wide variety of Northern Italian, French, Cuban, & Creole Specialties in the Historic Chimney’s

Playgrounds for Grownups!

International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Bar Open All Day Take Out Available

12

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Back in the dark ages, circa 1990, when Virginia had only a few dozen wineries, a day in wine country tended to be one-size-fits-all. You came, you sampled-usually for free-maybe splurging on a bottle to share on the lawn. And then, you left. If you wanted a yoga class, you found it at a yoga studio, not your local winery. Now, free tastings are harder to find at the state's 250 tasting rooms, but yoga, and myriad other strategies to attract and retain visitors' attention-and loyalty-are on the rise. The stakes are high, as many wineries rely almost exclusively on tasting room sales to pay the bills. Never leave home without your hound? Your Boxer can belly up to the bar (literally) at Barrel Oak Winery, Stinson Vineyards in Crozet, or Chateau Morrisette in Floyd, where puppy love colors everything from the winery's website-www.thedogs.com-to the wine club (aka "Kennel Club"), to the wine itself (Frosty Dog, Star Dog, and the perennial favorite, Our Dog Blue, a RieslingTraminette blend). Can't shake the kids? No problem: 130 wineries welcome young ones, including Potomac Point in Stafford, where a glass-walled "Little Buds" room lets parents keep an eye on kids and wine at the same time. DeVault Vineyards in Concord boasts not only a swing set and a playhouse, but also an indoor pool. Ready to party? Stop by Bluemont Vineyards or the Barns at Hamilton Station in Hamilton on a Saturday and odds are good you'll collide with a bachelorette party. Down the road in Purcellville, the 400-acre Breaux Vineyards recently invested $1.5 million to expand their wedding and private event space by 17,000 square feet, featuring a

pavilion with crystal chandeliers, wood floors, a huge fireplace and panoramic views of the vineyards. If celebrities jazz you, head south: billionaires Steve and Jean Case, of AOL fame, recently purchased and revived Early Mountain Vineyards in Madison, and Donald Trump's son Eric heads up another rescued winery, now rebranded as-wait for it!-Trump Winery. Across the road, groupies glance nonchalantly around airy Blenheim Vineyards, secretly hoping for a glimpse of owner/musician Dave Matthews. Wine tourists can choose from 20 lodgings to soak up the vineyard lifestyle 24x7, ranging from rustic cabins at Belle Mount Vineyards on the Northern Neck to opulent suites at Barboursville Vineyards, north of Charlottesville, where antique oriental carpets cover hand-hewn wood floors. Barboursville's white tablecloth restaurant, Palladio, is joined by Williamsburg Winery's Café Provencal, while at the more relaxed Narmada Winery in Amissville, owners Pandit and Sudha Patil pair vegetable samosas and Butter Chicken with MOM, their semisweet Vidal Blanc/Chardonel blend. And then there's this: Notaviva Vineyards in Purcellville even pairs wine with music (really). What are you looking for in a winery? Cigar bar? Kayaking? Star gazing? Sheep shearing? Yeah, Virginia's got that.

Nancy Bauer and Rick Collier are the authors of VAWineInMyPocket.com, the wine country travel app and website. Rick's photos are at RickCollierCreative.com

Olde Towne BUTCHER

in tune with june

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

By vanessa moncure

540.370.4105

by nancy bauer & rick Collier

Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm

623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

Season’s Bounty This year, spring is edging toward summer very slooowly. Deceived by Punxatawney Phil’s groundhog prognostication that spring was already on its way, we ignored the sage advice of the Farmer’s Almanac and went ahead with potatoes, peas, lettuces and even tomatoes and squash into the garden patch. Fifteen May days of cold, inhospitable rain helped the grass and weeds grow high - not so much in the garden. I’ve snapped a grand total of six asparagus from their bed, replanted peas and beans (I think the first may have rotted in the sodden soil), and am waiting for some sunny days to perk up the beets, arugula, lettuces and herbs. While waiting, I’ve been tapping into the spring/summer bounty in the farmer’s market - and taking advantage of the annual peak California season of artichokes & avocados. . ARTICHOKE 101 Don’t just use a can opener for the artichoke hearts within - prepare the thistle whole - have a pan one-quarter filled with water and a lemon half simmering on the stove (lemon is needed as artichokes darken quickly when cut. If you’d rather steam, rub cut edges with the lemon). On a cutting board and with a sharp knife, cut about 1-1 ½ inches off the top of the artichoke, then cut off the stem end. With kitchen scissors, cut the sharp tips off the thistle, then place in the water and cover. Bring to a medium boil and cook until the stem end can be pierced easily with a knife, about 20 minutes. Remove from water and place stem-side up in a colander to drain. Serve warm, at room temperature or cold. You can also stuff them with a variety of fillings after removing the fuzzy choke. Peel back the center of the leaves until you can see the fuzzy center - use a long-handled spoon to scoop it out, then whole artichoke is ready to be served. Place upright on a plate, with another for the remaining bits of leaves. Starting at the bottom, pull off a leaf and run it through your teeth to eat the tender bit at the base. Keep eating until you reach your goal - the artichoke heart - which is all edible and delicious! Make a dipping sauce - like this one, which is similar to a shrimp bang-bang sauce - or dip warm veg in melted butter. DIPPING SAUCE - one part mayonnaise to one part chili sauce, with as much Sriracha sauce as desired.

ASPARAGUS 102 If all the asparagus you’ve ever tried is the pale-green, squishy canned asparagus, then I say you’ve never tried it at all. Green, white and purple varieties are all grown, but green is most available in the market. Wash them, then snap or cut them at the natural edge between woody and tender. Place them in a large saute pan with water to just cover, bring to a boil and boil no longer than two minutes may be 30 seconds for the tiny pencil asparagus. Remove from heat, drain the water and either add butter to serve hot, or plunge them into ice water to chill them and set the green color for salads or ASPARAGUS SALAD - Place appetizers. chilled asparagus salad over a bed of spring salad greens. Mix together in a bowl 1 c. quartered artichoke hearts, drained and sliced 12 oz. can of hearts of palm, 1 pound of asparagus cut on the diagonal into 2” slices and ½ c. diced sweet red peppers along with enough fresh vinaigrette salad dressing to lightly cover. Can be made a day ahead of serving. AVOCADO 103 Crab salad in an avocado half is a sweet summer indulgence - even more if it’s a lobster salad! And I know everyone has a version of guacamole, but I love mine garlick-y and spicy, so try this on your chips next time. MOCK GUAC Halve two avocados, remove the seed and roughly dice them in their skin before turning the avocado into a bowl. Sprinkle with several teaspoonsful of lime juice and about ½ tsp. sea salt. Then add about ¼ c. or more to taste tomatillo salsa and one or two large grated garlic cloves. Fold this into the avocados until well mixed but still chunky. Sometimes I add spring onions or some finely chopped cilantro to the mix. SEAFOOD SALAD Chop one-half pound cooked shrimp (Gulf shrimp are worth the extra price - so much more flavor than farmed) and the meat of one whole 1pound to 1 1/2pound cooked lobster, or equivalent in cooked lobster tails. Reserve one-half pound jumbo lump crabmeat and set aside. Mix together one cup mayonnaise, 1 T. dijon mustard, ¼ c. ketchup, 1 tsp. Dried tarragon or 1 T. fresh, 2 tsp. Lemon juice, dash of salt, white pepper and dried mustard, 1-2 T. capers and 2 T. finely chopped green onions along with ¼ c. minced celery and ¼ c. minced sweet red peppers. Add just enough of the mayonnaise mixture to the shrimp and lobster to coat, then gently fold in the crabmeat so the lumps will remain whole. Serve seafood salad over fresh lettuces in an avocado half, garnishing with finely minced fresh parsley or a sprig of fresh tarragon. Fold everything together right before serving. Enjoy!

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

13


Va. Wineries Dine in Casual Elegance Enjoy a wide variety of Northern Italian, French, Cuban, & Creole Specialties in the Historic Chimney’s

Playgrounds for Grownups!

International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Bar Open All Day Take Out Available

12

June 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Back in the dark ages, circa 1990, when Virginia had only a few dozen wineries, a day in wine country tended to be one-size-fits-all. You came, you sampled-usually for free-maybe splurging on a bottle to share on the lawn. And then, you left. If you wanted a yoga class, you found it at a yoga studio, not your local winery. Now, free tastings are harder to find at the state's 250 tasting rooms, but yoga, and myriad other strategies to attract and retain visitors' attention-and loyalty-are on the rise. The stakes are high, as many wineries rely almost exclusively on tasting room sales to pay the bills. Never leave home without your hound? Your Boxer can belly up to the bar (literally) at Barrel Oak Winery, Stinson Vineyards in Crozet, or Chateau Morrisette in Floyd, where puppy love colors everything from the winery's website-www.thedogs.com-to the wine club (aka "Kennel Club"), to the wine itself (Frosty Dog, Star Dog, and the perennial favorite, Our Dog Blue, a RieslingTraminette blend). Can't shake the kids? No problem: 130 wineries welcome young ones, including Potomac Point in Stafford, where a glass-walled "Little Buds" room lets parents keep an eye on kids and wine at the same time. DeVault Vineyards in Concord boasts not only a swing set and a playhouse, but also an indoor pool. Ready to party? Stop by Bluemont Vineyards or the Barns at Hamilton Station in Hamilton on a Saturday and odds are good you'll collide with a bachelorette party. Down the road in Purcellville, the 400-acre Breaux Vineyards recently invested $1.5 million to expand their wedding and private event space by 17,000 square feet, featuring a

pavilion with crystal chandeliers, wood floors, a huge fireplace and panoramic views of the vineyards. If celebrities jazz you, head south: billionaires Steve and Jean Case, of AOL fame, recently purchased and revived Early Mountain Vineyards in Madison, and Donald Trump's son Eric heads up another rescued winery, now rebranded as-wait for it!-Trump Winery. Across the road, groupies glance nonchalantly around airy Blenheim Vineyards, secretly hoping for a glimpse of owner/musician Dave Matthews. Wine tourists can choose from 20 lodgings to soak up the vineyard lifestyle 24x7, ranging from rustic cabins at Belle Mount Vineyards on the Northern Neck to opulent suites at Barboursville Vineyards, north of Charlottesville, where antique oriental carpets cover hand-hewn wood floors. Barboursville's white tablecloth restaurant, Palladio, is joined by Williamsburg Winery's Café Provencal, while at the more relaxed Narmada Winery in Amissville, owners Pandit and Sudha Patil pair vegetable samosas and Butter Chicken with MOM, their semisweet Vidal Blanc/Chardonel blend. And then there's this: Notaviva Vineyards in Purcellville even pairs wine with music (really). What are you looking for in a winery? Cigar bar? Kayaking? Star gazing? Sheep shearing? Yeah, Virginia's got that.

Nancy Bauer and Rick Collier are the authors of VAWineInMyPocket.com, the wine country travel app and website. Rick's photos are at RickCollierCreative.com

Olde Towne BUTCHER

in tune with june

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

By vanessa moncure

540.370.4105

by nancy bauer & rick Collier

Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm

623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

Season’s Bounty This year, spring is edging toward summer very slooowly. Deceived by Punxatawney Phil’s groundhog prognostication that spring was already on its way, we ignored the sage advice of the Farmer’s Almanac and went ahead with potatoes, peas, lettuces and even tomatoes and squash into the garden patch. Fifteen May days of cold, inhospitable rain helped the grass and weeds grow high - not so much in the garden. I’ve snapped a grand total of six asparagus from their bed, replanted peas and beans (I think the first may have rotted in the sodden soil), and am waiting for some sunny days to perk up the beets, arugula, lettuces and herbs. While waiting, I’ve been tapping into the spring/summer bounty in the farmer’s market - and taking advantage of the annual peak California season of artichokes & avocados. . ARTICHOKE 101 Don’t just use a can opener for the artichoke hearts within - prepare the thistle whole - have a pan one-quarter filled with water and a lemon half simmering on the stove (lemon is needed as artichokes darken quickly when cut. If you’d rather steam, rub cut edges with the lemon). On a cutting board and with a sharp knife, cut about 1-1 ½ inches off the top of the artichoke, then cut off the stem end. With kitchen scissors, cut the sharp tips off the thistle, then place in the water and cover. Bring to a medium boil and cook until the stem end can be pierced easily with a knife, about 20 minutes. Remove from water and place stem-side up in a colander to drain. Serve warm, at room temperature or cold. You can also stuff them with a variety of fillings after removing the fuzzy choke. Peel back the center of the leaves until you can see the fuzzy center - use a long-handled spoon to scoop it out, then whole artichoke is ready to be served. Place upright on a plate, with another for the remaining bits of leaves. Starting at the bottom, pull off a leaf and run it through your teeth to eat the tender bit at the base. Keep eating until you reach your goal - the artichoke heart - which is all edible and delicious! Make a dipping sauce - like this one, which is similar to a shrimp bang-bang sauce - or dip warm veg in melted butter. DIPPING SAUCE - one part mayonnaise to one part chili sauce, with as much Sriracha sauce as desired.

ASPARAGUS 102 If all the asparagus you’ve ever tried is the pale-green, squishy canned asparagus, then I say you’ve never tried it at all. Green, white and purple varieties are all grown, but green is most available in the market. Wash them, then snap or cut them at the natural edge between woody and tender. Place them in a large saute pan with water to just cover, bring to a boil and boil no longer than two minutes may be 30 seconds for the tiny pencil asparagus. Remove from heat, drain the water and either add butter to serve hot, or plunge them into ice water to chill them and set the green color for salads or ASPARAGUS SALAD - Place appetizers. chilled asparagus salad over a bed of spring salad greens. Mix together in a bowl 1 c. quartered artichoke hearts, drained and sliced 12 oz. can of hearts of palm, 1 pound of asparagus cut on the diagonal into 2” slices and ½ c. diced sweet red peppers along with enough fresh vinaigrette salad dressing to lightly cover. Can be made a day ahead of serving. AVOCADO 103 Crab salad in an avocado half is a sweet summer indulgence - even more if it’s a lobster salad! And I know everyone has a version of guacamole, but I love mine garlick-y and spicy, so try this on your chips next time. MOCK GUAC Halve two avocados, remove the seed and roughly dice them in their skin before turning the avocado into a bowl. Sprinkle with several teaspoonsful of lime juice and about ½ tsp. sea salt. Then add about ¼ c. or more to taste tomatillo salsa and one or two large grated garlic cloves. Fold this into the avocados until well mixed but still chunky. Sometimes I add spring onions or some finely chopped cilantro to the mix. SEAFOOD SALAD Chop one-half pound cooked shrimp (Gulf shrimp are worth the extra price - so much more flavor than farmed) and the meat of one whole 1pound to 1 1/2pound cooked lobster, or equivalent in cooked lobster tails. Reserve one-half pound jumbo lump crabmeat and set aside. Mix together one cup mayonnaise, 1 T. dijon mustard, ¼ c. ketchup, 1 tsp. Dried tarragon or 1 T. fresh, 2 tsp. Lemon juice, dash of salt, white pepper and dried mustard, 1-2 T. capers and 2 T. finely chopped green onions along with ¼ c. minced celery and ¼ c. minced sweet red peppers. Add just enough of the mayonnaise mixture to the shrimp and lobster to coat, then gently fold in the crabmeat so the lumps will remain whole. Serve seafood salad over fresh lettuces in an avocado half, garnishing with finely minced fresh parsley or a sprig of fresh tarragon. Fold everything together right before serving. Enjoy!

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

13


Cooking With Kyle

In Season what will be fresh at farm stands

english muffins by james kyle snyder

Nothing smells like an English muffin toasting. The conjured memories of the delicious bready treats make your mouth begin to water, with images of the toppings the nooks and crannies will hold. Now it is time to make them at home. I’ve take another step into the baker’s secret world of alchemy. Having an active mother helps, but making a mother is as easy as combining 75 grams of water and bread flour and setting them on the counter for three days – adding another blend of water and flour each of the three day until it is foamy from the wild yeast. A mother is born. There are two ways to make English muffins – make a bread-like dough and cut them out or make a pancake-like batter and pour it into rings. I prefer the second method because of the larger nooks permitted by the thinner dough. It also removes the overnight proofing necessary with the biscuit like method. The ingredients are simple: ½ cup of the mother, one cup of 95% milk split evenly, 1 ¼ bread flour divided evenly, 1 TBS butter melted, 1 tsp yeast, and 1 tsp sugar. The preparation is just as easy. Preheat an oven to 350. Combine the yeast, sugar, and half the warm milk and set aside until

14

June 2016

frothy. This will get the regular yeast going. The mother is full of wild yeast and the bacteria that gives sourdough its distinctive flavor. If you are skipping the additional yeast, simply combine the sugar / milk mixture with half the flour and the mother and set aside for one hour. Combine the rest of the milk with the butter and salt for addition once the yeast is going good. You can choose to use only mother if you want a more-sour English muffin. Just use two cups of mother and add ½ cup of fresh flour and ¼ cup warm milk – the additional yeast, again, is optional. If you leave the additional yeast out, allow the batter to rise in the refrigerator overnight so the muffins proof correctly. Make sure you pull the batter two hours before it is time to cook. Even cooking heat is important, hence the oven. Many people use cast iron on the stovetop or electric frying pans. I find it too hard to duplicate a great product. If you follow the recipe step by step, you can get consistent. Coat a sheet pan with a thin layer of butter or oil. Spray eight cooking rings with non-stick spray and place on the buttered surface. Sprinkle a small amount of raw semolina in the rings to give the muffin that distinctive textured outside. Do not stir the batter. Use a large ladle to evenly fill the rings about 1/3 full. They are going to proof and fill the ring. Place another greases cookie sheet pan on top the rings and put it all into the oven for 10 minutes. Flip the whole pan assembly sprinkle the tops with semolina, recover, and cook for an additional five minutes. Remove the top sheet pan and rings, cooking for an additional 8-10 minutes. Be sure the outside doesn’t get too dark as English Muffins are usually toasted to finish the process. Now you have an ingredient for Eggs Benedict or an insanely tasty sandwich! The hardest part about baking is the patience to allow your ingredients to do what they need to do. Start these the night before and refrigerate them. You will be happy you did. As always, we love eating things that are simple, easy, and delicious. Be well!

Kyle brings us dec\licious recipes each month in this space.

Front porch fredericksburg

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

June Food Ideas from Snead Farm 1) Mix grated cucumber with whole milk, plain yogart, garlic, olive oil, cumin, chopped fresh mint or basil, salt

Be sure to visit Snead Farm, open daily from 9am -6pm to purchase your freash produce.

Etc. Fredericksburg, VA

and pepeer to taste for a cool sauce that can be spooned over grilled meats or vegetables. 2) Green beans havethe most nutrients when you cook them the least. For a quick salad, finely chop raw beans and toss with olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon juice or your favorite vinaigrette. Add a dash of red pepper. 3) Puree fresh raspberries, add sugar to tast and cream together with room temperature butter and a dash of lemon juice. Spread on waffles, toast, scones and other treats.

Soup & Taco,

BISTRO BETHEM an old favorite revisited

813 Caroline St.

by emmett snead June: Summer offically begins the day of the summer solstice, June 20. Food-wise, the entire month of June signals to us that spring has given way to summer. The menu of greens and root vegetables we’ve been eating is augmented with the arrival of cucumbers, green b e a n s , blueberries, raspberries and summer squash. Here’s what to look for in June: green onions, lettuce, radishes, kohlrabi, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, cucumbers, green beans, zucchini, crookneck squash and early tomatoes.

The

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

The Sunken Well Tavern

Front Porch Fredericksburg

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

By M.L. Powers

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

There are so many choices these Aby told me they are in the days for everything. In our little city process of refreshing things. They have alone, there are at least fifteen different brought back movie night, which includes eateries. It is difficult to claim a favorite a five course meal, wine paired if desired. among these, as most have something Bistro has been a great venue for local different to offer. A spot that was one of artists to show their work, and their latest the first I tried in the ‘burg, and one I venture is an employee art show. They often return to is Bistro Bethem on may even don new uniforms, a change William Street. from the logo t-shirts the crew has worn One of the first things I noticed over the years. about Bistro Bethem, and is one of the The Bethems are interested in things that brings me back is the staff’s their employees, and try to look out for attention to detail. Aby, co-owner with their future success, as well as the husband Blake has an businesses. Blake has amazing memory for mentored many aspiring They take orders without faces and names. When chefs. Mark Manjarrez writing them down, they fold she is in “house,” which presently holds the title tends to be often, she your napkin if you leave the of Sous Chef which he table, and generally give tirelessly chats up earned through the you the feel of having customers, remembering “climb the ladder, slowly” details like their children received the royal treatment method. He started as a or parents, and generally dishwasher, he then without the white gloves. making one feel like they moved to the “pantry” are part of a restaurant where he learned many of the family. Little things like this are instilled techniques that support a fresh menu. Try in the servers. They take orders without shucking a couple hundred oysters per writing them down, they fold your napkin night, now that’s a feat. Additionally, the if you leave the table, and generally give pantry runs the wood oven where pizzas you the feel of having received the royal are cooked, French Onion Soup is topped treatment without the white gloves. off, home-made ciabatta bread is baked, Bistro Bethem came into being in giving all these dishes the unique flavor of 2004, when Blake and Aby recently the wood oven. After a couple of years, married, decided to take the plunge and Mark moved to the grill where he learned become restauranteurs. Over time, they hands on from Blake the methods of have built a strong clientele that enjoy the grilling, and the difficult timing involved fresh and local products that Blake in putting out fresh sides with correctly specializes in, as well as the new items that cooked meats. Now, Mark is the kitchen he regularly comes up with. For instance, manager and pays his knowledge forward no one in town offered a charcuterie by training other newcomers. board, until a few years back when Blake Everyone likes to try new things, put it on the menu, and now it is on many but when something is good you always menus, including Wegman’s Deli. He has come back for more. This is how I feel some tried and true dishes, but is about Bistro. I try all the new spots, but constantly perfecting new items. for a great meal, I go back to Bistro Bethem.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

15


Cooking With Kyle

In Season what will be fresh at farm stands

english muffins by james kyle snyder

Nothing smells like an English muffin toasting. The conjured memories of the delicious bready treats make your mouth begin to water, with images of the toppings the nooks and crannies will hold. Now it is time to make them at home. I’ve take another step into the baker’s secret world of alchemy. Having an active mother helps, but making a mother is as easy as combining 75 grams of water and bread flour and setting them on the counter for three days – adding another blend of water and flour each of the three day until it is foamy from the wild yeast. A mother is born. There are two ways to make English muffins – make a bread-like dough and cut them out or make a pancake-like batter and pour it into rings. I prefer the second method because of the larger nooks permitted by the thinner dough. It also removes the overnight proofing necessary with the biscuit like method. The ingredients are simple: ½ cup of the mother, one cup of 95% milk split evenly, 1 ¼ bread flour divided evenly, 1 TBS butter melted, 1 tsp yeast, and 1 tsp sugar. The preparation is just as easy. Preheat an oven to 350. Combine the yeast, sugar, and half the warm milk and set aside until

14

June 2016

frothy. This will get the regular yeast going. The mother is full of wild yeast and the bacteria that gives sourdough its distinctive flavor. If you are skipping the additional yeast, simply combine the sugar / milk mixture with half the flour and the mother and set aside for one hour. Combine the rest of the milk with the butter and salt for addition once the yeast is going good. You can choose to use only mother if you want a more-sour English muffin. Just use two cups of mother and add ½ cup of fresh flour and ¼ cup warm milk – the additional yeast, again, is optional. If you leave the additional yeast out, allow the batter to rise in the refrigerator overnight so the muffins proof correctly. Make sure you pull the batter two hours before it is time to cook. Even cooking heat is important, hence the oven. Many people use cast iron on the stovetop or electric frying pans. I find it too hard to duplicate a great product. If you follow the recipe step by step, you can get consistent. Coat a sheet pan with a thin layer of butter or oil. Spray eight cooking rings with non-stick spray and place on the buttered surface. Sprinkle a small amount of raw semolina in the rings to give the muffin that distinctive textured outside. Do not stir the batter. Use a large ladle to evenly fill the rings about 1/3 full. They are going to proof and fill the ring. Place another greases cookie sheet pan on top the rings and put it all into the oven for 10 minutes. Flip the whole pan assembly sprinkle the tops with semolina, recover, and cook for an additional five minutes. Remove the top sheet pan and rings, cooking for an additional 8-10 minutes. Be sure the outside doesn’t get too dark as English Muffins are usually toasted to finish the process. Now you have an ingredient for Eggs Benedict or an insanely tasty sandwich! The hardest part about baking is the patience to allow your ingredients to do what they need to do. Start these the night before and refrigerate them. You will be happy you did. As always, we love eating things that are simple, easy, and delicious. Be well!

Kyle brings us dec\licious recipes each month in this space.

Front porch fredericksburg

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

June Food Ideas from Snead Farm 1) Mix grated cucumber with whole milk, plain yogart, garlic, olive oil, cumin, chopped fresh mint or basil, salt

Be sure to visit Snead Farm, open daily from 9am -6pm to purchase your freash produce.

Etc. Fredericksburg, VA

and pepeer to taste for a cool sauce that can be spooned over grilled meats or vegetables. 2) Green beans havethe most nutrients when you cook them the least. For a quick salad, finely chop raw beans and toss with olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon juice or your favorite vinaigrette. Add a dash of red pepper. 3) Puree fresh raspberries, add sugar to tast and cream together with room temperature butter and a dash of lemon juice. Spread on waffles, toast, scones and other treats.

Soup & Taco,

BISTRO BETHEM an old favorite revisited

813 Caroline St.

by emmett snead June: Summer offically begins the day of the summer solstice, June 20. Food-wise, the entire month of June signals to us that spring has given way to summer. The menu of greens and root vegetables we’ve been eating is augmented with the arrival of cucumbers, green b e a n s , blueberries, raspberries and summer squash. Here’s what to look for in June: green onions, lettuce, radishes, kohlrabi, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, cucumbers, green beans, zucchini, crookneck squash and early tomatoes.

The

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

The Sunken Well Tavern

Front Porch Fredericksburg

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

By M.L. Powers

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

There are so many choices these Aby told me they are in the days for everything. In our little city process of refreshing things. They have alone, there are at least fifteen different brought back movie night, which includes eateries. It is difficult to claim a favorite a five course meal, wine paired if desired. among these, as most have something Bistro has been a great venue for local different to offer. A spot that was one of artists to show their work, and their latest the first I tried in the ‘burg, and one I venture is an employee art show. They often return to is Bistro Bethem on may even don new uniforms, a change William Street. from the logo t-shirts the crew has worn One of the first things I noticed over the years. about Bistro Bethem, and is one of the The Bethems are interested in things that brings me back is the staff’s their employees, and try to look out for attention to detail. Aby, co-owner with their future success, as well as the husband Blake has an businesses. Blake has amazing memory for mentored many aspiring They take orders without faces and names. When chefs. Mark Manjarrez writing them down, they fold she is in “house,” which presently holds the title tends to be often, she your napkin if you leave the of Sous Chef which he table, and generally give tirelessly chats up earned through the you the feel of having customers, remembering “climb the ladder, slowly” details like their children received the royal treatment method. He started as a or parents, and generally dishwasher, he then without the white gloves. making one feel like they moved to the “pantry” are part of a restaurant where he learned many of the family. Little things like this are instilled techniques that support a fresh menu. Try in the servers. They take orders without shucking a couple hundred oysters per writing them down, they fold your napkin night, now that’s a feat. Additionally, the if you leave the table, and generally give pantry runs the wood oven where pizzas you the feel of having received the royal are cooked, French Onion Soup is topped treatment without the white gloves. off, home-made ciabatta bread is baked, Bistro Bethem came into being in giving all these dishes the unique flavor of 2004, when Blake and Aby recently the wood oven. After a couple of years, married, decided to take the plunge and Mark moved to the grill where he learned become restauranteurs. Over time, they hands on from Blake the methods of have built a strong clientele that enjoy the grilling, and the difficult timing involved fresh and local products that Blake in putting out fresh sides with correctly specializes in, as well as the new items that cooked meats. Now, Mark is the kitchen he regularly comes up with. For instance, manager and pays his knowledge forward no one in town offered a charcuterie by training other newcomers. board, until a few years back when Blake Everyone likes to try new things, put it on the menu, and now it is on many but when something is good you always menus, including Wegman’s Deli. He has come back for more. This is how I feel some tried and true dishes, but is about Bistro. I try all the new spots, but constantly perfecting new items. for a great meal, I go back to Bistro Bethem.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

15


CALENDAR of events

Birding Club learn how and where june 2016…Happy Father’s Day, Dads!! Fredericksburg to look and listen for local birds and why the Rappahannock River is so important to them.

Thursday, June 2

Trois Visages de France art event @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop featuring works by Barbara J. Ellison. Artist Opening: Thursday, June 2, 7-9pm Vocals by Becky Stewart, offering a variety of French songs We will be accepting donations of dog and cat food or funds for the Fredericksburg SPCA Velvet Devils Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Learn More About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Fredericksburg Headquarters Library The Life and Films of Stanley Kubrick--Continuing series of the "Auteur" Film Directors. (540) 3721144 1201 Caroline Street Central Rappahannock Regional Library, Headquarters Free

First Friday, June 3

810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday from 6-8:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils 810 Caroline Street 10-5 daily. . Opening Reception for "Okra and More" by Johnny Johnson @ Art First Gallery, 6-9pm The "much maligned" vegetable, okra, will be featured in Johnny Johnson's latest exhibit throughout the month of June. The artist's portfolio spans 60 years, and is included in international collections. The Print Show Opening Reception @ Ponshop Studio & Gallery, 6-10pm, This month-long event will feature print editions of signature work by local and regional artists and is curated by Chance Kenyon of Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival.. 712 Caroline St. Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Wylder.

Saturday, June 4

Rock the River FXBG @ Old Mill Park, 11am -7pm. adventure with multi-sport river and foot races, outdoor activities for grown-ups, kids, as well as furry friends, a display of unique art and crafts, in addition to the enjoyment of the best local craft beer, tasty food, and live music all day. Antique Car Show- Downtown Fredericksburg @ Downtown Fredericksburg 10am -3pm Join the Historic Fredericksburg Region AACA for the 59th Annual Antique Car ShowThe streets of Fredericksburg will provide the show field for an array of antique cars ranging from 1890s through 1991. Monster Mashup Art Show @ Historic Town Hall features the work of 23 local artists who echo the work of Kindergarteners from Hugh Mercer Elementary in their own depictions of creative creatures. Each artist used the creativity of a student's work to create a professional piece of art. Presented by Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center Virginia Family and Pet Festival @ Stafford Airport, 10am -5pm. This is a family fun event featuring Rides, Games, Food, Beer, Contests and much more. Bring your entire family and, even your dog! Admission is free Stafford High School Chorus Presents "A Night on Broadway" @ Stafford High School Auditorium. 5:30pm

Sunday, June 5

Armand & Angelina Morning Musical Service @ Unity of Fredericksburg, 10am & 12pm. International Inspirational Speakers and performing artists, Armand and Angelina will be offering morning of Music, Message and Mirth to create a once in a lifetime experience of love, laughter and music.

Monday, June 6

Dixie Power Trio,Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Rock the River FXBG Bird Hike @ Old Mill Park, 7:30am -9:30am Join guides from the

Tuesday, June 7

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity for community groups, business people, friends, families, seniors, and preschoolers to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Come celebrate the spirit and music of the Grateful Dead with The Brokedown Boys at Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 8

Art of Aging Expo - Fredericksburg Expo Center 10:00am - 2:00pm - Free Admission -Over 100 organizations and agencies will be on hand to share info about their services and activities; free health screenings are also available. Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 9

Jonathan Byrd & the Pickup Cowboys Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 10

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight The Duskwhales.

Saturday, June 11

20TH Annual Fxbg SOAP BOX DERBY This community jewel is celebrating 20 years of children 8yrs-20yrs racing down William St. at top speeds to become the next champion in their division. Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $ Civil War Paddle @ Edy's Ford Boat Launch, 8am 4pm. Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and

National Park Service Supervisory Historian Greg Mertz for a daylong canoe trip, highlighting many of the Civil War sites along the Rapidan River. riverfriends.org/eventspage. Jonny Grave blues Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sunday, June 12

Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $ Ticket to Murder! @ Adventure Brewing South Adventure Brewing and Entree Act are teaming up for an exciting evening of dinner theatre. Watch the 'whodunnit' unfold over a delicious, Italianinspired three course meal.Call (540) 371-7799 for more information, or visit us on Facebook: facebook.com/blueandgraybrewingco/events Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage

Monday, June 13

Maranatha Music Ministries Music on the Steps. Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 14

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity f to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 15

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 16

Pete & laurie folk Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 17

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Rue Snider

Military History Book signing at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 35pm Col. Camp is the author of 14 military nonfiction and fiction books and over 150 articles in various military-related magazines. Many of these books are currently being sold at Agora Downtown in our local writers section. Free cup of hot drip coffee with purchase of a signed book!

Saturday, June 18

Juneteenth Celebration at New City Fellowship, from 12 p.m. until 7 p.m. New City Fellowship may be reached at (540) 899-5349 and is located at 200 Prince Edward Street. Follow Fredericksburg Juneteenth on Facebook for the most up-to-date event information The Record~Mann Archive Vintage Vinyl Record Show @ 4 Mile Treasures ~ Event Room Next to Hard Times Café Yoga in the Park @ Hurkamp Park (Downtown Fredericksburg), 8-10am Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $

Father's Day, Sunday, June 19

A. Smith Bowman Distillery’s 5th Annual FATHER'S DAY FESTIVAL 11AM -5PM One Bowman Drive Free fun includes tours of our distillery which was awarded the World's Best Bourbon Award for 2016, live band, delicious food trucks, local beers and wines, activities and vendors such as the Gauntlet Golf Course, Dominion Raceway, cigars and more! This day will be a fun and memorable way to honor dad and get great gift ideas too! Songfest Sundays: Harley Boone @ John Lee Pratt Memorial Park, 5pm, t is often said that music can stir the soul and elicit previously undiscovered emotions: Harley Boone excels at doing exactly that. This dynamic group of musicians merges country, bluegrass and rock elements into a sharp contemporary sound.. Presented by Stafford County Parks & Rec. $

Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $

Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 7-9pm

need to be in working order. If you have old desk top computers, monitors, TV's, laptops, cell phones, tablets, microwaves, DVD/VCR's etc. and you want to dispose of them properly bring them to FredWorks! (25lb limit per item please)We will try to refurbish anything that is close to working and give them back to the community members in need, or possibly take your electronics apart to use in some of our educational projects. Finally everything else will be taken to a local E-cycling pick up for proper recycling and disposal.

Monday, June 20

Sunday, June 26

Looking for something fun and exciting for your child to do this summer? Enroll them in Camp Adventure! This activity filled summer camp includes sports camp, field trips, outings, and much more! If you'd like more information, please give us a call. We'd love to schedule a tour with you! http://www.thefcalions.org/. June 20-Aug 26

Monday, June 27

Artist's Opening Reception with G. Sean Walker @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage,7-9pm

Laurie Rose Griffin & Pete Mealy Music on the Steps. Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 21

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity for community groups, business people, friends, families, seniors, and preschoolers to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 22

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 23

Wylder pop folk Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 24

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Elby Brass.

Saturday, June 25

FredWorks E-cycling @ Fredericksburg Academy We need your small electronics or appliances! Does not

Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm

The Company Store, Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 28

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and op to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 29

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 30

Learn More About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Porter Library, 6pm There are almost 1,280 children in the foster care system in Northern Virginia. These children have been neglected and abused by those meant to love and care for them. Right now the need for homes is great. 12 Bar Fuse Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. If you are reading this 227th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for July 2016 issue is June 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

2904 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!”

540-8 899-6 6787 16

June 2016

fortemusicstudios.com Front porch fredericksburg

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

Front Porch on

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

17


CALENDAR of events

Birding Club learn how and where june 2016…Happy Father’s Day, Dads!! Fredericksburg to look and listen for local birds and why the Rappahannock River is so important to them.

Thursday, June 2

Trois Visages de France art event @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop featuring works by Barbara J. Ellison. Artist Opening: Thursday, June 2, 7-9pm Vocals by Becky Stewart, offering a variety of French songs We will be accepting donations of dog and cat food or funds for the Fredericksburg SPCA Velvet Devils Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Learn More About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Fredericksburg Headquarters Library The Life and Films of Stanley Kubrick--Continuing series of the "Auteur" Film Directors. (540) 3721144 1201 Caroline Street Central Rappahannock Regional Library, Headquarters Free

First Friday, June 3

810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday from 6-8:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils 810 Caroline Street 10-5 daily. . Opening Reception for "Okra and More" by Johnny Johnson @ Art First Gallery, 6-9pm The "much maligned" vegetable, okra, will be featured in Johnny Johnson's latest exhibit throughout the month of June. The artist's portfolio spans 60 years, and is included in international collections. The Print Show Opening Reception @ Ponshop Studio & Gallery, 6-10pm, This month-long event will feature print editions of signature work by local and regional artists and is curated by Chance Kenyon of Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival.. 712 Caroline St. Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Wylder.

Saturday, June 4

Rock the River FXBG @ Old Mill Park, 11am -7pm. adventure with multi-sport river and foot races, outdoor activities for grown-ups, kids, as well as furry friends, a display of unique art and crafts, in addition to the enjoyment of the best local craft beer, tasty food, and live music all day. Antique Car Show- Downtown Fredericksburg @ Downtown Fredericksburg 10am -3pm Join the Historic Fredericksburg Region AACA for the 59th Annual Antique Car ShowThe streets of Fredericksburg will provide the show field for an array of antique cars ranging from 1890s through 1991. Monster Mashup Art Show @ Historic Town Hall features the work of 23 local artists who echo the work of Kindergarteners from Hugh Mercer Elementary in their own depictions of creative creatures. Each artist used the creativity of a student's work to create a professional piece of art. Presented by Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center Virginia Family and Pet Festival @ Stafford Airport, 10am -5pm. This is a family fun event featuring Rides, Games, Food, Beer, Contests and much more. Bring your entire family and, even your dog! Admission is free Stafford High School Chorus Presents "A Night on Broadway" @ Stafford High School Auditorium. 5:30pm

Sunday, June 5

Armand & Angelina Morning Musical Service @ Unity of Fredericksburg, 10am & 12pm. International Inspirational Speakers and performing artists, Armand and Angelina will be offering morning of Music, Message and Mirth to create a once in a lifetime experience of love, laughter and music.

Monday, June 6

Dixie Power Trio,Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Rock the River FXBG Bird Hike @ Old Mill Park, 7:30am -9:30am Join guides from the

Tuesday, June 7

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity for community groups, business people, friends, families, seniors, and preschoolers to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Come celebrate the spirit and music of the Grateful Dead with The Brokedown Boys at Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 8

Art of Aging Expo - Fredericksburg Expo Center 10:00am - 2:00pm - Free Admission -Over 100 organizations and agencies will be on hand to share info about their services and activities; free health screenings are also available. Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 9

Jonathan Byrd & the Pickup Cowboys Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 10

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight The Duskwhales.

Saturday, June 11

20TH Annual Fxbg SOAP BOX DERBY This community jewel is celebrating 20 years of children 8yrs-20yrs racing down William St. at top speeds to become the next champion in their division. Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $ Civil War Paddle @ Edy's Ford Boat Launch, 8am 4pm. Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and

National Park Service Supervisory Historian Greg Mertz for a daylong canoe trip, highlighting many of the Civil War sites along the Rapidan River. riverfriends.org/eventspage. Jonny Grave blues Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sunday, June 12

Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $ Ticket to Murder! @ Adventure Brewing South Adventure Brewing and Entree Act are teaming up for an exciting evening of dinner theatre. Watch the 'whodunnit' unfold over a delicious, Italianinspired three course meal.Call (540) 371-7799 for more information, or visit us on Facebook: facebook.com/blueandgraybrewingco/events Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage

Monday, June 13

Maranatha Music Ministries Music on the Steps. Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 14

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity f to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 15

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 16

Pete & laurie folk Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 17

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. in historic Market Square located at 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Rue Snider

Military History Book signing at Agora Downtown Coffee Shop @ Agora Downtown Coffee Shop, 35pm Col. Camp is the author of 14 military nonfiction and fiction books and over 150 articles in various military-related magazines. Many of these books are currently being sold at Agora Downtown in our local writers section. Free cup of hot drip coffee with purchase of a signed book!

Saturday, June 18

Juneteenth Celebration at New City Fellowship, from 12 p.m. until 7 p.m. New City Fellowship may be reached at (540) 899-5349 and is located at 200 Prince Edward Street. Follow Fredericksburg Juneteenth on Facebook for the most up-to-date event information The Record~Mann Archive Vintage Vinyl Record Show @ 4 Mile Treasures ~ Event Room Next to Hard Times Café Yoga in the Park @ Hurkamp Park (Downtown Fredericksburg), 8-10am Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $

Father's Day, Sunday, June 19

A. Smith Bowman Distillery’s 5th Annual FATHER'S DAY FESTIVAL 11AM -5PM One Bowman Drive Free fun includes tours of our distillery which was awarded the World's Best Bourbon Award for 2016, live band, delicious food trucks, local beers and wines, activities and vendors such as the Gauntlet Golf Course, Dominion Raceway, cigars and more! This day will be a fun and memorable way to honor dad and get great gift ideas too! Songfest Sundays: Harley Boone @ John Lee Pratt Memorial Park, 5pm, t is often said that music can stir the soul and elicit previously undiscovered emotions: Harley Boone excels at doing exactly that. This dynamic group of musicians merges country, bluegrass and rock elements into a sharp contemporary sound.. Presented by Stafford County Parks & Rec. $

Shakespeare on the Lawn at Kenmore performance of Hamlet-one of the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature. The production is set in an eighteenth-century style-as if a young George Washington is in the audience. 7pm $

Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 7-9pm

need to be in working order. If you have old desk top computers, monitors, TV's, laptops, cell phones, tablets, microwaves, DVD/VCR's etc. and you want to dispose of them properly bring them to FredWorks! (25lb limit per item please)We will try to refurbish anything that is close to working and give them back to the community members in need, or possibly take your electronics apart to use in some of our educational projects. Finally everything else will be taken to a local E-cycling pick up for proper recycling and disposal.

Monday, June 20

Sunday, June 26

Looking for something fun and exciting for your child to do this summer? Enroll them in Camp Adventure! This activity filled summer camp includes sports camp, field trips, outings, and much more! If you'd like more information, please give us a call. We'd love to schedule a tour with you! http://www.thefcalions.org/. June 20-Aug 26

Monday, June 27

Artist's Opening Reception with G. Sean Walker @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage,7-9pm

Laurie Rose Griffin & Pete Mealy Music on the Steps. Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 21

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and opportunity for community groups, business people, friends, families, seniors, and preschoolers to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 22

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 23

Wylder pop folk Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, June 24

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. FREE. 907 Princess Anne Street. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy family-friendly music by local and regional bands. Tonight Elby Brass.

Saturday, June 25

FredWorks E-cycling @ Fredericksburg Academy We need your small electronics or appliances! Does not

Sunday Funday Bluegrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm

The Company Store, Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, June 28

Picnic in the Park FREE Concert Series. Each concert serves as a meeting place and op to gather together and enjoy music, downtown Fredericksburg, and each other. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, June 29

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, June 30

Learn More About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Porter Library, 6pm There are almost 1,280 children in the foster care system in Northern Virginia. These children have been neglected and abused by those meant to love and care for them. Right now the need for homes is great. 12 Bar Fuse Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. If you are reading this 227th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for July 2016 issue is June 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

2904 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!”

540-8 899-6 6787 16

June 2016

fortemusicstudios.com Front porch fredericksburg

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

Front Porch on

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

17


history’s stories

FREDERICK PRINCE OF WALES

OUR HERITAGE

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

playgrounds: not just for kids

diaries & journals

By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I was always amused as a member of City Council that many of those elected did not know the origin of the n a m e “FREDERICKSBURG”. Former Supervisor Alvin Bandy was always proud to explain that our neighbor Stafford County was named in 1664 after Staffordshire England when it was formed out of what was then Westmoreland. Anne who is from Syracuse, New York tells me that the name Syracuse came from an Italian island near Sicily which was Siracusa in Italian. Many of the early names for towns came from the countries of the colonists and emigrants.

By judy chaimson On June 29, 1936, Togo Graves paid his hired hands George and Walter for eight hours work chopping grapes and sweet corn. Lottie Bennett enjoyed a “beautiful day”. Her Aunt Bell came for supper. The next day, June 30th, Lottie, who worked at the J. C. Penney Department Store in downtown Fredericksburg, won a pair of hose [stockings] for selling $100 more than the year before. On June 29th, William

Frederick was born on February 1, 1707 in Hanover, Germany as Duke Friedrich Ludwig of Brunswick-Luneburg to George II and Caroline of Ansbach. His life was to be one of interest and excitement for the times. With the death of Queen Anne in 1714, Frederick’s father Prince of Wales first in line for the British throne and Frederick himself second in line at the age of seven. Frederick’s father and mother quickly left for Great Britain leaving Frederick in care of his grand uncle Augustus for the next 14 years before he would travel to England in 1728. His father was now King George II. Frederick survived the smallpox epidemic as he was one of the first to be inoculated against smallpox in 1722 a rare procedure for the time. The long separation from his parents caused poor family relationship that would last throughout his lifetime. Frederick enjoyed gambling, drinking and the courtship of many ladies. He also had interest in the game of Cricket not only as a gambler and enthusiast, he enjoyed playing the game. forming his own team. During the period of between 1727-1728 Fredericksburg, Virginia was named in honor of Frederick. Frederick never fulfilled his political ambitions as he died in 1751 at age of forty-four, from abscess in the lung caused by a suspected blow from a cricket ball. He was buried at Westminster Abbey on April 13, 1751. Fredericksburg Virginia, Ford Frederica, Georgia and Prince Frederick Maryland are also named after him. Dedicated in memory of Matthew Carter, Gloria Rogers, Ollie Stephens and George Dodson, Sr.

Liebenow paid his bills: $2.85 to City Oil Company, $2.50 to the Phone Company, and a whopping $7.37 to the Electric Company. How do we know about these mundane activities of Fredericksburg residents, none of whom are still with us? Of course, we know because they have told us. They all kept diaries or journals which have come to the Heritage Center by way of their descendants. Mr. Graves was a farmer who kept his farm records in the 1930’s in a few paper composition books written in pencil. He continued to record daily life and weather in small notebooks from 1962 into the 1990’s. Mrs. Bennett’s diaries cover nearly every day of her life from 1930 to 1978. Written in ink, sometimes a different color for each year, her detailed records are contained in 5-year diaries. William Liebenow began his diaries in 1902. His last entry was February 6, 1949; he died on February 7th – his diaries literally a life-long achievement! Want to know how much rain fell

in Fredericksburg on that day in May, 1972, when Hurricane Agnes hit? Some diarists concentrated on one area of interest. Allen Green, of Copper Shop fame, kept meticulous information about Fredericksburg weather from 1957 to 2003, recording high and low temperature, barometric pressure, precipitation, and wind direction every day. (The answer to your question is 5.60 inches.) Not all personal histories are in the form of diaries. DuVal Hicks was asked in his older age to write some thoughts about his youth. His informal memoir of growing up in Fredericksburg in the 1930’s is a fascinating read. The description of his voyage to Europe in 1937 as a member of Levin Houston’s orchestra playing aboard the “Ile de France” is highly entertaining. Hicks was 18 at the time! In the age of texting, emailing, and the delete key, personal records of everyday activities written in real time may be a thing of the past. Members of the “Baby Boomer” generation are less likely than their parents to keep diaries, but perhaps can be encouraged to write brief memoirs for their children and grandchildren who can then donate copies to our regional archives – the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center – so that generations to come might share in their experiences. Judy Chaimson is a volunteer at the Heritage Center.

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 18

Renew

June 2016

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net

Fredericksburg

by Joan M. Geisler Think your neighborhood playground is just for kids? Think again! Monkey bars, swings, and a park bench can easily become all you need for an effective total-body workout. Dynamic Warm-U Up Jog around the park at a slow, relaxed pace for five to 10 minutes, then mix in some skips, butt kicks, walking lunges, arm circles, and jumping jacks. Upper Body 1. Swing Row Equipment: A swing Stand facing a swing and hold the chains

(or side of a tire swing, as pictured) so that your arms are straight out from chest. Lean back until your body forms a 45-degree angle to the ground. Keeping shoulders down and back, pull your body to meet your hands, bending elbows straight back. Slowly and with control, lower back to the starting position. Want more of a challenge? Lean back even more to start. PIN IT 2. Park Bench Push-U Up Equipment: Park bench with back Hold the back of the bench with hands

slightly wider than shoulder width. Walk feet back a few steps so your body forms a diagonal line. (The farther away you walk, the harder the move will be). With elbows tucked at your side, lower torso to the bench, performing a push-up. Keeping your core engaged and hips lifted, push up to return to the starting position. (Use the seat of the bench (as pictured) to make this move harder.) 3. Triceps Dip Equipment: A bench Sit on the edge of a bench and place hands by your hips, fingers forward so that you can hold the edge. Lift your butt off the seat and walk feet a few steps away from the bench. Bending at elbows, lower your body until your upper arms are parallel to the seat of the bench. Push back up to complete one rep.

Lower Body 4. Elevated Back Lunge Equipment: A bench Stand facing away from the bench (about

one foot away) and rest the top of your left foot on the seat. Place hands on hips. Bend your right (standing) knee until thigh is parallel to the ground. Pause, then press through your right heel to rise back up. That's one rep. Complete 10 to 12 reps, then switch legs. 5. Bench Toe Tap Equipment: A bench Facing a bench, stand one to two feet away and place your right foot on the seat of the bench. You should be comfortably close so your leg bends at the knee. Jump and switch feet, so your left foot is on the bench, right foot on the ground. Continue to switch as quickly as possible, tapping only your toes and maintaining good posture throughout. Complete 10 to 12 reps on each leg. Core 6. Swing Criss-C Cross Equipment: A swing

Sit in a swing and hold the chains on each side. Keeping your back straight and engaging your core, lean back slightly. Next, lift both legs up until your body forms a "V." Open legs wide, then bring them together and cross left over right. Spread wide again, then cross right over left. That's one rep. Joan Geisler is a personal trainer and certified nutrition counselor contact her at joangeisler@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

19


history’s stories

FREDERICK PRINCE OF WALES

OUR HERITAGE

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

playgrounds: not just for kids

diaries & journals

By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I was always amused as a member of City Council that many of those elected did not know the origin of the n a m e “FREDERICKSBURG”. Former Supervisor Alvin Bandy was always proud to explain that our neighbor Stafford County was named in 1664 after Staffordshire England when it was formed out of what was then Westmoreland. Anne who is from Syracuse, New York tells me that the name Syracuse came from an Italian island near Sicily which was Siracusa in Italian. Many of the early names for towns came from the countries of the colonists and emigrants.

By judy chaimson On June 29, 1936, Togo Graves paid his hired hands George and Walter for eight hours work chopping grapes and sweet corn. Lottie Bennett enjoyed a “beautiful day”. Her Aunt Bell came for supper. The next day, June 30th, Lottie, who worked at the J. C. Penney Department Store in downtown Fredericksburg, won a pair of hose [stockings] for selling $100 more than the year before. On June 29th, William

Frederick was born on February 1, 1707 in Hanover, Germany as Duke Friedrich Ludwig of Brunswick-Luneburg to George II and Caroline of Ansbach. His life was to be one of interest and excitement for the times. With the death of Queen Anne in 1714, Frederick’s father Prince of Wales first in line for the British throne and Frederick himself second in line at the age of seven. Frederick’s father and mother quickly left for Great Britain leaving Frederick in care of his grand uncle Augustus for the next 14 years before he would travel to England in 1728. His father was now King George II. Frederick survived the smallpox epidemic as he was one of the first to be inoculated against smallpox in 1722 a rare procedure for the time. The long separation from his parents caused poor family relationship that would last throughout his lifetime. Frederick enjoyed gambling, drinking and the courtship of many ladies. He also had interest in the game of Cricket not only as a gambler and enthusiast, he enjoyed playing the game. forming his own team. During the period of between 1727-1728 Fredericksburg, Virginia was named in honor of Frederick. Frederick never fulfilled his political ambitions as he died in 1751 at age of forty-four, from abscess in the lung caused by a suspected blow from a cricket ball. He was buried at Westminster Abbey on April 13, 1751. Fredericksburg Virginia, Ford Frederica, Georgia and Prince Frederick Maryland are also named after him. Dedicated in memory of Matthew Carter, Gloria Rogers, Ollie Stephens and George Dodson, Sr.

Liebenow paid his bills: $2.85 to City Oil Company, $2.50 to the Phone Company, and a whopping $7.37 to the Electric Company. How do we know about these mundane activities of Fredericksburg residents, none of whom are still with us? Of course, we know because they have told us. They all kept diaries or journals which have come to the Heritage Center by way of their descendants. Mr. Graves was a farmer who kept his farm records in the 1930’s in a few paper composition books written in pencil. He continued to record daily life and weather in small notebooks from 1962 into the 1990’s. Mrs. Bennett’s diaries cover nearly every day of her life from 1930 to 1978. Written in ink, sometimes a different color for each year, her detailed records are contained in 5-year diaries. William Liebenow began his diaries in 1902. His last entry was February 6, 1949; he died on February 7th – his diaries literally a life-long achievement! Want to know how much rain fell

in Fredericksburg on that day in May, 1972, when Hurricane Agnes hit? Some diarists concentrated on one area of interest. Allen Green, of Copper Shop fame, kept meticulous information about Fredericksburg weather from 1957 to 2003, recording high and low temperature, barometric pressure, precipitation, and wind direction every day. (The answer to your question is 5.60 inches.) Not all personal histories are in the form of diaries. DuVal Hicks was asked in his older age to write some thoughts about his youth. His informal memoir of growing up in Fredericksburg in the 1930’s is a fascinating read. The description of his voyage to Europe in 1937 as a member of Levin Houston’s orchestra playing aboard the “Ile de France” is highly entertaining. Hicks was 18 at the time! In the age of texting, emailing, and the delete key, personal records of everyday activities written in real time may be a thing of the past. Members of the “Baby Boomer” generation are less likely than their parents to keep diaries, but perhaps can be encouraged to write brief memoirs for their children and grandchildren who can then donate copies to our regional archives – the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center – so that generations to come might share in their experiences. Judy Chaimson is a volunteer at the Heritage Center.

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 18

Renew

June 2016

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

Virginia’s only Regional Archive The Heritage Center

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net

Fredericksburg

by Joan M. Geisler Think your neighborhood playground is just for kids? Think again! Monkey bars, swings, and a park bench can easily become all you need for an effective total-body workout. Dynamic Warm-U Up Jog around the park at a slow, relaxed pace for five to 10 minutes, then mix in some skips, butt kicks, walking lunges, arm circles, and jumping jacks. Upper Body 1. Swing Row Equipment: A swing Stand facing a swing and hold the chains

(or side of a tire swing, as pictured) so that your arms are straight out from chest. Lean back until your body forms a 45-degree angle to the ground. Keeping shoulders down and back, pull your body to meet your hands, bending elbows straight back. Slowly and with control, lower back to the starting position. Want more of a challenge? Lean back even more to start. PIN IT 2. Park Bench Push-U Up Equipment: Park bench with back Hold the back of the bench with hands

slightly wider than shoulder width. Walk feet back a few steps so your body forms a diagonal line. (The farther away you walk, the harder the move will be). With elbows tucked at your side, lower torso to the bench, performing a push-up. Keeping your core engaged and hips lifted, push up to return to the starting position. (Use the seat of the bench (as pictured) to make this move harder.) 3. Triceps Dip Equipment: A bench Sit on the edge of a bench and place hands by your hips, fingers forward so that you can hold the edge. Lift your butt off the seat and walk feet a few steps away from the bench. Bending at elbows, lower your body until your upper arms are parallel to the seat of the bench. Push back up to complete one rep.

Lower Body 4. Elevated Back Lunge Equipment: A bench Stand facing away from the bench (about

one foot away) and rest the top of your left foot on the seat. Place hands on hips. Bend your right (standing) knee until thigh is parallel to the ground. Pause, then press through your right heel to rise back up. That's one rep. Complete 10 to 12 reps, then switch legs. 5. Bench Toe Tap Equipment: A bench Facing a bench, stand one to two feet away and place your right foot on the seat of the bench. You should be comfortably close so your leg bends at the knee. Jump and switch feet, so your left foot is on the bench, right foot on the ground. Continue to switch as quickly as possible, tapping only your toes and maintaining good posture throughout. Complete 10 to 12 reps on each leg. Core 6. Swing Criss-C Cross Equipment: A swing

Sit in a swing and hold the chains on each side. Keeping your back straight and engaging your core, lean back slightly. Next, lift both legs up until your body forms a "V." Open legs wide, then bring them together and cross left over right. Spread wide again, then cross right over left. That's one rep. Joan Geisler is a personal trainer and certified nutrition counselor contact her at joangeisler@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

19


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA A Personal Service

‘tis the season for ticks a microscopic worm-like organism that live in the soil, they feed on tick larvae, so break their life cycle and kill off the parasite. Another is diatomaceous earth, it is a non-toxic powder that consists of ground fossils, marine life and fresh water organisms, while it is non-toxic to humans and pets it is lethal to ticks and fleas. It is always best to use a wide variety of treatments, use a topical treatment plus an environmental treatment to repel ticks and fleas, I will be doing this during the hot summer months. If you are going away during the summer please be sure to give me a call, I will care for your pets as if they are my own.

“When it’s time to say “Good-bye” Cremation & Bereavement Service Serving the Area since 2003

Alexis Grogan is the owner-operator of Lexi Grogan Pet Sitting Services. Contact her at Lexig0892@gmail.com, 540-903-0437, or on facebook.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com 20

June 2016

compassion by patrick neustatter, MD

collars on the market but why buy one when you can just make it.: Mix two tablespoons almond oil with Rose Geranium Oil or Palo Santo. Dab a few drops on your dog's neck area before heading out. Alternately you could apply the essential oil directly to the dogs collar then reapply the essential oil to the dogs collar weekly. You can also give your dog a bath, now if your dog is anything like mine he will protest kicking, howling and some form of punching. Anyway, you can mix several drops of Palo Santo into some lavender shampoo and let the suds sit on your dog for twenty minutes, this solution will kill existing ticks and also prevent new ones, I'm going to be making this myself! We all love the environment right? At least a majority of us do, you can use environmental methods to repel ticks and fleas as well as topical, nematodes are

540-898-0737

Front porch fredericksburg

Mind Your Mind

knowing your doctor’s foibles

By Alexis grogan

So we are getting into that time of year the hot, humid, summer days, there's flowers, green grass, sitting poolside, and bonfires although you are not the only one that likes the hot summer, bugs love it to specially fleas and ticks, so far I have found four ticks on myself and two on my furry pup. We all hate these bloodsuckers and wish they would be nonexistent we all seem to ask the same question "what good are these nasty creatures?!" I still do not have an answer for that. Fortunately there are natural ways to repel these crawlers, there are multiple all-natural products that you can use to repel fleas and ticks from your furry friend. Herbal flea and tick powders can be used to protect your pet, you can also make your own flea and tick powder with three simple ingredients, another form of natural repellent are herbal flea and tick collars there are several flea and tick

Emancipated Patients

info@animalritesusa.com animalritesusa.com 540-361-7487

A crucial part of managing your surgeon of a 36 year old who died after own healthcare is finding a competent bariatric and gallbladder surgery doctor. (ironically the fiancé of a member of the “No problem” you may think. National Physician Alliance “Safe Patient There’s lots of organizations like Project”). This surgeon turned out to have Healthgrades, Angie’s List and Yelp that had a series of arrests, including for crack publish reviews of doctors. Or if you’re cocaine possession – but was able to keep really serious you’ll get information from practicing and his history secret per the the National Practice Data Bank or the policy and the California board and their state licensing board. doctor substance abuse program. In that case, the May issue of As well as not being able to get at Consumer Reports magazine will show you the information when the board does how naive you are. actually discipline someone, there is an They tell of how a young, extremely high bar for getting them to pregnant mother who signed up with a act. Much of the work of the boards is Californian obstetrician done by volunteer was dead a week after doctors, who are often delivery from a ruptured uncomfortable about Currently only hospitals, appendix that the doctor sanctioning a member doctors, law enforcement, had reputedly failed “to of their own profession insurance companies and adequately evaluate.” – as illustrated by the few others can access OK, disasters California board detailed information from happen in medicine, even receiving 8,267 the state (medical) licensing complaints in 2014/15. to good doctors. The problem was boards. ... “You can find out But only opening cases more about the safety that, although the on 1,381 of them. mother had researched record of your toaster than Currently only the doctor’s record, it was hospitals, doctors, law you can about your only after the fact, when enforcement, insurance physician” it was too late of course, companies and few that the husband/father others can access detailed found out this doctor had been cited by information from the state licensing the state medical board for 40 instances boards. There have been moves to allow of negligence and incompetence with the public, wanting to vet any new doctor, errors of medical knowledge, judgment, greater access. But “the American Medical protocol and attentiveness. And had been Association has long lobbied against public reprimanded for negligence, dishonesty access” notes the article. and incompetence. “You can find out more about Healthgrades, only reported that the safety record of your toaster than you he had been dinged for “failure to keep can about your physician” notes an adequate records.” And Yelp, had “glowing expert in the article. But this is a real reports” notes the Consumer Reports emancipated patient issue – that like so article. many others requires us all to bring about a change in position of the medical profession. KEPT IN THE DARK In the mean time, dig as deep as you can in the state boards records and be The problem is “it’s still too difficult for consumers to find a doctor’s skeptical of any disciplinary action even if it sounds trifling like a reprimand or disciplinary record and it’s cause.” probation. The National Practitioner Data Bank is an agency of the DHSS - but this only provides information on malpractice payouts or certain disciplinary actions. The multiple websites grading doctors just pass on subjective reports from patients – who may have had an exceptionally good, or bad, experience. The state boards are the agencies that really know about doctors – but their information is impossibly difficult to access, complains the report. You would think that any doctor that was a danger would have their license revoked. But often they are only put on probation or into some rehab’ program and the information is kept secret – like the

By Barbara Deal Compassion is important in relationships everywhere every day. One strategy is to use one’s own troubles and your own r e a c t i o n s , thoughts and emotions as a window into and understanding the suffering and perspective of others. Select a heartache in your own experience. Go deeper. Expand to imagine others feel that same pain. The transfer emerges from the details of your personal experience I will take you through the process of minding my own mind linking it to others with something that recently happened to me. I found myself with a sports injury leaving me ambling slowly, leaning on a walking stick, limping. ..What follows, I hope, will be informative and not simply a whine. Thus, my process. Purposely, for the most part, I have left out the single pronoun “I” hoping to bring the experience more forward to you the reader. For me, here, the link was with the physically disabled in our world. Oh vanity. Embarrassed to be in public, but in truth more facing the mirror. Rejected a prescription for a cane, choosing a “cool” cedar decorative walking stick. This decision disguised the injury, someone noted, thus my ‘solution’ contributed to what follows.? Dependent as never before. Attending a psychotherapy workshop attended by 3,000 clinicians. navigating streets, lobbies, hallways. Fearful and tearful about tenuous balance. Wobbly, demanded hubby within grabbing distance. Looking to the floor instead of ahead. Time standing still or slow. The newness of maneuvers,

counterintuitively putting the stick down simultaneous with my “good” leg. This, alone, took the weekend to accomplish, meandering along. Everywhere seemed insurmountable in distance. Doors that spin like spokes on a stagecoach wheel. A line for a taxi, the strain standing on a concrete sidewalk. Now invisible, waiting the line for a taxi due to thoughtful, enlightened others, who avoid looking. Repeated efforts to reassure everyone that the compromised condition would be temporary, to circumvent pity. Ordinary stamina : elusive. Tired, angry, helpless, even hopeless imagining the task “of 4 days “like this”. In this familiar hotel, locations for keynotes and workshops had become suddenly a maze of long hallways, more lines to the elevator and stairs of 4 or 5 steps challenging balance. and a willingness even to continue. We all strive to be kind and understanding. Therapists, as a group, see this as their profession and expertise. Surprisingly, a convention marked by ‘mindful awareness’ workshops the counselors, were inattentive, at times, blocked access. Groups of 5 were more engaged in animated discussions and renewed friendships. There, too, invisible. Too fatigued to walk around crowds. The physical limitations were really painful and explicit. Directly asking for passage was inevitable. Hurriedly, one person crawled over me and a chair instead of the aisle. Hotel rules prohibited sitting safely, apart from lined rows in the large assembly for keynotes. Sitting in an aisle seat, early, one must endure later seatings in rows of 18 chairs. These are situations faced constantly among others with disabilities and handled with dignity and courage along with the suffering. The variety of wellness in the human condition is much about suffering and hope. Maybe others can overlook our lack of understanding as we try better to understand theirs.

Publisher’s Note: Read Patrick Neustatter’s Book, “Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient’s Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare”, available at Amazon.com

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. He is interested in stories of emancipated patients/people and would like to hear any stories of this kind from any readers. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com

S HOP

FOR

G OOD ~ 806 C AR OLINE S T. F REDERICKSB UR G front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

21


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA A Personal Service

‘tis the season for ticks a microscopic worm-like organism that live in the soil, they feed on tick larvae, so break their life cycle and kill off the parasite. Another is diatomaceous earth, it is a non-toxic powder that consists of ground fossils, marine life and fresh water organisms, while it is non-toxic to humans and pets it is lethal to ticks and fleas. It is always best to use a wide variety of treatments, use a topical treatment plus an environmental treatment to repel ticks and fleas, I will be doing this during the hot summer months. If you are going away during the summer please be sure to give me a call, I will care for your pets as if they are my own.

“When it’s time to say “Good-bye” Cremation & Bereavement Service Serving the Area since 2003

Alexis Grogan is the owner-operator of Lexi Grogan Pet Sitting Services. Contact her at Lexig0892@gmail.com, 540-903-0437, or on facebook.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com 20

June 2016

compassion by patrick neustatter, MD

collars on the market but why buy one when you can just make it.: Mix two tablespoons almond oil with Rose Geranium Oil or Palo Santo. Dab a few drops on your dog's neck area before heading out. Alternately you could apply the essential oil directly to the dogs collar then reapply the essential oil to the dogs collar weekly. You can also give your dog a bath, now if your dog is anything like mine he will protest kicking, howling and some form of punching. Anyway, you can mix several drops of Palo Santo into some lavender shampoo and let the suds sit on your dog for twenty minutes, this solution will kill existing ticks and also prevent new ones, I'm going to be making this myself! We all love the environment right? At least a majority of us do, you can use environmental methods to repel ticks and fleas as well as topical, nematodes are

540-898-0737

Front porch fredericksburg

Mind Your Mind

knowing your doctor’s foibles

By Alexis grogan

So we are getting into that time of year the hot, humid, summer days, there's flowers, green grass, sitting poolside, and bonfires although you are not the only one that likes the hot summer, bugs love it to specially fleas and ticks, so far I have found four ticks on myself and two on my furry pup. We all hate these bloodsuckers and wish they would be nonexistent we all seem to ask the same question "what good are these nasty creatures?!" I still do not have an answer for that. Fortunately there are natural ways to repel these crawlers, there are multiple all-natural products that you can use to repel fleas and ticks from your furry friend. Herbal flea and tick powders can be used to protect your pet, you can also make your own flea and tick powder with three simple ingredients, another form of natural repellent are herbal flea and tick collars there are several flea and tick

Emancipated Patients

info@animalritesusa.com animalritesusa.com 540-361-7487

A crucial part of managing your surgeon of a 36 year old who died after own healthcare is finding a competent bariatric and gallbladder surgery doctor. (ironically the fiancé of a member of the “No problem” you may think. National Physician Alliance “Safe Patient There’s lots of organizations like Project”). This surgeon turned out to have Healthgrades, Angie’s List and Yelp that had a series of arrests, including for crack publish reviews of doctors. Or if you’re cocaine possession – but was able to keep really serious you’ll get information from practicing and his history secret per the the National Practice Data Bank or the policy and the California board and their state licensing board. doctor substance abuse program. In that case, the May issue of As well as not being able to get at Consumer Reports magazine will show you the information when the board does how naive you are. actually discipline someone, there is an They tell of how a young, extremely high bar for getting them to pregnant mother who signed up with a act. Much of the work of the boards is Californian obstetrician done by volunteer was dead a week after doctors, who are often delivery from a ruptured uncomfortable about Currently only hospitals, appendix that the doctor sanctioning a member doctors, law enforcement, had reputedly failed “to of their own profession insurance companies and adequately evaluate.” – as illustrated by the few others can access OK, disasters California board detailed information from happen in medicine, even receiving 8,267 the state (medical) licensing complaints in 2014/15. to good doctors. The problem was boards. ... “You can find out But only opening cases more about the safety that, although the on 1,381 of them. mother had researched record of your toaster than Currently only the doctor’s record, it was hospitals, doctors, law you can about your only after the fact, when enforcement, insurance physician” it was too late of course, companies and few that the husband/father others can access detailed found out this doctor had been cited by information from the state licensing the state medical board for 40 instances boards. There have been moves to allow of negligence and incompetence with the public, wanting to vet any new doctor, errors of medical knowledge, judgment, greater access. But “the American Medical protocol and attentiveness. And had been Association has long lobbied against public reprimanded for negligence, dishonesty access” notes the article. and incompetence. “You can find out more about Healthgrades, only reported that the safety record of your toaster than you he had been dinged for “failure to keep can about your physician” notes an adequate records.” And Yelp, had “glowing expert in the article. But this is a real reports” notes the Consumer Reports emancipated patient issue – that like so article. many others requires us all to bring about a change in position of the medical profession. KEPT IN THE DARK In the mean time, dig as deep as you can in the state boards records and be The problem is “it’s still too difficult for consumers to find a doctor’s skeptical of any disciplinary action even if it sounds trifling like a reprimand or disciplinary record and it’s cause.” probation. The National Practitioner Data Bank is an agency of the DHSS - but this only provides information on malpractice payouts or certain disciplinary actions. The multiple websites grading doctors just pass on subjective reports from patients – who may have had an exceptionally good, or bad, experience. The state boards are the agencies that really know about doctors – but their information is impossibly difficult to access, complains the report. You would think that any doctor that was a danger would have their license revoked. But often they are only put on probation or into some rehab’ program and the information is kept secret – like the

By Barbara Deal Compassion is important in relationships everywhere every day. One strategy is to use one’s own troubles and your own r e a c t i o n s , thoughts and emotions as a window into and understanding the suffering and perspective of others. Select a heartache in your own experience. Go deeper. Expand to imagine others feel that same pain. The transfer emerges from the details of your personal experience I will take you through the process of minding my own mind linking it to others with something that recently happened to me. I found myself with a sports injury leaving me ambling slowly, leaning on a walking stick, limping. ..What follows, I hope, will be informative and not simply a whine. Thus, my process. Purposely, for the most part, I have left out the single pronoun “I” hoping to bring the experience more forward to you the reader. For me, here, the link was with the physically disabled in our world. Oh vanity. Embarrassed to be in public, but in truth more facing the mirror. Rejected a prescription for a cane, choosing a “cool” cedar decorative walking stick. This decision disguised the injury, someone noted, thus my ‘solution’ contributed to what follows.? Dependent as never before. Attending a psychotherapy workshop attended by 3,000 clinicians. navigating streets, lobbies, hallways. Fearful and tearful about tenuous balance. Wobbly, demanded hubby within grabbing distance. Looking to the floor instead of ahead. Time standing still or slow. The newness of maneuvers,

counterintuitively putting the stick down simultaneous with my “good” leg. This, alone, took the weekend to accomplish, meandering along. Everywhere seemed insurmountable in distance. Doors that spin like spokes on a stagecoach wheel. A line for a taxi, the strain standing on a concrete sidewalk. Now invisible, waiting the line for a taxi due to thoughtful, enlightened others, who avoid looking. Repeated efforts to reassure everyone that the compromised condition would be temporary, to circumvent pity. Ordinary stamina : elusive. Tired, angry, helpless, even hopeless imagining the task “of 4 days “like this”. In this familiar hotel, locations for keynotes and workshops had become suddenly a maze of long hallways, more lines to the elevator and stairs of 4 or 5 steps challenging balance. and a willingness even to continue. We all strive to be kind and understanding. Therapists, as a group, see this as their profession and expertise. Surprisingly, a convention marked by ‘mindful awareness’ workshops the counselors, were inattentive, at times, blocked access. Groups of 5 were more engaged in animated discussions and renewed friendships. There, too, invisible. Too fatigued to walk around crowds. The physical limitations were really painful and explicit. Directly asking for passage was inevitable. Hurriedly, one person crawled over me and a chair instead of the aisle. Hotel rules prohibited sitting safely, apart from lined rows in the large assembly for keynotes. Sitting in an aisle seat, early, one must endure later seatings in rows of 18 chairs. These are situations faced constantly among others with disabilities and handled with dignity and courage along with the suffering. The variety of wellness in the human condition is much about suffering and hope. Maybe others can overlook our lack of understanding as we try better to understand theirs.

Publisher’s Note: Read Patrick Neustatter’s Book, “Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient’s Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare”, available at Amazon.com

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. He is interested in stories of emancipated patients/people and would like to hear any stories of this kind from any readers. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com

S HOP

FOR

G OOD ~ 806 C AR OLINE S T. F REDERICKSB UR G front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

21


Senior Care lower fall risk By Karl Karch

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

June is designated as National Safety Month. Each year, millions of older people 65 and older fall. In fact, one out of three older people falls, but less than half tell their doctor. Unfortunately, falling once doubles your chances of falling again. Many falls do not cause injuries. But one out of five falls does cause a serious injury such as a broken bone or a head injury. More than 95% of hip fractures are caused by falling, usually by falling sideways. Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries (TBI). The direct medical costs for fall injuries are $34 billion annually. Fall related injuries can make it hard for a person to get around, do everyday activities, or live on their own. Many people who fall, even if they’re not injured, become afraid of falling. This fear may cause a person to cut down on their everyday activities causing them to become weaker and increase their chances of falling. Falls are not a normal part of aging and they can be prevented. By following these simple steps you can lower your fall risk: Get active. Staying active can help you feel better, improve your balance, and make your legs stronger. Do strengthening activities at least 2 days a week. These include lifting weights or using resistance bands (long rubber strips that stretch). You don’t have to be a weightlifter, just start with a light weight and build up over time. Talk with your doctor about using medicines safely. Some medicines can make you sleepy or dizzy and can cause you to fall. Have all medications reviewed each time you get a new prescription.

22

June 2016

Get your vision checked at least every 12 years. Your vision changes as you get older and poor vision can increase your chances of falling. Get a bone density test. If you are a woman age 65 or older, get a bone density test to measure how strong your bones are. If you have weak bones (osteoporosis), you can take steps to stop bone loss and lower your chances of breaking a bone. Make your home safer. About half of all falls happen inside the home. For example, add grab bars inside and outside your bathtub or shower; make certain area rugs have anti-skid pads underneath; put night lights in hallways and bathrooms. To help older adults better understand their fall risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Injury Center has an initiative called STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths & Injuries). The following brochures can be downloaded from their websitewww.cdc.gov/steadi/patient.html: Stay Independent; What You Can Do to Prevent Falls; and Check for Safety (eliminate home fall hazards). Partners In Aging is holding its free admission Art of Aging Expo 2016 on Wednesday June 8th at the Fredericksburg Expo Center from 10:00am – 2:00pm. In addition to 100 agencies and organizations, there will be free health screenings including: fall risk, vision & hearing, diabetes, blood glucose & blood pressure checks, body mass, bone density, and foot scans are available. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home

Front porch fredericksburg

Celebrate & Enjoy Life

Wellness

art of aging expo

celebrating 20 years serving fxbg

BY PAM PELL Well, it’s official. We Baby Boomers have all turned 50. And boy, oh boy, have we ever done it in style, and by rewriting all of the rules of aging. The Active Adult Life Style has begun, and will continue with fervor. Aging actively, gracefully and with dignity occurs on individual, family and community levels. On Wednesday, June 8, Partners in Aging will host the tenth annual Art of Aging – Life Begins at 50 Expo at the Fredericksburg Expo Center from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Partners in Aging is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life as we age in the greater Fredericksburg area by providing access to resources. The Art of Aging Expo showcases the many facets of aging and the active lifestyle. Today there are approximately 70 million Baby Boomers in the United States, many of whom still have living parents. Many of us continue to work well past the age of 65; many who have retired are finding other ways to channel our energy and efforts. Some are starting second careers, spurred on by hobbies or bucket list wishes. Others are investing their time by volunteering and giving back to the community. Yet others find themselves sandwiched into caring for their children and/or grandchildren, as many navigate the duties of caregiving for their spouses and/or parents. We Baby Boomers are a loud generation. We believe in sharing our opinions, making our voices heard. We are large and in charge, and intend to redefine the rules of aging. Like a fine wine, we aren’t getting old, we’re getting better. We strive to make our community a better place for the generations to come. Boomers and Seniors have a wealth of knowledge and experience that continue to shape our society. The Art of Aging Expo provides the opportunity to visit over 100 sponsors and vendors. You can discover ways to get involved, volunteer and give back, and learn about aging wisely. You can discover ways to broaden your horizons and knowledge, whether staying local or

travelling the world. There will be fourteen short courses, on various topics, throughout the day. There will be various health screenings and demonstrations, as well. The Attorney General of Virginia, Mark Herring, will be on hand for a special ceremony and the signing of the Fredericksburg/Spotsylvania/Stafford TRIAD’s Agreement. Short Courses include: Generating Income for Living and Wills & Trusts Sex After 50 and Aging Well Long Term Care Insurance and Understanding Medicare & Medicaid What to Ask your Doctor and Medication Management Make the Most of the Library Dementia and Prepare to Care Palliative Care Yoga and Meditation Avoid Scams & Senior Safety Demos include: The Silver Liners Line Dancing Jazzercise DoTerra Essential Oil Hand Massages and Chair Massages by Eve Wegmans offers Healthy Cooking & Tastings and Ask Your Pharmacist Indian Motorcycles Screenings include: Diabetes, Glucose and BMI Blood Pressure and Stroke Risk Fall Risk Assessment by OSPTA Vision and Hearing by The Lions’ Club Bone Density by Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center Remember that each day is the first day of the rest of your life. Take charge of your life to age well, successfully, and with dignity. Take advantage of the riches we have locally and give back to add more value to our community. Join us on June 8 th at the Art of Aging – Life Begins at 50 Expo… learn how we can age well together. Pam Pell is a Certified Relocation & Transition Specialist and the owner of Caring Transitions of Fredericksburg, as well as Vice President of Partners in Aging and Chairman of the Art of Aging Committee.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

By christine h. thompson, D.C. This

year

celebrates the 20th anniversary of my chiropractic practice in Fredericksburg. What a difference a couple of decades make! I arrived in Fredericksburg nervous, excited, full of ideas and anxious to get started on my new career. I had no idea if I could really help people and certainly didn’t feel like a doctor. It has been quite a journey, with a few bumps in the road, but now I am certain of the body’s ability to heal from almost anything, and also my ability to be of help to those in need, if only in some small way. The public perception of chiropractic as a healing modality has also come a long way in Fredericksburg. When I started out in practice, it was a surprise to me to find that a vast portion of the population had no idea what chiropractic was or why they should see a chiropractor. Some even asked me if I had to go to school to become a chiropractor. (If you are still wondering, chiropractors have 8 years of college and hold a doctorate in chiropractic.) Fortunately, a few trusting souls in our community gave me a chance and my practice was born. Now, two decades later, when I tell a new acquaintance I am a chiropractor, they usually have some idea of what I do, that I am a college-educated doctor and that I work on the musculoskeletal system. Some may not be ready to trust my skills or may have heard something negative, but many profess to have a friend or relative who swears by chiropractic and how much it has helped them. What a relief! Chiropractic has been around more than 100 years, but is still the new kid on the block in healthcare. In the 1800’s a German philosopher said that all truths pass through three stages: First it is ridiculed, then violently opposed and lastly it is considered self-evident. When a patient tells me their doctor warned them never to see a chiropractor, I know we have yet to arrive at the final stage. Fortunately, most health care professionals are becoming more open minded and informed about the benefits of holistic forms of healthcare. The truth is that chiropractic and nutritional therapies are non-invasive and complications are practically non-existent when delivered by a trained and educated professional. The statistics are solid and clear on this.

The World Health Organization says “90% of the diseases prevalent today are not treatable with orthodox medical procedures.” While drugs and surgery can save lives in an emergency, when used to treat the life-style mediated diseases of today, they can create dangerous sideeffects, complications and barriers to healing. Examples of these lifestylegenerated health issues are diabetes, heart disease, thyroid disorders, hormonal imbalance and digestive problems, to name a few. The key to these health issues is finding the underlying cause, correcting it and helping the body to heal. This is the philosophy of chiropractic and all holistic modalities. Despite the amazing capability of chiropractic to restore balance and communication within the body, I realized early on, if I was going to help people to the well-being I knew was possible for them, I was going to have to do more than balance their skeletal frame and restore motion to their spinal joints. It seemed they were coming back all too soon with the same complaints. Since I already had quite a thorough education in nutrition and had learned a lot about exercise, ergonomics, posture and other lifestyle habits, I launched into teaching people how to create lifetime wellness through healthy lifestyle habits. The process of gathering the skills and cutting-edge scientific knowledge needed to help people to health has been, and continues to be, transformative and fascinating. Last year I put all I have learned into a comprehensive wellness curriculum designed to help people recover from debilitating health issues, and also maintain and keep improving their health and well-being for a lifetime. This has been my career-long goal and passion and I am thrilled and honored to celebrate my 20th year serving Fredericksburg by offering the fruits of my labor.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

23


Senior Care lower fall risk By Karl Karch

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

June is designated as National Safety Month. Each year, millions of older people 65 and older fall. In fact, one out of three older people falls, but less than half tell their doctor. Unfortunately, falling once doubles your chances of falling again. Many falls do not cause injuries. But one out of five falls does cause a serious injury such as a broken bone or a head injury. More than 95% of hip fractures are caused by falling, usually by falling sideways. Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries (TBI). The direct medical costs for fall injuries are $34 billion annually. Fall related injuries can make it hard for a person to get around, do everyday activities, or live on their own. Many people who fall, even if they’re not injured, become afraid of falling. This fear may cause a person to cut down on their everyday activities causing them to become weaker and increase their chances of falling. Falls are not a normal part of aging and they can be prevented. By following these simple steps you can lower your fall risk: Get active. Staying active can help you feel better, improve your balance, and make your legs stronger. Do strengthening activities at least 2 days a week. These include lifting weights or using resistance bands (long rubber strips that stretch). You don’t have to be a weightlifter, just start with a light weight and build up over time. Talk with your doctor about using medicines safely. Some medicines can make you sleepy or dizzy and can cause you to fall. Have all medications reviewed each time you get a new prescription.

22

June 2016

Get your vision checked at least every 12 years. Your vision changes as you get older and poor vision can increase your chances of falling. Get a bone density test. If you are a woman age 65 or older, get a bone density test to measure how strong your bones are. If you have weak bones (osteoporosis), you can take steps to stop bone loss and lower your chances of breaking a bone. Make your home safer. About half of all falls happen inside the home. For example, add grab bars inside and outside your bathtub or shower; make certain area rugs have anti-skid pads underneath; put night lights in hallways and bathrooms. To help older adults better understand their fall risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Injury Center has an initiative called STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths & Injuries). The following brochures can be downloaded from their websitewww.cdc.gov/steadi/patient.html: Stay Independent; What You Can Do to Prevent Falls; and Check for Safety (eliminate home fall hazards). Partners In Aging is holding its free admission Art of Aging Expo 2016 on Wednesday June 8th at the Fredericksburg Expo Center from 10:00am – 2:00pm. In addition to 100 agencies and organizations, there will be free health screenings including: fall risk, vision & hearing, diabetes, blood glucose & blood pressure checks, body mass, bone density, and foot scans are available. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home

Front porch fredericksburg

Celebrate & Enjoy Life

Wellness

art of aging expo

celebrating 20 years serving fxbg

BY PAM PELL Well, it’s official. We Baby Boomers have all turned 50. And boy, oh boy, have we ever done it in style, and by rewriting all of the rules of aging. The Active Adult Life Style has begun, and will continue with fervor. Aging actively, gracefully and with dignity occurs on individual, family and community levels. On Wednesday, June 8, Partners in Aging will host the tenth annual Art of Aging – Life Begins at 50 Expo at the Fredericksburg Expo Center from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Partners in Aging is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life as we age in the greater Fredericksburg area by providing access to resources. The Art of Aging Expo showcases the many facets of aging and the active lifestyle. Today there are approximately 70 million Baby Boomers in the United States, many of whom still have living parents. Many of us continue to work well past the age of 65; many who have retired are finding other ways to channel our energy and efforts. Some are starting second careers, spurred on by hobbies or bucket list wishes. Others are investing their time by volunteering and giving back to the community. Yet others find themselves sandwiched into caring for their children and/or grandchildren, as many navigate the duties of caregiving for their spouses and/or parents. We Baby Boomers are a loud generation. We believe in sharing our opinions, making our voices heard. We are large and in charge, and intend to redefine the rules of aging. Like a fine wine, we aren’t getting old, we’re getting better. We strive to make our community a better place for the generations to come. Boomers and Seniors have a wealth of knowledge and experience that continue to shape our society. The Art of Aging Expo provides the opportunity to visit over 100 sponsors and vendors. You can discover ways to get involved, volunteer and give back, and learn about aging wisely. You can discover ways to broaden your horizons and knowledge, whether staying local or

travelling the world. There will be fourteen short courses, on various topics, throughout the day. There will be various health screenings and demonstrations, as well. The Attorney General of Virginia, Mark Herring, will be on hand for a special ceremony and the signing of the Fredericksburg/Spotsylvania/Stafford TRIAD’s Agreement. Short Courses include: Generating Income for Living and Wills & Trusts Sex After 50 and Aging Well Long Term Care Insurance and Understanding Medicare & Medicaid What to Ask your Doctor and Medication Management Make the Most of the Library Dementia and Prepare to Care Palliative Care Yoga and Meditation Avoid Scams & Senior Safety Demos include: The Silver Liners Line Dancing Jazzercise DoTerra Essential Oil Hand Massages and Chair Massages by Eve Wegmans offers Healthy Cooking & Tastings and Ask Your Pharmacist Indian Motorcycles Screenings include: Diabetes, Glucose and BMI Blood Pressure and Stroke Risk Fall Risk Assessment by OSPTA Vision and Hearing by The Lions’ Club Bone Density by Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center Remember that each day is the first day of the rest of your life. Take charge of your life to age well, successfully, and with dignity. Take advantage of the riches we have locally and give back to add more value to our community. Join us on June 8 th at the Art of Aging – Life Begins at 50 Expo… learn how we can age well together. Pam Pell is a Certified Relocation & Transition Specialist and the owner of Caring Transitions of Fredericksburg, as well as Vice President of Partners in Aging and Chairman of the Art of Aging Committee.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

By christine h. thompson, D.C. This

year

celebrates the 20th anniversary of my chiropractic practice in Fredericksburg. What a difference a couple of decades make! I arrived in Fredericksburg nervous, excited, full of ideas and anxious to get started on my new career. I had no idea if I could really help people and certainly didn’t feel like a doctor. It has been quite a journey, with a few bumps in the road, but now I am certain of the body’s ability to heal from almost anything, and also my ability to be of help to those in need, if only in some small way. The public perception of chiropractic as a healing modality has also come a long way in Fredericksburg. When I started out in practice, it was a surprise to me to find that a vast portion of the population had no idea what chiropractic was or why they should see a chiropractor. Some even asked me if I had to go to school to become a chiropractor. (If you are still wondering, chiropractors have 8 years of college and hold a doctorate in chiropractic.) Fortunately, a few trusting souls in our community gave me a chance and my practice was born. Now, two decades later, when I tell a new acquaintance I am a chiropractor, they usually have some idea of what I do, that I am a college-educated doctor and that I work on the musculoskeletal system. Some may not be ready to trust my skills or may have heard something negative, but many profess to have a friend or relative who swears by chiropractic and how much it has helped them. What a relief! Chiropractic has been around more than 100 years, but is still the new kid on the block in healthcare. In the 1800’s a German philosopher said that all truths pass through three stages: First it is ridiculed, then violently opposed and lastly it is considered self-evident. When a patient tells me their doctor warned them never to see a chiropractor, I know we have yet to arrive at the final stage. Fortunately, most health care professionals are becoming more open minded and informed about the benefits of holistic forms of healthcare. The truth is that chiropractic and nutritional therapies are non-invasive and complications are practically non-existent when delivered by a trained and educated professional. The statistics are solid and clear on this.

The World Health Organization says “90% of the diseases prevalent today are not treatable with orthodox medical procedures.” While drugs and surgery can save lives in an emergency, when used to treat the life-style mediated diseases of today, they can create dangerous sideeffects, complications and barriers to healing. Examples of these lifestylegenerated health issues are diabetes, heart disease, thyroid disorders, hormonal imbalance and digestive problems, to name a few. The key to these health issues is finding the underlying cause, correcting it and helping the body to heal. This is the philosophy of chiropractic and all holistic modalities. Despite the amazing capability of chiropractic to restore balance and communication within the body, I realized early on, if I was going to help people to the well-being I knew was possible for them, I was going to have to do more than balance their skeletal frame and restore motion to their spinal joints. It seemed they were coming back all too soon with the same complaints. Since I already had quite a thorough education in nutrition and had learned a lot about exercise, ergonomics, posture and other lifestyle habits, I launched into teaching people how to create lifetime wellness through healthy lifestyle habits. The process of gathering the skills and cutting-edge scientific knowledge needed to help people to health has been, and continues to be, transformative and fascinating. Last year I put all I have learned into a comprehensive wellness curriculum designed to help people recover from debilitating health issues, and also maintain and keep improving their health and well-being for a lifetime. This has been my career-long goal and passion and I am thrilled and honored to celebrate my 20th year serving Fredericksburg by offering the fruits of my labor.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

23


Art in the Burg

Stories

of fredericksburg

summer at sophia street studios by ryan poe

by emily hollingsworth

Artists are often their own worst critics. It may take a few marks on the inside of a piece of pottery, a different texture on a pot’s outward surface or a slight chip in or outside the creation to change the artwork’s fate. A piece of pottery that would have normally stood proudly on a shelf becomes discreetly hidden in Sophia Street Studios’ upper level, deemed unsellable. Come June’s First Friday, however, this may change. Trista Chapman, owner of Sophia Street Studios, and Neal Reed, artist and potter, plan to put these hidden and marked pieces on center stage for a Second Sale, an event that allows shoppers to purchase these items at a discount. “[We] accumulate pieces throughout the year that aren’t perfect,” Chapman said.

Rather than throw the pieces away, Chapman and Reed want to sell them at a price that allows people to own self-created artwork and pottery that they may not have been able to purchase at full price. Chapman said that buyers often see the mistakes at a much smaller scale than Chapman and Reed see them. “Whatever’s wrong with it bothers us a lot more than it bothers them because we’re more perfectionistic,”

24

June 2016

Chapman said. On a cool blue mug created by Reed, smoothly coated with glaze and etched with several fish, Reed pointed out a small area on the rim of the cup where the glaze snapped. Chapman also brought out a series of mugs with striped black and white handles and patterned with muted greens, blues and yellows, jazzed with streaks of red and coated magenta on the inside of the rim and mug. The outside of one of the mugs is chipped in a few places, yellow against a reddish background. These mugs will be among the items sold at the June Second Sale. Chapman, who has often traveled to art shows, hopes to attract a larger audience to the store through the sale. In August, Chapman and Reed intend to have little trouble bringing people to Sophia Street Studios,

particularly those who want an escape from the heat or a tasty treat. Chapman will be reviving last year’s Ice Cream Contest, where residents submit their homemade ice cream and have a chance to win ice cream bowls. Last year, the bowls were made by Chapman, Reed and assistant Christina Bendo themselves. The winning ice cream recipe is a people’s choice, the ice cream is offered to passerby’s free of charge, who then vote for their favorite flavors. Chapman is considering expanding the competition to allow artists to submit their self-created ice cream bowls as well. “[It was a] really big success,” Chapman said about the previous year’s contest. Nestled on the corner of Sophia Street (1104), in view of draping trees over the Rappahannock River, Sophia Street Studios is a bit out of the way in downtown Fredericksburg. Chapman hopes the First Friday event in June and the contest in August will bring more people around the area, and possibly take new works of art and a new favorite ice cream flavor with them. Emily Hollingsworth is a regular contributor to Front Porch

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

I met up with Jay Anderson at Hyperion. It was a rare sunny morning during a stretch of endless rain. I know Jay as an artist, storyteller, and practical jokester. He recounted one of his recent escapades. “There are two kinds of people in this world in regard to any specific service or product, producers or consumers. When it comes to art there are artists and there are art lovers and we are all a mix of both depending on what we can produce.” “This friend of ours told us she was taking a Paranormal 101 class. There’s really no producer for the other side of that paranormal business. They are going out and looking for the paranormal, which at the time I was pretty sure was baloney, and they’re not finding it. I was thinking I would give them the experience, from the other side, produce a paranormal experience.” “My idea was to take these transducer type speakers. They’re speakers you can put on objects and the object will resonate. My idea was to do things like have a baby crying so they’d be looking for the baby and then have it morph into a demon’s voice or something like that and just scare the heck out of them. I called it my EVP Injector, Electronic Voice Phenomena Injector.” “I went into the Marriott and they were talking about the history of the location. It used to be the Indian Queen hotel. The paranormal researcher’s belief is that the ghosts don’t know that the Indian Queen’s been knocked down and they’re inhabiting the Marriott. I found out which room they were going to be in

and that it was the location of the stables for the Indian Queen.” “On the day that it was happening I went down there and I couldn’t see in the classroom but I could see them going in. I went to the side door and it had a little peephole on it. I looked through it and I could see the whole classroom on the inside. It was reversed. I guess so the waitstaff can see what’s going on inside. It was a solid wood door which is perfect for putting the inductor against. It’s basically floating there and it creates a big speaker. I thought, ‘Wow, this is great!’” “I went to the front side door where I could see the teacher. She’s explaining something to the class and they’re all sitting there really intently. I put the EVP Injector on the door and I played the sound of a horse whinnying. She turns her head and looks towards the door. The classroom just stops and I’m realizing that some of them are getting up out of their chairs and I better get the heck out of Dodge. I stepped into the men’s room and I went to a stall and just stood in front of a toilet. I thought, ‘Hey, this is a good cover.’ So I waited there a while for things to cool down.” “I came back and I played the sound of a horse clopping down a cobblestone road. That got them going too and I went back to my hiding space. Then I went to the back door and I played this evil demon thing going, ‘Ha! Ha! Ha! Did you find what you were looking for? Ha! Ha!’ It was a really evil laugh. The classroom, they looked kind of… my interpretation of their faces was that some of them were kind of horrified. They’re getting out of their chairs so I took off and went and sat out in the main room and just watched them filter out of there and go hunting around for whatever it was. I got a kick out of doing that. I just thought that was probably the first paranormal experience that those paranormal investigators have really ever had.” If you have a Story of Fredericksburg, email storyfburg@gmail.com. Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He brings us "snippets" of real 'Burg folks each month in FP. Photo by Ryan Poe front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

25


Art in the Burg

Stories

of fredericksburg

summer at sophia street studios by ryan poe

by emily hollingsworth

Artists are often their own worst critics. It may take a few marks on the inside of a piece of pottery, a different texture on a pot’s outward surface or a slight chip in or outside the creation to change the artwork’s fate. A piece of pottery that would have normally stood proudly on a shelf becomes discreetly hidden in Sophia Street Studios’ upper level, deemed unsellable. Come June’s First Friday, however, this may change. Trista Chapman, owner of Sophia Street Studios, and Neal Reed, artist and potter, plan to put these hidden and marked pieces on center stage for a Second Sale, an event that allows shoppers to purchase these items at a discount. “[We] accumulate pieces throughout the year that aren’t perfect,” Chapman said.

Rather than throw the pieces away, Chapman and Reed want to sell them at a price that allows people to own self-created artwork and pottery that they may not have been able to purchase at full price. Chapman said that buyers often see the mistakes at a much smaller scale than Chapman and Reed see them. “Whatever’s wrong with it bothers us a lot more than it bothers them because we’re more perfectionistic,”

24

June 2016

Chapman said. On a cool blue mug created by Reed, smoothly coated with glaze and etched with several fish, Reed pointed out a small area on the rim of the cup where the glaze snapped. Chapman also brought out a series of mugs with striped black and white handles and patterned with muted greens, blues and yellows, jazzed with streaks of red and coated magenta on the inside of the rim and mug. The outside of one of the mugs is chipped in a few places, yellow against a reddish background. These mugs will be among the items sold at the June Second Sale. Chapman, who has often traveled to art shows, hopes to attract a larger audience to the store through the sale. In August, Chapman and Reed intend to have little trouble bringing people to Sophia Street Studios,

particularly those who want an escape from the heat or a tasty treat. Chapman will be reviving last year’s Ice Cream Contest, where residents submit their homemade ice cream and have a chance to win ice cream bowls. Last year, the bowls were made by Chapman, Reed and assistant Christina Bendo themselves. The winning ice cream recipe is a people’s choice, the ice cream is offered to passerby’s free of charge, who then vote for their favorite flavors. Chapman is considering expanding the competition to allow artists to submit their self-created ice cream bowls as well. “[It was a] really big success,” Chapman said about the previous year’s contest. Nestled on the corner of Sophia Street (1104), in view of draping trees over the Rappahannock River, Sophia Street Studios is a bit out of the way in downtown Fredericksburg. Chapman hopes the First Friday event in June and the contest in August will bring more people around the area, and possibly take new works of art and a new favorite ice cream flavor with them. Emily Hollingsworth is a regular contributor to Front Porch

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

I met up with Jay Anderson at Hyperion. It was a rare sunny morning during a stretch of endless rain. I know Jay as an artist, storyteller, and practical jokester. He recounted one of his recent escapades. “There are two kinds of people in this world in regard to any specific service or product, producers or consumers. When it comes to art there are artists and there are art lovers and we are all a mix of both depending on what we can produce.” “This friend of ours told us she was taking a Paranormal 101 class. There’s really no producer for the other side of that paranormal business. They are going out and looking for the paranormal, which at the time I was pretty sure was baloney, and they’re not finding it. I was thinking I would give them the experience, from the other side, produce a paranormal experience.” “My idea was to take these transducer type speakers. They’re speakers you can put on objects and the object will resonate. My idea was to do things like have a baby crying so they’d be looking for the baby and then have it morph into a demon’s voice or something like that and just scare the heck out of them. I called it my EVP Injector, Electronic Voice Phenomena Injector.” “I went into the Marriott and they were talking about the history of the location. It used to be the Indian Queen hotel. The paranormal researcher’s belief is that the ghosts don’t know that the Indian Queen’s been knocked down and they’re inhabiting the Marriott. I found out which room they were going to be in

and that it was the location of the stables for the Indian Queen.” “On the day that it was happening I went down there and I couldn’t see in the classroom but I could see them going in. I went to the side door and it had a little peephole on it. I looked through it and I could see the whole classroom on the inside. It was reversed. I guess so the waitstaff can see what’s going on inside. It was a solid wood door which is perfect for putting the inductor against. It’s basically floating there and it creates a big speaker. I thought, ‘Wow, this is great!’” “I went to the front side door where I could see the teacher. She’s explaining something to the class and they’re all sitting there really intently. I put the EVP Injector on the door and I played the sound of a horse whinnying. She turns her head and looks towards the door. The classroom just stops and I’m realizing that some of them are getting up out of their chairs and I better get the heck out of Dodge. I stepped into the men’s room and I went to a stall and just stood in front of a toilet. I thought, ‘Hey, this is a good cover.’ So I waited there a while for things to cool down.” “I came back and I played the sound of a horse clopping down a cobblestone road. That got them going too and I went back to my hiding space. Then I went to the back door and I played this evil demon thing going, ‘Ha! Ha! Ha! Did you find what you were looking for? Ha! Ha!’ It was a really evil laugh. The classroom, they looked kind of… my interpretation of their faces was that some of them were kind of horrified. They’re getting out of their chairs so I took off and went and sat out in the main room and just watched them filter out of there and go hunting around for whatever it was. I got a kick out of doing that. I just thought that was probably the first paranormal experience that those paranormal investigators have really ever had.” If you have a Story of Fredericksburg, email storyfburg@gmail.com. Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He brings us "snippets" of real 'Burg folks each month in FP. Photo by Ryan Poe front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

25


A Walk in the Woods

Youth Writing Clubs

exercise for body and soul

engaging youth in the craft

By todd drake I can’t think of a better to way to spend a day than walking in the woods, away from the rush and clutter of the world. The simplicity of walking in the sunshine through a small glade or along a path in the shade of tall trees has a restorative effect on the body and the mind far greater, I believe, than most things in life. It’s not only good exercise for the body, but the peace of walking in nature brings one to a more meditative state of mind where all of one’s cares and worries are humbled by the myriad forms of trees, plants and rocks, the sound of birdsong and stream, and the feel of the earth beneath one’s feet. To walk in the woods, regardless of how much time is spent there—an hour, a day, a week— awakens one to a more spacious freedom of spirit that is our birthright. One of my favorite places for communing with nature, a place I’ve visited for close to 50 years now, is Prince William Forest Park, about 20 miles north of Fredericksburg, in Dumfries, Virginia, just off I-95. The park is roughly 15,000 acres of forested land and was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935. Franklin D. Roosevelt created the CCC during the Great Depression to reduce unemployment and teach job skills, and as a place for inner-city kids and low-income families to enjoy the outdoors. The park has numerous, wellmarked hiking trails (37 miles worth), and is not that difficult to traverse. The hiking is unusually pleasant and brings you in touch with the local flora and numerous small woodland animals that you can often hear and sometimes see scampering amongst fallen trees and the vast leaf-matted forest floor, as well a variety of birds flitting from one tree to another. Several of the trails parallel Quantico Creek,

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com 26

June 2016

where you can find a boulder to sit on and enjoy the flow of life on the water. With a map of the park in hand, you can create circuit hikes that lead back to you where you are parked. My favorite hike is to go from the start of Turkey Run Ridge Trail to South Valley Trail, which runs along Quantico Creek, to the old Pyrite Mine and the boardwalk

that leads onto North Valley Trail. This trail takes you to Quantico Cascades Trail, where you can view a beautiful series of

by tom conway

waterfalls, which is one of the highlights of the park. After you’ve enjoyed the falls, find your way to Mary Bird Trail, which will take you to Turkey Run Ridge Campground, the start of this delightful hike. The hike, one among many in the park, takes anywhere from 2 ½ to 3 ½ hours, depending on your pace. The park also has 21 miles of biking trails, a gorgeous scenic drive, several campsites for both tent and trailer, and numerous picnic areas if you just want to sit and feast and enjoy a day in the outdoors away from the noise of modern life. If you’re interested in further details regarding Prince William Forest Park, you can visit their website at: https://www.nps.gov/prwi/index.htm

Todd Drake is committed to bringing the benefits of meditation and mindfulness practice to the local community. He is the co-founder of Insight Mediation Community of Fredericksburg

Own The Movie

rs avo g l F 30 untin o &C

A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Front porch fredericksburg

Price Match Parking Garage Christian Collectibles Gift shop Jewelry Kitchen Ware Books Crafts Supplies Antiques 611 Caroline Street 540.371.1333 LordAndLillys@gmail.com facebook.com/lordlillys www.lordlilly.com

empowerhouseva.org

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

When I announced that Thornburg Middle School, where I teach 7th grade English, was going to have a writing center, I expected a handful of kids to show up. I figured I would work with them on creative writing, maybe do a little poetry writing and some small-scale poetry slams, and then maybe the word would spread and the idea would grow. What I got was the exact opposite. Twenty-five kids showed up to my first meeting, and the majority of them kept coming. During the course of the year they produced fiction and poetry, but also started a student-led newspaper. I expected it to be a challenge to drum up enthusiasm for writing, but once we got started I just had to show up and maybe throw a few ideas up on the blackboard. The rest just happened. This past Tuesday, in fact, the students started a list of types of poetry before I even stepped in the room: free verse, ballads, haiku, limericks. I helped them finish the list – perhaps it was wishful thinking, but I added villanelles and sonnets – and they spent the rest of the afternoon writing. Lance Roeskey, who began a similar group that meets at St. George’s Episcopal Church in downtown Fredericksburg, had a similar experience. “My daughter was in 7th grade and founded a group for youth who love the written word and were looking for others to share their love of writing and reading.” His group is called the Griffin Word Thieves, and they currently have as many as 21 members several of whom

graduate from high school this summer. The groups have a lot in common, the main thing being that they are almost entirely student-led and the focus is on communication through the written word. “There is no better form of communication,” says Roeske. “The kids understand this, and are searching for others to share it with. When they come together, what they accomplish is magnificent.” Maybe this true is because there are so few opportunities in this day and age for kids to really find and build an audience, maybe it’s because the focus in English classes these days is limited to drills on how to take a multiple choice reading test and on writing essays responding to deliberately torturous SOL prompts, or maybe it’s because our testdriven, aim-for- adequate educational culture is leaving kids searching for something – anything really – that sets a higher standard. Maybe it’s just a part of the nature of adolescence to want a forum to air fears, complaints, and concerns where they aren’t discouraged from being honest and direct. Whatever the reason, it’s clear that kids want to write, and all we had to do was open a door to get them to do it. The Griffin Word Thieves and the Thornburg Middle School Writing Center will be holding a joint poetry slam event on June 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Market Square downtown. Contact Tom Conway at tconway@spotsylvania.k12.va.us for details.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

27


A Walk in the Woods

Youth Writing Clubs

exercise for body and soul

engaging youth in the craft

By todd drake I can’t think of a better to way to spend a day than walking in the woods, away from the rush and clutter of the world. The simplicity of walking in the sunshine through a small glade or along a path in the shade of tall trees has a restorative effect on the body and the mind far greater, I believe, than most things in life. It’s not only good exercise for the body, but the peace of walking in nature brings one to a more meditative state of mind where all of one’s cares and worries are humbled by the myriad forms of trees, plants and rocks, the sound of birdsong and stream, and the feel of the earth beneath one’s feet. To walk in the woods, regardless of how much time is spent there—an hour, a day, a week— awakens one to a more spacious freedom of spirit that is our birthright. One of my favorite places for communing with nature, a place I’ve visited for close to 50 years now, is Prince William Forest Park, about 20 miles north of Fredericksburg, in Dumfries, Virginia, just off I-95. The park is roughly 15,000 acres of forested land and was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935. Franklin D. Roosevelt created the CCC during the Great Depression to reduce unemployment and teach job skills, and as a place for inner-city kids and low-income families to enjoy the outdoors. The park has numerous, wellmarked hiking trails (37 miles worth), and is not that difficult to traverse. The hiking is unusually pleasant and brings you in touch with the local flora and numerous small woodland animals that you can often hear and sometimes see scampering amongst fallen trees and the vast leaf-matted forest floor, as well a variety of birds flitting from one tree to another. Several of the trails parallel Quantico Creek,

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com 26

June 2016

where you can find a boulder to sit on and enjoy the flow of life on the water. With a map of the park in hand, you can create circuit hikes that lead back to you where you are parked. My favorite hike is to go from the start of Turkey Run Ridge Trail to South Valley Trail, which runs along Quantico Creek, to the old Pyrite Mine and the boardwalk

that leads onto North Valley Trail. This trail takes you to Quantico Cascades Trail, where you can view a beautiful series of

by tom conway

waterfalls, which is one of the highlights of the park. After you’ve enjoyed the falls, find your way to Mary Bird Trail, which will take you to Turkey Run Ridge Campground, the start of this delightful hike. The hike, one among many in the park, takes anywhere from 2 ½ to 3 ½ hours, depending on your pace. The park also has 21 miles of biking trails, a gorgeous scenic drive, several campsites for both tent and trailer, and numerous picnic areas if you just want to sit and feast and enjoy a day in the outdoors away from the noise of modern life. If you’re interested in further details regarding Prince William Forest Park, you can visit their website at: https://www.nps.gov/prwi/index.htm

Todd Drake is committed to bringing the benefits of meditation and mindfulness practice to the local community. He is the co-founder of Insight Mediation Community of Fredericksburg

Own The Movie

rs avo g l F 30 untin o &C

A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Front porch fredericksburg

Price Match Parking Garage Christian Collectibles Gift shop Jewelry Kitchen Ware Books Crafts Supplies Antiques 611 Caroline Street 540.371.1333 LordAndLillys@gmail.com facebook.com/lordlillys www.lordlilly.com

empowerhouseva.org

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

When I announced that Thornburg Middle School, where I teach 7th grade English, was going to have a writing center, I expected a handful of kids to show up. I figured I would work with them on creative writing, maybe do a little poetry writing and some small-scale poetry slams, and then maybe the word would spread and the idea would grow. What I got was the exact opposite. Twenty-five kids showed up to my first meeting, and the majority of them kept coming. During the course of the year they produced fiction and poetry, but also started a student-led newspaper. I expected it to be a challenge to drum up enthusiasm for writing, but once we got started I just had to show up and maybe throw a few ideas up on the blackboard. The rest just happened. This past Tuesday, in fact, the students started a list of types of poetry before I even stepped in the room: free verse, ballads, haiku, limericks. I helped them finish the list – perhaps it was wishful thinking, but I added villanelles and sonnets – and they spent the rest of the afternoon writing. Lance Roeskey, who began a similar group that meets at St. George’s Episcopal Church in downtown Fredericksburg, had a similar experience. “My daughter was in 7th grade and founded a group for youth who love the written word and were looking for others to share their love of writing and reading.” His group is called the Griffin Word Thieves, and they currently have as many as 21 members several of whom

graduate from high school this summer. The groups have a lot in common, the main thing being that they are almost entirely student-led and the focus is on communication through the written word. “There is no better form of communication,” says Roeske. “The kids understand this, and are searching for others to share it with. When they come together, what they accomplish is magnificent.” Maybe this true is because there are so few opportunities in this day and age for kids to really find and build an audience, maybe it’s because the focus in English classes these days is limited to drills on how to take a multiple choice reading test and on writing essays responding to deliberately torturous SOL prompts, or maybe it’s because our testdriven, aim-for- adequate educational culture is leaving kids searching for something – anything really – that sets a higher standard. Maybe it’s just a part of the nature of adolescence to want a forum to air fears, complaints, and concerns where they aren’t discouraged from being honest and direct. Whatever the reason, it’s clear that kids want to write, and all we had to do was open a door to get them to do it. The Griffin Word Thieves and the Thornburg Middle School Writing Center will be holding a joint poetry slam event on June 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Market Square downtown. Contact Tom Conway at tconway@spotsylvania.k12.va.us for details.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

27


First Friday Openings

THE POETRY MAN

June 3rd

Morning Introspection

FCCA’S YOUTH ART PROGRAM

The Youth Art Program, supported by the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts (FCCA), is hosting a youth art show at the Fredericksburg First Fridays event on Friday, June 3, 2016 from 6:00-8:00 PM at the Fredericksburg Visitor Center , 706 Caroline Street. . The public is invited to view the talented art work made by youth of the Hazel Hill and Heritage Park communities. The young artists will be curating their art on display. FCCA offers the Youth Art Program as a community outreach initiative to enrich the lives of children through art. The Artist in Education grant allows the program to be offered free of charge to the participants. The objective of the Youth Art Program is to offer art instruction and supplies to children who would not otherwise have access to extracurricular art education.

guests to enjoy food, refreshments, and live music. Artists participating from Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival include: Kenny Brown, Kelley Drake, Mike Tschirn, Greg Howell, Lefty Lipuma, Johan Ulrich, Kevin Murphy, Chance Kenyon. From Golden Monkey Tattoo: Drew Baker, Tony Talbert, Julian Bast, Rob Scheyder, and Stephan Saunders. From Human Canvas Tattoo: Brad Bellante. From Loyalty Tattoo UT: Nick Phillips. Local artists include Bill Harris, Nick Rose, Dustin Mugridge, Rachel Hicks, Courtney Fishback, Jeremy Gann, and Jenna Anderson.

Brush Strokes Gallery Members' Show "Small Scenes" at Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg. Browse around for just the perfect gift from Brush Strokes Gallery's new collection of "Small Scenes" reasonably priced at $75.00 this month. Add to your own art collection or start one for someone special. You will also find other art works including one-of-a-kind hand painted scarves, delicately beaded jewelry,

- By Frank Fratoe

What will this day bring through the hours ahead? Will it make us content and filled with gladness bestowing far more than we could ever dream of?

“Doing It Right”, Stacy Gaglio photography, fused glass wall art and bowls, and original fine art paintings in all media.

Art First According to Johnny P. Johnson, "the much maligned vegetable", okra, will be featured in his latest exhibit at Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St. Okra triggers reflections on childhood, on heritage and on history in these latest works. Even dried okra seeds and pods, collected for years in anticipation of this show, add texture to some paintings.

What will it ask of us and how should we answer?

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

Greg Howell

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

28

June 2016

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Front porch fredericksburg

by georgia Lee Strentz

Will the day give an end to confidence once held or achieve good things that courage may enrich?

Inspired by Norma Woodward’s Front Porch cover, March 2016, “The Coffee Shop”

COMING MAY 2016 at fredericksburgwriters.com

local group helps moms

compassionate friends

Or will it intrude again with new disappointments yielding much less than we had expected before?

The Print Show PONSHOP Studio and Gallery is pleased to announce our June exhibition, "The Print Show." Curated by Chance Kenyon of Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival, this month-long exhibit will feature print editions of signature work by local and regional artists. The opening reception is Friday, June 3 from 6-10pm. The Print Show will be an exhibit in which everyone has the opportunity to take quality artwork home, with over forty diverse styles to choose from. Artwork will range from traditional block prints to archival ink editions on watercolor paper. PONSHOP's garden space will be open for

FXBG’ERS

Baby Wearers Group

All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. ~Cecil Frances Alexander The Federal Government is revising a Federal rule that will allow wind energy companies to operate high speed turbines for up to 30 years, even though it means killing or injuring thousands of federally protected bald and golden eagles. Civilization, has always been at odds with our natural world, changing it, taming it, using it up for man's needs, whether for food, shelter, fuel or getting rid of the wastes from our vast cities. We use the oceans and rivers, skies, mountain valleys as refuse dumps, never hearing the cries of Mother Nature, our wildlife who struggle to eke out their simple survival needs. It seems so much of the time there are only a few humans listening, also crying out in the wilderness for ecological sanity. I was very fortunate to meet two of these caring, compassionate citizens, on a lovely country afternoon. Andora Brady is one of only a few licensed Dept. of Games and Inland Fisheries Wildlife Rehabilitators in Virginia.. She lives in Parlow,Virginia. Kelly Ashley is a wildlife rehabilitator trainee, who lives in Spotsylvania and is being trained by Andora. Both Andora and Kelly live on farms. Andora has dogs, cats, chickens, horses, while Kelly has in her menagerie, dogs, cats and 30 cows. Both Andora and Kelly have very supportive husbands and both say they could not do this often emotionally draining work without the support of these amazing men, as both women have jobs. Andora works at the Spotsylvania Animal shelter, Kelly works at the Spotsylvania Courthouse. Each of

them provides a temporary shelter/facility for free to all the wildlife they help. This facility must be inspected by the state. They are true volunteers and I was very surprised to learn that Virginia has no monetary fund to compensate individuals for all the training, long hours and personal funds spent helping our wildlife. It takes 2 years of study and field work to get a license to be a Wildlife Rehabilitator. Both women have paid for their pre-exposure vaccine(rabies) for $400.00. Andora and Kelly work with wildlife that has been abandoned, injured, sick or otherwise in need of specialized medical care or TLC. I am overwhelmed with gratitude that there are people out there like Andora and Kelly, who are really the only trained help for our wildlife, often in painful, life threatening situations. Their love of animals developed in rural homes, as both Andora and Kelly grew up in Stafford,Va., with relatives and family who had lots of farm animals and pets. Andora belonged to 4H club. Andora cautions you, it is against the law to have wildlife in your possession. Please follow these directions to help our furry/feathered friends return to their natural world alive. If you come upon wildlife that is young and you think abandoned, do not move it, wait unless it is in a dangerous situation(road,etc.)as the mother may be back shortly. If you move the baby she will not be able to find it. Look for the nest and return it to nest if possible. If it is injured,or the parent does not return, call any vet., and they will give you the number of a wildlife rehabilitator. Keep the animal warm, do not feed it, as that could prove fatal. Hey Fredericksburgers,Spring is here, lots of wild baby animals out there!

by Amy Raposo Before I became a mother, I knew that I wanted to babywear. I knew about the benefits of keeping baby close, and I knew that a carrier would help me function as a new mom. If the baby wanted to be held all day, no problem, I’d still have my hands free to get things done around the house. I read about a few different carriers and assumed that any of them would work for me. So when the time came, I chose a popular stretchy wrap and a soft-structured ergonomic carrier. While they were useful, the baby outgrew one quickly and the other was not very comfortable on my body frame, so after a few months it was time to find something else. That’s when I began to uncover the mindboggling multitude of babywearing options. Ring slings, stretchy wraps, woven wraps, soft-structured carriers, mei tais, onbus, and conversion wraps, with different fabrics, styles, and brands galore. How was I supposed to figure out which one would be best for me and my baby? Back then, I could have saved myself hours of Google searches and confusion had I known to look for a babywearing group. We are fortunate in this area to Quantico Area have such a group. Babywearers (QAB) came to life two years ago when Heather Aziz and Hope Hichak (above) realized the need for a local community that would help families and caregivers find the right carrier and the right fit. “The most important thing is to be safe and have fun!” says Aziz. Aziz’s babywearing journey began in 2005 with the birth of her first child. “I learned early on that navigating a stroller through clothing aisles and large crowds was rather difficult. I started looking for alternatives.” Through trial and error and the help of other babywearing educators,

she found life-changing comfort and convenience. “During the creation and growth of QAB I gave birth to my fourth child and I definitely plan on wearing her for as long as possible.” As Aziz pointed out, safety is of utmost importance. Each QAB meeting begins with the reminder of the T.I.C.K.S. safety guidelines developed by the British organization The School of Babywearing. The carrier should be tight, baby should be in view at all times, close enough to kiss, keep chin off the chest, and supported back. With six meetings a month in Frederickburg, Stafford, and Woodbridge, QAB’s dedicated babywearing educators volunteer their time to help attendees find the best fit with their own carriers or explore the options available in the group’s vast library of carriers. Meetings are free of charge, but a small monthly fee or yearly membership allows carriers to be checked out for a month a time. For more information and a list of upcoming local meetings, please visit www.quanticoareababywearers.weebl y.com, or connect with them on Facebook.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

29


First Friday Openings

THE POETRY MAN

June 3rd

Morning Introspection

FCCA’S YOUTH ART PROGRAM

The Youth Art Program, supported by the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts (FCCA), is hosting a youth art show at the Fredericksburg First Fridays event on Friday, June 3, 2016 from 6:00-8:00 PM at the Fredericksburg Visitor Center , 706 Caroline Street. . The public is invited to view the talented art work made by youth of the Hazel Hill and Heritage Park communities. The young artists will be curating their art on display. FCCA offers the Youth Art Program as a community outreach initiative to enrich the lives of children through art. The Artist in Education grant allows the program to be offered free of charge to the participants. The objective of the Youth Art Program is to offer art instruction and supplies to children who would not otherwise have access to extracurricular art education.

guests to enjoy food, refreshments, and live music. Artists participating from Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival include: Kenny Brown, Kelley Drake, Mike Tschirn, Greg Howell, Lefty Lipuma, Johan Ulrich, Kevin Murphy, Chance Kenyon. From Golden Monkey Tattoo: Drew Baker, Tony Talbert, Julian Bast, Rob Scheyder, and Stephan Saunders. From Human Canvas Tattoo: Brad Bellante. From Loyalty Tattoo UT: Nick Phillips. Local artists include Bill Harris, Nick Rose, Dustin Mugridge, Rachel Hicks, Courtney Fishback, Jeremy Gann, and Jenna Anderson.

Brush Strokes Gallery Members' Show "Small Scenes" at Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg. Browse around for just the perfect gift from Brush Strokes Gallery's new collection of "Small Scenes" reasonably priced at $75.00 this month. Add to your own art collection or start one for someone special. You will also find other art works including one-of-a-kind hand painted scarves, delicately beaded jewelry,

- By Frank Fratoe

What will this day bring through the hours ahead? Will it make us content and filled with gladness bestowing far more than we could ever dream of?

“Doing It Right”, Stacy Gaglio photography, fused glass wall art and bowls, and original fine art paintings in all media.

Art First According to Johnny P. Johnson, "the much maligned vegetable", okra, will be featured in his latest exhibit at Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St. Okra triggers reflections on childhood, on heritage and on history in these latest works. Even dried okra seeds and pods, collected for years in anticipation of this show, add texture to some paintings.

What will it ask of us and how should we answer?

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

Greg Howell

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

28

June 2016

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Front porch fredericksburg

by georgia Lee Strentz

Will the day give an end to confidence once held or achieve good things that courage may enrich?

Inspired by Norma Woodward’s Front Porch cover, March 2016, “The Coffee Shop”

COMING MAY 2016 at fredericksburgwriters.com

local group helps moms

compassionate friends

Or will it intrude again with new disappointments yielding much less than we had expected before?

The Print Show PONSHOP Studio and Gallery is pleased to announce our June exhibition, "The Print Show." Curated by Chance Kenyon of Jack Brown's Tattoo Revival, this month-long exhibit will feature print editions of signature work by local and regional artists. The opening reception is Friday, June 3 from 6-10pm. The Print Show will be an exhibit in which everyone has the opportunity to take quality artwork home, with over forty diverse styles to choose from. Artwork will range from traditional block prints to archival ink editions on watercolor paper. PONSHOP's garden space will be open for

FXBG’ERS

Baby Wearers Group

All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. ~Cecil Frances Alexander The Federal Government is revising a Federal rule that will allow wind energy companies to operate high speed turbines for up to 30 years, even though it means killing or injuring thousands of federally protected bald and golden eagles. Civilization, has always been at odds with our natural world, changing it, taming it, using it up for man's needs, whether for food, shelter, fuel or getting rid of the wastes from our vast cities. We use the oceans and rivers, skies, mountain valleys as refuse dumps, never hearing the cries of Mother Nature, our wildlife who struggle to eke out their simple survival needs. It seems so much of the time there are only a few humans listening, also crying out in the wilderness for ecological sanity. I was very fortunate to meet two of these caring, compassionate citizens, on a lovely country afternoon. Andora Brady is one of only a few licensed Dept. of Games and Inland Fisheries Wildlife Rehabilitators in Virginia.. She lives in Parlow,Virginia. Kelly Ashley is a wildlife rehabilitator trainee, who lives in Spotsylvania and is being trained by Andora. Both Andora and Kelly live on farms. Andora has dogs, cats, chickens, horses, while Kelly has in her menagerie, dogs, cats and 30 cows. Both Andora and Kelly have very supportive husbands and both say they could not do this often emotionally draining work without the support of these amazing men, as both women have jobs. Andora works at the Spotsylvania Animal shelter, Kelly works at the Spotsylvania Courthouse. Each of

them provides a temporary shelter/facility for free to all the wildlife they help. This facility must be inspected by the state. They are true volunteers and I was very surprised to learn that Virginia has no monetary fund to compensate individuals for all the training, long hours and personal funds spent helping our wildlife. It takes 2 years of study and field work to get a license to be a Wildlife Rehabilitator. Both women have paid for their pre-exposure vaccine(rabies) for $400.00. Andora and Kelly work with wildlife that has been abandoned, injured, sick or otherwise in need of specialized medical care or TLC. I am overwhelmed with gratitude that there are people out there like Andora and Kelly, who are really the only trained help for our wildlife, often in painful, life threatening situations. Their love of animals developed in rural homes, as both Andora and Kelly grew up in Stafford,Va., with relatives and family who had lots of farm animals and pets. Andora belonged to 4H club. Andora cautions you, it is against the law to have wildlife in your possession. Please follow these directions to help our furry/feathered friends return to their natural world alive. If you come upon wildlife that is young and you think abandoned, do not move it, wait unless it is in a dangerous situation(road,etc.)as the mother may be back shortly. If you move the baby she will not be able to find it. Look for the nest and return it to nest if possible. If it is injured,or the parent does not return, call any vet., and they will give you the number of a wildlife rehabilitator. Keep the animal warm, do not feed it, as that could prove fatal. Hey Fredericksburgers,Spring is here, lots of wild baby animals out there!

by Amy Raposo Before I became a mother, I knew that I wanted to babywear. I knew about the benefits of keeping baby close, and I knew that a carrier would help me function as a new mom. If the baby wanted to be held all day, no problem, I’d still have my hands free to get things done around the house. I read about a few different carriers and assumed that any of them would work for me. So when the time came, I chose a popular stretchy wrap and a soft-structured ergonomic carrier. While they were useful, the baby outgrew one quickly and the other was not very comfortable on my body frame, so after a few months it was time to find something else. That’s when I began to uncover the mindboggling multitude of babywearing options. Ring slings, stretchy wraps, woven wraps, soft-structured carriers, mei tais, onbus, and conversion wraps, with different fabrics, styles, and brands galore. How was I supposed to figure out which one would be best for me and my baby? Back then, I could have saved myself hours of Google searches and confusion had I known to look for a babywearing group. We are fortunate in this area to Quantico Area have such a group. Babywearers (QAB) came to life two years ago when Heather Aziz and Hope Hichak (above) realized the need for a local community that would help families and caregivers find the right carrier and the right fit. “The most important thing is to be safe and have fun!” says Aziz. Aziz’s babywearing journey began in 2005 with the birth of her first child. “I learned early on that navigating a stroller through clothing aisles and large crowds was rather difficult. I started looking for alternatives.” Through trial and error and the help of other babywearing educators,

she found life-changing comfort and convenience. “During the creation and growth of QAB I gave birth to my fourth child and I definitely plan on wearing her for as long as possible.” As Aziz pointed out, safety is of utmost importance. Each QAB meeting begins with the reminder of the T.I.C.K.S. safety guidelines developed by the British organization The School of Babywearing. The carrier should be tight, baby should be in view at all times, close enough to kiss, keep chin off the chest, and supported back. With six meetings a month in Frederickburg, Stafford, and Woodbridge, QAB’s dedicated babywearing educators volunteer their time to help attendees find the best fit with their own carriers or explore the options available in the group’s vast library of carriers. Meetings are free of charge, but a small monthly fee or yearly membership allows carriers to be checked out for a month a time. For more information and a list of upcoming local meetings, please visit www.quanticoareababywearers.weebl y.com, or connect with them on Facebook.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

29


Fredericksburg Sketches

Mindfullness be present & improve yourlife By christina ferber We all have stresses and sometimes that stress can play havoc on our emotions and our body, but luckily there is a way to handle those tensions and improve our quality of life. Mindfulness is fast becoming a proven technique that can help us better manage all aspects of our lives, and Bill Brooks, owner of Manse Fields Mindfulness, is doing his part to help the Fredericksburg area realize its benefits. “For me mindfulness has made an immense difference in my life. By being mindful, we can shift how we’re relating to and accepting the things that happen in our lives, and it can make a huge difference in the quality of those experiences,” says Bill, who also is a founder of and teacher at the Insight Meditation Community of Fredericksburg. Mindfulness is the quality of intentionally being present in the moment and clearly noticing what is happening in it. It is also the ability to accept what is happening in a nonjudgmental way, and respond instead of react to it. It has been offered in the health care setting for many years through Mindful-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and research has shown that this practice can benefit both the body and the mind as it helps reduce the stress we feel in our daily lives. Manse Field Mindfulness offers courses that teach how to develop a practice of mindfulness and cultivate it to more fully experience life. “We have all felt what it is like to be present in the moment at some point in our lives. Being fully engaged in a creative moment, watching a sunset, or walking on the beach all give us the experience of mindfulness. Athletes experience it when they are in the flow, as well. There is no separation between them and the experience,” says Bill. Through his Introduction to Mindfulness course, he teaches the formal practice of mindfulness, where time is set aside to practice through meditation. Mindfulness of the breath, body, emotions, thoughts, and relationships are taught, along with how to apply those

Remodeling & Re-Imagining Sale All in-stock items up to 50% OFF. Don’t Miss Our Biggest Event Ever!

By Casey Alan Shaw

June 2016

From My Porch

george washington’s changing city

time traveling & gardenias

By Tom Conway It’s easy to find history in Fredericksburg. Just throw a silver dollar across the Rappahannock and you’re bound to hit something. Maybe Boston has more reason to call itself the birthplace of our nation, but the father of our nation grew up here. skills to our daily lives through the informal practice of paying attention to what we are doing throughout the day. He has also offered a course to help those already familiar with the practice, deepen it even more. “We can mindfully wash the dishes, eat our food, or brush our teeth,” says Bill. “When we are mindful of those experiences, the quality of them changes and the quality of our lives change along with them. When we find ourselves being caught up with life, it’s amazing what simply taking three conscious breaths can do to help us come back to the present and get out of the story in our heads.” Bill also teaches a co-curricular course at The University of Mary Washington and, along with his wife, local poet Lynda Allen, has brought mindfulness to an area elementary school. “A Mindful Life” teaches students techniques and tools to help them address the stresses that they feel in their daily lives. A growing body of research is finding that when students practice mindfulness, they experience better focus and concentration, an increased sense of calm, and can better manage their emotions. ”Being mindful has allowed me to be aware of how I react, and given me the opportunity to notice and make a choice in the moment. It’s liberating and has reduced my level of stress and increased my contentment with life,” says Bill. To see a full listing of courses offered by Manse Field Mindfulness and find out more about it, visit www.mansefields.com. You can also email Bill at bemindful@verizon.net.

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

Sometimes history pokes through the cracks, like cobblestones under the pavement.

SKETCH #19: Corner of Hanover and Princess Anne Street. When I started this column, I envisioned it to be a purely “visual” alternative to the terrific written columns Front Porch offers. Virginia Grogan, in her infinite wisdom, encouraged me to add a few sentences with each Sketch to help you get inside the mind of the artist and communicate a little bit about the creative process. Normally, that means trying to describe a certain positive aspect about a scene that inspired me. It’s often very simple … the way a church spire soars or the simple way sunlight hits the ground in a pattern. This sketch came from a different place. This year has been difficult for me. Within a short time span, I had emergency surgery to save my vision (with all the modern-day insurance woes) and then my father passed away. I was raised in a Methodist Church in Texas sitting next to my Dad, so this sketch took on a certain cathartic role as I thought about him and as my eye began its healing process. Art often serves many different purposes … not just for the viewer … but for the artist, too.

This antiques store used to be a Woolworth’s, and stands on the site of Weedon’s tavern.

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Front porch fredericksburg

Of course, back then the streets would have all been cobblestone or dirt and there would have been as many animals on the streets as people. I imagine it didn’t smell very good, since no one had toilets or weekly trash pickup. They didn’t have showers either, which is one reason why smoking tobacco seemed like such a good idea. Living back then would have been like camping, only smellier and in buildings instead of tents. In those days, some of the most important people in America walked our streets, including seven Revolutionary War generals and two future US Presidents, George Washington and James Monroe. Washington, especially, spent a lot of time wandering around town. I can picture him sitting atop the rock overlooking Kenmore Park, or exploring the wilderness along the river from Old Mill Park up past the Embrey Dam.

Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

373-7847

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

A visual Celebration of our community

Then & Now

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

Maybe he even looked down on the town from Marye’s Heights (though it wasn’t called that then, because John Lawrence Marye, for whom the heights are named, had yet to be born). Perhaps a slave would have accompanied him, as was

the custom in those days. I’m guessing neither of them could imagine the slaughter that would happen there a century later, when thousands of men gave their lives in the fight to end that custom. Washington would visited a lot of familiar sites we can still see downtown, picking up items at the Lewis Store, attending meetings of the Masons at a little tavern that we now know as Hugh Mercer’s Apothecary, and visiting his mom at the Mary Washington House or his sister at Kenmore. One site he visited that’s not still standing, though, is Weedon’s Tavern, which stood at the corner of Caroline and William Streets. The tavern was the site of many meetings of our founding fathers, including Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, Hugh Mercer, George Mason, and others. It was on this site where Thomas Jefferson drafted the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, which laid the foundation for our nation’s history of religious tolerance.

The Lewis Store, which was the closest thing to Target that Fredericksburg had back in the day. It did not, however, establish a tradition of racial tolerance, though it was written by the man who later penned the words, “We hold these truths to be selfevident, that all men are created equal.” Which is why it is ironic that, in 1960, African-Americans staged sit-ins at a Woolworths lunch counter built on that very site, demanding the right to be allowed to eat there. What would George Washington think if he could see Fredericksburg today? Honestly, I think he would be impressed that the town he grew up in and the nation he founded had become models for ever more inclusive freedom and progress. I also think he would like the way it smells. Tom Conway teaches 7th grade at Thornburg Middle School

By Jo Loving Each day of our lives we make deposits in the memory banks of our children. ~Charles R. Swindoll I have been traveling today. I never left my porch, but I have traveled through time and space. No, this is not going to be a science fiction story. This morning, I stepped out onto the porch with my Earl Grey tea, sat in my favorite wicker chair, and listened to the morning birds. A few minutes after I sat down, a familiar scent wafted in on the whispery wind. Gardenias. The Gardenias are in bloom. Did you hear me? THE GARDENIAS ARE IN BLOOM! Good grief, who gets excited about Gardenias? Me. Why? I'll tell you a story. I'll start out as my granddaughter, Ava, does, when she tells a story: One time, there was a house. It was a simple house: white clapboard, black shutters, small front porch, a single story. In the house lived an old lady, an old man, and a little dog. The old lady cooked all the time. There was one time of year when she did not like to cook, because of the heat, but she did cook a meal of only vegetables. She cooked peas and butterbeans, fried cornbread, sliced fresh tomatoes, and rice. For dessert, she baked a pineapple upside down cake in a huge, black, cast-iron skillet. This was not "meatless Monday," as we know it today. She just did not like to cook or eat meat when it was hot. It was early summer in Florida, and it was hot. "Tommy," she called to her husband, "Supper's ready." Tommy moseyed into the kitchen, patted her shoulder, and said, "OK, Shug." She asked, "Can you put ice in

the glasses and pour the tea?" Again, Tommy replied, "OK, Shug," got the ice, put it in the fancy iced tea glasses, and poured the tea in. You could hear the ice cracking slightly as the still-hot, freshlymade tea entered the glass. He took the glasses in and put them on the table. "Jo," the old lady said, "It's time to eat." "Ok, Nanny," I said, and skipped my 7-year-old self to the table. We said grace, and then we started talking. Nanny said, "I love this time of year." "Why, Nanny, I said. "Because the gardenias bloom." "What's a gardenia?" I asked. "It's the most beautiful and sweet-smelling flower of all, Jo." "Where are they?" I asked. "On a bush in the front yard. We'll go see them after supper." I couldn't wait to go outside. I hurried through the delicious supper, helped clear the table, and asked, "Nanny, can we go see the gardenias?" "I guess we can," she said, as she walked out onto the porch. We walked across the yard, my hand in hers, and she stopped at a bush covered with white flowers. "These are gardenias, Jo, and I love when they bloom. It makes me think about prom and graduation, when the boys would give the girls gardenias to wear with their dresses. Here, you can take this one. Smell it." I inhaled its fragrance, the sweet smell of, to my grandmother, youth. We sat on the porch for much of the evening, me in Nanny's lap in the rocking chair, talking about everything and nothing, and of gardenias. Jo Loving is enjoying the sight and scent from her porch of her large gardenia bush, the memories of her Nanny, and drinking iced tea while enjoying a vegetable supper on this early summer evening

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

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Fredericksburg Sketches

Mindfullness be present & improve yourlife By christina ferber We all have stresses and sometimes that stress can play havoc on our emotions and our body, but luckily there is a way to handle those tensions and improve our quality of life. Mindfulness is fast becoming a proven technique that can help us better manage all aspects of our lives, and Bill Brooks, owner of Manse Fields Mindfulness, is doing his part to help the Fredericksburg area realize its benefits. “For me mindfulness has made an immense difference in my life. By being mindful, we can shift how we’re relating to and accepting the things that happen in our lives, and it can make a huge difference in the quality of those experiences,” says Bill, who also is a founder of and teacher at the Insight Meditation Community of Fredericksburg. Mindfulness is the quality of intentionally being present in the moment and clearly noticing what is happening in it. It is also the ability to accept what is happening in a nonjudgmental way, and respond instead of react to it. It has been offered in the health care setting for many years through Mindful-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and research has shown that this practice can benefit both the body and the mind as it helps reduce the stress we feel in our daily lives. Manse Field Mindfulness offers courses that teach how to develop a practice of mindfulness and cultivate it to more fully experience life. “We have all felt what it is like to be present in the moment at some point in our lives. Being fully engaged in a creative moment, watching a sunset, or walking on the beach all give us the experience of mindfulness. Athletes experience it when they are in the flow, as well. There is no separation between them and the experience,” says Bill. Through his Introduction to Mindfulness course, he teaches the formal practice of mindfulness, where time is set aside to practice through meditation. Mindfulness of the breath, body, emotions, thoughts, and relationships are taught, along with how to apply those

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By Casey Alan Shaw

June 2016

From My Porch

george washington’s changing city

time traveling & gardenias

By Tom Conway It’s easy to find history in Fredericksburg. Just throw a silver dollar across the Rappahannock and you’re bound to hit something. Maybe Boston has more reason to call itself the birthplace of our nation, but the father of our nation grew up here. skills to our daily lives through the informal practice of paying attention to what we are doing throughout the day. He has also offered a course to help those already familiar with the practice, deepen it even more. “We can mindfully wash the dishes, eat our food, or brush our teeth,” says Bill. “When we are mindful of those experiences, the quality of them changes and the quality of our lives change along with them. When we find ourselves being caught up with life, it’s amazing what simply taking three conscious breaths can do to help us come back to the present and get out of the story in our heads.” Bill also teaches a co-curricular course at The University of Mary Washington and, along with his wife, local poet Lynda Allen, has brought mindfulness to an area elementary school. “A Mindful Life” teaches students techniques and tools to help them address the stresses that they feel in their daily lives. A growing body of research is finding that when students practice mindfulness, they experience better focus and concentration, an increased sense of calm, and can better manage their emotions. ”Being mindful has allowed me to be aware of how I react, and given me the opportunity to notice and make a choice in the moment. It’s liberating and has reduced my level of stress and increased my contentment with life,” says Bill. To see a full listing of courses offered by Manse Field Mindfulness and find out more about it, visit www.mansefields.com. You can also email Bill at bemindful@verizon.net.

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

Sometimes history pokes through the cracks, like cobblestones under the pavement.

SKETCH #19: Corner of Hanover and Princess Anne Street. When I started this column, I envisioned it to be a purely “visual” alternative to the terrific written columns Front Porch offers. Virginia Grogan, in her infinite wisdom, encouraged me to add a few sentences with each Sketch to help you get inside the mind of the artist and communicate a little bit about the creative process. Normally, that means trying to describe a certain positive aspect about a scene that inspired me. It’s often very simple … the way a church spire soars or the simple way sunlight hits the ground in a pattern. This sketch came from a different place. This year has been difficult for me. Within a short time span, I had emergency surgery to save my vision (with all the modern-day insurance woes) and then my father passed away. I was raised in a Methodist Church in Texas sitting next to my Dad, so this sketch took on a certain cathartic role as I thought about him and as my eye began its healing process. Art often serves many different purposes … not just for the viewer … but for the artist, too.

This antiques store used to be a Woolworth’s, and stands on the site of Weedon’s tavern.

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Front porch fredericksburg

Of course, back then the streets would have all been cobblestone or dirt and there would have been as many animals on the streets as people. I imagine it didn’t smell very good, since no one had toilets or weekly trash pickup. They didn’t have showers either, which is one reason why smoking tobacco seemed like such a good idea. Living back then would have been like camping, only smellier and in buildings instead of tents. In those days, some of the most important people in America walked our streets, including seven Revolutionary War generals and two future US Presidents, George Washington and James Monroe. Washington, especially, spent a lot of time wandering around town. I can picture him sitting atop the rock overlooking Kenmore Park, or exploring the wilderness along the river from Old Mill Park up past the Embrey Dam.

Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

373-7847

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

A visual Celebration of our community

Then & Now

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

Maybe he even looked down on the town from Marye’s Heights (though it wasn’t called that then, because John Lawrence Marye, for whom the heights are named, had yet to be born). Perhaps a slave would have accompanied him, as was

the custom in those days. I’m guessing neither of them could imagine the slaughter that would happen there a century later, when thousands of men gave their lives in the fight to end that custom. Washington would visited a lot of familiar sites we can still see downtown, picking up items at the Lewis Store, attending meetings of the Masons at a little tavern that we now know as Hugh Mercer’s Apothecary, and visiting his mom at the Mary Washington House or his sister at Kenmore. One site he visited that’s not still standing, though, is Weedon’s Tavern, which stood at the corner of Caroline and William Streets. The tavern was the site of many meetings of our founding fathers, including Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, Hugh Mercer, George Mason, and others. It was on this site where Thomas Jefferson drafted the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, which laid the foundation for our nation’s history of religious tolerance.

The Lewis Store, which was the closest thing to Target that Fredericksburg had back in the day. It did not, however, establish a tradition of racial tolerance, though it was written by the man who later penned the words, “We hold these truths to be selfevident, that all men are created equal.” Which is why it is ironic that, in 1960, African-Americans staged sit-ins at a Woolworths lunch counter built on that very site, demanding the right to be allowed to eat there. What would George Washington think if he could see Fredericksburg today? Honestly, I think he would be impressed that the town he grew up in and the nation he founded had become models for ever more inclusive freedom and progress. I also think he would like the way it smells. Tom Conway teaches 7th grade at Thornburg Middle School

By Jo Loving Each day of our lives we make deposits in the memory banks of our children. ~Charles R. Swindoll I have been traveling today. I never left my porch, but I have traveled through time and space. No, this is not going to be a science fiction story. This morning, I stepped out onto the porch with my Earl Grey tea, sat in my favorite wicker chair, and listened to the morning birds. A few minutes after I sat down, a familiar scent wafted in on the whispery wind. Gardenias. The Gardenias are in bloom. Did you hear me? THE GARDENIAS ARE IN BLOOM! Good grief, who gets excited about Gardenias? Me. Why? I'll tell you a story. I'll start out as my granddaughter, Ava, does, when she tells a story: One time, there was a house. It was a simple house: white clapboard, black shutters, small front porch, a single story. In the house lived an old lady, an old man, and a little dog. The old lady cooked all the time. There was one time of year when she did not like to cook, because of the heat, but she did cook a meal of only vegetables. She cooked peas and butterbeans, fried cornbread, sliced fresh tomatoes, and rice. For dessert, she baked a pineapple upside down cake in a huge, black, cast-iron skillet. This was not "meatless Monday," as we know it today. She just did not like to cook or eat meat when it was hot. It was early summer in Florida, and it was hot. "Tommy," she called to her husband, "Supper's ready." Tommy moseyed into the kitchen, patted her shoulder, and said, "OK, Shug." She asked, "Can you put ice in

the glasses and pour the tea?" Again, Tommy replied, "OK, Shug," got the ice, put it in the fancy iced tea glasses, and poured the tea in. You could hear the ice cracking slightly as the still-hot, freshlymade tea entered the glass. He took the glasses in and put them on the table. "Jo," the old lady said, "It's time to eat." "Ok, Nanny," I said, and skipped my 7-year-old self to the table. We said grace, and then we started talking. Nanny said, "I love this time of year." "Why, Nanny, I said. "Because the gardenias bloom." "What's a gardenia?" I asked. "It's the most beautiful and sweet-smelling flower of all, Jo." "Where are they?" I asked. "On a bush in the front yard. We'll go see them after supper." I couldn't wait to go outside. I hurried through the delicious supper, helped clear the table, and asked, "Nanny, can we go see the gardenias?" "I guess we can," she said, as she walked out onto the porch. We walked across the yard, my hand in hers, and she stopped at a bush covered with white flowers. "These are gardenias, Jo, and I love when they bloom. It makes me think about prom and graduation, when the boys would give the girls gardenias to wear with their dresses. Here, you can take this one. Smell it." I inhaled its fragrance, the sweet smell of, to my grandmother, youth. We sat on the porch for much of the evening, me in Nanny's lap in the rocking chair, talking about everything and nothing, and of gardenias. Jo Loving is enjoying the sight and scent from her porch of her large gardenia bush, the memories of her Nanny, and drinking iced tea while enjoying a vegetable supper on this early summer evening

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp front porch fredericksburg

June 2016

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