Page 1


contents

closeups

16-17

Calendar of events

18

history’s stories.: christmas memories our heritage: 1500 washington ave.

19

assisting survivors...fema surge capacity force

20

Senior Care: joy to the aging world

21

emancipated Patients: active shooter defense

22

It’s all energy: tips to avoid holiday hiccups renew: healing above, down & inside out

23

life in motion: sarah & claude Phillippy

24

art in the ‘burg: moss clinic helped by elves

25

mYSTERY hOUSE

porch talk

26

Joey Frye. perspective is everything

27

The Hite Family Artists

.

28

companions: compassion

29

cancer journal:

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: lines, wrinkles & stories

5

bob whittingham ...creating christmas memories

25

florence ridderhof ...tireless micah worker

31

Jon Van Zandt historic adaptive reuse

31

3

D.B.Newton receives preservation award

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

Master Gardeners: the 20 question salute

7

On the trails:: cold beer, hot soup & warm shower

.8

I have a friend: the gift of sharing

10

downtown buzz: making spirits bright

11

Poetryman: purpose

12

Vino: Aglianico, perfect winter wine

13

season’s bounty: plenty of pounds

14

cooking with kyle: shrimp crab crepes

15

everything greens: survival by cooperation

27

7

hats off ...to jeanne fraser

11 & 19 29

fxbg sister cities: frejus & nepal

izzy james: Local writer ~ national recognition Cover: “Suncicles” By David c. kennedy

2

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

historic preservation award by travis wakeman

The CVBT Board & President present award to D.B.Newton (2nd from right)

...And more! 9

D.B. Newton

The White Oak Civil War Museum and Stafford Research Center, located in Falmouth, VA, houses a wide collection of Civil War artifacts, representing both Union and Confederate troops. Most items were discarded or lost by troops camping or fighting in the Stafford County and Fredericksburg areas. To give proper commemoration to these brave soldiers, White Oak Museum exhibits both military and personal items to honor the soldiers, from the ranks of Private to General, who agonized both in battle and behind the front lines. D. P. Newton is a life-long resident of White Oak and, with his own resourcefulness, established the White Oak Civil War Museum and Stafford Research Center. The museum and D. P. have been

recognized by the Virginia Historical Society for their contributions to understanding the lives of the common soldiers of both armies during the Civil War. D.P. is an indispensable resource on all aspects of Civil War research and especially on Stafford’s role and participation in the war. On October 28th Central Virginia Battlefields Trust presented the 2018 Michael P. Stevens Preservation Award to D.P. Newton for his outstanding conservation and education work in Stafford County, Virginia. The oyster roast celebration was organized by a group of his friends at his privately owned museum and was attended by 700 members of the public, including uniformed reenactors from the 47th Virginia Infantry. CVBT

President Tom Van Winkle presented the award, stating: "[The] stories [here] are masterfully told by D.P.... the education offered to the public of our history is priceless, and in these tumultuous times, more significant than ever.” Mr. Newton continues to run and maintain the White Oak Civil War Museum while simultaneously battling cancer. White Oak sits somewhat off the beaten track for Civil War enthusiasts visiting Virginia. Unassuming from the outside, upon entry one is confronted with a wonderland of Civil War militaria, some of the rarest of which provide glimpses into Civil War camp life, but all of which tell a story. For anyone who glances inside one of the replica reconstructions of soldier's winter encampments on the museum grounds, it quickly becomes apparent that the story is not a pleasant one. The American Civil War saw two soldiers die from disease and exposure for every one killed in action. The Stafford Civil War Military Park (that was founded in 2013 Glen Trimmer) by D.B. Newton and

documents what some have called the Union Army's "Valley Forge" in the wake of their defeat at Fredericksburg in December of 1862. One cannot hope to ever truly grasp the hardships of those who fought until they see how these men spent the vast majority of their time. The Central Virginia Battlefield Trust, who has preserved over 1,200 acres of endangered Civil War battlegrounds on the Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness and Spotsylvania battlefields over the past twenty one years, also awarded D.P. Newton a $1000 dollar check (raised personally from the CVBT Board of Directors) as part of the Michael P. Stevens Preservation Award.

Travis Wakeman is the Assistant to the Chief Administrator at Central Virginia Battlefields Trust

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

3


contents

closeups

16-17

Calendar of events

18

history’s stories.: christmas memories our heritage: 1500 washington ave.

19

assisting survivors...fema surge capacity force

20

Senior Care: joy to the aging world

21

emancipated Patients: active shooter defense

22

It’s all energy: tips to avoid holiday hiccups renew: healing above, down & inside out

23

life in motion: sarah & claude Phillippy

24

art in the ‘burg: moss clinic helped by elves

25

mYSTERY hOUSE

porch talk

26

Joey Frye. perspective is everything

27

The Hite Family Artists

.

28

companions: compassion

29

cancer journal:

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: lines, wrinkles & stories

5

bob whittingham ...creating christmas memories

25

florence ridderhof ...tireless micah worker

31

Jon Van Zandt historic adaptive reuse

31

3

D.B.Newton receives preservation award

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

Master Gardeners: the 20 question salute

7

On the trails:: cold beer, hot soup & warm shower

.8

I have a friend: the gift of sharing

10

downtown buzz: making spirits bright

11

Poetryman: purpose

12

Vino: Aglianico, perfect winter wine

13

season’s bounty: plenty of pounds

14

cooking with kyle: shrimp crab crepes

15

everything greens: survival by cooperation

27

7

hats off ...to jeanne fraser

11 & 19 29

fxbg sister cities: frejus & nepal

izzy james: Local writer ~ national recognition Cover: “Suncicles” By David c. kennedy

2

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

historic preservation award by travis wakeman

The CVBT Board & President present award to D.B.Newton (2nd from right)

...And more! 9

D.B. Newton

The White Oak Civil War Museum and Stafford Research Center, located in Falmouth, VA, houses a wide collection of Civil War artifacts, representing both Union and Confederate troops. Most items were discarded or lost by troops camping or fighting in the Stafford County and Fredericksburg areas. To give proper commemoration to these brave soldiers, White Oak Museum exhibits both military and personal items to honor the soldiers, from the ranks of Private to General, who agonized both in battle and behind the front lines. D. P. Newton is a life-long resident of White Oak and, with his own resourcefulness, established the White Oak Civil War Museum and Stafford Research Center. The museum and D. P. have been

recognized by the Virginia Historical Society for their contributions to understanding the lives of the common soldiers of both armies during the Civil War. D.P. is an indispensable resource on all aspects of Civil War research and especially on Stafford’s role and participation in the war. On October 28th Central Virginia Battlefields Trust presented the 2018 Michael P. Stevens Preservation Award to D.P. Newton for his outstanding conservation and education work in Stafford County, Virginia. The oyster roast celebration was organized by a group of his friends at his privately owned museum and was attended by 700 members of the public, including uniformed reenactors from the 47th Virginia Infantry. CVBT

President Tom Van Winkle presented the award, stating: "[The] stories [here] are masterfully told by D.P.... the education offered to the public of our history is priceless, and in these tumultuous times, more significant than ever.” Mr. Newton continues to run and maintain the White Oak Civil War Museum while simultaneously battling cancer. White Oak sits somewhat off the beaten track for Civil War enthusiasts visiting Virginia. Unassuming from the outside, upon entry one is confronted with a wonderland of Civil War militaria, some of the rarest of which provide glimpses into Civil War camp life, but all of which tell a story. For anyone who glances inside one of the replica reconstructions of soldier's winter encampments on the museum grounds, it quickly becomes apparent that the story is not a pleasant one. The American Civil War saw two soldiers die from disease and exposure for every one killed in action. The Stafford Civil War Military Park (that was founded in 2013 Glen Trimmer) by D.B. Newton and

documents what some have called the Union Army's "Valley Forge" in the wake of their defeat at Fredericksburg in December of 1862. One cannot hope to ever truly grasp the hardships of those who fought until they see how these men spent the vast majority of their time. The Central Virginia Battlefield Trust, who has preserved over 1,200 acres of endangered Civil War battlegrounds on the Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness and Spotsylvania battlefields over the past twenty one years, also awarded D.P. Newton a $1000 dollar check (raised personally from the CVBT Board of Directors) as part of the Michael P. Stevens Preservation Award.

Travis Wakeman is the Assistant to the Chief Administrator at Central Virginia Battlefields Trust

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

3


Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Guest Porch Editorial Contributing Writers & Artists Candice Armstrong A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Ashleigh Chevalier Mike Costa Beth Daly Barbara Deal Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Mary Geil Ann Glave Lou Gramann Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Judy Penn Jones Karl Karch Susan Kenney David C. Kennedy Marion Krock Kolson Jo Loving Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Friedrich Müntges Patrick Neustatter M.L. Powers Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Anne Slivinski Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Travis Wakeman Phyllis Whitley Tina Will Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

December 2017

ON THE PORCH

'Tis the Season whittingham Christmas WINDOW

It’s a wonderful Community

By M.L. Powers

by lenora kruk-mullanaphy In 2008, my husband’s job required our family to relocate to the Washington, D.C., area from Las Vegas. Except for our six-year stint in Vegas, we’d lived in New Jersey most of our lives, and that’s where we called home. We now had the dilemma of choosing a state--Maryland or Virginia. We decided on Virginia and took the next step of figuring out if we wanted to live close to D.C. or further south. From what we knew about the area, we could’ve put a map on the wall, stuck a thumbtack on any area and called it home. We finally narrowed down a location when we discovered a gem named Stafford County. Specifically, we learned about southern Stafford and Fredericksburg and were intrigued. We didn’t have much time to search--not an ideal situation--but we found a house that felt like home to us as soon as we entered the door. The kids loved the area—the trees, ponds in our yard, deer, squirrels, birds—what was there not to love about it? Nine years later, we couldn’t be happier with the decision to move here. The reasons are many, but it primarily comes down to one thing: the community. My children have attended elementary, middle and high school here, and I couldn’t be more pleased with the education system. They’re at Stafford High School, where one is immersed in art classes and the marching band’s color guard. The other is a senior and an aspiring stage actress. Luckily she attends Stafford High School and part of the award-winning theater department. She’s learned every aspect of the theater, including working on stage crew, set design and costumes, as well as taking voice lessons to affect an accent and acting in the plays. The drama teachers work with the students every day after school and on Saturdays to create productions that are similar to those you’d see on the professional stage.

Another aspect of Stafford High School’s excellence is the fine arts department, where students in the choir gain a great education, experience performing and a love of music. It’s amazing how many employment opportunities there are here for adults and teenagers. My husband works at the American Traffic Safety Services Association, where he’s the director of meetings & conventions and The Foundation director. I own KrukMullanaphy Media Group, LLC and work from home. My older daughter had a great career opportunity at the Riverside Center for the Performing Arts this summer. She landed parts in two plays and couldn’t have been happier to perform during summer vacation. Well, she actually did become happier when she found out she’d be paid for doing what she loved. There are many agencies and organizations that help others in the community. I’m a volunteer with the Senior Visitor Program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg (MHAF), and the individual I visit each week has enriched my life much more, I’m sure, than I’ve done for her. In addition, MHAF holds a teen support group for youngsters in the area. The teens meet to discuss a variety of issues, such as depression and anxiety. This type of program is invaluable to our children, who may sometimes feel isolated and struggle with not being able to share their feelings elsewhere. There’s so much to do in the area, from parks and hiking trails to pickyour-own produce and shopping. Our outof-town visitors enjoy strolling through the eclectic shops in downtown Fredericksburg, and there are a variety of restaurants from which to choose. What I saved for last is the fact that the people in the community are what make it shine. The friends we’ve made here will last a lifetime and are more like extended family. The traditions we’ve

messages

Virginia

The Salmon looks good (Kyle, Pistachio Pecan Salmon, October 2017), but the Award -Winning A. Smith Bowman Distillery Whiskey looks superb!.

Thanks so much for your beautifully written article about Bill Carter. (October 2017) Your intro of the Irish Blessing was perfect and the article was a superb tribute to a man who blessed all who knew him including our family. How right you are that he will live in our hearts forever.

Grapes & Grains Trail

Jo Middleton

FPF

Front porch fredericksburg

built with them throughout the years, such as Christmas house lightings, Thanksgiving dinners, pool parties and weekly coffee groups, will always be etched in our memories. When my daughters have fundraisers for school, the neighbors, friends and shop owners in the community are generous—they believe in the words, “It takes a village.” They seem to truly want to support young people and their goals. In doing so, they’re also building a stronger community, where our children can thrive and feel valued. Though we were born and raised in New Jersey and still call it home, we couldn’t be happier to raise our family in Virginia—particularly in Stafford County, Fredericksburg. So sit back on your porch this holiday season, feeling blessed to live in this wondeful community and read Front Porch cover-to-cover

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy lives, works , and plays in Stafford County. Pictured above with daughter Ava, a sophomore at Stafford High School.

Thanks for the article on Nurse Practitioners (Neustatter, October 2017). What an asset they are! Joe Corning Publishers Note: Thank you Anne Slivinski for your FEMA service with the rescue efforts in Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas & California during this years disasterous hurricanes and wild fires.The community appreciates your personal sacrifices to help the members of our greater community.

Nothing signals the beginning of the Christmas season like the unveiling of Whittingham’s Christmas window. For many years now, I have taken house guests into town to enjoy the festive display at Whittinghams that appears every year on the day after Thanksgiving. Some years, the display is simple and minimalist, and other years it abounds with characters from some Christmas tale, as in the year of the mice. Everyone who shops in town remembers the “mice life” mirrored below the family house all celebrating the season. This year is no exception, as the theme is Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Bob Whittingham (upper right) works with local master carpenter, Tom Rainey and artist, Linda Silk Sviland (below) to accomplish the shop’s extravaganza. They begin their blueprints that allow this all to come together. The costumes, hand made by Linda are authentic down to the brace on Tiny Tim’s leg. The ghost of Christmas past is a magnificent fairy looking creature, that stuns you with its beauty and craftmanship. Both windows tell a part of

the story. One side shows Tiny Tim and Scrooge against the backdrop of the dark Victorian town, and the other side will depict the ghosts of past, present and future. The Scrooge figure is fantastic, and all together the story is depicted in grand form. Owner of one of Fredericksburg’s long time standing businesses and favorite shopkeepers, Bob. Whittingham is no stranger to the craft of window dressing. His first job was in a retail store in his hometown in Minnesota. The employees were expected to learn all aspects of the trade. Later, he worked in New York City, doing many different types of retail and marketing positions. He designed a window for Cartier and many others. Whittingham and The Kitchen which are both connected are a highlight in one’s shopping experience in Fredericksburg. I always find the right gift when I shop there. I joked with Bob that the last time I interviewed him, I came home with an article and a border collie door stopper. That time is upon us

again, another winter, another flurry of seasonal fun, and hopefully a return to the simple life of family and friendship that was so beautifully depicted in A Christmas Carol, and now in the window at 1021 Caroline Street. Scenes: Mr. Scrooge walking through London town;Tiny Tim & his cane taking a stroll; Fezziwig & his wife at the ball.

brainstorming on the project in early Spring, and work throughout the year acquiring the pieces that fit their imagined idea of the window. Linda does all the costumes and painting, while Tom constructs the actual set pieces. They work together from the onset to determine what they can do physically in the space, assessing the cost factor, and lastly the set up and mechanics are put in place in time for the grand opening. The tricky part is the mechanics of the display. There are moving pieces that need to run 24/7, so the installation and testing becomes key to the success of the show. The construction of the set was in full swing by the time I spoke with Mr. Whittingham last month. He calculated this as the 10th year of a major holiday window. The first was a collection of candy castles in 2007. I was able to see the workshop and some of the many drafts and front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

5


Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Guest Porch Editorial Contributing Writers & Artists Candice Armstrong A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Ashleigh Chevalier Mike Costa Beth Daly Barbara Deal Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Mary Geil Ann Glave Lou Gramann Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Judy Penn Jones Karl Karch Susan Kenney David C. Kennedy Marion Krock Kolson Jo Loving Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Friedrich Müntges Patrick Neustatter M.L. Powers Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Anne Slivinski Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Travis Wakeman Phyllis Whitley Tina Will Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

December 2017

ON THE PORCH

'Tis the Season whittingham Christmas WINDOW

It’s a wonderful Community

By M.L. Powers

by lenora kruk-mullanaphy In 2008, my husband’s job required our family to relocate to the Washington, D.C., area from Las Vegas. Except for our six-year stint in Vegas, we’d lived in New Jersey most of our lives, and that’s where we called home. We now had the dilemma of choosing a state--Maryland or Virginia. We decided on Virginia and took the next step of figuring out if we wanted to live close to D.C. or further south. From what we knew about the area, we could’ve put a map on the wall, stuck a thumbtack on any area and called it home. We finally narrowed down a location when we discovered a gem named Stafford County. Specifically, we learned about southern Stafford and Fredericksburg and were intrigued. We didn’t have much time to search--not an ideal situation--but we found a house that felt like home to us as soon as we entered the door. The kids loved the area—the trees, ponds in our yard, deer, squirrels, birds—what was there not to love about it? Nine years later, we couldn’t be happier with the decision to move here. The reasons are many, but it primarily comes down to one thing: the community. My children have attended elementary, middle and high school here, and I couldn’t be more pleased with the education system. They’re at Stafford High School, where one is immersed in art classes and the marching band’s color guard. The other is a senior and an aspiring stage actress. Luckily she attends Stafford High School and part of the award-winning theater department. She’s learned every aspect of the theater, including working on stage crew, set design and costumes, as well as taking voice lessons to affect an accent and acting in the plays. The drama teachers work with the students every day after school and on Saturdays to create productions that are similar to those you’d see on the professional stage.

Another aspect of Stafford High School’s excellence is the fine arts department, where students in the choir gain a great education, experience performing and a love of music. It’s amazing how many employment opportunities there are here for adults and teenagers. My husband works at the American Traffic Safety Services Association, where he’s the director of meetings & conventions and The Foundation director. I own KrukMullanaphy Media Group, LLC and work from home. My older daughter had a great career opportunity at the Riverside Center for the Performing Arts this summer. She landed parts in two plays and couldn’t have been happier to perform during summer vacation. Well, she actually did become happier when she found out she’d be paid for doing what she loved. There are many agencies and organizations that help others in the community. I’m a volunteer with the Senior Visitor Program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg (MHAF), and the individual I visit each week has enriched my life much more, I’m sure, than I’ve done for her. In addition, MHAF holds a teen support group for youngsters in the area. The teens meet to discuss a variety of issues, such as depression and anxiety. This type of program is invaluable to our children, who may sometimes feel isolated and struggle with not being able to share their feelings elsewhere. There’s so much to do in the area, from parks and hiking trails to pickyour-own produce and shopping. Our outof-town visitors enjoy strolling through the eclectic shops in downtown Fredericksburg, and there are a variety of restaurants from which to choose. What I saved for last is the fact that the people in the community are what make it shine. The friends we’ve made here will last a lifetime and are more like extended family. The traditions we’ve

messages

Virginia

The Salmon looks good (Kyle, Pistachio Pecan Salmon, October 2017), but the Award -Winning A. Smith Bowman Distillery Whiskey looks superb!.

Thanks so much for your beautifully written article about Bill Carter. (October 2017) Your intro of the Irish Blessing was perfect and the article was a superb tribute to a man who blessed all who knew him including our family. How right you are that he will live in our hearts forever.

Grapes & Grains Trail

Jo Middleton

FPF

Front porch fredericksburg

built with them throughout the years, such as Christmas house lightings, Thanksgiving dinners, pool parties and weekly coffee groups, will always be etched in our memories. When my daughters have fundraisers for school, the neighbors, friends and shop owners in the community are generous—they believe in the words, “It takes a village.” They seem to truly want to support young people and their goals. In doing so, they’re also building a stronger community, where our children can thrive and feel valued. Though we were born and raised in New Jersey and still call it home, we couldn’t be happier to raise our family in Virginia—particularly in Stafford County, Fredericksburg. So sit back on your porch this holiday season, feeling blessed to live in this wondeful community and read Front Porch cover-to-cover

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy lives, works , and plays in Stafford County. Pictured above with daughter Ava, a sophomore at Stafford High School.

Thanks for the article on Nurse Practitioners (Neustatter, October 2017). What an asset they are! Joe Corning Publishers Note: Thank you Anne Slivinski for your FEMA service with the rescue efforts in Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas & California during this years disasterous hurricanes and wild fires.The community appreciates your personal sacrifices to help the members of our greater community.

Nothing signals the beginning of the Christmas season like the unveiling of Whittingham’s Christmas window. For many years now, I have taken house guests into town to enjoy the festive display at Whittinghams that appears every year on the day after Thanksgiving. Some years, the display is simple and minimalist, and other years it abounds with characters from some Christmas tale, as in the year of the mice. Everyone who shops in town remembers the “mice life” mirrored below the family house all celebrating the season. This year is no exception, as the theme is Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Bob Whittingham (upper right) works with local master carpenter, Tom Rainey and artist, Linda Silk Sviland (below) to accomplish the shop’s extravaganza. They begin their blueprints that allow this all to come together. The costumes, hand made by Linda are authentic down to the brace on Tiny Tim’s leg. The ghost of Christmas past is a magnificent fairy looking creature, that stuns you with its beauty and craftmanship. Both windows tell a part of

the story. One side shows Tiny Tim and Scrooge against the backdrop of the dark Victorian town, and the other side will depict the ghosts of past, present and future. The Scrooge figure is fantastic, and all together the story is depicted in grand form. Owner of one of Fredericksburg’s long time standing businesses and favorite shopkeepers, Bob. Whittingham is no stranger to the craft of window dressing. His first job was in a retail store in his hometown in Minnesota. The employees were expected to learn all aspects of the trade. Later, he worked in New York City, doing many different types of retail and marketing positions. He designed a window for Cartier and many others. Whittingham and The Kitchen which are both connected are a highlight in one’s shopping experience in Fredericksburg. I always find the right gift when I shop there. I joked with Bob that the last time I interviewed him, I came home with an article and a border collie door stopper. That time is upon us

again, another winter, another flurry of seasonal fun, and hopefully a return to the simple life of family and friendship that was so beautifully depicted in A Christmas Carol, and now in the window at 1021 Caroline Street. Scenes: Mr. Scrooge walking through London town;Tiny Tim & his cane taking a stroll; Fezziwig & his wife at the ball.

brainstorming on the project in early Spring, and work throughout the year acquiring the pieces that fit their imagined idea of the window. Linda does all the costumes and painting, while Tom constructs the actual set pieces. They work together from the onset to determine what they can do physically in the space, assessing the cost factor, and lastly the set up and mechanics are put in place in time for the grand opening. The tricky part is the mechanics of the display. There are moving pieces that need to run 24/7, so the installation and testing becomes key to the success of the show. The construction of the set was in full swing by the time I spoke with Mr. Whittingham last month. He calculated this as the 10th year of a major holiday window. The first was a collection of candy castles in 2007. I was able to see the workshop and some of the many drafts and front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

5


How Does A Master Gardener Grow? the 20 question salute By Tina Will

Who do you call when your garden won’t grow? In Stafford, it’s the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) agent, Guy Mussey and Gwen Pote, Administrative Horticultural Technician. These two people field the constant stream of calls and queries from citizens in our region. Their wide range of knowledge has to be ready to answer a myriad of questions: why does my lawn look so bad, why is my Rhododendron slowly dying, how do you grow tomatoes around here, and on and on. Their answers reflect the research and guidance that has come from Virginia Tech, and it’s a rare question that

they can’t answer. As new research brings a need for change, they must absorb the information and pass it on to us. Gwen answers horticultural questions, helps administer the Master Gardener program and helps review our projects. She also teaches adults and children in our area. She is busy all day long, and her friendly and outgoing manner makes us all feel welcome. Guy loves to teach, and does so giving talks, teaching the Master Gardener class, and visiting elementary schools in the area, and 4H Camp in summer. His work experience in Florida, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and here in Virginia (for the past 16 years) has given him a wealth of knowledge and experience that he enjoys sharing with each new Master Gardener class. While living in Florida, Guy found the fragrance of certain flowers to be something he wasn’t willing to part with when he moved North. So he brought some of them here. Banana and Brugmansia are two that he continues to grow successfully, though Brugmansia has to come indoors in the winter. He grows what he loves, and likes to see if he can defy the plant zone guidance. One of the first things he will tell us in class is that,

given a little protection, many plants will survive our cold winters even if the USDA specified plant zone disagrees. Citizens come into the VCE office frequently bringing a plant or insect specimen with a question or story that sets Guy and Gwen on the ‘20 question’ mission to determine the scope of the problem and ferret out the best way to answer the citizen’s concern. “What’s wrong with my (favorite) tree?” and similar questions can’t always be answered right away, but many are common problems. In recent years Emerald Ash Borer, Cankerworm, and Fall Webworm have plagued our area in different seasons, and there is a constant lament over the damage that moles and voles are doing to numerous lawns. Guy wears many different “hats” in his work. He teaches the Pesticide Applicators Recertification courses for those in that profession and he makes house calls to assess an insect, disease or horticultural concern. He also has a degree in Entomology and has a great insect collection that travels with him to the classrooms he visits. In recent years VCE has begun a very successful Smart Green Lawn program that meets individual

homeowner’s needs for good lawn care. Guy or a Master Gardener evaluates the homeowner’s property and assesses all the characteristics of the lawn. Guy then reviews the information and writes a detailed report answering the questions and recommending lawn fertilization and weed control measures if warranted. Hundreds of people have taken the Master Gardener training and are always amazed at how much they learn. Guy and Gwen are great teachers and there are many who are grateful for their hard work! Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photos by Susan Kenney

While bicycling on a journey from Canada to Texas, a British tourist’s route leads to an overnight stay in Fredericksburg, VA. He pulls up the Warmshowers.org app on his smart phone to see if there is any room available in the city. Fortunately, he finds a space available at the Dorn residence on Caroline St. Although it is after dark, navigating to the Dorn’s proves to be fairly simple, and only requires a brief

detour from the East Coast Greenway (ECG). The ECG is a lengthy coastal bike route that crosses from Stafford County over the Chatham Bridge to the Virginia Central Railway trail and Lee Drive southward. Arriving in the Fredericksburg area, if not for the Dorn’s hospitality, this

Brit would likely have to put up a tent in a campground. After arriving at the house, he checks in on the app to let the Dorns know he is outside. He pulls his bike around back to a secure area, and then is heartily greeted by the Dorns with a cold beer, hot soup, and a warm soothing shower in their upstairs guest area. Most folks in Fredericksburg are probably not aware of how many longdistance bicyclists pass through our city, and the gracious local network that supports them. So this month, let’s learn more about Terry and Beth Dorn (left), and the Warmshowers program. Terry and Beth actually met several years ago in Fredericksburg through their mutual bicycling interest. As avid riders, they are both long-time members of the Fredericksburg Cyclist Club (www.bikefred.com), and have also both served as club President. They are active in the community as Rotarians, St. George’s Episcopal Church members, and supporters of the Fredericksburg Food Co-O Op Initiative. Terry commutes to work in Washington, DC, via a nifty folding Brompton (brompton.com) bike and the train. To get to and from the train, he pedals along

On the Trails

cold beer, hot soup & a warm shower

By Kevin Brown the streets of Fredericksburg and Washington, DC. Beth is enjoying her recent retirement with frequent week-day bike rides in the Fredericksburg region, to include long-distance jaunts to Caroline County, Belle Plains, and Lake Anna. On weekends, the couple likes to walk their dog Tucker along the scenic River Heritage Trail which passes directly in front of their home. Since joining the Warmshowers network, Terry and Beth have hosted over 60 riders from across the world, creating wonderful memories with each experience. On a typical evening last month, they hosted a Scot, a Brit, and an American, whose separate journeys led them to a joint overnight stay where mutual bonding flourished. During the evening of conversation over Beth’s home-cooked dinner, connections were made which enabled the guests to assist each other as they moved forward in their respective journeys. For example, the American had just stayed the previous night in Charlottesville, and he called and coordinated the same Charlottesville

lodging for the Brit who was headed south. Sharing the story of another bicyclist-hosting experience, the Dorn’s recently hosted a fellow-Rotarian from Russia who was on a “peace and goodwill” bike trip around the world. They took him several places downtown, to include the Castiglia’s Sky bar and Sammy T’s. The Russian was amazed at the vibrancy of downtown Fredericksburg, remarking that it reminded him of European nightlife. Thanks Terry and Beth for exemplifying the hospitality that our city offers to visitors, and for sharing your story and hopefully inspiring others to join the Warmshowers.org network.

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group Photo taken by Friedrich Müntges, The Dorn’s first Warmshowers guest, as a thank you to them.

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen! 601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

7


How Does A Master Gardener Grow? the 20 question salute By Tina Will

Who do you call when your garden won’t grow? In Stafford, it’s the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) agent, Guy Mussey and Gwen Pote, Administrative Horticultural Technician. These two people field the constant stream of calls and queries from citizens in our region. Their wide range of knowledge has to be ready to answer a myriad of questions: why does my lawn look so bad, why is my Rhododendron slowly dying, how do you grow tomatoes around here, and on and on. Their answers reflect the research and guidance that has come from Virginia Tech, and it’s a rare question that

they can’t answer. As new research brings a need for change, they must absorb the information and pass it on to us. Gwen answers horticultural questions, helps administer the Master Gardener program and helps review our projects. She also teaches adults and children in our area. She is busy all day long, and her friendly and outgoing manner makes us all feel welcome. Guy loves to teach, and does so giving talks, teaching the Master Gardener class, and visiting elementary schools in the area, and 4H Camp in summer. His work experience in Florida, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and here in Virginia (for the past 16 years) has given him a wealth of knowledge and experience that he enjoys sharing with each new Master Gardener class. While living in Florida, Guy found the fragrance of certain flowers to be something he wasn’t willing to part with when he moved North. So he brought some of them here. Banana and Brugmansia are two that he continues to grow successfully, though Brugmansia has to come indoors in the winter. He grows what he loves, and likes to see if he can defy the plant zone guidance. One of the first things he will tell us in class is that,

given a little protection, many plants will survive our cold winters even if the USDA specified plant zone disagrees. Citizens come into the VCE office frequently bringing a plant or insect specimen with a question or story that sets Guy and Gwen on the ‘20 question’ mission to determine the scope of the problem and ferret out the best way to answer the citizen’s concern. “What’s wrong with my (favorite) tree?” and similar questions can’t always be answered right away, but many are common problems. In recent years Emerald Ash Borer, Cankerworm, and Fall Webworm have plagued our area in different seasons, and there is a constant lament over the damage that moles and voles are doing to numerous lawns. Guy wears many different “hats” in his work. He teaches the Pesticide Applicators Recertification courses for those in that profession and he makes house calls to assess an insect, disease or horticultural concern. He also has a degree in Entomology and has a great insect collection that travels with him to the classrooms he visits. In recent years VCE has begun a very successful Smart Green Lawn program that meets individual

homeowner’s needs for good lawn care. Guy or a Master Gardener evaluates the homeowner’s property and assesses all the characteristics of the lawn. Guy then reviews the information and writes a detailed report answering the questions and recommending lawn fertilization and weed control measures if warranted. Hundreds of people have taken the Master Gardener training and are always amazed at how much they learn. Guy and Gwen are great teachers and there are many who are grateful for their hard work! Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photos by Susan Kenney

While bicycling on a journey from Canada to Texas, a British tourist’s route leads to an overnight stay in Fredericksburg, VA. He pulls up the Warmshowers.org app on his smart phone to see if there is any room available in the city. Fortunately, he finds a space available at the Dorn residence on Caroline St. Although it is after dark, navigating to the Dorn’s proves to be fairly simple, and only requires a brief

detour from the East Coast Greenway (ECG). The ECG is a lengthy coastal bike route that crosses from Stafford County over the Chatham Bridge to the Virginia Central Railway trail and Lee Drive southward. Arriving in the Fredericksburg area, if not for the Dorn’s hospitality, this

Brit would likely have to put up a tent in a campground. After arriving at the house, he checks in on the app to let the Dorns know he is outside. He pulls his bike around back to a secure area, and then is heartily greeted by the Dorns with a cold beer, hot soup, and a warm soothing shower in their upstairs guest area. Most folks in Fredericksburg are probably not aware of how many longdistance bicyclists pass through our city, and the gracious local network that supports them. So this month, let’s learn more about Terry and Beth Dorn (left), and the Warmshowers program. Terry and Beth actually met several years ago in Fredericksburg through their mutual bicycling interest. As avid riders, they are both long-time members of the Fredericksburg Cyclist Club (www.bikefred.com), and have also both served as club President. They are active in the community as Rotarians, St. George’s Episcopal Church members, and supporters of the Fredericksburg Food Co-O Op Initiative. Terry commutes to work in Washington, DC, via a nifty folding Brompton (brompton.com) bike and the train. To get to and from the train, he pedals along

On the Trails

cold beer, hot soup & a warm shower

By Kevin Brown the streets of Fredericksburg and Washington, DC. Beth is enjoying her recent retirement with frequent week-day bike rides in the Fredericksburg region, to include long-distance jaunts to Caroline County, Belle Plains, and Lake Anna. On weekends, the couple likes to walk their dog Tucker along the scenic River Heritage Trail which passes directly in front of their home. Since joining the Warmshowers network, Terry and Beth have hosted over 60 riders from across the world, creating wonderful memories with each experience. On a typical evening last month, they hosted a Scot, a Brit, and an American, whose separate journeys led them to a joint overnight stay where mutual bonding flourished. During the evening of conversation over Beth’s home-cooked dinner, connections were made which enabled the guests to assist each other as they moved forward in their respective journeys. For example, the American had just stayed the previous night in Charlottesville, and he called and coordinated the same Charlottesville

lodging for the Brit who was headed south. Sharing the story of another bicyclist-hosting experience, the Dorn’s recently hosted a fellow-Rotarian from Russia who was on a “peace and goodwill” bike trip around the world. They took him several places downtown, to include the Castiglia’s Sky bar and Sammy T’s. The Russian was amazed at the vibrancy of downtown Fredericksburg, remarking that it reminded him of European nightlife. Thanks Terry and Beth for exemplifying the hospitality that our city offers to visitors, and for sharing your story and hopefully inspiring others to join the Warmshowers.org network.

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group Photo taken by Friedrich Müntges, The Dorn’s first Warmshowers guest, as a thank you to them.

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen! 601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

6

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

7


“I Have A Friend”

Hat's Off...Nope Hat's On! jeanne fraser knits hugs

the gift of sharing By Laurie Black

By Judy Penn Jones

Contrary to popular belief, half our body heat isn’t lost through naked heads, but we definitely feel warmer when we wear a hat.

HOT COCOA COLLECTION After 43 years working as a Teacher of the Deaf, Debbie Drolshagen retired, but didn’t slow down! She continued to work as a substitute teacher, sign language interpreter, and consultant. “I need to stay busy and fortunately, my dad who is 97 years old, lives with my husband and me, is in good health and is very independent, which allows me to continue to work in this capacity.” However, Debbie still wanted to do more. While looking for volunteer opportunities in the Fredericksburg area Debbie found Senior Visitors Program. the “I immediately thought that this would be a perfect match for me as well as an opportunity for my dad to get out and give some of his time,” said Debbie. Debbie and her father, Fred, joined the Senior Visitors Program and were matched with Shirley. They have been visiting now for over a year. Debbie says, “What a perfect match for us! It seems we never have to struggle to find something to chat about. We share stories about our families, backgrounds, Deaf Education, and often – she and Dad compare and discuss health issues, politics, taxes, etc. They have both experienced the past in ways that I have not and it gives me great pleasure to just sit back and entertain Shirley’s little dog, Buster Brown, while they share their past life experiences.”

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

December 2017

Fred and Shirley agree that their visits have been a wonderful gift. Fred says, “I enjoy my visits with Shirley because it makes me happy to help those who request my help. The day Shirley and I sat together while I helped her understand her tax return was particularly enjoyable to me.” Shirley explains, “At 97 years old, Fred is so alive! I am a history nut and I love our interesting conversations about Fred’s World War II experiences. And I don’t know how Debbie finds time for everything, but she does! She is so good to me.” Shirley goes on to say that she heard about the Senior Visitors Program several years ago. She was used to being able to come and go. When she couldn’t any more, it was nice to have someone to visit with or occasionally take her out in the community. Shirley’s first volunteer was a college student. “I wasn’t sure if we would have anything in common because of our ages being so different, but we had great conversations. I was sad when she had to move. Then Debbie and Fred became my visitors. They are just two really nice people. It is so good to have them.” For these three, sharing time, sharing memories, and sharing life experiences are precious gifts. Debbie summed it up, “This program has added so much to all three of us. Dad and I have gained a new friend in Shirley and we all have a sincere caring about each other’s health, happiness and wellbeing. I have grown to love Shirley and I look forward to continuing our visits together. Having cared for both of my parents has made me more aware of how elderly people need to be able to stay in touch and to have people with similar backgrounds, health and family issues to confide in!” If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you would like to volunteer to visit a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Front porch fredericksburg

723 Caroline St

899.8077

Daily 10-5:30; Sunday 12-5

The winter of 2016-2017 my friend Jeanne Fraser (above knotting) spent almost two months in Florida. Think Florida and visions of oranges, sandy beaches, and golden sunshine flash across our mental screens. Jeanne returned to Fredericksburg in January, after binge watching every episode of The Good Wife, with almost 200 knitted hats that were delivered to a homeless shelter, a private school for teens with emotional/ behavioral disorders, a home for victims of domestic violence, and a halfway house for adults fighting an addiction. In late February this year, Jeanne talked with Lena Berrios, Salem Church Library’s Branch Manager, because she

thought she might make hats to give to child readers on Dr. Seuss’s birthday (April 1). That idea quickly flew out the window when Lena answered Jeanne’s question, “How many children celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday at the library?” with “600.” “Six HUNDRED? Guess I won’t be making hats for his birthday.” But that didn’t mean Jeanne wasn’t going to knit some hats. Yarn that had been securely stashed in the attic for months—years, in some cases—was pulled out and sorted by color. It was immediately apparent that she was going to have to do some yarn shopping, if she was to make each hat as individual as its future owner—almost all of her yarn was some shade of blue. The knitting began. Stacks of 30 assorted hats were soon teetering on a footstool before being put in brown paper grocery bags and stored back in the attic. Every day there was at least one new hat added to the growing stash. No minute was wasted. When she went to the movies she took a ball of yarn, her needles, and a “necklace” kind of flashlight that she could aim into her lap so she could knit while watching a

film. “I made a hat during every film,” Jeanne told me—“a bonus hat for those days.”

At some point during the summer she went back to the library where she talked with Christine Carlson, the library’s Youth Services Department

Head, to start planning for delivery of the hats. Jeanne, a former special education teacher, wanted the middle and high school students, who are often overlooked when children’s programs are designed, to have the hats before Thanksgiving when the cold weather really sets in. Just before Halloween Jeanne delivered 355 hats to the library. She’s already said she’s looking forward to visiting the library—her home away from home—over the winter and maybe seeing some boy or girl wearing one of the hats she made. “I think of them as hugs from me to them,” Jeanne says. “There are about 900 stitches in each hat and each stitch is made by wrapping yarn around a needle the way we wrap our arms around family and friends in a hug to tell them we care.” There’s yarn left over so it’ll be interesting to see what she does next. I know that last week she finished a baby blanket that’s tucked into a drawer waiting for a baby who needs one. Judy Penn Jones ~ luxuriating in retirement.

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

9


“I Have A Friend”

Hat's Off...Nope Hat's On! jeanne fraser knits hugs

the gift of sharing By Laurie Black

By Judy Penn Jones

Contrary to popular belief, half our body heat isn’t lost through naked heads, but we definitely feel warmer when we wear a hat.

HOT COCOA COLLECTION After 43 years working as a Teacher of the Deaf, Debbie Drolshagen retired, but didn’t slow down! She continued to work as a substitute teacher, sign language interpreter, and consultant. “I need to stay busy and fortunately, my dad who is 97 years old, lives with my husband and me, is in good health and is very independent, which allows me to continue to work in this capacity.” However, Debbie still wanted to do more. While looking for volunteer opportunities in the Fredericksburg area Debbie found Senior Visitors Program. the “I immediately thought that this would be a perfect match for me as well as an opportunity for my dad to get out and give some of his time,” said Debbie. Debbie and her father, Fred, joined the Senior Visitors Program and were matched with Shirley. They have been visiting now for over a year. Debbie says, “What a perfect match for us! It seems we never have to struggle to find something to chat about. We share stories about our families, backgrounds, Deaf Education, and often – she and Dad compare and discuss health issues, politics, taxes, etc. They have both experienced the past in ways that I have not and it gives me great pleasure to just sit back and entertain Shirley’s little dog, Buster Brown, while they share their past life experiences.”

Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997 8

December 2017

Fred and Shirley agree that their visits have been a wonderful gift. Fred says, “I enjoy my visits with Shirley because it makes me happy to help those who request my help. The day Shirley and I sat together while I helped her understand her tax return was particularly enjoyable to me.” Shirley explains, “At 97 years old, Fred is so alive! I am a history nut and I love our interesting conversations about Fred’s World War II experiences. And I don’t know how Debbie finds time for everything, but she does! She is so good to me.” Shirley goes on to say that she heard about the Senior Visitors Program several years ago. She was used to being able to come and go. When she couldn’t any more, it was nice to have someone to visit with or occasionally take her out in the community. Shirley’s first volunteer was a college student. “I wasn’t sure if we would have anything in common because of our ages being so different, but we had great conversations. I was sad when she had to move. Then Debbie and Fred became my visitors. They are just two really nice people. It is so good to have them.” For these three, sharing time, sharing memories, and sharing life experiences are precious gifts. Debbie summed it up, “This program has added so much to all three of us. Dad and I have gained a new friend in Shirley and we all have a sincere caring about each other’s health, happiness and wellbeing. I have grown to love Shirley and I look forward to continuing our visits together. Having cared for both of my parents has made me more aware of how elderly people need to be able to stay in touch and to have people with similar backgrounds, health and family issues to confide in!” If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you would like to volunteer to visit a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Front porch fredericksburg

723 Caroline St

899.8077

Daily 10-5:30; Sunday 12-5

The winter of 2016-2017 my friend Jeanne Fraser (above knotting) spent almost two months in Florida. Think Florida and visions of oranges, sandy beaches, and golden sunshine flash across our mental screens. Jeanne returned to Fredericksburg in January, after binge watching every episode of The Good Wife, with almost 200 knitted hats that were delivered to a homeless shelter, a private school for teens with emotional/ behavioral disorders, a home for victims of domestic violence, and a halfway house for adults fighting an addiction. In late February this year, Jeanne talked with Lena Berrios, Salem Church Library’s Branch Manager, because she

thought she might make hats to give to child readers on Dr. Seuss’s birthday (April 1). That idea quickly flew out the window when Lena answered Jeanne’s question, “How many children celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday at the library?” with “600.” “Six HUNDRED? Guess I won’t be making hats for his birthday.” But that didn’t mean Jeanne wasn’t going to knit some hats. Yarn that had been securely stashed in the attic for months—years, in some cases—was pulled out and sorted by color. It was immediately apparent that she was going to have to do some yarn shopping, if she was to make each hat as individual as its future owner—almost all of her yarn was some shade of blue. The knitting began. Stacks of 30 assorted hats were soon teetering on a footstool before being put in brown paper grocery bags and stored back in the attic. Every day there was at least one new hat added to the growing stash. No minute was wasted. When she went to the movies she took a ball of yarn, her needles, and a “necklace” kind of flashlight that she could aim into her lap so she could knit while watching a

film. “I made a hat during every film,” Jeanne told me—“a bonus hat for those days.”

At some point during the summer she went back to the library where she talked with Christine Carlson, the library’s Youth Services Department

Head, to start planning for delivery of the hats. Jeanne, a former special education teacher, wanted the middle and high school students, who are often overlooked when children’s programs are designed, to have the hats before Thanksgiving when the cold weather really sets in. Just before Halloween Jeanne delivered 355 hats to the library. She’s already said she’s looking forward to visiting the library—her home away from home—over the winter and maybe seeing some boy or girl wearing one of the hats she made. “I think of them as hugs from me to them,” Jeanne says. “There are about 900 stitches in each hat and each stitch is made by wrapping yarn around a needle the way we wrap our arms around family and friends in a hug to tell them we care.” There’s yarn left over so it’ll be interesting to see what she does next. I know that last week she finished a baby blanket that’s tucked into a drawer waiting for a baby who needs one. Judy Penn Jones ~ luxuriating in retirement.

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

9


Downtown Buzz making spirits bright By Ann Glave

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

December 2017

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

Downtown Fredericksburg is THE place to be this Holiday Season! Numerous partners and volunteers have put together a delightful variety of events and activities for residents and visitors of all ages. 1. PARKING PERKS. Downtown parking limits have increased to four hours to the end of January. See the map posted on Fredericksburg Downtown facebook page. 2. FIND SANTA. Think the guy in red is elusive and hard to find? Not this year. Now you can track Santa as he strolls Downtown with your Fred Map app or by visiting fredmap.com. This app is free and available for both iphone and android. 3. RIDDLE ME THIS. Window Wonderland display and riddle contest is underway. Find the riddles in Downtown business windows. The Free Lance Star and the Economic Development and Tourism office, created this fun contest which has many prizes sponsored by the Economic Development Authority and numerous Downtown businesses. Pick up your form at the Visitor Center. 4. LATE FRIDAYS. There are four open late Fridays starting in December. Most downtown shops will stay open until 8 pm (or later). Look for the gold “Open Late” flags outside these establishments. 5. LIFE SIZED HOLIDAY CARDS – Life size cards displaying Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Holidays, and Happy Kwanzaa are located at Hurkamp Park for instant selfie photos. This photo opp is brought to you by Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated and Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events Department. Start a new tradition. 6. GIFT CARD HOLIDAY BONUS. For every $50 gift cards purchased, you will receive a $10 gift card from Main Street as our way of saying “Thank You” for shopping and dining Downtown. This special designed gift card is limited to the first 400 purchases and must be used by April 30, 2018. This promotion started in November and will sell out. Promotion is available on line at www.fredericksburgdowntown.org, at the Visitor Center and at LibertyTown Arts.

Return to Nepal THE POETRY MAN

Establishment of first Asian sister city BY Collette Caprara

- By Frank Fratoe

purpose We have not been put on the earth To hate, fight, and kill others, but to explore, discover, learn and nourish creation everywhere, not only on our planet but beyond because that is our vital destiny~ it is the reason why we are here. Inside my grandchildren are codes of all peoples of the world, from Europe, Africa, Asia, America and each land where humans exist, woven together in will and energy to begin a new direction at last ~ which replaces strife with peace.

7. FA-L LA-L LA. Merry Carols in Market Square. On Friday, December 15, there will be a community sing-a-long from 7 – 8 pm with The Spotsylvanians leading our voices in Christmas carols. Come out and sing carols. This event is being brought to you by ScoutComms and Thalhimer, Cushman & Wakefield’s agent, Wilson Greenlaw. 8. Downtown 31. It’s a month-long celebration to close out 2017 and bring in 2018. Fredericksburg Parks & Rec has partnered with Economic Development Authority and Main Street with family friendly activities. Go to downtown31.com for all the details. And who doesn’t enjoy a snowball fight? On Thursday, December 28, from 6:00pm – 8:00pm at Riverfront Park, grab some ”snowballs” for $3 per person or 2 people for $5 to stay and play for the night. Close out the year on December 31 with music, interactive activities, dancing, games and more from 5pm to 9pm at Riverfront Park for adults and kids, End the evening with a 3,000+ Ping Pong Ball Drop. Who will find one of the 100 prize balls? Make your holidays bright with traditions, ongoing or newly created. Join us for Historic Holidays in Downtown Fredericksburg! Ann Glave is a busy elf for Fredericksburg VA Main Street.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

A delegation from the Fredericksburg region, led by Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw and Councilman Matt Kelly, returned on October 23 from a twoweek visit in Nepal, in which a declaration of the Fredericksburg/Kathmandu sistercity status was co-signed in a public ceremony with the Kathmandu Mayor Bidya Sundar Shakya, establishing our first Asian sister-city relationship.

The signing ceremony was followed by a banquet hosted by the Kathmandu Metropolitan City mayor in the nation’s capital, which included vibrant and fascinating dance-theater performances depicting traditional folklore. The festivities were attended by US Ambassador Alaina B. Teplitz, who was inspired by the creation of this new partnership and the Fredericksburg folks offered entertainment of their own—in a rendition of “This Land Is Your Land,” with some lyrics rewritten for the occasion. While in Nepal, the Fredericksburg contingent also visited the Sagarmatha Children's Home in Kathmandu, which is sponsored by local couple Carol and Frank Mauro. Fredericksburg’s engagement with Nepal began two years ago with the highly successful Rise Nepal! benefit concert/silent auction at the Silk Mill that provided relief for the victims of Nepal’s 2015 tragic earthquake that claimed the lives of an estimated 9,000 men, women, and children. The travelling cohort included David and Collette Caprara, who coordinated the fundraiser, artists Sue Henderson and Cathy Herndon, who donated works for the silent auction, Fredericksburg-Kathmandu sister-city chair Purna Shrestha of the Here and Abroad Deli, Nepali-American Dikchya Perry, and Councilman Kelly’s wife and area teacher Cynthia. The Kellys and David Caprara later joined a group of area trekkers for a hike coordinated by April and Keith Peterson, owners of River Rock Outfitters in Fredericksburg, in which they summited Himalayan Poon Hill together with US Sherpa. In addition to their activities in Kathmandu, the Fredericksburg cohort visited Patan and Bhaktapur—all cities that were once Nepal’s three ancient kingdoms. In the cities, the delegation was greeted by the mayor, and in each they visited the cities’ central plaza that served

as the kingdoms’ spiritual and governmental hubs. The earthquake’s devastation was evidenced by the temples and houses that had been reduced to rubble, while the hallmark resiliency of the Nepalese people was manifest in rebuilding efforts, including the painstaking reconstruction of temples and palaces from pieces that have been salvaged and categorized from the ruins. Highlights of the trip included tours of a Buddhist monastery and a school for students ranging from Kindergarten to high school. While the more adventurous cohort of the sister-city contingent trekked in the Himalayas, the cohort of “bottom dwellers” enjoyed an art and cultural tour in the south that climaxed with a safari by elephant(!)--in which, with the help of their trusty guide, they sighted rhinos, wild boars, and a variety of native deer. ON-G GOING & EXPANDING ENGAGEMENT The continuing engagement of Fredericksburg organizations with counterparts in Nepal will include discussions on issues ranging from waste management and disaster preparedness to conservation, as well as exchanges of art and culture. In December, a contingent of UMW students—led by Professor David Rettinger of UMW’s Center for Honor, Leadership and Service and Professor Daniel Hirschberg of the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies—will travel to Nepal for service learning and will meet with counterparts at the esteemed Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu. In addition, throughout February, 2018, the Headquarters branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library will feature an exhibit of artwork from and about Nepal. Details on the sister city effort Facebook.com/FredericksburgNepalExchange.

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

11


Downtown Buzz making spirits bright By Ann Glave

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com 10

December 2017

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

Downtown Fredericksburg is THE place to be this Holiday Season! Numerous partners and volunteers have put together a delightful variety of events and activities for residents and visitors of all ages. 1. PARKING PERKS. Downtown parking limits have increased to four hours to the end of January. See the map posted on Fredericksburg Downtown facebook page. 2. FIND SANTA. Think the guy in red is elusive and hard to find? Not this year. Now you can track Santa as he strolls Downtown with your Fred Map app or by visiting fredmap.com. This app is free and available for both iphone and android. 3. RIDDLE ME THIS. Window Wonderland display and riddle contest is underway. Find the riddles in Downtown business windows. The Free Lance Star and the Economic Development and Tourism office, created this fun contest which has many prizes sponsored by the Economic Development Authority and numerous Downtown businesses. Pick up your form at the Visitor Center. 4. LATE FRIDAYS. There are four open late Fridays starting in December. Most downtown shops will stay open until 8 pm (or later). Look for the gold “Open Late” flags outside these establishments. 5. LIFE SIZED HOLIDAY CARDS – Life size cards displaying Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Holidays, and Happy Kwanzaa are located at Hurkamp Park for instant selfie photos. This photo opp is brought to you by Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated and Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events Department. Start a new tradition. 6. GIFT CARD HOLIDAY BONUS. For every $50 gift cards purchased, you will receive a $10 gift card from Main Street as our way of saying “Thank You” for shopping and dining Downtown. This special designed gift card is limited to the first 400 purchases and must be used by April 30, 2018. This promotion started in November and will sell out. Promotion is available on line at www.fredericksburgdowntown.org, at the Visitor Center and at LibertyTown Arts.

Return to Nepal THE POETRY MAN

Establishment of first Asian sister city BY Collette Caprara

- By Frank Fratoe

purpose We have not been put on the earth To hate, fight, and kill others, but to explore, discover, learn and nourish creation everywhere, not only on our planet but beyond because that is our vital destiny~ it is the reason why we are here. Inside my grandchildren are codes of all peoples of the world, from Europe, Africa, Asia, America and each land where humans exist, woven together in will and energy to begin a new direction at last ~ which replaces strife with peace.

7. FA-L LA-L LA. Merry Carols in Market Square. On Friday, December 15, there will be a community sing-a-long from 7 – 8 pm with The Spotsylvanians leading our voices in Christmas carols. Come out and sing carols. This event is being brought to you by ScoutComms and Thalhimer, Cushman & Wakefield’s agent, Wilson Greenlaw. 8. Downtown 31. It’s a month-long celebration to close out 2017 and bring in 2018. Fredericksburg Parks & Rec has partnered with Economic Development Authority and Main Street with family friendly activities. Go to downtown31.com for all the details. And who doesn’t enjoy a snowball fight? On Thursday, December 28, from 6:00pm – 8:00pm at Riverfront Park, grab some ”snowballs” for $3 per person or 2 people for $5 to stay and play for the night. Close out the year on December 31 with music, interactive activities, dancing, games and more from 5pm to 9pm at Riverfront Park for adults and kids, End the evening with a 3,000+ Ping Pong Ball Drop. Who will find one of the 100 prize balls? Make your holidays bright with traditions, ongoing or newly created. Join us for Historic Holidays in Downtown Fredericksburg! Ann Glave is a busy elf for Fredericksburg VA Main Street.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

A delegation from the Fredericksburg region, led by Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw and Councilman Matt Kelly, returned on October 23 from a twoweek visit in Nepal, in which a declaration of the Fredericksburg/Kathmandu sistercity status was co-signed in a public ceremony with the Kathmandu Mayor Bidya Sundar Shakya, establishing our first Asian sister-city relationship.

The signing ceremony was followed by a banquet hosted by the Kathmandu Metropolitan City mayor in the nation’s capital, which included vibrant and fascinating dance-theater performances depicting traditional folklore. The festivities were attended by US Ambassador Alaina B. Teplitz, who was inspired by the creation of this new partnership and the Fredericksburg folks offered entertainment of their own—in a rendition of “This Land Is Your Land,” with some lyrics rewritten for the occasion. While in Nepal, the Fredericksburg contingent also visited the Sagarmatha Children's Home in Kathmandu, which is sponsored by local couple Carol and Frank Mauro. Fredericksburg’s engagement with Nepal began two years ago with the highly successful Rise Nepal! benefit concert/silent auction at the Silk Mill that provided relief for the victims of Nepal’s 2015 tragic earthquake that claimed the lives of an estimated 9,000 men, women, and children. The travelling cohort included David and Collette Caprara, who coordinated the fundraiser, artists Sue Henderson and Cathy Herndon, who donated works for the silent auction, Fredericksburg-Kathmandu sister-city chair Purna Shrestha of the Here and Abroad Deli, Nepali-American Dikchya Perry, and Councilman Kelly’s wife and area teacher Cynthia. The Kellys and David Caprara later joined a group of area trekkers for a hike coordinated by April and Keith Peterson, owners of River Rock Outfitters in Fredericksburg, in which they summited Himalayan Poon Hill together with US Sherpa. In addition to their activities in Kathmandu, the Fredericksburg cohort visited Patan and Bhaktapur—all cities that were once Nepal’s three ancient kingdoms. In the cities, the delegation was greeted by the mayor, and in each they visited the cities’ central plaza that served

as the kingdoms’ spiritual and governmental hubs. The earthquake’s devastation was evidenced by the temples and houses that had been reduced to rubble, while the hallmark resiliency of the Nepalese people was manifest in rebuilding efforts, including the painstaking reconstruction of temples and palaces from pieces that have been salvaged and categorized from the ruins. Highlights of the trip included tours of a Buddhist monastery and a school for students ranging from Kindergarten to high school. While the more adventurous cohort of the sister-city contingent trekked in the Himalayas, the cohort of “bottom dwellers” enjoyed an art and cultural tour in the south that climaxed with a safari by elephant(!)--in which, with the help of their trusty guide, they sighted rhinos, wild boars, and a variety of native deer. ON-G GOING & EXPANDING ENGAGEMENT The continuing engagement of Fredericksburg organizations with counterparts in Nepal will include discussions on issues ranging from waste management and disaster preparedness to conservation, as well as exchanges of art and culture. In December, a contingent of UMW students—led by Professor David Rettinger of UMW’s Center for Honor, Leadership and Service and Professor Daniel Hirschberg of the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies—will travel to Nepal for service learning and will meet with counterparts at the esteemed Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu. In addition, throughout February, 2018, the Headquarters branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library will feature an exhibit of artwork from and about Nepal. Details on the sister city effort Facebook.com/FredericksburgNepalExchange.

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

11


Season’s Bounty

Vino

plenty of pounds

Aglianico: Perfect Wine for Fall/Winter Dishes by City Vino Aglianico is a full-bodied, hightannin, high-acid wine that is perfect with hearty roasts, stews and game meats. As the weather cools and the leaves fall, our cooking transitions from summer grilling to hearty winter roasts and stews. Hunting season brings game meats, like deer and rabbit, to the table. Aglianico (pronounce al-li-yawn-ee-co) is a full-bodied, high-tannin, high-acid wine that is perfect with these types of dishes. Aglianico comes from the Campania and Basilicata regions in southern Italy. In Campania, the area around the town of Taurasi is home to powerful Aglianico-based wines. The Taurasi DOC (Denominazione di Origine Controllata) rules require that wine contain at least 85% Aglianico, and the wines must be aged at least 3 years before they are released. This allows time for the tannins to soften. In Basilicata, Aglianico is grown on the slopes of the ancient volcano, Mount Vulture. Wines of the Aglianico del Vulture DOCG (Denominazione di Origine

Controllata e Garantita) are 100% Aglianico, and are known for having rich berry, plum, spice and coffee flavors. The Gudarra Aglianico del Vulture 2012 has enticing notes of red cherries, fig, chocolate, plum, and sweet spice. It pairs excellently with roasted game, spicy tomato-based sauces, southern Italian pasta dishes, and slow-cooked beef stews. We've assembled a hand full of suggested recipes on Pinterest that would all be great with a bottle of Aglianico. Enjoy!

City Vino is located at 810 Caroline St. You can find owners Renee Dunn and Rita Allan on-site to provide answers to all of your wine questions

New Year’s Day BRUNCH 9am-1pm Adults: $21.95 Ages 5-12: $10 4 & Under: FREE Military & Senior Discount Call for Reservations Complimentary Parking 540.373.8300

620 Caroline Street

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

12

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg’s Hometown Irish Pub & Restaurant Since 1961

By vanessa moncure

CARIBBEAN TEX-MEX RESTAURANT Fresh Made-To-Order Food Family Friendly Meeting Rooms/Private Parties Happy Hour/ 3 bars, 2 inside, 1 outside Outdoor Seating Overlooking Rappahannock River Catering/Take-Out www.donmoncho.com 1101 Sophia St, Fxbg, 373-0870 10151 Jefferson Davis Highway, Spotsy, 642-4204

Do you need a delicious and easy centerpiece for your holiday dessert table? Well, a poundcake might just fit the bill. Originally named because the first oral recipe called for a pound each of sugar, flour, butter and eggs - easy recipe to remember without being written out making a large cake which, if unfrosted and stored airtight, becomes moister and tastier as it ages. Poundcakes have long been popular Southern desserts - I have SO many variations by SO many friends and family members that a lightbulb went on - I should compile them into a poundcake cookbook! Well, the lightbulb dimmed and then went out when I typed in “Poundcake Cookbook” on my computer - hmmm….only 14,000,000 results on my search engine. Looks like a few others had the same idea. Just shows how popular this type of cake really is! Flavorings, from original rosewater to vanilla and various liqueurs fruits and citrus zest, nuts and even cornmeal are just some of the numerous additions made to the basic cake in different regions of the country and of the world. The original 1:1:1:1 recipe was baked without leavening - baking soda or baking powder - although as the cake evolved, these additions began to be added to make the cake lighter. Bake in a loaf pan, Bundt pan or tube pan - and remember the first order of baking - measure exactly - cakes can fall if overbeaten or underbeaten, baked in either a too cool or too hot oven, jostled when baking or cooling or using cake flour in a dense poundcake - it can’t support the other ingredients and won’t rise well. Although most recipes don’t mention this tip - it’s usually best to have all ingredients at room temperature - especially eggs, as the volume produced by the egg white may be halved when using chilled eggs. If you want to try the original recipe, you will need a kitchen scale. Amelia Simmons wrote the first known American cookbook in 1796 and supplied ingredients as follows: “One pound sugar, one pound butter, one pound flour, ten eggs, one gill of rosewater, spices to our taste. Watch it well in a slow oven.” Very succinct. TRADITIONAL POUNDCAKE Keeps well if stored airtight, also mails and travels well. Cream together two cups of butter with three cups of sugar. Add slowly nine beaten eggs with one tablespoon each vanilla and lemon extract and a dash of ground nutmeg. Beat in four cups of flour and beat on medium speed of mixer for three minutes until batter is well combined. Spoon into a greased and floured ten-inch tube pan. Bake in

preheated 300F oven for 90 minutes or until a tester comes out clean. Cool in pan, away from drafts. (This is from an old recipe and makes a large, very dense cake which doesn’t seem to rise as much as the following - great to use as cake in a trifle recipe). CHOCOLATE POUNDCAKE Dense, moist, chocolate-y betteras-it-ages cake. Makes a great birthday cake when iced with Seven Minute Frosting. Beat together one cup butter with two cups sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Melt together eight ounces of semisweet chocolate chips with one sixteen-ounce can of chocolate syrup (dark if available) and add to the butter-sugar-egg mixture when chocolate mixture is at room temperature. Stir one tablespoonful vanilla extract into one cup of whole-milk buttermilk and add alternately with three cups all-purpose flour to the batter. Beat until smooth. Spoon into a well-greased and floured twelve-cup Bundt pan or ten-inch tube pan. Bake in preheated 350F oven 80-90 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack, then remove from pan and invert onto serving plate. Dust with confectioner’s sugar if desired.

BASIC RECIPE Beat together one cup butter with three cups sugar until very light and fluffy. Beat in six eggs, each one minute apart, until batter is light. Gently stir in one cup sour cream (not light or nonfat), then three cups sifted flour (measure full cups, then sift) along with one-quarter teaspoon baking soda. Stir in two tablespoons of vanilla extract. Spoon into ten-inch tube pan and bake in preheated 325F oven for 75 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.

The Sunken Well Tavern

BROWN SUGAR POUNDCAKE Glaze with a mixture of chopped toasted pecans, confectioner’s sugar and milk if desired. Beat together one cup butter with one-half cup Crisco until light, gradually adding one pound plus one cup light brown sugar. Beat until smooth. Beat in five eggs, one at a time. Sift together three and one-half cups flour with one-half teaspoon baking powder and add alternately with one cup whole milk. Bake in greased and floured Bundt pan or teninch tube pan in preheated 325F oven for 80-90 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean. Let cool in pan at least thirty minutes before trying to remove. SOUR CREAM POUNDCAKE This rich version seems to be Southern in origin. For a variation, replace vanilla extract with pure lemon extract and one-eighth cup or more poppy seeds for a LEMON POPPYSEED POUNDCAKE or add one cup flaked coconut along with the vanilla extract and two teaspoons coconut extract for a delicious COCONUT POUNDCAKE or for a nutty ALMOND POUNDCAKE replace one-half cup flour with almond flour, then add one and onehalf cup chopped almonds and one and one-half teaspoons almond extract along with the vanilla extract.

Mon-Thurs, 11am-9pm Fri & Sat, 11am-10pm Sun, 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

13


Season’s Bounty

Vino

plenty of pounds

Aglianico: Perfect Wine for Fall/Winter Dishes by City Vino Aglianico is a full-bodied, hightannin, high-acid wine that is perfect with hearty roasts, stews and game meats. As the weather cools and the leaves fall, our cooking transitions from summer grilling to hearty winter roasts and stews. Hunting season brings game meats, like deer and rabbit, to the table. Aglianico (pronounce al-li-yawn-ee-co) is a full-bodied, high-tannin, high-acid wine that is perfect with these types of dishes. Aglianico comes from the Campania and Basilicata regions in southern Italy. In Campania, the area around the town of Taurasi is home to powerful Aglianico-based wines. The Taurasi DOC (Denominazione di Origine Controllata) rules require that wine contain at least 85% Aglianico, and the wines must be aged at least 3 years before they are released. This allows time for the tannins to soften. In Basilicata, Aglianico is grown on the slopes of the ancient volcano, Mount Vulture. Wines of the Aglianico del Vulture DOCG (Denominazione di Origine

Controllata e Garantita) are 100% Aglianico, and are known for having rich berry, plum, spice and coffee flavors. The Gudarra Aglianico del Vulture 2012 has enticing notes of red cherries, fig, chocolate, plum, and sweet spice. It pairs excellently with roasted game, spicy tomato-based sauces, southern Italian pasta dishes, and slow-cooked beef stews. We've assembled a hand full of suggested recipes on Pinterest that would all be great with a bottle of Aglianico. Enjoy!

City Vino is located at 810 Caroline St. You can find owners Renee Dunn and Rita Allan on-site to provide answers to all of your wine questions

New Year’s Day BRUNCH 9am-1pm Adults: $21.95 Ages 5-12: $10 4 & Under: FREE Military & Senior Discount Call for Reservations Complimentary Parking 540.373.8300

620 Caroline Street

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

12

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg’s Hometown Irish Pub & Restaurant Since 1961

By vanessa moncure

CARIBBEAN TEX-MEX RESTAURANT Fresh Made-To-Order Food Family Friendly Meeting Rooms/Private Parties Happy Hour/ 3 bars, 2 inside, 1 outside Outdoor Seating Overlooking Rappahannock River Catering/Take-Out www.donmoncho.com 1101 Sophia St, Fxbg, 373-0870 10151 Jefferson Davis Highway, Spotsy, 642-4204

Do you need a delicious and easy centerpiece for your holiday dessert table? Well, a poundcake might just fit the bill. Originally named because the first oral recipe called for a pound each of sugar, flour, butter and eggs - easy recipe to remember without being written out making a large cake which, if unfrosted and stored airtight, becomes moister and tastier as it ages. Poundcakes have long been popular Southern desserts - I have SO many variations by SO many friends and family members that a lightbulb went on - I should compile them into a poundcake cookbook! Well, the lightbulb dimmed and then went out when I typed in “Poundcake Cookbook” on my computer - hmmm….only 14,000,000 results on my search engine. Looks like a few others had the same idea. Just shows how popular this type of cake really is! Flavorings, from original rosewater to vanilla and various liqueurs fruits and citrus zest, nuts and even cornmeal are just some of the numerous additions made to the basic cake in different regions of the country and of the world. The original 1:1:1:1 recipe was baked without leavening - baking soda or baking powder - although as the cake evolved, these additions began to be added to make the cake lighter. Bake in a loaf pan, Bundt pan or tube pan - and remember the first order of baking - measure exactly - cakes can fall if overbeaten or underbeaten, baked in either a too cool or too hot oven, jostled when baking or cooling or using cake flour in a dense poundcake - it can’t support the other ingredients and won’t rise well. Although most recipes don’t mention this tip - it’s usually best to have all ingredients at room temperature - especially eggs, as the volume produced by the egg white may be halved when using chilled eggs. If you want to try the original recipe, you will need a kitchen scale. Amelia Simmons wrote the first known American cookbook in 1796 and supplied ingredients as follows: “One pound sugar, one pound butter, one pound flour, ten eggs, one gill of rosewater, spices to our taste. Watch it well in a slow oven.” Very succinct. TRADITIONAL POUNDCAKE Keeps well if stored airtight, also mails and travels well. Cream together two cups of butter with three cups of sugar. Add slowly nine beaten eggs with one tablespoon each vanilla and lemon extract and a dash of ground nutmeg. Beat in four cups of flour and beat on medium speed of mixer for three minutes until batter is well combined. Spoon into a greased and floured ten-inch tube pan. Bake in

preheated 300F oven for 90 minutes or until a tester comes out clean. Cool in pan, away from drafts. (This is from an old recipe and makes a large, very dense cake which doesn’t seem to rise as much as the following - great to use as cake in a trifle recipe). CHOCOLATE POUNDCAKE Dense, moist, chocolate-y betteras-it-ages cake. Makes a great birthday cake when iced with Seven Minute Frosting. Beat together one cup butter with two cups sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Melt together eight ounces of semisweet chocolate chips with one sixteen-ounce can of chocolate syrup (dark if available) and add to the butter-sugar-egg mixture when chocolate mixture is at room temperature. Stir one tablespoonful vanilla extract into one cup of whole-milk buttermilk and add alternately with three cups all-purpose flour to the batter. Beat until smooth. Spoon into a well-greased and floured twelve-cup Bundt pan or ten-inch tube pan. Bake in preheated 350F oven 80-90 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack, then remove from pan and invert onto serving plate. Dust with confectioner’s sugar if desired.

BASIC RECIPE Beat together one cup butter with three cups sugar until very light and fluffy. Beat in six eggs, each one minute apart, until batter is light. Gently stir in one cup sour cream (not light or nonfat), then three cups sifted flour (measure full cups, then sift) along with one-quarter teaspoon baking soda. Stir in two tablespoons of vanilla extract. Spoon into ten-inch tube pan and bake in preheated 325F oven for 75 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.

The Sunken Well Tavern

BROWN SUGAR POUNDCAKE Glaze with a mixture of chopped toasted pecans, confectioner’s sugar and milk if desired. Beat together one cup butter with one-half cup Crisco until light, gradually adding one pound plus one cup light brown sugar. Beat until smooth. Beat in five eggs, one at a time. Sift together three and one-half cups flour with one-half teaspoon baking powder and add alternately with one cup whole milk. Bake in greased and floured Bundt pan or teninch tube pan in preheated 325F oven for 80-90 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean. Let cool in pan at least thirty minutes before trying to remove. SOUR CREAM POUNDCAKE This rich version seems to be Southern in origin. For a variation, replace vanilla extract with pure lemon extract and one-eighth cup or more poppy seeds for a LEMON POPPYSEED POUNDCAKE or add one cup flaked coconut along with the vanilla extract and two teaspoons coconut extract for a delicious COCONUT POUNDCAKE or for a nutty ALMOND POUNDCAKE replace one-half cup flour with almond flour, then add one and onehalf cup chopped almonds and one and one-half teaspoons almond extract along with the vanilla extract.

Mon-Thurs, 11am-9pm Fri & Sat, 11am-10pm Sun, 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

13


Cooking With Kyle

Everything Greens survival by cooperation

from a simple question .... by james kyle snyder

...To Shrimp and Crab Crêpes After last month’s success with jeanne, I thought it might be fun to see if she had any favorites she might like to try. I emailed, “I was think about you this morning, ...wonder if jeanne has anything she would see as an article...” “Many years ago I had shrimp crêpes in a light white wine sauce in a small country French restaurant in Denver,” was returned. An instant memory of a classic shrimp and crab cake with a delicious mornay started me salivating. Good pull Jeanne! Crêpes are super easy. In a blender being careful not to create too many bubbles combine Mitzi’s brother and sister-in-law’s recipe: ½ cup water, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup all-purpose flour, ¼ teaspoon salt. In a 10-12 inch skillet or pan over medium heat and using a non-stick spray, add ¼ C of the mixture and swirl the pan to coat the entire surface. Cook the first side until just golden (3-5 minutes depending on the heat), and then flip until the second side is golden as well (2 more minutes). Stack high or, if they start to stick, put a piece of waxed paper between them – I usually get a stack of 3-4 and then cook more as I go. Crab and shrimp are easy too! Spread one pound of cooked lump crab (jumbo is too big and too expensive for this) on a cookie sheet and remove the bones that were missed. Bisect one pound of shrimp so you have two matching halves. Steam the shrimp for 2-3 minutes until just done. Combine with the crab and set in a colander over a plate to drain. Now for the mornay! A mornay is an adaptation of the classic “mother sauce” - Béchamel – just add cheese. The five “mother sauces” are: Béchamel: Roux + Dairy (traditionally milk or cream), Velouté: Roux + White Stock traditionally chicken,

14

December 2017

Espagnole: Roux + Brown Stock traditionally veal or beef, Tomato: Roux + Tomatoes, and Hollandaise: Egg Yolks + Clarified Melted Butter + Acid - like lemon juice. A roux is flour and equal parts fat – I use butter and cook until golden brown. So I thought it would be fun to get the BNEs (Best Neighbors Ever – Andrew, Stacey, and Charlotte Horne – Rachael was in Indianapolis), King Richard, Frank and Susan, Gavin, and jeanne together to try multiple different cheeses and pick the best one! We used: Guyere, Swiss, drunken goat, bee master goat cheese, cheddar, Manchego, and parmesan. For the experiment I made small batches of the mornays – 1TBS butter and flour over med heat till golden, add 2/3 C milk - stir until bubbling, add 1/3 C heavy cream and 1 TBS of the graded cheese. These are pretty good starting proportions. Want it thicker – add more roux. You can use rice flour for the roux, in the same proportions, to make this gluten free! Let the games begin! I made 3 lbs of bacon, hash browns, mimosas, and bloody Mary’s to accompany the feast and stave off hunger; sides are important We set-up an assembly line and made one type at a time, rolling a crêpe filled with the crab, shrimp, mixture and topped with more mornay. YUM! Each was carefully judged on its merits: texture, ability to still taste the crab and shrimp, thickness of the crêpe, overall combination, and others that were ad-hock. Needless to say after multiple iterations and combinations of cheeses, the nap was the winner from the fabulous feats! For holiday fun that doesn’t include, shopping, a television, football game, or text messages, yet still incorporates a nap, making crêpes together can be: FUN, simple easy, and delicious! Be well! Kyle Snyder appeals to all tastes when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

By Mike costa

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Maybe by the time that the December issue comes out, the approach of the season will be more obvious. As I write this, short sleeves are still battling with long sleeves for prime closet space, but even on the mildest day of May, the honeybees know that winter is eventually coming. They will never pause in their efforts, will never judge their honey stores sufficient, and decide to take the day off. If the weather allows them to fly and there are nectar bearing flowers in bloom, the bees will continue to fill their comb. Ingrained in their DNA is the evolutionary knowledge that good times don’t last. There is a smaller nectar flow that comes in the fall, a smaller saving grace. Walk out in the yard in September and October, and depending on the week, you can see ornamental plantings of sedums and New England asters full of honey bees and native pollinators including bumble bees, wasps, and butterflies. Foraging bees will search out these small oases and bring word of them back to the hive. This past month I was called to investigate the sudden unexplained appearance of bees at a local downtown business. After some poking around and head scratching, it dawned on us that the place, a boutique spa, was filled with the scents of fragrant oils, apparently as appealing to the occasional foraging worker bee as to the spa’s human clients. The answer in this case, was simply keeping the door closed. I suspect that come spring, when the whole world is redolent with the scent of blossoms, the door can be left open again - we’ll see. Unlike their native cousins, such as the solitary bees and wasps of North America, the honey bee does not hibernate or in some way go dormant in the winter, but instead survives right though the season in colonies consisting of tens of thousands of individual bees. They need to have stored food to survive. There are in fact changes to the colony in anticipation of winter though. With the end of the mating season, and their sole purpose for existence gone, worker bees will eject struggling drones out the front of the hive, where they will perish without the support of the colony. The production of new bees generally drops dramatically in number. Those new bees that are produced in the fall are stockier and will live longer than their summer sisters, lasting for 2-3 months compared to the short frazzled span of 6 weeks for the workers in other seasons. This adaptation alone would not allow the honeybee to survive though, especially in climates farther north than ours.

Key to survival in the cold, is a behavior termed “clustering”. When temperatures drop, the bees of the colony form a tight ball in their hive around the queen and any brood that might be left. Imagine a smallish soccer ball made up of nothing but bees (but don’t kick it). The individual bees can generate heat by contracting their muscles and so maintain the center of the cluster at around 95 degrees. As the bees at the periphery cool down, they migrate towards the center and are replaced by bees from the interior. For this reason, beekeepers in Virginia generally do not wrap their hives with insulating material in the winter. The moisture trapped inside the hive by the wrapping would be more injurious to the colony than would be the cold. In fact, the conditions inside the hive are pleasant enough so that another fall chore of the beekeeper is to staple wire mesh over the hive opening to keep uninvited mice from coming in to set up winter quarters. On warmer winter days, the bees will break cluster, maybe to consume honey they could not reach before, to clean the hive of dead carcasses, and even to leave the hive to defecate, in so called cleansing flights. By being fastidious about their wastes, the colony helps to suppress disease in this way. Having a bit more scientific knowledge than Aesop did, drawing lessons from the Kingdom Animalia can be problematic. Still, the overwintering honeybee is something to contemplate as we sit by our individual fires trying to stave off the chill this season. It is a marvelous example of survival by cooperation. Our partners as fellow social organisms, apis mellifera, know by instinct that they are all in it together. Maybe we could learn something from them. Mike Costa is a Famiy Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtown Greens Family.

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

15


Cooking With Kyle

Everything Greens survival by cooperation

from a simple question .... by james kyle snyder

...To Shrimp and Crab Crêpes After last month’s success with jeanne, I thought it might be fun to see if she had any favorites she might like to try. I emailed, “I was think about you this morning, ...wonder if jeanne has anything she would see as an article...” “Many years ago I had shrimp crêpes in a light white wine sauce in a small country French restaurant in Denver,” was returned. An instant memory of a classic shrimp and crab cake with a delicious mornay started me salivating. Good pull Jeanne! Crêpes are super easy. In a blender being careful not to create too many bubbles combine Mitzi’s brother and sister-in-law’s recipe: ½ cup water, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup all-purpose flour, ¼ teaspoon salt. In a 10-12 inch skillet or pan over medium heat and using a non-stick spray, add ¼ C of the mixture and swirl the pan to coat the entire surface. Cook the first side until just golden (3-5 minutes depending on the heat), and then flip until the second side is golden as well (2 more minutes). Stack high or, if they start to stick, put a piece of waxed paper between them – I usually get a stack of 3-4 and then cook more as I go. Crab and shrimp are easy too! Spread one pound of cooked lump crab (jumbo is too big and too expensive for this) on a cookie sheet and remove the bones that were missed. Bisect one pound of shrimp so you have two matching halves. Steam the shrimp for 2-3 minutes until just done. Combine with the crab and set in a colander over a plate to drain. Now for the mornay! A mornay is an adaptation of the classic “mother sauce” - Béchamel – just add cheese. The five “mother sauces” are: Béchamel: Roux + Dairy (traditionally milk or cream), Velouté: Roux + White Stock traditionally chicken,

14

December 2017

Espagnole: Roux + Brown Stock traditionally veal or beef, Tomato: Roux + Tomatoes, and Hollandaise: Egg Yolks + Clarified Melted Butter + Acid - like lemon juice. A roux is flour and equal parts fat – I use butter and cook until golden brown. So I thought it would be fun to get the BNEs (Best Neighbors Ever – Andrew, Stacey, and Charlotte Horne – Rachael was in Indianapolis), King Richard, Frank and Susan, Gavin, and jeanne together to try multiple different cheeses and pick the best one! We used: Guyere, Swiss, drunken goat, bee master goat cheese, cheddar, Manchego, and parmesan. For the experiment I made small batches of the mornays – 1TBS butter and flour over med heat till golden, add 2/3 C milk - stir until bubbling, add 1/3 C heavy cream and 1 TBS of the graded cheese. These are pretty good starting proportions. Want it thicker – add more roux. You can use rice flour for the roux, in the same proportions, to make this gluten free! Let the games begin! I made 3 lbs of bacon, hash browns, mimosas, and bloody Mary’s to accompany the feast and stave off hunger; sides are important We set-up an assembly line and made one type at a time, rolling a crêpe filled with the crab, shrimp, mixture and topped with more mornay. YUM! Each was carefully judged on its merits: texture, ability to still taste the crab and shrimp, thickness of the crêpe, overall combination, and others that were ad-hock. Needless to say after multiple iterations and combinations of cheeses, the nap was the winner from the fabulous feats! For holiday fun that doesn’t include, shopping, a television, football game, or text messages, yet still incorporates a nap, making crêpes together can be: FUN, simple easy, and delicious! Be well! Kyle Snyder appeals to all tastes when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

By Mike costa

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Maybe by the time that the December issue comes out, the approach of the season will be more obvious. As I write this, short sleeves are still battling with long sleeves for prime closet space, but even on the mildest day of May, the honeybees know that winter is eventually coming. They will never pause in their efforts, will never judge their honey stores sufficient, and decide to take the day off. If the weather allows them to fly and there are nectar bearing flowers in bloom, the bees will continue to fill their comb. Ingrained in their DNA is the evolutionary knowledge that good times don’t last. There is a smaller nectar flow that comes in the fall, a smaller saving grace. Walk out in the yard in September and October, and depending on the week, you can see ornamental plantings of sedums and New England asters full of honey bees and native pollinators including bumble bees, wasps, and butterflies. Foraging bees will search out these small oases and bring word of them back to the hive. This past month I was called to investigate the sudden unexplained appearance of bees at a local downtown business. After some poking around and head scratching, it dawned on us that the place, a boutique spa, was filled with the scents of fragrant oils, apparently as appealing to the occasional foraging worker bee as to the spa’s human clients. The answer in this case, was simply keeping the door closed. I suspect that come spring, when the whole world is redolent with the scent of blossoms, the door can be left open again - we’ll see. Unlike their native cousins, such as the solitary bees and wasps of North America, the honey bee does not hibernate or in some way go dormant in the winter, but instead survives right though the season in colonies consisting of tens of thousands of individual bees. They need to have stored food to survive. There are in fact changes to the colony in anticipation of winter though. With the end of the mating season, and their sole purpose for existence gone, worker bees will eject struggling drones out the front of the hive, where they will perish without the support of the colony. The production of new bees generally drops dramatically in number. Those new bees that are produced in the fall are stockier and will live longer than their summer sisters, lasting for 2-3 months compared to the short frazzled span of 6 weeks for the workers in other seasons. This adaptation alone would not allow the honeybee to survive though, especially in climates farther north than ours.

Key to survival in the cold, is a behavior termed “clustering”. When temperatures drop, the bees of the colony form a tight ball in their hive around the queen and any brood that might be left. Imagine a smallish soccer ball made up of nothing but bees (but don’t kick it). The individual bees can generate heat by contracting their muscles and so maintain the center of the cluster at around 95 degrees. As the bees at the periphery cool down, they migrate towards the center and are replaced by bees from the interior. For this reason, beekeepers in Virginia generally do not wrap their hives with insulating material in the winter. The moisture trapped inside the hive by the wrapping would be more injurious to the colony than would be the cold. In fact, the conditions inside the hive are pleasant enough so that another fall chore of the beekeeper is to staple wire mesh over the hive opening to keep uninvited mice from coming in to set up winter quarters. On warmer winter days, the bees will break cluster, maybe to consume honey they could not reach before, to clean the hive of dead carcasses, and even to leave the hive to defecate, in so called cleansing flights. By being fastidious about their wastes, the colony helps to suppress disease in this way. Having a bit more scientific knowledge than Aesop did, drawing lessons from the Kingdom Animalia can be problematic. Still, the overwintering honeybee is something to contemplate as we sit by our individual fires trying to stave off the chill this season. It is a marvelous example of survival by cooperation. Our partners as fellow social organisms, apis mellifera, know by instinct that they are all in it together. Maybe we could learn something from them. Mike Costa is a Famiy Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtown Greens Family.

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

15


CALENDAR of events

december 2017….We Need A Little Christmas....NOW! * indicates event takes place throughout the month

Stage Door Production presents "Elf: the Musical, Jr." @ Chancellor H.S., 7pm

First Friday, December 1

Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm *Home for the Holidays, Gari Melcher's Belmont, The House and Studio will be decorated for the season in the tasteful and natural style of its artist homeowners, Gari and Corinne Melchers. Included with museum admission.

Saturday, December 2

Nature Crafts for Christmas, Hart Community Center, 10-12n, $ 408 Canal St. Mistletoe Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-2p Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm

Kick off 1st Friday @Community Bank of the Chesapeake, Artisits reception 2-5pm

Annual Christmas Parade "The Magic of Christmas", Downtown FXBG, 5:30p. Caroline & Pr. Anne Streets

Deck the Walls@ Brush Strokes Gallery All Member Holiday Show. 824 Caroline St

Annual Spotsylvania 1pm.Spotsy Courthouse

FCCA Word, Text & Image reception 6-9p. 813 Sophia St

1st Sat @ Highmark Brewery, enjoy afternoon of bluegrass music & craft beer! Live music with Reckless Brigade Bluegrass Band. FREE admission, dogs welcome in outdoor area.

Show.

Opening

Sammy T's hosting"Art Sale for Moss Free Clinic". Thru Dec & Jan. you can buy Art off the Wall. See pg. 24 for more info Fred Area Museum open FREE 5-8pm Artful Dimensions Pop-Up Gallery at Coldwell Banker Elite, thru month William St, 6-9pm A Monroe Christmas Open House, seasonal music played on the harp, and the Monroe family Astor pianoforte, reception with holiday beverages and treats. Museum Store holiday specials! Museum Store holiday specials! 6-8pm PONSHOP Holiday Celebration, latest creations from our artists. 6-9pm Rising Sun Tavern Holiday Open House, 6-8:30pm. Come out and taste seasonal treats and beverages while touring this historic property decorated and glowing for the holidays. Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com Brian Burgess, local Plen-Air artist @ Agora Downtown Coffe Shop, 7-9pm

Christmas

Parade,

Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc.

Tuesday, December 5

National Park Service to commemorate the 155th Anniv. Of the Battle of FXBG 11am-4pm

Women's Rights Forum, CRRL FXBG, 7pm. focus on women's rights issues, domestic violence, reproductive justice, & economic equality. Speakers from Empowerhouse, NOW. **We will be accepting donations of non-perishable foods and toiletries for Empowerhouse, which supports survivors of domestic violence and their children. facebook.com/WeAreForAmerica

Central VA Battlefields Trust FXBG History & Biography Book Signing , Eileen's Bakery, 9-10:30 a

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, December 6

Holiday Open House, Porter Library, Celebrate the season with crafts and activities, visit from Santa & Amyclae Dance Academy. 6:30-8pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, December 7

Ron Rosner Family YMCA Breakfast with Santa followed by a Trolley Ride. Pancake breakfast. Bring your camera to capture pictures with Santa. 9-11am, 5700 Smith Station Rd. The Chamber Chorale of Fredericksburg A Dazzling Light: featuring Rutter's Gloria, trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Ave,Tickets and information are available at ccfbg.org, 540-898-0458. Storytime & Breakfast with Santa, 9:30-10:45 am, Dorothy Hart Comm Center. $

Holiday Open House - "A Christmas Tale: If Corals Could Talk"speaker UMW Professor Dr. Pamela Grothe shares her research conducted on Christmas Island. Crrl fxbg, 2-4PM

Saturday, December 9

47th Annual Candlelight Tour on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured-1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Wednesday, December 13 Gingerbread House Building, Community Center, 6-7:15p $

Dorothy

Hart

Christmas at Chatham,12-4pm join park staff, living historians, and Civil War Santa for Christmas at Chatham! Learn about how soldiers and civilians experienced Christmas during the Civil War, and participate in 19th Century Christmas traditions! Union soldiers encamped on the riverside terraces will share stories about being in camp for Christmas, and how soldiers entertained themselves during the cold winter months.

Live Music @ Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Sunday, December 10

Mary Washington House Candlelight Tour & Open House, 4:30-7pm. FREE

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

FA-LA-LA. Merry Carols in Market Square. community sing-a-long from 7 - 8 pm with The Spotsylvanians leading our voices in Christmas carols.

Tinsel Town Holiday Craft Show, featuring local artists, drink specials & hors d'ouevres included!. Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage. 6-9pm

Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Classical Ballet of Fredericksburg presents The Nutcracker @ James Monroe High School Auditorium, 3pm. $

Friday, December 15

*WEE Christmas-Dollhouse & Miniatures Show, Historic Kenmore 1201 Washington Ave, exhibit of highly detailed, replica dollhouses - including the mansion - and miniatures in the Crowninshield Museum Building., 10a-2p. $

Friday, December 8

Tuesday, December 12

Sunday, December 17

19th Century Christmas at Ellwood Manor, 93pm.FREE

Family Holiday Tree Triming, Dorothy Hart Comm. Center, 408 Canal St, 4:30-6p. $

Stafford High School Theater Department 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' @ Stafford Senior HS 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Colonial Christmas, Main Library celebrate Christmas as the colonist did, 5:30-7pm

Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm

*Annual Gingerbread Contest & Exhibit, Adults and children alike will enjoy the sights and smells of the festive creations displayed at George Washington's Ferry Farm! This year's theme is "Historic Sites in Virginia."10a-2p.

Monday, December 11

Stafford Hall Christmastide Celebrate the season through the traditions, songs, dances, conversations, and stories passed down through the generations at Stratford Hall., 4:30-8:30pm. $ Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Sunday, December 3

Holiday Walk @ Spencer Devon. 3-8pm. Experience the lights and sights of the holiday season as you walk downtown Fredericksburg. Stop at our cookie checkpoint to enjoy cookies and hot drinks.

Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

47th Annual Candlelight Tour on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured-1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue. Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Author Chris Mackowski will be signing copies of his book, Simply Murder. @FXBG Battlefield Bookstore, 12-3pm

Dog Gone Christmas Party, Dorothy Hart Comm. Center, Come out and play, eat, sing, and take photos of you and your pets , 7-9p ,$

Saturday, December 16

19th Century Christmas at Ellwood Manor, 36380 Constituition Hwy, Locust Grove. FREE.9am-2pm children of all ages may visit with Santa and enjoy making period arts and crafts until 12:00 P.M. Parents will want to be sure to bring their cameras! Classical Ballet of Fredericksburg presents The Nutcracker @ James Monroe High School Auditorium, 7pm

Tuesday, December 19

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, December 21

Winter Solstice Celebration, Motts Run Reserve, 6:30-8p, $

Sunday, December 24

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, December 25

Merry Christmas! Hope Hope Santa din’t leave you coal!

Tuesday, December 26

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Thursday, December 28 Snowball Fights, join us for an evening of snowball fight matches using our fun-to-throw polyester "snowballs." Held snow or shine. Riverfront Park, 68p, $

Sunday, December 31 New Year’s Eve

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Family Fun New Year's Eve , Riverfront Park on Sophia St. Bubble Romp Stomp, Games, Fire Pits & more! Early 9pm countdown to the New Year & ping pong ball drop

If you are reading this 245th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for January 2018 issue is December 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3242 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

17


CALENDAR of events

december 2017….We Need A Little Christmas....NOW! * indicates event takes place throughout the month

Stage Door Production presents "Elf: the Musical, Jr." @ Chancellor H.S., 7pm

First Friday, December 1

Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm *Home for the Holidays, Gari Melcher's Belmont, The House and Studio will be decorated for the season in the tasteful and natural style of its artist homeowners, Gari and Corinne Melchers. Included with museum admission.

Saturday, December 2

Nature Crafts for Christmas, Hart Community Center, 10-12n, $ 408 Canal St. Mistletoe Market, Hurkamp Park, 7a-2p Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm

Kick off 1st Friday @Community Bank of the Chesapeake, Artisits reception 2-5pm

Annual Christmas Parade "The Magic of Christmas", Downtown FXBG, 5:30p. Caroline & Pr. Anne Streets

Deck the Walls@ Brush Strokes Gallery All Member Holiday Show. 824 Caroline St

Annual Spotsylvania 1pm.Spotsy Courthouse

FCCA Word, Text & Image reception 6-9p. 813 Sophia St

1st Sat @ Highmark Brewery, enjoy afternoon of bluegrass music & craft beer! Live music with Reckless Brigade Bluegrass Band. FREE admission, dogs welcome in outdoor area.

Show.

Opening

Sammy T's hosting"Art Sale for Moss Free Clinic". Thru Dec & Jan. you can buy Art off the Wall. See pg. 24 for more info Fred Area Museum open FREE 5-8pm Artful Dimensions Pop-Up Gallery at Coldwell Banker Elite, thru month William St, 6-9pm A Monroe Christmas Open House, seasonal music played on the harp, and the Monroe family Astor pianoforte, reception with holiday beverages and treats. Museum Store holiday specials! Museum Store holiday specials! 6-8pm PONSHOP Holiday Celebration, latest creations from our artists. 6-9pm Rising Sun Tavern Holiday Open House, 6-8:30pm. Come out and taste seasonal treats and beverages while touring this historic property decorated and glowing for the holidays. Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com Brian Burgess, local Plen-Air artist @ Agora Downtown Coffe Shop, 7-9pm

Christmas

Parade,

Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc.

Tuesday, December 5

National Park Service to commemorate the 155th Anniv. Of the Battle of FXBG 11am-4pm

Women's Rights Forum, CRRL FXBG, 7pm. focus on women's rights issues, domestic violence, reproductive justice, & economic equality. Speakers from Empowerhouse, NOW. **We will be accepting donations of non-perishable foods and toiletries for Empowerhouse, which supports survivors of domestic violence and their children. facebook.com/WeAreForAmerica

Central VA Battlefields Trust FXBG History & Biography Book Signing , Eileen's Bakery, 9-10:30 a

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, December 6

Holiday Open House, Porter Library, Celebrate the season with crafts and activities, visit from Santa & Amyclae Dance Academy. 6:30-8pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, December 7

Ron Rosner Family YMCA Breakfast with Santa followed by a Trolley Ride. Pancake breakfast. Bring your camera to capture pictures with Santa. 9-11am, 5700 Smith Station Rd. The Chamber Chorale of Fredericksburg A Dazzling Light: featuring Rutter's Gloria, trinity Episcopal Church, 825 College Ave,Tickets and information are available at ccfbg.org, 540-898-0458. Storytime & Breakfast with Santa, 9:30-10:45 am, Dorothy Hart Comm Center. $

Holiday Open House - "A Christmas Tale: If Corals Could Talk"speaker UMW Professor Dr. Pamela Grothe shares her research conducted on Christmas Island. Crrl fxbg, 2-4PM

Saturday, December 9

47th Annual Candlelight Tour on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured-1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue.

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Wednesday, December 13 Gingerbread House Building, Community Center, 6-7:15p $

Dorothy

Hart

Christmas at Chatham,12-4pm join park staff, living historians, and Civil War Santa for Christmas at Chatham! Learn about how soldiers and civilians experienced Christmas during the Civil War, and participate in 19th Century Christmas traditions! Union soldiers encamped on the riverside terraces will share stories about being in camp for Christmas, and how soldiers entertained themselves during the cold winter months.

Live Music @ Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Sunday, December 10

Mary Washington House Candlelight Tour & Open House, 4:30-7pm. FREE

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

FA-LA-LA. Merry Carols in Market Square. community sing-a-long from 7 - 8 pm with The Spotsylvanians leading our voices in Christmas carols.

Tinsel Town Holiday Craft Show, featuring local artists, drink specials & hors d'ouevres included!. Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage. 6-9pm

Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Classical Ballet of Fredericksburg presents The Nutcracker @ James Monroe High School Auditorium, 3pm. $

Friday, December 15

*WEE Christmas-Dollhouse & Miniatures Show, Historic Kenmore 1201 Washington Ave, exhibit of highly detailed, replica dollhouses - including the mansion - and miniatures in the Crowninshield Museum Building., 10a-2p. $

Friday, December 8

Tuesday, December 12

Sunday, December 17

19th Century Christmas at Ellwood Manor, 93pm.FREE

Family Holiday Tree Triming, Dorothy Hart Comm. Center, 408 Canal St, 4:30-6p. $

Stafford High School Theater Department 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' @ Stafford Senior HS 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, contact Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Colonial Christmas, Main Library celebrate Christmas as the colonist did, 5:30-7pm

Holiday Craft Show, FXBG Expo Center, 10-6pm

*Annual Gingerbread Contest & Exhibit, Adults and children alike will enjoy the sights and smells of the festive creations displayed at George Washington's Ferry Farm! This year's theme is "Historic Sites in Virginia."10a-2p.

Monday, December 11

Stafford Hall Christmastide Celebrate the season through the traditions, songs, dances, conversations, and stories passed down through the generations at Stratford Hall., 4:30-8:30pm. $ Stafford High School Theater Department Presents 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' in December @ Stafford Senior High School, 7pm, info thestaffordplayers@gmail.com

Sunday, December 3

Holiday Walk @ Spencer Devon. 3-8pm. Experience the lights and sights of the holiday season as you walk downtown Fredericksburg. Stop at our cookie checkpoint to enjoy cookies and hot drinks.

Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

47th Annual Candlelight Tour on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured-1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue. Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Author Chris Mackowski will be signing copies of his book, Simply Murder. @FXBG Battlefield Bookstore, 12-3pm

Dog Gone Christmas Party, Dorothy Hart Comm. Center, Come out and play, eat, sing, and take photos of you and your pets , 7-9p ,$

Saturday, December 16

19th Century Christmas at Ellwood Manor, 36380 Constituition Hwy, Locust Grove. FREE.9am-2pm children of all ages may visit with Santa and enjoy making period arts and crafts until 12:00 P.M. Parents will want to be sure to bring their cameras! Classical Ballet of Fredericksburg presents The Nutcracker @ James Monroe High School Auditorium, 7pm

Tuesday, December 19

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, December 21

Winter Solstice Celebration, Motts Run Reserve, 6:30-8p, $

Sunday, December 24

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, December 25

Merry Christmas! Hope Hope Santa din’t leave you coal!

Tuesday, December 26

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Thursday, December 28 Snowball Fights, join us for an evening of snowball fight matches using our fun-to-throw polyester "snowballs." Held snow or shine. Riverfront Park, 68p, $

Sunday, December 31 New Year’s Eve

Every Sunday Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! Family Fun New Year's Eve , Riverfront Park on Sophia St. Bubble Romp Stomp, Games, Fire Pits & more! Early 9pm countdown to the New Year & ping pong ball drop

If you are reading this 245th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for January 2018 issue is December 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Live Music @Spencer Devon, 9-midnight

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3242 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

17


history’s stories

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I am writing this article late in the evening just days before Thanksgiving. Anne has been away from home working with FEMA helping victims of the hurricanes and California fires for six weeks and I am thankful she will be home in time for Thanksgiving, it is Individuals like her from Fredericksburg that receive little if any recognition, but are the real unknown hero’s. Christmas is my favorite time of the year, as it was my mother’s, as she would begin her preparations for the holiday in September of each year. We all have our special memories of Christmas growing up. I remember back over 60 years ago in the late 1940, s when I received my first bicycle, which was a major gift for any young child. In those days the TV was just coming into existence and most homes did not have a set as it was very expensive. I remember our first set had a 12inch round screen and we all gathered around it too watch 1 of the 4 stations that it would telecast. The TV had the antenna mounted on the roof of the house for reception. I remember my father going up on the roof to turn it, so the reception would be clearer as we now say the “good old days”. Our telephone would be what they called a “party line” with 4 other homes on the same line. We would have to wait until the line was clear before we could make a call. Sometimes we would hear a click on the line as other users would listen in on our calls. Just” being nosey” as Mom would say. Most all decorations in those days were made by hand, we would gather running cedar, holly branches from the nearby woods. Mother would make wreathes and have running cedar all around the fire place. Dad and I would go out into the woods two weeks before Christmas and find a tree usually cedar and cut it down and bring it home trim it up and put it in a bucket of water in the house, it would normally not be taken down until after January first. Many times, the needles would begin falling off and were everywhere. I can still recall how the homes smelled of the cedar. Mom was always baking cookies and of course making those fruit cakes that lasted for months with a touch of rum. The tree was decorated with many homemade decorations, as in school we would make strings of popcorn, circles of paper and ginger bread men. I remember we had those glass lights with bubble water in them. Two weeks before Christmas we would have to go downtown to see Santa Clause with our list. Santa Clause back in those days was a local policeman the locals called “Short Stop” Smith (picture). I wanted a bicycle that year and was I happy when Christmas day came. A red bike was my favorite for many years. I can remember making it a motor bike by taking a playing card and clothes pin and putting it on the fender and the spokes made a sound like a motor. I think back on all those Christmases past and each one has a special meaning for me as I know those memories do for you. Mom and Dad have been gone for many years now, however, I think of them often, especially at Christmas. This year my granddaughter Emma Grace celebrates her first Christmas beginning a life I hope is as long and blessed as mine has been. God Bless and MERRY CHRISTMAS Dedicated to Joyce Decatur, Warren Cox, Reed Butzner and Tony Battista

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Virginia’s only Regional Archives The Heritage Center Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; www.crhcarchives.org. 18

November 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

Assisting Survivors

Friends from Fréjus

cottage at 1500 washington Ave

fema sURGE cAPACITY fORCE team

christmas parade guests

By Beth Daly Have you ever wondered about the small stone house on Washington Avenue next to the Mary Washington Monument and Gordon Family Cemetery? It has been called the Keeper’s Cottage, the Caretaker’s Cottage, and most recently The Lodge. It was built as a residence for the caretaker of the Mary Washington Monument. The Monument, begun in 1833 when Andrew Jackson was president, was finally completed in 1894 and dedicated by President Grover Cleveland. Richmond architect Captain M. J. Dimmock prepared the original drawings for the house, envisioning a building that was larger and somewhat different from the as-built structure. The Battlefield granite used came from a quarry on the Rappahannock River. The style is a mixture of Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and Romanesque. Local contractor George Washington Wroten oversaw the construction. Stonemason J.W. Musselman used red-tinted mortar to bind the roughcut stone. The front pediment features red fish-scale shingles and a Palladian window. The center of the Palladian window matches the dormer window. There is a lancet window on the first floor. Frances Goolrick, her husband Judge John T. Goolrick, and their four sons were the first occupants. Mrs. Goolrick, a founding member of the WashingtonLewis Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and author, was the first caretaker. Two more generations of Goolricks lived in the cottage as caretakers. In 1966, a dispute regarding the ownership of the cottage resulted in it being deeded to the City. It was in disrepair, and there was talk of tearing it down. Kenmore In 1979, the Association and the City entered into a long-term lease. Generous donations by Kenmore regents provided for repairs. Vernon Edenfield, then Executive Director of Kenmore, moved into the cottage— rechristened “The Lodge.” Under his guidance, shelving was added to display items Edenfield had collected in his travels, climate control equipment was carefully hidden, and a “secret door” was created between the living room and kitchen. The original boardroom, known as the Connecticut Room, which looks out at the Monument, became a formal dining room. In the late 1990s, landscape designer Philip Watson of Washington Gardens created an English country garden inside the low stone wall.

Most recently, The Lodge has served as temporary housing for the City Manager. What will the next chapter hold for this charming building? For the fourth time, The Lodge Historic will be open for the Fredericksburg Foundation’s Candlelight Tour. The interior will be furnished with items from the Fredericksburg Area Museum and filled with lavish holiday decorations by Jay Downey of Downey Design & Interiors, Inc. The 47th Annual Candlelight Tour will take place on December 9 and 10 on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured—1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue. Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. Its mission is to preserve, protect, and revitalize the historic environment and cultural resources of the Fredericksburg area. More information can be found at hffi.org/holidaycandlelight-ttour/. Beth Daly is a volunteer with the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, & the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. Pen and Ink drawing by Marion Krock Kolson.

Supporting Historic Preservation Since 1997

by phyllis whitley

By Anne Slivinski For the second time in history the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reached out to other federal agencies to support their disaster efforts following an unprecedented number of hurricanes within a one month period to include the California fires. FEMA’s “Surge Capacity Force” (SCF). In total, 15 Waves were mobilized to various disaster and support locations. I was assigned to Wave 13 which consisted of over 500 volunteers from various federal agencies. After a brief training at Anniston, Alabama, 60 other Wave 13 individuals, were mobilized to the Nevada National Processing Service Center (NPSC). This was one of several FEMA Call Centers. Once there we joined approximately 600 other NPSC staff members. We became known as “Team 57” which included the following agencies: Department of Labor, Department of the Air Force, Department of the Navy, US Marine Corps, Defense Logistics Agency, National Science Foundation, Internal Revenue Service, Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice, Department of Interior and Veteran’s Affairs. All of the teams worked closely together to quickly learn FEMA’s systems and delivery of services. FEMA’s mission is to support citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. Their core values are Compassion, Integrity and Respect and Fairness. The SCF supported FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program. Services which includes Housing Assistance, Other Needs Assistance, Housing Assistance, assisting

survivors to return to safe, sanitary and functional conditions. FEMA provides Other Needs Assistance, (ONA) for Personal Property, Transportation, Moving and Storage, Medical, Dental, Funeral and other miscellaneous expenses. Within 5 short weeks we covered territories that full time FEMA employees learn over a period of years. Our primary focus was answering calls and assisting applicants with registration and management of their information.. Calls varied from providing information about the status of eligibility to informing callers of the locations of Disaster Relief Centers and providing local phone numbers and addresses of local support agencies. Our efforts contributed to over 5 million applications being processed, approximately 100,000 documents being matched to applicant’s file and over 3 billion dollars of assistance. As I reflect on this experience our learning curve was steep, our days were long, the calls were numerous and the stories were heart breaking. It was a firsthand glimpse into the personal tragedies of the thousands whose lives were forever changed. I am humbled by the opportunity to serve our nation during one of its most demanding natural disaster times. It was not only an honor to support FEMA’s disaster relief efforts to so many deserving citizens but to serve alongside so many other dedicated and committed fellow government employees. It is an experience that holds a special place in my heart. Anne works at the Dept of Veterans Affairs, and lives in the Burg with husband Tuffy Hicks

Philippe Rigoulot is President of Fréjus' five Sister Cities and his wife, Maryse, is Director of the Fredericksburg Section. They have been invited by Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw to be honored guests in the Fredericksburg Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 2. The Rigoulot’s have been active in the Sister City Program since 1990. In 1992 they made their first visit to Fredericksburg with a group of 16 students and two other chaperones from the Fréjus Technical School. Maryse and Philippe were teachers at that school. They visited local businesses and toured Virginia, D.C. and other historical attractions. Since 1992 the Rigoulots have made seven trips to the United States. They say, "That visit in 1992 was the beginning of a long and enduring friendship with our American friends." Mr. Rigoulot says they have already had a busy year but, "We are so anxious to see our many friends in Virginia. It is the first time we have visited the USA in winter. Also, it will be our first Christmas parade. " A busy year indeed! He said the sister cities activities included visits to other Sister Cities and other groups were hosted in Fréjus; in July they hosted a group of Fredericksburg students and several adults for twelve days; went to Culoz, France, near Geneva to participate in Tour de France activities - cooking two Giant Omelettes -with truffles; In September they held their annual Giant Omelette festivities in Fréjus; In early October, they drove to Italy to participate in the Congress of European Sister Cities and in November, just a few days before departing for Fredericksburg, they will prepare an American Thanksgiving Dinner for 50 or so Sister City friends.

Both are retired school teachers. Maryse taught English and Philippe was a Logistics and Driving teacher. When duties of the Jumelage & Giante Omelette Group allows he likes to play the drums with local groups and she conducts English classes for adults. They have five grown children and three grandchildren. Plans for the Rigoulot visit have included tours of historic sites in the area, speaking to local groups about Sister City relationships, visit with Honorary ViceChairwoman of Sister Cities International - Mrs. Mike Pence, dinners parties, shopping, visiting with many friends they have made over the years and of course participating as honored guests at the Fredericksburg Christmas Parade on December 2nd. Be sure to attend the parade, visit with our two very special guests and learn more about the Giant Omelette Festival coming to Fredericksburg.

Phyllis C. Whitley is a past president of the Fredericksburg Sister City Association

Registration Opens January 2018 Event: September 28 & 29 front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

19


history’s stories

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I am writing this article late in the evening just days before Thanksgiving. Anne has been away from home working with FEMA helping victims of the hurricanes and California fires for six weeks and I am thankful she will be home in time for Thanksgiving, it is Individuals like her from Fredericksburg that receive little if any recognition, but are the real unknown hero’s. Christmas is my favorite time of the year, as it was my mother’s, as she would begin her preparations for the holiday in September of each year. We all have our special memories of Christmas growing up. I remember back over 60 years ago in the late 1940, s when I received my first bicycle, which was a major gift for any young child. In those days the TV was just coming into existence and most homes did not have a set as it was very expensive. I remember our first set had a 12inch round screen and we all gathered around it too watch 1 of the 4 stations that it would telecast. The TV had the antenna mounted on the roof of the house for reception. I remember my father going up on the roof to turn it, so the reception would be clearer as we now say the “good old days”. Our telephone would be what they called a “party line” with 4 other homes on the same line. We would have to wait until the line was clear before we could make a call. Sometimes we would hear a click on the line as other users would listen in on our calls. Just” being nosey” as Mom would say. Most all decorations in those days were made by hand, we would gather running cedar, holly branches from the nearby woods. Mother would make wreathes and have running cedar all around the fire place. Dad and I would go out into the woods two weeks before Christmas and find a tree usually cedar and cut it down and bring it home trim it up and put it in a bucket of water in the house, it would normally not be taken down until after January first. Many times, the needles would begin falling off and were everywhere. I can still recall how the homes smelled of the cedar. Mom was always baking cookies and of course making those fruit cakes that lasted for months with a touch of rum. The tree was decorated with many homemade decorations, as in school we would make strings of popcorn, circles of paper and ginger bread men. I remember we had those glass lights with bubble water in them. Two weeks before Christmas we would have to go downtown to see Santa Clause with our list. Santa Clause back in those days was a local policeman the locals called “Short Stop” Smith (picture). I wanted a bicycle that year and was I happy when Christmas day came. A red bike was my favorite for many years. I can remember making it a motor bike by taking a playing card and clothes pin and putting it on the fender and the spokes made a sound like a motor. I think back on all those Christmases past and each one has a special meaning for me as I know those memories do for you. Mom and Dad have been gone for many years now, however, I think of them often, especially at Christmas. This year my granddaughter Emma Grace celebrates her first Christmas beginning a life I hope is as long and blessed as mine has been. God Bless and MERRY CHRISTMAS Dedicated to Joyce Decatur, Warren Cox, Reed Butzner and Tony Battista

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Virginia’s only Regional Archives The Heritage Center Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; www.crhcarchives.org. 18

November 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

Assisting Survivors

Friends from Fréjus

cottage at 1500 washington Ave

fema sURGE cAPACITY fORCE team

christmas parade guests

By Beth Daly Have you ever wondered about the small stone house on Washington Avenue next to the Mary Washington Monument and Gordon Family Cemetery? It has been called the Keeper’s Cottage, the Caretaker’s Cottage, and most recently The Lodge. It was built as a residence for the caretaker of the Mary Washington Monument. The Monument, begun in 1833 when Andrew Jackson was president, was finally completed in 1894 and dedicated by President Grover Cleveland. Richmond architect Captain M. J. Dimmock prepared the original drawings for the house, envisioning a building that was larger and somewhat different from the as-built structure. The Battlefield granite used came from a quarry on the Rappahannock River. The style is a mixture of Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and Romanesque. Local contractor George Washington Wroten oversaw the construction. Stonemason J.W. Musselman used red-tinted mortar to bind the roughcut stone. The front pediment features red fish-scale shingles and a Palladian window. The center of the Palladian window matches the dormer window. There is a lancet window on the first floor. Frances Goolrick, her husband Judge John T. Goolrick, and their four sons were the first occupants. Mrs. Goolrick, a founding member of the WashingtonLewis Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and author, was the first caretaker. Two more generations of Goolricks lived in the cottage as caretakers. In 1966, a dispute regarding the ownership of the cottage resulted in it being deeded to the City. It was in disrepair, and there was talk of tearing it down. Kenmore In 1979, the Association and the City entered into a long-term lease. Generous donations by Kenmore regents provided for repairs. Vernon Edenfield, then Executive Director of Kenmore, moved into the cottage— rechristened “The Lodge.” Under his guidance, shelving was added to display items Edenfield had collected in his travels, climate control equipment was carefully hidden, and a “secret door” was created between the living room and kitchen. The original boardroom, known as the Connecticut Room, which looks out at the Monument, became a formal dining room. In the late 1990s, landscape designer Philip Watson of Washington Gardens created an English country garden inside the low stone wall.

Most recently, The Lodge has served as temporary housing for the City Manager. What will the next chapter hold for this charming building? For the fourth time, The Lodge Historic will be open for the Fredericksburg Foundation’s Candlelight Tour. The interior will be furnished with items from the Fredericksburg Area Museum and filled with lavish holiday decorations by Jay Downey of Downey Design & Interiors, Inc. The 47th Annual Candlelight Tour will take place on December 9 and 10 on Washington Avenue. Five historic homes will be featured—1200, 1206, 1302, 1309, and 1500 Washington Avenue. Decorators and florists beautifully decorate each home for the holidays. The gift shop on the day of the event will be 616 Amelia Street (formerly the Free Lance Star building). The event is presented by the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. Its mission is to preserve, protect, and revitalize the historic environment and cultural resources of the Fredericksburg area. More information can be found at hffi.org/holidaycandlelight-ttour/. Beth Daly is a volunteer with the Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, & the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. Pen and Ink drawing by Marion Krock Kolson.

Supporting Historic Preservation Since 1997

by phyllis whitley

By Anne Slivinski For the second time in history the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reached out to other federal agencies to support their disaster efforts following an unprecedented number of hurricanes within a one month period to include the California fires. FEMA’s “Surge Capacity Force” (SCF). In total, 15 Waves were mobilized to various disaster and support locations. I was assigned to Wave 13 which consisted of over 500 volunteers from various federal agencies. After a brief training at Anniston, Alabama, 60 other Wave 13 individuals, were mobilized to the Nevada National Processing Service Center (NPSC). This was one of several FEMA Call Centers. Once there we joined approximately 600 other NPSC staff members. We became known as “Team 57” which included the following agencies: Department of Labor, Department of the Air Force, Department of the Navy, US Marine Corps, Defense Logistics Agency, National Science Foundation, Internal Revenue Service, Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice, Department of Interior and Veteran’s Affairs. All of the teams worked closely together to quickly learn FEMA’s systems and delivery of services. FEMA’s mission is to support citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. Their core values are Compassion, Integrity and Respect and Fairness. The SCF supported FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program. Services which includes Housing Assistance, Other Needs Assistance, Housing Assistance, assisting

survivors to return to safe, sanitary and functional conditions. FEMA provides Other Needs Assistance, (ONA) for Personal Property, Transportation, Moving and Storage, Medical, Dental, Funeral and other miscellaneous expenses. Within 5 short weeks we covered territories that full time FEMA employees learn over a period of years. Our primary focus was answering calls and assisting applicants with registration and management of their information.. Calls varied from providing information about the status of eligibility to informing callers of the locations of Disaster Relief Centers and providing local phone numbers and addresses of local support agencies. Our efforts contributed to over 5 million applications being processed, approximately 100,000 documents being matched to applicant’s file and over 3 billion dollars of assistance. As I reflect on this experience our learning curve was steep, our days were long, the calls were numerous and the stories were heart breaking. It was a firsthand glimpse into the personal tragedies of the thousands whose lives were forever changed. I am humbled by the opportunity to serve our nation during one of its most demanding natural disaster times. It was not only an honor to support FEMA’s disaster relief efforts to so many deserving citizens but to serve alongside so many other dedicated and committed fellow government employees. It is an experience that holds a special place in my heart. Anne works at the Dept of Veterans Affairs, and lives in the Burg with husband Tuffy Hicks

Philippe Rigoulot is President of Fréjus' five Sister Cities and his wife, Maryse, is Director of the Fredericksburg Section. They have been invited by Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw to be honored guests in the Fredericksburg Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 2. The Rigoulot’s have been active in the Sister City Program since 1990. In 1992 they made their first visit to Fredericksburg with a group of 16 students and two other chaperones from the Fréjus Technical School. Maryse and Philippe were teachers at that school. They visited local businesses and toured Virginia, D.C. and other historical attractions. Since 1992 the Rigoulots have made seven trips to the United States. They say, "That visit in 1992 was the beginning of a long and enduring friendship with our American friends." Mr. Rigoulot says they have already had a busy year but, "We are so anxious to see our many friends in Virginia. It is the first time we have visited the USA in winter. Also, it will be our first Christmas parade. " A busy year indeed! He said the sister cities activities included visits to other Sister Cities and other groups were hosted in Fréjus; in July they hosted a group of Fredericksburg students and several adults for twelve days; went to Culoz, France, near Geneva to participate in Tour de France activities - cooking two Giant Omelettes -with truffles; In September they held their annual Giant Omelette festivities in Fréjus; In early October, they drove to Italy to participate in the Congress of European Sister Cities and in November, just a few days before departing for Fredericksburg, they will prepare an American Thanksgiving Dinner for 50 or so Sister City friends.

Both are retired school teachers. Maryse taught English and Philippe was a Logistics and Driving teacher. When duties of the Jumelage & Giante Omelette Group allows he likes to play the drums with local groups and she conducts English classes for adults. They have five grown children and three grandchildren. Plans for the Rigoulot visit have included tours of historic sites in the area, speaking to local groups about Sister City relationships, visit with Honorary ViceChairwoman of Sister Cities International - Mrs. Mike Pence, dinners parties, shopping, visiting with many friends they have made over the years and of course participating as honored guests at the Fredericksburg Christmas Parade on December 2nd. Be sure to attend the parade, visit with our two very special guests and learn more about the Giant Omelette Festival coming to Fredericksburg.

Phyllis C. Whitley is a past president of the Fredericksburg Sister City Association

Registration Opens January 2018 Event: September 28 & 29 front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

19


Senior Care Joy to the (aging) World By Karl Karch Economic Research, retirement is likely to improve your overall happiness and health. The study found that life satisfaction improves immediately upon retirement. Measurable health outcomes are not immediate, but are positively impacted four or more years after retirement. And, the positive effects on wellbeing are long-lasting. So, ignore the fake news and look forward to retirement. I recently had a scary dream that the world was coming to an end. I probably am not the only one with scary or weird dreams with all the craziness, violence, threat of nuclear war, and other obscene, destructive, and negative news. It’s getting to the point that it’s too depressing to turn on the news, which is bad for a news junky like me. Speaking of news, we’ve all heard the term “fake news”. Well, fake news applies to aging as well. We all too often hear that getting old is miserable with declining physical and mental functioning. We hear numerous negative stereotypes and jokes associated with aging. Yes, decline is inevitable and affects each person differently. Regardless, it certainly beats the alternative. As a young adult, I remember hearing older people say they don’t want to retire because they wouldn’t know what to do, a false assumption. I now hear retirees saying there are not enough hours in the day to do all they want and are asked to do by various organizations. I also hear retirement will accelerate the decline of physical and mental well-being. Thankfully, research has proven that to be more fake news. According to a working paper published by the National Bureau of

Age is a state of mind. When greeted by someone who says, “It’s great to see you,” an acquaintance of mine who was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease would respond by saying “It’s great to be seen.” Knowing he had Alzheimer’s, he still felt happy to be alive. A retired veteran friend of mine said that whenever he whines about his aches and pains, his wife reminds him of those less fortunate who lost limbs fighting for our country, or who lost their lives during a church service or outdoor concert. We take so much for granted, don’t we? Many reading this may remember the cartoon strip Li’l Abner and the character Joe Btfsplk. He’s the one that always walked around with the rain cloud over his head. He was an outcast, lonely, unpopular, and perpetually gloomy. Nobody wanted to be around him. But remember, amidst all the dark clouds generated in the world lately, there are rays of sunshine. When you wake up, get out of bed, and see daylight, remind yourself that it’s great to be above ground and vertical. It beats the alternative. A friend of mine’s father once said, “You might as well be happy as the way you are.” I first heard that statement over forty years ago and will never forget it, especially when I get stressed out. It helps me bring life back into perspective. I’m especially mindful this time of year about the joy of aging. So, help bring joy to yourself and the world around you. Happy holiday season to all!!

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

20

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Emancipated Patients

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

shooter defense

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

It seems to me a sign of the times that the agenda at the recent Virginia Association of Free and Charitable Clinics that I just attended at Virginia Beach, included a presentation on ‘Active Threat Citizen’s Defense Training.’ This annual get-together of people from Moss and similar clinics around the state usually covers a bunch of clinical and administrative issues. This was a little different. A little scary. Master Police Officer David J. Nieves of the Virginia Beach police showed us videos of active shooters in shopping malls. Played the 911 recording of one of the teachers trapped in a school, being stalked by a gunman. Pretended to be a gunman himself and stalked us. He talked about defensive strategies like, whenever he goes out to eat with his kids, he always sits, back to the wall so he can see the entrance – and notes where the exits are. If you’re in a restaurant, remember, there’s always an exit through the kitchen. If you’re in a mall there’s usually a way out through the shops, rather than being part of the mass fighting to get out the main entrance – which provides such a good target. He also talked about the mentality of the perpetrators intent on mass carnage. This I find interesting – and maybe this is in the genes as my dad was a forensic psychiatrist and wrote a book The Mind of the Murderer’. The cases he saw were people with definite psychiatric diagnoses who usually committed multiple murders – like John George Haigh, psychopath and a sadist who murdered several people, then dissolved their bodies in sulfuric acid (I remember my mother went with my father to a talk by Stafford Clark, the forensic pathologist on the case, who had the job of examining the sludge of the dissolved bodies. She told of him reporting his excitement of the eureka moment

when human gall stones were found, proving these were the remains of a human body). American murderers seem to come in all shapes and sizes, Nieves noted – a grandfather, a middle aged woman biology professor (who shot members of the college board at a meeting when they denied her tenure), two kids (Mitchell Johnson age 13 and Andrew Golden aged 11) who pulled the fire alarm and shot up fellow pupils as they filtered out. He claimed they were just acting out a video game. The typical profile however is a young male, obsessed with guns, looking for fame, often with a history of substance abuse and often an alienated loners. He also noted the latest fashion seems to be murder/suicide. This may have been a very opportune presentation as there has been some nut who is disgruntled with the clinic, calling up to say he’s going to come get us. How to stop this happening is the obvious question. There is criticism of the press for dissecting every detail of every shooting incident ad-nauseam so any shooter is almost glorified. There’s the perennial debate about guns of course, which I shall not comment on other than to say a madman can do a whole lot more with a semiautomatic rifle than a knife, or even a hand gun. But “have a plan”, is the principal message Nieves told us.

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic.

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

21


Senior Care Joy to the (aging) World By Karl Karch Economic Research, retirement is likely to improve your overall happiness and health. The study found that life satisfaction improves immediately upon retirement. Measurable health outcomes are not immediate, but are positively impacted four or more years after retirement. And, the positive effects on wellbeing are long-lasting. So, ignore the fake news and look forward to retirement. I recently had a scary dream that the world was coming to an end. I probably am not the only one with scary or weird dreams with all the craziness, violence, threat of nuclear war, and other obscene, destructive, and negative news. It’s getting to the point that it’s too depressing to turn on the news, which is bad for a news junky like me. Speaking of news, we’ve all heard the term “fake news”. Well, fake news applies to aging as well. We all too often hear that getting old is miserable with declining physical and mental functioning. We hear numerous negative stereotypes and jokes associated with aging. Yes, decline is inevitable and affects each person differently. Regardless, it certainly beats the alternative. As a young adult, I remember hearing older people say they don’t want to retire because they wouldn’t know what to do, a false assumption. I now hear retirees saying there are not enough hours in the day to do all they want and are asked to do by various organizations. I also hear retirement will accelerate the decline of physical and mental well-being. Thankfully, research has proven that to be more fake news. According to a working paper published by the National Bureau of

Age is a state of mind. When greeted by someone who says, “It’s great to see you,” an acquaintance of mine who was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease would respond by saying “It’s great to be seen.” Knowing he had Alzheimer’s, he still felt happy to be alive. A retired veteran friend of mine said that whenever he whines about his aches and pains, his wife reminds him of those less fortunate who lost limbs fighting for our country, or who lost their lives during a church service or outdoor concert. We take so much for granted, don’t we? Many reading this may remember the cartoon strip Li’l Abner and the character Joe Btfsplk. He’s the one that always walked around with the rain cloud over his head. He was an outcast, lonely, unpopular, and perpetually gloomy. Nobody wanted to be around him. But remember, amidst all the dark clouds generated in the world lately, there are rays of sunshine. When you wake up, get out of bed, and see daylight, remind yourself that it’s great to be above ground and vertical. It beats the alternative. A friend of mine’s father once said, “You might as well be happy as the way you are.” I first heard that statement over forty years ago and will never forget it, especially when I get stressed out. It helps me bring life back into perspective. I’m especially mindful this time of year about the joy of aging. So, help bring joy to yourself and the world around you. Happy holiday season to all!!

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

20

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

Emancipated Patients

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

shooter defense

Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

It seems to me a sign of the times that the agenda at the recent Virginia Association of Free and Charitable Clinics that I just attended at Virginia Beach, included a presentation on ‘Active Threat Citizen’s Defense Training.’ This annual get-together of people from Moss and similar clinics around the state usually covers a bunch of clinical and administrative issues. This was a little different. A little scary. Master Police Officer David J. Nieves of the Virginia Beach police showed us videos of active shooters in shopping malls. Played the 911 recording of one of the teachers trapped in a school, being stalked by a gunman. Pretended to be a gunman himself and stalked us. He talked about defensive strategies like, whenever he goes out to eat with his kids, he always sits, back to the wall so he can see the entrance – and notes where the exits are. If you’re in a restaurant, remember, there’s always an exit through the kitchen. If you’re in a mall there’s usually a way out through the shops, rather than being part of the mass fighting to get out the main entrance – which provides such a good target. He also talked about the mentality of the perpetrators intent on mass carnage. This I find interesting – and maybe this is in the genes as my dad was a forensic psychiatrist and wrote a book The Mind of the Murderer’. The cases he saw were people with definite psychiatric diagnoses who usually committed multiple murders – like John George Haigh, psychopath and a sadist who murdered several people, then dissolved their bodies in sulfuric acid (I remember my mother went with my father to a talk by Stafford Clark, the forensic pathologist on the case, who had the job of examining the sludge of the dissolved bodies. She told of him reporting his excitement of the eureka moment

when human gall stones were found, proving these were the remains of a human body). American murderers seem to come in all shapes and sizes, Nieves noted – a grandfather, a middle aged woman biology professor (who shot members of the college board at a meeting when they denied her tenure), two kids (Mitchell Johnson age 13 and Andrew Golden aged 11) who pulled the fire alarm and shot up fellow pupils as they filtered out. He claimed they were just acting out a video game. The typical profile however is a young male, obsessed with guns, looking for fame, often with a history of substance abuse and often an alienated loners. He also noted the latest fashion seems to be murder/suicide. This may have been a very opportune presentation as there has been some nut who is disgruntled with the clinic, calling up to say he’s going to come get us. How to stop this happening is the obvious question. There is criticism of the press for dissecting every detail of every shooting incident ad-nauseam so any shooter is almost glorified. There’s the perennial debate about guns of course, which I shall not comment on other than to say a madman can do a whole lot more with a semiautomatic rifle than a knife, or even a hand gun. But “have a plan”, is the principal message Nieves told us.

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic.

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997 Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

21


Renew

Life in Motion

It’s All Energy

heal above, Down & inside out by Joan M. Geisler

eem tips to avoid holiday hiccup

Sarah & Claude Phillippy

by christina ferber

By rich gaudio, pt

“The way to stay healthy and young is a healthy mind and healthy spine.” That is the philosophy of J. P . Yurgel D.C. owner of Hands of Hope Chiropractic & Wellness Center, 2001 Lafayette Blvd across from Paul’s Bakery. “We need to listen to our body while it is ‘whispering’ before it starts to scream “PAIN!” , says Dr. Yurgel. Dr. Yurgel, has assembled a team, Naturopath -Unita Walburn, and Life Coach - Portia Bennett to heal you as a whole. “Our patients heal quicker because we treat the whole person and not just the symptoms,” Together they use the ‘Above, Down, Inside Out’ method of healing. Wisdom from God from above comes down to guide us to heal from the inside out. “The body has the natural ability to heal itself. When we align the physical, emotional and chemical aspects, then our body can begin to heal”, says Dr. Yurgel. “If a person has suffered a traumatic event, physical or emotional, they hold on to it until that ‘trauma’ finds its home in a weakness in the body and then manifests itself as ache, pain or disease.” He continues, “We really help people connect with themselves. We can only help those who are ready to put in the work to assist us in the process. We do not give out false hope that WE are

22

December 2017

the healers. We are facilitating the body’s natural capacity to heal ‘body, mind and soul.’ Dr. Yurgel specializes in BioGeometric Integration. He describes it like an onion with many layers to healing. Although he works with all ages, body types and backgrounds, Dr. JP loves assisting pregnant women and newborns. He helps the woman’s pelvic and sacrum to best facilitate natural child birth. Giving birth is traumatic for the baby too. While their bones are still ossified, it is the perfect time to assess the babies body for optimal alignment and function. Unita Walburn works with cancer patients to reclaim health during and after the course of treatment. “Trauma does not cause cancer, but research shows that along with external factors, smoking, poor eating, lack of exercise, environmental toxins, one’s emotional state such as anxiety, depression, uncontrolled anger, tragic childhood events, excessive grief can influence the risk of cancer. Unita uses Reflexology, nutrition, essential oils, herbs and many other tools to help patients heal. Portia Bennett has 20 years as a mental health counselor. Now as a Life Coach she focuses on the ‘Worried Well.’ “I help people get unstuck, to navigate the worried parts of their lives. I help them see the light at the end of the tunnel and encourage them to stay focused and on track to their dreams.” Portia’s passion is to empower teens who are NOT at risk, who are “good kids” that need someone safe and confidential to help them find ‘their voice.’ As a widowed mother of 2, she specializes in relationship coaching to help others rebuild. Read more of his treatments and services at handsofhopechiropractic.com or 540-369-3864. Phoenix Rising Health at phoenixrisinghealth.com or 540-8484347. Portia Bennett can be contacted at portia.bennett@portiabennett.com and 540-645-3582 As always, I am here to help you be Empowered to restore yourhealth. Contact me at 8020lifefitacademy.com

Front porch fredericksburg

Whether we are ready or not, the holiday season is upon us. That means seasonal parties, shopping, and outings may take up more of our time, and it can be easy to get off track both physically and emotionally. Eden Energy Medicine exercises can help us stay balanced throughout the month of December and help us stay on track in the new year. Try some of these techniques and see if they help you avoid any hiccups during the holiday season. Crowds, gatherings, and even family can add to feelings of overwhelm and make us feel off center, and it is important to stay grounded to avoid getting off balance. The Grounding Thump is a quick way to get back on track, and can also help relieve any feelings of worry. Simply tap on your cheekbones while taking two to three deep breaths. Taking Down the Flame can help us sleep better and lower blood pressure. Take a deep breath in and out with your hands on your thighs. On the next inhale, raise your hands on either side of your body and connect your fingers and thumbs above your head. Bring them down and touch the top of your head with your thumbs on an exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to the middle of your forehead, and exhale. As you continue this pattern of breathing, bring your thumbs to your heart, and then to your naval. On the next inhale, flatten your hands on your thighs and move them down your legs, and off your toes. Then trace your hands up the inside of your legs, finishing in the same spot you started. Holding points on your forehead, called the Main Neurovasculars, can also help us find a sense of calm. Simply hold your hand over your forehead and breathe. You can also try holding the back of your head at the same time, either directly behind your eyes or further down where your neck and head meet. Be sure to breathe and hold this as long as you like. It seems that December can often be a month of overindulging and as we partake in food and spirits, our body may have a tough time processing those things.

To help your body metabolize, try the Spleen Tap. Tap or rub the points on each side of your ribcage at the base of your ribs to activate the Spleen Meridian. Working your Ileocecal and Houston Valves can also help process what you take in and aid in digestion. Place both hands on your hip bones with your little fingers at the edges of them. With pressure, push in and drag your hands up about six or seven inches on a deep in-breath. Shake off your hands, and repeat this four more times. Finally, drag your thumbs downward from the waist to the hip bone. Oftentimes amid all the holiday hub-bub, we forget that this is supposed to be a season of joy. Heaven Rushing In is one technique that can help us tap into the real reason for the season. Place your hands on your thighs and take a few deep breaths to ground yourself. Raise your hands to your sides and over your head, touching your hands above it, and then bring them down to a prayer position in front of your chest. On the next deep breath, open your hands wide to the sky above your head and stay there as long as you need to. When you are ready, bring your hands to your heart and breathe knowing that all is well and you have all that you need. Happy Holidays!

If you have the occasion to meet Sarah and Claude Phillippy in the grocery store or in a small shop in downtown Fredericksburg, we could predict at least one thought that would cross your mind: ‘they are like peanut butter and jelly, they are something special when they’re together!’ As we have gotten to know Sara and Claude, over the months at Fusion PT, we have learned how important it is for them to lead a healthier lifestyle. “We got married, now have adult children and a handful of grandchildren. They are an active bunch, and we want to keep up with them as much as possible. We look around and see plenty of folks who are unable to do the things they used to. They miss the ‘good stuff,’ the time with family, and that’s what is most important to us. Being with them and doing things together, that is the legacy we want for our family.”

Sarah and Claude were high school sweethearts from Harrisonburg. He worked for the telephone company for years, she worked at a doctor’s office. They raised two beautiful girls, Teresa and Cindy, both of whom have blossomed into strong women who juggle the delicate balance of being professionals and a family cornerstone of mother/wife in their respective families. During the season of life when they were raising the girls and working, Sarah and Claude admit they did not give much thought to their own health or aging in a healthy manner. “We just did what needed to be done at the time to take care of family,” Sarah clarifies. Digging in a little more, it became apparent that Claude worked a laborintensive job and Sarah’s style of home management had its roots well established in the traditions of Appalachian-America; including slow-cooking, utilizing locally

grown food (meat and vegetables) and establishing a balance of work and rest. These were not principles that they read about in some magazine and decided to adopt into their world…it was the way it had been done in the past, and they wanted to carry it forward. This is not to say that they did not enjoy the benefits of modern conveniences, but that there was a balance of old and new…a challenging juggle for many parents trying to raise families today! As the girls grew and went out on their own, Sarah and Claude began to learn and become more knowledgeable about how food is being produced in our country. They watched neighbors, friends and family become overwhelmed with onset of various chronic diseases and they started to think smarter. They realized that the fuel we put in our bodies matters; that our bodies are made for moving and we need to keep them moving; and they learned that relationships matter – they are some of the most precious resources we have on earth. In their time at Fusion,

the rehab, training and exercise that Sarah and Claude have done has made that precious time with family a little easier for them! We thank Sarah and Claude for their willingness to talk about their life experience and allowing us to share it with the Front Porch readership. We celebrate Sarah and Claude, and the dozens of others we’ve met at Fusion who have similar stories to tell. We thank everyone that has been on the journey with us in 2017 and look forward to an exciting 2018! Please have a Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a blessed 2018 from all of us at Fusion Physical Therapy Spotsylvania!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, He can be reached several ways: 540.710.0100; Rich@fusionpta.com www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy www.fusionpta.com

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more twww.itsallenergywellness.com

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

23


Renew

Life in Motion

It’s All Energy

heal above, Down & inside out by Joan M. Geisler

eem tips to avoid holiday hiccup

Sarah & Claude Phillippy

by christina ferber

By rich gaudio, pt

“The way to stay healthy and young is a healthy mind and healthy spine.” That is the philosophy of J. P . Yurgel D.C. owner of Hands of Hope Chiropractic & Wellness Center, 2001 Lafayette Blvd across from Paul’s Bakery. “We need to listen to our body while it is ‘whispering’ before it starts to scream “PAIN!” , says Dr. Yurgel. Dr. Yurgel, has assembled a team, Naturopath -Unita Walburn, and Life Coach - Portia Bennett to heal you as a whole. “Our patients heal quicker because we treat the whole person and not just the symptoms,” Together they use the ‘Above, Down, Inside Out’ method of healing. Wisdom from God from above comes down to guide us to heal from the inside out. “The body has the natural ability to heal itself. When we align the physical, emotional and chemical aspects, then our body can begin to heal”, says Dr. Yurgel. “If a person has suffered a traumatic event, physical or emotional, they hold on to it until that ‘trauma’ finds its home in a weakness in the body and then manifests itself as ache, pain or disease.” He continues, “We really help people connect with themselves. We can only help those who are ready to put in the work to assist us in the process. We do not give out false hope that WE are

22

December 2017

the healers. We are facilitating the body’s natural capacity to heal ‘body, mind and soul.’ Dr. Yurgel specializes in BioGeometric Integration. He describes it like an onion with many layers to healing. Although he works with all ages, body types and backgrounds, Dr. JP loves assisting pregnant women and newborns. He helps the woman’s pelvic and sacrum to best facilitate natural child birth. Giving birth is traumatic for the baby too. While their bones are still ossified, it is the perfect time to assess the babies body for optimal alignment and function. Unita Walburn works with cancer patients to reclaim health during and after the course of treatment. “Trauma does not cause cancer, but research shows that along with external factors, smoking, poor eating, lack of exercise, environmental toxins, one’s emotional state such as anxiety, depression, uncontrolled anger, tragic childhood events, excessive grief can influence the risk of cancer. Unita uses Reflexology, nutrition, essential oils, herbs and many other tools to help patients heal. Portia Bennett has 20 years as a mental health counselor. Now as a Life Coach she focuses on the ‘Worried Well.’ “I help people get unstuck, to navigate the worried parts of their lives. I help them see the light at the end of the tunnel and encourage them to stay focused and on track to their dreams.” Portia’s passion is to empower teens who are NOT at risk, who are “good kids” that need someone safe and confidential to help them find ‘their voice.’ As a widowed mother of 2, she specializes in relationship coaching to help others rebuild. Read more of his treatments and services at handsofhopechiropractic.com or 540-369-3864. Phoenix Rising Health at phoenixrisinghealth.com or 540-8484347. Portia Bennett can be contacted at portia.bennett@portiabennett.com and 540-645-3582 As always, I am here to help you be Empowered to restore yourhealth. Contact me at 8020lifefitacademy.com

Front porch fredericksburg

Whether we are ready or not, the holiday season is upon us. That means seasonal parties, shopping, and outings may take up more of our time, and it can be easy to get off track both physically and emotionally. Eden Energy Medicine exercises can help us stay balanced throughout the month of December and help us stay on track in the new year. Try some of these techniques and see if they help you avoid any hiccups during the holiday season. Crowds, gatherings, and even family can add to feelings of overwhelm and make us feel off center, and it is important to stay grounded to avoid getting off balance. The Grounding Thump is a quick way to get back on track, and can also help relieve any feelings of worry. Simply tap on your cheekbones while taking two to three deep breaths. Taking Down the Flame can help us sleep better and lower blood pressure. Take a deep breath in and out with your hands on your thighs. On the next inhale, raise your hands on either side of your body and connect your fingers and thumbs above your head. Bring them down and touch the top of your head with your thumbs on an exhale. Inhale and bring your thumbs to the middle of your forehead, and exhale. As you continue this pattern of breathing, bring your thumbs to your heart, and then to your naval. On the next inhale, flatten your hands on your thighs and move them down your legs, and off your toes. Then trace your hands up the inside of your legs, finishing in the same spot you started. Holding points on your forehead, called the Main Neurovasculars, can also help us find a sense of calm. Simply hold your hand over your forehead and breathe. You can also try holding the back of your head at the same time, either directly behind your eyes or further down where your neck and head meet. Be sure to breathe and hold this as long as you like. It seems that December can often be a month of overindulging and as we partake in food and spirits, our body may have a tough time processing those things.

To help your body metabolize, try the Spleen Tap. Tap or rub the points on each side of your ribcage at the base of your ribs to activate the Spleen Meridian. Working your Ileocecal and Houston Valves can also help process what you take in and aid in digestion. Place both hands on your hip bones with your little fingers at the edges of them. With pressure, push in and drag your hands up about six or seven inches on a deep in-breath. Shake off your hands, and repeat this four more times. Finally, drag your thumbs downward from the waist to the hip bone. Oftentimes amid all the holiday hub-bub, we forget that this is supposed to be a season of joy. Heaven Rushing In is one technique that can help us tap into the real reason for the season. Place your hands on your thighs and take a few deep breaths to ground yourself. Raise your hands to your sides and over your head, touching your hands above it, and then bring them down to a prayer position in front of your chest. On the next deep breath, open your hands wide to the sky above your head and stay there as long as you need to. When you are ready, bring your hands to your heart and breathe knowing that all is well and you have all that you need. Happy Holidays!

If you have the occasion to meet Sarah and Claude Phillippy in the grocery store or in a small shop in downtown Fredericksburg, we could predict at least one thought that would cross your mind: ‘they are like peanut butter and jelly, they are something special when they’re together!’ As we have gotten to know Sara and Claude, over the months at Fusion PT, we have learned how important it is for them to lead a healthier lifestyle. “We got married, now have adult children and a handful of grandchildren. They are an active bunch, and we want to keep up with them as much as possible. We look around and see plenty of folks who are unable to do the things they used to. They miss the ‘good stuff,’ the time with family, and that’s what is most important to us. Being with them and doing things together, that is the legacy we want for our family.”

Sarah and Claude were high school sweethearts from Harrisonburg. He worked for the telephone company for years, she worked at a doctor’s office. They raised two beautiful girls, Teresa and Cindy, both of whom have blossomed into strong women who juggle the delicate balance of being professionals and a family cornerstone of mother/wife in their respective families. During the season of life when they were raising the girls and working, Sarah and Claude admit they did not give much thought to their own health or aging in a healthy manner. “We just did what needed to be done at the time to take care of family,” Sarah clarifies. Digging in a little more, it became apparent that Claude worked a laborintensive job and Sarah’s style of home management had its roots well established in the traditions of Appalachian-America; including slow-cooking, utilizing locally

grown food (meat and vegetables) and establishing a balance of work and rest. These were not principles that they read about in some magazine and decided to adopt into their world…it was the way it had been done in the past, and they wanted to carry it forward. This is not to say that they did not enjoy the benefits of modern conveniences, but that there was a balance of old and new…a challenging juggle for many parents trying to raise families today! As the girls grew and went out on their own, Sarah and Claude began to learn and become more knowledgeable about how food is being produced in our country. They watched neighbors, friends and family become overwhelmed with onset of various chronic diseases and they started to think smarter. They realized that the fuel we put in our bodies matters; that our bodies are made for moving and we need to keep them moving; and they learned that relationships matter – they are some of the most precious resources we have on earth. In their time at Fusion,

the rehab, training and exercise that Sarah and Claude have done has made that precious time with family a little easier for them! We thank Sarah and Claude for their willingness to talk about their life experience and allowing us to share it with the Front Porch readership. We celebrate Sarah and Claude, and the dozens of others we’ve met at Fusion who have similar stories to tell. We thank everyone that has been on the journey with us in 2017 and look forward to an exciting 2018! Please have a Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a blessed 2018 from all of us at Fusion Physical Therapy Spotsylvania!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy, He can be reached several ways: 540.710.0100; Rich@fusionpta.com www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy www.fusionpta.com

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more twww.itsallenergywellness.com

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

23


Art in the Burg

Stories

of fredericksburg

Moss Free Clinic helped by elves

Florence Ridderhof

by lou gramann Gaglio thinks her print of Sammy T’s is appropriate for the location. Ala Christmas style, Aileen Campbell, a member of the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild, made a pair of old fashioned “handcranked” socks to hang in the show. Helen Schwartz and Lee Cochrane of Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts eagerly offered their skills. Both are members of the Fredericksburg Photography Club. Founded in 1993, Lloyd F. Moss Free Clinic provides comprehensive medical, mental health, and dental “Sammy T’s”, Stacy Gaglio care, as well as non-narcotic No one would be surprised to prescriptions. It’s a community effort learn that generous local artists are supported by many hours of service from donating their efforts to help the Lloyd F. area doctors, nurses, dentists and other Moss Free Clinic. Painters, print-makers, weavers medical professionals, and volunteers are Lisa Mugavero, and photographers might not consider crucial to its success. Marketing and Special Events Coordinator, themselves “elves” most of the year, but noted that for every $1 donated, $14 of over 35 local artists could not resist the healthcare service is provided. call to help a deserving cause. The Clinic’s Information about volunteering mission is to provide “quality heathcare can be found at www.mossfreeclinic.org delivered in an atmosphere of dignity and “Licensed health care professionals are respect,” without charge, to low-income, needed to provide primary and specialty uninsured people. care,” emailed Mugavero. Nonmedical volunteers are “essential in assisting staff with day-to-day operations of the Clinic.” Karen Executive Director Dulaney expresses gratitude for both staff and volunteers at the Clinic. “Committed staff help power the mission of delivering compassionate, quality care. However, volunteerism and partnerships in our community are the keys to our success,” she emailed. “We are grateful to Sammy T’s and to all of the “Mississippi Flower Market”, Leah Fromer talented artists who are contributing to this fundraising The benefit art show is hanging effort.” Event organizers expect at Sammy T’s Restaurant during December to be a busy month for benefit December and January. Members of the public can “Buy it Now” and take their sales, combining an initial excitement with purchases home, with 100% of the the gift-giving season. Artwork is not auctioned, but is sold “right off the walls.” proceeds going to the Clinic. Sold items will be removed and replaced Gloria Affernit of Art First Gallery wanted to participate immediately. by new offerings throughout the sale. She knew about the Clinic’s goals from Additional donations from artists are fellow parishioner Dr. Nicholas Harding, a welcome through January 5th by Clinic volunteer. Painters Ed King, Barbara Perry and Chuck Fromer of LibertyTown Arts Workshop all recognized the Clinic’s reputation. Over a dozen artists from the gallery donated. As their colleague Ruth Ann Loving said, “No one ever knows when they’re going to need help in life.” Artists chose donations with care. Brush Strokes Gallery member Stacy

24

December 2017

contacting clinic.artshow@gmail.com In the art community, Jen Galvin at Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts spoke for many: “If my artwork can help, then I’m all for it. People should not be allowed to fall through the cracks.” Lou Gramann is a volunteer on this project but has no artistic talent. If she did, she would donate, too.

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Florence Ridderhof has been working with the homeless for around 20 years in the Fredericksburg area. Florence was on the task force when Micah was first starting. She would help brainstorm what the needs of the homeless in our area were. She also served as Fredericksburg United Methodist Church’s representative on the Micah board as a member and as the chair, then she started working at Micah’s Hospitality Center at the front desk when it first opened. Now you can find Florence answering clients' many questions at the Micah Journey office every Thursday. "Before Micah, there was a big need - we started serving the homeless in the churches. I didn’t want people to be freezing to death or have nowhere to put their heads, so I just started helping with it. And at one time we would actually take turns staying all night. We would put all these cots down, check them in,

and they would stay in all the Sunday school rooms throughout the church. At the end of the week you had a team go in, clear them out, and move them onto the next church. It has really been a learning experience not only for the people we work with, but for us too to see the changes and to see how we have helped the homeless get back on their feet. Most of them really want to work. I know people characterize the homeless as ‘they’re lazy, they won’t do anything’ and that’s just not true. You cannot generalize. They’re each different. They’re people and they’re individuals. I used to drive some of the homeless people to their radiation and other appointments and I’ve gone to services when they have died. I believe in what Micah does and I believe in keeping Micah here in the city because then the homeless people can walk here. I mean, there were people who lived right on the other side of the river next to route 17 and they would walk here every day just to come in and take a shower and be taken care of. I live here in town and we’ll wave at each other. I’ve seen Micah clients different places and we always stop and chat.”

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 922 Grove Ave. The Winner of a Roxbury Farm & Garden Center Gift Certificate is Debbie Loveland

Glory What is it you do to my soul, when I gaze into your windows dark, yet life still lives within, as I feel the warm pulse still. For 200 years and more, you have gazed across the river, at the tiny little city, where people linger still. The floods of time and great waters, have covered you so completely, as one day a mighty Agnes came, and I saw your beautiful chimneys barely alive. I was a "Newbie" then, to this.Burg of ours, and did not know your name. The slaves of old loved you like a father, safety within your sturdy walls, and the basement deep within. Stand tall as you always have, with your bravest of hearts. Rest easy with your loving caretaker, who faithfully dwells within.

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish Beverley Coates Feature Show in Nov. @ Brush Strokes Gallery Daily hours 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

25


Art in the Burg

Stories

of fredericksburg

Moss Free Clinic helped by elves

Florence Ridderhof

by lou gramann Gaglio thinks her print of Sammy T’s is appropriate for the location. Ala Christmas style, Aileen Campbell, a member of the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild, made a pair of old fashioned “handcranked” socks to hang in the show. Helen Schwartz and Lee Cochrane of Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts eagerly offered their skills. Both are members of the Fredericksburg Photography Club. Founded in 1993, Lloyd F. Moss Free Clinic provides comprehensive medical, mental health, and dental “Sammy T’s”, Stacy Gaglio care, as well as non-narcotic No one would be surprised to prescriptions. It’s a community effort learn that generous local artists are supported by many hours of service from donating their efforts to help the Lloyd F. area doctors, nurses, dentists and other Moss Free Clinic. Painters, print-makers, weavers medical professionals, and volunteers are Lisa Mugavero, and photographers might not consider crucial to its success. Marketing and Special Events Coordinator, themselves “elves” most of the year, but noted that for every $1 donated, $14 of over 35 local artists could not resist the healthcare service is provided. call to help a deserving cause. The Clinic’s Information about volunteering mission is to provide “quality heathcare can be found at www.mossfreeclinic.org delivered in an atmosphere of dignity and “Licensed health care professionals are respect,” without charge, to low-income, needed to provide primary and specialty uninsured people. care,” emailed Mugavero. Nonmedical volunteers are “essential in assisting staff with day-to-day operations of the Clinic.” Karen Executive Director Dulaney expresses gratitude for both staff and volunteers at the Clinic. “Committed staff help power the mission of delivering compassionate, quality care. However, volunteerism and partnerships in our community are the keys to our success,” she emailed. “We are grateful to Sammy T’s and to all of the “Mississippi Flower Market”, Leah Fromer talented artists who are contributing to this fundraising The benefit art show is hanging effort.” Event organizers expect at Sammy T’s Restaurant during December to be a busy month for benefit December and January. Members of the public can “Buy it Now” and take their sales, combining an initial excitement with purchases home, with 100% of the the gift-giving season. Artwork is not auctioned, but is sold “right off the walls.” proceeds going to the Clinic. Sold items will be removed and replaced Gloria Affernit of Art First Gallery wanted to participate immediately. by new offerings throughout the sale. She knew about the Clinic’s goals from Additional donations from artists are fellow parishioner Dr. Nicholas Harding, a welcome through January 5th by Clinic volunteer. Painters Ed King, Barbara Perry and Chuck Fromer of LibertyTown Arts Workshop all recognized the Clinic’s reputation. Over a dozen artists from the gallery donated. As their colleague Ruth Ann Loving said, “No one ever knows when they’re going to need help in life.” Artists chose donations with care. Brush Strokes Gallery member Stacy

24

December 2017

contacting clinic.artshow@gmail.com In the art community, Jen Galvin at Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts spoke for many: “If my artwork can help, then I’m all for it. People should not be allowed to fall through the cracks.” Lou Gramann is a volunteer on this project but has no artistic talent. If she did, she would donate, too.

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Florence Ridderhof has been working with the homeless for around 20 years in the Fredericksburg area. Florence was on the task force when Micah was first starting. She would help brainstorm what the needs of the homeless in our area were. She also served as Fredericksburg United Methodist Church’s representative on the Micah board as a member and as the chair, then she started working at Micah’s Hospitality Center at the front desk when it first opened. Now you can find Florence answering clients' many questions at the Micah Journey office every Thursday. "Before Micah, there was a big need - we started serving the homeless in the churches. I didn’t want people to be freezing to death or have nowhere to put their heads, so I just started helping with it. And at one time we would actually take turns staying all night. We would put all these cots down, check them in,

and they would stay in all the Sunday school rooms throughout the church. At the end of the week you had a team go in, clear them out, and move them onto the next church. It has really been a learning experience not only for the people we work with, but for us too to see the changes and to see how we have helped the homeless get back on their feet. Most of them really want to work. I know people characterize the homeless as ‘they’re lazy, they won’t do anything’ and that’s just not true. You cannot generalize. They’re each different. They’re people and they’re individuals. I used to drive some of the homeless people to their radiation and other appointments and I’ve gone to services when they have died. I believe in what Micah does and I believe in keeping Micah here in the city because then the homeless people can walk here. I mean, there were people who lived right on the other side of the river next to route 17 and they would walk here every day just to come in and take a shower and be taken care of. I live here in town and we’ll wave at each other. I’ve seen Micah clients different places and we always stop and chat.”

win downtown gift certificate Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 922 Grove Ave. The Winner of a Roxbury Farm & Garden Center Gift Certificate is Debbie Loveland

Glory What is it you do to my soul, when I gaze into your windows dark, yet life still lives within, as I feel the warm pulse still. For 200 years and more, you have gazed across the river, at the tiny little city, where people linger still. The floods of time and great waters, have covered you so completely, as one day a mighty Agnes came, and I saw your beautiful chimneys barely alive. I was a "Newbie" then, to this.Burg of ours, and did not know your name. The slaves of old loved you like a father, safety within your sturdy walls, and the basement deep within. Stand tall as you always have, with your bravest of hearts. Rest easy with your loving caretaker, who faithfully dwells within.

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish Beverley Coates Feature Show in Nov. @ Brush Strokes Gallery Daily hours 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

25


Joey Frye Perspective is everything By A.E. Bayne

The sign hanging behind Joey Frye’s display at a recent local arts festival reads “ARTism” with the slogan, “Ideas Transformed into Magical Art for You and Other Awesome People.” When chatting with Frye, that same sense of wonderment glosses his words, wonder at the reception his illustrations have received over the past two years, wonder at the condition he views as a gift, and wonder at the impact his work has had on his patrons. In 2015, Joey Frye fell ill with

“Crab-C Cake” Type 1 Diabetes. He and his family felt the weight of this diagnosis keenly, as he had been living with Asperger Syndrome all of his life, and this seemed yet another complication on his road toward independence. When a friend of Frye’s mother learned of his illness, she commissioned a piece of art from him to lift his spirits. Frye, an avid illustrator, gladly accepted the job and discovered that his unique perspective through

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997 26

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Aspergers made for compelling artwork. ARTism was born, an enterprise that has earned Frye accolades and an ever-growing audience of patrons in the Fredericksburg region. Frye’s extremely literal compound illustrations translate to surreal worlds on paper through imagery that creates just enough visual disonance to give pause to the viewer. The results are humorous, whimsical, and sometimes dark. He says, “I see words very literally, so when I hear compound words, the image from those words are exactly as they are in life. Take my character “crab cake.” I see a cake, and it is a sea crab. It wouldn’t taste very good, but people think it is funny. Another is “shrimp cocktail,” a shrimp with a rooster head holding a beverage. I do a lot of fun stuff like that, but I also do dark and sad things. I have had commissions to remember young people who have died, and the people I make them for weep when they see them. Those are really hard ones. I guess I try to take the three or four things people love and make a memory for them.” Frye considers his Asperger syndrome a tool and a gift. He says, “I see things that other people can’t see. I am also spiritual and believe it is a gift for me to be able to see stuff the way I do.” Most recently, Frye was the featured rising artist at the Caledon State Park Art and Wine Festival, and he has been working on a series of illustrated books called The Adventures of Book and Wine that are geared toward adult readers. Frye is also considering ideas for children’s books, as he would like to parlay his artwork into publishing in the future. He would like to meet others with autism

and possibly collaborate on written or art projects with them. Frye’s mother, Caroline, notes that he has little idea of the impact he makes on people with his personal attention to their stories and his visual truthtelling. As for Frye, he says he gets

COUNTY ARTISTS

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

“Daydream-N Nightmare” great pleasure from the measure of joy his illustrations bring to his patrons. “My artwork makes people happy and that is a big deal to me. I love to bring people joy, and I work hard on the details to make happy memories for them. I hope to make my gift my life’s work, because that would be lovely.” Follow Joey Frye @ARTism by Joey on Facebook for a peek at his most recent work and endeavors. Read more about Frye and other talented regional artists and writers in the fall edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review in December. A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and educator who publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

Is it in their blood?

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

By Mary Geil The Hite Family of Caroline County has a number of creative members. There are four Hites in this generation who share the art passion. Is it in their blood or just coincidence? Cousins Alan and Eva are featured in this article.

photography and was another encourager along his journey. J. Shelby Guss allowed him the use of his home darkroom. He learned much about color and texture in conversations with Johnny P. Johnson.

Alan lives in Caroline County. For as long as he can remember, he wanted to be a photographer. “I first remember having a point and shoot camera…very basic…around the age of 9.” he recollects. Alan grew up and attended schools in Caroline County. According to Alan, “There were no photography classes when I came through high school. I was a reader, however, and it was reading A Choice of Weapons by Gordon Parks in 1965 that really got me to thinking about the power of the photographic image.”

Mr. Hite, as he was known to many students during his 32 years teaching in the Caroline County Public Schools. Now in retirement, he pursues his photography passion as a free-lance photographer. Along with

In college, Alan was encouraged by Masaaki Okada, a friend and photographer with The Richmond Times Dispatch. Wilbur J. Chance, a principal in the Caroline County Schools when Alan started his teaching career, enjoyed

doing portraits, landscapes, seascapes, and botanical works he does documentary work featuring his home county of Caroline. At Classic Cottage Art & Antiques in Bowling Green, Virginia, he sells prints, matted and mounted prints, canvas wraps, and greeting cards featuring his photography. His photography page on Facebook is "Alan Hite Photographics," and his blog and galleries of his work can be http://calanfound at: hite.squarespace.com. He started a former student’s project in 2016, and I was one of the former students who participated. This project is ongoing. If you are a former student of his, feel free to contact him to be included.

intrigued Eva. During high school, she was further motivated and inspired by teachers, Dianne Staples and Marcia Lewis. According to Eva, “One of the best things to happen to me was when Dianne bought a stained glass piece from me.” Eva now lives in Richmond, Virginia, where she has her studio. As long as she can remember she has painted and drawn. Over the last ten years, she committed to drawing every day. This dedication has paid off in many ways and developed her creativity in more areas. She creates stained glass pieces, mosaics and other art forms. Many of the art pieces are created using recycled materials. She also demonstrates her creativity through backyard gardening. In 2017, I had the pleasure of participating in a mosaic art workshop that she led. Her art work can be viewed at Eva Hite Art Page on Facebook or www.evahiteartpage.com. Her inventory varies from time to time, but her stained glass dragonflies are popular.

Mary Geil grew up in Caroline County and now lives in Spotsylvania. Photos by Alan Hite

Eva Hite’s last stop in her career was at the Virginia Department of Social Services. She is now retired and immersed in her creative art. She describes herself as a “muse follower, dream chaser, easy go lucky multi-media artist.” She is pictured with one of her creations that she calls Garden Man. Eva was also raised in Caroline County. Her mother was a selftaught artist who painted with oils which

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

27


Joey Frye Perspective is everything By A.E. Bayne

The sign hanging behind Joey Frye’s display at a recent local arts festival reads “ARTism” with the slogan, “Ideas Transformed into Magical Art for You and Other Awesome People.” When chatting with Frye, that same sense of wonderment glosses his words, wonder at the reception his illustrations have received over the past two years, wonder at the condition he views as a gift, and wonder at the impact his work has had on his patrons. In 2015, Joey Frye fell ill with

“Crab-C Cake” Type 1 Diabetes. He and his family felt the weight of this diagnosis keenly, as he had been living with Asperger Syndrome all of his life, and this seemed yet another complication on his road toward independence. When a friend of Frye’s mother learned of his illness, she commissioned a piece of art from him to lift his spirits. Frye, an avid illustrator, gladly accepted the job and discovered that his unique perspective through

Supporting Local Authors/Writers Since 1997 26

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Aspergers made for compelling artwork. ARTism was born, an enterprise that has earned Frye accolades and an ever-growing audience of patrons in the Fredericksburg region. Frye’s extremely literal compound illustrations translate to surreal worlds on paper through imagery that creates just enough visual disonance to give pause to the viewer. The results are humorous, whimsical, and sometimes dark. He says, “I see words very literally, so when I hear compound words, the image from those words are exactly as they are in life. Take my character “crab cake.” I see a cake, and it is a sea crab. It wouldn’t taste very good, but people think it is funny. Another is “shrimp cocktail,” a shrimp with a rooster head holding a beverage. I do a lot of fun stuff like that, but I also do dark and sad things. I have had commissions to remember young people who have died, and the people I make them for weep when they see them. Those are really hard ones. I guess I try to take the three or four things people love and make a memory for them.” Frye considers his Asperger syndrome a tool and a gift. He says, “I see things that other people can’t see. I am also spiritual and believe it is a gift for me to be able to see stuff the way I do.” Most recently, Frye was the featured rising artist at the Caledon State Park Art and Wine Festival, and he has been working on a series of illustrated books called The Adventures of Book and Wine that are geared toward adult readers. Frye is also considering ideas for children’s books, as he would like to parlay his artwork into publishing in the future. He would like to meet others with autism

and possibly collaborate on written or art projects with them. Frye’s mother, Caroline, notes that he has little idea of the impact he makes on people with his personal attention to their stories and his visual truthtelling. As for Frye, he says he gets

COUNTY ARTISTS

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

“Daydream-N Nightmare” great pleasure from the measure of joy his illustrations bring to his patrons. “My artwork makes people happy and that is a big deal to me. I love to bring people joy, and I work hard on the details to make happy memories for them. I hope to make my gift my life’s work, because that would be lovely.” Follow Joey Frye @ARTism by Joey on Facebook for a peek at his most recent work and endeavors. Read more about Frye and other talented regional artists and writers in the fall edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review in December. A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and educator who publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival.

Is it in their blood?

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

By Mary Geil The Hite Family of Caroline County has a number of creative members. There are four Hites in this generation who share the art passion. Is it in their blood or just coincidence? Cousins Alan and Eva are featured in this article.

photography and was another encourager along his journey. J. Shelby Guss allowed him the use of his home darkroom. He learned much about color and texture in conversations with Johnny P. Johnson.

Alan lives in Caroline County. For as long as he can remember, he wanted to be a photographer. “I first remember having a point and shoot camera…very basic…around the age of 9.” he recollects. Alan grew up and attended schools in Caroline County. According to Alan, “There were no photography classes when I came through high school. I was a reader, however, and it was reading A Choice of Weapons by Gordon Parks in 1965 that really got me to thinking about the power of the photographic image.”

Mr. Hite, as he was known to many students during his 32 years teaching in the Caroline County Public Schools. Now in retirement, he pursues his photography passion as a free-lance photographer. Along with

In college, Alan was encouraged by Masaaki Okada, a friend and photographer with The Richmond Times Dispatch. Wilbur J. Chance, a principal in the Caroline County Schools when Alan started his teaching career, enjoyed

doing portraits, landscapes, seascapes, and botanical works he does documentary work featuring his home county of Caroline. At Classic Cottage Art & Antiques in Bowling Green, Virginia, he sells prints, matted and mounted prints, canvas wraps, and greeting cards featuring his photography. His photography page on Facebook is "Alan Hite Photographics," and his blog and galleries of his work can be http://calanfound at: hite.squarespace.com. He started a former student’s project in 2016, and I was one of the former students who participated. This project is ongoing. If you are a former student of his, feel free to contact him to be included.

intrigued Eva. During high school, she was further motivated and inspired by teachers, Dianne Staples and Marcia Lewis. According to Eva, “One of the best things to happen to me was when Dianne bought a stained glass piece from me.” Eva now lives in Richmond, Virginia, where she has her studio. As long as she can remember she has painted and drawn. Over the last ten years, she committed to drawing every day. This dedication has paid off in many ways and developed her creativity in more areas. She creates stained glass pieces, mosaics and other art forms. Many of the art pieces are created using recycled materials. She also demonstrates her creativity through backyard gardening. In 2017, I had the pleasure of participating in a mosaic art workshop that she led. Her art work can be viewed at Eva Hite Art Page on Facebook or www.evahiteartpage.com. Her inventory varies from time to time, but her stained glass dragonflies are popular.

Mary Geil grew up in Caroline County and now lives in Spotsylvania. Photos by Alan Hite

Eva Hite’s last stop in her career was at the Virginia Department of Social Services. She is now retired and immersed in her creative art. She describes herself as a “muse follower, dream chaser, easy go lucky multi-media artist.” She is pictured with one of her creations that she calls Garden Man. Eva was also raised in Caroline County. Her mother was a selftaught artist who painted with oils which

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

27


Companions Compassion during the holidays

By candice armstrong awareness about the importance of spay/neuter, to donate food, toys and bedding, and to volunteer their time for this cause. This year, in partnership with the Spotsylvania Department of Social Services, FredSPCA is teaming up with their Holiday Hope Program that provides assistance to residents in need during the festive season. We will be providing goody bags for families with pets who receive assistance through Holiday Hope, with items donated to our Pet Pantry Program. Community residents may sign up for our Pet Pantry Program at any time of the

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

receives national recognition

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

“Lucille”, 8.5 yrs old, friendly, confident, affectionate year, and as long as they meet income requirements, we provide assistance for up to five animals per household one time each month. We are so excited to extend the reach of our Pet Pantry to reach families in need during the holidays! Candi Armstrong, MSW isthe Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at Fredericksburg Regional SPCA. She can be reached at 540-898-1500x17

540-898-0737

It is quite well known by most, or becomes known rather quickly to the newly residing, Fredericksburg is blossoming with artistic talent in many mediums. The talent is well loved and fostered by the intimate community member, such as you, dear reader. Many are the diamonds in rough, and it is always a treasure to see a new diamond arise. Izzy James has lived in King George County, Virginia since 1999. After raising three children and working in geographic sciences, she decided to pursue her lifelong dream and heart felt passion for writing. “I have dabbled in writing all of my life, and I, of course, love to read. But, it wasn’t until my twin children were in college that I had the time to pursue a creative writing career. I didn’t have the time consistently available before to be creative, let alone write seriously and with discipline.” Izzy James brings a unique cozy

“Kai” 3 yrs old, playful, loving, & good with other dogs, alongside law enforcement officials. We’ve all read stories about animals saving the lives of small children in emergency situations, or helping alert families of impending dangers in time to get to safety. By caring about the livelihood of animals, our organization is also caring about the livelihood of people - they are truly one in the same. It takes people to save the animals, to rescue them from an untimely fate on the streets, to raise

28

December 2017

Helping homeless children and “Isabelle”, 1yr old, Hurricane Harvey Survivor, friendly & playful

Front porch fredericksburg

Cancer Journal this must be spring! by rim vining

By Ashleigh Chevalier

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

“Mickey”, 4 yrs old, happy-g go-llucky, friendly & lovable At FredSPCA, we believe that compassion starts here - it’s our motto! Even though the focus of our mission is obviously to save the lives of animals, we believe that compassion for our furry friends is closely related to compassion for human beings. For so many of us, our pets bring us joy, comfort, and happiness, at least. For some, service animals alter the course of their life, increasing their ability to live and work independently. Animals help keep our communities safe

Izzy James

families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

and imaginative voice to her warmly romantic tales. Her faith inspired stories are accessible and easily loved by many, as confirmed by her second novella, The Christmas Gift. Izzy James won the prestigious Maggie Award in 2016 for Best Romantic Novella, as judged by librarians and book sellers. James’ romantic holiday tale competed against submissions from around the world. This brought popularity to her first Christian romance novel, Finding Boaz. But perhaps the most exciting news is James’ 2017 second place award in The Lonestar Contest, following her fourth place award in Wisconsin Fab Five. These contests are hosted by different national and state chapters of the contemporary association The Romance Writers of America, or RWA. The awards earn James street credentials as a competitive contender for publication, all the while earning her badges of honor as an independent author in her own right, with or without a major league publishing deal. Izzy James is at this point an independent author competing in the Christian and secular market, winning readers from across the nation. James’ Christian based writing is not meant to be evangelical, but to carry on stories of hope, forgiveness, and redemption that serve as a reminder to the hope, forgiveness, and redemption she believes is given by Jesus Christ. She feels sweet love stories offer a positive opportunity to encourage the heart. Her upcoming Christmas novella, The Christmas Plain Song, renders a classic tale anew with restored love. James explores the later life of Charles Dicken’s famed character Ebenezer Scrooge after his change of heart that enchanted Christmas eve. Scrooge loved a woman once. Could a young love be reclaimed decades later? The Christmas Plain Song will be released in December 2017. This and James’ other two works are available digitally and in paperback from Amazon, iBooks, SmashWords, KoBo, and Barnes & Noble. You can follow Izzy James and her blog at ECHull.com and on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Twitter. Happy Holidays, ya scrooges.

This December sure doesn’t feel like the end of a year. Having lost the summer to a steady stream of tests and treatments and having chemo-brain in control of most of the fall I am pretty sure this must be spring! I’ve already had all the presents one man can imagine so it can’t be Christmas, right? It feels more like spring! Since we have to write in “deadline time” I have the freedom to envision the wonderful feast I enjoyed at Thanksgiving (which is still ten days off) in any way I see fit. So I’ll tell you it was wonderful and I ate whatever I wanted and even enjoyed some of that Double Cask 12 year old single malt. The reality is that since I regained the use of my mortal feeding tube and got rid of the tubal-libation apparatus I have been packing it away. I’m eating whatever I want, I’ve gotten back much of the lost taste that results from radiation treatments and thanks to the friendly folks at La Petite who understand that a Stella and a Crème Brule’ make a perfect afternoon snack… I am gaining weight! So what can I say? I really am the poster child for neck and throat cancer. Six weeks from treatment and only four weeks from when the feeding tube was my lifeline, my docs and techs can’t believe I’m doing this well. I have energy. I am enjoying going to work and slugging through the backlog. I am driving my MG every day with a renewed sense of why I do it… because it is fun! I am even looking forward to raking leaves. For now my cancer journey is in

the holding pattern where everything is pretty good. Future tests and those contemplative looks and “hems” and “haws” and “harrumphs” from doctors about what they see or don’t see are just that… in the future. Right now this is my springtime in this winter season. Make is yours too. I have been given some measure of freedom to look around and enjoy the world and I believe I am not supposed to squander the opportunity. This springtime reprieve was not given lightly. I can enjoy my family and my friends and revel in the thoughts and prayers of the greater community of faith that continue to make their presence known in my world. However, with spring comes planting and admittedly I do not have a garden plan all worked out. Truthfully, I haven’t even gotten my feeble chemobrain wrapped around the thought of not having to constantly interrupt each day with meds and procedures. I realized last week that taking an afternoon off from work felt entirely different than just not being at work. It felt good. The time off made a difference. I have that freedom and now the question is what to do with that time. How do you “plant” hours? Well for a period of time ages ago I decided to give away a day per week to some cause greater than myself. That got me involved with benevolent organizations including Habitat for Humanity. Years later a woman stopped me in a WaWa and told me that while I probably didn’t recognize her, I had helped get her into her Habitat house. Her kids had grown, one was graduating from high school and life was good. I guess that’s how you plant hours and yes they do grow. Enjoy your spring planting this winter – and for those looking at the postcard – yes, it is a Cord – the chains are on the front wheels! ~Rim

Ashleigh Chevalier is a Blues/Jazz/Rock Musican-Vocalist, Songwriter, Music & Media Journalist, Entertainment & Marketing Consultant, and, a mother living in Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

29


Companions Compassion during the holidays

By candice armstrong awareness about the importance of spay/neuter, to donate food, toys and bedding, and to volunteer their time for this cause. This year, in partnership with the Spotsylvania Department of Social Services, FredSPCA is teaming up with their Holiday Hope Program that provides assistance to residents in need during the festive season. We will be providing goody bags for families with pets who receive assistance through Holiday Hope, with items donated to our Pet Pantry Program. Community residents may sign up for our Pet Pantry Program at any time of the

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

receives national recognition

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

“Lucille”, 8.5 yrs old, friendly, confident, affectionate year, and as long as they meet income requirements, we provide assistance for up to five animals per household one time each month. We are so excited to extend the reach of our Pet Pantry to reach families in need during the holidays! Candi Armstrong, MSW isthe Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at Fredericksburg Regional SPCA. She can be reached at 540-898-1500x17

540-898-0737

It is quite well known by most, or becomes known rather quickly to the newly residing, Fredericksburg is blossoming with artistic talent in many mediums. The talent is well loved and fostered by the intimate community member, such as you, dear reader. Many are the diamonds in rough, and it is always a treasure to see a new diamond arise. Izzy James has lived in King George County, Virginia since 1999. After raising three children and working in geographic sciences, she decided to pursue her lifelong dream and heart felt passion for writing. “I have dabbled in writing all of my life, and I, of course, love to read. But, it wasn’t until my twin children were in college that I had the time to pursue a creative writing career. I didn’t have the time consistently available before to be creative, let alone write seriously and with discipline.” Izzy James brings a unique cozy

“Kai” 3 yrs old, playful, loving, & good with other dogs, alongside law enforcement officials. We’ve all read stories about animals saving the lives of small children in emergency situations, or helping alert families of impending dangers in time to get to safety. By caring about the livelihood of animals, our organization is also caring about the livelihood of people - they are truly one in the same. It takes people to save the animals, to rescue them from an untimely fate on the streets, to raise

28

December 2017

Helping homeless children and “Isabelle”, 1yr old, Hurricane Harvey Survivor, friendly & playful

Front porch fredericksburg

Cancer Journal this must be spring! by rim vining

By Ashleigh Chevalier

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

“Mickey”, 4 yrs old, happy-g go-llucky, friendly & lovable At FredSPCA, we believe that compassion starts here - it’s our motto! Even though the focus of our mission is obviously to save the lives of animals, we believe that compassion for our furry friends is closely related to compassion for human beings. For so many of us, our pets bring us joy, comfort, and happiness, at least. For some, service animals alter the course of their life, increasing their ability to live and work independently. Animals help keep our communities safe

Izzy James

families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

and imaginative voice to her warmly romantic tales. Her faith inspired stories are accessible and easily loved by many, as confirmed by her second novella, The Christmas Gift. Izzy James won the prestigious Maggie Award in 2016 for Best Romantic Novella, as judged by librarians and book sellers. James’ romantic holiday tale competed against submissions from around the world. This brought popularity to her first Christian romance novel, Finding Boaz. But perhaps the most exciting news is James’ 2017 second place award in The Lonestar Contest, following her fourth place award in Wisconsin Fab Five. These contests are hosted by different national and state chapters of the contemporary association The Romance Writers of America, or RWA. The awards earn James street credentials as a competitive contender for publication, all the while earning her badges of honor as an independent author in her own right, with or without a major league publishing deal. Izzy James is at this point an independent author competing in the Christian and secular market, winning readers from across the nation. James’ Christian based writing is not meant to be evangelical, but to carry on stories of hope, forgiveness, and redemption that serve as a reminder to the hope, forgiveness, and redemption she believes is given by Jesus Christ. She feels sweet love stories offer a positive opportunity to encourage the heart. Her upcoming Christmas novella, The Christmas Plain Song, renders a classic tale anew with restored love. James explores the later life of Charles Dicken’s famed character Ebenezer Scrooge after his change of heart that enchanted Christmas eve. Scrooge loved a woman once. Could a young love be reclaimed decades later? The Christmas Plain Song will be released in December 2017. This and James’ other two works are available digitally and in paperback from Amazon, iBooks, SmashWords, KoBo, and Barnes & Noble. You can follow Izzy James and her blog at ECHull.com and on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Twitter. Happy Holidays, ya scrooges.

This December sure doesn’t feel like the end of a year. Having lost the summer to a steady stream of tests and treatments and having chemo-brain in control of most of the fall I am pretty sure this must be spring! I’ve already had all the presents one man can imagine so it can’t be Christmas, right? It feels more like spring! Since we have to write in “deadline time” I have the freedom to envision the wonderful feast I enjoyed at Thanksgiving (which is still ten days off) in any way I see fit. So I’ll tell you it was wonderful and I ate whatever I wanted and even enjoyed some of that Double Cask 12 year old single malt. The reality is that since I regained the use of my mortal feeding tube and got rid of the tubal-libation apparatus I have been packing it away. I’m eating whatever I want, I’ve gotten back much of the lost taste that results from radiation treatments and thanks to the friendly folks at La Petite who understand that a Stella and a Crème Brule’ make a perfect afternoon snack… I am gaining weight! So what can I say? I really am the poster child for neck and throat cancer. Six weeks from treatment and only four weeks from when the feeding tube was my lifeline, my docs and techs can’t believe I’m doing this well. I have energy. I am enjoying going to work and slugging through the backlog. I am driving my MG every day with a renewed sense of why I do it… because it is fun! I am even looking forward to raking leaves. For now my cancer journey is in

the holding pattern where everything is pretty good. Future tests and those contemplative looks and “hems” and “haws” and “harrumphs” from doctors about what they see or don’t see are just that… in the future. Right now this is my springtime in this winter season. Make is yours too. I have been given some measure of freedom to look around and enjoy the world and I believe I am not supposed to squander the opportunity. This springtime reprieve was not given lightly. I can enjoy my family and my friends and revel in the thoughts and prayers of the greater community of faith that continue to make their presence known in my world. However, with spring comes planting and admittedly I do not have a garden plan all worked out. Truthfully, I haven’t even gotten my feeble chemobrain wrapped around the thought of not having to constantly interrupt each day with meds and procedures. I realized last week that taking an afternoon off from work felt entirely different than just not being at work. It felt good. The time off made a difference. I have that freedom and now the question is what to do with that time. How do you “plant” hours? Well for a period of time ages ago I decided to give away a day per week to some cause greater than myself. That got me involved with benevolent organizations including Habitat for Humanity. Years later a woman stopped me in a WaWa and told me that while I probably didn’t recognize her, I had helped get her into her Habitat house. Her kids had grown, one was graduating from high school and life was good. I guess that’s how you plant hours and yes they do grow. Enjoy your spring planting this winter – and for those looking at the postcard – yes, it is a Cord – the chains are on the front wheels! ~Rim

Ashleigh Chevalier is a Blues/Jazz/Rock Musican-Vocalist, Songwriter, Music & Media Journalist, Entertainment & Marketing Consultant, and, a mother living in Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

December 2017

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS Jon Van Zandt

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

SKETCH #38: WASHINGTON BOULEVARD Washington Boulevard is my favorite neighborhood street in Fredericksburg.

When I allow myself to dream a little, I picture living in one of those beautiful, historic Victorian homes and walking a couple of blocks one direction to enjoy terrific restaurants or the other direction to enjoy the park and tennis courts. It's also one of the most frustrating streets for me because I still haven't figured out how best to create a sketch that captures it all. There are dozens of great vantage points along the boulevard, but each only reveals a bit of what makes this street so special. But I'll figure it out (eventually). That's part of the fun of drawing, actually. It makes you really, really look at things. You can't just glance and take for granted where a tree sits or how wide a road is or how pitched a roof is or any of a million other tiny details. Before you begin to draw something, you really have to look at it in ways you never have before. And that’s how I’ll finally figure out how to draw this Boulevard in a way that satisfies me ... I’ll really have to look at it and discover it in a whole new way. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

30

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

lines, wrinkles & stories

by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

From My Porch

"Compassion hurts. When you feel connected to everything, you also feel responsible for everything, and you cannot turn away. Your destiny is bound to the destiny of others." ~ Unknown Jon Van Zandt is a young man who truly is connected to our community, and is helping revive the streetscapes and unique neighborhoods of Downtown Fredericksburg. Jon restores many of the beautiful old homes in our town. By rebuilding and redeveloping historic buildings and properties that have been abandoned or long neglected, he is helping areas of our city to live and thrive again. He and his wife Maggie, are raising 4 children here in the city, so it is amazing he has any free time to spend on the many nonprofit Boards, whose goal is to help improve the lives of those in need here in our town by the river. He is a vital member of our community, serving on the Mary Washington Hospital Foundation Board, and the Fredericksburg Architectural Review Board. He has also served on the board at HFFI, United Methodist Board of Trustees and The Fredericksburg Rotary Club. He is currently serving on the Community Foundation Board and working on a project to grow their nonrestricted funds which are used to address immediate needs or hotspot that pop up in our community, such as opioids crisis and health service's needs. They have also recently giving out 60K in Visionary grants organization including the Friends of the Rappahannock, Moss Free Clinic,

Germanna Community and College. "I could not have done any of this without the endless love and support of my amazing wife Maggie," Jon said, who he met in college, as they both went to JMU. Maggie and Jon love the eclectic and historic nature of living downtown. He bought one house, restored it and then moved to another and another, doing research on historic restorations and learned as he worked on each house. They restored the large early 1800's Victorian home they now live in, as they always loved the old home on the hillside but which was in very poor condition. One day Jon saw a moving truck in yard of the home. He walked up and talked to the owners who were in the process of moving out and asked what they intended to do with the house. When he learned they intended to sell the house. He ran home and said to Maggie, "we just bought new/old house!," not full knowing what adventures lay ahead for the young family! Jon is enthused about life, and feels blessed with his family, and to live in Fredericksburg. His hobbies include, hiking, mountain biking, visiting other historic communities, spending time with his wife and four children, and studying restoration, architecture, and adaptive reuse of historic structures. Jon is the owner of Van Zandt Restorations LLC., and they are currently restoring, The Charles Dick House (circa1740) in downtown, and developing the old " Beanery Building," and adjoining property on Fredericks and Charles street which will be called, "The Lofts at Frederick Street.". Jon loves the work he does, and he feels that serving on the various Boards, is his way of giving back to the community from which he has received so much. Thanks Jon, for giving your valuable time and efforts working on charitable local goals, fundraising and life enhancing programs, and for making the old homes in our "Burg" live again with the sweet voices of a new generation of children. Oh Burr, teaching my new little shelter dog (see the SPCA article in this issue), how to run alongside my bike, so she can get some exercise quickly (me too!) Then reading my Front Porch by the fireplace, with a cup of tea these days, Ahhh!

By Jo Loving "All of these lines across my face, tell you the story of who I am, so many stories of where I've been, and how I got to where I am." ~ Phillip John Hanseroth, lyricist, The Story It is quiet in the diner this morning. Dishes clang in the kitchen, the scent of bacon and eggs drift through the air, as the server visits his table to take his order. "Mornin', Vickie. Two eggs, over light, bacon, a biscuit, and coffee, please," he says. The server smiles and says, "They'll be right up, Del," as she flips a page and scribbles onto the order pad. "Thank you, ma'am," he says. His eyes drift toward the window, painted with colorful poinsettias and holly, and he clasps his hands on the table, waiting. He looks down at them, the instruments of his life -- the hands that had gripped hammers and fishing rods, held babies, patted many backs, rubbed tired legs of loved ones, and helped ease growing pains in children. He examines them as if he scarcely recognizes them, turning them over, stretching the fingers, then bending them, silently scratching the table. He takes out a handkerchief and rubs his eyes, which had, in the past couple of years, began leaking of their own volition. The server is back, and he straightens his hands as he looks up at her. "Here's your coffee, Del," she says, "Cream and sugar are right there," as she points towards a small pitcher and a bowl filled with pink, white, and blue packets of a variety of sweeteners. "I like mine with just a little cream," he says, "thank you." He encircles the cup with both hands, lifts it, sniffs, and takes a sip, and emits a barely audible "hmmm." His attention returns to his hands, and he traces the lines of one with the other. I wonder how many stories those hands tell. The door opens, a bell rings, and the server calls out without looking, "Grab any seat you like." The young man looks around, and recognizes the gentleman. "Hi, Del," he says, "Mind if I sit with you today?" A hearty smile crosses his face, erasing the years, as he responds, "Well, Hey, Mitch, have a seat," as he pulls out the chair. "Vickie, can you get a cup of coffee for Mitch," he says. The server smiles and greets Mitch. "Anything to go with your coffee?" she asks. "How about that Texas Omelet," he responds. She

scratches on the order pad and scurries away. "What're you up to today?" Mitch asks. "Bout the same as any day," Del responds, "Eat breakfast, shoot the breeze with you, walk around town a little, then go home and putter around for a while. How about you, Mitch?" "I have the day off today, and thought maybe if you didn't have any plans, later on we could catch that new Clint Eastwood movie down at the theater. What do you think." Del's face brightens, "That'd be great, Mitch. Let's do it." The diner patrons start filing in, and Vickie is scurrying from table to table. A voice calls from the kitchen, "Order up!" She goes to the window, grabs two plates, and delivers them to Del and Mitch. "Here ya go, boys," she says, "can I get ya anything else." "No thanks," they say, in unison, as she scurries off to take another order. They begin eating, and, because the diner has filled, I can't hear their conversations any more. They're smiling and talking, nodding, and laughing. Is there a person in your life like Del? Someone who would brighten up, just to see you and share a bit of breakfast? It's easy to become so busy, especially during this Holiday season, that we forget the Dels in our life, and how a simple shared breakfast, good conversation, and the thought of a movie, later, can make the difference between staring at their hands and the making of a new story. Who is your Del? Jo Loving is headed off the porch today, to breakfast with her Del, and maybe a movie, later.

Co

front porch fredericksburg

min

g in

Jan ua

ry

December 2017

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org

FXBG’ERS Jon Van Zandt

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

SKETCH #38: WASHINGTON BOULEVARD Washington Boulevard is my favorite neighborhood street in Fredericksburg.

When I allow myself to dream a little, I picture living in one of those beautiful, historic Victorian homes and walking a couple of blocks one direction to enjoy terrific restaurants or the other direction to enjoy the park and tennis courts. It's also one of the most frustrating streets for me because I still haven't figured out how best to create a sketch that captures it all. There are dozens of great vantage points along the boulevard, but each only reveals a bit of what makes this street so special. But I'll figure it out (eventually). That's part of the fun of drawing, actually. It makes you really, really look at things. You can't just glance and take for granted where a tree sits or how wide a road is or how pitched a roof is or any of a million other tiny details. Before you begin to draw something, you really have to look at it in ways you never have before. And that’s how I’ll finally figure out how to draw this Boulevard in a way that satisfies me ... I’ll really have to look at it and discover it in a whole new way. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

30

December 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

lines, wrinkles & stories

by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

From My Porch

"Compassion hurts. When you feel connected to everything, you also feel responsible for everything, and you cannot turn away. Your destiny is bound to the destiny of others." ~ Unknown Jon Van Zandt is a young man who truly is connected to our community, and is helping revive the streetscapes and unique neighborhoods of Downtown Fredericksburg. Jon restores many of the beautiful old homes in our town. By rebuilding and redeveloping historic buildings and properties that have been abandoned or long neglected, he is helping areas of our city to live and thrive again. He and his wife Maggie, are raising 4 children here in the city, so it is amazing he has any free time to spend on the many nonprofit Boards, whose goal is to help improve the lives of those in need here in our town by the river. He is a vital member of our community, serving on the Mary Washington Hospital Foundation Board, and the Fredericksburg Architectural Review Board. He has also served on the board at HFFI, United Methodist Board of Trustees and The Fredericksburg Rotary Club. He is currently serving on the Community Foundation Board and working on a project to grow their nonrestricted funds which are used to address immediate needs or hotspot that pop up in our community, such as opioids crisis and health service's needs. They have also recently giving out 60K in Visionary grants organization including the Friends of the Rappahannock, Moss Free Clinic,

Germanna Community and College. "I could not have done any of this without the endless love and support of my amazing wife Maggie," Jon said, who he met in college, as they both went to JMU. Maggie and Jon love the eclectic and historic nature of living downtown. He bought one house, restored it and then moved to another and another, doing research on historic restorations and learned as he worked on each house. They restored the large early 1800's Victorian home they now live in, as they always loved the old home on the hillside but which was in very poor condition. One day Jon saw a moving truck in yard of the home. He walked up and talked to the owners who were in the process of moving out and asked what they intended to do with the house. When he learned they intended to sell the house. He ran home and said to Maggie, "we just bought new/old house!," not full knowing what adventures lay ahead for the young family! Jon is enthused about life, and feels blessed with his family, and to live in Fredericksburg. His hobbies include, hiking, mountain biking, visiting other historic communities, spending time with his wife and four children, and studying restoration, architecture, and adaptive reuse of historic structures. Jon is the owner of Van Zandt Restorations LLC., and they are currently restoring, The Charles Dick House (circa1740) in downtown, and developing the old " Beanery Building," and adjoining property on Fredericks and Charles street which will be called, "The Lofts at Frederick Street.". Jon loves the work he does, and he feels that serving on the various Boards, is his way of giving back to the community from which he has received so much. Thanks Jon, for giving your valuable time and efforts working on charitable local goals, fundraising and life enhancing programs, and for making the old homes in our "Burg" live again with the sweet voices of a new generation of children. Oh Burr, teaching my new little shelter dog (see the SPCA article in this issue), how to run alongside my bike, so she can get some exercise quickly (me too!) Then reading my Front Porch by the fireplace, with a cup of tea these days, Ahhh!

By Jo Loving "All of these lines across my face, tell you the story of who I am, so many stories of where I've been, and how I got to where I am." ~ Phillip John Hanseroth, lyricist, The Story It is quiet in the diner this morning. Dishes clang in the kitchen, the scent of bacon and eggs drift through the air, as the server visits his table to take his order. "Mornin', Vickie. Two eggs, over light, bacon, a biscuit, and coffee, please," he says. The server smiles and says, "They'll be right up, Del," as she flips a page and scribbles onto the order pad. "Thank you, ma'am," he says. His eyes drift toward the window, painted with colorful poinsettias and holly, and he clasps his hands on the table, waiting. He looks down at them, the instruments of his life -- the hands that had gripped hammers and fishing rods, held babies, patted many backs, rubbed tired legs of loved ones, and helped ease growing pains in children. He examines them as if he scarcely recognizes them, turning them over, stretching the fingers, then bending them, silently scratching the table. He takes out a handkerchief and rubs his eyes, which had, in the past couple of years, began leaking of their own volition. The server is back, and he straightens his hands as he looks up at her. "Here's your coffee, Del," she says, "Cream and sugar are right there," as she points towards a small pitcher and a bowl filled with pink, white, and blue packets of a variety of sweeteners. "I like mine with just a little cream," he says, "thank you." He encircles the cup with both hands, lifts it, sniffs, and takes a sip, and emits a barely audible "hmmm." His attention returns to his hands, and he traces the lines of one with the other. I wonder how many stories those hands tell. The door opens, a bell rings, and the server calls out without looking, "Grab any seat you like." The young man looks around, and recognizes the gentleman. "Hi, Del," he says, "Mind if I sit with you today?" A hearty smile crosses his face, erasing the years, as he responds, "Well, Hey, Mitch, have a seat," as he pulls out the chair. "Vickie, can you get a cup of coffee for Mitch," he says. The server smiles and greets Mitch. "Anything to go with your coffee?" she asks. "How about that Texas Omelet," he responds. She

scratches on the order pad and scurries away. "What're you up to today?" Mitch asks. "Bout the same as any day," Del responds, "Eat breakfast, shoot the breeze with you, walk around town a little, then go home and putter around for a while. How about you, Mitch?" "I have the day off today, and thought maybe if you didn't have any plans, later on we could catch that new Clint Eastwood movie down at the theater. What do you think." Del's face brightens, "That'd be great, Mitch. Let's do it." The diner patrons start filing in, and Vickie is scurrying from table to table. A voice calls from the kitchen, "Order up!" She goes to the window, grabs two plates, and delivers them to Del and Mitch. "Here ya go, boys," she says, "can I get ya anything else." "No thanks," they say, in unison, as she scurries off to take another order. They begin eating, and, because the diner has filled, I can't hear their conversations any more. They're smiling and talking, nodding, and laughing. Is there a person in your life like Del? Someone who would brighten up, just to see you and share a bit of breakfast? It's easy to become so busy, especially during this Holiday season, that we forget the Dels in our life, and how a simple shared breakfast, good conversation, and the thought of a movie, later, can make the difference between staring at their hands and the making of a new story. Who is your Del? Jo Loving is headed off the porch today, to breakfast with her Del, and maybe a movie, later.

Co

front porch fredericksburg

min

g in

Jan ua

ry

December 2017

31


Front Porch Fredericksburg - December 2017  
Front Porch Fredericksburg - December 2017  
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