Page 1


contents

closeups 5

Laura LaBelle ... potty training to podcasting

9

hope raebeck ..walking for the first time

24

24

ana rendich art blooms on cover of flar

Porch talk surprising journey of a yoga teacher

.3

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....great idea

7

on the trails: veteran, service dog & faithful friend

8

I have a friend: community spirit

18

history’s stories.:july 4th our heritage: home with a view

19

what’s in a wall?.....919 caroline street

20

Senior Care: seniors & sun

21

life in motion: summertime

22

its all energy: calm cravings emancipated patients: need to write or ocd?

23

Poetryman: Cool Relief

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: lisa

26

art in the burg: gillen, julihn, brennan

27

#fredstrong: usa fun facts everything greens

28

companions: kittens

29

bookmark: new kid’s book

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: musings downtowners: be a tourist

meet dori weitz by collette caprara

10

...And more!

11

Liberte,, Egalite, Fraternite : y

12

frank & ana’s unique coffe house

10

sam stoker: “The world didn’t do it to me”

13

season’s bounty: summer suppers

15

polishing a gem: kenmore inn makeover

14

spirits: double gold for bowman

23

dragonfly...yoga’s confluence

16-17

Calendar of events

12

S URPRISING L IFE J OURNEY OF A YOGA T EACHER

Cover: “Backyard View” By Kathleen Willingham

Picture this scene: A young girl (whose name begins with D) is on her parents’ family farm in Kansas, while an approaching tornado can be seen in the distance which will take her on a topsyturvy journey. You might be thinking “Dorothy” but, in fact, the protagonist in this journey is Dori Weitz, teacher at the Yoga Foundation of Fredericksburg who is known and loved by a spectrum of students of all ages and levels of experience. The bio for Dori on the Foundation’s web site tells us that she has more than 30 years of diverse yoga practice and that she is also a nationally certified massage therapist, an aroma therapist, a third-level reiki practitioner and a whole-food nutrition advocate. Though that seems like a lot of experience, it is just a fraction of her life journey that she describes as her own personal “tornado” of a whirlwind of activities that she took on as she followed her impulses and inspirations.

“Though we didn’t have a working farm (my dad was a contractor), we lived in the country and we always had animals—horses or goats or cows and cats and dogs,” Dori said. “I grew up as an environmentalist and animal activist.” In her earlier years, Dori’s explorations were of her talents and physical abilities within the Wichita area. She began dancing when she was eight and continued to dance through her college years and even today. Her experience in the performing arts later extended to the theater and she was voted Best Actress for three straight years in high-school. Surprisingly, yoga was a part of her childhood, even in an era where it was not yet “in vogue.” “When I was just nine, I started doing yoga watching the Lilias Folan program on my grandmother’s black-and-white television,” she recalls. After graduating high-school, Dori attended a community college for a year. Then the desire to explore expanded to include travel: She joined the Navy to “see the world!” Her assignments in the Philippines, Japan, and Hong Kong exposed her to Eastern cultures and spirituality, which added new depth to her yoga practice. “I took yoga videos with me when I was on a ship sailing around the world!” she explained. After three years of active duty in the Navy, Dori went into the reserves and experienced a major milestone in her life: becoming a mom to her daughter Jennifer. To be near her supportive family, she moved back to Wichita and enrolled in Friends University, majoring in zoology and biology. At the same time, she took a job at the local zoo, beginning in the bird habitat and later caring for snakes, lizards and turtles. Then, through a zoological association, she learned of a job opening in

the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas, and seized the opportunity, taking on the responsibility of caring for rhinos, hippos, and elephants. Her tasks ranged from cleaning out the pens, to feeding and bathing the animals, to teaching the elephants to paint! Dori recalls that this also entailed teaching the elephants not to eat the brushes. But Dori yearned for travel and requested to be on active duty for the Navy again. When they responded that they didn’t have anything for her at that time, Dori informed them that the Army was offering her a promotion and training to be a combat medic. The Navy released her and she went into the medical training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. “Right after college, I went straight into the Army,” she said, “I didn’t even attend graduation.” As fate would have it, Dori suffered a pelvic fracture while in basic training, and was given a medical discharge. That is when she heard nature’s call again and went to Monterey, California, where she worked for the Monterey Bay Aquarium and later conducted whale-watching tours. “I have

a 100-ton captains’ license and drove the tour boat,” she said. “I was one of two female captains in the Monterey Bay!” It was there she was to meet the love of her life, Jeff, who was in the Naval post-graduate school, earning his Masters degree in engineering. They were married in 2002, and their son Ethan was born that year. After moving throughout the country on assignments of his naval career, Jeff retired five years ago, and the family moved to Fredericksburg, where Dori continued the yoga teaching she had begun in 2011. Looking back on a journey that was far more convoluted than the Yellow Brick Road, Dori says “I always took opportunities as they came, and yoga has always been a centering element for me. It was my eye of calm in the middle of my personal tornado!”

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

25% OFF All Clothing, Footwear & Handbags 723 Caroline St 2

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

899.8077 / Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5 front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

3


contents

closeups 5

Laura LaBelle ... potty training to podcasting

9

hope raebeck ..walking for the first time

24

24

ana rendich art blooms on cover of flar

Porch talk surprising journey of a yoga teacher

.3

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....great idea

7

on the trails: veteran, service dog & faithful friend

8

I have a friend: community spirit

18

history’s stories.:july 4th our heritage: home with a view

19

what’s in a wall?.....919 caroline street

20

Senior Care: seniors & sun

21

life in motion: summertime

22

its all energy: calm cravings emancipated patients: need to write or ocd?

23

Poetryman: Cool Relief

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: lisa

26

art in the burg: gillen, julihn, brennan

27

#fredstrong: usa fun facts everything greens

28

companions: kittens

29

bookmark: new kid’s book

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: musings downtowners: be a tourist

meet dori weitz by collette caprara

10

...And more!

11

Liberte,, Egalite, Fraternite : y

12

frank & ana’s unique coffe house

10

sam stoker: “The world didn’t do it to me”

13

season’s bounty: summer suppers

15

polishing a gem: kenmore inn makeover

14

spirits: double gold for bowman

23

dragonfly...yoga’s confluence

16-17

Calendar of events

12

S URPRISING L IFE J OURNEY OF A YOGA T EACHER

Cover: “Backyard View” By Kathleen Willingham

Picture this scene: A young girl (whose name begins with D) is on her parents’ family farm in Kansas, while an approaching tornado can be seen in the distance which will take her on a topsyturvy journey. You might be thinking “Dorothy” but, in fact, the protagonist in this journey is Dori Weitz, teacher at the Yoga Foundation of Fredericksburg who is known and loved by a spectrum of students of all ages and levels of experience. The bio for Dori on the Foundation’s web site tells us that she has more than 30 years of diverse yoga practice and that she is also a nationally certified massage therapist, an aroma therapist, a third-level reiki practitioner and a whole-food nutrition advocate. Though that seems like a lot of experience, it is just a fraction of her life journey that she describes as her own personal “tornado” of a whirlwind of activities that she took on as she followed her impulses and inspirations.

“Though we didn’t have a working farm (my dad was a contractor), we lived in the country and we always had animals—horses or goats or cows and cats and dogs,” Dori said. “I grew up as an environmentalist and animal activist.” In her earlier years, Dori’s explorations were of her talents and physical abilities within the Wichita area. She began dancing when she was eight and continued to dance through her college years and even today. Her experience in the performing arts later extended to the theater and she was voted Best Actress for three straight years in high-school. Surprisingly, yoga was a part of her childhood, even in an era where it was not yet “in vogue.” “When I was just nine, I started doing yoga watching the Lilias Folan program on my grandmother’s black-and-white television,” she recalls. After graduating high-school, Dori attended a community college for a year. Then the desire to explore expanded to include travel: She joined the Navy to “see the world!” Her assignments in the Philippines, Japan, and Hong Kong exposed her to Eastern cultures and spirituality, which added new depth to her yoga practice. “I took yoga videos with me when I was on a ship sailing around the world!” she explained. After three years of active duty in the Navy, Dori went into the reserves and experienced a major milestone in her life: becoming a mom to her daughter Jennifer. To be near her supportive family, she moved back to Wichita and enrolled in Friends University, majoring in zoology and biology. At the same time, she took a job at the local zoo, beginning in the bird habitat and later caring for snakes, lizards and turtles. Then, through a zoological association, she learned of a job opening in

the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas, and seized the opportunity, taking on the responsibility of caring for rhinos, hippos, and elephants. Her tasks ranged from cleaning out the pens, to feeding and bathing the animals, to teaching the elephants to paint! Dori recalls that this also entailed teaching the elephants not to eat the brushes. But Dori yearned for travel and requested to be on active duty for the Navy again. When they responded that they didn’t have anything for her at that time, Dori informed them that the Army was offering her a promotion and training to be a combat medic. The Navy released her and she went into the medical training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. “Right after college, I went straight into the Army,” she said, “I didn’t even attend graduation.” As fate would have it, Dori suffered a pelvic fracture while in basic training, and was given a medical discharge. That is when she heard nature’s call again and went to Monterey, California, where she worked for the Monterey Bay Aquarium and later conducted whale-watching tours. “I have

a 100-ton captains’ license and drove the tour boat,” she said. “I was one of two female captains in the Monterey Bay!” It was there she was to meet the love of her life, Jeff, who was in the Naval post-graduate school, earning his Masters degree in engineering. They were married in 2002, and their son Ethan was born that year. After moving throughout the country on assignments of his naval career, Jeff retired five years ago, and the family moved to Fredericksburg, where Dori continued the yoga teaching she had begun in 2011. Looking back on a journey that was far more convoluted than the Yellow Brick Road, Dori says “I always took opportunities as they came, and yoga has always been a centering element for me. It was my eye of calm in the middle of my personal tornado!”

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

25% OFF All Clothing, Footwear & Handbags 723 Caroline St 2

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

899.8077 / Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5 front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

3


Bill Freehling

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Barbara Anderson Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Susan Brown Collette Caprara Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Bill Freehling K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Alexis Grogan Jennifer Gron Anne F. Hicks Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Lori Izykowski David Jennings Sarah Anne Jump Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Sarah Perry M.L. Powers Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Kathleen Willingham Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward Kristie Wooldridge Siobhan Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

July 2018

From Potty Training to Podcasting Laura LaBelle’s “Impossible Job”

from temporary stop to forever home

interview By Chuck Archer works as a civilian contractor at Quantico and is in the National Guard, so he can still be gone for long stretches.

by bill freehling My wife and I didn’t envision Fredericksburg as our forever home when we moved here in 2004. At the time, we were both young (at least she was!) journalists for The News & Advance Newspaper in Lynchburg, where we had met in 2002. We had always heard great things about Fredericksburg’s Star, and daily newspaper, The Free Lance-S liked the fact that it was independently owned by the Rowe family. Many of our friends from Lynchburg had gone on to work at the FLS. Fredericksburg itself seemed a good place to live and was relatively close to both of our families. It seemed a convenient launching point to easily visit other places, and we got a good feel for the City itself as a nice place to live and work. But our choice to move here when we both received job offers from The Free Lance-Star was due more to the newspaper than the City itself. The typical career trajectory for a newspaper reporter is to move gradually up the ranks from smaller to larger markets, staying only a few years at each stop. Back in 2004, we saw The Free LanceStar and Fredericksburg as nice places to live and work for a few years before moving on to a larger market. We both rented apartments here (Emily downtown on Hanover Street, me at the Colonial Village at Greenbrier apartment complex) and settled in for what we assumed would be a fairly short stay. But then things changed. We fell in love with Fredericksburg for factors including its friendly people, time-honored traditions, delicious restaurants, outdoor amenities, walkability and more. We loved the convenience of the City, which is so

messages To Virginia Grogan, FPF Publisher, & Contributing Writers & Artists: The Front Porch light has shown brightly for 21 Years, never dimming, truly interesting & informative for the Fredericksburg Area’s men & women. Congratulations! P.S.Kudos to the Poetryman, Frank Fratoe Lowell Self, Habitual Reader

Front porch fredericksburg

close to beaches, mountains, major cities, airports and train travel yet feels a world apart. The Free Lance-Star lived up to its reputation as a great place to work and a friendly, caring atmosphere. After marrying in 2006, both Emily and I wanted to start a family and set down roots somewhere, and we decided that Fredericksburg was as good a place as any. As our former Lynchburg colleague Darrell Laurant had put it simply yet memorably (to us anyway), “You gotta live somewhere.” We decided Fredericksburg would be that somewhere for us. It just felt like home. Much has changed for us since we made that decision. We had two children, who are now almost 6 and 8 and are enjoying their experience in the Fredericksburg City Public Schools. We decided to buy a house downtown in 2009, and we still live on the same street (though not the same house). My parents moved a few blocks away. One beloved dog left us, and another arrived. Emily left the FLS to focus on the children and build a career as a freelance writer and marketer, and I went to work for the City in economic development and tourism. Through it all, Fredericksburg has been a constant. Though we have visited many other places and even briefly imagined ourselves living in some of them,

Virginia: We are grateful for the Front Porch coverage of this iconic artist and gentleman. (Johnny Johnson, June 2018) Regards, Pamela Bridgewater Virginia & FPF Contributors Great monthly…so filled with FXBG news. Loved this month’s cover (June 2018, Allman’s by Kevin Klump) Phyllis Whitley

we have never thought seriously about leaving Fredericksburg. My former boss, Karen Hedelt, used to say frequently that she and her husband concluded long ago that there are certainly bigger places to be, but not better ones. We agree. We feel so fortunate to be able to live and work downtown, and raise our kids here. We feel like a part of this community in a way that has eluded us in previous stops on our journey. So we are here to stay, Fredericksburg. Thanks for helping us make this our forever home.

Bill Freehling, Fredericksburg’s director of economic development and tourism, lives with his wife, Emily, two children, Abby and Andrew, and cockapoo, Chessie, in downtown Fredericksburg. Bill has been reading The Front Porch cover to cover for his entire 14-year stay in Fredericksburg and plans to continue doing so.

Front Porch: Thanks for having this contest. (Mystery House) It's fun to track the houses down. Lynne Wood

Publisher’s Note: In June Issue’s “Art in the Burg” Hubert Jackson’s painting was mistakenly identified as Hubert Humphrey. Obviously politics must have been on the mine! Apologies to Mr. Jackson

It’s just after 5pm on Wednesday. The B101.5 studios are mostly quiet as office staff and management have gone home for the day. I greet Laura LaBelle as she arrives to set up the studio to record a new episode of her podcast, “The Impossible Job”. While not a professional on-air personality, her natural NPR-style delivery and biting sense of humor has propelled the podcast to be one of the most popular on the Channel B Podcast Network. CA: You talk a lot about your family in the podcast. Can you introduce them to me? LL: Sure. I’ve been married to my husband, Avery, for 8 years. We have two kids, Lucy, who is 5 and Willie, who is 2. CA: Even though you work for B101.5 as a promotions assistant, you’ve essentially made the decision to be a “stayat-home” mom. Why? LL: Before we had kids, I was an EMT and my husband used to be in the Marine Corps. We discussed that I would stay at home since he was out of town a lot for trips and deployments. He has since gotten out of the military and now

CA: You are not an “onair personality”, so how did you land a podcast on B101.5’s Channel B Podcast Network? LL: My boss told me that B101.5 was going to dip into the podcast world. I was really excited about the idea because I love listening to a variety of different podcasts. He told me I could host my own podcast but I needed to come with an idea to pitch to the team. When I talked about my idea on hosting a parenting podcast I think everyone could see how passionate I was about it. CA: And you came up with the name “The Impossible Job”? LL: Well, I was trying to think of all the things that parents are expected to do. You research the best car seats, strollers, and bottles. There are new studies and methods that come out all the time on sleeping training, potty training, screen time, and so much more. It’s a 24/7 job, and it can feel impossible to keep up with. CA: As I recall, the real selling point was the idea of exploring the different ways of parenting without judgement. LL: When people become that passionate about something where there isn’t an exact set of rules to follow, judgement can start to flare up. I mean, everyone has heard of the “mommy wars”. However, there is no one right way. It’s just the right way for your family. The more we learn and hear from

other parents’ experiences, the broader our understanding can be to hopefully become less judgmental. We all just want what is best for our kids. CA: In promoting the podcast, you say we all have the goal, “To not raise jerks”. What do you mean by that? LL: Every parent I have talked with wants their kids to grow up to be productive members of society. All I want for my kids is for them to be happy, healthy, and empathetic. I want them to be helpers, and I’m fairly positive most parents would agree with that. CA: Do you think your podcast is aptly named? LL: Being a parent is hard work. I am in the business of raising human beings and it’s not something I take lightly. When it comes to raising kids there are certain experiences all parents

go through eventually. My motivation is to bridge a gap between families. By talking to different parents from different walks of life, different ethnicities, different sexual orientations, we expose ourselves to different ways of parenting, but we can also learn from it and have a broader understanding of it and hopefully be more accepting.

New episodes of “The Impossible Job” podcast can be heard every other Thursday on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Music, TuneIn Radio, or at www.b1015.com, keyword “podcasts”.

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

5


Bill Freehling

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Barbara Anderson Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Susan Brown Collette Caprara Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Bill Freehling K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Alexis Grogan Jennifer Gron Anne F. Hicks Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Lori Izykowski David Jennings Sarah Anne Jump Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Sarah Perry M.L. Powers Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Kathleen Willingham Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward Kristie Wooldridge Siobhan Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

July 2018

From Potty Training to Podcasting Laura LaBelle’s “Impossible Job”

from temporary stop to forever home

interview By Chuck Archer works as a civilian contractor at Quantico and is in the National Guard, so he can still be gone for long stretches.

by bill freehling My wife and I didn’t envision Fredericksburg as our forever home when we moved here in 2004. At the time, we were both young (at least she was!) journalists for The News & Advance Newspaper in Lynchburg, where we had met in 2002. We had always heard great things about Fredericksburg’s Star, and daily newspaper, The Free Lance-S liked the fact that it was independently owned by the Rowe family. Many of our friends from Lynchburg had gone on to work at the FLS. Fredericksburg itself seemed a good place to live and was relatively close to both of our families. It seemed a convenient launching point to easily visit other places, and we got a good feel for the City itself as a nice place to live and work. But our choice to move here when we both received job offers from The Free Lance-Star was due more to the newspaper than the City itself. The typical career trajectory for a newspaper reporter is to move gradually up the ranks from smaller to larger markets, staying only a few years at each stop. Back in 2004, we saw The Free LanceStar and Fredericksburg as nice places to live and work for a few years before moving on to a larger market. We both rented apartments here (Emily downtown on Hanover Street, me at the Colonial Village at Greenbrier apartment complex) and settled in for what we assumed would be a fairly short stay. But then things changed. We fell in love with Fredericksburg for factors including its friendly people, time-honored traditions, delicious restaurants, outdoor amenities, walkability and more. We loved the convenience of the City, which is so

messages To Virginia Grogan, FPF Publisher, & Contributing Writers & Artists: The Front Porch light has shown brightly for 21 Years, never dimming, truly interesting & informative for the Fredericksburg Area’s men & women. Congratulations! P.S.Kudos to the Poetryman, Frank Fratoe Lowell Self, Habitual Reader

Front porch fredericksburg

close to beaches, mountains, major cities, airports and train travel yet feels a world apart. The Free Lance-Star lived up to its reputation as a great place to work and a friendly, caring atmosphere. After marrying in 2006, both Emily and I wanted to start a family and set down roots somewhere, and we decided that Fredericksburg was as good a place as any. As our former Lynchburg colleague Darrell Laurant had put it simply yet memorably (to us anyway), “You gotta live somewhere.” We decided Fredericksburg would be that somewhere for us. It just felt like home. Much has changed for us since we made that decision. We had two children, who are now almost 6 and 8 and are enjoying their experience in the Fredericksburg City Public Schools. We decided to buy a house downtown in 2009, and we still live on the same street (though not the same house). My parents moved a few blocks away. One beloved dog left us, and another arrived. Emily left the FLS to focus on the children and build a career as a freelance writer and marketer, and I went to work for the City in economic development and tourism. Through it all, Fredericksburg has been a constant. Though we have visited many other places and even briefly imagined ourselves living in some of them,

Virginia: We are grateful for the Front Porch coverage of this iconic artist and gentleman. (Johnny Johnson, June 2018) Regards, Pamela Bridgewater Virginia & FPF Contributors Great monthly…so filled with FXBG news. Loved this month’s cover (June 2018, Allman’s by Kevin Klump) Phyllis Whitley

we have never thought seriously about leaving Fredericksburg. My former boss, Karen Hedelt, used to say frequently that she and her husband concluded long ago that there are certainly bigger places to be, but not better ones. We agree. We feel so fortunate to be able to live and work downtown, and raise our kids here. We feel like a part of this community in a way that has eluded us in previous stops on our journey. So we are here to stay, Fredericksburg. Thanks for helping us make this our forever home.

Bill Freehling, Fredericksburg’s director of economic development and tourism, lives with his wife, Emily, two children, Abby and Andrew, and cockapoo, Chessie, in downtown Fredericksburg. Bill has been reading The Front Porch cover to cover for his entire 14-year stay in Fredericksburg and plans to continue doing so.

Front Porch: Thanks for having this contest. (Mystery House) It's fun to track the houses down. Lynne Wood

Publisher’s Note: In June Issue’s “Art in the Burg” Hubert Jackson’s painting was mistakenly identified as Hubert Humphrey. Obviously politics must have been on the mine! Apologies to Mr. Jackson

It’s just after 5pm on Wednesday. The B101.5 studios are mostly quiet as office staff and management have gone home for the day. I greet Laura LaBelle as she arrives to set up the studio to record a new episode of her podcast, “The Impossible Job”. While not a professional on-air personality, her natural NPR-style delivery and biting sense of humor has propelled the podcast to be one of the most popular on the Channel B Podcast Network. CA: You talk a lot about your family in the podcast. Can you introduce them to me? LL: Sure. I’ve been married to my husband, Avery, for 8 years. We have two kids, Lucy, who is 5 and Willie, who is 2. CA: Even though you work for B101.5 as a promotions assistant, you’ve essentially made the decision to be a “stayat-home” mom. Why? LL: Before we had kids, I was an EMT and my husband used to be in the Marine Corps. We discussed that I would stay at home since he was out of town a lot for trips and deployments. He has since gotten out of the military and now

CA: You are not an “onair personality”, so how did you land a podcast on B101.5’s Channel B Podcast Network? LL: My boss told me that B101.5 was going to dip into the podcast world. I was really excited about the idea because I love listening to a variety of different podcasts. He told me I could host my own podcast but I needed to come with an idea to pitch to the team. When I talked about my idea on hosting a parenting podcast I think everyone could see how passionate I was about it. CA: And you came up with the name “The Impossible Job”? LL: Well, I was trying to think of all the things that parents are expected to do. You research the best car seats, strollers, and bottles. There are new studies and methods that come out all the time on sleeping training, potty training, screen time, and so much more. It’s a 24/7 job, and it can feel impossible to keep up with. CA: As I recall, the real selling point was the idea of exploring the different ways of parenting without judgement. LL: When people become that passionate about something where there isn’t an exact set of rules to follow, judgement can start to flare up. I mean, everyone has heard of the “mommy wars”. However, there is no one right way. It’s just the right way for your family. The more we learn and hear from

other parents’ experiences, the broader our understanding can be to hopefully become less judgmental. We all just want what is best for our kids. CA: In promoting the podcast, you say we all have the goal, “To not raise jerks”. What do you mean by that? LL: Every parent I have talked with wants their kids to grow up to be productive members of society. All I want for my kids is for them to be happy, healthy, and empathetic. I want them to be helpers, and I’m fairly positive most parents would agree with that. CA: Do you think your podcast is aptly named? LL: Being a parent is hard work. I am in the business of raising human beings and it’s not something I take lightly. When it comes to raising kids there are certain experiences all parents

go through eventually. My motivation is to bridge a gap between families. By talking to different parents from different walks of life, different ethnicities, different sexual orientations, we expose ourselves to different ways of parenting, but we can also learn from it and have a broader understanding of it and hopefully be more accepting.

New episodes of “The Impossible Job” podcast can be heard every other Thursday on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Music, TuneIn Radio, or at www.b1015.com, keyword “podcasts”.

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

5


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? a great idea is now well rooted

The veteran, the service dog & the faithful friend

By Tina Will and with the advent of the internet and search engines, homeowners are asking and getting answers (of one sort or another) to almost any garden related question. Horticultural questions, plant care, insect and plant disease questions seem to be fair game for anyone with ‘advice’ to share. But beware! “Home remedy” blogs might offer the wrong advice, or advice for a different climate if the reader is not careful to check the origin of the website.

How Can I become a Master Gardener and Who’s Idea Was This Anyway? In the 1970’s suburban neighborhoods grew at a tremendous rate, and soon the home gardener had a growing list of questions. For reliable advice they turned to their Cooperative Extension Agents who had traditionally offered educational programs for Agriculture, Home Economics, and 4-H. The Agents now found themselves inundated with questions from home gardeners, too. Efforts to answer questions via television and radio simply drew even more questions. In Washington state the idea of a program to have educated volunteers available to answer these questions became a reality.

Sharon Collmen, and George Pinyuh the idea to offer a trial Plant Clinic was widely advertised and held at a mall in Tacoma WA in 1972. The public responded with enthusiasm thereby confirming the usefulness of educated volunteers. Once the curriculum was established and implemented it spread to other states and several provinces in Canada. The founders had spent time working in Germany and had seen the moniker ‘Meister’ associated with the top level of training and expertise, so ‘Gartenmeister’ was adopted in its English form, ‘Master Gardener,’ signifying that volunteers have received extensive training on horticultural and agricultural topics. In our area of Virginia the first classes were offered in 1990 and some of those MGs are still active in our group.

Through the vision and efforts of Gibby, William Scheer,

The need for reliable information has not diminished. In the last 20 years,

David

Rather than relying on the internet, consider becoming an educated volunteer with Virginia Cooperative Extension. This September 2018 is your chance to learn the answers to lawn and garden questions. Every year VCE Agent Guy Mussey has a list of people who have been waiting to enroll in the next Extension Master Gardener training class which begins shortly after Labor Day in September. It’s a great (and necessary) course for those who enjoy interacting with the public, and sharing researchbased knowledge on lawn care, tree and shrub choice and care, common insects

By Kevin Brown

anything related to the plant world. Guy loves to teach, has 40 years of experience, and has lived and worked in Florida, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania. Classes are informative and fun; everyone who takes this course is amazed at how much the course covers and how much they learn. Phone the Stafford County VCE office and get your name on the list to enroll: 540658-8000. Enrollment is limited to 22 people and always fills up so don’t wait. The classes begin shortly after Labor Day and are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 to 12 noon. Fee is $225.

Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. On the River Heritage Trail/Canal Path loop, I am continually amazed by the ingenuity of our local trails travelers. For example, one day recently a lady passed by me on a motorized wheelchair with a large black lab sitting on a platform on the

front, and another lady riding on the back of the wheelchair as a counterbalance as they rode downhill. This is how I first met Debbie Wolcott, her service dog Ready, and friend Jackie Riley. Since then, I’ve had the privilege of becoming better acquainted with this inspiring trio, and asked Debbie to share “the rest of the story” here. Debbie: “I served in the Army in the mid-1970s and am a disabled veteran. I’ve lived in Fredericksburg off and on for the past 16 years. After waiting over five years on several lists for a service dog, I was finally called by “This Able Veteran” (www.thisableveteran.org) for their program. They paired me with a black lab named Ready, and we attended a 3-week training program in Carbondale, Illinois that changed my life. I graduated the program in October 2013 with Ready and began what they call “the journey back home.” And it has been a wonderful journey.

“Having Ready in my life has helped me beyond belief. He is so well behaved, easy going and always helpful. If Ready sees a person using a cane, walker, crutches, or other walking aid, he wants to go and help them too. He will look at them, and then look at me like he is asking me for permission to go and help them. Ready has such a good heart, and really loves people. He does everything I ask him to do. I owe my life to him. “Ready loves to get outdoors with me. Thanks to the new Fall Hill trail, the city residents up where I live now have trails access. We venture out on the trail to pick up groceries at Wegmans, enjoy a meal at downtown restaurants, attend Sunday school at the Fredericksburg Baptist Church, and sightsee along the canal and river. While we are on the trails, we pick up litter. I use a trash grabber, but Ready also picks up litter and brings it to me. “I met my friend Jackie Riley over 10 years ago at church and we have been great friends ever since. We do a lot

of things together. Jackie walks with me and Ready because she likes to exercise and I help her keep a good pace. I have a cart attached to the rear of my wheelchair for transporting Ready when it is too hot for him. One time the wagon hitch broke and I had to build a temporary platform on the front of my wheelchair for Ready who was suffering from fatigue. Thankfully, Jackie was walking with me to stand on the back and help keep the front-loaded wheelchair from falling over when I was going downhill. This was when Kevin first saw me and probably wondered “what the heck is going on here?” Well, I got my wagon hitch fixed and we are able to once again travel from our apartment throughout the city on the trails and sidewalks. We love to meet new people, so if you see us out on the trails, please introduce yourself and say Hi!” Thanks for sharing your story Debbie, you and your crew are truly an inspiration to us all. Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails”

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! and

diseases

of

plants,

and

almost

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

7


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? a great idea is now well rooted

The veteran, the service dog & the faithful friend

By Tina Will and with the advent of the internet and search engines, homeowners are asking and getting answers (of one sort or another) to almost any garden related question. Horticultural questions, plant care, insect and plant disease questions seem to be fair game for anyone with ‘advice’ to share. But beware! “Home remedy” blogs might offer the wrong advice, or advice for a different climate if the reader is not careful to check the origin of the website.

How Can I become a Master Gardener and Who’s Idea Was This Anyway? In the 1970’s suburban neighborhoods grew at a tremendous rate, and soon the home gardener had a growing list of questions. For reliable advice they turned to their Cooperative Extension Agents who had traditionally offered educational programs for Agriculture, Home Economics, and 4-H. The Agents now found themselves inundated with questions from home gardeners, too. Efforts to answer questions via television and radio simply drew even more questions. In Washington state the idea of a program to have educated volunteers available to answer these questions became a reality.

Sharon Collmen, and George Pinyuh the idea to offer a trial Plant Clinic was widely advertised and held at a mall in Tacoma WA in 1972. The public responded with enthusiasm thereby confirming the usefulness of educated volunteers. Once the curriculum was established and implemented it spread to other states and several provinces in Canada. The founders had spent time working in Germany and had seen the moniker ‘Meister’ associated with the top level of training and expertise, so ‘Gartenmeister’ was adopted in its English form, ‘Master Gardener,’ signifying that volunteers have received extensive training on horticultural and agricultural topics. In our area of Virginia the first classes were offered in 1990 and some of those MGs are still active in our group.

Through the vision and efforts of Gibby, William Scheer,

The need for reliable information has not diminished. In the last 20 years,

David

Rather than relying on the internet, consider becoming an educated volunteer with Virginia Cooperative Extension. This September 2018 is your chance to learn the answers to lawn and garden questions. Every year VCE Agent Guy Mussey has a list of people who have been waiting to enroll in the next Extension Master Gardener training class which begins shortly after Labor Day in September. It’s a great (and necessary) course for those who enjoy interacting with the public, and sharing researchbased knowledge on lawn care, tree and shrub choice and care, common insects

By Kevin Brown

anything related to the plant world. Guy loves to teach, has 40 years of experience, and has lived and worked in Florida, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania. Classes are informative and fun; everyone who takes this course is amazed at how much the course covers and how much they learn. Phone the Stafford County VCE office and get your name on the list to enroll: 540658-8000. Enrollment is limited to 22 people and always fills up so don’t wait. The classes begin shortly after Labor Day and are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 to 12 noon. Fee is $225.

Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. On the River Heritage Trail/Canal Path loop, I am continually amazed by the ingenuity of our local trails travelers. For example, one day recently a lady passed by me on a motorized wheelchair with a large black lab sitting on a platform on the

front, and another lady riding on the back of the wheelchair as a counterbalance as they rode downhill. This is how I first met Debbie Wolcott, her service dog Ready, and friend Jackie Riley. Since then, I’ve had the privilege of becoming better acquainted with this inspiring trio, and asked Debbie to share “the rest of the story” here. Debbie: “I served in the Army in the mid-1970s and am a disabled veteran. I’ve lived in Fredericksburg off and on for the past 16 years. After waiting over five years on several lists for a service dog, I was finally called by “This Able Veteran” (www.thisableveteran.org) for their program. They paired me with a black lab named Ready, and we attended a 3-week training program in Carbondale, Illinois that changed my life. I graduated the program in October 2013 with Ready and began what they call “the journey back home.” And it has been a wonderful journey.

“Having Ready in my life has helped me beyond belief. He is so well behaved, easy going and always helpful. If Ready sees a person using a cane, walker, crutches, or other walking aid, he wants to go and help them too. He will look at them, and then look at me like he is asking me for permission to go and help them. Ready has such a good heart, and really loves people. He does everything I ask him to do. I owe my life to him. “Ready loves to get outdoors with me. Thanks to the new Fall Hill trail, the city residents up where I live now have trails access. We venture out on the trail to pick up groceries at Wegmans, enjoy a meal at downtown restaurants, attend Sunday school at the Fredericksburg Baptist Church, and sightsee along the canal and river. While we are on the trails, we pick up litter. I use a trash grabber, but Ready also picks up litter and brings it to me. “I met my friend Jackie Riley over 10 years ago at church and we have been great friends ever since. We do a lot

of things together. Jackie walks with me and Ready because she likes to exercise and I help her keep a good pace. I have a cart attached to the rear of my wheelchair for transporting Ready when it is too hot for him. One time the wagon hitch broke and I had to build a temporary platform on the front of my wheelchair for Ready who was suffering from fatigue. Thankfully, Jackie was walking with me to stand on the back and help keep the front-loaded wheelchair from falling over when I was going downhill. This was when Kevin first saw me and probably wondered “what the heck is going on here?” Well, I got my wagon hitch fixed and we are able to once again travel from our apartment throughout the city on the trails and sidewalks. We love to meet new people, so if you see us out on the trails, please introduce yourself and say Hi!” Thanks for sharing your story Debbie, you and your crew are truly an inspiration to us all. Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails”

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! and

diseases

of

plants,

and

almost

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

7


Hope Rae Beck

“I Have A Friend” community spirit

Walking for first time in 20 years

By Laurie Black

When Tawnia Brown and her friend, Micki, walked in the door, the room lit up with their smiles and energy. Tawnia and Micki have been visiting for over two years through the Senior Visitors Program. However, in talking with them, it would seem they have been friends for a life time. As Micki puts it, "We complement each other. We both have our oddities, but that's okay. Tawnia really is an angel. She keeps me in check. She gives me good advice and I trust her." Tawnia replied, "Micki is a fascinating person. She has done so much and has such wonderful stories. I love her laugh and she makes me laugh. " Micki really has lived a full and exciting life. She spoke of hitchhiking to Woodstock when she was 21 years old. She's worked as a chef, lived in Italy, travelled Europe, visited Japan and Brazil, and has driven tour buses all over the U.S. Tawnia helps Micki get to appointments and run errands, but their weekly time together is never routine or

Donate to a Cancer Organization 8

July 2018

Community Services Board. Micki worked driving a bus and Tawnia worked for about 10 years with adults with intellectual and physical disabilities. Both also have a strong sense of community. Tawnia and her husband co-own Jack Brown'sTattoo Revival. When they started their business twelve years ago, Tawnia proposed Tattoos for Communities as a way to help the community. "I believe every business has a responsibility to give back. Each year we choose a local nonprofit to donate to. It has really grown over the years; each year we have more people come out and support us." The success of this unique fundraiser is evidence of the great community spirit here in Fredericksburg. Community members, such as Tawnia and Micki, truly embody that community spirit and inspire us all to reach out and give back. mundane. Their visits always include lively conversations and laughter. On occasion, as time and health permit, they also go out to lunch, walk around downtown Fredericksburg "window shopping," or watch a movie at Micki's place. "There is more I would like to do, but I am limited right now because of health issues," said Micki. When asked what brought her to the Senior Visitors Program, Tawnia shared a remarkable story, "My degree and background is in social work. I haven't worked in the field for some time, but I wanted to stay involved. I was particularly interested in working with seniors. One day I was painting the house and listening to the radio when I heard that there was a Senior Expo happening that day. I went right away, in my paint clothes, to the Expo. That's where I met the Program Director, Teresa Bowers. She was so open and friendly and nonjudgmental. She told me about the program and it was exactly what I was looking for. It was meant to be." Micki described a similar experience. "My neighbor had been telling me about the Senior Visitors Program for a while. When I had to give up my car, I felt at odds. So, I decided to try the program. I met with Teresa Bowers. I told her that one of the most important things to me was to visit with someone who was very open and accepting, especially of my being Jewish. Teresa couldn't have chosen a more perfect person for me." Though it seems at first glance that Micki and Tawnia might not have much in common, they have found many common interests such as a love for plants and cooking. They also both worked at one time for the Rappahannock Area

Front porch fredericksburg

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

By lenora kruk-mullanaphy When Hope Rae Beck, of Fredericksburg, made an appointment with Greg Wright, of Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics, she wasn’t thinking about walking. She had a doctor’s prescription for offloading braces (boots that incline at the heel) in order to help alleviate pressure on a wound on her heel. Born with spina bifida, which occurs when a baby is in the womb and the spinal column doesn’t close all the way, she’s been confined to a wheelchair for most of her life. She was able to stand and walk with crutches and braces on her legs for a while, but the braces left wounds. That was two decades ago when Beck, 33, was 14 years old, and until she met Wright, she thought she was out of options and would never walk again. In May, Beck tried on the new boots, which also worked to give her balance if she tried to stand. It took less than five minutes for her to ask to try standing. When that mission was accomplished, she couldn’t resist the temptation to try to walk between two

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

metal bars that were bolted into the floor. She rose from the wheelchair, grabbed the bars, made her way across the floor, turned and walked back to the wheelchair, where she settled in with a smile that lit up the room. Her therapy dog, Kota, seemed to realize the special moment and jumped in her lap. “I expected to get offloading braces—nothing more,” said Beck. “I didn’t know standing, much less walking, was an option. Even after the first visit to Mobility, I only wanted to try to Greg Wright of Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics with stand a little. I really Hope trying the offloading braces created for her. didn’t think walking was a realistic goal.” something difficult need to know that When Beck arrived home in the nothing is impossible and never give up on new boots, she wanted to catch up with anything that means so much to them. the many things she wasn’t able to do before, such as standing before the bathroom mirror, where she plans to take Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is president of a “selfie” of herself for Facebook. She Kruk-Mullanaphy Media Group, LLC and describes the way it feels to finally stand lives in Stafford County. and walk as “free from the prison that is her wheelchair.” As for Wright, he knows he chose Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics the perfect field, especially when his work 3808 Jefferson Davis Hwy, can offer Beck a new lease on life. In the Fredericksburg, VA 22408 prosthetics and orthotics field for nearly http://www.mobilitypo.com 30 years, he’s created about 100 540-8 899-0 0127 offloading braces for clients, each varying in design to accommodate unique diagnoses and shapes to fit different individuals. Though the road ahead will include building her upper body strength and physical therapy appointments, Beck doesn’t let that deter her and, instead, is determined to work until she succeeds— even if it takes 10 years. “Once I get an idea in my head, I don’t stop until I succeed,” she said. “I’m way too damn stubborn to quit. My stubbornness and independence are the only reasons I believe I can do this.” Whether it’s walking with the aid of secured metal bars on each side or crutches or a walker, Beck is looking forward to the future. She said people who are struggling or going through

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

9


Hope Rae Beck

“I Have A Friend” community spirit

Walking for first time in 20 years

By Laurie Black

When Tawnia Brown and her friend, Micki, walked in the door, the room lit up with their smiles and energy. Tawnia and Micki have been visiting for over two years through the Senior Visitors Program. However, in talking with them, it would seem they have been friends for a life time. As Micki puts it, "We complement each other. We both have our oddities, but that's okay. Tawnia really is an angel. She keeps me in check. She gives me good advice and I trust her." Tawnia replied, "Micki is a fascinating person. She has done so much and has such wonderful stories. I love her laugh and she makes me laugh. " Micki really has lived a full and exciting life. She spoke of hitchhiking to Woodstock when she was 21 years old. She's worked as a chef, lived in Italy, travelled Europe, visited Japan and Brazil, and has driven tour buses all over the U.S. Tawnia helps Micki get to appointments and run errands, but their weekly time together is never routine or

Donate to a Cancer Organization 8

July 2018

Community Services Board. Micki worked driving a bus and Tawnia worked for about 10 years with adults with intellectual and physical disabilities. Both also have a strong sense of community. Tawnia and her husband co-own Jack Brown'sTattoo Revival. When they started their business twelve years ago, Tawnia proposed Tattoos for Communities as a way to help the community. "I believe every business has a responsibility to give back. Each year we choose a local nonprofit to donate to. It has really grown over the years; each year we have more people come out and support us." The success of this unique fundraiser is evidence of the great community spirit here in Fredericksburg. Community members, such as Tawnia and Micki, truly embody that community spirit and inspire us all to reach out and give back. mundane. Their visits always include lively conversations and laughter. On occasion, as time and health permit, they also go out to lunch, walk around downtown Fredericksburg "window shopping," or watch a movie at Micki's place. "There is more I would like to do, but I am limited right now because of health issues," said Micki. When asked what brought her to the Senior Visitors Program, Tawnia shared a remarkable story, "My degree and background is in social work. I haven't worked in the field for some time, but I wanted to stay involved. I was particularly interested in working with seniors. One day I was painting the house and listening to the radio when I heard that there was a Senior Expo happening that day. I went right away, in my paint clothes, to the Expo. That's where I met the Program Director, Teresa Bowers. She was so open and friendly and nonjudgmental. She told me about the program and it was exactly what I was looking for. It was meant to be." Micki described a similar experience. "My neighbor had been telling me about the Senior Visitors Program for a while. When I had to give up my car, I felt at odds. So, I decided to try the program. I met with Teresa Bowers. I told her that one of the most important things to me was to visit with someone who was very open and accepting, especially of my being Jewish. Teresa couldn't have chosen a more perfect person for me." Though it seems at first glance that Micki and Tawnia might not have much in common, they have found many common interests such as a love for plants and cooking. They also both worked at one time for the Rappahannock Area

Front porch fredericksburg

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

By lenora kruk-mullanaphy When Hope Rae Beck, of Fredericksburg, made an appointment with Greg Wright, of Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics, she wasn’t thinking about walking. She had a doctor’s prescription for offloading braces (boots that incline at the heel) in order to help alleviate pressure on a wound on her heel. Born with spina bifida, which occurs when a baby is in the womb and the spinal column doesn’t close all the way, she’s been confined to a wheelchair for most of her life. She was able to stand and walk with crutches and braces on her legs for a while, but the braces left wounds. That was two decades ago when Beck, 33, was 14 years old, and until she met Wright, she thought she was out of options and would never walk again. In May, Beck tried on the new boots, which also worked to give her balance if she tried to stand. It took less than five minutes for her to ask to try standing. When that mission was accomplished, she couldn’t resist the temptation to try to walk between two

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

metal bars that were bolted into the floor. She rose from the wheelchair, grabbed the bars, made her way across the floor, turned and walked back to the wheelchair, where she settled in with a smile that lit up the room. Her therapy dog, Kota, seemed to realize the special moment and jumped in her lap. “I expected to get offloading braces—nothing more,” said Beck. “I didn’t know standing, much less walking, was an option. Even after the first visit to Mobility, I only wanted to try to Greg Wright of Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics with stand a little. I really Hope trying the offloading braces created for her. didn’t think walking was a realistic goal.” something difficult need to know that When Beck arrived home in the nothing is impossible and never give up on new boots, she wanted to catch up with anything that means so much to them. the many things she wasn’t able to do before, such as standing before the bathroom mirror, where she plans to take Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is president of a “selfie” of herself for Facebook. She Kruk-Mullanaphy Media Group, LLC and describes the way it feels to finally stand lives in Stafford County. and walk as “free from the prison that is her wheelchair.” As for Wright, he knows he chose Mobility Prosthetics & Orthotics the perfect field, especially when his work 3808 Jefferson Davis Hwy, can offer Beck a new lease on life. In the Fredericksburg, VA 22408 prosthetics and orthotics field for nearly http://www.mobilitypo.com 30 years, he’s created about 100 540-8 899-0 0127 offloading braces for clients, each varying in design to accommodate unique diagnoses and shapes to fit different individuals. Though the road ahead will include building her upper body strength and physical therapy appointments, Beck doesn’t let that deter her and, instead, is determined to work until she succeeds— even if it takes 10 years. “Once I get an idea in my head, I don’t stop until I succeed,” she said. “I’m way too damn stubborn to quit. My stubbornness and independence are the only reasons I believe I can do this.” Whether it’s walking with the aid of secured metal bars on each side or crutches or a walker, Beck is looking forward to the future. She said people who are struggling or going through

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

9


Sam Stoker

The Sunken Well Tavern

Liberte, Egalité, Fraternite! Celebrating Bastille Day: A family affair

“the world didn’t do it to me”

By David Jennings

By dawn whitmore Sam Stoker understands adversity. He has experienced loss of a sibling, a helicopter crash (while serving in the Army in Southern Afghanistan), and a severe motorcycle accident. Yet, none of these have kept him down. Sam can be found 6 days a week at B2 Gourmet (Beans and Brews) where he is one of the owners. Sam shares his coffee and craft beer knowledge on a daily basis at B2. At least one of his regulars calls him a coffee guru. Another tells him ‘he is an old soul for such a young man’. Is his wisdom and maturity a result of 8 years in service to our country? Or his motorcycle accident? Shawn Greystone witnessed Sam’s accident. The driver of the car ran a red light and made a u-turn in front of Sam, which resulted in him being thrown approximately 75 feet from his motorcycle. Sam’s injuries included a fractured femur; tibia broke in 3 pieces and fibula, which tore through his thigh muscle. Shawn came to Sam’s assistance. He provided his belt for Sam to

use as a tourniquet to stop the bleeding. Even though they had never met Shawn stayed with Sam until the ambulance arrived. Normally incidents like these would end once the rescue workers arrived. Not in this case, it would be the beginning…. of a friendship and a future bike fest in Fredericksburg. The day after Sam’s accident Shawn visited him in the hospital. “We have been friends since,” shares Sam. One night, as the two sat in a garage listening to music, they started talking about a bike fest for Fredericksburg. The two chose the name, Blue and Gray for the bike fest because it represents Fredericksburg and the Civil War history of the area. “I had never held a festival before, but we decided to do it,” says Sam, “so, I started talking to vendors and lining up bands,” says Sam. The two wanted a portion of the proceeds to support a charity and chose Autism Speaks for the first year. The 1st Annual Blue and Gray Bike Festival was

held in June at Adventure Brewing North. “After expenses, we raised approximately $700.00 for Autism Speaks,” stated Sam, “Next year, the monies will benefit breast cancer. We want to focus on a different charity each year.” When someone comments about the fact of how positive he is after all the world has done to him. Sam replies “The world didn’t do it to me.” Want to know more about the 2019 2nd Annual Blue and Gray Bike Fest or B2 Gourmet? Visit Sam at B2 Gourmet. He is there MondayFriday from 6:00am-7:30pm or Saturday from 8:00am-8:00pm. Dawn Whitmore, The “Old Barn” Lady is a barnscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

B2 Gourmet 9849 Jefferson Davis Hwy #104, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 b2gourmet.com/ facebook

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

NEW Bistro Menu!

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

July 2018

540-373-8300 - marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

The Fredericksburg Sister City Association (FSCA) invites you to join us at the Market Square in downtown Fredericksburg, in celebration of the French national holiday. The 14th of July (Le Quatorze Juillet, as they say in France) commemorates the destruction of The Bastille, an ancient prison in Paris and the overthrow of the Monarchy. The French Revolution was guided by the same enlightened principles brought to life in our own Declaration of Independence thirteen years and ten days earlier The French celebrate Bastille Day, which is similar to our Independence Day, with great fervor-and this local fete has grown into quite an experience. Here in Fredericksburg, as in every town in France, we will gather in our Market Square for an evening of music, food, wine and fun. And, of course, the singing of La Marseillaise At this free event, music will be provided by Dangerous Kitchen who play a mix of bebop, Latin, and modal jazz. Authentic French street food will be offered for sale by Normandie Cuisine of King George. French wines, craft beer and other beverages will also be available for purchase. FSCA is allied with Frejus, France, a city of about 52,000 people that was founded by the Romans in 49 AD. It is located in the South of France on the Mediterranean between Nice and St. Tropez on the Cote d'Azur. Although the Association offers several local cultural events each year, its main purpose is to support the student summer exchange program between the two cities. This year students from Frejus will visit here July 12-24 and will enjoy numerous excursions around the region including Yorktown, Kings Dominion and D.C.

FSCA (nee 1980) is in its 38th year. Since its inception a thousand students have enjoyed the benefit of the cultural exchange. The Fredericksburg Sister City Association always encourages new membership. You can even join at the event. Visit the website at fredericksburgfrejus.com

Liberte, Egalité, Fraternite!

Davy Jennings is on the board of the Sister City and a local video producer. Photos by Sarah Anne Jump

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

11


Sam Stoker

The Sunken Well Tavern

Liberte, Egalité, Fraternite! Celebrating Bastille Day: A family affair

“the world didn’t do it to me”

By David Jennings

By dawn whitmore Sam Stoker understands adversity. He has experienced loss of a sibling, a helicopter crash (while serving in the Army in Southern Afghanistan), and a severe motorcycle accident. Yet, none of these have kept him down. Sam can be found 6 days a week at B2 Gourmet (Beans and Brews) where he is one of the owners. Sam shares his coffee and craft beer knowledge on a daily basis at B2. At least one of his regulars calls him a coffee guru. Another tells him ‘he is an old soul for such a young man’. Is his wisdom and maturity a result of 8 years in service to our country? Or his motorcycle accident? Shawn Greystone witnessed Sam’s accident. The driver of the car ran a red light and made a u-turn in front of Sam, which resulted in him being thrown approximately 75 feet from his motorcycle. Sam’s injuries included a fractured femur; tibia broke in 3 pieces and fibula, which tore through his thigh muscle. Shawn came to Sam’s assistance. He provided his belt for Sam to

use as a tourniquet to stop the bleeding. Even though they had never met Shawn stayed with Sam until the ambulance arrived. Normally incidents like these would end once the rescue workers arrived. Not in this case, it would be the beginning…. of a friendship and a future bike fest in Fredericksburg. The day after Sam’s accident Shawn visited him in the hospital. “We have been friends since,” shares Sam. One night, as the two sat in a garage listening to music, they started talking about a bike fest for Fredericksburg. The two chose the name, Blue and Gray for the bike fest because it represents Fredericksburg and the Civil War history of the area. “I had never held a festival before, but we decided to do it,” says Sam, “so, I started talking to vendors and lining up bands,” says Sam. The two wanted a portion of the proceeds to support a charity and chose Autism Speaks for the first year. The 1st Annual Blue and Gray Bike Festival was

held in June at Adventure Brewing North. “After expenses, we raised approximately $700.00 for Autism Speaks,” stated Sam, “Next year, the monies will benefit breast cancer. We want to focus on a different charity each year.” When someone comments about the fact of how positive he is after all the world has done to him. Sam replies “The world didn’t do it to me.” Want to know more about the 2019 2nd Annual Blue and Gray Bike Fest or B2 Gourmet? Visit Sam at B2 Gourmet. He is there MondayFriday from 6:00am-7:30pm or Saturday from 8:00am-8:00pm. Dawn Whitmore, The “Old Barn” Lady is a barnscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania. facebook.com/dewphotographypage or her website at www.dewphotographyva.com

B2 Gourmet 9849 Jefferson Davis Hwy #104, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 b2gourmet.com/ facebook

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

NEW Bistro Menu!

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

July 2018

540-373-8300 - marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

The Fredericksburg Sister City Association (FSCA) invites you to join us at the Market Square in downtown Fredericksburg, in celebration of the French national holiday. The 14th of July (Le Quatorze Juillet, as they say in France) commemorates the destruction of The Bastille, an ancient prison in Paris and the overthrow of the Monarchy. The French Revolution was guided by the same enlightened principles brought to life in our own Declaration of Independence thirteen years and ten days earlier The French celebrate Bastille Day, which is similar to our Independence Day, with great fervor-and this local fete has grown into quite an experience. Here in Fredericksburg, as in every town in France, we will gather in our Market Square for an evening of music, food, wine and fun. And, of course, the singing of La Marseillaise At this free event, music will be provided by Dangerous Kitchen who play a mix of bebop, Latin, and modal jazz. Authentic French street food will be offered for sale by Normandie Cuisine of King George. French wines, craft beer and other beverages will also be available for purchase. FSCA is allied with Frejus, France, a city of about 52,000 people that was founded by the Romans in 49 AD. It is located in the South of France on the Mediterranean between Nice and St. Tropez on the Cote d'Azur. Although the Association offers several local cultural events each year, its main purpose is to support the student summer exchange program between the two cities. This year students from Frejus will visit here July 12-24 and will enjoy numerous excursions around the region including Yorktown, Kings Dominion and D.C.

FSCA (nee 1980) is in its 38th year. Since its inception a thousand students have enjoyed the benefit of the cultural exchange. The Fredericksburg Sister City Association always encourages new membership. You can even join at the event. Visit the website at fredericksburgfrejus.com

Liberte, Egalité, Fraternite!

Davy Jennings is on the board of the Sister City and a local video producer. Photos by Sarah Anne Jump

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

11


Season’s Bounty

Curitiba unique coffee house & art cafe

Summer Suppers

By M.L. Powers

By vanessa moncure

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Once again, I had the pleasure of sitting down with two of the newest shop owners in Fredericksburg, Frank and Ana Robinson. So many cafes have come and gone, but this one is a keeper. Nestled in a prime location at 919 Caroline St., close to the William St. intersection, it is a prime target on the walking street. Though the city is getting to look a little like Europe with a coffee shop on every corner, Curitiba Art Café adds a different flare to the coffee scene. Joining the evergrowing art community, their intention is to showcase blooming artists and musicians along with great food and drink in more of a bistro atmosphere. The coffee recipe is a blend of primarily Brazilian beans created by Ana which she has named Blue Raven which is also the logo of the cafe. The name comes from a protected bird species (gralha–azul,) indigenous to Curitiba, the capital of the Brazilian state of Panana. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge of coffee, espresso, and the fine art of drinking them. The cafe also is serving a unique beverage called Nitrobeer, an infusion of nitrogen into beer. It will interesting to try that one! Frank has lived in Fredericksburg most of his life, though he has travelled extensively. He is an architect by trade, so the overhaul of the building was right up his alley. Ana is the newcomer. She met Frank 13 years ago when he was traveling to her home town in Southern Brazil. They married three years ago, and Ana agreed to move to the States. This was not an easy decision, which you can tell when you hear her talk about her home. She spoke to me of the beauty of her country, the food, and the people, all of which she would like to share with her guests.

12

July 2018

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

The cafe has a rustic feel, with interesting wood furniture throughout. Much of the furniture is handmade from a blend of hard Brazilian wood that had been reclaimed from demolition of old farmhouses. Much of this furniture is for sale. In the back area as they cleared the drywall, they uncovered an entire room, whose markings on the brick wall date back to the 1700s, where it was identified as slave quarters. Frank said there is a lot of history in these old buildings. The back room is where they will have music, and have already booked a few new local musicians. There is a piano situated in the back, ready for any pianist feeling the urge. Outside, there is a patio where your furry friends are welcome to take a break and enjoy a little fresh air. Ana said that her hope is for the cafe to become an oasis where people will come to relax, eat and share their talents. Be sure to like them on Facebook after you visit. The Front Porch wishes the Curitiba Art Café great success in their new business. ML Powers keeps us up-to-date on all that is new in FXBG Curtiiba Art Cafe 919 Caroline St Also See “What’s in a Wall”, pg. 19

Front porch fredericksburg

Celebration Saturday July 14th 6-1 10 PM Market Square Downtown

Spring just couldn’t seem to follow winter then segue into summer this year - how about those several 80-degree days in February? Followed by a chilly March and three snowstorms in April? I could tell by the thick strings of pollen hanging off the house, trees and car, and seasonal sneezing, with scratchy eyes and throat that we were having sure signs of spring - but where were the annual washing rains and cool spring nights? Fortunately, the spring frog peepers finally made themselves known - and though the early garden lettuces bolted too early because of the heat and humidity, we’re definitely on track for a long hot summer (check the Almanac!). Our summer season officially begins when the grills, picnic tables and Slip and Slides make their big box store appearances - and our cooking thoughts turn from oven roasting, soups and stews

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Live Music, Authentic French Street Food, French Wines , Craft Beers Free Family Fair.....Vive La France! Presented by Fredericksburg Sister City Association

Front Porch Fredericksburg

to outdoor charcoal-broiled steaks, burgers ‘n dogs and fragrant dryrubbed pork ribs. Many days I prep the food we’ll be eating for dinner before I finish cleaning up the breakfast dishes as it seems easier to pull meats, salads and vegetable fixings from the refrigerator rather than starting all over with another meal in the evening sometimes I may stop at the grocery store for a rotisserie chicken or have a pound of shrimp steamed at the fresh seafood counter as the base for a summer supper. My backyard herb garden is a treasure of flavors that I use to make flavored oils - stored in plastic condiment bottles in the refrigerator, they add a concentrated dash of flavor to your foods. And have some fun with your zucchini and yellow squash this year with a vegetable spiralizer - these flavored oils along with some minced fresh herbs make a delicious side dish! Enjoy some quick summer supper ideas! Use any of the herb oils on pocketless pita bread or lavash drizzle with the oil, then heat on the outdoor grill until lightly toasted. SHRIMP SALAD IN ARTICHOKES OR TOMATOES Cook, peel and devein one pound of sweet Gulf shrimp, then coarsely chop. Stir together one-half cup minced celery, one-quarter cup minced green onion and two teaspoons of capers with the shrimp. Mix together one cup mayonnaise, three tablespoons of dijon mustard, one-quarter cup of ketchup and one tablespoon of lemon juice, S&P and hot sauce to taste. Moisten the shrimp mixture with just enough of the mayonnaise to combine, then stir in one tablespoon of fresh tarragon if desired. Pull open the top of a cooked whole artichoke, then spoon out the spiky choke. Fill with shrimp salad - or alternatively, core a whole medium tomato and fill with shrimp salad. Serve over lettuce. CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD IN BUTTER LETTUCE Mix together four cups chopped cooked chicken breast, one-quarter cup minced green onion, one half teaspoon grated fresh ginger, one-half cup white raisins, one-half cup slivered almonds and one-half cup finely chopped celery. Mix together one-half cup mayonnaise, two teaspoons lemon juice, one teaspoon curry powder or more to taste, S&P - add just

enough of the mayonnaise mixture to combine. Scoop about a one-half cup serving into butter lettuce leaves. Serve with grilled bread, drizzled with curry oil. RIBEYE STEAK SALAD Grill a boneless ribeye to medium-rare. Season with salt and pepper and let rest about 5 to 10 minutes before thinly slicing over the following salad mixture: sliced romaine and red leaf lettuce, cooked haricots vert, halved cherry tomatoes, cooled roasted herbed potato wedges, diced sweet red pepper and one tablespoon coarsely chopped cilantro leaves - drizzle with a balsamic vinaigrette, then layer the sliced ribeye over the salad. FRESH HERB OILS Use these oils to give your foods a burst of fresh flavor - for instance, drizzle curried oil on flatbread and grill, then serve with the curried chicken salad. Drizzle cilantro oil atop the ribeye salad. If you use a bouquet garni, a traditional French aromatic flavoring of fresh herbs for stocks and stews , try a bouquet garni oil over grilled chicken or lamb. Fresh herbs de Provence are used frequently, tied together to flavor Southern French cooking - use the oil to flavor grilled duck or other game. These keep well in the refrigerator for a week or so. To make the fresh herb oils: Puree four ounces of herbs with onequarter cup water. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat and macerate for one to two hours. Strain and mix with onethird cup canola or other unflavored vegetable oil. Store in refrigerator and shake before drizzling on or around salads, breads or meat. CILANTRO OIL - use fresh cilantro and stems and prepare as above CURRY OIL - mix two teaspoons curry powder with one-half cup canola oil. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for a day, shaking occasionally. Pour into another clean container and store in refrigerator. BOUQUET GARNI - grind together parsley and stems, thyme leaves, a bay leaf, tarragon and rosemary leaves and prepare as a fresh herb oil HERBS DE PROVENCE - grind together thyme and savory leaves, marjoram and oregano leaves and prepare as a fresh herb oil

Vanessa has recipes for every season.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

13


Season’s Bounty

Curitiba unique coffee house & art cafe

Summer Suppers

By M.L. Powers

By vanessa moncure

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Once again, I had the pleasure of sitting down with two of the newest shop owners in Fredericksburg, Frank and Ana Robinson. So many cafes have come and gone, but this one is a keeper. Nestled in a prime location at 919 Caroline St., close to the William St. intersection, it is a prime target on the walking street. Though the city is getting to look a little like Europe with a coffee shop on every corner, Curitiba Art Café adds a different flare to the coffee scene. Joining the evergrowing art community, their intention is to showcase blooming artists and musicians along with great food and drink in more of a bistro atmosphere. The coffee recipe is a blend of primarily Brazilian beans created by Ana which she has named Blue Raven which is also the logo of the cafe. The name comes from a protected bird species (gralha–azul,) indigenous to Curitiba, the capital of the Brazilian state of Panana. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge of coffee, espresso, and the fine art of drinking them. The cafe also is serving a unique beverage called Nitrobeer, an infusion of nitrogen into beer. It will interesting to try that one! Frank has lived in Fredericksburg most of his life, though he has travelled extensively. He is an architect by trade, so the overhaul of the building was right up his alley. Ana is the newcomer. She met Frank 13 years ago when he was traveling to her home town in Southern Brazil. They married three years ago, and Ana agreed to move to the States. This was not an easy decision, which you can tell when you hear her talk about her home. She spoke to me of the beauty of her country, the food, and the people, all of which she would like to share with her guests.

12

July 2018

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

The cafe has a rustic feel, with interesting wood furniture throughout. Much of the furniture is handmade from a blend of hard Brazilian wood that had been reclaimed from demolition of old farmhouses. Much of this furniture is for sale. In the back area as they cleared the drywall, they uncovered an entire room, whose markings on the brick wall date back to the 1700s, where it was identified as slave quarters. Frank said there is a lot of history in these old buildings. The back room is where they will have music, and have already booked a few new local musicians. There is a piano situated in the back, ready for any pianist feeling the urge. Outside, there is a patio where your furry friends are welcome to take a break and enjoy a little fresh air. Ana said that her hope is for the cafe to become an oasis where people will come to relax, eat and share their talents. Be sure to like them on Facebook after you visit. The Front Porch wishes the Curitiba Art Café great success in their new business. ML Powers keeps us up-to-date on all that is new in FXBG Curtiiba Art Cafe 919 Caroline St Also See “What’s in a Wall”, pg. 19

Front porch fredericksburg

Celebration Saturday July 14th 6-1 10 PM Market Square Downtown

Spring just couldn’t seem to follow winter then segue into summer this year - how about those several 80-degree days in February? Followed by a chilly March and three snowstorms in April? I could tell by the thick strings of pollen hanging off the house, trees and car, and seasonal sneezing, with scratchy eyes and throat that we were having sure signs of spring - but where were the annual washing rains and cool spring nights? Fortunately, the spring frog peepers finally made themselves known - and though the early garden lettuces bolted too early because of the heat and humidity, we’re definitely on track for a long hot summer (check the Almanac!). Our summer season officially begins when the grills, picnic tables and Slip and Slides make their big box store appearances - and our cooking thoughts turn from oven roasting, soups and stews

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Live Music, Authentic French Street Food, French Wines , Craft Beers Free Family Fair.....Vive La France! Presented by Fredericksburg Sister City Association

Front Porch Fredericksburg

to outdoor charcoal-broiled steaks, burgers ‘n dogs and fragrant dryrubbed pork ribs. Many days I prep the food we’ll be eating for dinner before I finish cleaning up the breakfast dishes as it seems easier to pull meats, salads and vegetable fixings from the refrigerator rather than starting all over with another meal in the evening sometimes I may stop at the grocery store for a rotisserie chicken or have a pound of shrimp steamed at the fresh seafood counter as the base for a summer supper. My backyard herb garden is a treasure of flavors that I use to make flavored oils - stored in plastic condiment bottles in the refrigerator, they add a concentrated dash of flavor to your foods. And have some fun with your zucchini and yellow squash this year with a vegetable spiralizer - these flavored oils along with some minced fresh herbs make a delicious side dish! Enjoy some quick summer supper ideas! Use any of the herb oils on pocketless pita bread or lavash drizzle with the oil, then heat on the outdoor grill until lightly toasted. SHRIMP SALAD IN ARTICHOKES OR TOMATOES Cook, peel and devein one pound of sweet Gulf shrimp, then coarsely chop. Stir together one-half cup minced celery, one-quarter cup minced green onion and two teaspoons of capers with the shrimp. Mix together one cup mayonnaise, three tablespoons of dijon mustard, one-quarter cup of ketchup and one tablespoon of lemon juice, S&P and hot sauce to taste. Moisten the shrimp mixture with just enough of the mayonnaise to combine, then stir in one tablespoon of fresh tarragon if desired. Pull open the top of a cooked whole artichoke, then spoon out the spiky choke. Fill with shrimp salad - or alternatively, core a whole medium tomato and fill with shrimp salad. Serve over lettuce. CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD IN BUTTER LETTUCE Mix together four cups chopped cooked chicken breast, one-quarter cup minced green onion, one half teaspoon grated fresh ginger, one-half cup white raisins, one-half cup slivered almonds and one-half cup finely chopped celery. Mix together one-half cup mayonnaise, two teaspoons lemon juice, one teaspoon curry powder or more to taste, S&P - add just

enough of the mayonnaise mixture to combine. Scoop about a one-half cup serving into butter lettuce leaves. Serve with grilled bread, drizzled with curry oil. RIBEYE STEAK SALAD Grill a boneless ribeye to medium-rare. Season with salt and pepper and let rest about 5 to 10 minutes before thinly slicing over the following salad mixture: sliced romaine and red leaf lettuce, cooked haricots vert, halved cherry tomatoes, cooled roasted herbed potato wedges, diced sweet red pepper and one tablespoon coarsely chopped cilantro leaves - drizzle with a balsamic vinaigrette, then layer the sliced ribeye over the salad. FRESH HERB OILS Use these oils to give your foods a burst of fresh flavor - for instance, drizzle curried oil on flatbread and grill, then serve with the curried chicken salad. Drizzle cilantro oil atop the ribeye salad. If you use a bouquet garni, a traditional French aromatic flavoring of fresh herbs for stocks and stews , try a bouquet garni oil over grilled chicken or lamb. Fresh herbs de Provence are used frequently, tied together to flavor Southern French cooking - use the oil to flavor grilled duck or other game. These keep well in the refrigerator for a week or so. To make the fresh herb oils: Puree four ounces of herbs with onequarter cup water. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat and macerate for one to two hours. Strain and mix with onethird cup canola or other unflavored vegetable oil. Store in refrigerator and shake before drizzling on or around salads, breads or meat. CILANTRO OIL - use fresh cilantro and stems and prepare as above CURRY OIL - mix two teaspoons curry powder with one-half cup canola oil. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for a day, shaking occasionally. Pour into another clean container and store in refrigerator. BOUQUET GARNI - grind together parsley and stems, thyme leaves, a bay leaf, tarragon and rosemary leaves and prepare as a fresh herb oil HERBS DE PROVENCE - grind together thyme and savory leaves, marjoram and oregano leaves and prepare as a fresh herb oil

Vanessa has recipes for every season.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

13


SpiritS

Polishing a Gem

Double Gold

Kenmore Inn by Lori Izykowski

kristie wooldridge When you live in a town with as much history as Fredericksburg, it’s easy to get complacent about some of the gems in our midst. Other than Thursday night music and a local wedding reception (shout out to Mary and Stuart!), I have not spent any time in the Kenmore Inn main building and

At this year's San Francisco World Spirits Competition, John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Citrus Supreme Flavored Gin, both from A. Smith Bowman Distillery, won the highest honor, a double gold medal. In total, A. Smith Bowman received five medals from the competition. This year, 48 spirits experts convened to judge a record breaking entry of more than 2,469 spirits from all over the world. John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Citrus Supreme Flavored Gin were judged as some of the finest products in the world. The double gold medal is given only if every judge awards a gold medal to the product and only few entries receive it. Other A. Smith Bowman spirits that were recognized include Bowman Brothers Small Batch Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Sweet Spice Flavored Gin which were awarded silver, and Tinkerman's Curiously Bright & Complex Flavored Gin, which received bronze. This competition is associated with the Triple Crown of Competitions (The San Francisco International Wine Competition and New York World Wine and Spirits Competition), and continues to be highly respected and the most influential spirits competition after 18 years. The SFWSC is judged by a panel of the spirit industry's most renowned judges including award-winning authors, buyers, journalists, educators and bar owners, who rate each spirit based off a blind taste test. Results from the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition can

14

July 2018

be found http://sfspiritscomp.com/results/.

formerly a storage room. This room runs the length of the back of the building on the main level and can accommodate 120 seated or 250 cocktail styles. It is perfect for any intimate celebration…. rehearsal dinners, anniversaries or birthdays, graduation gatherings, and was recently used for a CD release party. The main

at

About A. Smith Bowman A. Smith Bowman's distilling roots date back to the years before Prohibition when the Bowman family had a granary and dairy farm in Sunset Hills, Virginia. They used excess grain from the family estate to distill spirits. In 1934, after the Repeal of Prohibition, Abram Smith Bowman and his sons continued the family tradition and built a more modern distillery in Fairfax County, Virginia called Sunset Hills Farm. The Distillery was moved in 1988 and is now nestled in Spotsylvania County near the city of Fredericksburg, 60 miles away from the original location. As a small and privately owned company, A. Smith Bowman Distillery continues the time-honored traditions on which it was founded. Considered a microdistillery by by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of handcrafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. This micro-distillery focuses on the production of premium spirits honoring the legacy of Virginia's first settlers. Its various brands have won more than 100 awards in the past five years, including “World’s Best Bourbon” in 2016 for its Abraham Bowman Port Finished Bourbon and again in 2017 for its John J. Bowman Single Barrel at the World Whisky Awards. For more information on A. Smith Bowman, please visit www.asmithbowman.com or tgo to distillery at 1 Bowman Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22408 Kristie Wooldridge is the Public Relations Director for A.Smith Bowman Distillery

Front porch fredericksburg

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

have never seen the rooms upstairs. That all changed recently, when met up with Olivia Sanderson, who handles Event Sales for the Inn. As we enjoyed a fantastic brunch, Olivia gave me the history of the building, which was once owned by the father of Fielding Lewis, who was married to Betty Washington, George’s only sister. It survived the Battle of Fredericksburg, housed the horses of officers, and served as a hospital for the wounded. After brunch, I was treated to a tour of the entire building while Olivia talked about the various updates that have and are taking place, as well as the ideas she has percolating for engaging the community more at the facility. Since Rob Alling purchased the property in 2001, he has been busy revitalizing the space. The most significant change is the recently completed Fielding Lewis Ballroom,

level also includes the formal dining room, Audubon Gallery (a small event space that was about to be overtaken by a tea party for a young birthday girl), office space, and my favorite, the Mark Twain Library, with its dark wood, deep comfortable seating, and packed bookshelves.

On the upper level are nine guest rooms, including one suite, three luxury, two deluxe, and three standard. Many have been updated with new linens, drapes, and carpet, and all are historically named and have a relevant theme. All are elegantly appointed and designed for luxurious comfort. Many a bridal party has graced these rooms. My tour ended on the garden level, with its full bar, restaurant, and sunken patio garden. The recent renovations in the dining room have given it a more open, airy feeling. The walls are now a simple, soothing gray and the televisions are gone, making it a perfect venue for an art opening. Olivia, a senior at University of Mary Washington working on an historic preservation degree, exhibits a real passion for the inn. “I hear from quite a few people that they consider the Kenmore Inn a hidden gem in Fredericksburg, but I believe it’s becoming the place found by those seeking good company, great food, and a place to call home-away-fromhome. The Kenmore Inn is truly where history meets hospitality.” She is hoping to bring the local community into the inn more often, with events such as art openings, wine and ghost lock-ins (yes, it’s haunted) and more. Finally, Olivia took me into the kitchen to meet Anne Johnson (above), the current executive chef who served as sous chef under Jackie Hartman until Jackie departed for a new venture. Anne’s approach is simple: she loves food and wants to provide Kenmore’s guests with food that they will love. “I grew up with wonderful home cooks. Between both my

parents, my aunt, and my grandmas I was spoiled growing up. Mom’s fried chicken and mashed potatoes are still the best I've ever had. Her fried chicken and mashed potatoes is what inspired me to learn more of her favorites. From there my interest in cooking food just sky rocketed. I love seeing what we have available and creating a dish solely based on what we have on deck. When I think of my culinary drive I think of locally based produce/proteins and combining them with everyone's southern favorites and adding my own twist. My goal is to make Kenmore Inn your favorite neighborhood hang-out spot, somewhere you can come to eat good ole southern cooking!” So, if you haven’t visited The Kenmore Inn lately, I encourage you to do so. Check out brunch on a Sunday, enjoy a romantic weekend getaway without the drive, stop in during the week for happy hour in the tavern Tuesday through Saturday, and maybe stick around for dinner, and music on Thursday evenings. Plan a special event in the Audubon or Fielding Lewis room. As guest services associate Biz Fraser says, "Not only is Kenmore Inn the oldest running inn in Fredericksburg, it is one of the most unique properties. It's a one-stop-shop for all of your social and special occasion needs in this historic city.” And when you do stop by, tell the folks at Kenmore Inn you read about them in the Front Porch! \

Lori lives in Chatham, just a stone’s throw across the river from Fredericksburg. She has enjoyed watching the revitalization of Fredericksburg, with its new and renewed businesses and restaurants.

Become a Member

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

540-373-8300 h www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

15


SpiritS

Polishing a Gem

Double Gold

Kenmore Inn by Lori Izykowski

kristie wooldridge When you live in a town with as much history as Fredericksburg, it’s easy to get complacent about some of the gems in our midst. Other than Thursday night music and a local wedding reception (shout out to Mary and Stuart!), I have not spent any time in the Kenmore Inn main building and

At this year's San Francisco World Spirits Competition, John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Citrus Supreme Flavored Gin, both from A. Smith Bowman Distillery, won the highest honor, a double gold medal. In total, A. Smith Bowman received five medals from the competition. This year, 48 spirits experts convened to judge a record breaking entry of more than 2,469 spirits from all over the world. John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Citrus Supreme Flavored Gin were judged as some of the finest products in the world. The double gold medal is given only if every judge awards a gold medal to the product and only few entries receive it. Other A. Smith Bowman spirits that were recognized include Bowman Brothers Small Batch Virginia Straight Bourbon and Tinkerman's Sweet Spice Flavored Gin which were awarded silver, and Tinkerman's Curiously Bright & Complex Flavored Gin, which received bronze. This competition is associated with the Triple Crown of Competitions (The San Francisco International Wine Competition and New York World Wine and Spirits Competition), and continues to be highly respected and the most influential spirits competition after 18 years. The SFWSC is judged by a panel of the spirit industry's most renowned judges including award-winning authors, buyers, journalists, educators and bar owners, who rate each spirit based off a blind taste test. Results from the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition can

14

July 2018

be found http://sfspiritscomp.com/results/.

formerly a storage room. This room runs the length of the back of the building on the main level and can accommodate 120 seated or 250 cocktail styles. It is perfect for any intimate celebration…. rehearsal dinners, anniversaries or birthdays, graduation gatherings, and was recently used for a CD release party. The main

at

About A. Smith Bowman A. Smith Bowman's distilling roots date back to the years before Prohibition when the Bowman family had a granary and dairy farm in Sunset Hills, Virginia. They used excess grain from the family estate to distill spirits. In 1934, after the Repeal of Prohibition, Abram Smith Bowman and his sons continued the family tradition and built a more modern distillery in Fairfax County, Virginia called Sunset Hills Farm. The Distillery was moved in 1988 and is now nestled in Spotsylvania County near the city of Fredericksburg, 60 miles away from the original location. As a small and privately owned company, A. Smith Bowman Distillery continues the time-honored traditions on which it was founded. Considered a microdistillery by by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of handcrafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. This micro-distillery focuses on the production of premium spirits honoring the legacy of Virginia's first settlers. Its various brands have won more than 100 awards in the past five years, including “World’s Best Bourbon” in 2016 for its Abraham Bowman Port Finished Bourbon and again in 2017 for its John J. Bowman Single Barrel at the World Whisky Awards. For more information on A. Smith Bowman, please visit www.asmithbowman.com or tgo to distillery at 1 Bowman Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22408 Kristie Wooldridge is the Public Relations Director for A.Smith Bowman Distillery

Front porch fredericksburg

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

have never seen the rooms upstairs. That all changed recently, when met up with Olivia Sanderson, who handles Event Sales for the Inn. As we enjoyed a fantastic brunch, Olivia gave me the history of the building, which was once owned by the father of Fielding Lewis, who was married to Betty Washington, George’s only sister. It survived the Battle of Fredericksburg, housed the horses of officers, and served as a hospital for the wounded. After brunch, I was treated to a tour of the entire building while Olivia talked about the various updates that have and are taking place, as well as the ideas she has percolating for engaging the community more at the facility. Since Rob Alling purchased the property in 2001, he has been busy revitalizing the space. The most significant change is the recently completed Fielding Lewis Ballroom,

level also includes the formal dining room, Audubon Gallery (a small event space that was about to be overtaken by a tea party for a young birthday girl), office space, and my favorite, the Mark Twain Library, with its dark wood, deep comfortable seating, and packed bookshelves.

On the upper level are nine guest rooms, including one suite, three luxury, two deluxe, and three standard. Many have been updated with new linens, drapes, and carpet, and all are historically named and have a relevant theme. All are elegantly appointed and designed for luxurious comfort. Many a bridal party has graced these rooms. My tour ended on the garden level, with its full bar, restaurant, and sunken patio garden. The recent renovations in the dining room have given it a more open, airy feeling. The walls are now a simple, soothing gray and the televisions are gone, making it a perfect venue for an art opening. Olivia, a senior at University of Mary Washington working on an historic preservation degree, exhibits a real passion for the inn. “I hear from quite a few people that they consider the Kenmore Inn a hidden gem in Fredericksburg, but I believe it’s becoming the place found by those seeking good company, great food, and a place to call home-away-fromhome. The Kenmore Inn is truly where history meets hospitality.” She is hoping to bring the local community into the inn more often, with events such as art openings, wine and ghost lock-ins (yes, it’s haunted) and more. Finally, Olivia took me into the kitchen to meet Anne Johnson (above), the current executive chef who served as sous chef under Jackie Hartman until Jackie departed for a new venture. Anne’s approach is simple: she loves food and wants to provide Kenmore’s guests with food that they will love. “I grew up with wonderful home cooks. Between both my

parents, my aunt, and my grandmas I was spoiled growing up. Mom’s fried chicken and mashed potatoes are still the best I've ever had. Her fried chicken and mashed potatoes is what inspired me to learn more of her favorites. From there my interest in cooking food just sky rocketed. I love seeing what we have available and creating a dish solely based on what we have on deck. When I think of my culinary drive I think of locally based produce/proteins and combining them with everyone's southern favorites and adding my own twist. My goal is to make Kenmore Inn your favorite neighborhood hang-out spot, somewhere you can come to eat good ole southern cooking!” So, if you haven’t visited The Kenmore Inn lately, I encourage you to do so. Check out brunch on a Sunday, enjoy a romantic weekend getaway without the drive, stop in during the week for happy hour in the tavern Tuesday through Saturday, and maybe stick around for dinner, and music on Thursday evenings. Plan a special event in the Audubon or Fielding Lewis room. As guest services associate Biz Fraser says, "Not only is Kenmore Inn the oldest running inn in Fredericksburg, it is one of the most unique properties. It's a one-stop-shop for all of your social and special occasion needs in this historic city.” And when you do stop by, tell the folks at Kenmore Inn you read about them in the Front Porch! \

Lori lives in Chatham, just a stone’s throw across the river from Fredericksburg. She has enjoyed watching the revitalization of Fredericksburg, with its new and renewed businesses and restaurants.

Become a Member

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

540-373-8300 h www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

15


CALENDAR of events

july 2018… “Democracy requires active participation...” ~ Daniel Suarez Sunday, July 1

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 2

Mindful Eating @ Fredericksburg Branch Library, 6-7:03p. Presented by FXBG Food Co-Op Program includes an update on the Fredericksburg Food Coop and a tasting salad bar with local produce. fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

Wednesday, July 4

FXBG Heritage Festival, downtown, festival on the street, Craft Show with many great artists along Sophia Street! Classic Car Display.,Children’s Activities: face painting, moon bounce, photo booth, gyroscope ride and Misfit Acres Petting Zoo. , Music10a-4p 4th of July @Ferry Farm, 10a-5p, Celebrate Independence Day at George Washington’s boyhood home! Tour the Washington house, learn about archaeology at Ferry Farm, enjoy a patriotic flag retirement ceremony, interact with colonial and Civil War reenactors as well as members of the Patawomeck tribe, listen to festive music, view living history demonstrations and theatre performances, and participate in educational programs, crafts, games, and hands-on activities for the whole family. Fireworks & Music @ John Lee Pratt Memorial Park, 120 River Rd, Falmouth, starting at 4:30p, fireworks start at 9:30p

Thursday, July 5

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

First Friday, July 6

Fredericksburg Celebrates "Johnny P. Johnson Day", beloved iconic artist, educator, & humanitarian" local galleries and the Fredericksburg Area Museum will feature special exhibits Johnny Johnson's paintings. Exhibits will also be available for viewing throughout the weekend. Brushstrokes Gallery, opening reception 6-9p "Dreamscapes", by Karen Julihn, 824 Caroline St. Also on display the tribute to Johnny Johnson, 824 Carolie St FCCA "Power of Red" National Exhibit, Members Gallery Jim Hazzard & Breanna Thompson, opening reception, 6-9p, 813 Sophia St Spirit of the 4th - All Member Show @ Artful Dimensions Gallery, 922 Caroline St Nike Volleyball Camp at the University of Mary Washington, programs for everyone from beginners to club and high school level players, our summer camp in Virginia is fun and informative. Fredericksburg Community Concert Band's 2nd Summer Concert - Visions of America @ Fredericksburg Area Museum in Market Square, 78:30p. FREE

Saturday, July 7

Fredericksburg Celebrates Johnny P. Johnson Day" @ Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site), 10a, info contact The Arts and cultural Council of the Rappahannock Karen Jonas, live music @LaPetite Auberge, 8-10p, 311 Willaim St Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction with the Farmers Market. Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park, 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission, be sure to stop by on your way through the farmers market

Sunday, July 8

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 9

Acoustic Onion, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater. NERD NITE FXB @ Curitiba Art Cafe

Tuesday, July 10

Fredericksburg Photography Club welcomes new members. 7:00 pm, Dorothy Hart Center

ArtAliance at Thor Fine Arts will hold a grand opening reception during Colonial Beach's 2nd Friday Art Walk on July 13th, from 6-9 pm. Swamp Trash, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir , 6600 River Rd, Come hook your bait and cast your line to catch catfish in the Reservoir. Private boats will be allowed on the water only if they meet proper VDGIF standards for night fishing but all boats must be off the water by 12:30am.

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Saturday, July 14

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Wedneday, July 11

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Bastille Day Celebration, 6-10pm, Market Square. Live music, authentic French stret food, French wines, craft beers. Free family fun event.

Thursday, July 19

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Friday, July 20

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforing Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor Exciting dance & theate performances, 7:30p

Whiskey Revival, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids

Ted Nugent @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, 7p

Saturday, July 21

Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction with the Farmers Market. Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park, 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission, be sure to stop by on your way through the farmers market

Thursday, July 12

Sunday, July15

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforming Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor , fun matinee performance, 3:30p

Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Monday, July 16

Brett Eldredge @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours,

Wednesday, July 18

Federal Tavern Night at the Rising Sun Tavern, 1304 Caroline St, Taste some of the beverages 18th century tavern guests would have imbibed, and learn more about the origins of "treating" your fellows. With 18th century hosts, this is an event you won't want to miss. Admission 21+. $

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforing Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor .Performances by local poets, dancers & theatre artists, 7:30pm

Friday, July 13

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforming Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Fl Best of the Best Students from local high schools, dance studios & performing orgs. 7:30p

Don Brown's Soul Experience, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Sunday, July 22

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Nike Field Hockey Camp at the University of Mary Washington

Monday, July 23

Lafayette Station, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater Vacation Bible School, Resurrection Lutheran Church, 6170 Plank Rd, "Babylon: Daniel's Courage in Captivity", 5:30-8:15p, Program and dinner will be provided at no cost. There will be games, songs, Bible stories, crafts, and science fun! Middle and High Schoolers will assist the adult leaders. Everyone needs to register; you may register online or download the registration form at www.resurrectionpeople.org/VBS, fill it out, and either send it or e-mail it to the church office. Thru July 26 Camp Wilderness - VBS @ Wilderness Community Church, 6-8:30p.a fun filled week where the children are Shipwrecked! Each day at Shipwrecked VBS, kids travel through field-tested rotations that reinforce relevant Bible Points and immerse kids in new adventures. We provide snacks each night, crafts and lots of fun! To register your child(ren) visit tinyurl.com/CampWilderness2018 or call 540-972-8808.

Wednesday, July 25

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Thursday, July 26

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Friday, July 27

Transmitters, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir , 7p-1a Thunder Moon Paddle @ Fredericksburg City Dock, 7-10p Experience the magic of nightfall on the river Join FOR Volunteer Leader Michelle McGinley for this Friday night kayak float. We'll talk about river ecology, FOR's mission, and ways the river influenced local history.

Saturday, July 28

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Sunday, July 29

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 30

Kingbolts, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to

If you are reading this 252nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for August 2018 issue is July20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3284 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

17


CALENDAR of events

july 2018… “Democracy requires active participation...” ~ Daniel Suarez Sunday, July 1

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 2

Mindful Eating @ Fredericksburg Branch Library, 6-7:03p. Presented by FXBG Food Co-Op Program includes an update on the Fredericksburg Food Coop and a tasting salad bar with local produce. fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

Wednesday, July 4

FXBG Heritage Festival, downtown, festival on the street, Craft Show with many great artists along Sophia Street! Classic Car Display.,Children’s Activities: face painting, moon bounce, photo booth, gyroscope ride and Misfit Acres Petting Zoo. , Music10a-4p 4th of July @Ferry Farm, 10a-5p, Celebrate Independence Day at George Washington’s boyhood home! Tour the Washington house, learn about archaeology at Ferry Farm, enjoy a patriotic flag retirement ceremony, interact with colonial and Civil War reenactors as well as members of the Patawomeck tribe, listen to festive music, view living history demonstrations and theatre performances, and participate in educational programs, crafts, games, and hands-on activities for the whole family. Fireworks & Music @ John Lee Pratt Memorial Park, 120 River Rd, Falmouth, starting at 4:30p, fireworks start at 9:30p

Thursday, July 5

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

First Friday, July 6

Fredericksburg Celebrates "Johnny P. Johnson Day", beloved iconic artist, educator, & humanitarian" local galleries and the Fredericksburg Area Museum will feature special exhibits Johnny Johnson's paintings. Exhibits will also be available for viewing throughout the weekend. Brushstrokes Gallery, opening reception 6-9p "Dreamscapes", by Karen Julihn, 824 Caroline St. Also on display the tribute to Johnny Johnson, 824 Carolie St FCCA "Power of Red" National Exhibit, Members Gallery Jim Hazzard & Breanna Thompson, opening reception, 6-9p, 813 Sophia St Spirit of the 4th - All Member Show @ Artful Dimensions Gallery, 922 Caroline St Nike Volleyball Camp at the University of Mary Washington, programs for everyone from beginners to club and high school level players, our summer camp in Virginia is fun and informative. Fredericksburg Community Concert Band's 2nd Summer Concert - Visions of America @ Fredericksburg Area Museum in Market Square, 78:30p. FREE

Saturday, July 7

Fredericksburg Celebrates Johnny P. Johnson Day" @ Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site), 10a, info contact The Arts and cultural Council of the Rappahannock Karen Jonas, live music @LaPetite Auberge, 8-10p, 311 Willaim St Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction with the Farmers Market. Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park, 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission, be sure to stop by on your way through the farmers market

Sunday, July 8

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 9

Acoustic Onion, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater. NERD NITE FXB @ Curitiba Art Cafe

Tuesday, July 10

Fredericksburg Photography Club welcomes new members. 7:00 pm, Dorothy Hart Center

ArtAliance at Thor Fine Arts will hold a grand opening reception during Colonial Beach's 2nd Friday Art Walk on July 13th, from 6-9 pm. Swamp Trash, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir , 6600 River Rd, Come hook your bait and cast your line to catch catfish in the Reservoir. Private boats will be allowed on the water only if they meet proper VDGIF standards for night fishing but all boats must be off the water by 12:30am.

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Saturday, July 14

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Wedneday, July 11

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Bastille Day Celebration, 6-10pm, Market Square. Live music, authentic French stret food, French wines, craft beers. Free family fun event.

Thursday, July 19

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Friday, July 20

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforing Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor Exciting dance & theate performances, 7:30p

Whiskey Revival, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids

Ted Nugent @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, 7p

Saturday, July 21

Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction with the Farmers Market. Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park, 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission, be sure to stop by on your way through the farmers market

Thursday, July 12

Sunday, July15

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforming Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor , fun matinee performance, 3:30p

Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Monday, July 16

Brett Eldredge @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours,

Wednesday, July 18

Federal Tavern Night at the Rising Sun Tavern, 1304 Caroline St, Taste some of the beverages 18th century tavern guests would have imbibed, and learn more about the origins of "treating" your fellows. With 18th century hosts, this is an event you won't want to miss. Admission 21+. $

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforing Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor .Performances by local poets, dancers & theatre artists, 7:30pm

Friday, July 13

Performing Arts Festival, "Where the Peforming Arts Come to Play", Fred's Theatre, 810 Caroline St, 4th Fl Best of the Best Students from local high schools, dance studios & performing orgs. 7:30p

Don Brown's Soul Experience, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Sunday, July 22

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Nike Field Hockey Camp at the University of Mary Washington

Monday, July 23

Lafayette Station, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to the theater Vacation Bible School, Resurrection Lutheran Church, 6170 Plank Rd, "Babylon: Daniel's Courage in Captivity", 5:30-8:15p, Program and dinner will be provided at no cost. There will be games, songs, Bible stories, crafts, and science fun! Middle and High Schoolers will assist the adult leaders. Everyone needs to register; you may register online or download the registration form at www.resurrectionpeople.org/VBS, fill it out, and either send it or e-mail it to the church office. Thru July 26 Camp Wilderness - VBS @ Wilderness Community Church, 6-8:30p.a fun filled week where the children are Shipwrecked! Each day at Shipwrecked VBS, kids travel through field-tested rotations that reinforce relevant Bible Points and immerse kids in new adventures. We provide snacks each night, crafts and lots of fun! To register your child(ren) visit tinyurl.com/CampWilderness2018 or call 540-972-8808.

Wednesday, July 25

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Thursday, July 26

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

Friday, July 27

Transmitters, The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir , 7p-1a Thunder Moon Paddle @ Fredericksburg City Dock, 7-10p Experience the magic of nightfall on the river Join FOR Volunteer Leader Michelle McGinley for this Friday night kayak float. We'll talk about river ecology, FOR's mission, and ways the river influenced local history.

Saturday, July 28

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park

Sunday, July 29

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table

Monday, July 30

Kingbolts, Music on the Steps summer concert series, Downtown CRRL branch, 7pm, Lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. In case of inclement weather, concerts move inside to

If you are reading this 252nd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for August 2018 issue is July20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3284 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

17


history’s stories

JULY 4TH By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

Every child when I was growing up always looked forward to the July 4th holiday celebrations. It was not that we were excited about the celebration of the Declaration of Independence, but that we would be able to have “FIREWORKS”. I can still see those bright red Cherry Bombs and those silver TNT’s, and of course the usual Roman Candles, Fountains, Crawling Snakes, Sparklers and the Pin Wheels. Every 4th we started off the day on Caroline Street with the annual parade, that included the local National Guard along with the high school marching bands and with every political figure between here and Washington in attendance. I was always with my Grandfather Withers a WWI veteran who saw action in France at the Meuse. Back in those days we had many local heroes from Korea and WWII, men such as Battle Sale, Lem Houston, Wally Mann, Wadell Farmer, Lewis Ball and many others all now deceased that we admired. There are still several veterans many in their 90’s in the local area Bill Sale a local merchant and Jimmy Farmer of Bowling Green are two gentlemen well respected in the community and we thank them for their service along with all veterans from past and ongoing conflicts. Today the celebrations are not as localized but more on a national scale with major events in Washington or New York. We still have our local celebration of fireworks and people still get together too have a cook out. July 4, 1776 was not the day the continental Congress decided to declare independence, it was July 2, 1776. It was not the start of the Revolution either, that was in April 1775. Some say it was the day Jefferson wrote the draft, no that was in June 1776. It was not the date the Declaration was signed, that was August 2, 1776. So, what did happen on July 4, 1776? The Continental Congress approved the wording and finally agreed too all the edits and changes. July 4th, 1776 became the date that was included on the official handwritten copy and was signed in August. It was the printed and circulated throughout the new nation, so all citizens thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date always remembered. For the first twenty years people did not celebrate the date. With the deaths of both Jefferson and Adams just hours apart on July 4, 1826, Americans began too celebrating the holiday and it become more common and it was not until 1939 that it became a National Holiday.

Have a safe and happy 4 th.

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF: MARGARET SACRA, RANDY HART, DUVAL SULLIVAN, LARRY VIDA AND RONNIE WALLACE

Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

What’s in a Wall?

home with a view

919 Caroline Street

By Barbara Anderson

By jon gerlach

Surely there’s no better view of the Rappahannock River with Chatham Manor as its backdrop than from the home at 1305 Sophia Street. If you step out onto the porch, you also see the Civil War pontoon landing site. The home was built by Hargas Dillon in 1929. Henry McGee bought it in 1936 and used it as a rental property. According to the 1940 census, it was rented by Clarence Kratt, a relief watchman at a clothing manufacturer. He lived there with his wife, daughter, grandson, and two lodgers. The next year, Henry rented it to his son William, who started a family and lived there more than 20 years. The oldest part of the house includes the front parlor, sun porch, kitchen, three bedrooms, and one bathroom. William added two bedrooms, a bathroom, a full basement, and full attic space. The house was sold in 1962 for $15,500 to Elizabeth Robbins, who ran Blue China Antique Shop at 1004 Sophia Street. In 1972, Jimmy Jarrell, Jr., bought it and took the lead on a major expansion. He added on extensively to the house in the 1980s, including an elevator that goes to all five levels and an apartment for a caretaker. After Jimmy’s death in 2012, ownership passed to his son, James Jarrell III, who now rents out the house. This house has always had a pool. The original pool was much closer to the river when the river bank was further out. Since then, the banks have shifted as a result of natural erosion. William McGee built the swimming pool by himself for his family. He started with a small rectangle about 3 feet deep. Later, he continued to dig and built a 5-foot deep pool. The Jarrells installed the in-ground Anderson pool in the 1970s. In many ways, the history of the house is the history of Fredericksburg’s

floods. Plaques have been placed on the house to indicate how high the river rose during the floods. In April 1937, the Rappahannock crested at 39 feet. This was the highest level since the Johnstown flood of 1889. Then, only 5 years later in October 1942, the river crested at 43 feet with water covered Caroline Street in some areas. In August 1955, the river crested at 27 feet. Hurricane Agnes in 1972 saw the river crest at 39 feet, and with Hurricane Fran in 1996, it reached 27 feet. The most recent flood this year caused the river to peak at only 19 feet. As caretaker of the home, Nancy Gasparovic opened the residence to members of the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI) on June 17, 2018. Guests enjoyed a private tour where they walked through the entire home while hearing history from current and past residents, as well as HFFI docents. The day ended with an unplanned, but majestic, sighting of a bald eagle flying overhead. .

When you step inside Curitiba Art Café at 919 Caroline Street, you enter another world, filled with the inviting fragrance of Brazilian coffee and an air of warm hospitality. Owners Ana and Frank Robinson created the Café/Bistro to emphasize the arts, generating smiling faces and a following of familiar and frequent clients. The place has a special feel, beyond the reclaimed wood furniture, original tin ceiling panels, heartwood floors and local artwork. It has something to do with the walls themselves. According to Dr. Gary Stanton, past Chair of the UMW Department of Historic Preservation, two structures originally occupied this site: a main building and its dependency. Judging from architectural details, the back room of

Curitiba Art Café today connected to the front part of the business by a passageway was originally a s t a n d a l o n e building dating to the late 1700s. Many city lots in that era had a separate kitchen, or dependency, typically occupied by slaves, located in the back yard. Today only a handful of slave quarters survive in Fredericksburg. This is one of them. While tearing down drywall and sledge-hammering through cinder blocks during renovation, Frank Robinson and Joe Wilson uncovered a magnificent brick fireplace. Hidden for many years behind a wall in the back room, this was the smoking gun marking the site as a slave quarters. Topped by a massive wood beam, the fireplace interior is large enough to comfortably accommodate café Manager Bryan Raymond (above, standing over 6 feet tall). Here, meals were prepared by slaves who probably lived upstairs.

Rounded corners of bricks edging the fireplace indicate where knifes were burnished to maintain a cutting edge. What happened to the main building? According to a fascinating map prepared by Chief Historian John Hennessy of the National Park Service, the building was destroyed by fire during the 1862 Battle of Fredericksburg, a victim of indiscriminate artillery shelling aimed at the heart of the city. Fortunately, much of the city survived. Today, slave quarters join other buildings in "making for one of the best-preserved and healthiest historic downtowns in the east", says Hennessy in the blog Mysteries & Conundrums. The main building served as the post office and residence of Rueben Thom (1782-1868). Thom and his family sought refuge in the basement during the bombardment, and escaped to the garden when the situation grew dire. Separated from the main building by just a few feet of open space, the slave quarters were somehow spared from the fire. Ironically, this separation was meant to save the main building in the event of a kitchen fire in the dependency. Exactly the opposite

happened here. Today, charred wood in the kitchen's front door frame testifies to lapping flames that brought down the main building. According to a letter from J.H. Wallace, Rueben Thom was seen afterwards "nestled among the ruins like a bird which having been hurled from his nest by a howling hurricane, again picks up the scattered straws which compose it." Like a phoenix, the front room of Curitiba Art Café is an interesting story in itself. Erected in 1870, the new building rose from the ashes of the 1862 fire. A series of businesses took up residence here: Feuerherds Bakery around the turn of the century, and later the Western Auto Store. Frank Robinson fondly remembers a sporting goods display on the south wall. At this very spot his father picked out Frank's first baseball glove (which he owns to this day). Sometimes history makes a full circle, as it does here. So … what's in a wall? If only walls could talk. An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. Photo by Jon Gerlach

This information was researched and compiled by Barbra Anderson (with assistance from HFFI volunteers) who is the HFFI Events Coordinator and a member of the Board of Directors.

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

19


history’s stories

JULY 4TH By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

Every child when I was growing up always looked forward to the July 4th holiday celebrations. It was not that we were excited about the celebration of the Declaration of Independence, but that we would be able to have “FIREWORKS”. I can still see those bright red Cherry Bombs and those silver TNT’s, and of course the usual Roman Candles, Fountains, Crawling Snakes, Sparklers and the Pin Wheels. Every 4th we started off the day on Caroline Street with the annual parade, that included the local National Guard along with the high school marching bands and with every political figure between here and Washington in attendance. I was always with my Grandfather Withers a WWI veteran who saw action in France at the Meuse. Back in those days we had many local heroes from Korea and WWII, men such as Battle Sale, Lem Houston, Wally Mann, Wadell Farmer, Lewis Ball and many others all now deceased that we admired. There are still several veterans many in their 90’s in the local area Bill Sale a local merchant and Jimmy Farmer of Bowling Green are two gentlemen well respected in the community and we thank them for their service along with all veterans from past and ongoing conflicts. Today the celebrations are not as localized but more on a national scale with major events in Washington or New York. We still have our local celebration of fireworks and people still get together too have a cook out. July 4, 1776 was not the day the continental Congress decided to declare independence, it was July 2, 1776. It was not the start of the Revolution either, that was in April 1775. Some say it was the day Jefferson wrote the draft, no that was in June 1776. It was not the date the Declaration was signed, that was August 2, 1776. So, what did happen on July 4, 1776? The Continental Congress approved the wording and finally agreed too all the edits and changes. July 4th, 1776 became the date that was included on the official handwritten copy and was signed in August. It was the printed and circulated throughout the new nation, so all citizens thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date always remembered. For the first twenty years people did not celebrate the date. With the deaths of both Jefferson and Adams just hours apart on July 4, 1826, Americans began too celebrating the holiday and it become more common and it was not until 1939 that it became a National Holiday.

Have a safe and happy 4 th.

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF: MARGARET SACRA, RANDY HART, DUVAL SULLIVAN, LARRY VIDA AND RONNIE WALLACE

Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

What’s in a Wall?

home with a view

919 Caroline Street

By Barbara Anderson

By jon gerlach

Surely there’s no better view of the Rappahannock River with Chatham Manor as its backdrop than from the home at 1305 Sophia Street. If you step out onto the porch, you also see the Civil War pontoon landing site. The home was built by Hargas Dillon in 1929. Henry McGee bought it in 1936 and used it as a rental property. According to the 1940 census, it was rented by Clarence Kratt, a relief watchman at a clothing manufacturer. He lived there with his wife, daughter, grandson, and two lodgers. The next year, Henry rented it to his son William, who started a family and lived there more than 20 years. The oldest part of the house includes the front parlor, sun porch, kitchen, three bedrooms, and one bathroom. William added two bedrooms, a bathroom, a full basement, and full attic space. The house was sold in 1962 for $15,500 to Elizabeth Robbins, who ran Blue China Antique Shop at 1004 Sophia Street. In 1972, Jimmy Jarrell, Jr., bought it and took the lead on a major expansion. He added on extensively to the house in the 1980s, including an elevator that goes to all five levels and an apartment for a caretaker. After Jimmy’s death in 2012, ownership passed to his son, James Jarrell III, who now rents out the house. This house has always had a pool. The original pool was much closer to the river when the river bank was further out. Since then, the banks have shifted as a result of natural erosion. William McGee built the swimming pool by himself for his family. He started with a small rectangle about 3 feet deep. Later, he continued to dig and built a 5-foot deep pool. The Jarrells installed the in-ground Anderson pool in the 1970s. In many ways, the history of the house is the history of Fredericksburg’s

floods. Plaques have been placed on the house to indicate how high the river rose during the floods. In April 1937, the Rappahannock crested at 39 feet. This was the highest level since the Johnstown flood of 1889. Then, only 5 years later in October 1942, the river crested at 43 feet with water covered Caroline Street in some areas. In August 1955, the river crested at 27 feet. Hurricane Agnes in 1972 saw the river crest at 39 feet, and with Hurricane Fran in 1996, it reached 27 feet. The most recent flood this year caused the river to peak at only 19 feet. As caretaker of the home, Nancy Gasparovic opened the residence to members of the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI) on June 17, 2018. Guests enjoyed a private tour where they walked through the entire home while hearing history from current and past residents, as well as HFFI docents. The day ended with an unplanned, but majestic, sighting of a bald eagle flying overhead. .

When you step inside Curitiba Art Café at 919 Caroline Street, you enter another world, filled with the inviting fragrance of Brazilian coffee and an air of warm hospitality. Owners Ana and Frank Robinson created the Café/Bistro to emphasize the arts, generating smiling faces and a following of familiar and frequent clients. The place has a special feel, beyond the reclaimed wood furniture, original tin ceiling panels, heartwood floors and local artwork. It has something to do with the walls themselves. According to Dr. Gary Stanton, past Chair of the UMW Department of Historic Preservation, two structures originally occupied this site: a main building and its dependency. Judging from architectural details, the back room of

Curitiba Art Café today connected to the front part of the business by a passageway was originally a s t a n d a l o n e building dating to the late 1700s. Many city lots in that era had a separate kitchen, or dependency, typically occupied by slaves, located in the back yard. Today only a handful of slave quarters survive in Fredericksburg. This is one of them. While tearing down drywall and sledge-hammering through cinder blocks during renovation, Frank Robinson and Joe Wilson uncovered a magnificent brick fireplace. Hidden for many years behind a wall in the back room, this was the smoking gun marking the site as a slave quarters. Topped by a massive wood beam, the fireplace interior is large enough to comfortably accommodate café Manager Bryan Raymond (above, standing over 6 feet tall). Here, meals were prepared by slaves who probably lived upstairs.

Rounded corners of bricks edging the fireplace indicate where knifes were burnished to maintain a cutting edge. What happened to the main building? According to a fascinating map prepared by Chief Historian John Hennessy of the National Park Service, the building was destroyed by fire during the 1862 Battle of Fredericksburg, a victim of indiscriminate artillery shelling aimed at the heart of the city. Fortunately, much of the city survived. Today, slave quarters join other buildings in "making for one of the best-preserved and healthiest historic downtowns in the east", says Hennessy in the blog Mysteries & Conundrums. The main building served as the post office and residence of Rueben Thom (1782-1868). Thom and his family sought refuge in the basement during the bombardment, and escaped to the garden when the situation grew dire. Separated from the main building by just a few feet of open space, the slave quarters were somehow spared from the fire. Ironically, this separation was meant to save the main building in the event of a kitchen fire in the dependency. Exactly the opposite

happened here. Today, charred wood in the kitchen's front door frame testifies to lapping flames that brought down the main building. According to a letter from J.H. Wallace, Rueben Thom was seen afterwards "nestled among the ruins like a bird which having been hurled from his nest by a howling hurricane, again picks up the scattered straws which compose it." Like a phoenix, the front room of Curitiba Art Café is an interesting story in itself. Erected in 1870, the new building rose from the ashes of the 1862 fire. A series of businesses took up residence here: Feuerherds Bakery around the turn of the century, and later the Western Auto Store. Frank Robinson fondly remembers a sporting goods display on the south wall. At this very spot his father picked out Frank's first baseball glove (which he owns to this day). Sometimes history makes a full circle, as it does here. So … what's in a wall? If only walls could talk. An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. Photo by Jon Gerlach

This information was researched and compiled by Barbra Anderson (with assistance from HFFI volunteers) who is the HFFI Events Coordinator and a member of the Board of Directors.

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

19


Senior Care seniors & sun By Karl Karch

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Many older Americans love to walk, garden, golf, and fish. Seniors can enjoy the activities that they’ve always loved to do outdoors, but they should take precautions. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, an estimated 90 percent of skin aging is caused by the sun, not aging as many people may believe. The sun’s rays have also been linked to dehydration and skin cancer. Older adults are at a higher risk for dehydration. The sense of thirst and the body’s ability to conserve water diminishes with age. Certain medical conditions and medications can affect fluid retention. Individuals with cognitive impairment may forget to take fluids. Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. In fact, more people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined. Fortunately, it is also the most preventable. July is UV Safety Month, so it’s a good time to consider protecting yourself. Be proactive in reducing your risk of skin cancer and other negative side effects of sun exposure. Seek shade whenever possible and wear protective clothing (long sleeves, long pants or skirts, tightly woven fabric, and a wide-brimmed hat). Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or greater to help protect against two types of the sun's rays (UV-A and UV-B) and reapply at least every two hours. Also, wear a lip balm with an SPF of 15 or higher. Skin cancer is rarely painful so it is important to check your skin once a month for new or changing skin growths, particularly those that look unusual. Look for changes such as a new growth, a sore that doesn't heal, or a bleeding mole. Follow the ABCDE rule when checking moles, birthmarks, or other parts of the skin. • A = Asymmetry (one half of the growth looks different from the other half)

20

July 2018

• B = Borders that are irregular • C = Color changes or more than one color • D = Diameter greater than the size of a pencil eraser • E = Evolving; this means the growth changes in size, shape, symptoms (itching, tenderness), surface (especially bleeding), or shades of color. See your doctor right away if you have any of these signs to make sure it is not skin cancer. As we age, we see an increase in age spots (once called liver spots) on our skin. These are flat, brown spots often caused by years in the sun. We also may see skin tags, those small, usually fleshcolored growths of skin that have a raised surface. They are harmless, so don’t be alarmed. Excessive, prolonged UV exposure may also be linked to the development of eye conditions such as cataracts and agerelated macular degeneration. Protect your eyes even when it’s gray and overcast. Wear a brimmed hat and the right kind of sunglasses. Sunglasses don’t have to be expensive to offer the right kind of UV protection. Even inexpensive glasses can protect your eyes if they offer 99 to 100 percent UV-A and UV-B protection. Check the UV index frequently. A great website that also gives recommended safety measures is www.epa.gov/sunwise/uvindex.html. ; Regardless of your physical condition and your love of the outdoors, remember a few simple precautions to avoid potentially serious problems. Remember to follow the ABCDE rule.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Life in Motion summertime, summer’s fine!

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired?

By Rich Gaudio PT

Despite our temperaturecontrolled world (cars, homes, schools, work, etc), it turns out, life continues to be shaped by the changing of our seasons here in the greater-Fredericksburg area. Currently, we are enjoying the high time of summer, but it was not all that long ago we were wondering when our gray, rainy spring was going to end and when things would begin to warm up again. Each season comes with it's own unique characteristics, traditions and challenges. Summer is no exception. Yes, there is plenty of fun, sun and beach days to be had during this season, but the extremes of temperature and exposure can bring unwanted and unexpected consequences. So, here are a few considerations and things to think about when it's just too darn hot! STAY HYDRATED The standard guideline is 6-8 cups of water each day for adults. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages dehydrate you and another rule of them is to consume another cup of water for every alcoholic and/or caffeinated beverage you consume. On days when you are out in the sun and active, you want to keep your hydration going throughout to replenish the water you are sweating out and using up. BE AWARE Whether it is a restful day at home or a fun-filled family vacation plan ahead. Check weather forecasts to give you some idea of pending conditions; if

you take medication, make sure your supply is adequate; dress appropriately for the conditions - lighter vs darker colors, lightweight hat, sunglasses, etc. PROTECT YOUR SKIN Sunscreen, shady areas, indoor venues and adequate clothing (hat, sunglasses) will protect your skin from burning…it is often the cooler, more breezy days that result in sunburn for most folks,"I just didn't feel how hot it was." MONITOR ACTIVITY and EXERCISE Extremes in weather are the more dangerous conditions for doing exercise and being active (yard projects, garden maintenance). It is vitally important, especially if you are not used to being active in hot weather to plan on extra hydration, long restbreaks in the shade or someplace cooler, and modify your usual routine until your consistent training allows you to build tolerance to the conditions. BE PROACTIVE Be familiar with warning signs of dehydration, heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat syncope (healthin aging.org has some great info on these signs). Know that children and older persons are most susceptible to heat-related illness. So, much like the instructions we get from an airline attendant when they go through their pre-flight safety instructions: take care of you first, make sure you are able to handle the heat. Check the kids, the older folks and anyone you know with physical or mental health issues including friends and neighbors. Often, heat-related issues arise before someone has a chance to ask for help. So in this case and ounce of prevention is truly worth a pound of cure! Please prepare, be aware and enjoy your summer…. "In the summertime when the weather is high you can stretch right up and touch the sky…go out and see what you can find…" In the Summertime, Mungo Jerry (1970).

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy.He can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100

Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

Donate to a Cancer Organization

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

21


Senior Care seniors & sun By Karl Karch

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Many older Americans love to walk, garden, golf, and fish. Seniors can enjoy the activities that they’ve always loved to do outdoors, but they should take precautions. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, an estimated 90 percent of skin aging is caused by the sun, not aging as many people may believe. The sun’s rays have also been linked to dehydration and skin cancer. Older adults are at a higher risk for dehydration. The sense of thirst and the body’s ability to conserve water diminishes with age. Certain medical conditions and medications can affect fluid retention. Individuals with cognitive impairment may forget to take fluids. Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. In fact, more people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined. Fortunately, it is also the most preventable. July is UV Safety Month, so it’s a good time to consider protecting yourself. Be proactive in reducing your risk of skin cancer and other negative side effects of sun exposure. Seek shade whenever possible and wear protective clothing (long sleeves, long pants or skirts, tightly woven fabric, and a wide-brimmed hat). Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or greater to help protect against two types of the sun's rays (UV-A and UV-B) and reapply at least every two hours. Also, wear a lip balm with an SPF of 15 or higher. Skin cancer is rarely painful so it is important to check your skin once a month for new or changing skin growths, particularly those that look unusual. Look for changes such as a new growth, a sore that doesn't heal, or a bleeding mole. Follow the ABCDE rule when checking moles, birthmarks, or other parts of the skin. • A = Asymmetry (one half of the growth looks different from the other half)

20

July 2018

• B = Borders that are irregular • C = Color changes or more than one color • D = Diameter greater than the size of a pencil eraser • E = Evolving; this means the growth changes in size, shape, symptoms (itching, tenderness), surface (especially bleeding), or shades of color. See your doctor right away if you have any of these signs to make sure it is not skin cancer. As we age, we see an increase in age spots (once called liver spots) on our skin. These are flat, brown spots often caused by years in the sun. We also may see skin tags, those small, usually fleshcolored growths of skin that have a raised surface. They are harmless, so don’t be alarmed. Excessive, prolonged UV exposure may also be linked to the development of eye conditions such as cataracts and agerelated macular degeneration. Protect your eyes even when it’s gray and overcast. Wear a brimmed hat and the right kind of sunglasses. Sunglasses don’t have to be expensive to offer the right kind of UV protection. Even inexpensive glasses can protect your eyes if they offer 99 to 100 percent UV-A and UV-B protection. Check the UV index frequently. A great website that also gives recommended safety measures is www.epa.gov/sunwise/uvindex.html. ; Regardless of your physical condition and your love of the outdoors, remember a few simple precautions to avoid potentially serious problems. Remember to follow the ABCDE rule.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Life in Motion summertime, summer’s fine!

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired?

By Rich Gaudio PT

Despite our temperaturecontrolled world (cars, homes, schools, work, etc), it turns out, life continues to be shaped by the changing of our seasons here in the greater-Fredericksburg area. Currently, we are enjoying the high time of summer, but it was not all that long ago we were wondering when our gray, rainy spring was going to end and when things would begin to warm up again. Each season comes with it's own unique characteristics, traditions and challenges. Summer is no exception. Yes, there is plenty of fun, sun and beach days to be had during this season, but the extremes of temperature and exposure can bring unwanted and unexpected consequences. So, here are a few considerations and things to think about when it's just too darn hot! STAY HYDRATED The standard guideline is 6-8 cups of water each day for adults. Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages dehydrate you and another rule of them is to consume another cup of water for every alcoholic and/or caffeinated beverage you consume. On days when you are out in the sun and active, you want to keep your hydration going throughout to replenish the water you are sweating out and using up. BE AWARE Whether it is a restful day at home or a fun-filled family vacation plan ahead. Check weather forecasts to give you some idea of pending conditions; if

you take medication, make sure your supply is adequate; dress appropriately for the conditions - lighter vs darker colors, lightweight hat, sunglasses, etc. PROTECT YOUR SKIN Sunscreen, shady areas, indoor venues and adequate clothing (hat, sunglasses) will protect your skin from burning…it is often the cooler, more breezy days that result in sunburn for most folks,"I just didn't feel how hot it was." MONITOR ACTIVITY and EXERCISE Extremes in weather are the more dangerous conditions for doing exercise and being active (yard projects, garden maintenance). It is vitally important, especially if you are not used to being active in hot weather to plan on extra hydration, long restbreaks in the shade or someplace cooler, and modify your usual routine until your consistent training allows you to build tolerance to the conditions. BE PROACTIVE Be familiar with warning signs of dehydration, heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat syncope (healthin aging.org has some great info on these signs). Know that children and older persons are most susceptible to heat-related illness. So, much like the instructions we get from an airline attendant when they go through their pre-flight safety instructions: take care of you first, make sure you are able to handle the heat. Check the kids, the older folks and anyone you know with physical or mental health issues including friends and neighbors. Often, heat-related issues arise before someone has a chance to ask for help. So in this case and ounce of prevention is truly worth a pound of cure! Please prepare, be aware and enjoy your summer…. "In the summertime when the weather is high you can stretch right up and touch the sky…go out and see what you can find…" In the Summertime, Mungo Jerry (1970).

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy.He can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100

Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

Donate to a Cancer Organization

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

21


Emancipated Patients

It’s All Energy

need to write or ocd? By Patrick Neustatter, MD There’s this condition that I suffer from. So does my sister. Our great Aunt Henry had it bad. Likely all the people who contribute to this fine publication have it. Members of a newly formed group I’m part of, who have got together to confront it, are victims also. I refer to a compulsive desire, or perhaps need, to write. Not hypergraphia, that people with wacky neurological disorders, like temporal lobe epilepsy have. People who cannot stop themselves writing lists, poems, song lyrics, their name over and over. Sometimes drawing pictures. And on anything to hand – scraps of paper, envelopes, napkins, post it notes – often just an illegible scrawl (I’m tempted to throw in a joke here about all doctors must have hypergraphia) No. I am talking about people who have to write a diaries/poems/prose/letters. Or the new age way, a blog - though my impression is everyone is so busy writing blogs that no one has time to read them? Lament all those unseen, unloved words, drifting forlornly off to cyberspace. Group Therapy A few of us fellow sufferers have formed a writers group. An act of acceptance and acknowledgement rather than a 12 step program. Local psychologist Delise Dickard is a member. Despite having just completed a screenplay as her entry to some competition, when she should have been resting on her laurels, she was instead busily trying to organize past columns she had written. She, of all people, should be able to see how OCD* this was. But she defends with the argument that writing is a therapy, not an illness. “My mind is going to want to ruminate about things.. like I could totally ruminate about nuclear war” she told us. She sees substituting writing for ruminating as “like taking something dangerous from a baby and giving it a toy.”

All In The Family My sister, Angie, and brother in law Olly, are visiting, having stayed on after coming over from London for my daughters wedding. She is a freelance journalist, so has some justification for writing. When pinned down to tell me “why do you write?” we both agree, there’s an intellectual and artistic satisfaction in stringing together words to be as clear, concise and poetic as possible. But Angie also sounds a bit like a heroin addict at the stage where you keep doing it, not so much for the buzz it gives you when you do. But you feel so wretched if you don’t. Our great aunt, who wrote under the name of Henry (Handel Richardson) benefitted from her compulsion by becoming one of Australia’s better-respected authors (she and our grandma grew up in Australia). But there’s no question, she had a strong neurotic drive to write. Therapy As Delise insists we acknowledge, writing is a cross between neurosis and therapy. Studies with test subjects writing about past trauma, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings, were compared with a control group writing as objectively and factually as possible about some extremely neutral topic – their plans for the day for example (maybe your plans are exciting and not neutral?). Writing about thoughts and feelings seems to improve psychological well being; it result in less visits to the doctor with stress related diseases; improves immune function; and benefits people with HIV, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. If you think you need therapizing, “write about your childhood memories, your relationships, your work life” recommend the experts. But you must use it to better understand and learn from your emotions, rather than just venting. And watch out. You may find yourself writing about the compulsion to write, as an expression of your writing compulsion. OCD = Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a form of neurosis where people compulsively perform tasks.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com 22

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Calm Cravings by christina ferber Summer is here, and like many beach and pool-goers (including me), you might be trying to shed a few pounds to look your best. Eden Energy Medicine can be used along with a healthy diet and exercise to help balance the body, so that it works as optimally as possible. Why not try a few of the following EEM techniques to help you out in the weight loss department? An oldie but a goodie, the Triple Warmer Smoothie does many things to calm the body, and it can also help us calm cravings and make an informed choice about our eating. Try this before grabbing that second piece of pie and see if it makes you think twice. Rest your face in your hands with your palms at your chin, and fingers at your temples. As you breathe in deeply lift your fingers a few inches above the ears. On an exhale, circle behind your ears and press down the sides of your neck to your shoulders. As you hang your hands on your shoulders, press in and breath for two breaths. Finally, drag your hands down to cover your heart and take a deep breath. Once we eat, we want what goes in our bodies to travel where it is needed and not stick around too long. Doing the Spleen Tap to aid a healthy metabolism can help move things along in a balanced way. Simply, tap the areas located on both sides of your body at the base of your ribs. Do this regularly at least ten seconds before and after you eat. Massaging the Spleen points under the ribcage can also help (see diagram). The Metabolic Tummy Breath does just what it says- aids our metabolism to work more efficiently. Breath in while sucking in your tummy as much as possible, until you can't take in any more air. Then take in three, very quick, tiny breaths. Finally exhale, still sucking in your tummy until you have no more air left to release. Breathe out with three more quick, tiny breaths. Do this regularly to help reset a sluggish metabolism. Aiding the digestive process is another way to help us on our road to a healthier body. Resetting the Ileocecal and Houston Valves is a quick and easy way to move things along. With your fingers inside of your hip bones near your pubic bone, drag them up about six to seven inches with firm pressure while inhaling. Repeat this motion for a total of four times. Then, place your thumbs at the bottom of your ribcage and drag them down toward the hip bone to complete the exercise. Working with the Large and Small Intestine Neurolymphatic Reflex Points can also help with digestion. Massage deeply along the outside and

It’s that kind of summer now when air sways with humidity like jello undulant on a dish, and heat-torrents rush forth to blur my eyes until I see a man descending a riverbank, who slogs out into the stream with his rod and reel in hand thigh-high pretending to fish, so every bystander looking on would never think it strange that he’s there to cool off, yet bluejays up in sycamores and shad neglecting the bait understand what he is doing!

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Yoga’s confluence

- By Frank Fratoe

Cool Relief

inside of your thighs with pressure to activate these points (see diagram). Excess toxins can get our metabolism off balance, as well, and simply massaging the hands and feet is one way to help energy continue to move and not stick around. Drinking lots of water helps to move those toxins out, so be sure to stay hydrated. As always doing the five minute Daily Energy Routine, is a big helper in all departments and can keep your body functioning in a balanced way. View it and other exercises at www.itsallenergywellness.com.

dragonfly

THE POETRY MAN

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

Sweetly kindred with grace, the Dragonfly Studio has undergone new transformations since it opened five years ago. Anne Kemp, the new owner, came upon an unforeseen opportunity amid her family’s new transitions. The timing could not be better for all the Yogi’s and families near and far. One of her students recently was heard saying: “This is the best hour of my whole week!” A year ago, Anne never dreamed she would be the owner of a yoga studio. In retrospect, and thanks to the power of a positive outlook, the opportunity appeared through the vapor of happenstance, without seeking it. Anne Kit returned from Germany and McFarland, the founder of Dragonfly was on her way to Germany. It was a “Who Knew” moment! And neither knew until they reconnected. Anne moved to Germany in the summer of 2015 with her husband, Jesse, an active duty Marine. Anne and Jesse made strides to know their adopted German home-town, Ostfildern. Committed to learning German, Anne said Jesse was fearless and learned to speak it by just doing it and she learned to read.

They became a team in motion. Anne found a Yoga studio in Germany, along with a kindred spirit, its owner Helena, bringing new meaning to her teaching and growth in yoga. Anne said Helena, her teacher and mentor, warmly greeted her in English after observing Anne’s challenges with the German language. After that, Anne quickly learned to take classes taught in German which proved to her that yoga is truly a universal language. Helena inspired Anne to challenge her own boundaries, including eventually asking her to teach a class in English. Fondly Anne said, “It led to some pretty funny ‘lost in translation’ moments but was immensely rewarding.” She acknowledged that, even though she was far from home, the German studio had given her a genuine sense of community. While Anne and her family thought they would be in Germany for three years, they were destined to return home to Virginia last summer. Anne quickly reconnected with the local yoga community, including at Dragonfly, thanks to her many years of teaching experience in Fredericksburg. Kit McFarland, Dragonfly’s founder, and Anne shared threads that weaved a way. While at lunch one day, Kit revealed her family’s plans to live in Germany. Kit was wondering what to do with Dragonfly and it was coincidence it came up in conversation. In this, Anne found the opportunity she never sought in her journey back to Virginia. Kit and Anne worked to make the transition of Dragonfly’s ownership a reality. Anne knew it was the right fit for her personally as she said: “Dragonfly is a fantastic studio with amazing instructors, many of whom I have been connected with for years.” Dragonfly’s mission of building relationships through yoga and giving back to the community is karma, so much like Anne’s experience in Germany and the reconnection she made with Kit through coming home early. Moving forward Anne will strive to enhance what she believes is already a good thing:

By Anne F. Hicks

Dragonfly is a place where people share a passion for quality yoga and build a strong sense of community through authentic relationships. Anne believes that yoga teachers who commit to a strong personal practice make better leaders of others. Thus, seeking to create a collaborative community of teachers, she has offered free classes to all area yoga teachers-intraining and reduced rate classes for Fredericksburg studio yoga instructors. Her decision to purchase Dragonfly also came with a personal commitment to continue the studio’s thriving community donation program. More exciting changes are also on the way. Work has begun on expanding and upgrading the studio’s spaces. The project includes building a new lobby with its own bathroom and changing rooms, enlarging and sound-proofing the main studio and creating separate entrances to the main studio and hot studio spaces. This upgrade will allow Dragonfly to further diversify its schedule while enhancing the experience of individual yoga classes. Look for a grand-opening of the expanded studio in September. Anne embodies the dragonfly symbol: change, adaptability, joy, and lightness. Maybe like a Dragonfly or a seed planted to grow our healthy lifestyle, Anne came home to us with her name’s meaning, Grace! Kit McFarland, the founder, did the same. Such a confluence is grace. Our community is our opportunity. Anne and Kit both are doing this service to Fredericksburg. Thank you, Kit McFarland, and Welcome, Anne Kemp. Anne works for the US Dept. of Veteran Affairs . She lives with her husband Tuffy, in FXBG

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

23


Emancipated Patients

It’s All Energy

need to write or ocd? By Patrick Neustatter, MD There’s this condition that I suffer from. So does my sister. Our great Aunt Henry had it bad. Likely all the people who contribute to this fine publication have it. Members of a newly formed group I’m part of, who have got together to confront it, are victims also. I refer to a compulsive desire, or perhaps need, to write. Not hypergraphia, that people with wacky neurological disorders, like temporal lobe epilepsy have. People who cannot stop themselves writing lists, poems, song lyrics, their name over and over. Sometimes drawing pictures. And on anything to hand – scraps of paper, envelopes, napkins, post it notes – often just an illegible scrawl (I’m tempted to throw in a joke here about all doctors must have hypergraphia) No. I am talking about people who have to write a diaries/poems/prose/letters. Or the new age way, a blog - though my impression is everyone is so busy writing blogs that no one has time to read them? Lament all those unseen, unloved words, drifting forlornly off to cyberspace. Group Therapy A few of us fellow sufferers have formed a writers group. An act of acceptance and acknowledgement rather than a 12 step program. Local psychologist Delise Dickard is a member. Despite having just completed a screenplay as her entry to some competition, when she should have been resting on her laurels, she was instead busily trying to organize past columns she had written. She, of all people, should be able to see how OCD* this was. But she defends with the argument that writing is a therapy, not an illness. “My mind is going to want to ruminate about things.. like I could totally ruminate about nuclear war” she told us. She sees substituting writing for ruminating as “like taking something dangerous from a baby and giving it a toy.”

All In The Family My sister, Angie, and brother in law Olly, are visiting, having stayed on after coming over from London for my daughters wedding. She is a freelance journalist, so has some justification for writing. When pinned down to tell me “why do you write?” we both agree, there’s an intellectual and artistic satisfaction in stringing together words to be as clear, concise and poetic as possible. But Angie also sounds a bit like a heroin addict at the stage where you keep doing it, not so much for the buzz it gives you when you do. But you feel so wretched if you don’t. Our great aunt, who wrote under the name of Henry (Handel Richardson) benefitted from her compulsion by becoming one of Australia’s better-respected authors (she and our grandma grew up in Australia). But there’s no question, she had a strong neurotic drive to write. Therapy As Delise insists we acknowledge, writing is a cross between neurosis and therapy. Studies with test subjects writing about past trauma, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings, were compared with a control group writing as objectively and factually as possible about some extremely neutral topic – their plans for the day for example (maybe your plans are exciting and not neutral?). Writing about thoughts and feelings seems to improve psychological well being; it result in less visits to the doctor with stress related diseases; improves immune function; and benefits people with HIV, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. If you think you need therapizing, “write about your childhood memories, your relationships, your work life” recommend the experts. But you must use it to better understand and learn from your emotions, rather than just venting. And watch out. You may find yourself writing about the compulsion to write, as an expression of your writing compulsion. OCD = Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a form of neurosis where people compulsively perform tasks.

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com 22

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Calm Cravings by christina ferber Summer is here, and like many beach and pool-goers (including me), you might be trying to shed a few pounds to look your best. Eden Energy Medicine can be used along with a healthy diet and exercise to help balance the body, so that it works as optimally as possible. Why not try a few of the following EEM techniques to help you out in the weight loss department? An oldie but a goodie, the Triple Warmer Smoothie does many things to calm the body, and it can also help us calm cravings and make an informed choice about our eating. Try this before grabbing that second piece of pie and see if it makes you think twice. Rest your face in your hands with your palms at your chin, and fingers at your temples. As you breathe in deeply lift your fingers a few inches above the ears. On an exhale, circle behind your ears and press down the sides of your neck to your shoulders. As you hang your hands on your shoulders, press in and breath for two breaths. Finally, drag your hands down to cover your heart and take a deep breath. Once we eat, we want what goes in our bodies to travel where it is needed and not stick around too long. Doing the Spleen Tap to aid a healthy metabolism can help move things along in a balanced way. Simply, tap the areas located on both sides of your body at the base of your ribs. Do this regularly at least ten seconds before and after you eat. Massaging the Spleen points under the ribcage can also help (see diagram). The Metabolic Tummy Breath does just what it says- aids our metabolism to work more efficiently. Breath in while sucking in your tummy as much as possible, until you can't take in any more air. Then take in three, very quick, tiny breaths. Finally exhale, still sucking in your tummy until you have no more air left to release. Breathe out with three more quick, tiny breaths. Do this regularly to help reset a sluggish metabolism. Aiding the digestive process is another way to help us on our road to a healthier body. Resetting the Ileocecal and Houston Valves is a quick and easy way to move things along. With your fingers inside of your hip bones near your pubic bone, drag them up about six to seven inches with firm pressure while inhaling. Repeat this motion for a total of four times. Then, place your thumbs at the bottom of your ribcage and drag them down toward the hip bone to complete the exercise. Working with the Large and Small Intestine Neurolymphatic Reflex Points can also help with digestion. Massage deeply along the outside and

It’s that kind of summer now when air sways with humidity like jello undulant on a dish, and heat-torrents rush forth to blur my eyes until I see a man descending a riverbank, who slogs out into the stream with his rod and reel in hand thigh-high pretending to fish, so every bystander looking on would never think it strange that he’s there to cool off, yet bluejays up in sycamores and shad neglecting the bait understand what he is doing!

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Yoga’s confluence

- By Frank Fratoe

Cool Relief

inside of your thighs with pressure to activate these points (see diagram). Excess toxins can get our metabolism off balance, as well, and simply massaging the hands and feet is one way to help energy continue to move and not stick around. Drinking lots of water helps to move those toxins out, so be sure to stay hydrated. As always doing the five minute Daily Energy Routine, is a big helper in all departments and can keep your body functioning in a balanced way. View it and other exercises at www.itsallenergywellness.com.

dragonfly

THE POETRY MAN

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

Sweetly kindred with grace, the Dragonfly Studio has undergone new transformations since it opened five years ago. Anne Kemp, the new owner, came upon an unforeseen opportunity amid her family’s new transitions. The timing could not be better for all the Yogi’s and families near and far. One of her students recently was heard saying: “This is the best hour of my whole week!” A year ago, Anne never dreamed she would be the owner of a yoga studio. In retrospect, and thanks to the power of a positive outlook, the opportunity appeared through the vapor of happenstance, without seeking it. Anne Kit returned from Germany and McFarland, the founder of Dragonfly was on her way to Germany. It was a “Who Knew” moment! And neither knew until they reconnected. Anne moved to Germany in the summer of 2015 with her husband, Jesse, an active duty Marine. Anne and Jesse made strides to know their adopted German home-town, Ostfildern. Committed to learning German, Anne said Jesse was fearless and learned to speak it by just doing it and she learned to read.

They became a team in motion. Anne found a Yoga studio in Germany, along with a kindred spirit, its owner Helena, bringing new meaning to her teaching and growth in yoga. Anne said Helena, her teacher and mentor, warmly greeted her in English after observing Anne’s challenges with the German language. After that, Anne quickly learned to take classes taught in German which proved to her that yoga is truly a universal language. Helena inspired Anne to challenge her own boundaries, including eventually asking her to teach a class in English. Fondly Anne said, “It led to some pretty funny ‘lost in translation’ moments but was immensely rewarding.” She acknowledged that, even though she was far from home, the German studio had given her a genuine sense of community. While Anne and her family thought they would be in Germany for three years, they were destined to return home to Virginia last summer. Anne quickly reconnected with the local yoga community, including at Dragonfly, thanks to her many years of teaching experience in Fredericksburg. Kit McFarland, Dragonfly’s founder, and Anne shared threads that weaved a way. While at lunch one day, Kit revealed her family’s plans to live in Germany. Kit was wondering what to do with Dragonfly and it was coincidence it came up in conversation. In this, Anne found the opportunity she never sought in her journey back to Virginia. Kit and Anne worked to make the transition of Dragonfly’s ownership a reality. Anne knew it was the right fit for her personally as she said: “Dragonfly is a fantastic studio with amazing instructors, many of whom I have been connected with for years.” Dragonfly’s mission of building relationships through yoga and giving back to the community is karma, so much like Anne’s experience in Germany and the reconnection she made with Kit through coming home early. Moving forward Anne will strive to enhance what she believes is already a good thing:

By Anne F. Hicks

Dragonfly is a place where people share a passion for quality yoga and build a strong sense of community through authentic relationships. Anne believes that yoga teachers who commit to a strong personal practice make better leaders of others. Thus, seeking to create a collaborative community of teachers, she has offered free classes to all area yoga teachers-intraining and reduced rate classes for Fredericksburg studio yoga instructors. Her decision to purchase Dragonfly also came with a personal commitment to continue the studio’s thriving community donation program. More exciting changes are also on the way. Work has begun on expanding and upgrading the studio’s spaces. The project includes building a new lobby with its own bathroom and changing rooms, enlarging and sound-proofing the main studio and creating separate entrances to the main studio and hot studio spaces. This upgrade will allow Dragonfly to further diversify its schedule while enhancing the experience of individual yoga classes. Look for a grand-opening of the expanded studio in September. Anne embodies the dragonfly symbol: change, adaptability, joy, and lightness. Maybe like a Dragonfly or a seed planted to grow our healthy lifestyle, Anne came home to us with her name’s meaning, Grace! Kit McFarland, the founder, did the same. Such a confluence is grace. Our community is our opportunity. Anne and Kit both are doing this service to Fredericksburg. Thank you, Kit McFarland, and Welcome, Anne Kemp. Anne works for the US Dept. of Veteran Affairs . She lives with her husband Tuffy, in FXBG

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

23


FLAR’s Spring/Summer Edition Blooms... with cover artist ana rendich

This marks the sixth season of print for Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, and as with past issues we’re featuring a dynamic list of regional artists and writers in this edition. It’s never an easy task to choose our cover artists, but one thing that they all have in common is an ability to move us with color, concept, and imagery that compels us to look deeper and learn more. Ana Rendich (above) is a painter whose work impacts us in that way, and much of her

and authors that are different from the mainstream, to painters - to study the one’s who have left us centuries ago. Everything related to the liberal arts should be given generously. Professors should be saying, ‘I have this book, who wants it? You don't have homework; who wants to come with me to the National Gallery.’ I see this connection as vital. The poet Mary Oliver explains it beautifully when she says we should ‘…becomes best friends with the ones who have enriched our world so much.’” Rendich believes visual intelligence requires patience, and everyone can learn this. She compares studying paintings to studying poetry; there are parallels. The paintings, the books, the philosophy and essays are an artist’s best resources. “When you are young your artistic soul hasn’t developed yet. It develops through contact with these people who have come before.” Her favorite artists remain the old masters, like Caravaggio, Giotto, Cézanne, van Der Wyden. “Their works present profound imaginings of human life...in the past as now. Their thoughts and feelings are not directly of today’s life, but they ask the same questions about humanity and being alive.” In addition Rendich’s work, this edition of FLAR includes contributions from writers and artists across the United States and around the globe. Several prominent local creatives are featured this time, including renowned potter Dan Finnegan, ukulele craftsman and musician

Name This House

of fredericksburg

win downtown gift certificate

Lisa

By A.E. Bayne philosophy stems from a sense of reverence for master artists of the past and an equally sincere gratitude for the opportunities she has had, especially those that stem from her move to the United States. Originally from Argentina, Rendich says the pastel colors in her paintings represent hope. She explains, “I lost so many things, I lost a language, but I am on my knees thanking this country for what it has given me. I am so grateful. I haven’t met an immigrant who is not deeply grateful.” Rendich worries that young artists developing their skills today do not have the same exposure to techniques and knowledge of past masters. She notices a current trend in academia that is moving away from a well-rounded liberal arts background that enriches the fine artist’s well of inspirational knowledge. She says, “A long time ago, we were obsessed about teaching artists to find resources from deep areas to help their soul growth. That means working hard, being open to everything, to music that is different than yours, to cultures

Stories

Larry Hinkle, political cartoonist Clay Jones, and Pamdora owner and artist Pamela McLeod. Regional artists include Richmond-based painter Cheryl Clayton, mixed media artist Maiven McKnight of Alexandria, and author and photographer Paul Fuqua of Arlington. This issue will also spotlight Art First Gallery of Fredericksburg and Virginia Lake Authors of Lake of the Woods. There will be a special section curated by Nepali writer Govinda Giri Prerana that features Nepali writers living in Northern Virginia. Read more about Ana Rendich in the upcoming edition of FLAR, available free online at www.fredericksburgwriters.com and on Facebook @FredLitArtReview. Special thanks to Virginia Grogan for her work on the literary panel for this edition.

A.E. Bayne is a veteran educator, writer, and artist. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

Lisa, 51, grew up in the city of Fredericksburg. She is the youngest of three siblings. She had her first child when she was in the tenth grade and got married soon after. Although she left high school at a young age, she still pursued a GED. "I kind of grew up with my oldest son," she said. "One minute I was in a 10th grade math class, the next minute I was going to Roses getting maternity clothes and getting married. One minute I was getting up going to school, and the next I was trying to be a wife and didn't even know how to make fried chicken." The marriage did not last long and she returned home by the time she was 16. Her mother was highly involved in raising the child and she started working as soon as she could convince someone to hire her. She started out as a hostess and worked her way up to waiting tables. "I got to see different people and learn different things. It was kind of a dream job for me, but my life just changed."

She did get married a second time. That one lasted 16 years and brought about a second child. That relationship ended, another began, but after 10 more years it crumbled as well and so did other things. "When that ended in 2005 my whole life fell apart. I just started drinking and drinking and drinking. I lost everything." From May 2007 to March of 2013 Lisa was homeless, living primarily in a tent in the woods with her Chicaweenie (Chihuahua-dachshund mix). "Its not anything you wake up planning on happening in your life, but when you are left with nothing you either have to give up or survive. “People should not buy into the stereotypes about homelessness”, she said. "While alcohol may be a part of the issue, it goes a whole lot deeper. I had to understand there were a whole lot of other issues," she said. "Homeless people, that's not who they are, it's what they are going through. We have dreams, we have plans, and we want that." Since Lisa has been back in housing she has been able to address some underlying mental health issues. She is working on some complex medical issues. And she feels better knowing that each day she is able to accomplish something. "I didn't want to deal with life," she said of the time she was homeless. During that time, her children would not even allow her to see her grandchildren. Now that she is housed and stable, she has been able to rekindle relationships with family. She gets to go places with them, babysit and be involved in their lives. "I'm always afraid of falling," she said. "But I know Lisa is strong because of what I have been through." Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: “1618 Franklin St: The Carl Silver House” The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Emma Dolby

You are such a strange little rock house, sitting up on the hill, no one seems to know who you are. It is time you spoke out on this glorious 4th, as you have been quiet for a hundred and fifty years, and more. All your life you have been sheltering the families, of the Fredericksburg Battlefield Park staff. From your windows and doors, came the sounds of generations of children, reading a poem, sitting in your yard, memorized well, called,"Bivouac of The Dead," by Theodore O'Hara. An infant boy, born and left our earth within your walls, little Arthur, lies on the hill in the ground above you still. So many brave and honorable men and women have been laid to rest, in the tiers beside your walls, while you watched over the creation of a place on the hill, to honor our brave fallen dead.

“Drawn Together” Opening Reception First Friday July 6 Artists: Johnny P. Johnson, Jane Snead, Ruth Ann Loving, Beverley Coates, Robyn Ryan, Nancy Brittle. Norma Starkweather & Cathy Herndon Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 24

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

25


FLAR’s Spring/Summer Edition Blooms... with cover artist ana rendich

This marks the sixth season of print for Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, and as with past issues we’re featuring a dynamic list of regional artists and writers in this edition. It’s never an easy task to choose our cover artists, but one thing that they all have in common is an ability to move us with color, concept, and imagery that compels us to look deeper and learn more. Ana Rendich (above) is a painter whose work impacts us in that way, and much of her

and authors that are different from the mainstream, to painters - to study the one’s who have left us centuries ago. Everything related to the liberal arts should be given generously. Professors should be saying, ‘I have this book, who wants it? You don't have homework; who wants to come with me to the National Gallery.’ I see this connection as vital. The poet Mary Oliver explains it beautifully when she says we should ‘…becomes best friends with the ones who have enriched our world so much.’” Rendich believes visual intelligence requires patience, and everyone can learn this. She compares studying paintings to studying poetry; there are parallels. The paintings, the books, the philosophy and essays are an artist’s best resources. “When you are young your artistic soul hasn’t developed yet. It develops through contact with these people who have come before.” Her favorite artists remain the old masters, like Caravaggio, Giotto, Cézanne, van Der Wyden. “Their works present profound imaginings of human life...in the past as now. Their thoughts and feelings are not directly of today’s life, but they ask the same questions about humanity and being alive.” In addition Rendich’s work, this edition of FLAR includes contributions from writers and artists across the United States and around the globe. Several prominent local creatives are featured this time, including renowned potter Dan Finnegan, ukulele craftsman and musician

Name This House

of fredericksburg

win downtown gift certificate

Lisa

By A.E. Bayne philosophy stems from a sense of reverence for master artists of the past and an equally sincere gratitude for the opportunities she has had, especially those that stem from her move to the United States. Originally from Argentina, Rendich says the pastel colors in her paintings represent hope. She explains, “I lost so many things, I lost a language, but I am on my knees thanking this country for what it has given me. I am so grateful. I haven’t met an immigrant who is not deeply grateful.” Rendich worries that young artists developing their skills today do not have the same exposure to techniques and knowledge of past masters. She notices a current trend in academia that is moving away from a well-rounded liberal arts background that enriches the fine artist’s well of inspirational knowledge. She says, “A long time ago, we were obsessed about teaching artists to find resources from deep areas to help their soul growth. That means working hard, being open to everything, to music that is different than yours, to cultures

Stories

Larry Hinkle, political cartoonist Clay Jones, and Pamdora owner and artist Pamela McLeod. Regional artists include Richmond-based painter Cheryl Clayton, mixed media artist Maiven McKnight of Alexandria, and author and photographer Paul Fuqua of Arlington. This issue will also spotlight Art First Gallery of Fredericksburg and Virginia Lake Authors of Lake of the Woods. There will be a special section curated by Nepali writer Govinda Giri Prerana that features Nepali writers living in Northern Virginia. Read more about Ana Rendich in the upcoming edition of FLAR, available free online at www.fredericksburgwriters.com and on Facebook @FredLitArtReview. Special thanks to Virginia Grogan for her work on the literary panel for this edition.

A.E. Bayne is a veteran educator, writer, and artist. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

Lisa, 51, grew up in the city of Fredericksburg. She is the youngest of three siblings. She had her first child when she was in the tenth grade and got married soon after. Although she left high school at a young age, she still pursued a GED. "I kind of grew up with my oldest son," she said. "One minute I was in a 10th grade math class, the next minute I was going to Roses getting maternity clothes and getting married. One minute I was getting up going to school, and the next I was trying to be a wife and didn't even know how to make fried chicken." The marriage did not last long and she returned home by the time she was 16. Her mother was highly involved in raising the child and she started working as soon as she could convince someone to hire her. She started out as a hostess and worked her way up to waiting tables. "I got to see different people and learn different things. It was kind of a dream job for me, but my life just changed."

She did get married a second time. That one lasted 16 years and brought about a second child. That relationship ended, another began, but after 10 more years it crumbled as well and so did other things. "When that ended in 2005 my whole life fell apart. I just started drinking and drinking and drinking. I lost everything." From May 2007 to March of 2013 Lisa was homeless, living primarily in a tent in the woods with her Chicaweenie (Chihuahua-dachshund mix). "Its not anything you wake up planning on happening in your life, but when you are left with nothing you either have to give up or survive. “People should not buy into the stereotypes about homelessness”, she said. "While alcohol may be a part of the issue, it goes a whole lot deeper. I had to understand there were a whole lot of other issues," she said. "Homeless people, that's not who they are, it's what they are going through. We have dreams, we have plans, and we want that." Since Lisa has been back in housing she has been able to address some underlying mental health issues. She is working on some complex medical issues. And she feels better knowing that each day she is able to accomplish something. "I didn't want to deal with life," she said of the time she was homeless. During that time, her children would not even allow her to see her grandchildren. Now that she is housed and stable, she has been able to rekindle relationships with family. She gets to go places with them, babysit and be involved in their lives. "I'm always afraid of falling," she said. "But I know Lisa is strong because of what I have been through." Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: “1618 Franklin St: The Carl Silver House” The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Emma Dolby

You are such a strange little rock house, sitting up on the hill, no one seems to know who you are. It is time you spoke out on this glorious 4th, as you have been quiet for a hundred and fifty years, and more. All your life you have been sheltering the families, of the Fredericksburg Battlefield Park staff. From your windows and doors, came the sounds of generations of children, reading a poem, sitting in your yard, memorized well, called,"Bivouac of The Dead," by Theodore O'Hara. An infant boy, born and left our earth within your walls, little Arthur, lies on the hill in the ground above you still. So many brave and honorable men and women have been laid to rest, in the tiers beside your walls, while you watched over the creation of a place on the hill, to honor our brave fallen dead.

“Drawn Together” Opening Reception First Friday July 6 Artists: Johnny P. Johnson, Jane Snead, Ruth Ann Loving, Beverley Coates, Robyn Ryan, Nancy Brittle. Norma Starkweather & Cathy Herndon Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 24

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

25


Art in the Burg

Everything Greens

Glass Roots, Dreamscapes, & abandon houses

growing character in the garden

"Getting Back To My Glass Roots" @Art First A show that features several techniques in glass with a nature theme, including traditional copper foil stained glass, kiln formed glass, and glass jewelry by area artist Lisa Gillen (above) This is Gillen's first solo show in FXBG since moving to the area from Pueblo, Colorado where she had an art glass studio. Gillen's fascination with glass started over 25 years ago when a friend's mom, who was a glass artist, was retiring and selling her tools. Gillen started her journey with traditional leaded and foiled stained glass, but it wasn't until she was introduced to the world of glass fusing that she found her true passion for glass art. Over the years, she has studied with top glass artists like Bob

Leatherbarrow, Paul Tarlow and Lena Beckeus. Gillen shares her secret: "Nothing beats having an idea, formulating that idea into a plan, applying what you've learned and going for it! If it doesn't turn out the way you planned, you learn from it and go again!" In addition the artist tells us, "My glass journey has been an amazing learning process in which I have enjoyed every single lesson and every time I'm in my studio, I learn something new!" ~Casey Shaw Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline Street “My Glass Roots”, Lisa Gillen Opening Rception, 1st Friday, July 6

26

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

"Dreamscapes" @Brushstrokes Gallery Textured art is the hallmark of featured artist Karen Julihn's (right) "Dreamscape" show at Brush Strokes Gallery throughout July. Created with silk flowers, miniature iron gates and doors, and textured material, Karen brings landscapes to life with 3-D imagery. Taking inspiration from garden scenes, the desert, and sidewalk buildings, this series of small and large works in mixed media portrays scenes that you might experience on a walk in the city or hike across the countryside. See this and other new works in oil, pastel, watercolor, glasswork, jewelry, clay and photography created by member artists throughout July. B r u s h Strokes Gallery is also one of the art venues participating in a July tribute to renowned artist, teacher, and community leader, Johnny P. Johnson. Paintings by Johnny will be displayed by the gallery artists who own and treasure them. ~Norma Woodward

By jennifer gron

Colonial Beach Artist Alliance CoOp A collective sigh of relief passed through Colonial Beach at the announcement that an artists' cooperative has formed to reopen JarretThor Fine Arts (JTFA). Gallery owners Carl and Joyce Thor were closing the gallery in an attempt to retire for the fourth time. The cooperative, dubbed the Artists' Alliance (AA) at JTFA, includes 20 top regional artists, and is directed by a team of three volunteers. Many different artistic media are featured, including painting (oil, acrylic, watercolor, and pastel), photography, pottery, encaustic, stained glass, and jewelry.

“Dahlgren Farm”, Barbara Brennan

“Early Birds”, Karen Julihn Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St "Dreamscapes" July 2 to July 29 Opening Rception, 1st Friday, July 6

AA will hold a grand opening reception during Colonial Beach's 2nd Friday Art Walk on July 13th, from 6-9 pm. Painter Barbara Brennan (top) is the featured artist of the month. Barbara paints in oils and pastels, with a particular interest in disappearing landscapes, both urban and rural. ~Rob Rudrick AA at JTFA, 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach 804 224 7200, 804 224 6007, or 301 452 1333.

When I talk about Downtown Greens and the Youth Farm Program (YFP), I find myself focusing too much on how the garden is growing: how much we need rain (or a few dry days), which vegetables we've planted, and what foods we are starting to harvest. The physical garden is an important part of the work we are doing, but the real work is in helping our young farmers grow character and life skills. YFP is free for participants in 3rd-5 5th grades and is designed around three components. We have weekly meetings from April through October, consisting of non-ttraditional learning through playing, gardening, nature crafts and environmental literacy. During this time we provide a safe environment where children can see the positive benefits of community, responsibility, and teamwork and experience math in science in action. Once a month the youth work with a guest chef to create a family dinner with produce from their garden. These meals offer an opportunity to try fresh new ingredients and enjoy new healthy cooking experiences. The families are provided with recipes and inspiration, and the discovery that their children may like more vegetables than they thought. The young farmers beam with pride as they bring completed dishes to the table where their families are joining them for a formal sit-down dinner. The third piece of the program is our periodic trips to the Downtown Fredericksburg Farmers Market for the

Youth-L Led Farmers Market Stand. During these trips the youth tend a market stand, handling customer service transactions, counting money, tracking sales and telling stand visitors all about the program. Our goal with these trips is to support development of important life skills in leadership, customer service, clear communication, and entrepreneurship. Through these three activities, we truly are growing more than just vegetables in our garden. One of the first lessons the youth learn from the garden is patience and delayed gratification. It takes a long time for a seed to grow into a plant that produces food, making our work a longterm investment. We check on our plants weekly and monitor growth, and then get very excited when we finally see tomatoes or zucchini forming. The kids are learning that good things do come to those who wait. It is only through diligence that our gardens bear fruit. The kids are weeding, watering, and thinning out overcrowded plants while learning that sometimes you have to take responsibility and continuing working, even on days you might just want to play, to harvest the rewards of hard work. Our young farmers are learning that it feels really good to create something, to create this garden. The hope is that watching those little seeds grow into something much larger will show them that they can create anything they want in life. Selflessness and gratitude are reinforced during our monthly family dinners. Something very special happens when children set the table, prepare the meal, and help serve their families and others. They learn that it feels good to take care of those around us, and hopefully experience gratitude when they are on the receiving end. Growing this garden of plants and young farmers takes the whole community. If you are interested in helping, either by volunteering or financially, please contact Downtown Greens at downtowngreens@gmail.com or visiting our website at www.downtowngreens.org/support/.

Jennifer Gron is the Youth Farm Program Manager at Downtown Greens.

#FREDSTRONG Interesting Facts about America By Joan Geisler GOD BLESS AMERICA- A strong community makes for a strong nation. The United States’ current 50 star flag was designed as a school project by 17 year-old Robert G. Heft. Heft received a B- for his efforts, but his teacher said he would reconsider the grade if Congress accepted Heft’s ostensibly mediocre design. In 1959, that’s precisely what happened, and Heft’s design was selected to be the latest iteration of the American flag. His teacher promptly changed the grade to an A. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Zachary Taylor, and Woodrow Wilson were all born in Virginia, making it the birthplace of more Presidents than any other state. Uncle Sam was a real person named Samuel Wilson. Samuel Wilson was a meatpacker in Troy, N.Y. who fought in the American Revolution and became the official meat inspector for the northern army in the War of 1812. Wilson was well known in Troy for his meat business and for his friendliness and over time was given the nickname, “Uncle Sam.” When Wilson started providing and inspecting meat for the troops during the War of 1812, the troops from Troy would joke that the “U.S.” label on the meat barrels actually stood for Uncle Sam. This idea was eventually expanded to all United States military items with “U.S.” and so Uncle Sam became the figurehead of American might. James Madison weighed less than the average American teenage girl The best things come in small packages, right? Madison was only 5 feet 4 inches tall and weighed under 100 pounds. About 35 million Americans share DNA with at least one of the 102 pilgrims who arrived aboard the Mayflower in 1620 James Monroe has a capital named after him The capital of Liberia, Monrovia, was named after Monroe after he worked with the American Colonization Society to help create a state where freed slaves could live. William McKinley had a lucky charm that really worked McKinley wore a red carnation on his lapel almost all the time for good luck. One time in 1901, he gave his carnation to a little girl and was instantly shot by an assassin immediately after. He died eight days later. Woodrow Wilson was the eternal student Despite the fact that he didn't learn to read until he was 10 years old, Wilson is America's most educated president. He is the only president to have

earned a Ph.D., which he earned from John Hopkins University in political science and history. Gerald Ford had plenty of career options Ford worked as a fashion model during college and appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan. He also could have played for the NFL. In the American Zip Code, what does Zip stand for? - Zone Improvement Plan The seven rays on the crown of the Statue of Liberty represent the seven continents. Each measures up to 9 feet in length and weighs as much as 150 pounds The state of Alaska is 429 times larger than the state of Rhode Island, but Rhode Island has a significantly larger population. The Pledge of Allegiance. “The Youth’s Companion” was a magazine that also supplied American flags to schools across the country near the end of the 19th century. On Sept. 8, 1892 they published the pledge, written by an employee of the magazine to promote nationalism and presumably sell more flags and subscriptions. The pledge ended up taking off across the country, but over the years has undergone a few changes. Originally the pledge involved a salute modeled after the classic Roman one, which Mussolini and Hitler ended up adopting as well. Obviously that salute was dropped. Also “of the United States of America” was added to make it clear to immigrants that they were pledging to the U.S. The plesdge was offically recognized by the government in 1942 “Under God” was added during the Red Scare. in 1954 America did not have a mational anthem until 1931 when President Herbert Hoover signed a law making “The Star-Spangled Banner” the official national anthem of the United States of America. Apple has more money than the U.S. Treasury If you have $10 in your pocket and no debt, you are wealthier than 25% of Americans. Happy 242 nd Birthday America. Stay strong from Sea To Shining Sea Joan Geisler is a Behavioral Change Specialist. www.8020healthyhabits

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

27


Art in the Burg

Everything Greens

Glass Roots, Dreamscapes, & abandon houses

growing character in the garden

"Getting Back To My Glass Roots" @Art First A show that features several techniques in glass with a nature theme, including traditional copper foil stained glass, kiln formed glass, and glass jewelry by area artist Lisa Gillen (above) This is Gillen's first solo show in FXBG since moving to the area from Pueblo, Colorado where she had an art glass studio. Gillen's fascination with glass started over 25 years ago when a friend's mom, who was a glass artist, was retiring and selling her tools. Gillen started her journey with traditional leaded and foiled stained glass, but it wasn't until she was introduced to the world of glass fusing that she found her true passion for glass art. Over the years, she has studied with top glass artists like Bob

Leatherbarrow, Paul Tarlow and Lena Beckeus. Gillen shares her secret: "Nothing beats having an idea, formulating that idea into a plan, applying what you've learned and going for it! If it doesn't turn out the way you planned, you learn from it and go again!" In addition the artist tells us, "My glass journey has been an amazing learning process in which I have enjoyed every single lesson and every time I'm in my studio, I learn something new!" ~Casey Shaw Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline Street “My Glass Roots”, Lisa Gillen Opening Rception, 1st Friday, July 6

26

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

"Dreamscapes" @Brushstrokes Gallery Textured art is the hallmark of featured artist Karen Julihn's (right) "Dreamscape" show at Brush Strokes Gallery throughout July. Created with silk flowers, miniature iron gates and doors, and textured material, Karen brings landscapes to life with 3-D imagery. Taking inspiration from garden scenes, the desert, and sidewalk buildings, this series of small and large works in mixed media portrays scenes that you might experience on a walk in the city or hike across the countryside. See this and other new works in oil, pastel, watercolor, glasswork, jewelry, clay and photography created by member artists throughout July. B r u s h Strokes Gallery is also one of the art venues participating in a July tribute to renowned artist, teacher, and community leader, Johnny P. Johnson. Paintings by Johnny will be displayed by the gallery artists who own and treasure them. ~Norma Woodward

By jennifer gron

Colonial Beach Artist Alliance CoOp A collective sigh of relief passed through Colonial Beach at the announcement that an artists' cooperative has formed to reopen JarretThor Fine Arts (JTFA). Gallery owners Carl and Joyce Thor were closing the gallery in an attempt to retire for the fourth time. The cooperative, dubbed the Artists' Alliance (AA) at JTFA, includes 20 top regional artists, and is directed by a team of three volunteers. Many different artistic media are featured, including painting (oil, acrylic, watercolor, and pastel), photography, pottery, encaustic, stained glass, and jewelry.

“Dahlgren Farm”, Barbara Brennan

“Early Birds”, Karen Julihn Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St "Dreamscapes" July 2 to July 29 Opening Rception, 1st Friday, July 6

AA will hold a grand opening reception during Colonial Beach's 2nd Friday Art Walk on July 13th, from 6-9 pm. Painter Barbara Brennan (top) is the featured artist of the month. Barbara paints in oils and pastels, with a particular interest in disappearing landscapes, both urban and rural. ~Rob Rudrick AA at JTFA, 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach 804 224 7200, 804 224 6007, or 301 452 1333.

When I talk about Downtown Greens and the Youth Farm Program (YFP), I find myself focusing too much on how the garden is growing: how much we need rain (or a few dry days), which vegetables we've planted, and what foods we are starting to harvest. The physical garden is an important part of the work we are doing, but the real work is in helping our young farmers grow character and life skills. YFP is free for participants in 3rd-5 5th grades and is designed around three components. We have weekly meetings from April through October, consisting of non-ttraditional learning through playing, gardening, nature crafts and environmental literacy. During this time we provide a safe environment where children can see the positive benefits of community, responsibility, and teamwork and experience math in science in action. Once a month the youth work with a guest chef to create a family dinner with produce from their garden. These meals offer an opportunity to try fresh new ingredients and enjoy new healthy cooking experiences. The families are provided with recipes and inspiration, and the discovery that their children may like more vegetables than they thought. The young farmers beam with pride as they bring completed dishes to the table where their families are joining them for a formal sit-down dinner. The third piece of the program is our periodic trips to the Downtown Fredericksburg Farmers Market for the

Youth-L Led Farmers Market Stand. During these trips the youth tend a market stand, handling customer service transactions, counting money, tracking sales and telling stand visitors all about the program. Our goal with these trips is to support development of important life skills in leadership, customer service, clear communication, and entrepreneurship. Through these three activities, we truly are growing more than just vegetables in our garden. One of the first lessons the youth learn from the garden is patience and delayed gratification. It takes a long time for a seed to grow into a plant that produces food, making our work a longterm investment. We check on our plants weekly and monitor growth, and then get very excited when we finally see tomatoes or zucchini forming. The kids are learning that good things do come to those who wait. It is only through diligence that our gardens bear fruit. The kids are weeding, watering, and thinning out overcrowded plants while learning that sometimes you have to take responsibility and continuing working, even on days you might just want to play, to harvest the rewards of hard work. Our young farmers are learning that it feels really good to create something, to create this garden. The hope is that watching those little seeds grow into something much larger will show them that they can create anything they want in life. Selflessness and gratitude are reinforced during our monthly family dinners. Something very special happens when children set the table, prepare the meal, and help serve their families and others. They learn that it feels good to take care of those around us, and hopefully experience gratitude when they are on the receiving end. Growing this garden of plants and young farmers takes the whole community. If you are interested in helping, either by volunteering or financially, please contact Downtown Greens at downtowngreens@gmail.com or visiting our website at www.downtowngreens.org/support/.

Jennifer Gron is the Youth Farm Program Manager at Downtown Greens.

#FREDSTRONG Interesting Facts about America By Joan Geisler GOD BLESS AMERICA- A strong community makes for a strong nation. The United States’ current 50 star flag was designed as a school project by 17 year-old Robert G. Heft. Heft received a B- for his efforts, but his teacher said he would reconsider the grade if Congress accepted Heft’s ostensibly mediocre design. In 1959, that’s precisely what happened, and Heft’s design was selected to be the latest iteration of the American flag. His teacher promptly changed the grade to an A. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Zachary Taylor, and Woodrow Wilson were all born in Virginia, making it the birthplace of more Presidents than any other state. Uncle Sam was a real person named Samuel Wilson. Samuel Wilson was a meatpacker in Troy, N.Y. who fought in the American Revolution and became the official meat inspector for the northern army in the War of 1812. Wilson was well known in Troy for his meat business and for his friendliness and over time was given the nickname, “Uncle Sam.” When Wilson started providing and inspecting meat for the troops during the War of 1812, the troops from Troy would joke that the “U.S.” label on the meat barrels actually stood for Uncle Sam. This idea was eventually expanded to all United States military items with “U.S.” and so Uncle Sam became the figurehead of American might. James Madison weighed less than the average American teenage girl The best things come in small packages, right? Madison was only 5 feet 4 inches tall and weighed under 100 pounds. About 35 million Americans share DNA with at least one of the 102 pilgrims who arrived aboard the Mayflower in 1620 James Monroe has a capital named after him The capital of Liberia, Monrovia, was named after Monroe after he worked with the American Colonization Society to help create a state where freed slaves could live. William McKinley had a lucky charm that really worked McKinley wore a red carnation on his lapel almost all the time for good luck. One time in 1901, he gave his carnation to a little girl and was instantly shot by an assassin immediately after. He died eight days later. Woodrow Wilson was the eternal student Despite the fact that he didn't learn to read until he was 10 years old, Wilson is America's most educated president. He is the only president to have

earned a Ph.D., which he earned from John Hopkins University in political science and history. Gerald Ford had plenty of career options Ford worked as a fashion model during college and appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan. He also could have played for the NFL. In the American Zip Code, what does Zip stand for? - Zone Improvement Plan The seven rays on the crown of the Statue of Liberty represent the seven continents. Each measures up to 9 feet in length and weighs as much as 150 pounds The state of Alaska is 429 times larger than the state of Rhode Island, but Rhode Island has a significantly larger population. The Pledge of Allegiance. “The Youth’s Companion” was a magazine that also supplied American flags to schools across the country near the end of the 19th century. On Sept. 8, 1892 they published the pledge, written by an employee of the magazine to promote nationalism and presumably sell more flags and subscriptions. The pledge ended up taking off across the country, but over the years has undergone a few changes. Originally the pledge involved a salute modeled after the classic Roman one, which Mussolini and Hitler ended up adopting as well. Obviously that salute was dropped. Also “of the United States of America” was added to make it clear to immigrants that they were pledging to the U.S. The plesdge was offically recognized by the government in 1942 “Under God” was added during the Red Scare. in 1954 America did not have a mational anthem until 1931 when President Herbert Hoover signed a law making “The Star-Spangled Banner” the official national anthem of the United States of America. Apple has more money than the U.S. Treasury If you have $10 in your pocket and no debt, you are wealthier than 25% of Americans. Happy 242 nd Birthday America. Stay strong from Sea To Shining Sea Joan Geisler is a Behavioral Change Specialist. www.8020healthyhabits

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

27


Companions kittens, kittens, & more kittens by Siobhan Young

Kitten season is in full swing here at Fredericksburg SPCA. So what does 'Kitten Season' actually mean? Kitten season is the time of year between April through October when feline queens have up to two litters a year, inundating local shelters with neonatal felines. The SPCA takes in kittens from family households, feral colonies, stray surrenders and other area shelters in need. It is common for people to find baby kittens outside in their own yards or on the streets ranging from a few

vaccines, spay/neuter surgeries and get adopted! If you need to bring them to the shelter, the SPCA has trained staff and volunteers to raise orphaned kittens of all ages. This life saving work is heavy on our resources, and we often need supplies. Kittens require frequent feedings, basic supplies and medical care to help them survive. We depend on the donations of the community to help save these vulnerable lives. Donate, Foster, Volunteer, Spay and Neuter. This is how

hours old to months old. The SPCA advises the public to search for mom cats nearby before taking kittens away from found locations. Mother cats spook easily and tend to run off when other people are around and their babies need them. Don't worry, they will come back! No mom in sight? That's okay too. The Fredericksburg SPCA, local vets and online resources can walk you through how to care for neonatal kittens. You can sign up to foster with us to ensure the kittens receive their

28

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Siobhan Young is the Social Media Specialist at Fredericksburg SPCA

marla wears a halo by georgia strentz

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

you can help! We are always looking for supply donations of KMR (milk replacement formula), dry and wet kitten food, and non-clumping litter to care for kittens in our care. You can find our wishlist at Fredspca.org. With support from our community we can expand our life saving efforts and get these kittens off the streets and into loving homes!

Book Mark

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

540-898-0737

Hartwood Pet Lodge LLC has published its second book, Marla Wears A Halo, written by Marla Beagle, Hartwood Pet Lodge Manager. Like her first book, The Adventures of Hot Cocoa and Salt Water Taffy, Marla Beagle teamed up with local Fredericksburg artist, Joan Critz Limbrick to bring children's book's alive through expressive watercolor. In Marla Wears A Halo, Marla Beagle tells the tale of her dog's life - A standard poodle, named Marla, is rescued from a farm by a compassionate trio - a local enforcement official, a veterinarian, and boxer rescue group volunteers. Although Marla ultimately loses her sight, she perseveres and finds a wonderful purpose in life. Marla Wears A Halo showcases many of Marla's real-life experiences. With the help of a second rescue group, Marla finds her forever family and shares her time with a special little girl named Faith. Marla and Faith realize they are alike, and together, they make each other feel beautiful. The last sentence of the book is printed in braille.

Ms. Holly Frisch, President, National Fredericksburg Chapter, Federation of the Blind of Virginia and Volunteers for the Blind (VFB), Fredericksburg, Virginia, and VFB interns were instrumental in printing braille for the book. Holly's mother always felt strongly about the calming influence animals have on children. "Marla Wears A Halo is a charmingly endearing book. I'm glad that children will be exposed to braille. It plays an essential, critical role in literacy for everyone who is either totally blind or has significantly limited vision," said Holly. Carol McElhaney Shelton writing as Marla Beagle, grew up in Yacht Haven

Estates, Alexandria, Virginia, with her first standard poodle named Pierre. Carol and her husband are committed to helping dogs by transporting, sheltering, locating forever families, and donating a portion of each book sale to a non-profit animal rescue organization at the end of each month. Hartwood Pet Lodge LLC, a rescue lodge, is in Stafford County, Hartwood Virginia, just a few miles from the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Please contact Marla Beagle (Carol Shelton) at poodletaxi@gmail.com or 540.841.4260

Four ways to purchase books: 1) buy online at hartwoodpetlodge.com; 2) buy on site - see hartwoodpetlodge.com calendar for locations; 3) buy through Amazon.com; and 4) direct email with details to poodletaxi@gmail.com.

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

29


Companions kittens, kittens, & more kittens by Siobhan Young

Kitten season is in full swing here at Fredericksburg SPCA. So what does 'Kitten Season' actually mean? Kitten season is the time of year between April through October when feline queens have up to two litters a year, inundating local shelters with neonatal felines. The SPCA takes in kittens from family households, feral colonies, stray surrenders and other area shelters in need. It is common for people to find baby kittens outside in their own yards or on the streets ranging from a few

vaccines, spay/neuter surgeries and get adopted! If you need to bring them to the shelter, the SPCA has trained staff and volunteers to raise orphaned kittens of all ages. This life saving work is heavy on our resources, and we often need supplies. Kittens require frequent feedings, basic supplies and medical care to help them survive. We depend on the donations of the community to help save these vulnerable lives. Donate, Foster, Volunteer, Spay and Neuter. This is how

hours old to months old. The SPCA advises the public to search for mom cats nearby before taking kittens away from found locations. Mother cats spook easily and tend to run off when other people are around and their babies need them. Don't worry, they will come back! No mom in sight? That's okay too. The Fredericksburg SPCA, local vets and online resources can walk you through how to care for neonatal kittens. You can sign up to foster with us to ensure the kittens receive their

28

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Siobhan Young is the Social Media Specialist at Fredericksburg SPCA

marla wears a halo by georgia strentz

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

you can help! We are always looking for supply donations of KMR (milk replacement formula), dry and wet kitten food, and non-clumping litter to care for kittens in our care. You can find our wishlist at Fredspca.org. With support from our community we can expand our life saving efforts and get these kittens off the streets and into loving homes!

Book Mark

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

540-898-0737

Hartwood Pet Lodge LLC has published its second book, Marla Wears A Halo, written by Marla Beagle, Hartwood Pet Lodge Manager. Like her first book, The Adventures of Hot Cocoa and Salt Water Taffy, Marla Beagle teamed up with local Fredericksburg artist, Joan Critz Limbrick to bring children's book's alive through expressive watercolor. In Marla Wears A Halo, Marla Beagle tells the tale of her dog's life - A standard poodle, named Marla, is rescued from a farm by a compassionate trio - a local enforcement official, a veterinarian, and boxer rescue group volunteers. Although Marla ultimately loses her sight, she perseveres and finds a wonderful purpose in life. Marla Wears A Halo showcases many of Marla's real-life experiences. With the help of a second rescue group, Marla finds her forever family and shares her time with a special little girl named Faith. Marla and Faith realize they are alike, and together, they make each other feel beautiful. The last sentence of the book is printed in braille.

Ms. Holly Frisch, President, National Fredericksburg Chapter, Federation of the Blind of Virginia and Volunteers for the Blind (VFB), Fredericksburg, Virginia, and VFB interns were instrumental in printing braille for the book. Holly's mother always felt strongly about the calming influence animals have on children. "Marla Wears A Halo is a charmingly endearing book. I'm glad that children will be exposed to braille. It plays an essential, critical role in literacy for everyone who is either totally blind or has significantly limited vision," said Holly. Carol McElhaney Shelton writing as Marla Beagle, grew up in Yacht Haven

Estates, Alexandria, Virginia, with her first standard poodle named Pierre. Carol and her husband are committed to helping dogs by transporting, sheltering, locating forever families, and donating a portion of each book sale to a non-profit animal rescue organization at the end of each month. Hartwood Pet Lodge LLC, a rescue lodge, is in Stafford County, Hartwood Virginia, just a few miles from the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Please contact Marla Beagle (Carol Shelton) at poodletaxi@gmail.com or 540.841.4260

Four ways to purchase books: 1) buy online at hartwoodpetlodge.com; 2) buy on site - see hartwoodpetlodge.com calendar for locations; 3) buy through Amazon.com; and 4) direct email with details to poodletaxi@gmail.com.

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

DOWNTOWNERS

A visual Celebration of our community

373-7847

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

By Jo Loving kids,who can actually learn history, but in a very fun way. You will enjoy the wonderful and knowledgeable park rangers and volunteers at the Fredericksburg Military Cemetery. You can also pick up some outstanding healthful drinks and food right next door on Lafayette ,no junk food for your kids in our town!

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties 810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684 Sketch #45: “Shelton Cottage” Whenever I drive to downtown Fredericksburg from Stafford, I love to cut through Falmouth and take River Road. It’s a beautiful drive. One of my favorite sites along the way is historic Shelton Cottage. I’d thought often about sketching the simple structure. By chance, I got an email a couple of months ago from someone whose distant family had settled the Falmouth area and once occupied Shelton Cottage. It was the perfect inspiration to get my pen moving and finally do this drawing. While I have ironically traced some of my family ancestry to the Northern Neck area during the mid-1600s, I myself am not a native to this area having grown up in Texas. I always find it fascinating to talk with someone whose family has managed to stay in the same area for generation after generation. And there are quite a few of those families proudly still around this area. But this nicest thing I’ve found is that regardless of whether they are a newbie to the area (which I consider myself to be, even though I’ve now been here for twenty years) or whether they’ve been here for generations, I’ve found people fo be very welcoming … especially in the local creative arts community. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

Read for Free Today at fredericksburgwriters.com 30

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

musings

be a tourist in your hometown by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

From My Porch

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Our town, Fredericksburg, Virginia, has a big, interesting downtown. It spreads out, twists around odd corners, includes very new( fabulous) buildings and also very old (also fabulous) and many historic buildings, parks, a beautiful river right smack-dab bordering our main Princess Anne/Sophia St. Food, food, food, our farmers market, outside concerts, street after street of older restored homes with good old Southern hospitality, our University of Mary Washington, Mary Washington's home, (yes his mom and her daughters house also) Let us not forget the complete walking and biking/ trail system! Fredericksburg is eclectic, beautiful and friendly. Walk a few more blocks,or take a horse carriage exploration ride, discover the side streets too. This town of ours is very artsy, and attracts interesting people to visit and live here. The unusual stores, so many artists and craftsmen around every corner, made in Virginia products, from wine to handmade furniture, many products made in the stores in our downtown shops. Eating the delicious and varied foods inside and on the streetside tables, and even on the roof, you will not be disappointed. The fringe areas of town spreading out from downtown are interesting also. Beautiful neighborhoods with many older homes, friendly people who say hi! Follow Lafayette Blvd, from the train station and end up at the memorable site of the Battlefield Visitors Center display especially in July, when the flag display, the illumination, special tours, fireworks and the bookstore has many interesting historical souvenirs. They have several guided walking tours 7 days a week,which makes it so easy to come see the movie about Fredericksburg, then take a tour! This can be a really great part of your vacation for your

We have a wonderful hotel (Courtyard Marriott) and many bed and breakfast establishments,so you can stay right downtown where all the interesting action takes place. Fredericksburg downtown is very dog friendly, and has alot of pooches, and feline friends who live in and above the stores. Some of these friendly canines and felines have gotten to be downtown celebrities, and quite well-known from stories in our Front Porch paper.(AK "Pumpkin," "Downtown Dewey," "Kenny") Don't forget our wonderful downtown walking and bike trails, which are so interesting and refreshing! This gal about town and her buddy Bailey, heading out on her 3 wheeler to the river, with a good book, her Front Porch magazine, and some grapes and a cool watermelon drink. What a great town, when you know you can have this freedom and safely to do your thing.

More info. on: FXBG Military Visitors Center Lafayette Blvd www.nps.gov/frsp Mary Washington House 1200 Charles St washingtonheritagemuseums.org Kenmore Plantation 1201 Washington Ave http://kenmore.org/ or Visit the FXBG Visitors Center 706 Caroline St visitfred.com/listings/things-to-do/

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

"It was one of those humid days when the atmosphere gets confused. Sitting on the porch, you could feel it: the air wishing it was water." ~Jeffrey Eugenides Today is one of those hot, humid days that makes me long for the cool, crispness of Autumn. But then, I would miss the beauty of the world that can be found only on such days as these. For the past several months, I've been back and forth to Oklahoma three times, have stopped along the way, and have been on my own porch far too few times. So, I thought I'd share a little picture into the world From My Porch and other porches. Last week, it was hot, humid, and rainy. On a rare break from the rain, my neighbor ventured out. Libby was on her way to the horse barn. Following her, in a straight line, were five chickens, one goose that looks like Mother Goose from the children's illustrations, and three white geese. Ahead of her were two miniature horses and a beautiful retired racehorse. All of Libby and Joe's animals are rescue animals. They and their seven children, several of whom they fostered, then adopted, tend to the animals with love and care. I have the rare privilege of watching their daily lives unfold, from my porch. So, on this day, when we had a welcome hour's break from the rain, the animal parade to the barn began. I watched, quietly. The birds were chirping, happy to have a little sun. A couple of them were sitting on the fence. Libby carried on to the barn, unaware that she had started a procession. The chickens were clucking a little, occasionally turning to look behind them. Mother Goose was honking, keeping the other geese in line. And then, there was the kitten. The kitten was late to the party. He caught sight of it from across the yard, and then took off like a panther, running at full speed to catch up. Once he made it to the line of animals, he joined the parade, slowing to a bouncing walk, the way kittens do when they are containing their energy. Libby's parade continued to the barn, which is just out of sight of my porch. As they ducked into the barn, the yard was quiet, except for the fence-squatting birds, whose melody filled the drippy air with a lilt. Then, there was a cacophony of geese honking, chickens clucking, horses snorting, and, faintly, a mew. Libby was feeding her entourage. It was a simple act on a simple day, but it was a celebration - of life, of the relationship between nature and human, of love.

On another day a few weeks ago, I sat on a porch in Oklahoma with my sister. We were just doing sisterly things talking about her plants (she has a green thumb), life, and the dry heat. Oklahoma is interesting - on each day for the past few months when we sat on her porch, a healthy breeze was blowing. Although it was hot, the strong breeze made the atmosphere bearable, even if it was a warm breeze. What made it pleasant was two sisters, talking, sharing, visiting with neighbors who would pass by on the sidewalk, and being together. For a while, we were little girls again, just talking, just being, just enjoying being outdoors together, once again, affirming our love by our presence and common bonds. On one of the trips to Oklahoma, I was joined by my dear friend, Shirley, who lives in North Carolina, and whom I had not seen for a few years. Shirley and I have a relationship that does not require daily communication. We catch up on the phone and are friends who can pick up where we left off the moment we see each other. Taking a road trip of that distance was a gift. We both tend to have full plates, so on this trip, we just talked, relaxed, unwound, and were our truest selves. Each day, we sat on the porch of whichever place we were staying and reflected, shared, and sometimes, we just sat in silence. It was glorious. In Oklahoma, it was hot, but the wide porch and company made the heat seem to fade. Porches are great places for visiting with friends and strangers. We met many people who were from a variety of places throughout the US. We were joined by the common bond of humanity. Back home now, life has resumed its pace. This morning, I was on the porch with my dog. He was lying in the sun. The air was thick with humidity. And then, I heard it - a hen clucking for all she was worth. She appeared out of the corner of my eye, half walking, half running. She saw the picnic table and lingered under it for a moment. Dixie, the retired racehorse, was grazing, her tail moving gently from side to side. The hen stopped her clucking for a moment, then started up again, running and clucking, until she saw Joe's truck by the fence. She slowed to a walk, and joined another hen under the truck, in the shade. She and the other hen clucked with one another for a few minutes, then they sat down, content in the shade of the truck. It was reminiscent of my visits with my sister and with Shirley. In the shade of a porch, or the shade under a truck - we are sociable creatures, even if in companionable silence. Jo Loving will be on the porch this evening, watching the moon rise & the stars pop out She hopes you will take a moment to enjoy the view from a porch, and just breathe in your surroundings.

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

DOWNTOWNERS

A visual Celebration of our community

373-7847

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

By Jo Loving kids,who can actually learn history, but in a very fun way. You will enjoy the wonderful and knowledgeable park rangers and volunteers at the Fredericksburg Military Cemetery. You can also pick up some outstanding healthful drinks and food right next door on Lafayette ,no junk food for your kids in our town!

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties 810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684 Sketch #45: “Shelton Cottage” Whenever I drive to downtown Fredericksburg from Stafford, I love to cut through Falmouth and take River Road. It’s a beautiful drive. One of my favorite sites along the way is historic Shelton Cottage. I’d thought often about sketching the simple structure. By chance, I got an email a couple of months ago from someone whose distant family had settled the Falmouth area and once occupied Shelton Cottage. It was the perfect inspiration to get my pen moving and finally do this drawing. While I have ironically traced some of my family ancestry to the Northern Neck area during the mid-1600s, I myself am not a native to this area having grown up in Texas. I always find it fascinating to talk with someone whose family has managed to stay in the same area for generation after generation. And there are quite a few of those families proudly still around this area. But this nicest thing I’ve found is that regardless of whether they are a newbie to the area (which I consider myself to be, even though I’ve now been here for twenty years) or whether they’ve been here for generations, I’ve found people fo be very welcoming … especially in the local creative arts community. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

Read for Free Today at fredericksburgwriters.com 30

July 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

musings

be a tourist in your hometown by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

From My Porch

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Our town, Fredericksburg, Virginia, has a big, interesting downtown. It spreads out, twists around odd corners, includes very new( fabulous) buildings and also very old (also fabulous) and many historic buildings, parks, a beautiful river right smack-dab bordering our main Princess Anne/Sophia St. Food, food, food, our farmers market, outside concerts, street after street of older restored homes with good old Southern hospitality, our University of Mary Washington, Mary Washington's home, (yes his mom and her daughters house also) Let us not forget the complete walking and biking/ trail system! Fredericksburg is eclectic, beautiful and friendly. Walk a few more blocks,or take a horse carriage exploration ride, discover the side streets too. This town of ours is very artsy, and attracts interesting people to visit and live here. The unusual stores, so many artists and craftsmen around every corner, made in Virginia products, from wine to handmade furniture, many products made in the stores in our downtown shops. Eating the delicious and varied foods inside and on the streetside tables, and even on the roof, you will not be disappointed. The fringe areas of town spreading out from downtown are interesting also. Beautiful neighborhoods with many older homes, friendly people who say hi! Follow Lafayette Blvd, from the train station and end up at the memorable site of the Battlefield Visitors Center display especially in July, when the flag display, the illumination, special tours, fireworks and the bookstore has many interesting historical souvenirs. They have several guided walking tours 7 days a week,which makes it so easy to come see the movie about Fredericksburg, then take a tour! This can be a really great part of your vacation for your

We have a wonderful hotel (Courtyard Marriott) and many bed and breakfast establishments,so you can stay right downtown where all the interesting action takes place. Fredericksburg downtown is very dog friendly, and has alot of pooches, and feline friends who live in and above the stores. Some of these friendly canines and felines have gotten to be downtown celebrities, and quite well-known from stories in our Front Porch paper.(AK "Pumpkin," "Downtown Dewey," "Kenny") Don't forget our wonderful downtown walking and bike trails, which are so interesting and refreshing! This gal about town and her buddy Bailey, heading out on her 3 wheeler to the river, with a good book, her Front Porch magazine, and some grapes and a cool watermelon drink. What a great town, when you know you can have this freedom and safely to do your thing.

More info. on: FXBG Military Visitors Center Lafayette Blvd www.nps.gov/frsp Mary Washington House 1200 Charles St washingtonheritagemuseums.org Kenmore Plantation 1201 Washington Ave http://kenmore.org/ or Visit the FXBG Visitors Center 706 Caroline St visitfred.com/listings/things-to-do/

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

"It was one of those humid days when the atmosphere gets confused. Sitting on the porch, you could feel it: the air wishing it was water." ~Jeffrey Eugenides Today is one of those hot, humid days that makes me long for the cool, crispness of Autumn. But then, I would miss the beauty of the world that can be found only on such days as these. For the past several months, I've been back and forth to Oklahoma three times, have stopped along the way, and have been on my own porch far too few times. So, I thought I'd share a little picture into the world From My Porch and other porches. Last week, it was hot, humid, and rainy. On a rare break from the rain, my neighbor ventured out. Libby was on her way to the horse barn. Following her, in a straight line, were five chickens, one goose that looks like Mother Goose from the children's illustrations, and three white geese. Ahead of her were two miniature horses and a beautiful retired racehorse. All of Libby and Joe's animals are rescue animals. They and their seven children, several of whom they fostered, then adopted, tend to the animals with love and care. I have the rare privilege of watching their daily lives unfold, from my porch. So, on this day, when we had a welcome hour's break from the rain, the animal parade to the barn began. I watched, quietly. The birds were chirping, happy to have a little sun. A couple of them were sitting on the fence. Libby carried on to the barn, unaware that she had started a procession. The chickens were clucking a little, occasionally turning to look behind them. Mother Goose was honking, keeping the other geese in line. And then, there was the kitten. The kitten was late to the party. He caught sight of it from across the yard, and then took off like a panther, running at full speed to catch up. Once he made it to the line of animals, he joined the parade, slowing to a bouncing walk, the way kittens do when they are containing their energy. Libby's parade continued to the barn, which is just out of sight of my porch. As they ducked into the barn, the yard was quiet, except for the fence-squatting birds, whose melody filled the drippy air with a lilt. Then, there was a cacophony of geese honking, chickens clucking, horses snorting, and, faintly, a mew. Libby was feeding her entourage. It was a simple act on a simple day, but it was a celebration - of life, of the relationship between nature and human, of love.

On another day a few weeks ago, I sat on a porch in Oklahoma with my sister. We were just doing sisterly things talking about her plants (she has a green thumb), life, and the dry heat. Oklahoma is interesting - on each day for the past few months when we sat on her porch, a healthy breeze was blowing. Although it was hot, the strong breeze made the atmosphere bearable, even if it was a warm breeze. What made it pleasant was two sisters, talking, sharing, visiting with neighbors who would pass by on the sidewalk, and being together. For a while, we were little girls again, just talking, just being, just enjoying being outdoors together, once again, affirming our love by our presence and common bonds. On one of the trips to Oklahoma, I was joined by my dear friend, Shirley, who lives in North Carolina, and whom I had not seen for a few years. Shirley and I have a relationship that does not require daily communication. We catch up on the phone and are friends who can pick up where we left off the moment we see each other. Taking a road trip of that distance was a gift. We both tend to have full plates, so on this trip, we just talked, relaxed, unwound, and were our truest selves. Each day, we sat on the porch of whichever place we were staying and reflected, shared, and sometimes, we just sat in silence. It was glorious. In Oklahoma, it was hot, but the wide porch and company made the heat seem to fade. Porches are great places for visiting with friends and strangers. We met many people who were from a variety of places throughout the US. We were joined by the common bond of humanity. Back home now, life has resumed its pace. This morning, I was on the porch with my dog. He was lying in the sun. The air was thick with humidity. And then, I heard it - a hen clucking for all she was worth. She appeared out of the corner of my eye, half walking, half running. She saw the picnic table and lingered under it for a moment. Dixie, the retired racehorse, was grazing, her tail moving gently from side to side. The hen stopped her clucking for a moment, then started up again, running and clucking, until she saw Joe's truck by the fence. She slowed to a walk, and joined another hen under the truck, in the shade. She and the other hen clucked with one another for a few minutes, then they sat down, content in the shade of the truck. It was reminiscent of my visits with my sister and with Shirley. In the shade of a porch, or the shade under a truck - we are sociable creatures, even if in companionable silence. Jo Loving will be on the porch this evening, watching the moon rise & the stars pop out She hopes you will take a moment to enjoy the view from a porch, and just breathe in your surroundings.

front porch fredericksburg

July 2018

31


Front Porch Fredericksburg - July 2018  
Front Porch Fredericksburg - July 2018  
Advertisement