Page 1


contents

closeups 10

karl karch ...a tireless advocate

11

Bill & Elaine Mason ...Makers dISTRICT

26

hUBERT jACKSON sPIRITS & bEYOND

26

porch talk .

18

history’s stories.: 1777 fxbg MEETING our heritage: .LET IT SNOW

19

FXBG MUSIC: ROBERT KEELIN

20

Senior Care: ADVOCATE FOR SENIORS

21

emancipated Patients: INNOVATIONS WELLNESS: BRAIN HEALTH

22

It’s all energy: BALANCE renew: DO NOT MAKE NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS

23

life in motion: YOU ARE NOT A BEAR

24

art in the ‘burg: DREAM BIG ONLINE ART DIRECTORY

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG

27

PORCHLIGHT: KEEP ON SLACKING

28

companions: NEW COMPANION FOR NEW YEAR

3

WINTER RESTAURANT WEEK

30

fredericksburg sketches

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

31

from my porch: RING IN NEW YEAR WITH KINDNESS

6

Master Gardeners: SEED SWAP

7

On the trails:: CLARICE BARKER’S

25

I have a friend: INSPIRATION & RESOLUTIONS

11

Poetryman: RAPPAHANNOCK WINTER

...And more!

12

Vino: WHAT’S THE GRAPE?

5

nEW hOME FOR ARTFUL DIMENSIONS gALLERY

13

season’s bounty: SLOW COOING

14

cooking with kyle: HASSELBACK POTATOES

9

Mark Prieto...art of memory

15

everything greens: WELCOME BACK SUN

16-17

Calendar of events

31

SALUTE TO 2017 FREDERICKSBURGERS

Cover: “Faces” By David c. kennedy

CARIBBEAN TEX-MEX RESTAURANT Fresh Made-To-Order Food Family Friendly Meeting Rooms/Private Parties Happy Hour/ 3 bars, 2 inside, 1 outside Outdoor Seating Overlooking Rappahannock River Catering/Take-Out www.donmoncho.com 1101 Sophia St, Fxbg, 373-0870 10151 Jefferson Davis Highway, Spotsy, 642-4204 2

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

January 12-21 by Bill freehling

.8

31

Winter Restaurant Week

Legume Kitchen & Bar, “Gnocchi” Dozens of Downtown Fredericksburg Restaurants to Participate

Restaurant Week. “Dining is such an integral part of the downtown Fredericksburg experience,” said Fredericksburg Visitor Center Manager Danelle Rose, who coordinates the annual event. “For many, Restaurant Week provides a wonderful introduction to downtown’s many topnotch restaurants.” Similar to past years, Winter Restaurant Week will feature a variety of two- and three-ccourse specials for $10.18, $20.18 or $30.18. Sample menus will be available prior to the event on the

participating restaurants, and bring the completed passport to the Fredericksburg Visitor Center at 706 Caroline St. Everybody who brings a passport with five or more stamps to the Visitor Center by 5 p.m. January 22 will qualify for a random drawing to win the $250 in cards. The City of Fredericksburg is sponsoring the promotion. Passports are available at the Visitor Center, participating restaurants and VisitFred.com. Winter Restaurant Week comes during a traditionally slow

Bill Freehling is the City of Fredericksburg’s Director of Economic Development and Tourism and also a downtown resident who loves partaking in Restaurant Week – both Summer and Winter.

Downtown Fredericksburg’s annual Winter Restaurant Week will begin January 12 and run through January 21. The annual event showcases the many talents of downtown’s eclectic mix of award-winning restaurateurs. The list of participants was still being finalized as of this writing, but it’s expected to include most downtown restaurants. Nearly 30 participated in last year’s Winter

Foode, “Eggplant Parmesan”

Castiglias Italian Restaurant, “Salmon”

“Fredericksburg, Virginia Economic Development and Tourism” Facebook page and on the Winter Restaurant Week event page on VisitFred.com. “You’ll be amazed at the variety and quality of menu items available during Winter Restaurant Week,” Rose said. “Our dedicated chefs embrace this opportunity to showcase their talents to both new and returning customers.” People who dine at five or more participating restaurants during Winter Restaurant Week can qualify to win $250 worth of downtown gift cards. To qualify, diners should get a Restaurant Week passport, have it stamped after eating at

season for restaurants following the holiday boom. It therefore provides a nice boost to restaurants while giving people another great reason to come downtown to eat. Winter Restaurant Week is one of two restaurant weeks offered during the year. Summer Restaurant Week is planned again this coming July. “Our Restaurant Week events have become a twice-annual fixture for downtown, and we can’t wait to see what our great chefs have in store this year,” Rose said. “Come on down and experience it for yourself!”

The Bavarian Chef, “Chicken Schnitzel”

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

3


contents

closeups 10

karl karch ...a tireless advocate

11

Bill & Elaine Mason ...Makers dISTRICT

26

hUBERT jACKSON sPIRITS & bEYOND

26

porch talk .

18

history’s stories.: 1777 fxbg MEETING our heritage: .LET IT SNOW

19

FXBG MUSIC: ROBERT KEELIN

20

Senior Care: ADVOCATE FOR SENIORS

21

emancipated Patients: INNOVATIONS WELLNESS: BRAIN HEALTH

22

It’s all energy: BALANCE renew: DO NOT MAKE NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS

23

life in motion: YOU ARE NOT A BEAR

24

art in the ‘burg: DREAM BIG ONLINE ART DIRECTORY

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG

27

PORCHLIGHT: KEEP ON SLACKING

28

companions: NEW COMPANION FOR NEW YEAR

3

WINTER RESTAURANT WEEK

30

fredericksburg sketches

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

31

from my porch: RING IN NEW YEAR WITH KINDNESS

6

Master Gardeners: SEED SWAP

7

On the trails:: CLARICE BARKER’S

25

I have a friend: INSPIRATION & RESOLUTIONS

11

Poetryman: RAPPAHANNOCK WINTER

...And more!

12

Vino: WHAT’S THE GRAPE?

5

nEW hOME FOR ARTFUL DIMENSIONS gALLERY

13

season’s bounty: SLOW COOING

14

cooking with kyle: HASSELBACK POTATOES

9

Mark Prieto...art of memory

15

everything greens: WELCOME BACK SUN

16-17

Calendar of events

31

SALUTE TO 2017 FREDERICKSBURGERS

Cover: “Faces” By David c. kennedy

CARIBBEAN TEX-MEX RESTAURANT Fresh Made-To-Order Food Family Friendly Meeting Rooms/Private Parties Happy Hour/ 3 bars, 2 inside, 1 outside Outdoor Seating Overlooking Rappahannock River Catering/Take-Out www.donmoncho.com 1101 Sophia St, Fxbg, 373-0870 10151 Jefferson Davis Highway, Spotsy, 642-4204 2

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

January 12-21 by Bill freehling

.8

31

Winter Restaurant Week

Legume Kitchen & Bar, “Gnocchi” Dozens of Downtown Fredericksburg Restaurants to Participate

Restaurant Week. “Dining is such an integral part of the downtown Fredericksburg experience,” said Fredericksburg Visitor Center Manager Danelle Rose, who coordinates the annual event. “For many, Restaurant Week provides a wonderful introduction to downtown’s many topnotch restaurants.” Similar to past years, Winter Restaurant Week will feature a variety of two- and three-ccourse specials for $10.18, $20.18 or $30.18. Sample menus will be available prior to the event on the

participating restaurants, and bring the completed passport to the Fredericksburg Visitor Center at 706 Caroline St. Everybody who brings a passport with five or more stamps to the Visitor Center by 5 p.m. January 22 will qualify for a random drawing to win the $250 in cards. The City of Fredericksburg is sponsoring the promotion. Passports are available at the Visitor Center, participating restaurants and VisitFred.com. Winter Restaurant Week comes during a traditionally slow

Bill Freehling is the City of Fredericksburg’s Director of Economic Development and Tourism and also a downtown resident who loves partaking in Restaurant Week – both Summer and Winter.

Downtown Fredericksburg’s annual Winter Restaurant Week will begin January 12 and run through January 21. The annual event showcases the many talents of downtown’s eclectic mix of award-winning restaurateurs. The list of participants was still being finalized as of this writing, but it’s expected to include most downtown restaurants. Nearly 30 participated in last year’s Winter

Foode, “Eggplant Parmesan”

Castiglias Italian Restaurant, “Salmon”

“Fredericksburg, Virginia Economic Development and Tourism” Facebook page and on the Winter Restaurant Week event page on VisitFred.com. “You’ll be amazed at the variety and quality of menu items available during Winter Restaurant Week,” Rose said. “Our dedicated chefs embrace this opportunity to showcase their talents to both new and returning customers.” People who dine at five or more participating restaurants during Winter Restaurant Week can qualify to win $250 worth of downtown gift cards. To qualify, diners should get a Restaurant Week passport, have it stamped after eating at

season for restaurants following the holiday boom. It therefore provides a nice boost to restaurants while giving people another great reason to come downtown to eat. Winter Restaurant Week is one of two restaurant weeks offered during the year. Summer Restaurant Week is planned again this coming July. “Our Restaurant Week events have become a twice-annual fixture for downtown, and we can’t wait to see what our great chefs have in store this year,” Rose said. “Come on down and experience it for yourself!”

The Bavarian Chef, “Chicken Schnitzel”

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

3


Jo Loving

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Doreen Barnes A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Judy Chaisom Ashleigh Chevalier Barbara Deal Scott DeHaven Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Bill Freehling K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch Susan Kenney David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Barbara Possey M.L. Powers Liz Ritoli Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Pat Smith Georgia Strentz Jeremy Sutton James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Carolyn Van der Jagt Phyllis Whitley Tina Will Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Artful Dimensions

January 2018

Gallery’s New Home at 922 Caroline St

choose to heal

By Barbara Posey

by jo loving Always choose to heal, not to hurt; to forgive, not to despise; to persevere, not to quit; to smile, not to frown, and to love not to hate! At the end of life, what really matters is not what we bought, but what we built; not what we got, but what we shared; not our competence but our character; and not our success, but our significance. Live a life that matters. Live a life that cares... ~ Ritu Ghatourey

A friend recently asked, “If you could change one decision you made in your life, what would it be, and what would you do, instead?” I didn’t answer, but instead traveled down the rabbit-hole of thought, philosophy, and examination. What is the point of such a question? What would be your reaction? Your thoughts? Your actions? As I pondered over the next few days, I intentionally traveled through my own impressions of the life I have led, examining this decision, that decision, this action, and that action. The truth is, there are many things I would love to have done differently, but the fact is, I cannot. As we travel through life, we make wrong decisions, we make mistakes, and we have regrets. Those are the things that, if we live a life of introspection, we change. We move forward. So, what of this examination and this question? Ahhh . . . that is the point. Every decision we have made brought us to this place in our life. Had I not made certain mistakes, some of the most joyous events would never have taken form, so were they truly mistakes? Or were they, instead, opportunities to learn, to grow, and to change? I choose to believe the latter.

Happy New Year Fredericksburg Let’s Make 2018 A Kind Year

Front porch fredericksburg

So, if we strive to live a life that cares, as Ghatourey compels us, what form will that take? Where have kindnesses been shown you, and where have you been kind? How did it feel, both ways? What if we were kind, just for the sake of being kind, not for the rewards we reap, but to help someone, in small or in large ways, considering others before ourselves. A story: There was a time in my life that was filled with stress, and I felt that the world was closing in. I was taking courses towards an advanced degree, raising children, working full time, and going through a very rough patch in life. I did not register for my last semester. The phone rang. It was the President of the University. He asked why I had not registered. I was a good student, chosen by my peers and by the University to represent them, and had interacted with him on several occasions. When I explained that it was a bad time to carry on with my studies, he listened. Then, he said something that changed the course of many future events in my life. “I’ve taken the liberty to enroll you anyway. You have a bright future. You have come this far. You can do it. I will help you in any way I can.” Wow. Really? The President of the University cared enough to reach out and offer help? That one conversation gave me hope. It spurred me into action and out of my doldrums. It was inspiring, and I went on to finish that semester. I didn’t call on him, but in my spirit, in my heart, it helped to know that if I needed help, I could. He did not have to do this. There were plenty of other students, students

In October 2011, Artful Dimensions Gallery opened its doors at 911 Charles Street, fulfilling a dream of many years shared by Christine LushRodriguez, (below) president of the gallery, with a small group of founding board members. The board created the gallery space from an empty workshop space with a shoestring budget, sweat, muscles, and parental authority. Comprising about 20 member artists at with better academic and personal qualities than I, and yet, he called me. He cared. As we move into the New Year, one of the themes of Front Porch Fredericksburg will be kindness. Fredericksburg is a community of heart and kindness. Will you share your story of kindness with us? Are you planning to work on behalf of others, or have you been doing so for a while? Has someone been kind to you? What was the result? Did it brighten your day? Change your life? Set you on a new course towards a goal? Call, email, or drop us a letter, and while you think about it…read this issue from cover to cover.

Jo Loving is an adventurer who may never truly retire, a retired Federal Executive, former AmeriCorps Park Ranger, a nurse, a fashion consultant, and is a regular contributor to Front Porch. She lived in the Fredericksburg area for 26 years, and considers it the home of her heart. She is mother of three grown children, and grandmother to five, who, like us, will be focusing on kindness this year.

opening, Artful Dimensions filled a unique niche in the area's art community, providing the only venue dedicated exclusively to three-dimensional art between and including DC and Richmond. In the years following, Artful Dimensions has enriched the local art scene with many classes and workshops. Member artists have taught directly or arranged for guest artists of national and international standing to teach classes in creating wearable art, building art-robots, paper making, making fused-glass art, and many others. Artful Dimensions has partnered with other non-profit organizations to raise funds for such endeavors as providing veterans with server dogs, among others. The gallery has sponsored student shows, giving experience and exposure to aspiring young artists. Each April since 2014 has seen the invitational Dimensional Expressions juried show in which area, and now national, artists participate. At the end of October 2017, Artful Dimensions Gallery began a new

chapter, saying farewell to the Charles space with the community. As usual Street gallery. An interim show, graciously we will be offering a wide range of art hosted by Coldwell Banker Elite at 520 experiences and special workshops as Williams Street in November, bridged the well as a constant availability of unique gap between having to leave Charles Street 3 Dimensional works of art. and readying the new space at 922 The gallery will have 6 Caroline Street. working studios along with a large, A venerable storefront recently high ceilinged gallery display space. vacated by an antique The Charles Street mall, the new space location, while it Artful Dimensions fill(s) needed a lot of was a wonderful a unique niche in the area's preparation. First, out art community, providing the working and with the old: led by Joe teaching space, with only venue dedicated Wilkinson, (below) a welcoming exclusively to three-d dimensional founding board member atmosphere and art between and including DC creative energy, was and talented and Richmond. woodworker, members a little off the gutted the space , beaten path. The removed two drop ceilings, removed floor Caroline Street location can support tiles, cleaned debris, scraped off old paint. new members as well as drawing more This work revealed a stunning pressed-ttin visitors and students. ceiling, a terrazzo floor, The doors at 922 Caroline will original brick work, original open on First Friday, January 5, 2018, wallpaper and many other with our trademark generous snack historical treasures. And now, spread, wine, and live music provided by work progresses quickly on guitarist David Toves. Don’t miss it! the new: framing out studios, fresh paint, cleaning the old adhesive off the floor. The gathering of efforts by our members has created a wonderful community relationship that has only been strengthened by doing all of this work with our own hands. The gallery will be configured in such a way as to preserve as many historical stories as possible so we can share the story of our artwork and our

Barbara Posey, a Needlefelted Artist and a member of Artful Dimensions Gallery

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

5


Jo Loving

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Doreen Barnes A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Judy Chaisom Ashleigh Chevalier Barbara Deal Scott DeHaven Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Bill Freehling K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch Susan Kenney David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Barbara Possey M.L. Powers Liz Ritoli Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Pat Smith Georgia Strentz Jeremy Sutton James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Carolyn Van der Jagt Phyllis Whitley Tina Will Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Artful Dimensions

January 2018

Gallery’s New Home at 922 Caroline St

choose to heal

By Barbara Posey

by jo loving Always choose to heal, not to hurt; to forgive, not to despise; to persevere, not to quit; to smile, not to frown, and to love not to hate! At the end of life, what really matters is not what we bought, but what we built; not what we got, but what we shared; not our competence but our character; and not our success, but our significance. Live a life that matters. Live a life that cares... ~ Ritu Ghatourey

A friend recently asked, “If you could change one decision you made in your life, what would it be, and what would you do, instead?” I didn’t answer, but instead traveled down the rabbit-hole of thought, philosophy, and examination. What is the point of such a question? What would be your reaction? Your thoughts? Your actions? As I pondered over the next few days, I intentionally traveled through my own impressions of the life I have led, examining this decision, that decision, this action, and that action. The truth is, there are many things I would love to have done differently, but the fact is, I cannot. As we travel through life, we make wrong decisions, we make mistakes, and we have regrets. Those are the things that, if we live a life of introspection, we change. We move forward. So, what of this examination and this question? Ahhh . . . that is the point. Every decision we have made brought us to this place in our life. Had I not made certain mistakes, some of the most joyous events would never have taken form, so were they truly mistakes? Or were they, instead, opportunities to learn, to grow, and to change? I choose to believe the latter.

Happy New Year Fredericksburg Let’s Make 2018 A Kind Year

Front porch fredericksburg

So, if we strive to live a life that cares, as Ghatourey compels us, what form will that take? Where have kindnesses been shown you, and where have you been kind? How did it feel, both ways? What if we were kind, just for the sake of being kind, not for the rewards we reap, but to help someone, in small or in large ways, considering others before ourselves. A story: There was a time in my life that was filled with stress, and I felt that the world was closing in. I was taking courses towards an advanced degree, raising children, working full time, and going through a very rough patch in life. I did not register for my last semester. The phone rang. It was the President of the University. He asked why I had not registered. I was a good student, chosen by my peers and by the University to represent them, and had interacted with him on several occasions. When I explained that it was a bad time to carry on with my studies, he listened. Then, he said something that changed the course of many future events in my life. “I’ve taken the liberty to enroll you anyway. You have a bright future. You have come this far. You can do it. I will help you in any way I can.” Wow. Really? The President of the University cared enough to reach out and offer help? That one conversation gave me hope. It spurred me into action and out of my doldrums. It was inspiring, and I went on to finish that semester. I didn’t call on him, but in my spirit, in my heart, it helped to know that if I needed help, I could. He did not have to do this. There were plenty of other students, students

In October 2011, Artful Dimensions Gallery opened its doors at 911 Charles Street, fulfilling a dream of many years shared by Christine LushRodriguez, (below) president of the gallery, with a small group of founding board members. The board created the gallery space from an empty workshop space with a shoestring budget, sweat, muscles, and parental authority. Comprising about 20 member artists at with better academic and personal qualities than I, and yet, he called me. He cared. As we move into the New Year, one of the themes of Front Porch Fredericksburg will be kindness. Fredericksburg is a community of heart and kindness. Will you share your story of kindness with us? Are you planning to work on behalf of others, or have you been doing so for a while? Has someone been kind to you? What was the result? Did it brighten your day? Change your life? Set you on a new course towards a goal? Call, email, or drop us a letter, and while you think about it…read this issue from cover to cover.

Jo Loving is an adventurer who may never truly retire, a retired Federal Executive, former AmeriCorps Park Ranger, a nurse, a fashion consultant, and is a regular contributor to Front Porch. She lived in the Fredericksburg area for 26 years, and considers it the home of her heart. She is mother of three grown children, and grandmother to five, who, like us, will be focusing on kindness this year.

opening, Artful Dimensions filled a unique niche in the area's art community, providing the only venue dedicated exclusively to three-dimensional art between and including DC and Richmond. In the years following, Artful Dimensions has enriched the local art scene with many classes and workshops. Member artists have taught directly or arranged for guest artists of national and international standing to teach classes in creating wearable art, building art-robots, paper making, making fused-glass art, and many others. Artful Dimensions has partnered with other non-profit organizations to raise funds for such endeavors as providing veterans with server dogs, among others. The gallery has sponsored student shows, giving experience and exposure to aspiring young artists. Each April since 2014 has seen the invitational Dimensional Expressions juried show in which area, and now national, artists participate. At the end of October 2017, Artful Dimensions Gallery began a new

chapter, saying farewell to the Charles space with the community. As usual Street gallery. An interim show, graciously we will be offering a wide range of art hosted by Coldwell Banker Elite at 520 experiences and special workshops as Williams Street in November, bridged the well as a constant availability of unique gap between having to leave Charles Street 3 Dimensional works of art. and readying the new space at 922 The gallery will have 6 Caroline Street. working studios along with a large, A venerable storefront recently high ceilinged gallery display space. vacated by an antique The Charles Street mall, the new space location, while it Artful Dimensions fill(s) needed a lot of was a wonderful a unique niche in the area's preparation. First, out art community, providing the working and with the old: led by Joe teaching space, with only venue dedicated Wilkinson, (below) a welcoming exclusively to three-d dimensional founding board member atmosphere and art between and including DC creative energy, was and talented and Richmond. woodworker, members a little off the gutted the space , beaten path. The removed two drop ceilings, removed floor Caroline Street location can support tiles, cleaned debris, scraped off old paint. new members as well as drawing more This work revealed a stunning pressed-ttin visitors and students. ceiling, a terrazzo floor, The doors at 922 Caroline will original brick work, original open on First Friday, January 5, 2018, wallpaper and many other with our trademark generous snack historical treasures. And now, spread, wine, and live music provided by work progresses quickly on guitarist David Toves. Don’t miss it! the new: framing out studios, fresh paint, cleaning the old adhesive off the floor. The gathering of efforts by our members has created a wonderful community relationship that has only been strengthened by doing all of this work with our own hands. The gallery will be configured in such a way as to preserve as many historical stories as possible so we can share the story of our artwork and our

Barbara Posey, a Needlefelted Artist and a member of Artful Dimensions Gallery

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

5


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? The Love of gardening & great food By Tina Will

Save and Swap Your Seeds Onward into the new year! Sow seeds of friendship, and make new connections by coming to our National Seed Swap event on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at the downtown CRRL library auditorium, 1201 Caroline Street, from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free and open to the public. All are welcome; everyone comes to learn or share knowledge, trade seeds and ask questions. The event is sponsored by the Central Rappahannock Area Extension Master Gardeners. Information, speaker schedule, and guidance on what to and what not to bring is also on our website for this event: mgacra.org. What in the world is National Seed Swap Day? Saving and sharing seeds is not a new idea., but ten years ago National Seed Swap Day was declared when Washington Gardener Magazine hosted the first of these on January 26, 2006 and it was and is usually held on the last Saturday in January. The first event was a success and people started organizing these events around the country. They are often held at libraries or arboretums; our Virginia Arboretum in Boyce, VA hosts one too, and there is a listing of other seed swap events

Clarice Barker: a life sustained by water at https://seedswapday.blogspot.com/. All over the country, including Fredericksburg, people have come to love freshly grown produce. Many of these are gardeners who also want to gather favorite seeds from successful crops. So this effort was born with the work of dedicated people who grow fresh produce, and want to share the seeds and also save some of the seeds in local seed libraries. Seed libraries have formed which have the library like purpose of “borrowing” the seed, growing it out, and returning some of the new seed to the library the next year. This keeps the store of seeds current and viable. It is definitely a grass roots, but growing movement! There is a website for more information: seedlibraries.org. Saving seeds is also a global effort. An international seed bank exists in Svalbard, Norway (croptrust.org), and there are many others. Two are in Decorah, Iowa, and Fort Collins, Colorado, but there are over 1700 ‘genebanks’worldwide. They preserve seeds of food crops and other plants, and if need arises these seeds can be grown in areas where drought, insects, or poor management have created a food shortage (croptrust.org).

What to do on January 27 Bring seeds from your summer bounty and/or ornamental plants in labeled packets, and take home new varieties to grow. Some seeds are not allowed: invasive plants and noxious weeds. The list for those plants is on this website: www.invasive.org/species/list. Even if you do not have seeds to trade, come anyway! It is a great place to meet and talk to other gardeners and hear informative talks by David Roos on gardening tips, Anne Little on bluebirds and how to attract them to your yard, and Barbara Ellison on botanical photography.

There will be tables with lots and lots of seeds, Master Gardeners to answer questions, garden items (books, tools, magazines) to trade, and a raffle. Bring something still usable and garden related, and take home something new to you (free!). Our first seed swap, organized by MGs Karen Brace and Katy Stewart in January of 2017, was a great success. Come be part of a fun and growing movement! Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photo by Susan Kenney

This month we feature Clarice Barker, a lady who spends a lot of time on our local water trails. A southern California girl who grew up on the Point Loma Peninsula in San Diego, Clarice moved to the Fredericksburg area in 1989. In her free time while not serving as a Lead Day Support Specialist in charge of Community Engagement for the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Clarice can be found (with longtime beau Jim Hamre, above) either camping or boating. We asked Clarice to share more about her experiences on the water. “When people ask why I would want to live in Virginia instead of San Diego, I tell them that I love the boating

in Virginia as I enjoy seeing the natural edges of the waterways. If I were to boat in San Diego, I would be out in the ocean away from the shoreline or in the bays, where the shoreline has commercial development. After moving to Fredericksburg, I was thrilled when I read in the Farmers’ Almanac that Virginia has more waterfront property, if you count rivers, lakes and creeks, than California. My natural desire to be near water has led me to live over the years in White Oak with access to the Potomac Creek, Crow’s Nest, and Caledon. Jim and I enjoy traveling on our 21-foot Trophy 2002 Walk-around boat, as it is large enough to allow us to spend the night on the water. My favorite place to stay overnight is on the Potomac River near Caledon State Park/natural area. There is nothing like dropping anchor and knowing that there are no houses or

By Kevin Brown

people nearby. It is more private than staying in a campground. We relax while watching the sunset colors blaze and fade into starlit nights. We stay up late to watch for shooting stars, while listening to music and singing. Jim and I first experienced bioluminescence in the Potomac River, fifteen years ago and have seen it every year since then. It is only activated by movement. We have often jumped off the boat in the dark, in the middle of the river, to swim in it. After a night on the boat, I routinely wake up an hour before sunrise as I feel that is when the best sunrise colors are seen. My hope is that pink, presun water will surround the boat and that columns of mist leave the bank to glide across the water to reunite with other columns, offshore. Then, at what seems to be precisely 6 AM, the eagles begin to communicate with each other before flying over the river to fish. Besides the Potomac River, for readers looking to get out on the water,

a great place to seasonally rent watercraft is Mott’s Reservoir. You can paddle out to experience narrow fjordlike nature areas. The west end of the reservoir has spectacular tall outcroppings of granite with a bonsaistyle pine tree growing out of the rock. In May, the banks are covered with cascading mountain laurel flowers. Other favorite places to kayak and camp in the Fredericksburg area are Cat Point Creek, Accokeek Creek in the spring when there is water, Potomac Creek, Rappahannock River including its many marshes, and the marsh above Port Royal.” Thanks for sharing your Clarice. We look forward to seeing you in 2018 on the Fredericksburg area water trails!

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp

6

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

7


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? The Love of gardening & great food By Tina Will

Save and Swap Your Seeds Onward into the new year! Sow seeds of friendship, and make new connections by coming to our National Seed Swap event on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at the downtown CRRL library auditorium, 1201 Caroline Street, from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free and open to the public. All are welcome; everyone comes to learn or share knowledge, trade seeds and ask questions. The event is sponsored by the Central Rappahannock Area Extension Master Gardeners. Information, speaker schedule, and guidance on what to and what not to bring is also on our website for this event: mgacra.org. What in the world is National Seed Swap Day? Saving and sharing seeds is not a new idea., but ten years ago National Seed Swap Day was declared when Washington Gardener Magazine hosted the first of these on January 26, 2006 and it was and is usually held on the last Saturday in January. The first event was a success and people started organizing these events around the country. They are often held at libraries or arboretums; our Virginia Arboretum in Boyce, VA hosts one too, and there is a listing of other seed swap events

Clarice Barker: a life sustained by water at https://seedswapday.blogspot.com/. All over the country, including Fredericksburg, people have come to love freshly grown produce. Many of these are gardeners who also want to gather favorite seeds from successful crops. So this effort was born with the work of dedicated people who grow fresh produce, and want to share the seeds and also save some of the seeds in local seed libraries. Seed libraries have formed which have the library like purpose of “borrowing” the seed, growing it out, and returning some of the new seed to the library the next year. This keeps the store of seeds current and viable. It is definitely a grass roots, but growing movement! There is a website for more information: seedlibraries.org. Saving seeds is also a global effort. An international seed bank exists in Svalbard, Norway (croptrust.org), and there are many others. Two are in Decorah, Iowa, and Fort Collins, Colorado, but there are over 1700 ‘genebanks’worldwide. They preserve seeds of food crops and other plants, and if need arises these seeds can be grown in areas where drought, insects, or poor management have created a food shortage (croptrust.org).

What to do on January 27 Bring seeds from your summer bounty and/or ornamental plants in labeled packets, and take home new varieties to grow. Some seeds are not allowed: invasive plants and noxious weeds. The list for those plants is on this website: www.invasive.org/species/list. Even if you do not have seeds to trade, come anyway! It is a great place to meet and talk to other gardeners and hear informative talks by David Roos on gardening tips, Anne Little on bluebirds and how to attract them to your yard, and Barbara Ellison on botanical photography.

There will be tables with lots and lots of seeds, Master Gardeners to answer questions, garden items (books, tools, magazines) to trade, and a raffle. Bring something still usable and garden related, and take home something new to you (free!). Our first seed swap, organized by MGs Karen Brace and Katy Stewart in January of 2017, was a great success. Come be part of a fun and growing movement! Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photo by Susan Kenney

This month we feature Clarice Barker, a lady who spends a lot of time on our local water trails. A southern California girl who grew up on the Point Loma Peninsula in San Diego, Clarice moved to the Fredericksburg area in 1989. In her free time while not serving as a Lead Day Support Specialist in charge of Community Engagement for the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Clarice can be found (with longtime beau Jim Hamre, above) either camping or boating. We asked Clarice to share more about her experiences on the water. “When people ask why I would want to live in Virginia instead of San Diego, I tell them that I love the boating

in Virginia as I enjoy seeing the natural edges of the waterways. If I were to boat in San Diego, I would be out in the ocean away from the shoreline or in the bays, where the shoreline has commercial development. After moving to Fredericksburg, I was thrilled when I read in the Farmers’ Almanac that Virginia has more waterfront property, if you count rivers, lakes and creeks, than California. My natural desire to be near water has led me to live over the years in White Oak with access to the Potomac Creek, Crow’s Nest, and Caledon. Jim and I enjoy traveling on our 21-foot Trophy 2002 Walk-around boat, as it is large enough to allow us to spend the night on the water. My favorite place to stay overnight is on the Potomac River near Caledon State Park/natural area. There is nothing like dropping anchor and knowing that there are no houses or

By Kevin Brown

people nearby. It is more private than staying in a campground. We relax while watching the sunset colors blaze and fade into starlit nights. We stay up late to watch for shooting stars, while listening to music and singing. Jim and I first experienced bioluminescence in the Potomac River, fifteen years ago and have seen it every year since then. It is only activated by movement. We have often jumped off the boat in the dark, in the middle of the river, to swim in it. After a night on the boat, I routinely wake up an hour before sunrise as I feel that is when the best sunrise colors are seen. My hope is that pink, presun water will surround the boat and that columns of mist leave the bank to glide across the water to reunite with other columns, offshore. Then, at what seems to be precisely 6 AM, the eagles begin to communicate with each other before flying over the river to fish. Besides the Potomac River, for readers looking to get out on the water,

a great place to seasonally rent watercraft is Mott’s Reservoir. You can paddle out to experience narrow fjordlike nature areas. The west end of the reservoir has spectacular tall outcroppings of granite with a bonsaistyle pine tree growing out of the rock. In May, the banks are covered with cascading mountain laurel flowers. Other favorite places to kayak and camp in the Fredericksburg area are Cat Point Creek, Accokeek Creek in the spring when there is water, Potomac Creek, Rappahannock River including its many marshes, and the marsh above Port Royal.” Thanks for sharing your Clarice. We look forward to seeing you in 2018 on the Fredericksburg area water trails!

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp

6

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

7


“I Have A Friend” inspiration & resolutions By Laurie Black

Winter Markdowns 899.8077

Beth was matched with senior, Glovenia. Glovenia heard about the program from her daughter, Belinda. Glovenia says, “The program sounded really nice. Because I live alone, it is good to have someone to visit with. It is easy for seniors to feel lonely, but Beth makes my week complete. Between Beth and my daughter my week is full and I don’t get lonely.”

Beth and Glovenia have been visiting now since 2009. In that time they have become very close. Belinda says, “It is a comfort knowing someone is coming to visit and check on my mother. Beth is wonderful. It is like having another family member. I just wish they had this program in D.C. My neighbor’s father could benefit from such a program.” The Senior Visitors Program serves the seniors in Fredericksburg and in Stafford, Spotsylvania, King George and Caroline Counties. When asked what has surprised her most about volunteering, Beth says, “I certainly feel that I get more out of our visits than Glovenia. She is my hero! She is very disciplined and very independent. For instance, she can make a box of chocolates last a whole month or two because she can be satisfied with one piece a day. I think that’s extraordinary.” Glovenia, at age 90, is still very active, so she and Beth enjoy getting out in the community together. They may go to the theatre or out to eat, or they may stay in to play cards or watch a Netflix movie. Glovenia says that one of her favorite visits was an outing to her Four Seasons. favorite restaurant, Another memorable visit was playing Wii Bowling together. If you feel inspired to learn more, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. Refer a senior or sign up to be a volunteer! The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

January 2018

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Front porch fredericksburg

By Pat Smith

Daily 10-5:30; Sunday 12-5

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

Senior Visitor volunteer, Beth, says her initial inspiration came from President Obama who encouraged citizens to volunteer in their communities. While looking into volunteer opportunities, her friend, Therese, recommended the Senior Visitors Program. Therese has been volunteering with Senior Visitors since 2002. She spoke very highly about her senior and the positive impact the Senior Visitors Program has in the community. The flexibility and one hour per week commitment was especially appealing to Beth.

Paintings by Mark Prieto

25% off Clothing & Fashion Accessories

723 Caroline St

With the New Year, many are making resolutions and looking for inspiration to motivate them in their resolutions. If you have resolved to volunteer in your community in 2018, the Senior Visitors Program may be a good fit for you.

The Art of Memory

RING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH OUR

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

Mark Prieto is the exhibiting painter at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery from January 7 through February 25, 2018. The reception for the artist will be on Sunday, Jan. 7 from 11:45 AM until 2 PM. A 'Storytelling Talk' will take place on Sunday, January 21, from 11:45 AM until 1 PM. Both events are free and open to the public. Mark accepts descriptions of his paintings by admirers. He is a self-taught folk painter who combines the authenticity of Grandma Moses, the storytelling Americana of Norman Rockwell, and the visual imagination of Picasso. He paints memories of a lifetime in his beloved rural Virginia. These paintings depict his real-life joys and sorrows. Since he was diagnosed with dementia in 2010, he has painted every day in an effort to ward off memory loss. The painting he is holding above, "Christmas at Buckingham", is a scene

reimagined from 30 years ago, depicting his wife, child, and pointer dogs during their first Christmas in this house without indoor plumbing. He tries to remember everything he can about the time, including the warmth of the outhouse because of the oil lantern, the way the light seeped under the outhouse door onto the snow, the footsteps back and forth to the porch. He remembers the kind of wood he chopped, the materials of each part of the cabin... Mark paints without photographic references, and he paints the farms and shops he knew well, having lived in Buckingham, Prince Edward, Amelia, Farmville. He grew up in Amelia County and now lives is Caroline County. He has had several occupations, including farm management, furniture restoration, and

even repairing art for antique shops. Virginia farm animals and wild animals are a familiar subject in his paintings, but his grandchildren are his inspiration, so he has been known to paint elephants, ostriches and monkeys for them. His grandchildren can bring out

year-old grandchild read the image as "a hole in the head", so Mark began painting people with holes in their heads! His grandchildren are the only people who have watched him paint. Although he needs to sell his paintings for income, Mark has always made gifts for friends and family. Mark says, "If I dream it, I get up and paint it! I paint the life of farm community, where everyone works together, knows each other, loves each other." Please come to see the paintings by this extraordinary artist, and hear some of his amazing stories, January 7February 25. Storytelling, January 21 For more information, contact the Office Administrator at UUFF, Nancy @540-310-4001. The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery is located at 25 Chalice Circle, Fredericksburg 22405. Pat Smith is a member of the Art Gallery Committee at UUFF, and a painter

“FCCA Gallery Paintings” the Picasso in him. Mark never painted faces on his figures, but once he painted a green apple over a face, and his three-

Publisher’s Note Mark’s work is also appearing in the FCCA Members Gallery throughout the month of January

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

9


“I Have A Friend” inspiration & resolutions By Laurie Black

Winter Markdowns 899.8077

Beth was matched with senior, Glovenia. Glovenia heard about the program from her daughter, Belinda. Glovenia says, “The program sounded really nice. Because I live alone, it is good to have someone to visit with. It is easy for seniors to feel lonely, but Beth makes my week complete. Between Beth and my daughter my week is full and I don’t get lonely.”

Beth and Glovenia have been visiting now since 2009. In that time they have become very close. Belinda says, “It is a comfort knowing someone is coming to visit and check on my mother. Beth is wonderful. It is like having another family member. I just wish they had this program in D.C. My neighbor’s father could benefit from such a program.” The Senior Visitors Program serves the seniors in Fredericksburg and in Stafford, Spotsylvania, King George and Caroline Counties. When asked what has surprised her most about volunteering, Beth says, “I certainly feel that I get more out of our visits than Glovenia. She is my hero! She is very disciplined and very independent. For instance, she can make a box of chocolates last a whole month or two because she can be satisfied with one piece a day. I think that’s extraordinary.” Glovenia, at age 90, is still very active, so she and Beth enjoy getting out in the community together. They may go to the theatre or out to eat, or they may stay in to play cards or watch a Netflix movie. Glovenia says that one of her favorite visits was an outing to her Four Seasons. favorite restaurant, Another memorable visit was playing Wii Bowling together. If you feel inspired to learn more, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. Refer a senior or sign up to be a volunteer! The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

January 2018

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Front porch fredericksburg

By Pat Smith

Daily 10-5:30; Sunday 12-5

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

Senior Visitor volunteer, Beth, says her initial inspiration came from President Obama who encouraged citizens to volunteer in their communities. While looking into volunteer opportunities, her friend, Therese, recommended the Senior Visitors Program. Therese has been volunteering with Senior Visitors since 2002. She spoke very highly about her senior and the positive impact the Senior Visitors Program has in the community. The flexibility and one hour per week commitment was especially appealing to Beth.

Paintings by Mark Prieto

25% off Clothing & Fashion Accessories

723 Caroline St

With the New Year, many are making resolutions and looking for inspiration to motivate them in their resolutions. If you have resolved to volunteer in your community in 2018, the Senior Visitors Program may be a good fit for you.

The Art of Memory

RING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH OUR

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

Mark Prieto is the exhibiting painter at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery from January 7 through February 25, 2018. The reception for the artist will be on Sunday, Jan. 7 from 11:45 AM until 2 PM. A 'Storytelling Talk' will take place on Sunday, January 21, from 11:45 AM until 1 PM. Both events are free and open to the public. Mark accepts descriptions of his paintings by admirers. He is a self-taught folk painter who combines the authenticity of Grandma Moses, the storytelling Americana of Norman Rockwell, and the visual imagination of Picasso. He paints memories of a lifetime in his beloved rural Virginia. These paintings depict his real-life joys and sorrows. Since he was diagnosed with dementia in 2010, he has painted every day in an effort to ward off memory loss. The painting he is holding above, "Christmas at Buckingham", is a scene

reimagined from 30 years ago, depicting his wife, child, and pointer dogs during their first Christmas in this house without indoor plumbing. He tries to remember everything he can about the time, including the warmth of the outhouse because of the oil lantern, the way the light seeped under the outhouse door onto the snow, the footsteps back and forth to the porch. He remembers the kind of wood he chopped, the materials of each part of the cabin... Mark paints without photographic references, and he paints the farms and shops he knew well, having lived in Buckingham, Prince Edward, Amelia, Farmville. He grew up in Amelia County and now lives is Caroline County. He has had several occupations, including farm management, furniture restoration, and

even repairing art for antique shops. Virginia farm animals and wild animals are a familiar subject in his paintings, but his grandchildren are his inspiration, so he has been known to paint elephants, ostriches and monkeys for them. His grandchildren can bring out

year-old grandchild read the image as "a hole in the head", so Mark began painting people with holes in their heads! His grandchildren are the only people who have watched him paint. Although he needs to sell his paintings for income, Mark has always made gifts for friends and family. Mark says, "If I dream it, I get up and paint it! I paint the life of farm community, where everyone works together, knows each other, loves each other." Please come to see the paintings by this extraordinary artist, and hear some of his amazing stories, January 7February 25. Storytelling, January 21 For more information, contact the Office Administrator at UUFF, Nancy @540-310-4001. The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery is located at 25 Chalice Circle, Fredericksburg 22405. Pat Smith is a member of the Art Gallery Committee at UUFF, and a painter

“FCCA Gallery Paintings” the Picasso in him. Mark never painted faces on his figures, but once he painted a green apple over a face, and his three-

Publisher’s Note Mark’s work is also appearing in the FCCA Members Gallery throughout the month of January

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

9


Karl Karch A Tireless Advocate By Doreen Barnes

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

January 2018

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

An advocate, businessman, graduate student, and leader are only a few of the adjectives that describe Karl Karch, franchise owner of two Home Instead Senior Care offices in Fredericksburg and in Culpeper. Karl and his wife, Roberta, have owned the Fredericksburg and Culpeper franchises since 2005 and 2009 respectively. They have Roberta Karch, Karl Karch and Dr Waylan Marks over 200 employees and are positioned as the largest family owned some respite time. Karl has recently completed his and operated, non-clinical agency in the coursework toward his MA in social Fredericksburg area. gerontology and is working on his thesis. Karl is a founding member of He has shared his knowledge and expertise Partners in Aging, serves on the Board of with the citizens of this area in the Front Directors and also began Operation Porch “Senior Care” articles that he has Medicine Cabinet with Partners in Aging. He is on the Board of Directors for the written for the last 10 years. Karl Karch is more than a dollar Rappahannock Area Agency on Aging, and cents businessman. He offers a serves on the Alzheimer’s Advisory human side to business, and helps seniors Council, and is a member of the and their families navigate the aging Rappahannock Rotary Club, a service Dr Aaron Blight, former process. organization. Karl was the recipient of the franchise owner of two Home Instead 2017 Advocacy Award, presented to one Senior Care franchises says “Karl Karch franchise owner by Home Instead Senior has been a tireless advocate for seniors Care Corporate office, for his legislative in the Fredericksburg area. Over the work advocating for seniors in years, Karl has served the elderly with diligence and compassion through his Washington and Richmond. Delegate Home Instead Senior Care franchises in Bobby Orrock says, “Karl Karch has Fredericksburg and Culpeper. Through worked hard for the benefit of our area’s the provision of direct home care seniors with his thoughtful and winsome services, Karl has helped thousands of manner. He has been an excellent individual seniors to receive the advocate within the local community, assistance they need in activities of daily such as his recent organization of a Q & living, allowing them to maintain their A Session I attended. He is also welldignity and remain at home for as long received among state lawmakers when he as possible. Karl has also worked at the visits Richmond during General Assembly policy level to strengthen and expand the Session. He’s a real asset to our area who supports available to the entire aging deserves recognition for years of tireless population in his community. Although effort for seniors.” Karl gives freely of his time and Karl himself was the age of many expertise, but he also shows his generosity retirees, he opted to pursue a Master's degree in gerontology to gain additional through the Be A Santa to A Senior® program. Each year, Planning District 16, knowledge and expertise in all his efforts as well as a few other organizations, to work with seniors. Karl Karch is wellprovide names of seniors who are either deserving of the Dr. Wayland Marks alone, or who may not receive a gift at Gratitude Award through Partners in Christmas. Area businesses are asked to Aging in Fredericksburg. “ In business and personal life, Karl “adopt” a senior and provide gifts. The always tries to do the right thing, and organization of this endeavor is time thinks through how his decisions will consuming and costly, but Karl feels each affect others. The senior community is senior should be thought of at the holiday. Numerous hours of caregiver services fortunate to have Karl Karch as their have been donated for the Partners in advocate.. Aging Caregiver Luncheon, so that deserving family caregivers can enjoy a few hours away, to the Betty Brazemore Scholarship recipients, and for those awarded scholarships through Hilarity for Charity, so family caregivers can have

Doreen Barnes is the Community Liason at Homeinstead Senior Care

c THE POETRY MAN

The Makers District meet bill & elaine mason

- By Frank Fratoe

Rappahannock Winter

BY Collette Caprara

Webs of snow crystallize in midair and fall gently down to the waiting river.

part in the periodic school tours that Mason offers. “I tell them that what they are about to experience is a blend of history, geometry, acoustics, physics, chemistry, science, engineering, and craftsmanship, and that they are about to enter a realm that connects with everything they learn in school,” said Mason. “We also talk about economics, the industry and business, and how the violin has migrated all over the world because of different plagues and upheavals and rebellions.” Visitors might also notice a blueprint depicting a side view of a violin, which, it turns out, is a reproduction of one created by Stradivari in the 1600s when he crafted his instruments. “There are so many blueprints of the old masters,” said Mason, “We are making the old masters’ models.” And the little cookers one may sight in the studio are

A winter dusk comes early and surrounds the motion made by frost descending. Rapids absorb each flake and add them to currents that flow into whiteness. Then night annuls a cloud suspended above the shore when darkness takes over. Snow will end before long and the air become placid yet waters move unchecked. Our river has gone ahead advancing toward bayside to foreshadow a new year.. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

Wm Mason II Violin Shop 509-1 1 Jackson St. www.wmmasonviolinshop.com 540-6 645-7 7498

Bill Mason, Elaine Smith-M Mason, Christina Wan, Wm Mason II

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

A magical realm within the Burg, the neighborhood near the intersection of Wolfe and Jackson Streets might appear to be quiet from the outside but it is bustling with activity, creativity, and innovation within, as artists and artisans (some acclaimed nationally and internationally) go about their work. This spontaneously-generated “makers district” is home a captivatingly eclectic mix of creators—including crafters of fine instruments, a specialist in the restoration of historic furniture, and even the creators of innovative toys) who will be featured in this series of Front Porch profiles. “We all know one another,” said Bill Mason who co-owns, with his wife Elaine, the William Mason II Violin Shop on Jackson Street. “It’s a very unique collective of highly-skilled artisans up here. The talent is just through the roof.” Objects sighted in even a brief walk through the violin-makers’ facility reveals the depth and scope of their appreciation for and understanding of the instruments they devote themselves to. An inconspicuous little map of Italy posted near a doorway harkens to the origins of the violin in Cremona in the early 1500s before the central focus of the instrument moved to France and on to Germany. That bit of history is part of the wealth of knowledge conveyed to students who take

sculptures include an eight-foot violin that will soon take its place in front of the shop. A new development at the violin shop is the Fredericksburg Chamber Music Initiative, in which students are taught in session of trios and quartets. “Playing with three or four people is different from playing in a symphony. The partners have to pay close attention to each other and they ‘feed’ off one another. It was amazing to see the first group we had blossom and come into themselves,” said Mason. Next on the horizon is the celebration of the William Mason II Violin Shop’s tenth anniversary this spring, and plans are underway for an exciting public event that will feature all of the makers in the community. Stay tuned to the Front Porch for more details!

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist

not for heating the crafters’ lunch but to heat the resins that Mason uses to create his own varnish for the instruments. “Currently, there is a big revival of interest in the violin in America and we are in touch with makers throughout the country,” Mason explains. In fact, he hosts annual conferences where counterparts throughout the nation gather for presentations and workshops. The Masons are also in the forefront of an on-going movement to re-establish the connections between those who create the instruments and those who play them. In addition to serving her role at the shop, Elaine is an artist in her own right. A selection of the fascinating, unique jewelry that she creates from pieces of the instruments is on display at the studio and her towering metal front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

11


Karl Karch A Tireless Advocate By Doreen Barnes

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

January 2018

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

An advocate, businessman, graduate student, and leader are only a few of the adjectives that describe Karl Karch, franchise owner of two Home Instead Senior Care offices in Fredericksburg and in Culpeper. Karl and his wife, Roberta, have owned the Fredericksburg and Culpeper franchises since 2005 and 2009 respectively. They have Roberta Karch, Karl Karch and Dr Waylan Marks over 200 employees and are positioned as the largest family owned some respite time. Karl has recently completed his and operated, non-clinical agency in the coursework toward his MA in social Fredericksburg area. gerontology and is working on his thesis. Karl is a founding member of He has shared his knowledge and expertise Partners in Aging, serves on the Board of with the citizens of this area in the Front Directors and also began Operation Porch “Senior Care” articles that he has Medicine Cabinet with Partners in Aging. He is on the Board of Directors for the written for the last 10 years. Karl Karch is more than a dollar Rappahannock Area Agency on Aging, and cents businessman. He offers a serves on the Alzheimer’s Advisory human side to business, and helps seniors Council, and is a member of the and their families navigate the aging Rappahannock Rotary Club, a service Dr Aaron Blight, former process. organization. Karl was the recipient of the franchise owner of two Home Instead 2017 Advocacy Award, presented to one Senior Care franchises says “Karl Karch franchise owner by Home Instead Senior has been a tireless advocate for seniors Care Corporate office, for his legislative in the Fredericksburg area. Over the work advocating for seniors in years, Karl has served the elderly with diligence and compassion through his Washington and Richmond. Delegate Home Instead Senior Care franchises in Bobby Orrock says, “Karl Karch has Fredericksburg and Culpeper. Through worked hard for the benefit of our area’s the provision of direct home care seniors with his thoughtful and winsome services, Karl has helped thousands of manner. He has been an excellent individual seniors to receive the advocate within the local community, assistance they need in activities of daily such as his recent organization of a Q & living, allowing them to maintain their A Session I attended. He is also welldignity and remain at home for as long received among state lawmakers when he as possible. Karl has also worked at the visits Richmond during General Assembly policy level to strengthen and expand the Session. He’s a real asset to our area who supports available to the entire aging deserves recognition for years of tireless population in his community. Although effort for seniors.” Karl gives freely of his time and Karl himself was the age of many expertise, but he also shows his generosity retirees, he opted to pursue a Master's degree in gerontology to gain additional through the Be A Santa to A Senior® program. Each year, Planning District 16, knowledge and expertise in all his efforts as well as a few other organizations, to work with seniors. Karl Karch is wellprovide names of seniors who are either deserving of the Dr. Wayland Marks alone, or who may not receive a gift at Gratitude Award through Partners in Christmas. Area businesses are asked to Aging in Fredericksburg. “ In business and personal life, Karl “adopt” a senior and provide gifts. The always tries to do the right thing, and organization of this endeavor is time thinks through how his decisions will consuming and costly, but Karl feels each affect others. The senior community is senior should be thought of at the holiday. Numerous hours of caregiver services fortunate to have Karl Karch as their have been donated for the Partners in advocate.. Aging Caregiver Luncheon, so that deserving family caregivers can enjoy a few hours away, to the Betty Brazemore Scholarship recipients, and for those awarded scholarships through Hilarity for Charity, so family caregivers can have

Doreen Barnes is the Community Liason at Homeinstead Senior Care

c THE POETRY MAN

The Makers District meet bill & elaine mason

- By Frank Fratoe

Rappahannock Winter

BY Collette Caprara

Webs of snow crystallize in midair and fall gently down to the waiting river.

part in the periodic school tours that Mason offers. “I tell them that what they are about to experience is a blend of history, geometry, acoustics, physics, chemistry, science, engineering, and craftsmanship, and that they are about to enter a realm that connects with everything they learn in school,” said Mason. “We also talk about economics, the industry and business, and how the violin has migrated all over the world because of different plagues and upheavals and rebellions.” Visitors might also notice a blueprint depicting a side view of a violin, which, it turns out, is a reproduction of one created by Stradivari in the 1600s when he crafted his instruments. “There are so many blueprints of the old masters,” said Mason, “We are making the old masters’ models.” And the little cookers one may sight in the studio are

A winter dusk comes early and surrounds the motion made by frost descending. Rapids absorb each flake and add them to currents that flow into whiteness. Then night annuls a cloud suspended above the shore when darkness takes over. Snow will end before long and the air become placid yet waters move unchecked. Our river has gone ahead advancing toward bayside to foreshadow a new year.. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

Wm Mason II Violin Shop 509-1 1 Jackson St. www.wmmasonviolinshop.com 540-6 645-7 7498

Bill Mason, Elaine Smith-M Mason, Christina Wan, Wm Mason II

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

A magical realm within the Burg, the neighborhood near the intersection of Wolfe and Jackson Streets might appear to be quiet from the outside but it is bustling with activity, creativity, and innovation within, as artists and artisans (some acclaimed nationally and internationally) go about their work. This spontaneously-generated “makers district” is home a captivatingly eclectic mix of creators—including crafters of fine instruments, a specialist in the restoration of historic furniture, and even the creators of innovative toys) who will be featured in this series of Front Porch profiles. “We all know one another,” said Bill Mason who co-owns, with his wife Elaine, the William Mason II Violin Shop on Jackson Street. “It’s a very unique collective of highly-skilled artisans up here. The talent is just through the roof.” Objects sighted in even a brief walk through the violin-makers’ facility reveals the depth and scope of their appreciation for and understanding of the instruments they devote themselves to. An inconspicuous little map of Italy posted near a doorway harkens to the origins of the violin in Cremona in the early 1500s before the central focus of the instrument moved to France and on to Germany. That bit of history is part of the wealth of knowledge conveyed to students who take

sculptures include an eight-foot violin that will soon take its place in front of the shop. A new development at the violin shop is the Fredericksburg Chamber Music Initiative, in which students are taught in session of trios and quartets. “Playing with three or four people is different from playing in a symphony. The partners have to pay close attention to each other and they ‘feed’ off one another. It was amazing to see the first group we had blossom and come into themselves,” said Mason. Next on the horizon is the celebration of the William Mason II Violin Shop’s tenth anniversary this spring, and plans are underway for an exciting public event that will feature all of the makers in the community. Stay tuned to the Front Porch for more details!

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist

not for heating the crafters’ lunch but to heat the resins that Mason uses to create his own varnish for the instruments. “Currently, there is a big revival of interest in the violin in America and we are in touch with makers throughout the country,” Mason explains. In fact, he hosts annual conferences where counterparts throughout the nation gather for presentations and workshops. The Masons are also in the forefront of an on-going movement to re-establish the connections between those who create the instruments and those who play them. In addition to serving her role at the shop, Elaine is an artist in her own right. A selection of the fascinating, unique jewelry that she creates from pieces of the instruments is on display at the studio and her towering metal front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

11


What’s the grape

Season’s Bounty

by City Vino

By vanessa moncure

Vino

Slow...Slow Cooking

Sancerre & Pouilly Fume: Named for the twin towns on either side of the Loire River, these white wines are made from Sauvignon Blanc. If you come across a red Sancerre, it is made from Pinot Noir. Vouvray: This is a white wine from the Loire Valley made from Chenin Blanc. Champagne: You can call it Champagne only if it comes from that region of France. Everything else is “sparkling” or “cremant." The three approved grapes for Champagne are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Muenier. If you see “Blanc de Blanc” on the label, it is made entirely from Chardonnay. If you see “Blanc de Noir,” it will have some amount of Pinot Noir or Pinot Muenier in the blend. Cahors: The “black wine of Cahors," named for its dark color, is made from Malbec.

Italy Many wines, especially from Europe, are named for the place from which they come or their style. If you are familiar with the winemaking requirements of the region, the grapes can be inferred. Let’s examples:

take

a

look

at

some

France Bordeaux: If it is a red wine, it will be a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Petit Verdot and/or Carmenere. If it is a white wine, it will be a blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon and, possibly, Muscadell. Burgundy: With very few exceptions, white Burgundies are made from Chardonnay, and red Burgundies are made from Pinot Noir.

Barolo & Barbaresco: Barolo, the “king of wine," and its slightly younger counterpart, Barbaresco, are both made from 100% Nebbiolo. Prosecco: For the longest time, Prosecco was used as the term for both the wine style and the grape from which it is made. However, in recent years, Italy has returned to calling the grape by its proper name – Glera. Valpolicella: The wines of Valpolicella, including Amarone, are made from a combination of Corvina, Rodinella and Molinara. Chianti & Brunello di Montalcino: Chianti is made predominantly from Sangiovese, although some blending is allowed. Brunello (“the nice dark one”), on the other hand, is made from 100% Sangiovese.

Spain Rioja: Red Riojas are made predominantly from Tempranillo, while white Rioja is made predominantly from Viura. Priorat: Named for the county in Spain outside of Barcelona, Priorat wines are predominantly made from Grenache.

Cava: The “champagne” of Spain is made from a combination of Macabeo, Parellada, Xarel-lo and Chardonnay. City Vino is located at 810 Caroline St. You can find owners Renee Dunn & Rita Allen on-site to provide answers to all your wine questions

12

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg’s Hometown Irish Pub & Restaurant Since 1961

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

After about the eighth trip up and down the basement stairs, the detrius of holidays 2017 becomes a bit overwhelming. Why won’t Inflatable Santa fit back in his perfectly-sized box? Clever! the planned obsolescence of mini-twinklelights is less than six weeks - can they be recycled? Where is the Nativity bin? Two Wise Men and an ass need to rejoin their group. No, the practically de-needled tree won’t be street-collected with any tinsel, so pull it off and save it; yes, the vacuum cleaner is clogged with said needles, AGAIN. Hmm...a month of comfort and joy segues into several days of clean-up and teeth-knashing. I do love decorating for the holidays but dread the un-decorating much as I love cooking but eye the resulting kitchen mess with major trepidation. Holidays over, back to work, back to school, back to the daily routine after a month of heavy festive celebrating - give yourself a culinary break with that new slow-cooker found under the tree! Probably the idea of a “modern” slow cooker was introduced in the 1940sera Chambers Stove whose motto was “cooks with the gas turned off!” - the stove appeared to be a four-burner, but the back right was a patented “Thermowell” whose 1- or 3-compartment container “boils, steams, stews or roasts” with retained heat. My “Model B” stove brochure features a smiling housewife in a car demonstrating that recipes from the “Idle Hour” cookbook require no need to stand over a stove! Run errands! Go shopping! Meanwhile, your stove is doing all the work! Then along came the slow-cooker….. CHICKEN SALSA Slow cooking requires a minimum of liquid, a maximum of time. Although not necessary, a quick browning of meat before adding to the cooker increases the flavor. Brown (if desired) 4 large boneless chicken breasts in 2T. olive oil. Place in slow cooker, cover with 12 oz. salsa and ¼ c. minced fresh cilantro - cook 4 hours on

LOW setting. Serve with a selection of sliced lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shredded cheese, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, heated refried beans - whatever you like shred the meat and place in flour tortillas, topping with desired ingredients. PORK BBQ Brown a Boston butt in skillet without added fat - place in slow cooker and season with a rub of salt, pepper, garlic powder, chili powder, cayenne pepper cumin, oregano and paprika. Pour 1 c. cider vinegar in the bottom, and set the cooker for 8 hours on HIGH. Remove meat from cooker and discard liquid. Meat should pull easily off the bone - serve pulled pork on buns with BBQ sauce and creamy cole slaw. BEEF OR CHICKEN POT ROAST Brown a beef chuck roast or whole chicken in 3 T. canola oil in a large skillet, turning so all sides are browned. Pour juices over meat in slow cooker. Separately in large bowl, place 6 medium potatoes cut in half, 6 cut onions, 2 c. baby carrots, 4 cut celery ribs, ¼ c. minced fresh parsley, S&P, garlic powder, ½ tsp. thyme and toss with 3 T. olive oil until well-coated. Arrange vegetables around meat, sprinkle meat with S&P, garlic, paprika and fresh parsley. Cover, cook 2 hours on LOW, then 2-3 hours on HIGH. You may need to add more cook time if meat is over 3 ½ to 4 pounds. CHICKEN CACCIATORE Brown six floured chicken thighs in 2T. olive oil - transfer to slow cooker along with 4 large onions cut into rings. In same skillet, add 1 c. red wine, 1 c. chicken stock, S&P, garlic powder and cook over medium heat until slightly reduced and slightly thickened. Stir in 1 qt. whole Roma tomatoes, ¼ c. minced fresh parsley, 1 bay leaf, ½ tsp. each oregano, basil and thyme, and 1 tsp. sugar, then add to slow cooker. Cook 4 hours on LOW, one on HIGH - add tomato paste to thicken if needed. Serve over pasta with fresh-grated Parmesan cheese.

APPLESAUCE Although I’ve seen such recipes, I’ve never baked/slow-cooked a dessert, but I’ve used the cooker for most all soups and stews. As a bonus, the delicious aromas emanating from your kitchen basically come from a one-step process - you can easily adapt your favorite recipes, just remember to reduce the amount of liquid as there is less evaporation than oven- or stovetop- cooking. Applesauce is a slowcooker favorite - just peel and core Xamount of apples (or pears, or a mixture!), add small amount of unfiltered apple juice and cook on HIGH until apples are soft and ready to turn into applesauce (either by mashing, food mill or processor). Then you can add spices and sugar, cook a bit longer for delicious apple butter….almost no kitchen clean-up! Now if I can just find the giant candy cane box…….

Mon-Thurs, 11am-9pm Fri & Sat, 11am-10pm Sun, 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738 Vanessa resolves to fill our bellies with more deliciousness in 2018

The Sunken Well Tavern

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

13


What’s the grape

Season’s Bounty

by City Vino

By vanessa moncure

Vino

Slow...Slow Cooking

Sancerre & Pouilly Fume: Named for the twin towns on either side of the Loire River, these white wines are made from Sauvignon Blanc. If you come across a red Sancerre, it is made from Pinot Noir. Vouvray: This is a white wine from the Loire Valley made from Chenin Blanc. Champagne: You can call it Champagne only if it comes from that region of France. Everything else is “sparkling” or “cremant." The three approved grapes for Champagne are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Muenier. If you see “Blanc de Blanc” on the label, it is made entirely from Chardonnay. If you see “Blanc de Noir,” it will have some amount of Pinot Noir or Pinot Muenier in the blend. Cahors: The “black wine of Cahors," named for its dark color, is made from Malbec.

Italy Many wines, especially from Europe, are named for the place from which they come or their style. If you are familiar with the winemaking requirements of the region, the grapes can be inferred. Let’s examples:

take

a

look

at

some

France Bordeaux: If it is a red wine, it will be a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Petit Verdot and/or Carmenere. If it is a white wine, it will be a blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon and, possibly, Muscadell. Burgundy: With very few exceptions, white Burgundies are made from Chardonnay, and red Burgundies are made from Pinot Noir.

Barolo & Barbaresco: Barolo, the “king of wine," and its slightly younger counterpart, Barbaresco, are both made from 100% Nebbiolo. Prosecco: For the longest time, Prosecco was used as the term for both the wine style and the grape from which it is made. However, in recent years, Italy has returned to calling the grape by its proper name – Glera. Valpolicella: The wines of Valpolicella, including Amarone, are made from a combination of Corvina, Rodinella and Molinara. Chianti & Brunello di Montalcino: Chianti is made predominantly from Sangiovese, although some blending is allowed. Brunello (“the nice dark one”), on the other hand, is made from 100% Sangiovese.

Spain Rioja: Red Riojas are made predominantly from Tempranillo, while white Rioja is made predominantly from Viura. Priorat: Named for the county in Spain outside of Barcelona, Priorat wines are predominantly made from Grenache.

Cava: The “champagne” of Spain is made from a combination of Macabeo, Parellada, Xarel-lo and Chardonnay. City Vino is located at 810 Caroline St. You can find owners Renee Dunn & Rita Allen on-site to provide answers to all your wine questions

12

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg’s Hometown Irish Pub & Restaurant Since 1961

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

After about the eighth trip up and down the basement stairs, the detrius of holidays 2017 becomes a bit overwhelming. Why won’t Inflatable Santa fit back in his perfectly-sized box? Clever! the planned obsolescence of mini-twinklelights is less than six weeks - can they be recycled? Where is the Nativity bin? Two Wise Men and an ass need to rejoin their group. No, the practically de-needled tree won’t be street-collected with any tinsel, so pull it off and save it; yes, the vacuum cleaner is clogged with said needles, AGAIN. Hmm...a month of comfort and joy segues into several days of clean-up and teeth-knashing. I do love decorating for the holidays but dread the un-decorating much as I love cooking but eye the resulting kitchen mess with major trepidation. Holidays over, back to work, back to school, back to the daily routine after a month of heavy festive celebrating - give yourself a culinary break with that new slow-cooker found under the tree! Probably the idea of a “modern” slow cooker was introduced in the 1940sera Chambers Stove whose motto was “cooks with the gas turned off!” - the stove appeared to be a four-burner, but the back right was a patented “Thermowell” whose 1- or 3-compartment container “boils, steams, stews or roasts” with retained heat. My “Model B” stove brochure features a smiling housewife in a car demonstrating that recipes from the “Idle Hour” cookbook require no need to stand over a stove! Run errands! Go shopping! Meanwhile, your stove is doing all the work! Then along came the slow-cooker….. CHICKEN SALSA Slow cooking requires a minimum of liquid, a maximum of time. Although not necessary, a quick browning of meat before adding to the cooker increases the flavor. Brown (if desired) 4 large boneless chicken breasts in 2T. olive oil. Place in slow cooker, cover with 12 oz. salsa and ¼ c. minced fresh cilantro - cook 4 hours on

LOW setting. Serve with a selection of sliced lettuce, tomatoes, onions, shredded cheese, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, heated refried beans - whatever you like shred the meat and place in flour tortillas, topping with desired ingredients. PORK BBQ Brown a Boston butt in skillet without added fat - place in slow cooker and season with a rub of salt, pepper, garlic powder, chili powder, cayenne pepper cumin, oregano and paprika. Pour 1 c. cider vinegar in the bottom, and set the cooker for 8 hours on HIGH. Remove meat from cooker and discard liquid. Meat should pull easily off the bone - serve pulled pork on buns with BBQ sauce and creamy cole slaw. BEEF OR CHICKEN POT ROAST Brown a beef chuck roast or whole chicken in 3 T. canola oil in a large skillet, turning so all sides are browned. Pour juices over meat in slow cooker. Separately in large bowl, place 6 medium potatoes cut in half, 6 cut onions, 2 c. baby carrots, 4 cut celery ribs, ¼ c. minced fresh parsley, S&P, garlic powder, ½ tsp. thyme and toss with 3 T. olive oil until well-coated. Arrange vegetables around meat, sprinkle meat with S&P, garlic, paprika and fresh parsley. Cover, cook 2 hours on LOW, then 2-3 hours on HIGH. You may need to add more cook time if meat is over 3 ½ to 4 pounds. CHICKEN CACCIATORE Brown six floured chicken thighs in 2T. olive oil - transfer to slow cooker along with 4 large onions cut into rings. In same skillet, add 1 c. red wine, 1 c. chicken stock, S&P, garlic powder and cook over medium heat until slightly reduced and slightly thickened. Stir in 1 qt. whole Roma tomatoes, ¼ c. minced fresh parsley, 1 bay leaf, ½ tsp. each oregano, basil and thyme, and 1 tsp. sugar, then add to slow cooker. Cook 4 hours on LOW, one on HIGH - add tomato paste to thicken if needed. Serve over pasta with fresh-grated Parmesan cheese.

APPLESAUCE Although I’ve seen such recipes, I’ve never baked/slow-cooked a dessert, but I’ve used the cooker for most all soups and stews. As a bonus, the delicious aromas emanating from your kitchen basically come from a one-step process - you can easily adapt your favorite recipes, just remember to reduce the amount of liquid as there is less evaporation than oven- or stovetop- cooking. Applesauce is a slowcooker favorite - just peel and core Xamount of apples (or pears, or a mixture!), add small amount of unfiltered apple juice and cook on HIGH until apples are soft and ready to turn into applesauce (either by mashing, food mill or processor). Then you can add spices and sugar, cook a bit longer for delicious apple butter….almost no kitchen clean-up! Now if I can just find the giant candy cane box…….

Mon-Thurs, 11am-9pm Fri & Sat, 11am-10pm Sun, 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738 Vanessa resolves to fill our bellies with more deliciousness in 2018

The Sunken Well Tavern

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

13


New Year’s Resolution

Everything Greens

hasselback potatoes

Join the FXBG Food Co-Op

welcome back sun!

by james kyle snyder

By M.L. Powers

By Liz Ritoli

Cooking With Kyle

So there I was, hanging out with my grad-student girlfriend, contemplating dinner. All kidding aside, Mitzi is amazing: CFO/COO, full-time law student, and married to a high-needs husband! Where does she find the time?! On this cold sleet-filled day, when I asked what I could make her for dinner, she simply answered, “something warm.” It is really hard for me not to make her anything she wants – even if it is a vague request. I went straight to some knowgood-comfort foods: steak, potatoes, and Mitzi’s steamed broccoli and red peppers. YUM! I did the steak as easily as I know how – a tasty marinade of 1 TBS each: soy, Worcestershire, yellow mustard, maple syrup and a pinch of ground herbs ~ into a Ziploc bag with the air removed ~ then I sous vided them at 138 degrees for 2 hours and finished them on a white-hot cast iron pan 30 seconds per side. Prep was about two minutes and they almost cooked themselves to a perfect just-pastmid-rare. A couple of great things about this method are: you do not have to be

Co

min

g in

Jan ua

ry

good on a grill and you can let the steaks remain in the bags a little longer or shorter, depending on the rest of the meal. Finishing only takes one minute total! The broccoli and red peppers got cleaned, seasoned, held until the potato was almost done, and then steamed together for about 8 minutes. Again, almost no time needed to prepare or plate. Now for the hardest part of the meal - the potato. One of her favorite comfort foods is a baked potato. Ya-see, she’s from Idaho and has fond memories of the best, warm, satisfying potatoes the world has ever seen. I need to up my potato game to get into the running here. Thank goodness for the Hasselbacken Restaurant in Stockholm, Sweden ~ back in the 1700s. I guess back then you needed to be creative or the king had you beheaded. Sometimes the history of the food is as fun as eating the finished product. Any potato can be used. Multiple little reds can ring a festive plate. Goldens will look like a fan of potato chips. Russets, like these, can complete a hearty winter meal, skin on or skin off. I was making a fancy comfort meal for my studious bride, so these got peeled. The process is amazingly simple. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place the potato’s flattest side on a cutting board and border the long sides with a chopstick or some other thin wooden item. These will act as stops so you do not cut the potato all the way through. Make multiple parallel 1/8 inch cuts along the long axis of the potato so it looks like a long stack of connected chips. Combine 1 Tbs melted butter with 1 TBS of olive oil and brush the mixture over the potatoes in a rimmed baking dish; sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes. The individual slices will begin to separate. Reapply the butter / oil mixture (and 1 TBS of panko if you want a really crispy top) and back into the oven. Bake to desired crispiness. If you want them faster, turn on the broiler and watch carefully! Again, total prep time was about five minutes. Plan ahead and you can have everything coming off at exactly the same time. Serve to the table with your favorite potato toppings, pour the wine, and listen to the praise for of a meal that was simple, easy, and delicious. Be well! Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

14

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Many people don’t buy into the idea of New Year’s resolutions. It’s hard though not to pay attention to all the hoopla about what changes we should make. Inevitably, one thinks about healthy habits we could adapt. Fredericksburg is a health conscious community with many avenues to address this issue. One way is help promote the new food co-op which has been forming over the past few years. A cooperative is a member or worker owned organization. The Fredericksburg Co-o op is a member owned co-o op that will open a full service grocery store to sell local, organic and vegetarian options. In addition to sourcing local produce, they plan to offer local products like honey, coffee and baked goods, and because they are a full service grocery store, they’ll also carry products not produced locally - although local will always be the preference. Typically, the magic number to open a store is 1,000 members, and Fredericksburg is more than half way there. As of the middle of December, there were 581 members, an increase of one person per day over the month. This is a promising increase. It costs a family $200 to get in the organization on the ground floor. Once the co-op is open, members will receive benefits such as a say in what is sold, discount days, and equity once the coop begins to show a profit. Eventually, they hope to have a cafe attached and availability to cooking and other food related classes. This past summer the food co-op was often at the Farmer’s Market where they had a table to sign up members, as well as educate about the benefits of the co-op. Food co-ops have been in existence in some form as far back as the late 1800s. During the depression of the 1930s, there was a resurgence of the model to help farmers and local businesses succeed in a tough economy. Today there ops being formed is a new wave of food co-o

across the the country as more and more people prefer community owned groceries rather than chain grocery stores and local products rather than corporate farming. The food coop organizes monthly social and educational activities. During the fall, they had happy hours at Legume and Red Dragon Brewery. The January schedule is available on both the website (www.fredericksburgfoodcoop.com) and Facebook page, and includes an “Eat Your Veggies” session at the downtown library on January 14 from 2-2:30 in addition to other events. Understanding our food needs is a topic that changes often, promoting and demoting ideas at any given moment. Reverting back to nature has always been a current of thought in a health driven society. However individuals look at the changes that are occurring in our world, it can be agreed on that we need to look at how and what we are eating. Sometimes, “we are what we eat” can be a scary premise. But knowing and understanding is half the battle. Why not start out 2018 on a positive note by becoming a co-op member. M.L. believes in all things local, including food!

“And the seasons they go round & round And the painted ponies go up and down We're captive on the carousel of time We can't return we can only look behind From where we came And go round and round and round In the circle game” ~ Joni Mitchell, “The Circle Game” *

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Sometime in mid-November, during a particularly dark and dreary week, it dawned on me that winter was on the horizon. I had a sudden urge – no, a need - to bake bread and make soup, lots of soup. So, I cooked, I ate, and I watched the days get shorter, as they will until, the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year. On that blessed day the sun begins to travel northward in our sky, increasing daylight hours minute by minute every day until the Summer Solstice in June. For millennia, cultures around the world have celebrated the Winter Solstice, the “birth of the new sun,” with candles, fires, delicious food, and general merry-making. The ancient Romans coaxed the sun back with extra lamps and candles during Saturnalia, a gift-giving holiday that began a few days before the Solstice. Yule, an ancient Scandinavian holiday, began on the night before the Solstice when Nordic pagans celebrated the birth of the pagan Sun God, Balder. Falling within days of the Solstice, we have Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa celebrations and customs that make beautiful use of candles, fires, and lights. Celebrating the return of the light lives deep in our human cellular memory. The green world senses the diminishing light, too. As the days get shorter, fruit trees give up their fruits, and garden plants begin their final push, offering late season tomatoes, a second stand of kale or parsley, or a zucchini or two that hid too well. Root and tuber plants collect their energy and nap under ground until springtime. Perennial seed-

bearing plants tidy up by dropping seeds and drying-down to create natural mulch. Like we do, plants anticipate winter and prepare for spring, that time when the sun is high enough to warm the soil and wake up seeds and roots. Renewal and growth are predictable, a reliable cycle that flows from season to season. We know, as do the plants, when it’s time to take a rest, collect our energies, and begin preparing for the cycle to start again at the first inkling of spring. At Downtown Greens, putting the garden to bed for the winter is a service to the plants and a gift to everyone who spends time working there. It’s very peaceful to prune and mulch in the low, red light of an autumn sunset. Garden work at the end of the growing season feeds that part of us that needs to smell damp earth, hear the rustle of the dry leaves, and see children playing in the rows of arugula and overgrown cabbage plants. Over the winter these garden memories will nourish us until we start the next cycle in the spring. It makes no difference how we measure the turn of the year - from solstice to solstice or by another celestial event. Instinctively we recognize and to respond the changes happening around us; over and over we ride the merry-goround of time while the songs repeat again and again. My friend Kay Allison spoke outside of time when she said, “Everything in the universe is subject to change - and everything is on schedule.” By the way, the sun is back, right on schedule!! Liz Ritoli is a Licensed Massage Therapist, Certified Ayurvedic Health Counselor, and Yoga Teacher. She loves teaching children to cook, working in the gardens at Downtown Greens, and plays flute when the spirit moves her . . . Photo by Liz Ritoli - Sunrise, Garhwal Himalayans, Sursingdhar, Uttarakhand, India, March 2017

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

15


New Year’s Resolution

Everything Greens

hasselback potatoes

Join the FXBG Food Co-Op

welcome back sun!

by james kyle snyder

By M.L. Powers

By Liz Ritoli

Cooking With Kyle

So there I was, hanging out with my grad-student girlfriend, contemplating dinner. All kidding aside, Mitzi is amazing: CFO/COO, full-time law student, and married to a high-needs husband! Where does she find the time?! On this cold sleet-filled day, when I asked what I could make her for dinner, she simply answered, “something warm.” It is really hard for me not to make her anything she wants – even if it is a vague request. I went straight to some knowgood-comfort foods: steak, potatoes, and Mitzi’s steamed broccoli and red peppers. YUM! I did the steak as easily as I know how – a tasty marinade of 1 TBS each: soy, Worcestershire, yellow mustard, maple syrup and a pinch of ground herbs ~ into a Ziploc bag with the air removed ~ then I sous vided them at 138 degrees for 2 hours and finished them on a white-hot cast iron pan 30 seconds per side. Prep was about two minutes and they almost cooked themselves to a perfect just-pastmid-rare. A couple of great things about this method are: you do not have to be

Co

min

g in

Jan ua

ry

good on a grill and you can let the steaks remain in the bags a little longer or shorter, depending on the rest of the meal. Finishing only takes one minute total! The broccoli and red peppers got cleaned, seasoned, held until the potato was almost done, and then steamed together for about 8 minutes. Again, almost no time needed to prepare or plate. Now for the hardest part of the meal - the potato. One of her favorite comfort foods is a baked potato. Ya-see, she’s from Idaho and has fond memories of the best, warm, satisfying potatoes the world has ever seen. I need to up my potato game to get into the running here. Thank goodness for the Hasselbacken Restaurant in Stockholm, Sweden ~ back in the 1700s. I guess back then you needed to be creative or the king had you beheaded. Sometimes the history of the food is as fun as eating the finished product. Any potato can be used. Multiple little reds can ring a festive plate. Goldens will look like a fan of potato chips. Russets, like these, can complete a hearty winter meal, skin on or skin off. I was making a fancy comfort meal for my studious bride, so these got peeled. The process is amazingly simple. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place the potato’s flattest side on a cutting board and border the long sides with a chopstick or some other thin wooden item. These will act as stops so you do not cut the potato all the way through. Make multiple parallel 1/8 inch cuts along the long axis of the potato so it looks like a long stack of connected chips. Combine 1 Tbs melted butter with 1 TBS of olive oil and brush the mixture over the potatoes in a rimmed baking dish; sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes. The individual slices will begin to separate. Reapply the butter / oil mixture (and 1 TBS of panko if you want a really crispy top) and back into the oven. Bake to desired crispiness. If you want them faster, turn on the broiler and watch carefully! Again, total prep time was about five minutes. Plan ahead and you can have everything coming off at exactly the same time. Serve to the table with your favorite potato toppings, pour the wine, and listen to the praise for of a meal that was simple, easy, and delicious. Be well! Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating

14

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Many people don’t buy into the idea of New Year’s resolutions. It’s hard though not to pay attention to all the hoopla about what changes we should make. Inevitably, one thinks about healthy habits we could adapt. Fredericksburg is a health conscious community with many avenues to address this issue. One way is help promote the new food co-op which has been forming over the past few years. A cooperative is a member or worker owned organization. The Fredericksburg Co-o op is a member owned co-o op that will open a full service grocery store to sell local, organic and vegetarian options. In addition to sourcing local produce, they plan to offer local products like honey, coffee and baked goods, and because they are a full service grocery store, they’ll also carry products not produced locally - although local will always be the preference. Typically, the magic number to open a store is 1,000 members, and Fredericksburg is more than half way there. As of the middle of December, there were 581 members, an increase of one person per day over the month. This is a promising increase. It costs a family $200 to get in the organization on the ground floor. Once the co-op is open, members will receive benefits such as a say in what is sold, discount days, and equity once the coop begins to show a profit. Eventually, they hope to have a cafe attached and availability to cooking and other food related classes. This past summer the food co-op was often at the Farmer’s Market where they had a table to sign up members, as well as educate about the benefits of the co-op. Food co-ops have been in existence in some form as far back as the late 1800s. During the depression of the 1930s, there was a resurgence of the model to help farmers and local businesses succeed in a tough economy. Today there ops being formed is a new wave of food co-o

across the the country as more and more people prefer community owned groceries rather than chain grocery stores and local products rather than corporate farming. The food coop organizes monthly social and educational activities. During the fall, they had happy hours at Legume and Red Dragon Brewery. The January schedule is available on both the website (www.fredericksburgfoodcoop.com) and Facebook page, and includes an “Eat Your Veggies” session at the downtown library on January 14 from 2-2:30 in addition to other events. Understanding our food needs is a topic that changes often, promoting and demoting ideas at any given moment. Reverting back to nature has always been a current of thought in a health driven society. However individuals look at the changes that are occurring in our world, it can be agreed on that we need to look at how and what we are eating. Sometimes, “we are what we eat” can be a scary premise. But knowing and understanding is half the battle. Why not start out 2018 on a positive note by becoming a co-op member. M.L. believes in all things local, including food!

“And the seasons they go round & round And the painted ponies go up and down We're captive on the carousel of time We can't return we can only look behind From where we came And go round and round and round In the circle game” ~ Joni Mitchell, “The Circle Game” *

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Sometime in mid-November, during a particularly dark and dreary week, it dawned on me that winter was on the horizon. I had a sudden urge – no, a need - to bake bread and make soup, lots of soup. So, I cooked, I ate, and I watched the days get shorter, as they will until, the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year. On that blessed day the sun begins to travel northward in our sky, increasing daylight hours minute by minute every day until the Summer Solstice in June. For millennia, cultures around the world have celebrated the Winter Solstice, the “birth of the new sun,” with candles, fires, delicious food, and general merry-making. The ancient Romans coaxed the sun back with extra lamps and candles during Saturnalia, a gift-giving holiday that began a few days before the Solstice. Yule, an ancient Scandinavian holiday, began on the night before the Solstice when Nordic pagans celebrated the birth of the pagan Sun God, Balder. Falling within days of the Solstice, we have Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa celebrations and customs that make beautiful use of candles, fires, and lights. Celebrating the return of the light lives deep in our human cellular memory. The green world senses the diminishing light, too. As the days get shorter, fruit trees give up their fruits, and garden plants begin their final push, offering late season tomatoes, a second stand of kale or parsley, or a zucchini or two that hid too well. Root and tuber plants collect their energy and nap under ground until springtime. Perennial seed-

bearing plants tidy up by dropping seeds and drying-down to create natural mulch. Like we do, plants anticipate winter and prepare for spring, that time when the sun is high enough to warm the soil and wake up seeds and roots. Renewal and growth are predictable, a reliable cycle that flows from season to season. We know, as do the plants, when it’s time to take a rest, collect our energies, and begin preparing for the cycle to start again at the first inkling of spring. At Downtown Greens, putting the garden to bed for the winter is a service to the plants and a gift to everyone who spends time working there. It’s very peaceful to prune and mulch in the low, red light of an autumn sunset. Garden work at the end of the growing season feeds that part of us that needs to smell damp earth, hear the rustle of the dry leaves, and see children playing in the rows of arugula and overgrown cabbage plants. Over the winter these garden memories will nourish us until we start the next cycle in the spring. It makes no difference how we measure the turn of the year - from solstice to solstice or by another celestial event. Instinctively we recognize and to respond the changes happening around us; over and over we ride the merry-goround of time while the songs repeat again and again. My friend Kay Allison spoke outside of time when she said, “Everything in the universe is subject to change - and everything is on schedule.” By the way, the sun is back, right on schedule!! Liz Ritoli is a Licensed Massage Therapist, Certified Ayurvedic Health Counselor, and Yoga Teacher. She loves teaching children to cook, working in the gardens at Downtown Greens, and plays flute when the spirit moves her . . . Photo by Liz Ritoli - Sunrise, Garhwal Himalayans, Sursingdhar, Uttarakhand, India, March 2017

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

15


CALENDAR of events

january 2018….Let the New Year Be Filled With Kindness! Monday, January 1

Happy New Year…Resolve to make a diffeence this year!

Tuesday, January 2

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 3

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, January `4

Cardinal Institute for Health Careers and Cardinal Testing Center are co-sponsoring a Blood Drive for the American Red Cross. .9am. For an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call the American Red Cross at 1-800-RED CROSS 1-800733-2767. Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

First Friday, January 5

Meet the Artists @ Community Bank of the Chesapeake, 2-5pm Artful Dimensions Grand Reopening @ Artful Dimensions Gallery in our new home at 922 Caroline . new hours will be EVERY DAY from 11am-7pm. Brush Strokes Gallery "Dream Big", opening reception 6-9pm.

FCCA, "Word, Text & Image Exhibit", opening reception, 6-9 Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p Mark Allred @ Legume, 8-10

Saturday, January 6

City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 10

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, January 11 Young Artist artsliveva.org

Competition

Auditions

info

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Sunday, January 7

Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Art of Memory, Paintings by Mark Prieto, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery, opening reception, 11:45a -2pm. Exhibit through Feb.25. Mark is a self taught folk artist painting memories of his lifetime in rural Virginia.Diagnosed in 2010 with dementia, he paints every day in an effort to ward off memory loss.

Monday, January 8

Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Tuesday, January 9

Detoxification Class @ Whole Health Solutions, Help your body clean up, clear out, and feel terrific for the new year! TO REGISTER: Call (540) 8999421 or email reception@whole-health.net Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Friday, January 12

Restaurant Week in Downtown FXBG through Jan 21. Winter Restaurant Week will feature a variety of two- and three-course specials for $10.18, $20.18 or $30.18. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p Adwela & the Uprising (Reggae music) @Legume, 8-10p

Saturday, January 13

Winter Carnival, an indoor famiky friendly event. 10-noon. Winter themecarnival games & activities. Puppet show, $. Wilderness Presdential Resort, 9220 Plank Rd, Spotsy, 540-972-7433x8 You are invited to the annual birthday party for the Lees at Stratford Hall. family-fun event , tours, scavanger hunt, historical interpreters, food & more. FREE 9:30a-5p

Genealogy Workshop, Bring your "brickwall" genealogy problems to Salem Branch Library, 1-3p. FXBG REGIONAL genealogy Society will be on hand to aid. Frgs,org for info

Empowering Communications: Confronting Harrassment @ Unitarian Universalist Church of Fredericksburg. Learn skillful techniques for handling bullying, harassing, and controlling individuals. 1-3p. info: contact 540 785 4104 or visit MarciasLifeCoaching.com.; UUFF at 540 310 4001. No pre-registration is required. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Sunday, January 14

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Celebrate Hugh Mercer's Birthday - FREE Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop 1020 Caroline Street "Eat Your Veggies" presented by the FXBG Food CoOP, Downtown library, 2p-3:30p. Learn all the benefits of "eating the rainbow." Local Food Co-op members will offer samples of plant-based foods and recipes. learn more about the Food Co-op and how to join us to bring a community-owned natural foods grocery store to Fredericksburg.

Tuesday, January 16

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize!

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 17

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Planning for College: It's Never Too Soon @ Beth Sholom Temple, (across from England Run Library) 6:30-7:30p. Representatives from Germanna, Commmunity College Outreach and Virginia529 College Savings Plans,will give us a solid understanding of our options and how to EFFECTIVELY plan. FREE

Thursday, January 18

January Detoxification Class @ Whole Health Solutions Help your body CLEAN UP, CLEAR OUT, and FEEL TERRIFIC for the new year! 540-8999421 Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Friday, January 19

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p The Brokedown Boys (Grateful Dad style music) @Legume, 8-10p

Saturday, January 20

Young Artist Competition Finals Concert. info artsliveva.org City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Saturday, January 27

The Transmitter @Legume, 8-10p

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, National Touring Comedians 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Sunday, January 21

National Seed Swap, free come to learn , share knowledge, trade seeds sponsored by the CRRL dntn & Master Gardeners.10a-3p.Info: mgacra.org.

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

City Vino Wine Tasting Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Tuesday, January 23

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to be top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 24

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Sunday, January 28

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Belmont Woodland Tours 2 PM.,Conducted by Virginia Master Naturalists, walks cover a mile of trails in both woodlands, fields and historic ruins of Belmont's past. wear sturdy footwear. Free.

Tuesday, January 30

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize!

Thursday, January 25

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Friday, January 26

Reading Lee with Dr. Peter Carmichael: The Fate of a Confederate Deserter After Gettysburg @ CRRL 7-9p. Dr. Carmichael, one of the nation's foremost authorities on the American Civil War, Signed copies of Dr. Carmichael's books will be available for purchase. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Wednesday, January 31

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

If you are reading this 246th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for February 2018 issue is January 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3252 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

17


CALENDAR of events

january 2018….Let the New Year Be Filled With Kindness! Monday, January 1

Happy New Year…Resolve to make a diffeence this year!

Tuesday, January 2

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 3

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, January `4

Cardinal Institute for Health Careers and Cardinal Testing Center are co-sponsoring a Blood Drive for the American Red Cross. .9am. For an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call the American Red Cross at 1-800-RED CROSS 1-800733-2767. Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

First Friday, January 5

Meet the Artists @ Community Bank of the Chesapeake, 2-5pm Artful Dimensions Grand Reopening @ Artful Dimensions Gallery in our new home at 922 Caroline . new hours will be EVERY DAY from 11am-7pm. Brush Strokes Gallery "Dream Big", opening reception 6-9pm.

FCCA, "Word, Text & Image Exhibit", opening reception, 6-9 Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p Mark Allred @ Legume, 8-10

Saturday, January 6

City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 10

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, January 11 Young Artist artsliveva.org

Competition

Auditions

info

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info

Sunday, January 7

Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Art of Memory, Paintings by Mark Prieto, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Gallery, opening reception, 11:45a -2pm. Exhibit through Feb.25. Mark is a self taught folk artist painting memories of his lifetime in rural Virginia.Diagnosed in 2010 with dementia, he paints every day in an effort to ward off memory loss.

Monday, January 8

Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Tuesday, January 9

Detoxification Class @ Whole Health Solutions, Help your body clean up, clear out, and feel terrific for the new year! TO REGISTER: Call (540) 8999421 or email reception@whole-health.net Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Friday, January 12

Restaurant Week in Downtown FXBG through Jan 21. Winter Restaurant Week will feature a variety of two- and three-course specials for $10.18, $20.18 or $30.18. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p Adwela & the Uprising (Reggae music) @Legume, 8-10p

Saturday, January 13

Winter Carnival, an indoor famiky friendly event. 10-noon. Winter themecarnival games & activities. Puppet show, $. Wilderness Presdential Resort, 9220 Plank Rd, Spotsy, 540-972-7433x8 You are invited to the annual birthday party for the Lees at Stratford Hall. family-fun event , tours, scavanger hunt, historical interpreters, food & more. FREE 9:30a-5p

Genealogy Workshop, Bring your "brickwall" genealogy problems to Salem Branch Library, 1-3p. FXBG REGIONAL genealogy Society will be on hand to aid. Frgs,org for info

Empowering Communications: Confronting Harrassment @ Unitarian Universalist Church of Fredericksburg. Learn skillful techniques for handling bullying, harassing, and controlling individuals. 1-3p. info: contact 540 785 4104 or visit MarciasLifeCoaching.com.; UUFF at 540 310 4001. No pre-registration is required. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Sunday, January 14

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Celebrate Hugh Mercer's Birthday - FREE Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop 1020 Caroline Street "Eat Your Veggies" presented by the FXBG Food CoOP, Downtown library, 2p-3:30p. Learn all the benefits of "eating the rainbow." Local Food Co-op members will offer samples of plant-based foods and recipes. learn more about the Food Co-op and how to join us to bring a community-owned natural foods grocery store to Fredericksburg.

Tuesday, January 16

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize!

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 17

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Planning for College: It's Never Too Soon @ Beth Sholom Temple, (across from England Run Library) 6:30-7:30p. Representatives from Germanna, Commmunity College Outreach and Virginia529 College Savings Plans,will give us a solid understanding of our options and how to EFFECTIVELY plan. FREE

Thursday, January 18

January Detoxification Class @ Whole Health Solutions Help your body CLEAN UP, CLEAR OUT, and FEEL TERRIFIC for the new year! 540-8999421 Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Friday, January 19

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p The Brokedown Boys (Grateful Dad style music) @Legume, 8-10p

Saturday, January 20

Young Artist Competition Finals Concert. info artsliveva.org City Vino Wine Tasting @ City Vino Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810 Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Saturday, January 27

The Transmitter @Legume, 8-10p

Comedy @Liberty Laughs, National Touring Comedians 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Sunday, January 21

National Seed Swap, free come to learn , share knowledge, trade seeds sponsored by the CRRL dntn & Master Gardeners.10a-3p.Info: mgacra.org.

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

City Vino Wine Tasting Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Tuesday, January 23

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Bring the most knowledgeable friends and family you can find Compete to be top team of the night and go home with a prize! Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, January 24

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Sunday, January 28

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Belmont Woodland Tours 2 PM.,Conducted by Virginia Master Naturalists, walks cover a mile of trails in both woodlands, fields and historic ruins of Belmont's past. wear sturdy footwear. Free.

Tuesday, January 30

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night hosted by Donald Heinlein ! Compete to stand tall as the top team of the night and go home with a prize!

Thursday, January 25

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. See our ad on pg 12 for more info Legume, BOGO THURSDAYS , Buy 1 Entrée, get 1 half

Friday, January 26

Reading Lee with Dr. Peter Carmichael: The Fate of a Confederate Deserter After Gettysburg @ CRRL 7-9p. Dr. Carmichael, one of the nation's foremost authorities on the American Civil War, Signed copies of Dr. Carmichael's books will be available for purchase. Comedy @Liberty Laughs, Join us each week as the areas only Comedy Club brings you National Touring Comedians , 5801 Southpoint Center Blvd, , 7-9p

Wednesday, January 31

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

If you are reading this 246th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for February 2018 issue is January 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

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January 2018

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January 2018

17


history’s stories

JANUARY 13, 1777 MEETING By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

There have been several stories written about the meeting in Fredericksburg on January 13, 1777. The Act for Religious Freedom was written because of that meeting; however, it was not put into law until 1785. Thomas Jefferson, George Wythe, Edmund Pendleton, George Mason and Thomas Lee met in Fredericksburg as mandated by the Legislature of Virginia to revise the Colonial laws that were passed when Virginia was a Colony under British rule. George Mason unlike the others was not a politician, soldier or lawyer. He was a Virginia Farmer, self-educated and author of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of Virginia and most likely the first written Constitution in the History of the World, written to prevent Rulers changing the rights and liberties of the common citizen. Pendleton was a Statesman and Lawyer; somewhat like George Wythe a Lawyer and Judge. Thomas Lee was of the Stratford Hall family and a large land owner. Thomas Jefferson was well known for his work on the Declaration of Independence. All these men were Patriots with Mason, Jefferson and Wythe almost always in agreement with each other. Their main objective was to eradicate the customs and laws as established by the Crown. Before the Committee in Fredericksburg Thomas Jefferson proposed four measurers that opposed the British law. 1. Repeal the laws of entail. 2. The abolition of the law of primogeniture. 3. The establishment of a system of public education. 4. The law for the establishment of religious freedom and separation of Church and State Thomas Jefferson felt the repeal of the laws of entail would prevent the accumulation and perpetuation of wealth in select families. The law of primogeniture was the right of the first-born son rights over other children which was a relic of feudalism in Britain. With todays Public Schools it is difficult to believe that in 1607 in Jamestown up until the Revolution there were no public free schools. Jefferson proposed three school bills in the Fredericksburg meeting: Establish elementary free schools for all children; .Colleges; Highest grade of sciences Mason and Jefferson both felt that the more educated the people became the less chance of the people falling into the hands of a favored class. It is my opinion that this meeting of the five patriots in 1777 in Fredericksburg not only had and impact on the State of Virginia and the new born country called the United States of America, but these actions by these men in Fredericksburg was felt around the world. This was the meeting in Fredericksburg on January 13, 1777 that all these innovations were discussed and acted upon. It was not until 1785 that the Act of Religious Freedom was passed. The City of Fredericksburg celebrates the Religious Freedom passage. This is a annual celebration always held in January at the Religious Freedom Memorial on Washington Avenue. Anne F. Slivinski &I became husband and wife on New Years. Eve May God bless us DEDICATED TO: Mac Quann, TIim Amrhein, Janice Walsh, & Willis Boutchyard

18

jANUARY 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

FXBG Music Scene

let it snow

Keelin is Reelin’ in Determination

By Judy Chaimson

By ashleigh chevalier

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

his sister in 1863. The 1863 snowballs were a diversion for Confederate soldiers during a winter encampment. Included in the Heritage Center collections is a 1935 Free Lance-Star article which describes snow falling for 35 hours. The journalist praises city and state workers who opened roads quickly after the storm. These items and the photos represent the thousands of images and

For Fredericksburg area residents for whom there can never be enough snow, and for those who prefer to observe snow from a distance, the Heritage Center is happy to provide photos and documentation describing both the enjoyment and the headaches brought on by the falling white stuff. The Center has letters describing snowball fights – letters to Emmeline Stearns in 1948, and from Robert Knox to

It is 2018! Like most new years, most of us talk a lot about what we want to change and what we want to do differently…and what we may want to accomplish…and… lots of entrepreneurs capitalize on this natural human motivation to “want to be better” and “do what I’ve never done before, but always wanted to do…” Seems à propos to highlight a Fredericksburg livin’ musician who actually followed through and did just what he always wanted to do as the seasons of his life evolved.

Robert Keelin served in Human Resources in Virginia for the majority of his adult life, including an extended career with Verizon. After taking early retirement from Verizon, and working a part time job, he began the next phase. You can hear the echoes of a rejuvenated soul on his debut release, Going Places. If you go to Robert Keelin’s website, you can see it on his face in photos of him playing his guitar. The spirit of this album echoes the sentiment on John Mellancamp’s No Better Than This, acoustic album recorded at the historic Sun Studios and released in 2010, specifically the track “Save Some Time To Dream.” “I like to write songs solo,” and he prefers to play the acoustic guitar,

Keelin states. “Music is in me, has been ever since I was a little kid…I was in my late teens before I got my hands on a guitar….” Keelin has over 200 songs he has written over the years. He has taken a few lessons, practiced, studied up on recording, practiced, built a home studio, practiced, practiced….and obviously practiced some more. Going Places was all written and recorded (in LOGIC) by Keelin himself in his home studio. He sent it to BIAS Studios in Springfield to be mastered. Before you get any funny ideas about what that might mean, listen to it. It is authentic and good, even when you listen to it on laptop speakers. “I would get up in the morning, eat breakfast, go in the studio morning to night…but I got burned out… so since then, I have been building up my repertoire so I can get out and start playing in public.” Robert Keelin did what he set out to do… and he is still doing it, already

working on his second album that will incorporate his love for the rural south countryside. Keelin has played a few local shows here and there, and will perform more publicly in 2018. Even if you hate music… (It does exist. There are people who do not listen to music.) Even if you hate music, you cannot deny the spirit Keelin shares with his completed debut album: self written, self recorded, self released, and promoted. Check out Keelin’s album, Going Places, at RobertKeelin.com and on Facebook. Fredericksburg Friends, Please, use stories like Keelin’s to inspire yourself and others to accomplish what you have set your mind to do. DO IT, folks. Whatever it is on your mind to DO, just DO IT. It is worth it.

Happy 2018! May you see the blessings of new beginnings and creative transformations on your journeys. – From fellow musician and journey woman, Ashleigh Chevalier.

1936 Snow Storm documents to be found among collections donated Central to the Rappahannock Heritage Center by local citizens. Whether you are looking for information about past snowstorms or floods, maypole dancing or football games, you will be welcomed by the volunteers at the Center whatever the season.

Chatham Bridge, 1958 Snow Storm

Judy Chaimson is the Facility Manager at Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

19


history’s stories

JANUARY 13, 1777 MEETING By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

There have been several stories written about the meeting in Fredericksburg on January 13, 1777. The Act for Religious Freedom was written because of that meeting; however, it was not put into law until 1785. Thomas Jefferson, George Wythe, Edmund Pendleton, George Mason and Thomas Lee met in Fredericksburg as mandated by the Legislature of Virginia to revise the Colonial laws that were passed when Virginia was a Colony under British rule. George Mason unlike the others was not a politician, soldier or lawyer. He was a Virginia Farmer, self-educated and author of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of Virginia and most likely the first written Constitution in the History of the World, written to prevent Rulers changing the rights and liberties of the common citizen. Pendleton was a Statesman and Lawyer; somewhat like George Wythe a Lawyer and Judge. Thomas Lee was of the Stratford Hall family and a large land owner. Thomas Jefferson was well known for his work on the Declaration of Independence. All these men were Patriots with Mason, Jefferson and Wythe almost always in agreement with each other. Their main objective was to eradicate the customs and laws as established by the Crown. Before the Committee in Fredericksburg Thomas Jefferson proposed four measurers that opposed the British law. 1. Repeal the laws of entail. 2. The abolition of the law of primogeniture. 3. The establishment of a system of public education. 4. The law for the establishment of religious freedom and separation of Church and State Thomas Jefferson felt the repeal of the laws of entail would prevent the accumulation and perpetuation of wealth in select families. The law of primogeniture was the right of the first-born son rights over other children which was a relic of feudalism in Britain. With todays Public Schools it is difficult to believe that in 1607 in Jamestown up until the Revolution there were no public free schools. Jefferson proposed three school bills in the Fredericksburg meeting: Establish elementary free schools for all children; .Colleges; Highest grade of sciences Mason and Jefferson both felt that the more educated the people became the less chance of the people falling into the hands of a favored class. It is my opinion that this meeting of the five patriots in 1777 in Fredericksburg not only had and impact on the State of Virginia and the new born country called the United States of America, but these actions by these men in Fredericksburg was felt around the world. This was the meeting in Fredericksburg on January 13, 1777 that all these innovations were discussed and acted upon. It was not until 1785 that the Act of Religious Freedom was passed. The City of Fredericksburg celebrates the Religious Freedom passage. This is a annual celebration always held in January at the Religious Freedom Memorial on Washington Avenue. Anne F. Slivinski &I became husband and wife on New Years. Eve May God bless us DEDICATED TO: Mac Quann, TIim Amrhein, Janice Walsh, & Willis Boutchyard

18

jANUARY 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

FXBG Music Scene

let it snow

Keelin is Reelin’ in Determination

By Judy Chaimson

By ashleigh chevalier

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

his sister in 1863. The 1863 snowballs were a diversion for Confederate soldiers during a winter encampment. Included in the Heritage Center collections is a 1935 Free Lance-Star article which describes snow falling for 35 hours. The journalist praises city and state workers who opened roads quickly after the storm. These items and the photos represent the thousands of images and

For Fredericksburg area residents for whom there can never be enough snow, and for those who prefer to observe snow from a distance, the Heritage Center is happy to provide photos and documentation describing both the enjoyment and the headaches brought on by the falling white stuff. The Center has letters describing snowball fights – letters to Emmeline Stearns in 1948, and from Robert Knox to

It is 2018! Like most new years, most of us talk a lot about what we want to change and what we want to do differently…and what we may want to accomplish…and… lots of entrepreneurs capitalize on this natural human motivation to “want to be better” and “do what I’ve never done before, but always wanted to do…” Seems à propos to highlight a Fredericksburg livin’ musician who actually followed through and did just what he always wanted to do as the seasons of his life evolved.

Robert Keelin served in Human Resources in Virginia for the majority of his adult life, including an extended career with Verizon. After taking early retirement from Verizon, and working a part time job, he began the next phase. You can hear the echoes of a rejuvenated soul on his debut release, Going Places. If you go to Robert Keelin’s website, you can see it on his face in photos of him playing his guitar. The spirit of this album echoes the sentiment on John Mellancamp’s No Better Than This, acoustic album recorded at the historic Sun Studios and released in 2010, specifically the track “Save Some Time To Dream.” “I like to write songs solo,” and he prefers to play the acoustic guitar,

Keelin states. “Music is in me, has been ever since I was a little kid…I was in my late teens before I got my hands on a guitar….” Keelin has over 200 songs he has written over the years. He has taken a few lessons, practiced, studied up on recording, practiced, built a home studio, practiced, practiced….and obviously practiced some more. Going Places was all written and recorded (in LOGIC) by Keelin himself in his home studio. He sent it to BIAS Studios in Springfield to be mastered. Before you get any funny ideas about what that might mean, listen to it. It is authentic and good, even when you listen to it on laptop speakers. “I would get up in the morning, eat breakfast, go in the studio morning to night…but I got burned out… so since then, I have been building up my repertoire so I can get out and start playing in public.” Robert Keelin did what he set out to do… and he is still doing it, already

working on his second album that will incorporate his love for the rural south countryside. Keelin has played a few local shows here and there, and will perform more publicly in 2018. Even if you hate music… (It does exist. There are people who do not listen to music.) Even if you hate music, you cannot deny the spirit Keelin shares with his completed debut album: self written, self recorded, self released, and promoted. Check out Keelin’s album, Going Places, at RobertKeelin.com and on Facebook. Fredericksburg Friends, Please, use stories like Keelin’s to inspire yourself and others to accomplish what you have set your mind to do. DO IT, folks. Whatever it is on your mind to DO, just DO IT. It is worth it.

Happy 2018! May you see the blessings of new beginnings and creative transformations on your journeys. – From fellow musician and journey woman, Ashleigh Chevalier.

1936 Snow Storm documents to be found among collections donated Central to the Rappahannock Heritage Center by local citizens. Whether you are looking for information about past snowstorms or floods, maypole dancing or football games, you will be welcomed by the volunteers at the Center whatever the season.

Chatham Bridge, 1958 Snow Storm

Judy Chaimson is the Facility Manager at Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

19


Senior Care Advocate for Seniors By Karl Karch

20

January 2018

Emancipated Patients

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

innovations

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

As I write this article, it appears a Among the issues were: education, taxes, major tax reform legislation will pass. But transportation, and health care. Sadly, not before Senator Marco Rubio refused none addressed issues specific to our to vote for the tax reform bill until the senior community and family caregivers. refundability piece of child tax credits was Yet, the demographics are dramatically expanded, admittedly an excellent benefit shifting toward seniors, and I don't mean for needy families. What elected official high school seniors! Since the first baby was "shouting from the rooftop" to help boomer turned 65 in 2011, roughly 10,000 people are turning 65 every day needy seniors and their families with tax and by 2030 20% of the population will be relief? 85-90% of older adults want to 65 and older. By 2050, there will be as remain in their home as long as possible. As a person's health care needs change, many people 65 and older as 18 and the cost to remain home can become very younger. Our elected officials, priorities, burdensome. My industry routinely sees and budgets are woefully unprepared for seniors and their families this "silver tsunami" age making tough choices wave. The key point between finances and here is that it is I encourage everyone quality of life, often important to reach reading this to advocate forced to compromise out to your elected for seniors. quality of life and seniors' officials to see what desires to remain home If you aren't one now, you they are doing to help because of lack of hopefully will live to be one. advance senior issues. finances. I encourage How many of you have heard everyone reading this to advocate for about the Credit for Caring Act that is seniors. If you aren't one now, you working its way through Congress? This hopefully will live to be one. There are bill is designed to amend the IRS code to many other ways you can become a senior allow an eligible caregiver a new tax credit advocate. You can volunteer to help in for 30 percent of the cost of long-term nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or care expenses that exceed $2,000, up to senior centers. You can be a health care $3,000 credit in a taxable year? advocate by helping coordinate Legislation is also currently being written communication between medical staff and to expand Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) residential communities. If a loved one is to allow seniors and families to use some in a facility or hospital, check on them of their HSAs to cover home care expenses. often and at different times of the day. HR 1780, the Senior Accessible Housing Are they cared for properly? Act, will amend the tax code to allow As seniors, soon to be seniors, or people over the age of 60 to use up to current and potential family caregivers $30,000 of their funds to modify their for aging loved ones, are you an advocate home so a senior can be safe and more for seniors? If not, it's never too late to independent. These are not well start! publicized legislative steps to help ease the financial burden of home care. I attended a Culpeper Chamber of Commerce State Delegate forum prior to the November election. Questions were prepared in advance to hear candidates' views on community related issues.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

the latest on brain health

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Wellness

It’s New Year. Time to reflect on the old the number 1 spot however, is what is and usher in the new. being discovered about our microbiome – Keeping up with the exciting those 100 trillion microorganisms that innovations taking place in the medical lives on, or mostly in, us. field can be challenging. But luckily, each This whole idea produces a sort year, the Cleveland Clinic holds a Medical of “eeeuuuwwww” reaction in some. That Innovations Summit that identifies the 10 we are seething with cooties – but the fact hottest ideas – some maybe not so exotic is this seems to be very beneficial. Or like bio-absorbable essential. Trouble is people are stents; diabetes drugs It seems what, tending to overdo that reduce bacteria in particular, the cleanliness. cardiovascular disease; living in your GI tract, safety features for Kids who grow up on farms, or affects all sorts of driverless cars; immune processes as exposed to animals in the Ketamine for well as metabolic household tend to have less depression; Synthetic disorders and how health problems. blood transfusion medicines are processed Or less allergies at least formed by growing red in our bodies. blood stem cells and self Having a diverse administered HPV (the virus that causes microbiome seems important to your cervical cancer) test. health. Trouble is people are tending to overdo the cleanliness. Kids who grow up AMONG WHAT I RANK AS THE SEXIER on farms, or exposed to animals in the INNOVATIONS ARE: household tend to have less health Chimeric Antigen-R Receptor (CAR) T cell problems. Or less allergies at least. therapies – where you take immune cells Maybe we should be licking the out of the body of someone with cancer – handle of supermarket carts, rather than or with leukemia in particular. sanitizing them with the wipes provided? Cytologically razz them up to attack the Of course this is getting malignant cells and re-inject them to rein commercialized. The organization THRYVE immunological mayhem on the cancer. offers a service where you can monitor Liquid Biopsies which provide hope to your microbiome by sending them “a vastly improve cancer detection by small stool sample” (so this is what my identifying cancer cell DNA in the blood friend who had to be tested for gluten (as opposed to having to detect whole sensitivity calls a “poop-in-a-bucket” test) cancer cells, which are 100 times less and $59.95 a month – and they will send abundant). you whatever probiotics are indicated Augmented Reality headsets that allow My Own Favorites doctors or students to view a holographic As a long standing and weary image of the inside of the body as they protester about the lack of view the patient from the outside – a real “interoperability” of electronic medical boon for surgeons and/or medical records, I am happy to see, and hanging Fast Healthcare students, both of whom might want to my hopes on, Interoperability Resources. know exactly where this or that vital organ is located. Pretty bad to have to set up a system to act as “interpreter” in this Taking The Number One Spot veritable Tower of Babel that has grown The field that is listed as taking up as a zillion different organizations have developed their own, individual electronic medical records. And on a more flippant note, one other innovation that intrigues me is a distinct growth in butts. Or “gluteal augmentation” with implants. It used to be boobs. But this Kardashian-esque world is making huge, shapely butts a growing industry. So prepare yourself for large posteriors, cultivated microbiomes and a whole lot more.

Read Patrick Neustatter's book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

By christine H. Thompson, D.C. I recently attended a postgraduate educational seminar on neurodegeneration in the brain and how to prevent and repair damage done before it’s too late. Some of the early warning signs of dementia or brain inflammation and degeneration are memory loss, decrease in problem solving skills, difficulty with familiar tasks, mental fog or confusion and withdrawal or changes in mood and personality. If you are now worried about yourself and/or some of your loved ones, read on. The science around brain health had made great advances in recent years and we now understand how some of the devastating effects of chronic inflammation in the brain, (or any area of the body, for that matter) occur. Inflammation is necessary for the repair of damaged tissues of the body, but when it hangs around long term, it can cause tremendous damage to the body tissues. The seminar I attended illuminated the work of Dr. Datis Kharrazian, who is the first chiropractor to be a research fellow at Harvard Medical School. We learned that all areas of the brain can be subject to autoimmune attack and degeneration. This means that your own immune system can start to attack and destroy parts of your brain. Dr. Kharrazian has detailed some emerging theories on how this insidious selfdestruction is occurring and how to stop and even repair it. Autoimmune conditions have increased drastically in recent years. In fact, there are more people in the US suffering from autoimmune conditions today than from heart disease or cancer. Why this sudden explosion? There are a host of reasons and contributors, but a major player is gut health and intestinal permeability problems. We now know the mucosal lining of the gut is intimately connected with the health of the blood brain barrier and it is probably no surprise that gut health is in a dire state for many individuals today. The immune system produces antibodies, which are the cells it uses to tag microbes and other proteins that could be dangerous to your health. Our immune system is inundated by so many chemicals at such an increased rate today, our cell-protection system can’t keep up with the damage. The EPA estimates we are exposed to over 80,000 different manmade chemicals daily. Your body constantly orchestrates a complicated chemical cascade of events for cellular maintenance and repair. When this system is disrupted or confused through an overload of toxic

exposure, the immune system becomes “up-regulated” and ends up tagging anything that looks chemically similar to the targeted antigen. It turns out that some of our own body tissues, including brain proteins, can look similar to these dangerous foreign proteins. So our own body tissues end up getting tagged as dangerous and being destroyed by the immune system. WHAT TO DO? So what’s a person to do? Well, there is actually a lot you can do to prevent these neurodegenerative diseases. First, you can clean up your diet and eliminate anything that has added toxic chemicals. A great resource for this is the Environmental Working Group’s website, ewg.org. You can also eliminate some the food we know can trigger these types of immune reactions, which includes, you guessed it, gluten. It also includes some other grain proteins in some sensitive individuals. The next important thing you can do is to make sure you are eating a nutrient dense diet. What does that mean? Well most of our nutrients (vitamins, mineral, antioxidants, enzymes, etc.) come from plants, and the dark green leafy ones are very nutrient dense. Adding in some whole food supplements and nutrients that have been proven to protect our cells from damage and support the immune system effectively is essential for most people living a busy life today. And for those individuals who are already headed down the road of brain degeneration, finding a healthcare provider who is familiar with this field and knows some ways to help repair the damage and prevent further deterioration is vital. Christine Thompson is the owner of Whole Health Solutions. Contact her at 540-899-9421

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

21


Senior Care Advocate for Seniors By Karl Karch

20

January 2018

Emancipated Patients

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

innovations

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

As I write this article, it appears a Among the issues were: education, taxes, major tax reform legislation will pass. But transportation, and health care. Sadly, not before Senator Marco Rubio refused none addressed issues specific to our to vote for the tax reform bill until the senior community and family caregivers. refundability piece of child tax credits was Yet, the demographics are dramatically expanded, admittedly an excellent benefit shifting toward seniors, and I don't mean for needy families. What elected official high school seniors! Since the first baby was "shouting from the rooftop" to help boomer turned 65 in 2011, roughly 10,000 people are turning 65 every day needy seniors and their families with tax and by 2030 20% of the population will be relief? 85-90% of older adults want to 65 and older. By 2050, there will be as remain in their home as long as possible. As a person's health care needs change, many people 65 and older as 18 and the cost to remain home can become very younger. Our elected officials, priorities, burdensome. My industry routinely sees and budgets are woefully unprepared for seniors and their families this "silver tsunami" age making tough choices wave. The key point between finances and here is that it is I encourage everyone quality of life, often important to reach reading this to advocate forced to compromise out to your elected for seniors. quality of life and seniors' officials to see what desires to remain home If you aren't one now, you they are doing to help because of lack of hopefully will live to be one. advance senior issues. finances. I encourage How many of you have heard everyone reading this to advocate for about the Credit for Caring Act that is seniors. If you aren't one now, you working its way through Congress? This hopefully will live to be one. There are bill is designed to amend the IRS code to many other ways you can become a senior allow an eligible caregiver a new tax credit advocate. You can volunteer to help in for 30 percent of the cost of long-term nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or care expenses that exceed $2,000, up to senior centers. You can be a health care $3,000 credit in a taxable year? advocate by helping coordinate Legislation is also currently being written communication between medical staff and to expand Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) residential communities. If a loved one is to allow seniors and families to use some in a facility or hospital, check on them of their HSAs to cover home care expenses. often and at different times of the day. HR 1780, the Senior Accessible Housing Are they cared for properly? Act, will amend the tax code to allow As seniors, soon to be seniors, or people over the age of 60 to use up to current and potential family caregivers $30,000 of their funds to modify their for aging loved ones, are you an advocate home so a senior can be safe and more for seniors? If not, it's never too late to independent. These are not well start! publicized legislative steps to help ease the financial burden of home care. I attended a Culpeper Chamber of Commerce State Delegate forum prior to the November election. Questions were prepared in advance to hear candidates' views on community related issues.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

the latest on brain health

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Wellness

It’s New Year. Time to reflect on the old the number 1 spot however, is what is and usher in the new. being discovered about our microbiome – Keeping up with the exciting those 100 trillion microorganisms that innovations taking place in the medical lives on, or mostly in, us. field can be challenging. But luckily, each This whole idea produces a sort year, the Cleveland Clinic holds a Medical of “eeeuuuwwww” reaction in some. That Innovations Summit that identifies the 10 we are seething with cooties – but the fact hottest ideas – some maybe not so exotic is this seems to be very beneficial. Or like bio-absorbable essential. Trouble is people are stents; diabetes drugs It seems what, tending to overdo that reduce bacteria in particular, the cleanliness. cardiovascular disease; living in your GI tract, safety features for Kids who grow up on farms, or affects all sorts of driverless cars; immune processes as exposed to animals in the Ketamine for well as metabolic household tend to have less depression; Synthetic disorders and how health problems. blood transfusion medicines are processed Or less allergies at least formed by growing red in our bodies. blood stem cells and self Having a diverse administered HPV (the virus that causes microbiome seems important to your cervical cancer) test. health. Trouble is people are tending to overdo the cleanliness. Kids who grow up AMONG WHAT I RANK AS THE SEXIER on farms, or exposed to animals in the INNOVATIONS ARE: household tend to have less health Chimeric Antigen-R Receptor (CAR) T cell problems. Or less allergies at least. therapies – where you take immune cells Maybe we should be licking the out of the body of someone with cancer – handle of supermarket carts, rather than or with leukemia in particular. sanitizing them with the wipes provided? Cytologically razz them up to attack the Of course this is getting malignant cells and re-inject them to rein commercialized. The organization THRYVE immunological mayhem on the cancer. offers a service where you can monitor Liquid Biopsies which provide hope to your microbiome by sending them “a vastly improve cancer detection by small stool sample” (so this is what my identifying cancer cell DNA in the blood friend who had to be tested for gluten (as opposed to having to detect whole sensitivity calls a “poop-in-a-bucket” test) cancer cells, which are 100 times less and $59.95 a month – and they will send abundant). you whatever probiotics are indicated Augmented Reality headsets that allow My Own Favorites doctors or students to view a holographic As a long standing and weary image of the inside of the body as they protester about the lack of view the patient from the outside – a real “interoperability” of electronic medical boon for surgeons and/or medical records, I am happy to see, and hanging Fast Healthcare students, both of whom might want to my hopes on, Interoperability Resources. know exactly where this or that vital organ is located. Pretty bad to have to set up a system to act as “interpreter” in this Taking The Number One Spot veritable Tower of Babel that has grown The field that is listed as taking up as a zillion different organizations have developed their own, individual electronic medical records. And on a more flippant note, one other innovation that intrigues me is a distinct growth in butts. Or “gluteal augmentation” with implants. It used to be boobs. But this Kardashian-esque world is making huge, shapely butts a growing industry. So prepare yourself for large posteriors, cultivated microbiomes and a whole lot more.

Read Patrick Neustatter's book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

By christine H. Thompson, D.C. I recently attended a postgraduate educational seminar on neurodegeneration in the brain and how to prevent and repair damage done before it’s too late. Some of the early warning signs of dementia or brain inflammation and degeneration are memory loss, decrease in problem solving skills, difficulty with familiar tasks, mental fog or confusion and withdrawal or changes in mood and personality. If you are now worried about yourself and/or some of your loved ones, read on. The science around brain health had made great advances in recent years and we now understand how some of the devastating effects of chronic inflammation in the brain, (or any area of the body, for that matter) occur. Inflammation is necessary for the repair of damaged tissues of the body, but when it hangs around long term, it can cause tremendous damage to the body tissues. The seminar I attended illuminated the work of Dr. Datis Kharrazian, who is the first chiropractor to be a research fellow at Harvard Medical School. We learned that all areas of the brain can be subject to autoimmune attack and degeneration. This means that your own immune system can start to attack and destroy parts of your brain. Dr. Kharrazian has detailed some emerging theories on how this insidious selfdestruction is occurring and how to stop and even repair it. Autoimmune conditions have increased drastically in recent years. In fact, there are more people in the US suffering from autoimmune conditions today than from heart disease or cancer. Why this sudden explosion? There are a host of reasons and contributors, but a major player is gut health and intestinal permeability problems. We now know the mucosal lining of the gut is intimately connected with the health of the blood brain barrier and it is probably no surprise that gut health is in a dire state for many individuals today. The immune system produces antibodies, which are the cells it uses to tag microbes and other proteins that could be dangerous to your health. Our immune system is inundated by so many chemicals at such an increased rate today, our cell-protection system can’t keep up with the damage. The EPA estimates we are exposed to over 80,000 different manmade chemicals daily. Your body constantly orchestrates a complicated chemical cascade of events for cellular maintenance and repair. When this system is disrupted or confused through an overload of toxic

exposure, the immune system becomes “up-regulated” and ends up tagging anything that looks chemically similar to the targeted antigen. It turns out that some of our own body tissues, including brain proteins, can look similar to these dangerous foreign proteins. So our own body tissues end up getting tagged as dangerous and being destroyed by the immune system. WHAT TO DO? So what’s a person to do? Well, there is actually a lot you can do to prevent these neurodegenerative diseases. First, you can clean up your diet and eliminate anything that has added toxic chemicals. A great resource for this is the Environmental Working Group’s website, ewg.org. You can also eliminate some the food we know can trigger these types of immune reactions, which includes, you guessed it, gluten. It also includes some other grain proteins in some sensitive individuals. The next important thing you can do is to make sure you are eating a nutrient dense diet. What does that mean? Well most of our nutrients (vitamins, mineral, antioxidants, enzymes, etc.) come from plants, and the dark green leafy ones are very nutrient dense. Adding in some whole food supplements and nutrients that have been proven to protect our cells from damage and support the immune system effectively is essential for most people living a busy life today. And for those individuals who are already headed down the road of brain degeneration, finding a healthcare provider who is familiar with this field and knows some ways to help repair the damage and prevent further deterioration is vital. Christine Thompson is the owner of Whole Health Solutions. Contact her at 540-899-9421

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

21


Renew Do not make new year’s resolutions by Joan M. Geisler Instead, create NEW HABITS one at a time with small baby steps. There are 2 teenage fish swimming down the stream. They are met by an older fish swimming the other way. “Good mornin’ boys. How is the water today?” The teenage fish keep swimming when one fish looks at the other and says. “What’s water?” That is us. We are swimming in a sea of habits that we do not recognize. Here are 3 NO FAIL ways to create good habits that will crowd out the bad habits. ROUTINE , HABIT, WILLPOWER We are Establish a Routine. unconsciously slaves to routine. Notice how you move through your day. You have steady, predictable actions that you perform. So when it comes to your health, begin with creating new routines in order to create good habits. Start small. Start with a small habit at the beginning of your day. Start your day the night before. During your

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired? Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935 22

January 2018

evening hours begin to prep for the next day. Plan out your breakfast. Pack your lunch.Gather your keys, bags, coat, water bottle and put them together preferably by the door from which you will exit the house. Choose your clothing the night before so there are no surprises or frustrations in the morning like wrinkles, missing buttons, dirty… By creating a good ROUTINE, you will begin to turn that into a healthy habit. HABITS ACTUALLY SAVE OUR LIVES. If you had to relearn to get dress, cook, read, do math, drive each day, you would be exhausted. It is said that 90% of our day is habit. How many of those habits are causing you ill health? If one of those habits are broken and replaced with a healthy habit, it would cause a domino effect to the rest of your habits. We call that a Keystone Habit. A keystone habit is an action that is impactful enough that will affect other habits. Example. You decide you are going to get 8 hours of sleep every night. Because you are making that a habit, you find you are more rested. You are now more productive during the day, you are no longer tired and fatigued, you are more pleasant to those around you, you have energy to exercise,which in turn makes you want to eat better. All these ‘good habits’ were the collateral effects from one Keystone Habit of getting 8 hours of sleep. You have heard it said that ‘Willpower is a muscle, the more you use it the stronger it becomes.’ I agree. Willpower is a muscle, BUT the more you use it the more fatigued it gets. When you establish a routine in order to create healthy life habits you will conserve your WILLPOWER so you have it in excess when you need it most. If you have to use willpower to resist the donuts, the chocolate, the after-work drinks, then by the end of the day your will power will be exhausted. Late night eating sound familiar? This year, forgo the New Year’s Resolutions. Instead, choose one action that you know will impact your health for good.

Joan Geisler is a Habit Coach, A Behavioral Change Specialist. Visit her New Website at www.8020healthyhabits

Front porch fredericksburg

It’s All Energy

Life in Motion

hook up for more balance

you are not a bear

by christina ferber

By rich gaudio, pt

Have you ever had one of those days when you just could not get it together? When we feel “scatter brained,” or as if we can’t seem to focus, one way to pull ourselves back together is by doing what the Eden Energy Medicine community calls, “Hooking up.” up Doing a Hook-u brings energy systems together, so that they can keep your body in balance. Hooking up is as simple as holding two spots on your body that correlate with the systems you are trying to bring into balance. Because these exercises are so calming, they are good to do anytime you feel dizzy or faint, have a shock or change, or feel disconnected from yourself or others. up is part of the The Classic Hook-u Daily Energy Routine (see Jan/Feb 2017) for a good reason. It connects two meridians (energy pathways in the body) which are like our “energetic spine.” This hook-up also helps Radiant Energy (the energy of joy and vitality) flow, and helps connect the mind and body. There have also been reports that it has stopped seizures and fainting spells. Simply place one middle finger in your belly button and the other one on your forehead between your eyes. Push in, pull up, and breathe a few times. Triple Warmer is the meridian in charge of our survival, and is usually running at full speed. When it gets overworked, we can feel anxious and stressed, but Harmonizing Triple Warmer as a Radiant Circuit brings it into the Radiant Energy of joy. Place a flat hand on your forehead and the other flat hand on or a little above your bellybutton. Connecting these two areas settles the adrenals down and calms you. Another fantastic way to work with Triple Warmer is to Calm the Triple Warmer Neurovascular Points. Place your thumb, first and middle fingers in a cluster together, called a 3-ffinger notch. Then put those fingers at the “V” at the bottom of your throat above your collarbone. If this feels funny, you can use a flat hand over this spot. Place the other hand on the side of your face with your fingers flat at your temples. Take some deep breaths and then switch sides. This hold will also help to calm the Stomach Meridian which can be involved with any feelings of worry. Holding Neurovascular Points is another option to calm down and get

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 centered. Place one hand on your forehead and the other on the back of your head. You can place the hand on the back of your head in different areas depending on the need. Put it at the bottom of your head at the base of your skull to quickly calm down. Place it directly behind your eyes to alleviate any thoughts of fear, or behind your eyebrows to lessen panicked feelings. Be sure to breathe and hold any of these hook-ups as long as it takes to feel a sense of peace. up The 2nd & 4th Chakra Hook-u helps to center us and “come home” to ourselves. This exercise connects two chakras (energy centers that play a role in all of the system in our body) and brings balance to the body. Place a flat hand over your heart area and the other hand flat across the area beneath your belly button. Do this whenever you feel disconnected with yourself and need to feel more centered. These simple, easy hook-ups can change your day by adding peace and calm to it. Just remember to breathe and hold them for a few moments or until you feel better. For more exercises that can bring balance to your life, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com.

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

Living in the Fredericksburg area and working in healthcare for the past 20 years, I have observed an annual phenomenon that is as predictable as the changing seasons. The phenomenon is very subtle, in that it begins sometime after Thanksgiving as the days are getting shorter, the nights are longer, and the temperatures begin to drop. It has the greatest impact on those 65 years old and older but goes almost unnoticed, at first, due to the hustle, bustle, and holiday cheer that dominates the culture from Black Friday through New Year’s Day. Often, those most affected, do not begin to notice the consequences until we begin to thaw out in March. I am, of course, referring to the act of hibernation. Now, I am not criticizing the concept of slowing things down a bit, as a matter of fact, if you critically think about the idea, it is an intuitive instinct in many of us. The holidays are full of energy, activity and good cheer. Then, after uttering the last ‘auld lang syne,’ many folks are ready for a break in the action. The context of the season further encourages us as this is generally the darkest and coldest time of the year, lots of folks are in the postholiday, seasonal funk and quite frankly, it’s just easier to keep away until spring. Matter of fact, our language begins to reveal our desire for the hope of new life. You will often hear folks in mid to late February reciting these words, “When is it going to warm up around here? I’m done with winter. I’m ready for spring already!” And the cycle continues… So, I decided to look up the definition of the word hibernation and found the following: “Hibernation is the

condition or period of an animal or plant spending winter in a dormant state; an extended period of remaining inactive or indoors.” Not all bad, as a matter of fact, part of the healthy life cycle of certain animals and plants on this planet but the words that just grate on my nerve are: dormant and inactive. As people, we are built to move. Part of the evidence of our being alive is our ability to move. We need to move to live life in a healthier lifestyle. The older we get the more applicable this truth becomes. So, I am not suggesting that we sprint through this time of year, there is enough running around going on the rest of the year to keep us all satisfied. I am also, not endorsing dormancy and inactivity. Instead, much like farmers have historically done, I would encourage all of us to consider the months of January and February a time to slow down and plan. DO NOT STOP moving, but just slow your roll. Shift into a lower gear. Make sure you and your home are prepared for old-man winter and all he brings. Exercise indoors in a ‘maintenance mode’ to help you be prepared for shoveling or for the first foray into the garden in early spring. Whatever you do, do not hibernate, you are not a bear! Use this time to PAUSE and PLAN. Be in the moment, live your life in motion!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, 4701 Spotsylvania Pkwy Suite 106, Fredericksburg, VA 22407,Rich can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100, Or, agewellvirginia@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

23


Renew Do not make new year’s resolutions by Joan M. Geisler Instead, create NEW HABITS one at a time with small baby steps. There are 2 teenage fish swimming down the stream. They are met by an older fish swimming the other way. “Good mornin’ boys. How is the water today?” The teenage fish keep swimming when one fish looks at the other and says. “What’s water?” That is us. We are swimming in a sea of habits that we do not recognize. Here are 3 NO FAIL ways to create good habits that will crowd out the bad habits. ROUTINE , HABIT, WILLPOWER We are Establish a Routine. unconsciously slaves to routine. Notice how you move through your day. You have steady, predictable actions that you perform. So when it comes to your health, begin with creating new routines in order to create good habits. Start small. Start with a small habit at the beginning of your day. Start your day the night before. During your

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired? Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935 22

January 2018

evening hours begin to prep for the next day. Plan out your breakfast. Pack your lunch.Gather your keys, bags, coat, water bottle and put them together preferably by the door from which you will exit the house. Choose your clothing the night before so there are no surprises or frustrations in the morning like wrinkles, missing buttons, dirty… By creating a good ROUTINE, you will begin to turn that into a healthy habit. HABITS ACTUALLY SAVE OUR LIVES. If you had to relearn to get dress, cook, read, do math, drive each day, you would be exhausted. It is said that 90% of our day is habit. How many of those habits are causing you ill health? If one of those habits are broken and replaced with a healthy habit, it would cause a domino effect to the rest of your habits. We call that a Keystone Habit. A keystone habit is an action that is impactful enough that will affect other habits. Example. You decide you are going to get 8 hours of sleep every night. Because you are making that a habit, you find you are more rested. You are now more productive during the day, you are no longer tired and fatigued, you are more pleasant to those around you, you have energy to exercise,which in turn makes you want to eat better. All these ‘good habits’ were the collateral effects from one Keystone Habit of getting 8 hours of sleep. You have heard it said that ‘Willpower is a muscle, the more you use it the stronger it becomes.’ I agree. Willpower is a muscle, BUT the more you use it the more fatigued it gets. When you establish a routine in order to create healthy life habits you will conserve your WILLPOWER so you have it in excess when you need it most. If you have to use willpower to resist the donuts, the chocolate, the after-work drinks, then by the end of the day your will power will be exhausted. Late night eating sound familiar? This year, forgo the New Year’s Resolutions. Instead, choose one action that you know will impact your health for good.

Joan Geisler is a Habit Coach, A Behavioral Change Specialist. Visit her New Website at www.8020healthyhabits

Front porch fredericksburg

It’s All Energy

Life in Motion

hook up for more balance

you are not a bear

by christina ferber

By rich gaudio, pt

Have you ever had one of those days when you just could not get it together? When we feel “scatter brained,” or as if we can’t seem to focus, one way to pull ourselves back together is by doing what the Eden Energy Medicine community calls, “Hooking up.” up Doing a Hook-u brings energy systems together, so that they can keep your body in balance. Hooking up is as simple as holding two spots on your body that correlate with the systems you are trying to bring into balance. Because these exercises are so calming, they are good to do anytime you feel dizzy or faint, have a shock or change, or feel disconnected from yourself or others. up is part of the The Classic Hook-u Daily Energy Routine (see Jan/Feb 2017) for a good reason. It connects two meridians (energy pathways in the body) which are like our “energetic spine.” This hook-up also helps Radiant Energy (the energy of joy and vitality) flow, and helps connect the mind and body. There have also been reports that it has stopped seizures and fainting spells. Simply place one middle finger in your belly button and the other one on your forehead between your eyes. Push in, pull up, and breathe a few times. Triple Warmer is the meridian in charge of our survival, and is usually running at full speed. When it gets overworked, we can feel anxious and stressed, but Harmonizing Triple Warmer as a Radiant Circuit brings it into the Radiant Energy of joy. Place a flat hand on your forehead and the other flat hand on or a little above your bellybutton. Connecting these two areas settles the adrenals down and calms you. Another fantastic way to work with Triple Warmer is to Calm the Triple Warmer Neurovascular Points. Place your thumb, first and middle fingers in a cluster together, called a 3-ffinger notch. Then put those fingers at the “V” at the bottom of your throat above your collarbone. If this feels funny, you can use a flat hand over this spot. Place the other hand on the side of your face with your fingers flat at your temples. Take some deep breaths and then switch sides. This hold will also help to calm the Stomach Meridian which can be involved with any feelings of worry. Holding Neurovascular Points is another option to calm down and get

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 centered. Place one hand on your forehead and the other on the back of your head. You can place the hand on the back of your head in different areas depending on the need. Put it at the bottom of your head at the base of your skull to quickly calm down. Place it directly behind your eyes to alleviate any thoughts of fear, or behind your eyebrows to lessen panicked feelings. Be sure to breathe and hold any of these hook-ups as long as it takes to feel a sense of peace. up The 2nd & 4th Chakra Hook-u helps to center us and “come home” to ourselves. This exercise connects two chakras (energy centers that play a role in all of the system in our body) and brings balance to the body. Place a flat hand over your heart area and the other hand flat across the area beneath your belly button. Do this whenever you feel disconnected with yourself and need to feel more centered. These simple, easy hook-ups can change your day by adding peace and calm to it. Just remember to breathe and hold them for a few moments or until you feel better. For more exercises that can bring balance to your life, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com.

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

Living in the Fredericksburg area and working in healthcare for the past 20 years, I have observed an annual phenomenon that is as predictable as the changing seasons. The phenomenon is very subtle, in that it begins sometime after Thanksgiving as the days are getting shorter, the nights are longer, and the temperatures begin to drop. It has the greatest impact on those 65 years old and older but goes almost unnoticed, at first, due to the hustle, bustle, and holiday cheer that dominates the culture from Black Friday through New Year’s Day. Often, those most affected, do not begin to notice the consequences until we begin to thaw out in March. I am, of course, referring to the act of hibernation. Now, I am not criticizing the concept of slowing things down a bit, as a matter of fact, if you critically think about the idea, it is an intuitive instinct in many of us. The holidays are full of energy, activity and good cheer. Then, after uttering the last ‘auld lang syne,’ many folks are ready for a break in the action. The context of the season further encourages us as this is generally the darkest and coldest time of the year, lots of folks are in the postholiday, seasonal funk and quite frankly, it’s just easier to keep away until spring. Matter of fact, our language begins to reveal our desire for the hope of new life. You will often hear folks in mid to late February reciting these words, “When is it going to warm up around here? I’m done with winter. I’m ready for spring already!” And the cycle continues… So, I decided to look up the definition of the word hibernation and found the following: “Hibernation is the

condition or period of an animal or plant spending winter in a dormant state; an extended period of remaining inactive or indoors.” Not all bad, as a matter of fact, part of the healthy life cycle of certain animals and plants on this planet but the words that just grate on my nerve are: dormant and inactive. As people, we are built to move. Part of the evidence of our being alive is our ability to move. We need to move to live life in a healthier lifestyle. The older we get the more applicable this truth becomes. So, I am not suggesting that we sprint through this time of year, there is enough running around going on the rest of the year to keep us all satisfied. I am also, not endorsing dormancy and inactivity. Instead, much like farmers have historically done, I would encourage all of us to consider the months of January and February a time to slow down and plan. DO NOT STOP moving, but just slow your roll. Shift into a lower gear. Make sure you and your home are prepared for old-man winter and all he brings. Exercise indoors in a ‘maintenance mode’ to help you be prepared for shoveling or for the first foray into the garden in early spring. Whatever you do, do not hibernate, you are not a bear! Use this time to PAUSE and PLAN. Be in the moment, live your life in motion!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, 4701 Spotsylvania Pkwy Suite 106, Fredericksburg, VA 22407,Rich can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100, Or, agewellvirginia@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

23


Art in the Burg

Soup's On for The Fredericksburg Arts Directory

Dream Big! by norma Woodward Launching the New Year with an adventurous step, the members of the Brush Strokes Gallery decided to create a "Dream Big!" Exhibit that will be on display throughout January, featuring artwork with dimensions of 40 inches and above. This challenge has inspired some artists to venture into new styles, subject matter, and mediums. Visitors will enter an artistic realm filled with giant-sized energy, passion, and talent. Join us on Friday, January 5, to meet and speak with our artists at the "Dream Big!" opening reception from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg, is open daily from 11 AM to 5 PM. The "Dream Big!" exhibit will be featured from January 2 through January 28. Brushstrokesfredericksburg.com; facebook

“City Lights” Peggy Wickham

“Heavy Seas” Sarah Finn

“Dead of Winter” Stacy Gaglio

“Summer on the Drive” Kathleen Willingham

24

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

“Rappahannock Bloom” Penny Parrish

The Fredericksburg region is blessed with incredibly talented and dedicated creative people and an evergrowing community of all types of arts and cultural resources. Area residents enjoy arts opportunities from a plethora of galleries promoting the works of the area’s 2D and 3D visual artists, numerous theater groups and other performing artists from local bands, choral societies and orchestras. Unfortunately, few seem to know about the exact breadth and depth of the area arts offerings. With the assistance of the local arts community, the Arts & Cultural Council of the Rappahannock (ACCR) intends to conduct an arts & cultural resource inventory to identify the cultural assets of the region. The information collected by the inventory will be used to create an online resource directory to include artists, art teachers, galleries, museums, theaters, studios, festivals, bands, choral societies, art supply shops, art venues, and public art. On January 21 at the CRRL, FXBG branch, 2.30 to 4.30 pm, ACCR invites local artists and members of local arts organizations to another "Soup's On" gathering. Gathering open to the entire FVBG area art aficionado community who would like to assist with the effort to online compile and create the Fredericksburg Arts Directory. The “Soup’s On” gathering is to familiarize the arts community and local art lovers with ACCR’s Arts Directory project. We plan to form committees to represent all the various arts genres to assist in spreading the word about the Arts Directory and to aid in compiling the necessary information. CRRL will co-host the event in the auditorium at the Fredericksburg branch and ACCR will provide soup and refreshments. Save the date and come by the Library on January 21st prepared to warm up with some good soup and help ACCR develop an action plan to get this much needed resource off the ground. Having a comprehensive Arts Directory is the first step to promoting the Fredericksburg Region as an “Arts Destination of Merit.” For more information, email us at info@fredericksburgarts.org or visit www.fxbgarts.org ~ Carolyn Van Der Jagt

Stories

Name This House

of fredericksburg

Chris offering to pray with people and of course one of them came up with a military hat. I asked, "Are you a veteran" and he was like "yeah" and I got so angry. That was in August and by September I was volunteering here.

Chris first got involved with Micah when she started a new job and discovered that she had a lot of extra time on her hands, and she wanted to use it to "be the hands and feet of Jesus in the area." Chris, an army veteran (4.5 years on active duty, and one year in the guard), found Micah online, read their mission statement, and the rest is history. Here's what she has to say: "Micah intrigued me because of their ministry to the homeless but also because of their focus on veterans, and as a veteran that's kind of near and dear to my heart. No one should be homeless, but especially not veterans. I went on a mission trip to LA through my church […] and the whole week was spent working with the homeless or disadvantaged in the area, but one night we went to Skid Row and we were just handing out food and

It's such a pleasure to be at Micah and work with other like-minded people. I think most of us could say we grew up privileged and didn't have to deal with the kind of adversity that many of the folks we deal with do on a daily basis. So, it's eye opening to see how resilient some people are in the face of some really difficult situations. And then there are some people who, no matter what, will never be able to help themselves the way most of the people I've always known can. It is very good for me to be able to see that in reality and in practice and it sure builds your compassion for folks.

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

A Tiny Poem For a Tiny House

Last Month’s House: The “Conway House”, 305 King St. The Winner of a Roxbury Farms & Garden Center Gift Certificate is Chiung Huang

You are such a tiny house, looking more like a toy. You seem shy, like a child, waiting, waiting, for Mommy to return. Mom did live within your walls, many years ago, she spoke French, and had a little boy. Mom's boy grew up and moved away, leaving you and she alone, alone with your memories. Heaven took her up, leaving you to shed your tears. Below the college you have sat, empty now it seems, with several winters damping your walls, waiting for Mom to return.

And since coming here just little things like I go into my warm bed at night and the first thing I do is pray for the homeless because I have a nice warm bed and a nice house and they don't. And something as simple as that just really makes me realize that life is different for some folks and sometimes they just need a little hand

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

25


Art in the Burg

Soup's On for The Fredericksburg Arts Directory

Dream Big! by norma Woodward Launching the New Year with an adventurous step, the members of the Brush Strokes Gallery decided to create a "Dream Big!" Exhibit that will be on display throughout January, featuring artwork with dimensions of 40 inches and above. This challenge has inspired some artists to venture into new styles, subject matter, and mediums. Visitors will enter an artistic realm filled with giant-sized energy, passion, and talent. Join us on Friday, January 5, to meet and speak with our artists at the "Dream Big!" opening reception from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg, is open daily from 11 AM to 5 PM. The "Dream Big!" exhibit will be featured from January 2 through January 28. Brushstrokesfredericksburg.com; facebook

“City Lights” Peggy Wickham

“Heavy Seas” Sarah Finn

“Dead of Winter” Stacy Gaglio

“Summer on the Drive” Kathleen Willingham

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January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

“Rappahannock Bloom” Penny Parrish

The Fredericksburg region is blessed with incredibly talented and dedicated creative people and an evergrowing community of all types of arts and cultural resources. Area residents enjoy arts opportunities from a plethora of galleries promoting the works of the area’s 2D and 3D visual artists, numerous theater groups and other performing artists from local bands, choral societies and orchestras. Unfortunately, few seem to know about the exact breadth and depth of the area arts offerings. With the assistance of the local arts community, the Arts & Cultural Council of the Rappahannock (ACCR) intends to conduct an arts & cultural resource inventory to identify the cultural assets of the region. The information collected by the inventory will be used to create an online resource directory to include artists, art teachers, galleries, museums, theaters, studios, festivals, bands, choral societies, art supply shops, art venues, and public art. On January 21 at the CRRL, FXBG branch, 2.30 to 4.30 pm, ACCR invites local artists and members of local arts organizations to another "Soup's On" gathering. Gathering open to the entire FVBG area art aficionado community who would like to assist with the effort to online compile and create the Fredericksburg Arts Directory. The “Soup’s On” gathering is to familiarize the arts community and local art lovers with ACCR’s Arts Directory project. We plan to form committees to represent all the various arts genres to assist in spreading the word about the Arts Directory and to aid in compiling the necessary information. CRRL will co-host the event in the auditorium at the Fredericksburg branch and ACCR will provide soup and refreshments. Save the date and come by the Library on January 21st prepared to warm up with some good soup and help ACCR develop an action plan to get this much needed resource off the ground. Having a comprehensive Arts Directory is the first step to promoting the Fredericksburg Region as an “Arts Destination of Merit.” For more information, email us at info@fredericksburgarts.org or visit www.fxbgarts.org ~ Carolyn Van Der Jagt

Stories

Name This House

of fredericksburg

Chris offering to pray with people and of course one of them came up with a military hat. I asked, "Are you a veteran" and he was like "yeah" and I got so angry. That was in August and by September I was volunteering here.

Chris first got involved with Micah when she started a new job and discovered that she had a lot of extra time on her hands, and she wanted to use it to "be the hands and feet of Jesus in the area." Chris, an army veteran (4.5 years on active duty, and one year in the guard), found Micah online, read their mission statement, and the rest is history. Here's what she has to say: "Micah intrigued me because of their ministry to the homeless but also because of their focus on veterans, and as a veteran that's kind of near and dear to my heart. No one should be homeless, but especially not veterans. I went on a mission trip to LA through my church […] and the whole week was spent working with the homeless or disadvantaged in the area, but one night we went to Skid Row and we were just handing out food and

It's such a pleasure to be at Micah and work with other like-minded people. I think most of us could say we grew up privileged and didn't have to deal with the kind of adversity that many of the folks we deal with do on a daily basis. So, it's eye opening to see how resilient some people are in the face of some really difficult situations. And then there are some people who, no matter what, will never be able to help themselves the way most of the people I've always known can. It is very good for me to be able to see that in reality and in practice and it sure builds your compassion for folks.

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

A Tiny Poem For a Tiny House

Last Month’s House: The “Conway House”, 305 King St. The Winner of a Roxbury Farms & Garden Center Gift Certificate is Chiung Huang

You are such a tiny house, looking more like a toy. You seem shy, like a child, waiting, waiting, for Mommy to return. Mom did live within your walls, many years ago, she spoke French, and had a little boy. Mom's boy grew up and moved away, leaving you and she alone, alone with your memories. Heaven took her up, leaving you to shed your tears. Below the college you have sat, empty now it seems, with several winters damping your walls, waiting for Mom to return.

And since coming here just little things like I go into my warm bed at night and the first thing I do is pray for the homeless because I have a nice warm bed and a nice house and they don't. And something as simple as that just really makes me realize that life is different for some folks and sometimes they just need a little hand

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

25


Spirits & Beyond Hubert Jackson By A.E. Bayne

Artist Hubert Jackson has built a career on teaching and exhibiting art that holds specific memories. This is most evident in his body of work from the last decade entitled Spirits of the Journey. For each of the pieces in the series, Jackson visited hallowed ground - battlefields, farms and plantations across the landscape of Civil War era Virginia. His focus landed primarily on his former home in Culpeper County. Jackson's regional interest stems from his youth. He says, “I attended G.W. Carver High School, which was right at the base of Cedar Mountain. The school was on the site where battles were fought, so we were actually playing football on the battlefield. I collected things from that area and other sites, little towns like Winston and Orange. Those are the places where I used some of the tree bark from the actual battlefields in my paintings.”

For artifacts that he could not find on the battle fields, Jackson shopped online on Ebay. He says, “Some artifacts are more difficult to find than others. I bid on metallic things like belt buckles, bullets, horse shoes, all things recovered from those particular areas. I then worked them into the design of the pieces. I’ve always been around these battlefields and war history, and this particular place, which was a hub of Civil War activity, has always intrigued me." Jackson says he is also fascinated by the people of the era. He explains, “There’s a Timothy O’Sullivan photograph, very iconic, of slaves leaving Culpepper County crossing the river into what is now Remington. At the time it was Rappahannock Station. There are Union soldiers guarding them, but they are in their Conestoga wagons and riding on horses and mules leaving Culpepper and heading to the Union lines. That picture has always

Art is a Gift from the Heart Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish Daily hours 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 26

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

intrigued me, so I used that theme in some of my paintings.” As he learned more about the history of Culpeper and slavery, Jackson realized that the area had an astounding number of slaves, one of the highest numbers in the counties of Virginia at one point. He says, “I think of all those people.

Some of their descendants are still there, but most of them left. I think of my own family history. I’m a descendant of a slave owner and a slave, so I’m always thinking about my place in history. My painting reflects that interest.” Jackson is currently working on a mural in Culpeper in the building that once housed his high school alma mater. He says, “It was segregated when I attended, and when they integrated our high school became an industrial building. Then it was a church. More recently, the county has decided to renovate it and make it an agricultural center.” Alumni like Jackson lobbied for permission to use part of it as a museum that will recognize the 20-year history of the old school, which served the students of Culpeper, Madison, Rappahannock and Orange Counties. Jackson says the museum will recognize the history of one-

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

“Couple With Spirit”

“Spirits of Fredericksburg”

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

room schools used before integration in the county, some of which were built by people in the African American community who wanted their children to have a school. Jackson says, “They would actually dig the well and build the school.” Jackson’s mural will reflect the rich history of African Americans who contributed to education in Culpeper, even as equality was denied to them. He says, “I’m making an outline of the counties and putting some features of all those oneroom schools within the boundaries. Then I’ll design images that represent activities that went on at the high school and I’ll highlight the people who excelled in those areas. It will open in 2018.” Jackson’s signature mixed media style artistry are available for viewing in the Colonial Beach area and online through his website. He shows work in Washington, D.C., New York, and internationally. www.hubertjackson.com A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and educator who publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997

Porch Light Stories that Shine a Light on Life

keep on slacking in the free world By Jeremy Sutton I’ll be frank: I didn’t really get around to this piece this month. I told Virginia I would write up something for January Front Porch, because December is usually a pretty light month for me, professionally. And then, because no good deed goes unpunished, December ended up being as ludicrously busy as any Spring or Fall run of travel, sales calls, client meetings, wine dinners and tastings, etc. etc. etc. I didn’t forget about the promised article (it was even on my Google Calendar, which basically substitutes for my brain at this point, and is significantly more reliable). And I wouldn’t say I really put it off, either. I’m NOT a procrastinator, and kind of pride myself on punctuality and clearing deadlines with relative ease (Virginia is rolling her eyes at this point). So…..how did we get here? And why does any of this matter to you? First off, I personally wasn’t thrilled with her proposed topic. Virginia came over to the house in late October (Halloween, if we’re being specific). We have a new painting over the mantle that she hadn’t seen. It’s a Scott DeHaven piece, and it’s beautiful. Sunset over an early summer Fredericksburg, looking south-south-east from the Baptist Church tower over to the St. George’s spire, down Princess Anne St. There’s lively color, a small flock of starlings give wonderful action….the last rays of full sunlight and bright clouds that populate the top corner of the piece are a wonderful contrast to the late day shadows at street level that set a relaxed, 5 o’clock mood. We had the space above the mantle empty for almost three years until we bought the piece about a year ago. We have a lot of great artwork in our house, but nothing really fit this grandiose space, so we left it open knowing that eventually the right piece would present itself. And it did, on an anniversary dinner at the Sunken Well, no less. We saw it there as part of a show that Scott had hanging. We fell in love, and knew this was the one. My wife Jessica got in touch with Scott and now we enjoy it every day in our home. So that’s all well and good, of course, and I knew why Virginia liked the angle. It combines the citizenry of Fredericksburg (ourselves) with local businesses (finding it at Sunken Well), and notch art community (it’s our always top-n an article about a painting, after all) all coming together in some really beautiful synergy. It’s classic Front Porch, and

completely in the voice and vein of this venerable publication. But I don’t write about myself very often (the whole “I” thing in this piece is already driving me bonkers), and I must question on some level why anyone is even remotely interested in the art in my strongly suburban home in south Stafford. But I didn’t have anything else to go on, no other legitimate idea for an article for the Front Porch. In the blinding blur that is the race to Thanksgiving and holidays beyond, I couldn’t find something perfect to fall out of the blue for me, like the painting did that night. So, I wrote what I know: and I know that I have to pound out between 600-800 words before noon or so today, Monday, December 18th for the Front Porch or risk really letting down some people that are very important to me and my family. And then I couldn’t remember how to spell Scott’s last name, so I called Steve Cameli at Sunken Well to confirm, and we chatted for a while about a party he had missed that weekend, and had a nice mid-morning conversation. And then I thought about Ben Peck, a mutual friend of Steve and I’s (and a former Fredericksburg resident) who will be coming back this way for the holidays. I called him up before time got away from me again, so we could get our families together next week. And then I went to take a picture of the painting for the article, and I thought about how Libertytown is kind of just barely out of view, and how that would be the perfect

place to wrap up the final 2-3 gifts that I still had left to purchase. And then finally I thought how I still kind of ended up writing the piece Virginia wanted, only through a different filter and perspective. It was a good article idea, and in writing it I came back around and was reminded of all the positive points that made it work. Sometimes we can get pretty wrapped up in what something isn’t, the negative. “No one cares about your art, dude”, “I don’t think I can write this article in a way that translates”. When really, if we just sit down and let it start, letting things flow and meander and fill in like little rivulets, the answer is much clearer and more positive than it first appeared. And that’s where you come in. I implore you in this new year to open yourself up, and be an optimist. How can something be GREAT? How can you make something BETTER? The world is a dark and nervous place at this moment in history…..shine your light on the good things, and don’t worry about their validity. Positivity is it’s own reward.

Jeremy Sutton knows how to surrender to the flow, but should really learn to do so before the 11th hour.

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

27


Spirits & Beyond Hubert Jackson By A.E. Bayne

Artist Hubert Jackson has built a career on teaching and exhibiting art that holds specific memories. This is most evident in his body of work from the last decade entitled Spirits of the Journey. For each of the pieces in the series, Jackson visited hallowed ground - battlefields, farms and plantations across the landscape of Civil War era Virginia. His focus landed primarily on his former home in Culpeper County. Jackson's regional interest stems from his youth. He says, “I attended G.W. Carver High School, which was right at the base of Cedar Mountain. The school was on the site where battles were fought, so we were actually playing football on the battlefield. I collected things from that area and other sites, little towns like Winston and Orange. Those are the places where I used some of the tree bark from the actual battlefields in my paintings.”

For artifacts that he could not find on the battle fields, Jackson shopped online on Ebay. He says, “Some artifacts are more difficult to find than others. I bid on metallic things like belt buckles, bullets, horse shoes, all things recovered from those particular areas. I then worked them into the design of the pieces. I’ve always been around these battlefields and war history, and this particular place, which was a hub of Civil War activity, has always intrigued me." Jackson says he is also fascinated by the people of the era. He explains, “There’s a Timothy O’Sullivan photograph, very iconic, of slaves leaving Culpepper County crossing the river into what is now Remington. At the time it was Rappahannock Station. There are Union soldiers guarding them, but they are in their Conestoga wagons and riding on horses and mules leaving Culpepper and heading to the Union lines. That picture has always

Art is a Gift from the Heart Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish Daily hours 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 26

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

intrigued me, so I used that theme in some of my paintings.” As he learned more about the history of Culpeper and slavery, Jackson realized that the area had an astounding number of slaves, one of the highest numbers in the counties of Virginia at one point. He says, “I think of all those people.

Some of their descendants are still there, but most of them left. I think of my own family history. I’m a descendant of a slave owner and a slave, so I’m always thinking about my place in history. My painting reflects that interest.” Jackson is currently working on a mural in Culpeper in the building that once housed his high school alma mater. He says, “It was segregated when I attended, and when they integrated our high school became an industrial building. Then it was a church. More recently, the county has decided to renovate it and make it an agricultural center.” Alumni like Jackson lobbied for permission to use part of it as a museum that will recognize the 20-year history of the old school, which served the students of Culpeper, Madison, Rappahannock and Orange Counties. Jackson says the museum will recognize the history of one-

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

“Couple With Spirit”

“Spirits of Fredericksburg”

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

room schools used before integration in the county, some of which were built by people in the African American community who wanted their children to have a school. Jackson says, “They would actually dig the well and build the school.” Jackson’s mural will reflect the rich history of African Americans who contributed to education in Culpeper, even as equality was denied to them. He says, “I’m making an outline of the counties and putting some features of all those oneroom schools within the boundaries. Then I’ll design images that represent activities that went on at the high school and I’ll highlight the people who excelled in those areas. It will open in 2018.” Jackson’s signature mixed media style artistry are available for viewing in the Colonial Beach area and online through his website. He shows work in Washington, D.C., New York, and internationally. www.hubertjackson.com A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and educator who publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997

Porch Light Stories that Shine a Light on Life

keep on slacking in the free world By Jeremy Sutton I’ll be frank: I didn’t really get around to this piece this month. I told Virginia I would write up something for January Front Porch, because December is usually a pretty light month for me, professionally. And then, because no good deed goes unpunished, December ended up being as ludicrously busy as any Spring or Fall run of travel, sales calls, client meetings, wine dinners and tastings, etc. etc. etc. I didn’t forget about the promised article (it was even on my Google Calendar, which basically substitutes for my brain at this point, and is significantly more reliable). And I wouldn’t say I really put it off, either. I’m NOT a procrastinator, and kind of pride myself on punctuality and clearing deadlines with relative ease (Virginia is rolling her eyes at this point). So…..how did we get here? And why does any of this matter to you? First off, I personally wasn’t thrilled with her proposed topic. Virginia came over to the house in late October (Halloween, if we’re being specific). We have a new painting over the mantle that she hadn’t seen. It’s a Scott DeHaven piece, and it’s beautiful. Sunset over an early summer Fredericksburg, looking south-south-east from the Baptist Church tower over to the St. George’s spire, down Princess Anne St. There’s lively color, a small flock of starlings give wonderful action….the last rays of full sunlight and bright clouds that populate the top corner of the piece are a wonderful contrast to the late day shadows at street level that set a relaxed, 5 o’clock mood. We had the space above the mantle empty for almost three years until we bought the piece about a year ago. We have a lot of great artwork in our house, but nothing really fit this grandiose space, so we left it open knowing that eventually the right piece would present itself. And it did, on an anniversary dinner at the Sunken Well, no less. We saw it there as part of a show that Scott had hanging. We fell in love, and knew this was the one. My wife Jessica got in touch with Scott and now we enjoy it every day in our home. So that’s all well and good, of course, and I knew why Virginia liked the angle. It combines the citizenry of Fredericksburg (ourselves) with local businesses (finding it at Sunken Well), and notch art community (it’s our always top-n an article about a painting, after all) all coming together in some really beautiful synergy. It’s classic Front Porch, and

completely in the voice and vein of this venerable publication. But I don’t write about myself very often (the whole “I” thing in this piece is already driving me bonkers), and I must question on some level why anyone is even remotely interested in the art in my strongly suburban home in south Stafford. But I didn’t have anything else to go on, no other legitimate idea for an article for the Front Porch. In the blinding blur that is the race to Thanksgiving and holidays beyond, I couldn’t find something perfect to fall out of the blue for me, like the painting did that night. So, I wrote what I know: and I know that I have to pound out between 600-800 words before noon or so today, Monday, December 18th for the Front Porch or risk really letting down some people that are very important to me and my family. And then I couldn’t remember how to spell Scott’s last name, so I called Steve Cameli at Sunken Well to confirm, and we chatted for a while about a party he had missed that weekend, and had a nice mid-morning conversation. And then I thought about Ben Peck, a mutual friend of Steve and I’s (and a former Fredericksburg resident) who will be coming back this way for the holidays. I called him up before time got away from me again, so we could get our families together next week. And then I went to take a picture of the painting for the article, and I thought about how Libertytown is kind of just barely out of view, and how that would be the perfect

place to wrap up the final 2-3 gifts that I still had left to purchase. And then finally I thought how I still kind of ended up writing the piece Virginia wanted, only through a different filter and perspective. It was a good article idea, and in writing it I came back around and was reminded of all the positive points that made it work. Sometimes we can get pretty wrapped up in what something isn’t, the negative. “No one cares about your art, dude”, “I don’t think I can write this article in a way that translates”. When really, if we just sit down and let it start, letting things flow and meander and fill in like little rivulets, the answer is much clearer and more positive than it first appeared. And that’s where you come in. I implore you in this new year to open yourself up, and be an optimist. How can something be GREAT? How can you make something BETTER? The world is a dark and nervous place at this moment in history…..shine your light on the good things, and don’t worry about their validity. Positivity is it’s own reward.

Jeremy Sutton knows how to surrender to the flow, but should really learn to do so before the 11th hour.

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

27


Companions A New Companion for the New Year Open Your Heart And Home And Adopt A Furry Friend Today!

Kittens: $125 (age 9 months & under), Adopt one kitten and adoption fee on second kitten is waived! Senior animals (7+ years) & special needs animals: $60 Our adoption fee includes spay/neuter surgery, microchip & registration, basic vaccines, rabies vaccine (4 months and older), age-appropriate blood testing (6 months and older), flea/tick/heartworm treatments, and deworming. As a non-profit organization, our adoption fees help us to offset some of these costs. Please note, specialty breeds may be subject to higher fees and will be noted on the animal's profile.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

“Bronson” Let My Soulful Eyes Melt Your Heart! 5yrs First Time Adopting? Learn About Our Process. You must be 18 years and older to adopt an animal. Adoption applications can be filled out and submitted in person at the shelter. Applications are processed in the order that they are received and an application will not be processed until the applicant has met with the animal. Animals are available for visiting Thursday through Tuesday (closed Wednesday)

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

“Paws” I enjoy the finest of Catnip. 2yrs The Fredericksburg Regional SPCA is a non-profit, No-Kill humane organization dedicated to the principle that every life is unique and worthy of protection. As a local leader in humane care and education, the Fredericksburg SPCA's mission is to tackle the problem of pet overpopulation through education, adoption, rehabilitation and spay/neuter. The organization saves the lives of many homeless animals each year and cares for approximately 400 cats and dogs daily. 10819 Courthouse Rd, FXBG 22408 (540) 898-1 1500; fburgspca.org

“Romeo” Are You My Juliet?, 4yrs from 12pm to 6 pm. While visiting, we encourage you to ask any questions you may have with staff members or volunteers, as our goal is to help you find the right match for your family. The Fredericksburg SPCA thanks you for considering one of the many animals in need of a new home. Our fees are as follows: Adult dogs: $150 Puppies: $250 (age 6 months & under) Adult cats: $100

28

January 2018

Timid “Toby” Tugs at Your Heartstrings. 3yrs

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

29


Companions A New Companion for the New Year Open Your Heart And Home And Adopt A Furry Friend Today!

Kittens: $125 (age 9 months & under), Adopt one kitten and adoption fee on second kitten is waived! Senior animals (7+ years) & special needs animals: $60 Our adoption fee includes spay/neuter surgery, microchip & registration, basic vaccines, rabies vaccine (4 months and older), age-appropriate blood testing (6 months and older), flea/tick/heartworm treatments, and deworming. As a non-profit organization, our adoption fees help us to offset some of these costs. Please note, specialty breeds may be subject to higher fees and will be noted on the animal's profile.

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

“Bronson” Let My Soulful Eyes Melt Your Heart! 5yrs First Time Adopting? Learn About Our Process. You must be 18 years and older to adopt an animal. Adoption applications can be filled out and submitted in person at the shelter. Applications are processed in the order that they are received and an application will not be processed until the applicant has met with the animal. Animals are available for visiting Thursday through Tuesday (closed Wednesday)

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

“Paws” I enjoy the finest of Catnip. 2yrs The Fredericksburg Regional SPCA is a non-profit, No-Kill humane organization dedicated to the principle that every life is unique and worthy of protection. As a local leader in humane care and education, the Fredericksburg SPCA's mission is to tackle the problem of pet overpopulation through education, adoption, rehabilitation and spay/neuter. The organization saves the lives of many homeless animals each year and cares for approximately 400 cats and dogs daily. 10819 Courthouse Rd, FXBG 22408 (540) 898-1 1500; fburgspca.org

“Romeo” Are You My Juliet?, 4yrs from 12pm to 6 pm. While visiting, we encourage you to ask any questions you may have with staff members or volunteers, as our goal is to help you find the right match for your family. The Fredericksburg SPCA thanks you for considering one of the many animals in need of a new home. Our fees are as follows: Adult dogs: $150 Puppies: $250 (age 6 months & under) Adult cats: $100

28

January 2018

Timid “Toby” Tugs at Your Heartstrings. 3yrs

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS Salute by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

“I hope you will have a wonderful year . . . And, most importantly (because I think there should be more kindness and more wisdom in the world right now), . . .that you will always be kind.” ~ Neil Gaiman

Give a Child

There are many things I enjoy about writing this column, From My Porch. My family might think it is because it is the last column in each issue of Front Porch Fredericksburg, and I like to have the last word. My friends might think it is because it feeds my need to tell stories (which it does). But the most compelling reason is that writers feel that they have something to say, and it permits me to think and write about what interests me.

Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties Georgia & her companion, Bailey

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

A Huge 2018 New Year Thank You & Salute to Our FXBGERS of 2017 SKETCH #39: Snow Along the Rappahannock By the time this sketch appears in Front Porch, most of the leaves on the trees at this spot along the Rappahannock will be long gone. But this is one of those sketches that is more about a mood and a memory than it is about accuracy. And, even though this scene was executed in oil paint, it really is more of a sketch than a painting having been done on paper, rather than canvas. When I painted this, I decided to take a break from depicting local architecture and step outside for a “breath of fresh air.” Truth be told, I was suffering from a back and hip problem that was causing excruciating pain in the sciatic nerve down my entire left leg. Doing something seemingly as simple as drawing or painting was proving almost impossible. So I surrounded myself with a little bit of serenity in the form of our beautiful local river and as I painted I allowed myself to stray from worrying about whether what I depicted was entirely accurate. I was seeking a “happy place” in my mind to help battle the pain my body was encountering. Creating art can help do that sometimes. It’s almost like having your own personal therapist to help get you over the hard places. Though, as I look back at the sketch now, I’m still not sure whether the “pain” or the “happy place” left a bigger mark on the piece. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Roll Call You never ask for thanks, gliding around the city, helping those in need. Does anyone ever thank you, very seldom indeed. In fact when ask what you have done, to help the very helpless and hopeless, you smile and turn your face, and my heart swells with admiration, of your sterling character, that sits behind your shy, compassionate eyes. Thank you my friends, we wish you all the best, for helping make our little town, a cradle in the stable. ~ Most Appreciatively, Georgia for Front Porch Magazine

Our Wise, Generous People, Barbara Stafford, Bruce Harvey, Kathy Mahoney ,Cheryl Howard, Zena Hemp, Thea Verdak, Rebecca Rubin, Ruth Spratt, Andora Brady, Kathy Ashley, Annette and Charlie Ahart, Don Dixon, Ruth at "Ruby," kind policeman, Mike Cotter,Teresa Bullock, Tom Morgan, Laura Donnell and Poppy Merrell, Betty Menks, Ben Radman, Ethyl Hellman, Donna Gamache, Ron and Michelle Utt, Sally Cooney Anderson, Stacey McLaughlin, Carol and Billy Shelton, Steve Wilcox, Lisa Roosa,, Jesse Reeve, Kassie Stevenson, Jan Swager, Jack Rowley, Jon Van Zandt, and dear Lupe,one of the most beautiful and kindest of people in our Burg. Publisher’s Note: Georgia belongs on this list of generous, kind and giving residents of FXBG, VA. We salute her and add her to this illustrious list. As we start a New Year, we hope it will be filled with kindness.

30

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

ring in the new year with kindness By Jo Loving

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

From My Porch

You may have read this month’s guest editorial, in which I had the privilege of setting the tone for this year’s Front Porch. Throughout 2018, the magazine will focus on “kindness” in a variety of forms and from different perspectives. In composing my first column of the year, I have been reflecting on times in my own life when kindness was evident, one of which was when I crossed paths with Rob Grogan, who was the editor at Front Porch from its inception in 1999 until his passing in early 2014. Some people who know me know that I share a last name with Rob. I don’t know of any relatives we share, and write under my pen name, Jo Loving, as I did before I was a Grogan. Lack of common ancestors notwithstanding, I felt a kinship with Rob from the start. In late 2013, cold-queried him with a column idea. I had long enjoyed the magazine, as did my children. We had a habit of hitting up Hyperion Espresso, grabbing a copy of Front Porch, enjoying a delicious cuppa while we discussed each issue of the magazine. Both Front Porch and Hyperion felt like home to us. Rob was encouraging and kind, and asked me to submit for his Porch Light column. After I sent the column to him, he responded, “Jo, wonderfully done!” Three small words that meant the

world to me. I didn’t know that it would be the last message I would receive from him, as he passed away a little over three weeks afterward, having battled a rare form of cancer. From our communications, he never hinted at what he was enduring – he was kind and encouraging, even in the face of his own illness. I believe one of the greatest measures of a person is how they act towards others when under times of pain, stress, and all of the related emotions. I will always be grateful that our paths crossed. The kindness didn’t stop there. He had excellent taste in choosing his mate. His wife, Virginia, was the publisher; Rob was the editor. I didn’t interact with Virginia until about a month after Rob died. She had assumed Rob’s duties. Over time, we have shared snippets of our lives with one another. In late 2015, while recovering from a serious health issue, I received something in the mail. It was from Virginia. She knew I missed the Fredericksburg area, and sent a note and a beautiful cobalt blue bird feeder from Bottles Uncorked in Fredericksburg. The bird feeder hangs on my porch, and every time I see it and fill it, it reminds me of the kindness and thoughtful nature of Virginia Grogan. I am grateful for the opportunity to write for this magazine, and will be eternally grateful to Rob and Virginia for their faith in me and encouragement as a writer. So, with that, let’s ring in the new year – a year of kindness.

Jo Loving is on the porch this evening, enjoying the reflection of the moon on the beautiful wine bottle bird feeder from Virginia, and feeling thankful for the many acts of kindness and kind people she has known. Her goal is to “always be kind.”.

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS Salute by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

“I hope you will have a wonderful year . . . And, most importantly (because I think there should be more kindness and more wisdom in the world right now), . . .that you will always be kind.” ~ Neil Gaiman

Give a Child

There are many things I enjoy about writing this column, From My Porch. My family might think it is because it is the last column in each issue of Front Porch Fredericksburg, and I like to have the last word. My friends might think it is because it feeds my need to tell stories (which it does). But the most compelling reason is that writers feel that they have something to say, and it permits me to think and write about what interests me.

Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties Georgia & her companion, Bailey

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

A Huge 2018 New Year Thank You & Salute to Our FXBGERS of 2017 SKETCH #39: Snow Along the Rappahannock By the time this sketch appears in Front Porch, most of the leaves on the trees at this spot along the Rappahannock will be long gone. But this is one of those sketches that is more about a mood and a memory than it is about accuracy. And, even though this scene was executed in oil paint, it really is more of a sketch than a painting having been done on paper, rather than canvas. When I painted this, I decided to take a break from depicting local architecture and step outside for a “breath of fresh air.” Truth be told, I was suffering from a back and hip problem that was causing excruciating pain in the sciatic nerve down my entire left leg. Doing something seemingly as simple as drawing or painting was proving almost impossible. So I surrounded myself with a little bit of serenity in the form of our beautiful local river and as I painted I allowed myself to stray from worrying about whether what I depicted was entirely accurate. I was seeking a “happy place” in my mind to help battle the pain my body was encountering. Creating art can help do that sometimes. It’s almost like having your own personal therapist to help get you over the hard places. Though, as I look back at the sketch now, I’m still not sure whether the “pain” or the “happy place” left a bigger mark on the piece. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Roll Call You never ask for thanks, gliding around the city, helping those in need. Does anyone ever thank you, very seldom indeed. In fact when ask what you have done, to help the very helpless and hopeless, you smile and turn your face, and my heart swells with admiration, of your sterling character, that sits behind your shy, compassionate eyes. Thank you my friends, we wish you all the best, for helping make our little town, a cradle in the stable. ~ Most Appreciatively, Georgia for Front Porch Magazine

Our Wise, Generous People, Barbara Stafford, Bruce Harvey, Kathy Mahoney ,Cheryl Howard, Zena Hemp, Thea Verdak, Rebecca Rubin, Ruth Spratt, Andora Brady, Kathy Ashley, Annette and Charlie Ahart, Don Dixon, Ruth at "Ruby," kind policeman, Mike Cotter,Teresa Bullock, Tom Morgan, Laura Donnell and Poppy Merrell, Betty Menks, Ben Radman, Ethyl Hellman, Donna Gamache, Ron and Michelle Utt, Sally Cooney Anderson, Stacey McLaughlin, Carol and Billy Shelton, Steve Wilcox, Lisa Roosa,, Jesse Reeve, Kassie Stevenson, Jan Swager, Jack Rowley, Jon Van Zandt, and dear Lupe,one of the most beautiful and kindest of people in our Burg. Publisher’s Note: Georgia belongs on this list of generous, kind and giving residents of FXBG, VA. We salute her and add her to this illustrious list. As we start a New Year, we hope it will be filled with kindness.

30

January 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

ring in the new year with kindness By Jo Loving

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

From My Porch

You may have read this month’s guest editorial, in which I had the privilege of setting the tone for this year’s Front Porch. Throughout 2018, the magazine will focus on “kindness” in a variety of forms and from different perspectives. In composing my first column of the year, I have been reflecting on times in my own life when kindness was evident, one of which was when I crossed paths with Rob Grogan, who was the editor at Front Porch from its inception in 1999 until his passing in early 2014. Some people who know me know that I share a last name with Rob. I don’t know of any relatives we share, and write under my pen name, Jo Loving, as I did before I was a Grogan. Lack of common ancestors notwithstanding, I felt a kinship with Rob from the start. In late 2013, cold-queried him with a column idea. I had long enjoyed the magazine, as did my children. We had a habit of hitting up Hyperion Espresso, grabbing a copy of Front Porch, enjoying a delicious cuppa while we discussed each issue of the magazine. Both Front Porch and Hyperion felt like home to us. Rob was encouraging and kind, and asked me to submit for his Porch Light column. After I sent the column to him, he responded, “Jo, wonderfully done!” Three small words that meant the

world to me. I didn’t know that it would be the last message I would receive from him, as he passed away a little over three weeks afterward, having battled a rare form of cancer. From our communications, he never hinted at what he was enduring – he was kind and encouraging, even in the face of his own illness. I believe one of the greatest measures of a person is how they act towards others when under times of pain, stress, and all of the related emotions. I will always be grateful that our paths crossed. The kindness didn’t stop there. He had excellent taste in choosing his mate. His wife, Virginia, was the publisher; Rob was the editor. I didn’t interact with Virginia until about a month after Rob died. She had assumed Rob’s duties. Over time, we have shared snippets of our lives with one another. In late 2015, while recovering from a serious health issue, I received something in the mail. It was from Virginia. She knew I missed the Fredericksburg area, and sent a note and a beautiful cobalt blue bird feeder from Bottles Uncorked in Fredericksburg. The bird feeder hangs on my porch, and every time I see it and fill it, it reminds me of the kindness and thoughtful nature of Virginia Grogan. I am grateful for the opportunity to write for this magazine, and will be eternally grateful to Rob and Virginia for their faith in me and encouragement as a writer. So, with that, let’s ring in the new year – a year of kindness.

Jo Loving is on the porch this evening, enjoying the reflection of the moon on the beautiful wine bottle bird feeder from Virginia, and feeling thankful for the many acts of kindness and kind people she has known. Her goal is to “always be kind.”.

front porch fredericksburg

January 2018

31


Front Porch Fredericksburg - January 2018  
Front Porch Fredericksburg - January 2018  
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