Page 1


contents

closeups 9

the frog whisperer ...woodie walker

11

kristen lepine ...historic heroines

26

th guitar & ukulele man mark vollten

11

porch talk .

18

history’s stories.: geri melchers our heritage: guardians of history

19

It’s all energy: solving public speaking

20

Senior Care: let the good time roll

21

mind your mind: the poet asks emancipated patients: exercise

22

renew: fitness alot like farming Poetryman: cicadas

23

life in motion

24

art in the ‘burg: peggy wickham

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURg mYSTERY hOUSE

27

call for entries civility, dialogue not diatribe

28

companions: boomer’s story

29

oldest fair in the USA fxbg agricultural fair

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

30

fredericksburg sketches

5

On the trails:: bernard’s cabin

31

6

how does a master gardener grow?

FREDERICKSBURGERS: kassie stevenson from my porch: rising, falling, & rising again

7

our town..unique artistic depictions of fxbg

.8

I have a friend: enduring friendship

10

river protection: community concern

12

restaurant week

13

season’s bounty: peaches & blackberries

14

you’re not crazy

15

don moncho, tex-mex on the river

16-17

Calendar of events

SUMMER

OF LOVE

open letter to my friends by Rim Vining

24

...And more! 9

.3

summer of love...an open letter

10

the honey season

14

when you’re strange....strangeways brewery Cover: “The Look” by Norma Woodward

Rim and Kathy Vining at the Annual Rehoboth Beach Acouswtic Jam, 2016 So I started June as a guy pushing 64 in pretty good health with a couple bunions and a wart on one toe. I ended it with a CT scan and an ENT scoping me from my nose to my privates. What has ensued since the 1st of July is a biopsy, a meet and greet with the radiology oncology folks and a pre-op visit for surgery on the 10th when they will remove a tonsil, left side. It is out patient because with tonsils you get ice cream and no one can afford ice cream at hospital rates. I’m betting $800.00 a scoop with a 20% co-pay - wow! Think what sprinkles must cost. As an added bonus my gastro guy wants a third colonoscopy in 26 months just to make sure everything is still good and all my blood work was excellent except an elevated PSA so my urologist gets a shot as well… Hence the “Summer of Love” Oh, and did I mention I cracked the side off a tooth on the 4th ? So the dentist gets another donation as well before I start treatment. Amazing! So the long and short is my dentist noticed nothing in my spring check-up, my chiropractor who I see every month and who works a lot on my neck which is always tight especially on the left

2

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

side also felt nothing. So I’m just shaving one morning and notice the left side of my neck is swollen and oh… that node is fat! Could be allergies but after a week naw, call the doc. The biopsy did show Squamous Cell Cancer but it is being caught very early and we are moving towards treatment at a furious pace with an excellent prognosis for full recovery. We also get the wonderful side effects where the radiation doc says you’ll feel like you’re swallowing glass but any hair loss is from the other guys. He’s sharp! We like them all, they are working as a team to move this along and amazingly enough before the word is even out I have one friend, if you can call him that, who has already signed up to kick my ass during week four of my treatment. There are still six vacant slots available and Kathy will be running the sign-up sheet. I’ll keep you posted and have a great summer. You know I’ll enjoy mine. I wrote this out because I suffer from PC or Prim’s Condition… the bladder being too close to the eyes. Love to you all, Rim

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

3


contents

closeups 9

the frog whisperer ...woodie walker

11

kristen lepine ...historic heroines

26

th guitar & ukulele man mark vollten

11

porch talk .

18

history’s stories.: geri melchers our heritage: guardians of history

19

It’s all energy: solving public speaking

20

Senior Care: let the good time roll

21

mind your mind: the poet asks emancipated patients: exercise

22

renew: fitness alot like farming Poetryman: cicadas

23

life in motion

24

art in the ‘burg: peggy wickham

25

STORIES OF FREDERICKSBURg mYSTERY hOUSE

27

call for entries civility, dialogue not diatribe

28

companions: boomer’s story

29

oldest fair in the USA fxbg agricultural fair

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

30

fredericksburg sketches

5

On the trails:: bernard’s cabin

31

6

how does a master gardener grow?

FREDERICKSBURGERS: kassie stevenson from my porch: rising, falling, & rising again

7

our town..unique artistic depictions of fxbg

.8

I have a friend: enduring friendship

10

river protection: community concern

12

restaurant week

13

season’s bounty: peaches & blackberries

14

you’re not crazy

15

don moncho, tex-mex on the river

16-17

Calendar of events

SUMMER

OF LOVE

open letter to my friends by Rim Vining

24

...And more! 9

.3

summer of love...an open letter

10

the honey season

14

when you’re strange....strangeways brewery Cover: “The Look” by Norma Woodward

Rim and Kathy Vining at the Annual Rehoboth Beach Acouswtic Jam, 2016 So I started June as a guy pushing 64 in pretty good health with a couple bunions and a wart on one toe. I ended it with a CT scan and an ENT scoping me from my nose to my privates. What has ensued since the 1st of July is a biopsy, a meet and greet with the radiology oncology folks and a pre-op visit for surgery on the 10th when they will remove a tonsil, left side. It is out patient because with tonsils you get ice cream and no one can afford ice cream at hospital rates. I’m betting $800.00 a scoop with a 20% co-pay - wow! Think what sprinkles must cost. As an added bonus my gastro guy wants a third colonoscopy in 26 months just to make sure everything is still good and all my blood work was excellent except an elevated PSA so my urologist gets a shot as well… Hence the “Summer of Love” Oh, and did I mention I cracked the side off a tooth on the 4th ? So the dentist gets another donation as well before I start treatment. Amazing! So the long and short is my dentist noticed nothing in my spring check-up, my chiropractor who I see every month and who works a lot on my neck which is always tight especially on the left

2

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

side also felt nothing. So I’m just shaving one morning and notice the left side of my neck is swollen and oh… that node is fat! Could be allergies but after a week naw, call the doc. The biopsy did show Squamous Cell Cancer but it is being caught very early and we are moving towards treatment at a furious pace with an excellent prognosis for full recovery. We also get the wonderful side effects where the radiation doc says you’ll feel like you’re swallowing glass but any hair loss is from the other guys. He’s sharp! We like them all, they are working as a team to move this along and amazingly enough before the word is even out I have one friend, if you can call him that, who has already signed up to kick my ass during week four of my treatment. There are still six vacant slots available and Kathy will be running the sign-up sheet. I’ll keep you posted and have a great summer. You know I’ll enjoy mine. I wrote this out because I suffer from PC or Prim’s Condition… the bladder being too close to the eyes. Love to you all, Rim

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

3


Katie Hornung

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Candice Armstrong A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Peter Canito Ashleigh Chevalier Tara Chipps Mike Costa Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Bill Freehling Frank Fratoe K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Lou Gramann Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Kathleen Lewis Donna McCague Ashley O’Donnell J.Elias O’Neal Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Penny Newton Bryn Pavek M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Patricia Smith Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Dawn Whitmore Tina Will Suzy Woollam Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

August 2017

On the Trails

New normal

take a walk through fxbg history

BY Katie Hornung

By Kevin Brown

Next month is a reminder of how aware we need to be regarding the lives of our children in our community and at large. In 2012, President Barack Obama declared September Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The statistics are powerful: the American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) reported that 15,780 children under the age of 21 are diagnosed every year and only ¼ of them are expected to survive. Whether or not your life has been personally affected by a family going through diagnosis and treatment, chances are you will be and the question is What will you do about it? The ACCO states: “The objective of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is to put a spotlight on the types of cancer that largely affect children, survivorship issues, and – importantly – to help raise funds for research and family support.” So, in moving forward as a community, it is important to reflect and highlight the lives who inspire us to act in support of cancer research and the families who are affected by the diagnosis. Fredericksburg City Public Schools, where I am privileged to teach, has experienced the devastating loss of two bright souls within the past two years. Josh Hardy was one of the youngest super heroes this community has known, and his inspiring life has prompted an outpouring of national support for Ronald McDonald House as well as advocacy for the release of experimental treatment under “compassionate use.” From the age of 9months, Josh and his family battled one cancer after the next. I first became aware of the Hardy’s plight when my children were enrolled at The Potter’s House Preschool, located within the Fredericksburg Baptist Church. #savejosh became a rallying cry that even my then

messages I am a faithful reader of Front Porch! As a fairly new resident, the magazine really helps me learn all about this charming city. Thanks for the great publication! Michele Roberts

Front porch fredericksburg

on bernard’s cabins trail

four and three-year-old seemed to understand at the time. We wore our tee-shirts, we talked about cancer and empathy, and then we participated in fundraisers that came to Hugh Mercer Elementary and James Monroe as Josh’s needs changed and grew over the years. When he fought his last battle in September of 2016, he left a legacy of medical reform and social awareness behind for this community which will not forget the tenacious ten-year-old. Ceili Anne Leahy, (above left) who started as my Advanced English 11 student at James Monroe High School and became my friend, lost her battle with leukemia in January of 2016 at the age of 19. The cancer was a result of the side effects from her chemotherapy for Ewing’s Sarcoma, with which she was diagnosed just before her senior year of high school. I feel blessed that I knew Ceili’s vibrancy and passion for life before she became sick. I’m not sure that I would have believed that someone so young could have such appreciation for life prior to the thought of losing it. She was an exceptional writer and speaker. She was a relentless advocate for human rights, serving as the JMHS Amnesty International’s chapter president who increased their membership to over 60 through many outreach projects and organized protests. She completed her senior year by walking across the graduation stage to a standing ovation. She took that momentum with her to UVA, where she became active in Climate Action Society, rallies bringing to light sexual assault issues, and tuition hike protests. Her outreach made me reflect upon my own. In her 19 powerful years on earth, she positively affected countless lives and expected nothing but progress in return.

September is right around the corner. Opportunities abound for you to help families honor their loved ones and support those who are just learning about new normal. their Check out fairygodmotherproject.org to donate time and/or money for local families in need. Host a fundraiser event after reading up on the ACCO how-to tutoria at l www.acco.org/ or the Cancer Society , www.cancer.org/involved/fundraise. Find out where you can donate life saving blood by visitingredcross.org. Donate to or participate in the Day of Service, sponsored by James Monroe High School and hosted by Ceili’s parents John and Leslie Leahy and me, by emailing ceilileahyservicescholarship@gmail.com. Most importantly, consider the courage of these families and choose to do something in September that would make Josh and Ceili- and all those like themproud. Katie is a 13-year veteran English teacher at James Monroe High School, and she lives in Fredericksburg with her husband, Chris, and two children, Jacob and Isobel. Photo from the 2015 Fairy Godmother Star Dust Ball

Hello, I am in love with the picture on the cover of your May 2017 paper by David C Kennedy and would love to get a print of the picture. Could you tell me how to get in touch with him Annetta Winiesdorffer

Good Morning! I see that I'm not only a winner (Mystery House May) but will be receiving a gift certificate to my favorite shop in town, .Roxbury Farm & Garden Thanks again....You rock! Kaye Kingsbury

Virginia Thanks for your great support of our event (Sophia Street Throwdown) Trista Chapman

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

ps And I just bet I know this month's house as well

This month, we turn to local historian, Chris Landon, for a “walkthrough-time” Fredericksburg area trails . Chris graciously agreed to talk about one of our area’s lesser known historical sites, Bernard’s Cabins Trail. Chris shares: “If you are new to trail hiking in the woods, especially in our local National Battlefield Parks, the first time experience can seem a little daunting and scary. How deep are those woods? Are there any wild animals in there? What about spiders and snakes? Probably just a few of the thoughts that might go through your mind... “Like many others, I have been hiking those trails for years and have never once heard of or had a single problem on any of our local history trails. I have seen lots of deer, squirrels, birds and many beautiful nature vistas, including a short but impressive trail called the Bernard’s Cabins Trail or the Mannsfield Slave Cabins Trail. “This trail leads you on a well worn and easy path through the airy woods and opens up at the end to a beautiful seasonal meadow. You continue to follow a mowed meadow path to a slight rise. Here you will find two historic markers that outline the significance of this location to both local slave history (the cabins and their slave occupants belonged to Arthur Bernard, the owner of Mannsfield, a plantation house that stood about one and a half miles to the east), and as an important Confederate artillery Battle of position during the Fredericksburg (December 1862). “According to the National Park Service website, ‘Bernard's Cabins Trail starts at the road and winds through the

woods for half a mile before emerging into a large plowed field overlooking Shannon Airport and the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad (now CSX). It terminates at Bernard's Cabins, the site of a small slave community. “Bernard's Cabins became an important Confederate artillery position on "Stonewall" Jackson's end of the line. The center of his line was wooded, preventing the Confederate leader from placing any artillery there. Instead, he placed a large number of cannons on either side of the woods and angled the guns toward one another so as to catch any Union troops who might attempt to attack the woods in a deadly crossfire. To the left of the woods, at Bernard's Cabins, stood nine guns of Capt. Greenlee Davidson's battalion. “The AllTrails.com website states, ‘Bernard's Cabins Trail is a 1.3 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Artillery Ridge, Virginia that offers scenic views and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, nature trips, and birding and is best used from March until October.’ “This particular trail is unique for a couple of reasons. First, it is known locally by two different names, Benard's Cabins Trail and/or the Mannsfield Slave Cabin Trail. Second, you can experience it simply for its meaningful local slave history, especially if you are not particularly interested in Civil War military logistics. The site where the slave cabins were located is well interpreted by the National Park Service marker, and highlights the enslaved life of the nearly 35 African Americans who lived right there. Again, this brief hike up and back is simple and relaxing. So take a break from your busy schedule, and take an informative stroll through nature and history on the Bernard's Cabins Trail.” How to get there? Look for the wayside marker for the Bernard’s Cabins Trail about a half mile south of the Lee Drive & Lansdowne Road intersection, on the Fredericksburg Battlefield.

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" a downtown resident & a Military Analyst for Segue Technologies front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

5


Katie Hornung

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Candice Armstrong A.E.Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Peter Canito Ashleigh Chevalier Tara Chipps Mike Costa Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Bill Freehling Frank Fratoe K. Jeanne Frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Lou Gramann Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Kathleen Lewis Donna McCague Ashley O’Donnell J.Elias O’Neal Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Penny Newton Bryn Pavek M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Casey Alan Shaw Patricia Smith Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rm Vining Dawn Whitmore Tina Will Suzy Woollam Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg

The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2017 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

August 2017

On the Trails

New normal

take a walk through fxbg history

BY Katie Hornung

By Kevin Brown

Next month is a reminder of how aware we need to be regarding the lives of our children in our community and at large. In 2012, President Barack Obama declared September Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The statistics are powerful: the American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO) reported that 15,780 children under the age of 21 are diagnosed every year and only ¼ of them are expected to survive. Whether or not your life has been personally affected by a family going through diagnosis and treatment, chances are you will be and the question is What will you do about it? The ACCO states: “The objective of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is to put a spotlight on the types of cancer that largely affect children, survivorship issues, and – importantly – to help raise funds for research and family support.” So, in moving forward as a community, it is important to reflect and highlight the lives who inspire us to act in support of cancer research and the families who are affected by the diagnosis. Fredericksburg City Public Schools, where I am privileged to teach, has experienced the devastating loss of two bright souls within the past two years. Josh Hardy was one of the youngest super heroes this community has known, and his inspiring life has prompted an outpouring of national support for Ronald McDonald House as well as advocacy for the release of experimental treatment under “compassionate use.” From the age of 9months, Josh and his family battled one cancer after the next. I first became aware of the Hardy’s plight when my children were enrolled at The Potter’s House Preschool, located within the Fredericksburg Baptist Church. #savejosh became a rallying cry that even my then

messages I am a faithful reader of Front Porch! As a fairly new resident, the magazine really helps me learn all about this charming city. Thanks for the great publication! Michele Roberts

Front porch fredericksburg

on bernard’s cabins trail

four and three-year-old seemed to understand at the time. We wore our tee-shirts, we talked about cancer and empathy, and then we participated in fundraisers that came to Hugh Mercer Elementary and James Monroe as Josh’s needs changed and grew over the years. When he fought his last battle in September of 2016, he left a legacy of medical reform and social awareness behind for this community which will not forget the tenacious ten-year-old. Ceili Anne Leahy, (above left) who started as my Advanced English 11 student at James Monroe High School and became my friend, lost her battle with leukemia in January of 2016 at the age of 19. The cancer was a result of the side effects from her chemotherapy for Ewing’s Sarcoma, with which she was diagnosed just before her senior year of high school. I feel blessed that I knew Ceili’s vibrancy and passion for life before she became sick. I’m not sure that I would have believed that someone so young could have such appreciation for life prior to the thought of losing it. She was an exceptional writer and speaker. She was a relentless advocate for human rights, serving as the JMHS Amnesty International’s chapter president who increased their membership to over 60 through many outreach projects and organized protests. She completed her senior year by walking across the graduation stage to a standing ovation. She took that momentum with her to UVA, where she became active in Climate Action Society, rallies bringing to light sexual assault issues, and tuition hike protests. Her outreach made me reflect upon my own. In her 19 powerful years on earth, she positively affected countless lives and expected nothing but progress in return.

September is right around the corner. Opportunities abound for you to help families honor their loved ones and support those who are just learning about new normal. their Check out fairygodmotherproject.org to donate time and/or money for local families in need. Host a fundraiser event after reading up on the ACCO how-to tutoria at l www.acco.org/ or the Cancer Society , www.cancer.org/involved/fundraise. Find out where you can donate life saving blood by visitingredcross.org. Donate to or participate in the Day of Service, sponsored by James Monroe High School and hosted by Ceili’s parents John and Leslie Leahy and me, by emailing ceilileahyservicescholarship@gmail.com. Most importantly, consider the courage of these families and choose to do something in September that would make Josh and Ceili- and all those like themproud. Katie is a 13-year veteran English teacher at James Monroe High School, and she lives in Fredericksburg with her husband, Chris, and two children, Jacob and Isobel. Photo from the 2015 Fairy Godmother Star Dust Ball

Hello, I am in love with the picture on the cover of your May 2017 paper by David C Kennedy and would love to get a print of the picture. Could you tell me how to get in touch with him Annetta Winiesdorffer

Good Morning! I see that I'm not only a winner (Mystery House May) but will be receiving a gift certificate to my favorite shop in town, .Roxbury Farm & Garden Thanks again....You rock! Kaye Kingsbury

Virginia Thanks for your great support of our event (Sophia Street Throwdown) Trista Chapman

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

ps And I just bet I know this month's house as well

This month, we turn to local historian, Chris Landon, for a “walkthrough-time” Fredericksburg area trails . Chris graciously agreed to talk about one of our area’s lesser known historical sites, Bernard’s Cabins Trail. Chris shares: “If you are new to trail hiking in the woods, especially in our local National Battlefield Parks, the first time experience can seem a little daunting and scary. How deep are those woods? Are there any wild animals in there? What about spiders and snakes? Probably just a few of the thoughts that might go through your mind... “Like many others, I have been hiking those trails for years and have never once heard of or had a single problem on any of our local history trails. I have seen lots of deer, squirrels, birds and many beautiful nature vistas, including a short but impressive trail called the Bernard’s Cabins Trail or the Mannsfield Slave Cabins Trail. “This trail leads you on a well worn and easy path through the airy woods and opens up at the end to a beautiful seasonal meadow. You continue to follow a mowed meadow path to a slight rise. Here you will find two historic markers that outline the significance of this location to both local slave history (the cabins and their slave occupants belonged to Arthur Bernard, the owner of Mannsfield, a plantation house that stood about one and a half miles to the east), and as an important Confederate artillery Battle of position during the Fredericksburg (December 1862). “According to the National Park Service website, ‘Bernard's Cabins Trail starts at the road and winds through the

woods for half a mile before emerging into a large plowed field overlooking Shannon Airport and the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad (now CSX). It terminates at Bernard's Cabins, the site of a small slave community. “Bernard's Cabins became an important Confederate artillery position on "Stonewall" Jackson's end of the line. The center of his line was wooded, preventing the Confederate leader from placing any artillery there. Instead, he placed a large number of cannons on either side of the woods and angled the guns toward one another so as to catch any Union troops who might attempt to attack the woods in a deadly crossfire. To the left of the woods, at Bernard's Cabins, stood nine guns of Capt. Greenlee Davidson's battalion. “The AllTrails.com website states, ‘Bernard's Cabins Trail is a 1.3 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Artillery Ridge, Virginia that offers scenic views and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, nature trips, and birding and is best used from March until October.’ “This particular trail is unique for a couple of reasons. First, it is known locally by two different names, Benard's Cabins Trail and/or the Mannsfield Slave Cabin Trail. Second, you can experience it simply for its meaningful local slave history, especially if you are not particularly interested in Civil War military logistics. The site where the slave cabins were located is well interpreted by the National Park Service marker, and highlights the enslaved life of the nearly 35 African Americans who lived right there. Again, this brief hike up and back is simple and relaxing. So take a break from your busy schedule, and take an informative stroll through nature and history on the Bernard's Cabins Trail.” How to get there? Look for the wayside marker for the Bernard’s Cabins Trail about a half mile south of the Lee Drive & Lansdowne Road intersection, on the Fredericksburg Battlefield.

SUZY STONE Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" a downtown resident & a Military Analyst for Segue Technologies front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

5


How Does A Master Gardener Grow

"Our Town"

ann gorrell “herb nut”

unique artistic depictions of fxbg

By tina will horticultural knowledge in the years to come. The VCE Master Gardener training increased her knowledge and ability to grow vegetables, and perennials, and she learned how to identify weeds and defeat them without chemicals since they would harm insects and wildlife.

Growing up on a dairy farm in Purcellville, VA Ann Gorrell (above in Lavender Garden) was surrounded with vegetables and flowers, and at an early age Ann’s first taste of an herb came courtesy of her Grandmother’s sausage preserved with sage. Ann credits becoming an ‘herb nut’ to constant study of herb books, and her training and subsequent volunteer work with the VCE Master Gardener program. After retiring from her government job in 1996 she headed for the Master Gardener program shortly thereafter knowing that that’s what her ‘retirement life’ would center on. She knew also, that she’d be sharing her

Herbs are not just fragrant pretty plants; they can be used in many different ways. One of Ann’s specialties is a lavender wand that she makes with the lavender stems and flowers, and gives them away or uses them where their gentle scent is appreciated. She grows a wide variety of herbs and other perennials, and has learned that lavender likes the dry heat reflected by a surrounding of pea gravel, that mint around doorways and windows keeps ants out of the house, and that tansy keeps away flies. She makes her own pesto with the basil she grows, and does workshops on herbal vinegars, butters, and cheeses. Her herb list is long, but includes basil, oregano, thyme, parsley, chives, lemon balm, mountain mint, sage, lavender (varieties‘provence,’‘grosso,’ ‘phenomenal’) bronze fennel, and rosemary. Perennials also figure heavily in her several gardens. She has more than two dozen varieties of daffodils, sweet woodruff, Siberian Iris, Blackberry Lily, Spiderwort, NewYork Asters, Goldenrod, Yellow Foxglove, and roses. As an MG volunteer Ann organized a “First Saturday in the Garden”

By Patricia Smith

series that the public enjoyed for many years. At these workshops she and other Master Gardeners taught about roses (yes, the rose is an herb) at Chatham House, and culinary herbs at Kenmore and the James Monroe Library. Preparing for these is what really led to Ann becoming so knowledgeable about herbs. She is a member of the Virginia Commonwealth Unit of the Herb Society of America, and she is now the chairman of that Unit. Ann has also written about the Elderberry plant and its uses during the Civil War for the book “Essential Guide to the Elderberry” published in 2014 by the Herb Society of America.

A unique group art exhibition, "Our Town", will be at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg from August 1 through September 29. The participants in this exhibit each have a distinctive approach to depicting "Our Town" Fredericksburg.

After almost twenty years of establishing her garden Ann is now more

and all sorts of pollinating insects are doing their best work which adds to the enjoyment that Ann shares with her husband Joe. Though deer continue to find her garden irresistible, there is still plenty to harvest and enjoy.

Front porch fredericksburg

Bruce Day, Self Portrait

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Tina Will is a Master Gardener and lives in Stafford County. She can be readed at brianandtinawill@gmail.com Photos by Tina Will and Ann Gorrell relaxed in it. It’s a deserved posture and one that was essential for her last year following her knee surgery. Nevertheless it’s a busy garden where birds and bees

Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room

Bruce Day is perhaps best known as the drawing master of Caroline Street. He has held figure drawing sessions in his studio for many years.

Casey Shaw has a graphic approach to 'posters' of iconic landmarks in Fredericksburg, as if they are travel posters of a by-gone era. He came to Fredericksburg from Texas in 1995, and is currently President at Art First Gallery. He teaches at Germanna College and works full-time as a designer at the Free LanceStar. He writes a monthly column for Front Porch (see pg 30). Charles Fromer loves to paint iconic scenes of Fredericksburg. His oil painting "Pump House" depicts the Rappahannock River, the Train Trestle Bridge, the old pump house, and a VRE

David Lovegrove

Nancy Michael, the office administrator at UUFF, will help to arrange gallery visits if you can't make the opening reception on August 13. Please call 540-310-4001.

AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

Ed King, painting “Sunflowers 2”

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

Ed King, who has an MFA from Pratt Institute in NYC, likes to work from life as much as possible, preferring realism with an element of abstraction. "I have worked on a horse farm for years and years, so elements of nature and the weather are always evident in my work." Ed is a member of Art First and teaches at Germanna College.

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! August 2017

David Lovegrove, on the other hand, avoids the picturesque altogether, painting/photographing deteriorated structures and industrial facades in an abstract manner. David is a member of Art First.

Casey Shaw, Self Portrait

roxburyfarmgarden.com

6

from oil to acrylics, but still maintains her love of impressionism, especially the qualities of light and shadow as they play across the surface of buildings.

“Our Town” Exhibition August 1September 29. Opening reception Charles Fromer, “PumpHouse” Aug 13, 11:45 a 2 p. Reception is passenger train. The subject is meaningful free and open to the public. to him because the train symbolizes an Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is escape from the stress and conflict of located at 25 Chalice Circle. work "to a place of charm, classic beauty, and the best of cultured small-town living". Leah Fromer studied commercial art in New Mexico, but developed her painting skills by taking art lessons at Libertytown in Fredericksburg. She has changed her primary painting medium

Patricia Smith is a member of the Visual Arts Committee at UUFF ...

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

7


How Does A Master Gardener Grow

"Our Town"

ann gorrell “herb nut”

unique artistic depictions of fxbg

By tina will horticultural knowledge in the years to come. The VCE Master Gardener training increased her knowledge and ability to grow vegetables, and perennials, and she learned how to identify weeds and defeat them without chemicals since they would harm insects and wildlife.

Growing up on a dairy farm in Purcellville, VA Ann Gorrell (above in Lavender Garden) was surrounded with vegetables and flowers, and at an early age Ann’s first taste of an herb came courtesy of her Grandmother’s sausage preserved with sage. Ann credits becoming an ‘herb nut’ to constant study of herb books, and her training and subsequent volunteer work with the VCE Master Gardener program. After retiring from her government job in 1996 she headed for the Master Gardener program shortly thereafter knowing that that’s what her ‘retirement life’ would center on. She knew also, that she’d be sharing her

Herbs are not just fragrant pretty plants; they can be used in many different ways. One of Ann’s specialties is a lavender wand that she makes with the lavender stems and flowers, and gives them away or uses them where their gentle scent is appreciated. She grows a wide variety of herbs and other perennials, and has learned that lavender likes the dry heat reflected by a surrounding of pea gravel, that mint around doorways and windows keeps ants out of the house, and that tansy keeps away flies. She makes her own pesto with the basil she grows, and does workshops on herbal vinegars, butters, and cheeses. Her herb list is long, but includes basil, oregano, thyme, parsley, chives, lemon balm, mountain mint, sage, lavender (varieties‘provence,’‘grosso,’ ‘phenomenal’) bronze fennel, and rosemary. Perennials also figure heavily in her several gardens. She has more than two dozen varieties of daffodils, sweet woodruff, Siberian Iris, Blackberry Lily, Spiderwort, NewYork Asters, Goldenrod, Yellow Foxglove, and roses. As an MG volunteer Ann organized a “First Saturday in the Garden”

By Patricia Smith

series that the public enjoyed for many years. At these workshops she and other Master Gardeners taught about roses (yes, the rose is an herb) at Chatham House, and culinary herbs at Kenmore and the James Monroe Library. Preparing for these is what really led to Ann becoming so knowledgeable about herbs. She is a member of the Virginia Commonwealth Unit of the Herb Society of America, and she is now the chairman of that Unit. Ann has also written about the Elderberry plant and its uses during the Civil War for the book “Essential Guide to the Elderberry” published in 2014 by the Herb Society of America.

A unique group art exhibition, "Our Town", will be at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg from August 1 through September 29. The participants in this exhibit each have a distinctive approach to depicting "Our Town" Fredericksburg.

After almost twenty years of establishing her garden Ann is now more

and all sorts of pollinating insects are doing their best work which adds to the enjoyment that Ann shares with her husband Joe. Though deer continue to find her garden irresistible, there is still plenty to harvest and enjoy.

Front porch fredericksburg

Bruce Day, Self Portrait

Spiritual Supplies for Spiritual People Tina Will is a Master Gardener and lives in Stafford County. She can be readed at brianandtinawill@gmail.com Photos by Tina Will and Ann Gorrell relaxed in it. It’s a deserved posture and one that was essential for her last year following her knee surgery. Nevertheless it’s a busy garden where birds and bees

Raw and Tumbled Stones Energy and Healing Wands Herbs, Incense and Resin Books, Candles Salt Therapy Room

Bruce Day is perhaps best known as the drawing master of Caroline Street. He has held figure drawing sessions in his studio for many years.

Casey Shaw has a graphic approach to 'posters' of iconic landmarks in Fredericksburg, as if they are travel posters of a by-gone era. He came to Fredericksburg from Texas in 1995, and is currently President at Art First Gallery. He teaches at Germanna College and works full-time as a designer at the Free LanceStar. He writes a monthly column for Front Porch (see pg 30). Charles Fromer loves to paint iconic scenes of Fredericksburg. His oil painting "Pump House" depicts the Rappahannock River, the Train Trestle Bridge, the old pump house, and a VRE

David Lovegrove

Nancy Michael, the office administrator at UUFF, will help to arrange gallery visits if you can't make the opening reception on August 13. Please call 540-310-4001.

AND SO MUCH MORE!

The Shoppes @ 914 Caroline 540.273.2778

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

Ed King, painting “Sunflowers 2”

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

Ed King, who has an MFA from Pratt Institute in NYC, likes to work from life as much as possible, preferring realism with an element of abstraction. "I have worked on a horse farm for years and years, so elements of nature and the weather are always evident in my work." Ed is a member of Art First and teaches at Germanna College.

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us! August 2017

David Lovegrove, on the other hand, avoids the picturesque altogether, painting/photographing deteriorated structures and industrial facades in an abstract manner. David is a member of Art First.

Casey Shaw, Self Portrait

roxburyfarmgarden.com

6

from oil to acrylics, but still maintains her love of impressionism, especially the qualities of light and shadow as they play across the surface of buildings.

“Our Town” Exhibition August 1September 29. Opening reception Charles Fromer, “PumpHouse” Aug 13, 11:45 a 2 p. Reception is passenger train. The subject is meaningful free and open to the public. to him because the train symbolizes an Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is escape from the stress and conflict of located at 25 Chalice Circle. work "to a place of charm, classic beauty, and the best of cultured small-town living". Leah Fromer studied commercial art in New Mexico, but developed her painting skills by taking art lessons at Libertytown in Fredericksburg. She has changed her primary painting medium

Patricia Smith is a member of the Visual Arts Committee at UUFF ...

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

7


“I Have A Friend”

Woodie Walker the frog whisperer

enduring friendship

What’s On Your Agenda?

Interview BY Kevin Brown

By Laurie Black 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

At a time when it seems too many things just don’t last, it is refreshing to meet Sylvia(above left) and Therese. The two met and became instant friends 14 years ago through the Senior Visitors Program. The Senior Visitors Program which began in 2000, is now in its 17th year, which makes Therese and Sylvia the longest actively matched volunteer and senior in the Program. Therese Reiff says she wanted to volunteer to be company to someone who needed it. While working for another local nonprofit , she was introduced to the Senior Visitors Program. She felt called to participate. Sylvia remembers hearing about Senior Visitors not long after the Program began, but she did not join the right away. A visit to her mother in New York prompted her to join Senior Visitors. “I went to visit my mother who was in her 90s. She was still active, getting out, and by all appearances doing okay, but she really wasn’t. He apartment and living conditions had really declined and no one knew. I realized that could happen to me. I was living alone and had no family in Virginia. I wanted to have someone visit me on a regular basis who would really know how I’m doing and notice changes. So when I got home, I looked up the information and joined Senior Visitors.” Sylvia and Therese started out playing cards and scrabble and walking around the city. “We’ve had some adventures together and been through a lot changes together. Therese has grandchildren and I have great grandchildren now!” Sylvia laughs. “We run errands together and Therese takes me to new places I wouldn’t have tried.” When asked to describe some of their adventures, Therese fondly recalls, “We have developed some traditions like driving around during the holidays to look at Christmas lights; sometimes our

8

August 2017

adventures are something random like laying on mattresses at the mattress store when shopping for a new bed.” “Sylvia is my teacher and my hero. One of the things I love about her is that she is not afraid of new things. For example, she introduced me to Wii Tennis and Facebook! She loves trying new technology and is an avid reader. She lives simply, but fully. She gets up early every morning to exercise, do brain games, and she eats a smart, healthy diet.” Sylvia speaks just as fondly of Therese, “I can depend on her. She is very reliable and considerate which is so helpful. I am thrilled with Therese and with the Program.” Sylvia and Therese both enjoy Senior Visitors so much that they have brought several others into the Program over the years. Sylvia says she invites anyone new in her senior community to try the Senior Visitors Program and talks all the time about how fantastic it is! Two of Therese’s coworkers/friends have joined as volunteers. “I recommend the Senior Visitors Program to friends. It is both fulfilling and rewarding. It is as if you are brought together for a higher purpose to teach other.” It is certainly our hope that Therese and Sylvia will enjoy many more years of adventures together. Their enduring friendship inspires optimism and a wonderful sense of community. If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org.

We offer private lessons for string, woodwind and brass instruments, as well as guitar, bass, piano and voice. Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997

Located in "The House on the Corner at the Crossroads of Music" where Route 3 meets U.S. Highway 1. 540-899-6787

This month we learn about Woodie Walker, our beloved Community Conservationist from the Friends of the Rappahannock (www.riverfriends.org). Q. Woodie, what initially brought you to Fredericksburg? A: “About 15 years ago, I was working for a soil and water conservation district, developing best management practices for agricultural producers. While there, I helped found the Blackwater/Nottoway

Riverkeeper Program in Southampton County, Va. Through my work with Riverkeepers, I learned about the role non-profits play in the conservation world, and it was about that time I first heard about Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR). Over the following years, I never lost sight of FOR and the great work they were doing in Fredericksburg. In 2013, there was a job opening at FOR and I was hired by its former executive director, John Tippett, as Volunteer and Membership Coordinator. My role has grown over the years and my current title is Community Conservationist, because I work closely with our community to accomplish FOR goals. I have since fallen in love with the Rappahannock River and feel blessed every day to live in such a wonderful community.” Q. What are you favorite things about Fredericksburg? A: “Before coming to Fredericksburg, I was an AmeriCorps volunteer in West Virginia for two years. I loved the

mountains and the rural lifestyle, and made some wonderful friends there, but when my service was over I was ready to be around people! And restaurants! And live music! And pubs! The first time I walked around downtown, I knew I was in a good place for me. I love the history of our region and its museums, and the fact Downtown Greens, we have the Fredericksburg Food burgeoning Cooperative and bands like Eyes Like Birds.” Q. Please share a highlight from your time here in Fredericksburg. A: . “I am lucky to see Mr. Bill Micks from FOR and the Virginia Outdoor Center nearly every workday, and he has meant so much to me personally. I wanna be like Bill when I grow up! Anyway, a few years ago he told me there are dinosaur footprints along the Rappahannock. I did some research and located them on a field trip with my grandson and another special young fellow. We made a giant Plaster of Paris cast of a big veggiesaurus print. I'd have to say that was a big highlight of my time in Fredericksburg.”

Q. Given your frequent work with young volunteers, what is your perspective on our up-and-coming generation? A:. “I've always been a history buff, so soon after I moved to Fredericksburg I began taking history classes at the University of Mary Washington. I'm in the bachelor of liberal studies program, majoring in history, and I've really come to admire our school and the Department of History and American Studies faculty and students. Because of my work at FOR, I also know many of the biology department faculty and students. In my time here, we’ve had dozens of UMW students volunteer and intern with us at FOR. We also have amazing high school students working with us. I cannot say enough about the quality and character of the young people I've gotten to know here. They are trying so hard to make our world a better place.” Interested in FOR and want to contact Woodie? Email woodie.walker@riverfriends.org.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

Mid Week MARKDOWN

What's On Sale This Week Every Wednesday in August Noon to One ~ 25% Off Different Categories of Items Each Week 374-00443 shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program. She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org Photo by Tara Chipps, Zoom With A View Photography, LLC

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

9


“I Have A Friend”

Woodie Walker the frog whisperer

enduring friendship

What’s On Your Agenda?

Interview BY Kevin Brown

By Laurie Black 723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30, Sunday 12-5

At a time when it seems too many things just don’t last, it is refreshing to meet Sylvia(above left) and Therese. The two met and became instant friends 14 years ago through the Senior Visitors Program. The Senior Visitors Program which began in 2000, is now in its 17th year, which makes Therese and Sylvia the longest actively matched volunteer and senior in the Program. Therese Reiff says she wanted to volunteer to be company to someone who needed it. While working for another local nonprofit , she was introduced to the Senior Visitors Program. She felt called to participate. Sylvia remembers hearing about Senior Visitors not long after the Program began, but she did not join the right away. A visit to her mother in New York prompted her to join Senior Visitors. “I went to visit my mother who was in her 90s. She was still active, getting out, and by all appearances doing okay, but she really wasn’t. He apartment and living conditions had really declined and no one knew. I realized that could happen to me. I was living alone and had no family in Virginia. I wanted to have someone visit me on a regular basis who would really know how I’m doing and notice changes. So when I got home, I looked up the information and joined Senior Visitors.” Sylvia and Therese started out playing cards and scrabble and walking around the city. “We’ve had some adventures together and been through a lot changes together. Therese has grandchildren and I have great grandchildren now!” Sylvia laughs. “We run errands together and Therese takes me to new places I wouldn’t have tried.” When asked to describe some of their adventures, Therese fondly recalls, “We have developed some traditions like driving around during the holidays to look at Christmas lights; sometimes our

8

August 2017

adventures are something random like laying on mattresses at the mattress store when shopping for a new bed.” “Sylvia is my teacher and my hero. One of the things I love about her is that she is not afraid of new things. For example, she introduced me to Wii Tennis and Facebook! She loves trying new technology and is an avid reader. She lives simply, but fully. She gets up early every morning to exercise, do brain games, and she eats a smart, healthy diet.” Sylvia speaks just as fondly of Therese, “I can depend on her. She is very reliable and considerate which is so helpful. I am thrilled with Therese and with the Program.” Sylvia and Therese both enjoy Senior Visitors so much that they have brought several others into the Program over the years. Sylvia says she invites anyone new in her senior community to try the Senior Visitors Program and talks all the time about how fantastic it is! Two of Therese’s coworkers/friends have joined as volunteers. “I recommend the Senior Visitors Program to friends. It is both fulfilling and rewarding. It is as if you are brought together for a higher purpose to teach other.” It is certainly our hope that Therese and Sylvia will enjoy many more years of adventures together. Their enduring friendship inspires optimism and a wonderful sense of community. If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org.

We offer private lessons for string, woodwind and brass instruments, as well as guitar, bass, piano and voice. Supporting The Non-Profits Since 1997

Located in "The House on the Corner at the Crossroads of Music" where Route 3 meets U.S. Highway 1. 540-899-6787

This month we learn about Woodie Walker, our beloved Community Conservationist from the Friends of the Rappahannock (www.riverfriends.org). Q. Woodie, what initially brought you to Fredericksburg? A: “About 15 years ago, I was working for a soil and water conservation district, developing best management practices for agricultural producers. While there, I helped found the Blackwater/Nottoway

Riverkeeper Program in Southampton County, Va. Through my work with Riverkeepers, I learned about the role non-profits play in the conservation world, and it was about that time I first heard about Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR). Over the following years, I never lost sight of FOR and the great work they were doing in Fredericksburg. In 2013, there was a job opening at FOR and I was hired by its former executive director, John Tippett, as Volunteer and Membership Coordinator. My role has grown over the years and my current title is Community Conservationist, because I work closely with our community to accomplish FOR goals. I have since fallen in love with the Rappahannock River and feel blessed every day to live in such a wonderful community.” Q. What are you favorite things about Fredericksburg? A: “Before coming to Fredericksburg, I was an AmeriCorps volunteer in West Virginia for two years. I loved the

mountains and the rural lifestyle, and made some wonderful friends there, but when my service was over I was ready to be around people! And restaurants! And live music! And pubs! The first time I walked around downtown, I knew I was in a good place for me. I love the history of our region and its museums, and the fact Downtown Greens, we have the Fredericksburg Food burgeoning Cooperative and bands like Eyes Like Birds.” Q. Please share a highlight from your time here in Fredericksburg. A: . “I am lucky to see Mr. Bill Micks from FOR and the Virginia Outdoor Center nearly every workday, and he has meant so much to me personally. I wanna be like Bill when I grow up! Anyway, a few years ago he told me there are dinosaur footprints along the Rappahannock. I did some research and located them on a field trip with my grandson and another special young fellow. We made a giant Plaster of Paris cast of a big veggiesaurus print. I'd have to say that was a big highlight of my time in Fredericksburg.”

Q. Given your frequent work with young volunteers, what is your perspective on our up-and-coming generation? A:. “I've always been a history buff, so soon after I moved to Fredericksburg I began taking history classes at the University of Mary Washington. I'm in the bachelor of liberal studies program, majoring in history, and I've really come to admire our school and the Department of History and American Studies faculty and students. Because of my work at FOR, I also know many of the biology department faculty and students. In my time here, we’ve had dozens of UMW students volunteer and intern with us at FOR. We also have amazing high school students working with us. I cannot say enough about the quality and character of the young people I've gotten to know here. They are trying so hard to make our world a better place.” Interested in FOR and want to contact Woodie? Email woodie.walker@riverfriends.org.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

Mid Week MARKDOWN

What's On Sale This Week Every Wednesday in August Noon to One ~ 25% Off Different Categories of Items Each Week 374-00443 shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program. She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org Photo by Tara Chipps, Zoom With A View Photography, LLC

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

9


Historic Heroines

River Protection Everything Greens A community concern

the honey season

By lou gramann Riverfest is not a kid anymore. It has matured nicely into a twentysomething member of the Fredericksburg Community, with an important mission all its own. Riverfest is of course the Friends of the brainchild of Rappahannock. On September 16th, FOR will hold its 27th Annual Riverfest, and for most of those 27 years, the event has sold out. All tickets are sold in advance. Waiting until the last minute will not work. That’s why getting tickets now gives you a double advantage. You won’t miss out, and you get the early bird price which expires on September 1st.

Why is this event so popular? One reason is the gravity of the mission it represents. With 1,200 tickets sold each year, supporters understand that the FOR’s 32-year effort to protect the river is important to everyone in the area. Due to this support, the scale and impact of FOR’s programs continue to grow. Upstream of the Fredericksburg area, riparian buffers protect the flowing water from farm runoff that can include fertilizer and animal waste. Locally, highly visible River Clean-ups give many people the chance to make a difference with just a one-day commitment.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

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August 2017

Locally, too, FOR staff and volunteers offer conservation and stewardship classes and workshops for kids and teachers. Hands-on learning “At the River’s Edge” makes the sessions fun and memorable for over 6,000 students each year. Downstream in the Tappahannock area, the FOR satellite office coordinates oyster bed restoration. FOR is also committed to protecting the streams and groundwater of the watershed from the permanent pollution of fracking chemicals. “Each of these programs is important to our mission,” says Executive Director Kathleen Harrigan. “And without the funds raised at Riverfest, we just couldn’t do this important work. Riverfest is also a great party. It is at Farley Vale Farm in King George County again, under large tents, rain or shine. There will be a variety of festival foods and beverages, boat rides along the Rappahannock, a tent full of raffle prizes, and a live auction. Steamed blue crabs are a staple, as are the barbeque buffet and open bar. For the third year in a row, John Wack will cook catfish and hush puppies on-site. Wack began this tradition while serving on the FOR Executive Committee, and has added a new fryer and more volunteer assistants to keep up with demand. Wine tasting and bourbon tasting, another free part of the event, make the food taste that much better. Three different bands entertain. The Jazz Ensemble of UMW, led by music professor Doug Gately, is on stage first. Bob, Paul, and Amy follow with Riverfolk. Laurie Rose Griffith and Peter Mealy provide the pop and rock music that gets people up and dancing. Through Riverfest, Friends of the Rappahannock’s friends can keep FOR projects going strong with sponsorships ranging from $250 to $10,000. Individual tickets and sponsorships are on sale at www.riverfriends.org on the Riverfest page. The website also contains a wealth of information about FOR projects and important issues related to water quality. As the FOR mission statement says, this is a way for everyone in the area to be: “A voice and active force for a healthy and scenic Rappahannock River.”

Lou Gramann is a volunteer for Friends of the Rappahannock who has known Riverfest since it was an infant.

Front porch fredericksburg

By mike costa

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

One of the highlights of the beekeeper’s year is the time he or she gets to collect honey from the hive. In Virginia this is usually done at the end of the heavy nectar flow, which begins in mid spring and runs till the end of June. Humans have probably been doing this for a good 10,000 years, and this year at the Downtown Greens apiary, we joined in that tradition for the first time. Bees make honey in order to preserve food stores for long periods of time. It enables a colony, which might be composed of tens of thousands of individual bees, to survive through times of dearth, when either very little is flowering in mid summer, or through the dead of winter when it is just too cold to fly. Honey is composed of nectar which is processed by enzymes and bacteria in the bee’s digestive tract, carefully dried to a precise moisture content, and then sealed over in beeswax. In this form, it will stay good for hundreds and even thousands of exploring the years. Archaeologists pyramids of Egypt found honey in pots that still hadn’t spoiled. When harvesting, the beekeeper must take care not to take so much honey that it might threaten the survival of the colony. If stores become dangerously low later, the keeper can fall back on feeding the hive artificially using a solution of regular table sugar and water, but this is added work. Most beekeepers in this area use a box and frame system called a Langstroth hive. This enables us to remove honey by the frame without disrupting the rest of the colony. The bees tend to store large excesses at the top of their hive, so the apiarist usually places a whole box of clean frames, called a “super”, on top of the colony with the dedicated purpose of collecting honey. We ended up getting one full super off our production hive this year, which amounted to about 30 pounds of

honey. According to recent government statistics, the average colony produced about 38 pounds, so we were at least in the ballpark. The vagaries of weather can have a big impact on production. Last spring during the peak nectar flow we had an extended period of cool wet weather that severely hampered the ability of foraging bees to collect nectar. Honey production was down all over, and I opted not to pull a single frame. Last week I hauled the harvest up to the American Legion Hall in King George where the group I belong to, The Gateway Beekeeping Association, had set up the club’s extraction equipment. The frames are brought out one by one, and a hot knife is drawn across the tops of the cells to peel off the wax tops. Then the frames are placed in a big electric centrifuge that has a basin beneath it to collect all the honey as it spins out. You stick your food grade plastic bucket under a spigot and walk out with your honey. Finally, the honey gets filtered once or twice to strain out the odd remaining bee antennae and then poured into the bottles and pooh bears you might see at the farmers market. Of course, the actual final step is wiping everything down two or three times, since on honey day everything gets pretty sticky, including the beekeepers. It is a beautiful product sitting in nice rows on the counter of my kitchen. Maybe though, it is only the beekeeper that knows the reality of honey, a kind of distilled essence of countless stings, sweaty summer work, winter dead outs and other setbacks and disappointments. I suppose, in that way it doesn’t really differ from most human endeavors, and at least in beekeeping, if you’re lucky, you get something sweet in the end. Dr. Mike Costa is a Family Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtow Greens family

Kristen LePine’s publishing platform

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2701

By A.E. Bayne Playwright and novelist Kristen LePine says that big projects never seem to follow a straight line. The University of Mary Washington instructor discovered this for herself as she began writing her first novel, Daughter of Sparta. She began it several years ago as a “choose your own adventure” book for a new educational publisher, but then the book took a new direction, and LePine decided to publish it herself. Navigating this new turn, LePine put together a company called Historic Heroines as a publishing platform for Daughter of Sparta and then also decided to market other work from writers telling stories from a female perspective, something which was near and dear to her heart. Today, in addition to currently teaching playwriting at UMW, LePine also works as a marketing assistant for an arts organization. She says that as she looks at resources from around the world, she is still surprised at how the stories from the

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

photo by peter cannito. male perspective tend to be valued over others. She says, “I think that perception starts early. I worked with a group of middle schoolers in the fall writing a devised play and the instructor said, ‘I want you to go home and research your last name and tell me a story about your family.’ A group of thirty eighth-grade drama students went home, wrote stories, and brought them back. They were all wonderful, but most of them were about Grandpa. I thought where's grandma? Where's your aunt? Where are the women? Then I wondered why did that happen? Where are those stories and how can we highlight them? So with Historic Heroines that’s what I try to do.” LePine says that as an educator, she finds herself being much more balanced in her selection of syllabus materials, especially in light of her experiences throughout her own years in school. She explains, “I'm building a syllabus and I'm selecting stories to read. Certainly, when I was in college most of the stories I read were from a male writer's perspective. There might be one token female or you took women's literature, and there was just an imbalance to that. When I left school, I just wondered why it was that way.” As LePine was starting Historic Heroines, a friend from her days with a playwriting group at the Woolly Mammoth Theater Company in Washington, D.C. contacted her about working together on a project. Richard Rashke had a play he wanted to publish called Dear Esther, based on Holocaust survivor Esther Tenner Raab. LePine says that as she and Rashke delved deeper into publishing the play, Rashke also provided the authentic and moving letters that inspired it. This

made her reconsider the direction of her company, another twist in the path. She says, “I thought in order to be a publisher of this book, I need to become a non-profit. This is educational, and it belongs in schools as part of the history or English curriculum.” After the initial publication, LePine decided that the letters would make for tolerance and anti-bullying program, so she set to work to develop an educational component for the book in collaboration with educators to build the right language for a tolerance and antibullying lessons. She hopes to see feedback from schools after testing the book this fall. Next steps from Historic Heroines and LePine include piloting a tolerance and anti-bullying program based onChildren’s Letter’s to Holocaust Survivor: Dear Esther in three schools in New Jersey. Eventually, she hopes to get it out to as many schools as possible. LePine says she is really proud of the work Rashke has done and is excited to promote it. Additionally, LePine will be completing her own historic fiction novel, Daughter of Sparta. For inquiries about publication through Historic Heroines, contact Kristen LePine at kristen@historicheroines.org. Visit the website at historicherories.org. A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and veteran educator living in Fredericksburg. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review NOTE: A longer version of this piece was originally printed in the spring/summer edition of the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (FLAR), found at fredericksburgwriters.com .

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

11


Historic Heroines

River Protection Everything Greens A community concern

the honey season

By lou gramann Riverfest is not a kid anymore. It has matured nicely into a twentysomething member of the Fredericksburg Community, with an important mission all its own. Riverfest is of course the Friends of the brainchild of Rappahannock. On September 16th, FOR will hold its 27th Annual Riverfest, and for most of those 27 years, the event has sold out. All tickets are sold in advance. Waiting until the last minute will not work. That’s why getting tickets now gives you a double advantage. You won’t miss out, and you get the early bird price which expires on September 1st.

Why is this event so popular? One reason is the gravity of the mission it represents. With 1,200 tickets sold each year, supporters understand that the FOR’s 32-year effort to protect the river is important to everyone in the area. Due to this support, the scale and impact of FOR’s programs continue to grow. Upstream of the Fredericksburg area, riparian buffers protect the flowing water from farm runoff that can include fertilizer and animal waste. Locally, highly visible River Clean-ups give many people the chance to make a difference with just a one-day commitment.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

10

August 2017

Locally, too, FOR staff and volunteers offer conservation and stewardship classes and workshops for kids and teachers. Hands-on learning “At the River’s Edge” makes the sessions fun and memorable for over 6,000 students each year. Downstream in the Tappahannock area, the FOR satellite office coordinates oyster bed restoration. FOR is also committed to protecting the streams and groundwater of the watershed from the permanent pollution of fracking chemicals. “Each of these programs is important to our mission,” says Executive Director Kathleen Harrigan. “And without the funds raised at Riverfest, we just couldn’t do this important work. Riverfest is also a great party. It is at Farley Vale Farm in King George County again, under large tents, rain or shine. There will be a variety of festival foods and beverages, boat rides along the Rappahannock, a tent full of raffle prizes, and a live auction. Steamed blue crabs are a staple, as are the barbeque buffet and open bar. For the third year in a row, John Wack will cook catfish and hush puppies on-site. Wack began this tradition while serving on the FOR Executive Committee, and has added a new fryer and more volunteer assistants to keep up with demand. Wine tasting and bourbon tasting, another free part of the event, make the food taste that much better. Three different bands entertain. The Jazz Ensemble of UMW, led by music professor Doug Gately, is on stage first. Bob, Paul, and Amy follow with Riverfolk. Laurie Rose Griffith and Peter Mealy provide the pop and rock music that gets people up and dancing. Through Riverfest, Friends of the Rappahannock’s friends can keep FOR projects going strong with sponsorships ranging from $250 to $10,000. Individual tickets and sponsorships are on sale at www.riverfriends.org on the Riverfest page. The website also contains a wealth of information about FOR projects and important issues related to water quality. As the FOR mission statement says, this is a way for everyone in the area to be: “A voice and active force for a healthy and scenic Rappahannock River.”

Lou Gramann is a volunteer for Friends of the Rappahannock who has known Riverfest since it was an infant.

Front porch fredericksburg

By mike costa

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required.

One of the highlights of the beekeeper’s year is the time he or she gets to collect honey from the hive. In Virginia this is usually done at the end of the heavy nectar flow, which begins in mid spring and runs till the end of June. Humans have probably been doing this for a good 10,000 years, and this year at the Downtown Greens apiary, we joined in that tradition for the first time. Bees make honey in order to preserve food stores for long periods of time. It enables a colony, which might be composed of tens of thousands of individual bees, to survive through times of dearth, when either very little is flowering in mid summer, or through the dead of winter when it is just too cold to fly. Honey is composed of nectar which is processed by enzymes and bacteria in the bee’s digestive tract, carefully dried to a precise moisture content, and then sealed over in beeswax. In this form, it will stay good for hundreds and even thousands of exploring the years. Archaeologists pyramids of Egypt found honey in pots that still hadn’t spoiled. When harvesting, the beekeeper must take care not to take so much honey that it might threaten the survival of the colony. If stores become dangerously low later, the keeper can fall back on feeding the hive artificially using a solution of regular table sugar and water, but this is added work. Most beekeepers in this area use a box and frame system called a Langstroth hive. This enables us to remove honey by the frame without disrupting the rest of the colony. The bees tend to store large excesses at the top of their hive, so the apiarist usually places a whole box of clean frames, called a “super”, on top of the colony with the dedicated purpose of collecting honey. We ended up getting one full super off our production hive this year, which amounted to about 30 pounds of

honey. According to recent government statistics, the average colony produced about 38 pounds, so we were at least in the ballpark. The vagaries of weather can have a big impact on production. Last spring during the peak nectar flow we had an extended period of cool wet weather that severely hampered the ability of foraging bees to collect nectar. Honey production was down all over, and I opted not to pull a single frame. Last week I hauled the harvest up to the American Legion Hall in King George where the group I belong to, The Gateway Beekeeping Association, had set up the club’s extraction equipment. The frames are brought out one by one, and a hot knife is drawn across the tops of the cells to peel off the wax tops. Then the frames are placed in a big electric centrifuge that has a basin beneath it to collect all the honey as it spins out. You stick your food grade plastic bucket under a spigot and walk out with your honey. Finally, the honey gets filtered once or twice to strain out the odd remaining bee antennae and then poured into the bottles and pooh bears you might see at the farmers market. Of course, the actual final step is wiping everything down two or three times, since on honey day everything gets pretty sticky, including the beekeepers. It is a beautiful product sitting in nice rows on the counter of my kitchen. Maybe though, it is only the beekeeper that knows the reality of honey, a kind of distilled essence of countless stings, sweaty summer work, winter dead outs and other setbacks and disappointments. I suppose, in that way it doesn’t really differ from most human endeavors, and at least in beekeeping, if you’re lucky, you get something sweet in the end. Dr. Mike Costa is a Family Practitioner, a beekeeper & a member of the Downtow Greens family

Kristen LePine’s publishing platform

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg. Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2701

By A.E. Bayne Playwright and novelist Kristen LePine says that big projects never seem to follow a straight line. The University of Mary Washington instructor discovered this for herself as she began writing her first novel, Daughter of Sparta. She began it several years ago as a “choose your own adventure” book for a new educational publisher, but then the book took a new direction, and LePine decided to publish it herself. Navigating this new turn, LePine put together a company called Historic Heroines as a publishing platform for Daughter of Sparta and then also decided to market other work from writers telling stories from a female perspective, something which was near and dear to her heart. Today, in addition to currently teaching playwriting at UMW, LePine also works as a marketing assistant for an arts organization. She says that as she looks at resources from around the world, she is still surprised at how the stories from the

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

photo by peter cannito. male perspective tend to be valued over others. She says, “I think that perception starts early. I worked with a group of middle schoolers in the fall writing a devised play and the instructor said, ‘I want you to go home and research your last name and tell me a story about your family.’ A group of thirty eighth-grade drama students went home, wrote stories, and brought them back. They were all wonderful, but most of them were about Grandpa. I thought where's grandma? Where's your aunt? Where are the women? Then I wondered why did that happen? Where are those stories and how can we highlight them? So with Historic Heroines that’s what I try to do.” LePine says that as an educator, she finds herself being much more balanced in her selection of syllabus materials, especially in light of her experiences throughout her own years in school. She explains, “I'm building a syllabus and I'm selecting stories to read. Certainly, when I was in college most of the stories I read were from a male writer's perspective. There might be one token female or you took women's literature, and there was just an imbalance to that. When I left school, I just wondered why it was that way.” As LePine was starting Historic Heroines, a friend from her days with a playwriting group at the Woolly Mammoth Theater Company in Washington, D.C. contacted her about working together on a project. Richard Rashke had a play he wanted to publish called Dear Esther, based on Holocaust survivor Esther Tenner Raab. LePine says that as she and Rashke delved deeper into publishing the play, Rashke also provided the authentic and moving letters that inspired it. This

made her reconsider the direction of her company, another twist in the path. She says, “I thought in order to be a publisher of this book, I need to become a non-profit. This is educational, and it belongs in schools as part of the history or English curriculum.” After the initial publication, LePine decided that the letters would make for tolerance and anti-bullying program, so she set to work to develop an educational component for the book in collaboration with educators to build the right language for a tolerance and antibullying lessons. She hopes to see feedback from schools after testing the book this fall. Next steps from Historic Heroines and LePine include piloting a tolerance and anti-bullying program based onChildren’s Letter’s to Holocaust Survivor: Dear Esther in three schools in New Jersey. Eventually, she hopes to get it out to as many schools as possible. LePine says she is really proud of the work Rashke has done and is excited to promote it. Additionally, LePine will be completing her own historic fiction novel, Daughter of Sparta. For inquiries about publication through Historic Heroines, contact Kristen LePine at kristen@historicheroines.org. Visit the website at historicherories.org. A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist and veteran educator living in Fredericksburg. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review NOTE: A longer version of this piece was originally printed in the spring/summer edition of the Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review (FLAR), found at fredericksburgwriters.com .

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

11


Restaurant Week please your palate Without Draining your wallet By Bill Freehling

Chef Wade Truong of Kybecca Summer Restaurant Week kicked off July 28 in downtown Fredericksburg and will run through Sunday, August 6, giving area residents and visitors an opportunity to sample special menus from dozens of topnotch restaurants. Nearly 30 downtown eateries have signed up for Summer Restaurant Week, and more could decide to participate. Sample menus and updates can be seen on the “FXBG Summer Restaurant Week” event page on Facebook hosted by the Fredericksburg Department of E c o n o m i c Development and Tourism. Participating restaurants will be offering a variety of specials for Summer Restaurant Week. Among the options restaurants can offer are two-co urse dinner specials for $20 per person, two-course lunch specials for $10 per person and two dinners for $20. “Summer Restaurant Week is a wonderful opportunity for people to explore the culinary talents of our downtown restaurateurs at a special price,” said Danelle Rose, Fredericksburg’s Tourism Services Manager. “While downtown, diners can also explore our rich history, outdoor amenities, specialty retail shops and walkable streets. Summer Restaurant Week is a great time to be downtown.” Participating Restaurants: The Bavarian Chef, 200 Lafayette Blvd. Bistro Bethem, 309 William St.

12

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Brock’s Riverside Grill, 503 Sophia St. Capital Ale House, 917 Caroline St. Castiglia's Italian Restaurant, 324 Wm Cork and Table, 909 Caroline St. Deutschland Downtown, 411 William St. Eileen's Bakery & Café, 1115 Caroline Fahrenheit 132, 318 William St. Foode, 900 Princess Anne St.

Bistro Bethem The Happy Clam, 1017 Sophia St. Italian Station, 620 Caroline St. Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne St. Kickshaws Kitchen, 1002 Sophia St. Kybecca, 402 William St. La Petite Auberge, 311 William St. Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St. Ristorante Renato, 422 Caroline St. Sammy T’s, 801 Caroline St. Sedona Taphouse, 591 William St. Soup & Taco, 813 Caroline St. Soup & Taco 2, 806 William St. Sprelly, 920 Caroline St Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage St. The Virginia Deli, 826 Caroline St. Vivify Burger & Lounge, 314 William St. Happy Eating!!! Bill Freehling is the Director of Economic Development and Tourism for the City of Fredericksburg. Photos courtesy of City Dept of Economic Development

Season’s Bounty

peaches & blackberries By vanessa moncure The dictionary's definition of August is perfectly apt for gardeners "impressive" easily describes the lush tomato jungle outside my back door, while "celebrated" and "amazing" just about sum up the racks and rows of canned goods I've already put up for winter. Cold weather sounds so very, very far away while we're now sweltering through the dog days of summer. The heat index has risen into the triple digits outdoors, but if you can, pickle or preserve much of summer's bounty, it's easy to feel as sticky and sweaty indoors, just standing in front of the stove! I'm working on my August harvest now - sweet, dill and bread&butter pickles - peppers, tomatoes, garlic, onions and spices jazzing up a home-grown salsa a sauerkraut experiment, brined cabbage gently bubbling away in an old stoneware crock - zucchini everything - relishes, beets,corn-and did I mention pickles? My grandmother used to say it's harder work preserving the harvest than working the garden - I'm not sure my husband would agree as he's running the tiller or picking limas on one of those 105-degree heatindex days, though. Why garden? For me, it's the great satisfaction of being able to open a jar of summer, selecting from jeweled rows of glass-packed tomatoes, pickles, jellies, relishes and preserves, recipes lovingly handed down for generations in my family. August is also the month I take a vacation from my planted garden and head to Flint Hill for bushels of Red Haven peaches, and to my Madison farm to collect wild brambles, or blackberries. from thorny branches overarching the cold spring streams. Lustrous, purple-black fruits, formed of many small fruits called drupelets, blackberries are paradoxically red when they are green (immature) and can be gathered wild in most farm fields, fence lines and even along back roadsides. The Red Haven peach, according to TheTreeFarm.com, is the peach by which all others are measured - and I second this statement. Bite into a fresh golden freestone peach, with its summer blush of red, and you may find juice running down your chin and arm - quite a contrast to the dry, refrigerated husks sold in supermarkets. Quick, down to the Farmer's Market before they're all gone! NO-C CHURN OVERNIGHT ICE CREAM WITH PEACHY SAUCE All, right, do I have your attention now? This recipe is really foolproof, and you could swap out the peach liqueur and peaches for raspberries and raspberry liqueur, or blackberries and blackberry liqueur. Yum. Combine one and one-quarter cups heavy cream with six oz. of sweetened

condensed milk and two tablespoons of peach liqueur. Whisk the ingredients together in a chilled bowl until soft peaks form and you have a light, airy mixture. Fill an airtight container and freeze overnight. Make the peachy sauce and refrigerate until serving time - rinse, peel and thinly slice 2 to 3 cups of peaches and gently turn into a large shallow saucepan along with one-quarter cup sugar, one tablespoon lemon juice and two tablespoonsful peach liqueur. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and cook just long enough to release the juices from the peaches and allow the sugar to caramelize. When ready to serve, spoon chilled sauce into a shallow bowl and top with three small scoops of ice cream. Garnish with fresh blackberries and leaves of just-picked mint.Yum again. BLACKBERRY ZABAGLIONE Known in French as sabayon, the original recipe originated in Italy and is a kind of light custard - very versatile as you can serve it chilled, as in this recipe, warm or at room temperature, with fresh fruit or by itself or even as a sauce. This recipe requires plenty of whisking and some time over a hot stove, but patience is rewarded! In the top part of a double boiler, mix together eight beaten egg yolks with onehalf cup sugar and one-third cup Marsala wine (that is the traditional recipe - I like to substitute a fruit liqueur and serve it topped with the same liqueur, but don't use blackberry or any dark colored liqueur - your delicious zabaglione may turn an unappetizing gray color - delicious in the dark, though!) Cook over rapidly boiling water, whisking constantly until the mixture doubles in volume and thickens. Remove from heat and whisk for another minute or so. Pour into tall flute glasses and refrigerate, or chill and serve as a sauce with fresh blackberries. If you refrigerate in flutes, just top with fresh berries to serve. PEACH STREUSEL MUFFINS Preheat oven to 375F. Line muffin pan with white paper liners (When baked, I place each muffin on an open decorative liner - looks great for serving.).Peel and chop 2-3 cups fresh peaches and set aside. Beat together one-half cup butter, onehalf cup sugar until light, then beat in 2 eggs. Sift together 2cups flour, 3 teasp. baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt. Add alternately with one cup milk. Spoon batter into muffin tins, filling about onehalf full. Top with a scoop of the chopped peaches and some of the struesel topping - bake about 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Drizzle with a plain vanilla icing if desired. Serve with a bowl of fresh blackberries and you will always love August, too!

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

The Sunken Well Tavern

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

13


Restaurant Week please your palate Without Draining your wallet By Bill Freehling

Chef Wade Truong of Kybecca Summer Restaurant Week kicked off July 28 in downtown Fredericksburg and will run through Sunday, August 6, giving area residents and visitors an opportunity to sample special menus from dozens of topnotch restaurants. Nearly 30 downtown eateries have signed up for Summer Restaurant Week, and more could decide to participate. Sample menus and updates can be seen on the “FXBG Summer Restaurant Week” event page on Facebook hosted by the Fredericksburg Department of E c o n o m i c Development and Tourism. Participating restaurants will be offering a variety of specials for Summer Restaurant Week. Among the options restaurants can offer are two-co urse dinner specials for $20 per person, two-course lunch specials for $10 per person and two dinners for $20. “Summer Restaurant Week is a wonderful opportunity for people to explore the culinary talents of our downtown restaurateurs at a special price,” said Danelle Rose, Fredericksburg’s Tourism Services Manager. “While downtown, diners can also explore our rich history, outdoor amenities, specialty retail shops and walkable streets. Summer Restaurant Week is a great time to be downtown.” Participating Restaurants: The Bavarian Chef, 200 Lafayette Blvd. Bistro Bethem, 309 William St.

12

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Brock’s Riverside Grill, 503 Sophia St. Capital Ale House, 917 Caroline St. Castiglia's Italian Restaurant, 324 Wm Cork and Table, 909 Caroline St. Deutschland Downtown, 411 William St. Eileen's Bakery & Café, 1115 Caroline Fahrenheit 132, 318 William St. Foode, 900 Princess Anne St.

Bistro Bethem The Happy Clam, 1017 Sophia St. Italian Station, 620 Caroline St. Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne St. Kickshaws Kitchen, 1002 Sophia St. Kybecca, 402 William St. La Petite Auberge, 311 William St. Legume Kitchen & Bar, 715 Caroline St. Ristorante Renato, 422 Caroline St. Sammy T’s, 801 Caroline St. Sedona Taphouse, 591 William St. Soup & Taco, 813 Caroline St. Soup & Taco 2, 806 William St. Sprelly, 920 Caroline St Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage St. The Virginia Deli, 826 Caroline St. Vivify Burger & Lounge, 314 William St. Happy Eating!!! Bill Freehling is the Director of Economic Development and Tourism for the City of Fredericksburg. Photos courtesy of City Dept of Economic Development

Season’s Bounty

peaches & blackberries By vanessa moncure The dictionary's definition of August is perfectly apt for gardeners "impressive" easily describes the lush tomato jungle outside my back door, while "celebrated" and "amazing" just about sum up the racks and rows of canned goods I've already put up for winter. Cold weather sounds so very, very far away while we're now sweltering through the dog days of summer. The heat index has risen into the triple digits outdoors, but if you can, pickle or preserve much of summer's bounty, it's easy to feel as sticky and sweaty indoors, just standing in front of the stove! I'm working on my August harvest now - sweet, dill and bread&butter pickles - peppers, tomatoes, garlic, onions and spices jazzing up a home-grown salsa a sauerkraut experiment, brined cabbage gently bubbling away in an old stoneware crock - zucchini everything - relishes, beets,corn-and did I mention pickles? My grandmother used to say it's harder work preserving the harvest than working the garden - I'm not sure my husband would agree as he's running the tiller or picking limas on one of those 105-degree heatindex days, though. Why garden? For me, it's the great satisfaction of being able to open a jar of summer, selecting from jeweled rows of glass-packed tomatoes, pickles, jellies, relishes and preserves, recipes lovingly handed down for generations in my family. August is also the month I take a vacation from my planted garden and head to Flint Hill for bushels of Red Haven peaches, and to my Madison farm to collect wild brambles, or blackberries. from thorny branches overarching the cold spring streams. Lustrous, purple-black fruits, formed of many small fruits called drupelets, blackberries are paradoxically red when they are green (immature) and can be gathered wild in most farm fields, fence lines and even along back roadsides. The Red Haven peach, according to TheTreeFarm.com, is the peach by which all others are measured - and I second this statement. Bite into a fresh golden freestone peach, with its summer blush of red, and you may find juice running down your chin and arm - quite a contrast to the dry, refrigerated husks sold in supermarkets. Quick, down to the Farmer's Market before they're all gone! NO-C CHURN OVERNIGHT ICE CREAM WITH PEACHY SAUCE All, right, do I have your attention now? This recipe is really foolproof, and you could swap out the peach liqueur and peaches for raspberries and raspberry liqueur, or blackberries and blackberry liqueur. Yum. Combine one and one-quarter cups heavy cream with six oz. of sweetened

condensed milk and two tablespoons of peach liqueur. Whisk the ingredients together in a chilled bowl until soft peaks form and you have a light, airy mixture. Fill an airtight container and freeze overnight. Make the peachy sauce and refrigerate until serving time - rinse, peel and thinly slice 2 to 3 cups of peaches and gently turn into a large shallow saucepan along with one-quarter cup sugar, one tablespoon lemon juice and two tablespoonsful peach liqueur. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and cook just long enough to release the juices from the peaches and allow the sugar to caramelize. When ready to serve, spoon chilled sauce into a shallow bowl and top with three small scoops of ice cream. Garnish with fresh blackberries and leaves of just-picked mint.Yum again. BLACKBERRY ZABAGLIONE Known in French as sabayon, the original recipe originated in Italy and is a kind of light custard - very versatile as you can serve it chilled, as in this recipe, warm or at room temperature, with fresh fruit or by itself or even as a sauce. This recipe requires plenty of whisking and some time over a hot stove, but patience is rewarded! In the top part of a double boiler, mix together eight beaten egg yolks with onehalf cup sugar and one-third cup Marsala wine (that is the traditional recipe - I like to substitute a fruit liqueur and serve it topped with the same liqueur, but don't use blackberry or any dark colored liqueur - your delicious zabaglione may turn an unappetizing gray color - delicious in the dark, though!) Cook over rapidly boiling water, whisking constantly until the mixture doubles in volume and thickens. Remove from heat and whisk for another minute or so. Pour into tall flute glasses and refrigerate, or chill and serve as a sauce with fresh blackberries. If you refrigerate in flutes, just top with fresh berries to serve. PEACH STREUSEL MUFFINS Preheat oven to 375F. Line muffin pan with white paper liners (When baked, I place each muffin on an open decorative liner - looks great for serving.).Peel and chop 2-3 cups fresh peaches and set aside. Beat together one-half cup butter, onehalf cup sugar until light, then beat in 2 eggs. Sift together 2cups flour, 3 teasp. baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt. Add alternately with one cup milk. Spoon batter into muffin tins, filling about onehalf full. Top with a scoop of the chopped peaches and some of the struesel topping - bake about 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Drizzle with a plain vanilla icing if desired. Serve with a bowl of fresh blackberries and you will always love August, too!

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

The Sunken Well Tavern

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

13


Your Not Crazy.. you’re dehydrated

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738 14

August 2017

Fresh Local Organic

Everyone Remembers your beer

Since 2004

Interview by kevin Brown

by suzy woollam

“I think I’m going crazy”, she said on the phone. “I feel like the last couple of months I have just been irrationally ANGRY! It seems to come out of nowhere, and for no reason. I think I am losing my mind”. My first question to her was “Do you typically have low blood pressure?” Seasonal hypotension, a condition where the blood pressure drops in warmer weather, is sadly underdiscussed by most health care providers. Our body is generally very good at regulating itself, and naturally our blood

When You’re Strange.....

pressure tends to rise in the cold months, and drop in the warmer months. For most folks, this is a good thing, as it helps to regulate body temperature, keeping you warmer in winter and cooler in summer. But for those who have unusually low blood pressure, it can be anything but. Low Blood Pressure can cause an array of symptoms, including dizziness and confusion, weakness, nausea and even feeling faint. And unless it’s severe, symptoms are mild, and usually easy to manage. When blood pressure drops too low, the heart will begin to beat faster moving blood more quickly and forcefully through the heart, raising blood pressure temporarily. It’s the ongoing dance of our internal machine to keep us moving along, and most of the time goes completely unnoticed. But, add in the “normal” blood thinning that occurs in warm weather (read August in Virginia), coupled with even mild dehydration, and suddenly, first comes the “limp as a dishrag” lethargy, the yawns….and then BAM! your heart is racing, you’re wideeyed and The Hulk has nothing on you. This “irrational anger” comes from the sudden elevation in blood pressure as the body tries desperately to keep itself in a state of balance. One of the easiest ways to keep cool, in mind AND body, during these long hot summer days is staying hydrated! How much do you need? Generally speaking it’s your weight divided in half to get ounces per day. For example, a healthy 160lb male would need 80 oz daily to maintain hydration. This amount will increase based on activity level, but is a good starting point. Add cucumber, lemon or lime slices (NOT essential oils!!) to your water to perk up the flavor, or make my favorite Haymaker’s Water. (recipe below) Originally intended for those working in the fields to keep them cool and well hydrated, it contains ginger, helpful in regulate blood pressure, Apple Cider Vinegar and maple syrup, a good source of electrolytes to help keep everything in balance. Simply add (to taste) fresh grated ginger, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, and Maple Syrup to a water bottle, fill with filtered water, shake, and go. It should be slightly spicy-sweet-tart, taste great, and help to keep you hydrated throughout the day. And be sure to take the time to talk with your health care provider about all the ways you can keep your body happy, hydrated and healthy year round. Suzy Woollam is the owner of The Scenter of Town, Charles St, Downtown.

Front porch fredericksburg

Over the past few years, craft beer enthusiasts in the Fredericksburg region have welcomed a savory explosion in local brewery openings, along with associated tourism. Recently, the super-sized Strangeways Brewing arrived on the scene near the Fredericksburg Fairgrounds (which will be hosting the annual Fair through 6 August) . We interviewed Tonie Stevens, Strangeways Sales & Marketing Director to find out more about this exciting brewery. Q. Why did Strangeways photo by j.elias o’neal choose FXBG ? A: “Fredericksburg Neil Burton, Founder & Owner is the hometown of Neil Strangeways Brewing Burton, the founder and will keep our guests both entertained and owner of Strangeways Brewing and begging for more. With almost 3.5 acres graduate of James Monroe High School. to play with and the ability to seat nearly The building that houses the new Fredericksburg location was previously 300 people, Strangeways is poised to Burton’s Menswear, the family business present some amazing experiences to this where Neil worked for many years. After community. Programming and events will the success of our flagship Richmond-area start to populate our calendar starting brewery, the team explored expansion into early August. Unique eats, i.e., food, will other areas of Virginia. We believed that have a large focus in our programs, along the market north of Richmond provided with family activities that are kid and dog the most opportunity for success. Seeing friendly. Q. What is Strangeways' vision for how that the craft beer scene was doing well in the Fredericksburg area, Neil believed it you will affect/fit into the Fredericksburg was time to come home and bring some area culture? A: “Strangeways’ uses local Strangeways beer to the party. produce and ingredients in most of our Q. Describe the business operation, what beers. We support Virginia agriculture types of products/service/entertainment and are part of the VA Craft Beer Guild, do you offer? A: “Our Fredericksburg facility is participating in numerous programs that The both a tasting room and brewery support Virginia Tourism. Fredericksburg facility will provide occupying 10,000 square feet, which includes a state-of-the-art 10-barrel approximately 25 full and part-time jobs local residents, and enhance brewing system, a 100-foot one-of-a-kind to U-shaped bar, a private lounge, an arcade, Fredericksburg’s growing craft beer an additional private event space to scene. Additionally, Strangeways plans to accommodate small and large groups, a support local small businesses by offering newly constructed patio with a 30-foot their packaged food products and art for We are outside bar, and plenty of Strange decor sale in the tasting room. not to be missed. Matty Eck, our talented enhancing our tasting room experience head brewer, delights guests with a lineup with local talent, food (to include food of exquisitely peculiar beers, alongside trucks), sports groups, and more. We many of our perennial customer want people to feel “at home” at favorites. We have 48 taps inside and 48 Strangeways.” taps outside filled with a plethora of beers to please nearly every palate. The Strangeways concept is unlike anything else around. We welcome beer lovers to join us to experience for what is shear madness or perhaps genius - you be the judge. “We are moving towards curating unique events, activities and shows that

Thank you Neil, Tonie and the hard-working Strangeways team. More details on Strangeways events and happenings can be found at strangewaysbrewing.com and on their Facebook page, Strangeways Brewing Fredericksburg.”

Don Moncho tex mex on the river

309 William Street 540.371.9999

by Mary Lynn Powers

BISTROBETHEM.COM

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Fredericksburg abounds with a location is the big draw for me. Sitting on plethora of good restaurants. The newest their patio, lazily watching the river seems spot, Don Moncho is located at 1101 like a nice way to spend an hour or two. Sophia St. Don Moncho advertises both Jose comes from a hard working Tex-Mex and Caribbean cuisine, but they family, which is what it takes to make a soon realized that Tex-Mex was the desired restaurant work. He stressed that it is missing component downtown. I met with really all about the family. Don Moncho is Jose Acosta (above), the owner, and we sat a nickname for Ramon which is his in the newly renovated dining room which father’s middle name. His sister manages overlooks the river with a clear view of their first location in Adams Morgan. His Chatham Manor. If you have been in this brother in law works in the company. Two building prior, you will of his four children be amazed at the are working in the The new design gives the difference. Now the shop for the restaurant a more open feel, dining room is wide summer. It’s and lends to the magnificent open when you walk obvious that he in, as is the bar, teaches the “it backdrop of the river where prior they had doesn’t grow on been walled off from each other. The new trees” lesson! design gives the restaurant a more open The Acostas first opened DC Grill in Massaponax which has typical American feel, and lends to the magnificent backdrop of the river. fare, but with a latin flair. They have The menu has a list of the typical already established a local clientele which favorites, tacos, burritos, fajitas with some is reminiscent of a Cheers (TV show) American and Caribbean choices. The dinner atmosphere, “where everybody knows entrees all come with rice and beans, and your name.” They have music and they have some interesting choices like a showcase many of the local musicians. Hawaiian Shrimp that is served in a halved Jose has a good staff at both locations. pineapple. They are working on a $7.99 They are attentive, and seem to enjoy express lunch special which should be their jobs. He said they are still looking for quick and cheap! Don Moncho has daily a few more people to bring the staff up to specials like Taco Tuesdays and Fajita a necessary number. Stay tuned to Thursdays. I did try the tacos and was Facebook for upcoming specials and pleasantly surprised. There was a good changes. Try Don Moncho...you wil not be portion of chicken topped with a fresh disappointed. Don Moncho guacamole. My friend tried the burrito Open 11a - 11p which was huge, and not many could finish 1101 Sophia Street the whole thing, but he did! (540) 373-0 0870 Their cocktail menu is a work of www.donmoncho.com art, and it should be fun to see if the faacebook drinks are as good as they sound. Margaritas with jalapeño spiked tequila sounded interesting, as did the different Mary Lynn enjoys meeting and writing flavored mojitos. They do have some about interesting people in the ‘Burg happy hour and daily specials. The for Front Porch front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

15


Your Not Crazy.. you’re dehydrated

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738 14

August 2017

Fresh Local Organic

Everyone Remembers your beer

Since 2004

Interview by kevin Brown

by suzy woollam

“I think I’m going crazy”, she said on the phone. “I feel like the last couple of months I have just been irrationally ANGRY! It seems to come out of nowhere, and for no reason. I think I am losing my mind”. My first question to her was “Do you typically have low blood pressure?” Seasonal hypotension, a condition where the blood pressure drops in warmer weather, is sadly underdiscussed by most health care providers. Our body is generally very good at regulating itself, and naturally our blood

When You’re Strange.....

pressure tends to rise in the cold months, and drop in the warmer months. For most folks, this is a good thing, as it helps to regulate body temperature, keeping you warmer in winter and cooler in summer. But for those who have unusually low blood pressure, it can be anything but. Low Blood Pressure can cause an array of symptoms, including dizziness and confusion, weakness, nausea and even feeling faint. And unless it’s severe, symptoms are mild, and usually easy to manage. When blood pressure drops too low, the heart will begin to beat faster moving blood more quickly and forcefully through the heart, raising blood pressure temporarily. It’s the ongoing dance of our internal machine to keep us moving along, and most of the time goes completely unnoticed. But, add in the “normal” blood thinning that occurs in warm weather (read August in Virginia), coupled with even mild dehydration, and suddenly, first comes the “limp as a dishrag” lethargy, the yawns….and then BAM! your heart is racing, you’re wideeyed and The Hulk has nothing on you. This “irrational anger” comes from the sudden elevation in blood pressure as the body tries desperately to keep itself in a state of balance. One of the easiest ways to keep cool, in mind AND body, during these long hot summer days is staying hydrated! How much do you need? Generally speaking it’s your weight divided in half to get ounces per day. For example, a healthy 160lb male would need 80 oz daily to maintain hydration. This amount will increase based on activity level, but is a good starting point. Add cucumber, lemon or lime slices (NOT essential oils!!) to your water to perk up the flavor, or make my favorite Haymaker’s Water. (recipe below) Originally intended for those working in the fields to keep them cool and well hydrated, it contains ginger, helpful in regulate blood pressure, Apple Cider Vinegar and maple syrup, a good source of electrolytes to help keep everything in balance. Simply add (to taste) fresh grated ginger, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, and Maple Syrup to a water bottle, fill with filtered water, shake, and go. It should be slightly spicy-sweet-tart, taste great, and help to keep you hydrated throughout the day. And be sure to take the time to talk with your health care provider about all the ways you can keep your body happy, hydrated and healthy year round. Suzy Woollam is the owner of The Scenter of Town, Charles St, Downtown.

Front porch fredericksburg

Over the past few years, craft beer enthusiasts in the Fredericksburg region have welcomed a savory explosion in local brewery openings, along with associated tourism. Recently, the super-sized Strangeways Brewing arrived on the scene near the Fredericksburg Fairgrounds (which will be hosting the annual Fair through 6 August) . We interviewed Tonie Stevens, Strangeways Sales & Marketing Director to find out more about this exciting brewery. Q. Why did Strangeways photo by j.elias o’neal choose FXBG ? A: “Fredericksburg Neil Burton, Founder & Owner is the hometown of Neil Strangeways Brewing Burton, the founder and will keep our guests both entertained and owner of Strangeways Brewing and begging for more. With almost 3.5 acres graduate of James Monroe High School. to play with and the ability to seat nearly The building that houses the new Fredericksburg location was previously 300 people, Strangeways is poised to Burton’s Menswear, the family business present some amazing experiences to this where Neil worked for many years. After community. Programming and events will the success of our flagship Richmond-area start to populate our calendar starting brewery, the team explored expansion into early August. Unique eats, i.e., food, will other areas of Virginia. We believed that have a large focus in our programs, along the market north of Richmond provided with family activities that are kid and dog the most opportunity for success. Seeing friendly. Q. What is Strangeways' vision for how that the craft beer scene was doing well in the Fredericksburg area, Neil believed it you will affect/fit into the Fredericksburg was time to come home and bring some area culture? A: “Strangeways’ uses local Strangeways beer to the party. produce and ingredients in most of our Q. Describe the business operation, what beers. We support Virginia agriculture types of products/service/entertainment and are part of the VA Craft Beer Guild, do you offer? A: “Our Fredericksburg facility is participating in numerous programs that The both a tasting room and brewery support Virginia Tourism. Fredericksburg facility will provide occupying 10,000 square feet, which includes a state-of-the-art 10-barrel approximately 25 full and part-time jobs local residents, and enhance brewing system, a 100-foot one-of-a-kind to U-shaped bar, a private lounge, an arcade, Fredericksburg’s growing craft beer an additional private event space to scene. Additionally, Strangeways plans to accommodate small and large groups, a support local small businesses by offering newly constructed patio with a 30-foot their packaged food products and art for We are outside bar, and plenty of Strange decor sale in the tasting room. not to be missed. Matty Eck, our talented enhancing our tasting room experience head brewer, delights guests with a lineup with local talent, food (to include food of exquisitely peculiar beers, alongside trucks), sports groups, and more. We many of our perennial customer want people to feel “at home” at favorites. We have 48 taps inside and 48 Strangeways.” taps outside filled with a plethora of beers to please nearly every palate. The Strangeways concept is unlike anything else around. We welcome beer lovers to join us to experience for what is shear madness or perhaps genius - you be the judge. “We are moving towards curating unique events, activities and shows that

Thank you Neil, Tonie and the hard-working Strangeways team. More details on Strangeways events and happenings can be found at strangewaysbrewing.com and on their Facebook page, Strangeways Brewing Fredericksburg.”

Don Moncho tex mex on the river

309 William Street 540.371.9999

by Mary Lynn Powers

BISTROBETHEM.COM

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

Fredericksburg abounds with a location is the big draw for me. Sitting on plethora of good restaurants. The newest their patio, lazily watching the river seems spot, Don Moncho is located at 1101 like a nice way to spend an hour or two. Sophia St. Don Moncho advertises both Jose comes from a hard working Tex-Mex and Caribbean cuisine, but they family, which is what it takes to make a soon realized that Tex-Mex was the desired restaurant work. He stressed that it is missing component downtown. I met with really all about the family. Don Moncho is Jose Acosta (above), the owner, and we sat a nickname for Ramon which is his in the newly renovated dining room which father’s middle name. His sister manages overlooks the river with a clear view of their first location in Adams Morgan. His Chatham Manor. If you have been in this brother in law works in the company. Two building prior, you will of his four children be amazed at the are working in the The new design gives the difference. Now the shop for the restaurant a more open feel, dining room is wide summer. It’s and lends to the magnificent open when you walk obvious that he in, as is the bar, teaches the “it backdrop of the river where prior they had doesn’t grow on been walled off from each other. The new trees” lesson! design gives the restaurant a more open The Acostas first opened DC Grill in Massaponax which has typical American feel, and lends to the magnificent backdrop of the river. fare, but with a latin flair. They have The menu has a list of the typical already established a local clientele which favorites, tacos, burritos, fajitas with some is reminiscent of a Cheers (TV show) American and Caribbean choices. The dinner atmosphere, “where everybody knows entrees all come with rice and beans, and your name.” They have music and they have some interesting choices like a showcase many of the local musicians. Hawaiian Shrimp that is served in a halved Jose has a good staff at both locations. pineapple. They are working on a $7.99 They are attentive, and seem to enjoy express lunch special which should be their jobs. He said they are still looking for quick and cheap! Don Moncho has daily a few more people to bring the staff up to specials like Taco Tuesdays and Fajita a necessary number. Stay tuned to Thursdays. I did try the tacos and was Facebook for upcoming specials and pleasantly surprised. There was a good changes. Try Don Moncho...you wil not be portion of chicken topped with a fresh disappointed. Don Moncho guacamole. My friend tried the burrito Open 11a - 11p which was huge, and not many could finish 1101 Sophia Street the whole thing, but he did! (540) 373-0 0870 Their cocktail menu is a work of www.donmoncho.com art, and it should be fun to see if the faacebook drinks are as good as they sound. Margaritas with jalapeño spiked tequila sounded interesting, as did the different Mary Lynn enjoys meeting and writing flavored mojitos. They do have some about interesting people in the ‘Burg happy hour and daily specials. The for Front Porch front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

15


CALENDAR of events

Reception @ PONSHOP Studio and Gallery, 6-9pm. "Remixed 5" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums. The exhibit includes over fifty artists work on this unconventional canvas.

august 2017…dog days of summer...back to school shopping Tuesday, August 1

Restaurant Week through Aug 6 Beat the Heat! Come to the Beach at Artful Dimensions. Join us on throughout August for "Beach & Beyond" "Our Town", A mixed media art exhibit depicting scenes of historic FXBG by six local artists, David Lovegrove, Leah Fromer, Charles Fromer, Casey Ann Shaw, Ed King, & Bruce Day.thruout month Unitarian Univeraslist Fellowship of Fredericksburg, 25 Chalice Circle.

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm The Acoustic Onion

Saturday August 5

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park @Hukamp Park 9a-1p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

City Vino Wine Tasting Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Wednesday, August 2

Spotsylvania Farmers Market@ Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm Sweat Rewards - Fred. Area Museum and PITAIYO are partnering for a FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org Open Mic, Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts the coziest open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, August 3

"Out of Chaos", Music Concert @Presbyterian Church, 810 Pr.Anne St. 7:30 pm

First Friday, August 4

"Remixed 5" Vinyl Album Art Show Opening

Colonial Medicine for Kids, The Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop - 1020 Caroline St, Included with children's admission - Children will be invited to craft pills as they would have in Dr. Mercer's day. (Pills do not contain any medicinal ingredients.) Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street Legume Live Music, 8-10p Bluemont Concert Series present, The Pan Masters Steel Orchestra, & Caribbean Steel Drums @ Maury School Stadium7:30 p-m $ We love when Reckless Brigade comes to play at Highmark Brewery! Enjoy live bluegrass music and great beer. Baja Fresh food truck. admission is free! All welcome. 6pm. 390 Kings Hwy

Sunday, August 6

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday August 7

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, David Bradley at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, August 8

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 9

Spotsy Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm Sweat Rewards - Fred Area Museum and PITAIYO FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. For more info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, August 10

"Fredericksburg:City of Hospitals" @ St. George's Episcopal Church, Civil War Lecture/Medical Demo. Syndor Hall, 6-8pm

Friday, August 11

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm The Blue Tips Rhythm Revue

Saturday, August 12

efforts to cope with the aftermath of battle in the Fredericksburg region, from treating the wounded, to burying the dead, to, finally, according the dead dignified burials. Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street Bluemont Concert Series Dixie Power Trio & New Orleans Funk @ Maury School Stadium, 7:30 p-m $ Live Music ACOUSTIC ONION @ HIGHMARK BREWERY. Free. 5-8pm Summer Fun with Fredericksburg Community Concert Band @ Merchants Square Pavilion in Spotsy Courthouse Village. 7:30-9pm. FREE

Sunday, August 13

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! “Our Town” Art Exhibit openong reception, 11:302pm Unitarian Univeraslist Fellowship of Fredericksburg, 25 Chalice Circle.

Monday, August 14

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Razor Hill at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Tuesday, August 15

Learn About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Salem Church Library

Art in the Park @Hukamp Park 9a-1p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Wednesday, August 16

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Legume Live Music, 8-10p Campfire Programs, on the lawn below the Sunken Road, behind the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center. Bring a lawn chair or a blanket to sit upon. 8-9pm John Hennessy will look at the immense

Summer Fun in the Sun with FXBG Community Concert Band @Hurkamp Park, downtown. Sponsored by FXBG Parks & Rec. 7:30-9pm. FREE Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm

Sweat Rewards - Fred Area Museum and PITAIYO FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. For more info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130 dsmith@famcc.org

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Cabin Creek at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Enjoy the Solar Eclipse at the CRRL Hqtrs, 2:153pm. Solar Eclipse viewing glasses provided. Join acclaimed Patawomeck story teller Johnny McChin telling tales up to the peak of the solar eclipse and traditional Patawomeck

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Tuesday, August 22

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, August 18

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm Don Brown's Soul Experience

Saturday, August 19

Art In the Park at the Hurkamp Park Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p. Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Sunday, August 27

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, August 28

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Semilla Cultural at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm (see 6/16 ad)

Tuesday, August 29

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 30

Wednesday, August 23

The King George Huddle and OneVirginia2021 invite you to a special screening of GerryRIGGED, a documentary about Virginia's gerrymandered legislative districts and what we can do about them. Smott Memorial Library, 6:530-8:30 pm Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic Sign up 7, music at 8. 213 William Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, August 25

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open Sign up 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 30

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic Sign up at 7, music at 8.

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7pm to 9pm Feathered Fish

Legume Live Music, 8-10p

Saturday, August 26

Sweat Rewards - Fredericksburg Area Museum and PITAIYO are partnering for a FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org

City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Sunday, August 20

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Grow Our Fredericksburg Food Co-op @ MarstelDay. help bring a community-owned cooperative grocery store to Fred Support local food. Light refreshments. Free and everyone is welcome. fredericksburgfoodcoop.com. 3-4pm. 417 Wolfe St.

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

If you are reading this 241st issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication!

Commemoration of Mary Washington's Death @ Mary Washington House. Learn about 18th century mourning traditions in a special tour of her home, followed by a wreath laying ceremony at her monument.

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for September 2017 issue is August 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Monday, August 21 Solar Eclipse

Legume Live Music, 8-10p

3162 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540-8 899-6 6787 16

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

17


CALENDAR of events

Reception @ PONSHOP Studio and Gallery, 6-9pm. "Remixed 5" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums. The exhibit includes over fifty artists work on this unconventional canvas.

august 2017…dog days of summer...back to school shopping Tuesday, August 1

Restaurant Week through Aug 6 Beat the Heat! Come to the Beach at Artful Dimensions. Join us on throughout August for "Beach & Beyond" "Our Town", A mixed media art exhibit depicting scenes of historic FXBG by six local artists, David Lovegrove, Leah Fromer, Charles Fromer, Casey Ann Shaw, Ed King, & Bruce Day.thruout month Unitarian Univeraslist Fellowship of Fredericksburg, 25 Chalice Circle.

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm The Acoustic Onion

Saturday August 5

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park @Hukamp Park 9a-1p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

City Vino Wine Tasting Sample featured wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Wednesday, August 2

Spotsylvania Farmers Market@ Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm Sweat Rewards - Fred. Area Museum and PITAIYO are partnering for a FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org Open Mic, Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts the coziest open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, August 3

"Out of Chaos", Music Concert @Presbyterian Church, 810 Pr.Anne St. 7:30 pm

First Friday, August 4

"Remixed 5" Vinyl Album Art Show Opening

Colonial Medicine for Kids, The Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop - 1020 Caroline St, Included with children's admission - Children will be invited to craft pills as they would have in Dr. Mercer's day. (Pills do not contain any medicinal ingredients.) Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street Legume Live Music, 8-10p Bluemont Concert Series present, The Pan Masters Steel Orchestra, & Caribbean Steel Drums @ Maury School Stadium7:30 p-m $ We love when Reckless Brigade comes to play at Highmark Brewery! Enjoy live bluegrass music and great beer. Baja Fresh food truck. admission is free! All welcome. 6pm. 390 Kings Hwy

Sunday, August 6

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday August 7

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, David Bradley at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm

Tuesday, August 8

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 9

Spotsy Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm Sweat Rewards - Fred Area Museum and PITAIYO FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. For more info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, August 10

"Fredericksburg:City of Hospitals" @ St. George's Episcopal Church, Civil War Lecture/Medical Demo. Syndor Hall, 6-8pm

Friday, August 11

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm The Blue Tips Rhythm Revue

Saturday, August 12

efforts to cope with the aftermath of battle in the Fredericksburg region, from treating the wounded, to burying the dead, to, finally, according the dead dignified burials. Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street Bluemont Concert Series Dixie Power Trio & New Orleans Funk @ Maury School Stadium, 7:30 p-m $ Live Music ACOUSTIC ONION @ HIGHMARK BREWERY. Free. 5-8pm Summer Fun with Fredericksburg Community Concert Band @ Merchants Square Pavilion in Spotsy Courthouse Village. 7:30-9pm. FREE

Sunday, August 13

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table! “Our Town” Art Exhibit openong reception, 11:302pm Unitarian Univeraslist Fellowship of Fredericksburg, 25 Chalice Circle.

Monday, August 14

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Razor Hill at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Nerd Nite @ Red Dragon Brewry, 7pm, Sandra Fedowitz at sandrafedowitz@gmail.com."It's like the Discovery Channel…with beer™

Tuesday, August 15

Learn About Becoming a Foster Parent @ Salem Church Library

Art in the Park @Hukamp Park 9a-1p. Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Wednesday, August 16

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p Legume Live Music, 8-10p Campfire Programs, on the lawn below the Sunken Road, behind the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center. Bring a lawn chair or a blanket to sit upon. 8-9pm John Hennessy will look at the immense

Summer Fun in the Sun with FXBG Community Concert Band @Hurkamp Park, downtown. Sponsored by FXBG Parks & Rec. 7:30-9pm. FREE Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Medical Center, berries, peaches, cantaloupes, tomatoes and corn and a bounty of mid-summer produce, as well as locally raised meat and eggs, delicious cookies and pastries, ice cold lemonade, sweet-salty kettle corn and more! 2:30-5pm

Sweat Rewards - Fred Area Museum and PITAIYO FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. Workouts for all levels of fitness. raffle for a prize donated by a local business. For more info, contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130 dsmith@famcc.org

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Cabin Creek at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Enjoy the Solar Eclipse at the CRRL Hqtrs, 2:153pm. Solar Eclipse viewing glasses provided. Join acclaimed Patawomeck story teller Johnny McChin telling tales up to the peak of the solar eclipse and traditional Patawomeck

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic in Fredericksburg. Sign up starts at 7, music at 8. 213 William St.

Tuesday, August 22

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, August 18

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7:00pm to 9:00pm Don Brown's Soul Experience

Saturday, August 19

Art In the Park at the Hurkamp Park Browse and shop local artists and crafters on display . 9a-1p. Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Sunday, August 27

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. a good idea to reserve a table!

Monday, August 28

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series, Semilla Cultural at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm (see 6/16 ad)

Tuesday, August 29

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p

Tastings Tuesday in the Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 30

Wednesday, August 23

The King George Huddle and OneVirginia2021 invite you to a special screening of GerryRIGGED, a documentary about Virginia's gerrymandered legislative districts and what we can do about them. Smott Memorial Library, 6:530-8:30 pm Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic Sign up 7, music at 8. 213 William Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Friday, August 25

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open Sign up 7, music at 8. 213 William St. Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Prizes!! Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Bar @Legume. Taste featured wine &/or draft beer, 3-6p Legume $3 Taco Tuesday in the Bar All Day

Wednesday, August 30

Open Mic at the Rec Center 8 pm .Scott Wagner hosts open mic Sign up at 7, music at 8.

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Sounds of Summer Concert Series @ Market Square, 7-9pm. Free 7pm to 9pm Feathered Fish

Legume Live Music, 8-10p

Saturday, August 26

Sweat Rewards - Fredericksburg Area Museum and PITAIYO are partnering for a FREE PITAIYO HIITS Circuit workouts 8am. contact Denise Smith at (540) 371-3037 ext 130dsmith@famcc.org

City Vino Wine Tasting wines of the week. 12-4p The Shoppes @810

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm ~ match wits against the finest minds in Fred! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

Sunday, August 20

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Sunken Well Brunch from 9am-2pm, $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. Bluegrass night from 7-9pm. Usually a good idea to reserve a table!

Sunken Well Brunch 9a-2p

Grow Our Fredericksburg Food Co-op @ MarstelDay. help bring a community-owned cooperative grocery store to Fred Support local food. Light refreshments. Free and everyone is welcome. fredericksburgfoodcoop.com. 3-4pm. 417 Wolfe St.

Live music every Saturday night from 9pm until midnight at Spencer Devon 106 George Street

If you are reading this 241st issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 21st year of continuous publication!

Commemoration of Mary Washington's Death @ Mary Washington House. Learn about 18th century mourning traditions in a special tour of her home, followed by a wreath laying ceremony at her monument.

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for September 2017 issue is August 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Monday, August 21 Solar Eclipse

Legume Live Music, 8-10p

3162 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540-8 899-6 6787 16

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

17


history’s stories

GARI MELCHERS By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks A famous world artist lived just across the Rappahannock river in Falmouth, at the Belmont Estate. Julius Garbaldi Melchers was born in Detroit on August 11, 1860, the son of German born American sculptor Julius Melchers. He would be known as Gari from his early childhood nickname. Gari studied art in his teen years and was in Paris by the age of 20, where he worked and studied in several art studios under several famous European artists.

Several of his paintings from the World Columbian Exposition of 1893 are now in the Library of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. While on a trans-Atlantic cruise in 1902 he met his future wife Corinne Mackall, a Baltimore painter born in 1880, twenty years younger than Gari. Corinne had studied at the Maryland Institute Practical School for Mechanic Arts. They were married in 1903. Corinne and Gari would share their love for art until Gari’s death. In 1909, he was appointed Professor of Art at the Grand Ducal Saxony School of Art in Weimar, Germany and it was not until 1915 the he returned to New York. In New York City, he opened a studio at the Abraham Archibald Anderson’s Bryant Park Studios building that was the most famous in the country. He and Corinne would travel back and forth between his Belmont Estate in Virginia and New York City. He completed his studio at Belmont in 1924, and loved the gardens at Belmont and the surrounding area. On November 30, 1932, Gari Melchers died at Belmont while reading his mail of a Heart attack. Corrinne would live at Belmont until her death, 23 years later in 1955. She would leave the entire Estate of Belmont to the Commonwealth of Virginia. One of his paintings sold at auction in 2004 for $900,000.00. Several of his works are still lost such as “The Ring. A man smoking a long stem pipe giving a lady a ring. Belmont is open daily except for Wednesday, a beautiful 27 acre well maintained attraction with over1,677 of works done by Melcher. In the summer Belmont is a beautiful place to visit with family and friends, In the historic Town of Falmouth. Dedicated to the memory of Randy Diehr & Ronnie Baker Tuffy is FrontPorch's resident FXBG historian

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Virginia’s only Regional Archive

18

August 2017

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net Front porch fredericksburg

It’s All Energy

guardians of history

solving public speaking

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

By Donna McCague

In 1884, in Holland he founded the Egmond aan Zee with George Hitchcock an American artist. He began to become well known for his ability in 1886 at the Paris Salon with his painting called The “Self Portrait” Geri Melchers Sermon. In 1903, he became the first American painter to win a Grand Prize at the Paris Exposition along with fellow artist John Sargent. He also became a member of the National Academy of Design, New York and several other groups in Paris. London and Germany.

The Heritage Center

OUR HERITAGE

Fredericksburg

Historians are the guardians of prominent events and people throughout the past who have chronicled the events our country’s evolution. As a historian and lives of those who have come before and editor, much of his writing focused on us. They provide connectivity to the past the American Revolution through World we otherwise would not have. We learn II, prominent U.S. historical figures what we cherish and the mistakes we made associated with these conflicts, including from history. Knowing our history gives U.S. Presidents and Congress. Hay us an invaluable reference point as to how reviewed books on American history for far we have progressed as a society in The New York Times as well as trade culture, tradition, and technology. publications. One can only imagine the We are very fortunate to live in breadth of knowledge he possessed to not an area steeped in history beginning with only research and document his work but the first settlement in the New World to to comment on the work of other becoming a pivotal point historians of his day. Knowing our of expansion to what Documenting history is history gives us an eventually became the a multi-faceted discipline for United States. The invaluable reference point historians of which Thomas Rappahannock area is Robson Hay is a prime as to how far we have inarguably at the progressed as a society in example. His well-researched crossroads of the Civil facts, understanding of culture, tradition, and War. Countless books, politics, economics, and social technology films, and organizations issues of the times have been dedicated to relating the events demonstrate his ability to provide a of this war which occurred in our own thorough and comprehensive narrative of back yard. historical events. Modern communications has The Hay Collection contains over 600 brought well-known biographers such as documents and photographs preserved by Ken Burns, Shelby Foote, and David the Heritage Center. His early McCullough into our homes. But who manuscripts typed on onion skin paper recorded history before they came along? are yellowed with age. Hay’s handwritten One such historian was Thomas Robson notes in the margins give us a sense of his Hay (1888-1965), whose personal papers attention to meticulous detail. Extensive and manuscripts, along with his extensive correspondence with other historians and research, are archived at the Central military leaders tell us about his thirst for Rappahannock Heritage Center (CRHC). accuracy in recounting events in American Mr. Hay’s contributions to American history. The correspondence in this history are innumerable. The military collection of soldiers and their family history prize was awarded to him by the members appeals to us at a very visceral American Historical Association for his level. Photographs of generals to low comprehensive body of work on Hood’s ranking soldiers and pictures of their Tennessee Campaign published in 1929. families speak volumes. They tell a story Hay describes in exhaustive detail the just as well as the written word. leadership of Confederate General John The collection of Thomas Robson Bell Hood accompanied with military maps Hay is a one of the many archived by the of one of the Civil War’s major battles. Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. Just one of his noted accomplishments. Donna McCague is a volunteer and Hay was a preeminent historian Volunteer Coordinator at CRHC. during his lifetime producing works about

by christina ferber ble at Availa n.com Amazo

The fear of public speaking is second only to the fear of death according to a study that rated the most common fears, but luckily there are some natural techniques that can help us to feel a little more comfortable when all eyes are on us. Eden Energy Medicine (EEM) offers a wide variety of exercises that can help us before and during a speech. One way to prepare for a public speaking event is by doing the Main Neurovascular Hold. Place your hand on your forehead, being sure to cover the points above your eyebrows, and think about the upcoming event until you feel a shift in your anxiety. Right before you are getting ready to take center stage, try the TW/Spleen Hug. Place your right hand on the left side of the rib cage, and the left hand on the other arm with the pinky finger at the tip of the elbow. Wrap your hand around the elbow and breath. No one knows you are doing it, but you are calming a meridian (which are energy pathways in the body) that plays a large part in our anxiety. Another way to calm that meridian is to simply stroke your hair behind your ears. By tracing from your temples to behind your ears, you are sending a signal to your body that can help it to relax. When you are giving a speech there are some 'under the radar' techniques that can help. You can rub or tap what is called the TW Fear Point. Tap or rub between your ring and picky fingers for about 30-60 seconds on both hands. Holding the Heart Meridian Source Point can calm us and help to lower blood pressure. Simply hold or rub the point, which is located on the inside of your wrist in line with your pinky finger where your wrist and hand meet. Another EEM technique is to hold

your ring finger and place your hands right under your belly button. The spot on your body and the meridian point that you are holding come together in harmony here, switching any anxiety ridden feelings to peacefulness and calm. Do this on both sides. Breathing is another way to calm our stress response when the spotlight is on us. When we are stressed, our breathing tends to be shallow or we even hold our breath. When we pause to take longer breaths, it can help us by bringing oxygen to the brain so we can think more clearly. There are many breathing techniques that will work. Some involve simply counting breaths, but I think the best type of breathing during a public speaking event is to practice methods that help us to breath more deeply. Breathing in for a count of 5 and breathing out to a count of 5 can do the trick, or pick any number that works for you. Do this before or during your talk and you should find some relief from any anxiety you might feel. One tool that I often use, and has been a tremendous help for me is called the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), or Tapping as it is better known. It may seem a little strange at first, but it has done wonders for any feelings that I need to shift, including my own personal fear of public speaking. It involves tapping on points on the hands, head, and chest as you make statements that deal with your feelings about a particular subject. To find out more about tapping and other EEM techniques, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com. Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

Energy Healing Modalities to Assist You and Your Animals to Improve and Maintain Health in Body, Mind and Spirit 540.656.2201 ~ 877.534.5534 ~ Sherry@healingateway.com ~ facebook

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

19


history’s stories

GARI MELCHERS By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks A famous world artist lived just across the Rappahannock river in Falmouth, at the Belmont Estate. Julius Garbaldi Melchers was born in Detroit on August 11, 1860, the son of German born American sculptor Julius Melchers. He would be known as Gari from his early childhood nickname. Gari studied art in his teen years and was in Paris by the age of 20, where he worked and studied in several art studios under several famous European artists.

Several of his paintings from the World Columbian Exposition of 1893 are now in the Library of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. While on a trans-Atlantic cruise in 1902 he met his future wife Corinne Mackall, a Baltimore painter born in 1880, twenty years younger than Gari. Corinne had studied at the Maryland Institute Practical School for Mechanic Arts. They were married in 1903. Corinne and Gari would share their love for art until Gari’s death. In 1909, he was appointed Professor of Art at the Grand Ducal Saxony School of Art in Weimar, Germany and it was not until 1915 the he returned to New York. In New York City, he opened a studio at the Abraham Archibald Anderson’s Bryant Park Studios building that was the most famous in the country. He and Corinne would travel back and forth between his Belmont Estate in Virginia and New York City. He completed his studio at Belmont in 1924, and loved the gardens at Belmont and the surrounding area. On November 30, 1932, Gari Melchers died at Belmont while reading his mail of a Heart attack. Corrinne would live at Belmont until her death, 23 years later in 1955. She would leave the entire Estate of Belmont to the Commonwealth of Virginia. One of his paintings sold at auction in 2004 for $900,000.00. Several of his works are still lost such as “The Ring. A man smoking a long stem pipe giving a lady a ring. Belmont is open daily except for Wednesday, a beautiful 27 acre well maintained attraction with over1,677 of works done by Melcher. In the summer Belmont is a beautiful place to visit with family and friends, In the historic Town of Falmouth. Dedicated to the memory of Randy Diehr & Ronnie Baker Tuffy is FrontPorch's resident FXBG historian

Central Rappahannock Heritage Center

Virginia’s only Regional Archive

18

August 2017

Maury Commons 900 Barton St 540-373-3704; crhc@verizon.net Front porch fredericksburg

It’s All Energy

guardians of history

solving public speaking

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

By Donna McCague

In 1884, in Holland he founded the Egmond aan Zee with George Hitchcock an American artist. He began to become well known for his ability in 1886 at the Paris Salon with his painting called The “Self Portrait” Geri Melchers Sermon. In 1903, he became the first American painter to win a Grand Prize at the Paris Exposition along with fellow artist John Sargent. He also became a member of the National Academy of Design, New York and several other groups in Paris. London and Germany.

The Heritage Center

OUR HERITAGE

Fredericksburg

Historians are the guardians of prominent events and people throughout the past who have chronicled the events our country’s evolution. As a historian and lives of those who have come before and editor, much of his writing focused on us. They provide connectivity to the past the American Revolution through World we otherwise would not have. We learn II, prominent U.S. historical figures what we cherish and the mistakes we made associated with these conflicts, including from history. Knowing our history gives U.S. Presidents and Congress. Hay us an invaluable reference point as to how reviewed books on American history for far we have progressed as a society in The New York Times as well as trade culture, tradition, and technology. publications. One can only imagine the We are very fortunate to live in breadth of knowledge he possessed to not an area steeped in history beginning with only research and document his work but the first settlement in the New World to to comment on the work of other becoming a pivotal point historians of his day. Knowing our of expansion to what Documenting history is history gives us an eventually became the a multi-faceted discipline for United States. The invaluable reference point historians of which Thomas Rappahannock area is Robson Hay is a prime as to how far we have inarguably at the progressed as a society in example. His well-researched crossroads of the Civil facts, understanding of culture, tradition, and War. Countless books, politics, economics, and social technology films, and organizations issues of the times have been dedicated to relating the events demonstrate his ability to provide a of this war which occurred in our own thorough and comprehensive narrative of back yard. historical events. Modern communications has The Hay Collection contains over 600 brought well-known biographers such as documents and photographs preserved by Ken Burns, Shelby Foote, and David the Heritage Center. His early McCullough into our homes. But who manuscripts typed on onion skin paper recorded history before they came along? are yellowed with age. Hay’s handwritten One such historian was Thomas Robson notes in the margins give us a sense of his Hay (1888-1965), whose personal papers attention to meticulous detail. Extensive and manuscripts, along with his extensive correspondence with other historians and research, are archived at the Central military leaders tell us about his thirst for Rappahannock Heritage Center (CRHC). accuracy in recounting events in American Mr. Hay’s contributions to American history. The correspondence in this history are innumerable. The military collection of soldiers and their family history prize was awarded to him by the members appeals to us at a very visceral American Historical Association for his level. Photographs of generals to low comprehensive body of work on Hood’s ranking soldiers and pictures of their Tennessee Campaign published in 1929. families speak volumes. They tell a story Hay describes in exhaustive detail the just as well as the written word. leadership of Confederate General John The collection of Thomas Robson Bell Hood accompanied with military maps Hay is a one of the many archived by the of one of the Civil War’s major battles. Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. Just one of his noted accomplishments. Donna McCague is a volunteer and Hay was a preeminent historian Volunteer Coordinator at CRHC. during his lifetime producing works about

by christina ferber ble at Availa n.com Amazo

The fear of public speaking is second only to the fear of death according to a study that rated the most common fears, but luckily there are some natural techniques that can help us to feel a little more comfortable when all eyes are on us. Eden Energy Medicine (EEM) offers a wide variety of exercises that can help us before and during a speech. One way to prepare for a public speaking event is by doing the Main Neurovascular Hold. Place your hand on your forehead, being sure to cover the points above your eyebrows, and think about the upcoming event until you feel a shift in your anxiety. Right before you are getting ready to take center stage, try the TW/Spleen Hug. Place your right hand on the left side of the rib cage, and the left hand on the other arm with the pinky finger at the tip of the elbow. Wrap your hand around the elbow and breath. No one knows you are doing it, but you are calming a meridian (which are energy pathways in the body) that plays a large part in our anxiety. Another way to calm that meridian is to simply stroke your hair behind your ears. By tracing from your temples to behind your ears, you are sending a signal to your body that can help it to relax. When you are giving a speech there are some 'under the radar' techniques that can help. You can rub or tap what is called the TW Fear Point. Tap or rub between your ring and picky fingers for about 30-60 seconds on both hands. Holding the Heart Meridian Source Point can calm us and help to lower blood pressure. Simply hold or rub the point, which is located on the inside of your wrist in line with your pinky finger where your wrist and hand meet. Another EEM technique is to hold

your ring finger and place your hands right under your belly button. The spot on your body and the meridian point that you are holding come together in harmony here, switching any anxiety ridden feelings to peacefulness and calm. Do this on both sides. Breathing is another way to calm our stress response when the spotlight is on us. When we are stressed, our breathing tends to be shallow or we even hold our breath. When we pause to take longer breaths, it can help us by bringing oxygen to the brain so we can think more clearly. There are many breathing techniques that will work. Some involve simply counting breaths, but I think the best type of breathing during a public speaking event is to practice methods that help us to breath more deeply. Breathing in for a count of 5 and breathing out to a count of 5 can do the trick, or pick any number that works for you. Do this before or during your talk and you should find some relief from any anxiety you might feel. One tool that I often use, and has been a tremendous help for me is called the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), or Tapping as it is better known. It may seem a little strange at first, but it has done wonders for any feelings that I need to shift, including my own personal fear of public speaking. It involves tapping on points on the hands, head, and chest as you make statements that deal with your feelings about a particular subject. To find out more about tapping and other EEM techniques, visit www.itsallenergywellness.com. Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

Energy Healing Modalities to Assist You and Your Animals to Improve and Maintain Health in Body, Mind and Spirit 540.656.2201 ~ 877.534.5534 ~ Sherry@healingateway.com ~ facebook

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

19


Senior Care let the good times roll By Karl Karch

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

By now we’ve all heard that 60 is the new 40 and 70 is the new 50. But have you heard that your 60s and 70s could be the best times of your life? We are often influenced by images and stories of declining health and people becoming more dependent as they age. Retirement is often portrayed as a time of decline. However, this may be a little bit of “fake news” to use a now all too current phrase. The more I learn about the aging process, the more amazed I become. Rather than lamenting about getting old, many older people say their lives are more fulfilling and joyful than ever. In fact, according to a recent British study reported by the Office for National Statistics, 65 to 79 is the happiest age group for adults. Older adults are enjoying life and even feel younger and normal sometimes into their 90s. According to interviews with more than 50,000 people aged 50 and over by the insurer Sun Life, 75% are less bothered about what people think of them than when they were younger, 61% enjoy life more than when they were younger, 59% live for today instead of tomorrow, and 42% say their life is more exciting. Now, I’m certainly not attempting to say that life is wonderful for the elderly or paint a picture of older adults being physically fit, active, and cognitively alert. The vast majority of older adults will not be “SuperAgers”. Chronic physical and cognitive illnesses are still prevalent as people age. The important take-away, however, is how resilient we are in dealing with adversity in our lives and how successful we are in focusing on the positives in life. Retirement allows one the freedom to do meaningful things to improve your

20

August 2017

happiness like volunteering, playing with grandchildren, or simply expanding your knowledge. I remember Art Linkletter’s “Kids Say the Darndest Things”. Well, many of us who work with an aging population know that older adults also say the darndest thing. Kids are uninhibited because they haven’t learned otherwise. At the other end of the aging spectrum, older adults have gained a wealth of life experiences that makes them courageous and they get to the age where they no longer need to care what other people think. As Monica Hartwell, 69, put it: “The joy of getting older is much greater selfconfidence. It’s the loss of angst about what people think of you: the size of your bum or whether others are judging you correctly. It’s not an arrogance, but you know who you are when you’re older and all those roles you played to fit in when you were younger are irrelevant. That makes one more courageous.” Don’t let the thought of aging stress you out. Focus on the positives in life and you will have good things to look forward to. So, as you approach the golden years, just think of the song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” (Bobby McFerrin, 1988). “In every life, we have some trouble. But when you worry, you make it double. Don’t worry, be happy.” Let the good times roll!! Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients

Mind Your Mind the poet asks

exercise By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

I hurt in muscles I didn’t even know I had. This because I have abandoned running/ walking around the property as exercise, and have finally joined a gym – choosing Planet Fitness for their “no gymtimidation” philosophy . In my “Design Your Own Program” I consult with Kali, one of the trainers, whose, trim but young appearance belies the fact that she has a master’s level qualification in kinesthetics and fitness. We hone in on do I wanted to lose weight, geboost stamina, buff up (shed the “old fart with a beer gut” look is the program I’m looking for). She designs a personal program and introduces me to a variety of instruments of torture worthy of the dungeon at the Tower of London. I console myself with the quip about “pain is weakness leaving the body.” A Panacea – Or Will I Die Doing It? If there really is such a thing as a panacea - some one thing that cures all ills - it must be exercise. Everyone recommends it for everything so far as I can see. At least 150 minutes of moderate exercise (walking or gentle biking) or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise (running or singles tennis for example) a week, for any able-bodied individual says the DHSS. This will cure or prevent heart disease, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, cancer, depression. Just about everything. And I always like those studies showing exercise far more effective than medicines for diabetes - though I’ve yet to see a drug rep’ promoting rowing machines. As I work my routine, doing leg presses, pull downs, abdominal twists I try to recall the anatomy. Am I working Trapezius? Latissimus Dorsi?, Serratus Anterior? – stuff that conjures uncomfortable memories of medical school and Professor Warwick – one of the more vindictive member of the faculty who had belittlement and derision down to a fine art.

But “am I healthy enough to exercise?” is a question patients often ask their doctor. The bad news is that, like diet, most doctors have precious little formal training in risks – or benefits – of exercise. Sites like Mayo Clinic Healthy Life Style and Fitness list criteria for who should consult their doctor - though the old geezer with the oxygen tank, who was peddling away with impressive vigor on a stationary bike next to me, suggests even people with restricting conditions can benefit. He told me he has Interstitial Pulmonary Fibrosis, but his shortness of breath had improved significantly since he added attending the gym to his pulmonary rehab. And don’t overlook the stretching Kali admonished me. Primarily to reduce risk of injury, but the literature tells me it will improve my posture and relieve my stress. Adequate fluid intake is also important. It helps regulate your body temperature and keep your joints lubricated. Again specifics at the Mayo Clinic website – but aim for your urine being pale, as opposed to dark, yellow. And though sports drinks are heavily marketed if you drink a lot you are liable to overdo the sugar. And if they contain caffeine this acts as a diuretic (makes you pee more), which is counterproductive. Gyms are popping up all over, and exercise is becoming big business. You don’t have to join a gym. Any kind of exercise, will benefit our couch-potato culture. And just remember. A little pain is probably good for you.

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

By Barbara Deal “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too small for you.” Say it again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too small for you.” Say it again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too SMALL for you.” And again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you ALIVE is too small for you” Once more. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t BRING you alive is too small for YOU” The wording here is awkward, even off-putting. Several times, I have sat listening to this poet, David Whyte, Irish and British, raised in Britain. He presents, a large figure, stroking long hair that falls across his face, believed to be a wig, and unfamiliar to him, after a fashion. Yet, he repeats his phrases of poetry, as above, 3 or 5 times over, rhythmically, confidently and quickly, same inflection, with resonance, implying a meaning just beyond. His audience leans as if to hear more closely, more clearly and maybe catch his meaning, his inference, his reference. Oh, well it’s complicated. Well, there must be SOMETHING there, the way he says it so emphatically and looking beyond us. For this column, I put capital letters for one word, giving emphasis each time rendering a different focus. I do love this line and that poet. He got noticed at the Psychotherpy Networker Symposium, in my view, when his friend John O’Donahue, another Irish philosopher, beloved of the conference, died. There followed his articulating, for us, the meanings of love and loss and the grappling thereafter and with us. Look around. What DOES bring you alive? And what does that mean, anyhow “bring you alive”? I think it takes some thinking, some reflection. Rolling it around in your mouth and holding like

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

good wine. What tastes like this? He repeats it and so will I “Alive. Alive alive. Alive alive. Brings you alive. Too small if it does not. Too small - too - small…Chant that. The words are assembled in an odd way. Alive is not an adverb, now is it? I stumble at the grammatical construction. That in itself creates the setting for being brought alive. What? As with living, the mystery and surprise accompanying showing up, opening up, yields questions and temporary answers. That longing and grasping is living, is it not? Here seems to be a strategy for choosing and letting go, where possible. Not just things, like Kon-Mari and her tidying advice, but close. To consider this strategy in human relationships seems cold, calculated, selfish. Best to be deliberate. If one is drowning, it is best for one to recognize which would be too small. Too snug for our expansion.. We are, in our interior selves quite large, if not physically so. And now I am asking. What and who DO bring you alive? Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Alliance Therapy Center, (540) 373-9577

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

21


Senior Care let the good times roll By Karl Karch

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

By now we’ve all heard that 60 is the new 40 and 70 is the new 50. But have you heard that your 60s and 70s could be the best times of your life? We are often influenced by images and stories of declining health and people becoming more dependent as they age. Retirement is often portrayed as a time of decline. However, this may be a little bit of “fake news” to use a now all too current phrase. The more I learn about the aging process, the more amazed I become. Rather than lamenting about getting old, many older people say their lives are more fulfilling and joyful than ever. In fact, according to a recent British study reported by the Office for National Statistics, 65 to 79 is the happiest age group for adults. Older adults are enjoying life and even feel younger and normal sometimes into their 90s. According to interviews with more than 50,000 people aged 50 and over by the insurer Sun Life, 75% are less bothered about what people think of them than when they were younger, 61% enjoy life more than when they were younger, 59% live for today instead of tomorrow, and 42% say their life is more exciting. Now, I’m certainly not attempting to say that life is wonderful for the elderly or paint a picture of older adults being physically fit, active, and cognitively alert. The vast majority of older adults will not be “SuperAgers”. Chronic physical and cognitive illnesses are still prevalent as people age. The important take-away, however, is how resilient we are in dealing with adversity in our lives and how successful we are in focusing on the positives in life. Retirement allows one the freedom to do meaningful things to improve your

20

August 2017

happiness like volunteering, playing with grandchildren, or simply expanding your knowledge. I remember Art Linkletter’s “Kids Say the Darndest Things”. Well, many of us who work with an aging population know that older adults also say the darndest thing. Kids are uninhibited because they haven’t learned otherwise. At the other end of the aging spectrum, older adults have gained a wealth of life experiences that makes them courageous and they get to the age where they no longer need to care what other people think. As Monica Hartwell, 69, put it: “The joy of getting older is much greater selfconfidence. It’s the loss of angst about what people think of you: the size of your bum or whether others are judging you correctly. It’s not an arrogance, but you know who you are when you’re older and all those roles you played to fit in when you were younger are irrelevant. That makes one more courageous.” Don’t let the thought of aging stress you out. Focus on the positives in life and you will have good things to look forward to. So, as you approach the golden years, just think of the song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” (Bobby McFerrin, 1988). “In every life, we have some trouble. But when you worry, you make it double. Don’t worry, be happy.” Let the good times roll!! Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients

Mind Your Mind the poet asks

exercise By Patrick Neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

I hurt in muscles I didn’t even know I had. This because I have abandoned running/ walking around the property as exercise, and have finally joined a gym – choosing Planet Fitness for their “no gymtimidation” philosophy . In my “Design Your Own Program” I consult with Kali, one of the trainers, whose, trim but young appearance belies the fact that she has a master’s level qualification in kinesthetics and fitness. We hone in on do I wanted to lose weight, geboost stamina, buff up (shed the “old fart with a beer gut” look is the program I’m looking for). She designs a personal program and introduces me to a variety of instruments of torture worthy of the dungeon at the Tower of London. I console myself with the quip about “pain is weakness leaving the body.” A Panacea – Or Will I Die Doing It? If there really is such a thing as a panacea - some one thing that cures all ills - it must be exercise. Everyone recommends it for everything so far as I can see. At least 150 minutes of moderate exercise (walking or gentle biking) or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise (running or singles tennis for example) a week, for any able-bodied individual says the DHSS. This will cure or prevent heart disease, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, cancer, depression. Just about everything. And I always like those studies showing exercise far more effective than medicines for diabetes - though I’ve yet to see a drug rep’ promoting rowing machines. As I work my routine, doing leg presses, pull downs, abdominal twists I try to recall the anatomy. Am I working Trapezius? Latissimus Dorsi?, Serratus Anterior? – stuff that conjures uncomfortable memories of medical school and Professor Warwick – one of the more vindictive member of the faculty who had belittlement and derision down to a fine art.

But “am I healthy enough to exercise?” is a question patients often ask their doctor. The bad news is that, like diet, most doctors have precious little formal training in risks – or benefits – of exercise. Sites like Mayo Clinic Healthy Life Style and Fitness list criteria for who should consult their doctor - though the old geezer with the oxygen tank, who was peddling away with impressive vigor on a stationary bike next to me, suggests even people with restricting conditions can benefit. He told me he has Interstitial Pulmonary Fibrosis, but his shortness of breath had improved significantly since he added attending the gym to his pulmonary rehab. And don’t overlook the stretching Kali admonished me. Primarily to reduce risk of injury, but the literature tells me it will improve my posture and relieve my stress. Adequate fluid intake is also important. It helps regulate your body temperature and keep your joints lubricated. Again specifics at the Mayo Clinic website – but aim for your urine being pale, as opposed to dark, yellow. And though sports drinks are heavily marketed if you drink a lot you are liable to overdo the sugar. And if they contain caffeine this acts as a diuretic (makes you pee more), which is counterproductive. Gyms are popping up all over, and exercise is becoming big business. You don’t have to join a gym. Any kind of exercise, will benefit our couch-potato culture. And just remember. A little pain is probably good for you.

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Read his book, "Managing Your Doctor, The Smart Patient's Guide to Getting Effective, Affordable Healthcare", available at Amazon.com

By Barbara Deal “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too small for you.” Say it again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too small for you.” Say it again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you alive is too SMALL for you.” And again. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t bring you ALIVE is too small for you” Once more. “Anyone or anything that doesn’t BRING you alive is too small for YOU” The wording here is awkward, even off-putting. Several times, I have sat listening to this poet, David Whyte, Irish and British, raised in Britain. He presents, a large figure, stroking long hair that falls across his face, believed to be a wig, and unfamiliar to him, after a fashion. Yet, he repeats his phrases of poetry, as above, 3 or 5 times over, rhythmically, confidently and quickly, same inflection, with resonance, implying a meaning just beyond. His audience leans as if to hear more closely, more clearly and maybe catch his meaning, his inference, his reference. Oh, well it’s complicated. Well, there must be SOMETHING there, the way he says it so emphatically and looking beyond us. For this column, I put capital letters for one word, giving emphasis each time rendering a different focus. I do love this line and that poet. He got noticed at the Psychotherpy Networker Symposium, in my view, when his friend John O’Donahue, another Irish philosopher, beloved of the conference, died. There followed his articulating, for us, the meanings of love and loss and the grappling thereafter and with us. Look around. What DOES bring you alive? And what does that mean, anyhow “bring you alive”? I think it takes some thinking, some reflection. Rolling it around in your mouth and holding like

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

good wine. What tastes like this? He repeats it and so will I “Alive. Alive alive. Alive alive. Brings you alive. Too small if it does not. Too small - too - small…Chant that. The words are assembled in an odd way. Alive is not an adverb, now is it? I stumble at the grammatical construction. That in itself creates the setting for being brought alive. What? As with living, the mystery and surprise accompanying showing up, opening up, yields questions and temporary answers. That longing and grasping is living, is it not? Here seems to be a strategy for choosing and letting go, where possible. Not just things, like Kon-Mari and her tidying advice, but close. To consider this strategy in human relationships seems cold, calculated, selfish. Best to be deliberate. If one is drowning, it is best for one to recognize which would be too small. Too snug for our expansion.. We are, in our interior selves quite large, if not physically so. And now I am asking. What and who DO bring you alive? Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Alliance Therapy Center, (540) 373-9577

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

21


Renew

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

This noonday is the bridge between present and destiny, coming closer to perfection than we will ever imagine.

by Joan M. Geisler

I was born in America’s Dairyland, Wisconsin. I have driven a tractor, bailed hay, milked cows, I even helped butcher chickens. I now know how the phrase, “running around like a chicken with its head cut off” came from. Living in the ‘burg, we see farming all around us. In spring we see the farmer turning over the dirt, adding nutrients to optimize the soil so the seed has the very best environment in which to grow and flourish. We, too, need to prepare and optimize the soil of our mind to create the very best environment to make healthy lifestyle habits. We ‘turn over the soil’ by making a commitment to ourselves and ‘add nutrients’ with social support, reading health and fitness blogs, websites and other encouragement and knowledge. Then the farmer will plow the field and make straight rows in which to drop the seeds. He does not just scatter the seed haphazardly and with no control.

22

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

the better u community

Cicadas

fitness is a lot like farming

He knows just how far apart to make the rows and he keeps his eyes fixed on an object far on the horizon so his rows stay straight. We, too, need to plow the field and make straight rows with meal planning and preparation. We keep our ‘rows straight’ by having our meals planned out, prepared ahead of time so our ‘rows’ don’t get crooked by eating fast food, junk food or empty calories. We keep our eyes on the horizon, fixed on the prize of lowered cholesterol, better heart function, energy, stamina and less aches and pains. Now that the tilling, plowing and planting is done, the hard part begins. Patience. There is seed, time…. More time, more time and then harvest. Isn’t waiting the hardest part of all? We watch what we eat, exercise, drink water and by the end of the day expect to have lost 10 pounds. The farmer does not go out to the field and rip up the seed to see if it is growing? He waits and waits and waits. He waits, waters, fertilizes, waters, waits, fertilizes, waters… We, too, need to eat clean whole foods, drink half our body weight in ounces, move our bodies a minimum of 30 minutes a day, have good emotional support, have a positive mindset, hang around good health conscience people and do it day after day after day.

Life in Motion

In short, we need patience too. Because…wait for it, wait for it… HARVEST DAY IS COMING. Soon the numbers on your scale will drop, your blood work with improve, your energy will go through the roof, you will sleep better, move better, you will be strong to tackle the projects that have been sitting quietly waiting for you. You will reap a harvest of healthy life habits! I am here to help you. You can call me Farmer Joan. Start tilling your soil and plowing your field by contacting me and let me help you start your tractor. Visit www.8020lifefitacademy.com for a free nutrition and lifestyle consultation. To your good health, Joan

Joan Geisler is the founder of 80/20 LifeFit Academy. She offers online classes that will empower you to restore your health.

Within a grove of poplars the last cicadas now shake, churning their rowdy chorus before summer quiets them. A life ends, another begins are what they appear to say, as each one excels itself with a promise of tomorrow. If we stand aware and still to sense what has happened, radiance then foreshadows the incubation of progeny.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

By rich gaudio, pt get physical therapy have either sustained some sort of injury or are suffering from symptoms of an injury, illness or disease process. These issues are limiting and/or complete preventing them from doing what they want to do. Physical therapy is often viewed as a necessary means of getting back to doing the things that are important. Last month, Dr. Travis Stoner, DPT (Travis) did a great job of sharing with us how his practice, Fusion Physical Therapy, went from being an idea, to a vision, to a reality in our community. Travis, also helped us see what makes Fusion Amy Roberto, certified personal trainer, different from other physical therapy teaching folks about building strong backs practices, “…it’s what’s on the inside during a Thursday Forum. at Fusion that really makes the The ‘purchase’ of physical difference…it’s not just the staff that therapy services, for most folks, is very makes up the Fusion community, it’s the different than the purchase of a smart patients and their families as well.” The phone or a new TV. Many folks in our Fusion culture is one in which each person community have received physical therapy has the chance to chat, make friends, and at one time or another…very few, if any, build relationships during their recovery. just woke up one morning and decided, One of the unfortunate realities “hey, I want to go get some physical of the insurance-based physical therapy therapy today.” The majority of folks that profession is that insurance companies

only reimburse our services in the short term. The services are always finite and this creates unintended negative consequences for many of our patients. Research tells us that the majority of patients stop doing the exercises prescribed when physical therapy is finished. We get it! This is very much inline with our human nature. Most folks think to themselves, “Well I’m feeling better, the therapist said I was better, no one is monitoring me to see if I’m doing them,” and, “I don’t have time for them because…” Then, they stop doing the exercises and things get worse. Most folks lead busy lives but the bad news is that when folks stop doing their exercises they become vulnerable to the epidemic of chronic, preventable diseases that now plague our nation and most of the Western world. Our BetterU community is an intentionally designed space in our practice, a bridge between healthcare and the community. It is a space in which each person can develop their best defense against chronic illness and disease. It is how our friends and neighbors can continue those friendships they built

during their recovery into the longer journey of their overall health and wellness. It is a tribe in which Cathy and Clayton may call and offer to give you a ride to a Thursday Forum to practice yoga with Bobbi. Or your friend Claude, who you were complaining to about your food choices, may invite you to meet Faye, a local dietician. It is the kind of place where you might get an invite to come meet Amy, the certified personal trainer, because your friend, Sarah, has learned how important safe, resistance training is to prevent or manage osteoporosis! If you are looking for a community of encouraging and supportive folks who will walk along side of you on your journey to better health, we invite you to stop on in and just say ‘hi,’ or attend one of our Thursday Forums at 3pm. We look forward to making your recovery a little easier and building lasting relationships on your journey to a better you! Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

23


Renew

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

This noonday is the bridge between present and destiny, coming closer to perfection than we will ever imagine.

by Joan M. Geisler

I was born in America’s Dairyland, Wisconsin. I have driven a tractor, bailed hay, milked cows, I even helped butcher chickens. I now know how the phrase, “running around like a chicken with its head cut off” came from. Living in the ‘burg, we see farming all around us. In spring we see the farmer turning over the dirt, adding nutrients to optimize the soil so the seed has the very best environment in which to grow and flourish. We, too, need to prepare and optimize the soil of our mind to create the very best environment to make healthy lifestyle habits. We ‘turn over the soil’ by making a commitment to ourselves and ‘add nutrients’ with social support, reading health and fitness blogs, websites and other encouragement and knowledge. Then the farmer will plow the field and make straight rows in which to drop the seeds. He does not just scatter the seed haphazardly and with no control.

22

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

the better u community

Cicadas

fitness is a lot like farming

He knows just how far apart to make the rows and he keeps his eyes fixed on an object far on the horizon so his rows stay straight. We, too, need to plow the field and make straight rows with meal planning and preparation. We keep our ‘rows straight’ by having our meals planned out, prepared ahead of time so our ‘rows’ don’t get crooked by eating fast food, junk food or empty calories. We keep our eyes on the horizon, fixed on the prize of lowered cholesterol, better heart function, energy, stamina and less aches and pains. Now that the tilling, plowing and planting is done, the hard part begins. Patience. There is seed, time…. More time, more time and then harvest. Isn’t waiting the hardest part of all? We watch what we eat, exercise, drink water and by the end of the day expect to have lost 10 pounds. The farmer does not go out to the field and rip up the seed to see if it is growing? He waits and waits and waits. He waits, waters, fertilizes, waters, waits, fertilizes, waters… We, too, need to eat clean whole foods, drink half our body weight in ounces, move our bodies a minimum of 30 minutes a day, have good emotional support, have a positive mindset, hang around good health conscience people and do it day after day after day.

Life in Motion

In short, we need patience too. Because…wait for it, wait for it… HARVEST DAY IS COMING. Soon the numbers on your scale will drop, your blood work with improve, your energy will go through the roof, you will sleep better, move better, you will be strong to tackle the projects that have been sitting quietly waiting for you. You will reap a harvest of healthy life habits! I am here to help you. You can call me Farmer Joan. Start tilling your soil and plowing your field by contacting me and let me help you start your tractor. Visit www.8020lifefitacademy.com for a free nutrition and lifestyle consultation. To your good health, Joan

Joan Geisler is the founder of 80/20 LifeFit Academy. She offers online classes that will empower you to restore your health.

Within a grove of poplars the last cicadas now shake, churning their rowdy chorus before summer quiets them. A life ends, another begins are what they appear to say, as each one excels itself with a promise of tomorrow. If we stand aware and still to sense what has happened, radiance then foreshadows the incubation of progeny.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 9 years.

By rich gaudio, pt get physical therapy have either sustained some sort of injury or are suffering from symptoms of an injury, illness or disease process. These issues are limiting and/or complete preventing them from doing what they want to do. Physical therapy is often viewed as a necessary means of getting back to doing the things that are important. Last month, Dr. Travis Stoner, DPT (Travis) did a great job of sharing with us how his practice, Fusion Physical Therapy, went from being an idea, to a vision, to a reality in our community. Travis, also helped us see what makes Fusion Amy Roberto, certified personal trainer, different from other physical therapy teaching folks about building strong backs practices, “…it’s what’s on the inside during a Thursday Forum. at Fusion that really makes the The ‘purchase’ of physical difference…it’s not just the staff that therapy services, for most folks, is very makes up the Fusion community, it’s the different than the purchase of a smart patients and their families as well.” The phone or a new TV. Many folks in our Fusion culture is one in which each person community have received physical therapy has the chance to chat, make friends, and at one time or another…very few, if any, build relationships during their recovery. just woke up one morning and decided, One of the unfortunate realities “hey, I want to go get some physical of the insurance-based physical therapy therapy today.” The majority of folks that profession is that insurance companies

only reimburse our services in the short term. The services are always finite and this creates unintended negative consequences for many of our patients. Research tells us that the majority of patients stop doing the exercises prescribed when physical therapy is finished. We get it! This is very much inline with our human nature. Most folks think to themselves, “Well I’m feeling better, the therapist said I was better, no one is monitoring me to see if I’m doing them,” and, “I don’t have time for them because…” Then, they stop doing the exercises and things get worse. Most folks lead busy lives but the bad news is that when folks stop doing their exercises they become vulnerable to the epidemic of chronic, preventable diseases that now plague our nation and most of the Western world. Our BetterU community is an intentionally designed space in our practice, a bridge between healthcare and the community. It is a space in which each person can develop their best defense against chronic illness and disease. It is how our friends and neighbors can continue those friendships they built

during their recovery into the longer journey of their overall health and wellness. It is a tribe in which Cathy and Clayton may call and offer to give you a ride to a Thursday Forum to practice yoga with Bobbi. Or your friend Claude, who you were complaining to about your food choices, may invite you to meet Faye, a local dietician. It is the kind of place where you might get an invite to come meet Amy, the certified personal trainer, because your friend, Sarah, has learned how important safe, resistance training is to prevent or manage osteoporosis! If you are looking for a community of encouraging and supportive folks who will walk along side of you on your journey to better health, we invite you to stop on in and just say ‘hi,’ or attend one of our Thursday Forums at 3pm. We look forward to making your recovery a little easier and building lasting relationships on your journey to a better you! Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

23


Art in the Burg exploring the “extra” in extraordinary

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Stories

of fredericksburg

Sara & Darren

By NORMA WOODWARD Exploring the sensual side of color, Peggy Wickham offers a new look at the way colors move us in her show entitled "Exploring the 'Extra' in Extraordinary." Replacing a visual memory experience with the sense of "awe" that brilliant color can inspire, Peggy ventures deeper into the abstracted realm of art. Her new works are dramatic, and extraordinary to behold.

Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish enabled her to approach her acrylics with fresh creativity. Now, she enjoys conveying life's mystery and miraculous through acrylics, a medium she has worked with for years. Exploring the “Extra” in Extraordinary Artist Peggy Wickham July 31- August 27 First Friday Reception: August 4 See this and other fine art on display at Brush Strokes Gallery, 11-5 daily. Join us August 4 for the Artists' reception from 6-9 p.m. at Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg. Add your name to our monthly drawing for an original work of art by one of our member artists.

“City Lights” Peggy describes herself as a "late blooming artist," and so, encourages all those who long to pursue their artistic dreams. Until midlife, her work experience was primarily in the healthcare field, as a medical technician. Science was her creative "magic" during those years-not just the human body but trees, flowers,and nature as a whole. She explains that when she started to make art professionally, she never dreamed that somehow the two worlds of art and science might coalesce into one through happy exploration. While acrylic is Peggy's primary medium, she also loves painting in watercolor. She says, "I delight in discovering the 'magical and mysterious' qualities of watercolor." She says that her recent exploration of watercolor has

24

August 2017

Name This House

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

Sara, 39 was homeless on and off for about five years. She met her now husband Darren, 47, in a shelter. They found an apartment together and were then able to take in Sara’s father and brother, who were also homeless. They have all shared an apartment, supported and encouraged one another for the last three years. Sara has two children that do not live with her, but having a stable place to live has given her a chance to restore her relationship with them. "Who is Sara? Full of love and compassion. I try to be a good mom…I definitely want to be remembered for being a mom- raising two good boys, but sometimes it gets jumbled with them not here. I miss them terribly. I’m also a very strong Christian believer. I would want to be known for someone who’s got a lot of faith in the Lord. Someone who loves my kids, loves Darren, and loves my family. I was homeless with my children once…they were homeless with me. We were in a family dorm in a shelter. The shelter was helpful, but they only give you so much time to be there and my time was

coming up and I didn’t have any options. I knew I was going to become homeless again after a period of not being homeless. Fortunately, my brothers took us in at that time because they were not homeless. Having a neurological condition has left me not able to work very well and it leaves me with little different problems and I go through a lot of pain every day. Trying to transition from homelessness to not being homeless was such a blessing. We’re on a road to not needing the help anymore and it’s a little scary to wonder how we’re going to do out there. I care deeply about my children and Darren. I met Darren at a homeless shelter. He was homeless longer than I was, but I was homeless on my own and a female out there trying to fend for her herself…I just know that the good Lord brought Darren into my life for many reasons and I cherish Darren very much. He is the love of my life and I don’t know where I would be without him. That’s the honest truth. Also, Darren’s mom and my mom passed away on the same day 6 years apart. His was on 2003 and mine was in 2009…so that makes mother’s day hard, but we’re lucky that we have each other.”

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 909 Madison Street. The Winner of a Gift Certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden is Jorge Ibarra.

Oh where oh where did our little dog go, as my life was so golden when she was around. In the mornings the sun shone through my windows so clear, when our dad went to work, above us at the college so near. My mom rolled the ball, and we played everyday, with neighbors so friendly and dear. The years have flown, as I look up the hill, still expecting to hear his whistles, still. The years have piled up, and I have been sad, waiting, waiting for my family to appear. Tears and rain have turned me grey, as I sit here on a sunken road, waiting for a resurrection to unfold

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

“Forces of Nature”

Front porch fredericksburg

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

25


Art in the Burg exploring the “extra” in extraordinary

Art is a Gift from the Heart

Stories

of fredericksburg

Sara & Darren

By NORMA WOODWARD Exploring the sensual side of color, Peggy Wickham offers a new look at the way colors move us in her show entitled "Exploring the 'Extra' in Extraordinary." Replacing a visual memory experience with the sense of "awe" that brilliant color can inspire, Peggy ventures deeper into the abstracted realm of art. Her new works are dramatic, and extraordinary to behold.

Artists: Beverley Coates Lynn Abbott Penny Parrish enabled her to approach her acrylics with fresh creativity. Now, she enjoys conveying life's mystery and miraculous through acrylics, a medium she has worked with for years. Exploring the “Extra” in Extraordinary Artist Peggy Wickham July 31- August 27 First Friday Reception: August 4 See this and other fine art on display at Brush Strokes Gallery, 11-5 daily. Join us August 4 for the Artists' reception from 6-9 p.m. at Brush Strokes Gallery, located at 824 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg. Add your name to our monthly drawing for an original work of art by one of our member artists.

“City Lights” Peggy describes herself as a "late blooming artist," and so, encourages all those who long to pursue their artistic dreams. Until midlife, her work experience was primarily in the healthcare field, as a medical technician. Science was her creative "magic" during those years-not just the human body but trees, flowers,and nature as a whole. She explains that when she started to make art professionally, she never dreamed that somehow the two worlds of art and science might coalesce into one through happy exploration. While acrylic is Peggy's primary medium, she also loves painting in watercolor. She says, "I delight in discovering the 'magical and mysterious' qualities of watercolor." She says that her recent exploration of watercolor has

24

August 2017

Name This House

Daily hours 10 to 6. Artist on site Saturdays 810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg

Sara, 39 was homeless on and off for about five years. She met her now husband Darren, 47, in a shelter. They found an apartment together and were then able to take in Sara’s father and brother, who were also homeless. They have all shared an apartment, supported and encouraged one another for the last three years. Sara has two children that do not live with her, but having a stable place to live has given her a chance to restore her relationship with them. "Who is Sara? Full of love and compassion. I try to be a good mom…I definitely want to be remembered for being a mom- raising two good boys, but sometimes it gets jumbled with them not here. I miss them terribly. I’m also a very strong Christian believer. I would want to be known for someone who’s got a lot of faith in the Lord. Someone who loves my kids, loves Darren, and loves my family. I was homeless with my children once…they were homeless with me. We were in a family dorm in a shelter. The shelter was helpful, but they only give you so much time to be there and my time was

coming up and I didn’t have any options. I knew I was going to become homeless again after a period of not being homeless. Fortunately, my brothers took us in at that time because they were not homeless. Having a neurological condition has left me not able to work very well and it leaves me with little different problems and I go through a lot of pain every day. Trying to transition from homelessness to not being homeless was such a blessing. We’re on a road to not needing the help anymore and it’s a little scary to wonder how we’re going to do out there. I care deeply about my children and Darren. I met Darren at a homeless shelter. He was homeless longer than I was, but I was homeless on my own and a female out there trying to fend for her herself…I just know that the good Lord brought Darren into my life for many reasons and I cherish Darren very much. He is the love of my life and I don’t know where I would be without him. That’s the honest truth. Also, Darren’s mom and my mom passed away on the same day 6 years apart. His was on 2003 and mine was in 2009…so that makes mother’s day hard, but we’re lucky that we have each other.”

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 909 Madison Street. The Winner of a Gift Certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden is Jorge Ibarra.

Oh where oh where did our little dog go, as my life was so golden when she was around. In the mornings the sun shone through my windows so clear, when our dad went to work, above us at the college so near. My mom rolled the ball, and we played everyday, with neighbors so friendly and dear. The years have flown, as I look up the hill, still expecting to hear his whistles, still. The years have piled up, and I have been sad, waiting, waiting for my family to appear. Tears and rain have turned me grey, as I sit here on a sunken road, waiting for a resurrection to unfold

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness and identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540479-4116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

“Forces of Nature”

Front porch fredericksburg

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

25


FXBG Music Scene mark vollten

Calling for Entries Art Exhibit to Raise Awareness of human trafficking

He loves to cook, but music is his passion. Over the years Mark Vollten has played guitar for local reggae rock bands like Sons of Solomon, 2Raw, Sunsette Syndicette, and the up and coming group, The Feathered Fish. He has guested with many, including Adwela & The Uprising and Ashleigh Chevalier Band. But now, this gent has decided to pursue music solo, with all his many types of guitars and even, yes, an ukelele. “I got a guitar when I was four years old, and I have known since then that playing music was all I ever wanted to

do with my life; like some people wonder for a while. Nope. I have always known. I carried that guitar around for years like a safety blanket. I started my first band when I was 14 playing reggae.” Mark owns and can play an acoustic six string, a twelve string, a classic Fender electric, an old school resonator guitar, ukulele, mandolin, and a banjo. His instrumental medleys are as inspiring as his folk reggae rock infused lyrical songs. His strong tenor blends well with the ambient echo of the instrumentation. It’s original. It’s fresh. And it’s good vibes music. He draws his musical inspiration from the famed heroes like Bob Marley and Jimi Hendrix, but more lately from contemporary musical legends like John Butler Trio, The Avett Brothers, Green Sky Bluegrass and Trampled by Turtles. He goes outside to write, “I really like to be outside in nature…playing music is like meditation for me. It clears my mind.” Mark has written quite a few songs, some of which are available on SoundCloud under The Scenic Root. He is currently recording an album of new material at Wally Cleaver’s Studio that should be out summer 2018.

photo by kathlee m. lewis Michelle Trampe at the Red Sand Project

Don’t miss this guy live. You will be glad you did and truly enjoy the show. Catch Mark at Cancun Margarita Bar August 11 in Fredericksburg and at The Carytown Watermelon Festival Sunday, August 13 in Richmond. You can follow Mark on Facebook at Vollten for more dates to be announced and listen to his recordings on SoundCloud at The Scenic Root. Ashleigh Chevalier is a Blues/Jazz/Rock Musican-Vocalist, Songwriter, Music & Media Journalist, Entertainment & Marketing Consultant, Events Management & Support and, a mother living in Fredericksburg

“I hope people can put my music on and it brightens their day…if it does that? I’m happy. Ya know? It isn’t about fame or money… I have to play music. It’s not a choice, ya know? I mean, I guess it is a choice… Be miserable [not playing music] or be happy [playing music].” He laughed expressing the realization of this personal truth. What may not be known, unless you have attended a show, is how comical Mark is while performing. Good vibes music, good vibes smiles, and good laughs all around.

26

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

dialogue not diatribe by bryn Pavek

Dawn Whitmore

by Ashleigh Chevalier He has been around ol’ Fredericksburg for a while now… cooking as a trained chef at restaurants like FoodE, Mercantile, and Legume. Now he cooks for the classic American fare restaurant Mason Dixon Café on Old Princess Street

Civility

The “People Are Not Products” art exhibit benefit will be held in November by the local group, Central Virginia Justice Initiative (CVJI) and is currently accepting entries until August 15th. The exhibit’s purpose, according to the call for entry, is to ‘Raise awareness of Human Trafficking.’

AWARENESS OF THE FACTS: ~ Human trafficking happens in the USA ~ VA, MD, and D.C., according to Humantraffickinghotline.org, ranks in the top 25 for reported human trafficking cases and even in the top 10. Michelle Trampe became aware of the issue, of human trafficking, in the VA and surrounding areas while working in Richmond. Trampe and another concerned citizen’s first event to raise awareness

would be a luncheon. The event drew 70 people. Two State Senators and local law enforcement agreed to speak during the luncheon. The event accomplished their goal and helped raise awareness of human trafficking. Yet, Trampe said, “She felt called by God to do more.” While researching, Trampe found Richmond Justice Initiative (RJI), a faithbased non-profit which had been fighting and raising awareness of human trafficking for several years. Trampe contacted Sara Pomeroy, the founder of RJI. Pomeroy shared with Trampe the pertinent information of how to create a similar organization in the Fredericksburg area. All the pieces were falling into place for CVJI. While Trampe worked through the paperwork of creating a non-profit, Kathleen Lewis, who had been aware of US-based trafficking, had begun volunteering with RJI in Richmond. Lewis explains in an email, “I had been volunteering for about month, when the woman who was the current RJI executive director referenced Trampe. She told me Trampe, who lived in Spotsylvania, was creating a non-profit in Fredericksburg to raise awareness for human trafficking.” Once talking to Trampe and learning Trampe’s vision, Lewis attended a CVJI meeting.. CJVI has been active in the community since inception; including monthly meetings open to the public. The group has had movie nights and several awareness events, including collaborating with Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault’s “Red Sand Project” to raise awareness of human trafficking to the UMW campus population. The “People Are Not Products” art exhibit, according to the ‘Call for Entry’, will raise awareness to the plight of human trafficking “through using subject matter to include entry (lures, lies, force or coercion), to daily survival (coping, hoping and/or giving up), to exit (freedom, ruin and or restoration) of human trafficking” through an artist eyes. All artwork in the exhibit will be for sale. Sales will benefit both CVJI and the contributing artist. To learn more about the exhibit, contact the curator, Leah Lewis at LLewisarts@gmail.com. To learn more about human trafficking and the mission of CVJI visit: http://www.centralvajusticeinitiative.com. Dawn Whitmore, The “Old Barn” Lady is a landscape photographer and writer www.dewphotographyva.com facebook.com/dewphotographypage

A Pathway to Civility in Communications a non-partisan workshop (Sept. 30, 1-5 5pm) has been developed to support conversation over conversion, dialogue instead of diatribe, and to give the average resident of the greater Fredericksburg area some new skills. Christopher Pavek (right), the workshop moderator, says “We want to add to participants’ toolbox of lifelong learning to help them communicate with open minds – and without fear.” According to Pavek, “Civil Discourse is a universal skill that can be used whenever one communicates with others—whether as a parent, employee, boss, or just as a friend or club member “We started creating this workshop because we had several people asking themselves (and us), ‘why am I feeling so hostile toward my neighbor; I thought I knew my friends values but now I’m not sure; I’m interested in talking to people I totally disagree with but don’t know how to start. . I do I talk to an elderly parent about quitting driving;....trying to get a teenager to talk about their screen time ; speaking with a spouse about their growing anger; and to a supervisor/employee about a problem at work without frustration or resentment. It became clear that ordinary people were feeling squeezed about the level – and intensity – of incivility they faced during their typical day.” Facilitating the workshop are four local professionals skilled in communications and teaching. Iris Coleman is a licensed Master Social Worker in clinical supervision and Therapist in Fredericksburg. She brings a military background and crisis counseling know-how with families, in addition to advocacy skills. Lena Gonzalez Berrios (right) is a public librarian with cross cultural communications proficiency. She has designed civic engagement programs for audiences in local, state and international settings. Brian Vaughn is a Mental Health Counselor in clinical supervision who works with adults and youth, including teens. He is also recognized for his leadership in restorative justice work. Jennifer Vaughan (left) is a school system Professional

Development Specialist. Coaching, training and supporting transformational change are her areas of expertise. She is also knowledgeable about research in the field. “With combined experience of close to a hundred years,“ notes Pavek “participants will benefit from the expertise of all four facilitators because they will learn from all of them at the event.” The free workshop is open to the first 100 registrants and you can register by sending an email to

civildiscourse17@aol.com, listing your name, and number in their party. The workshop will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (UUFF) building at 25 Chalice Drive in Fredericksburg, 22405. Onsite and accessible parking is available. Persons without access to email can call Chris or Bryn Pavek at 703-7160888 to register. Additionally, volunteers are able to drive participants without transportation, and child care to age 10 is available. Persons needing transportation and/or child care should indicate it when they register.

Sponsors include the League of Women Voters of the Fredericksburg area, the social justice committee of the UUFF, Front Porch and The Magazine Fredericksburg, . Partners in the event are the Central Regional Rappahannock Library and the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board. Bryn Pavek is a member of the workshop publicity committee.

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

27


FXBG Music Scene mark vollten

Calling for Entries Art Exhibit to Raise Awareness of human trafficking

He loves to cook, but music is his passion. Over the years Mark Vollten has played guitar for local reggae rock bands like Sons of Solomon, 2Raw, Sunsette Syndicette, and the up and coming group, The Feathered Fish. He has guested with many, including Adwela & The Uprising and Ashleigh Chevalier Band. But now, this gent has decided to pursue music solo, with all his many types of guitars and even, yes, an ukelele. “I got a guitar when I was four years old, and I have known since then that playing music was all I ever wanted to

do with my life; like some people wonder for a while. Nope. I have always known. I carried that guitar around for years like a safety blanket. I started my first band when I was 14 playing reggae.” Mark owns and can play an acoustic six string, a twelve string, a classic Fender electric, an old school resonator guitar, ukulele, mandolin, and a banjo. His instrumental medleys are as inspiring as his folk reggae rock infused lyrical songs. His strong tenor blends well with the ambient echo of the instrumentation. It’s original. It’s fresh. And it’s good vibes music. He draws his musical inspiration from the famed heroes like Bob Marley and Jimi Hendrix, but more lately from contemporary musical legends like John Butler Trio, The Avett Brothers, Green Sky Bluegrass and Trampled by Turtles. He goes outside to write, “I really like to be outside in nature…playing music is like meditation for me. It clears my mind.” Mark has written quite a few songs, some of which are available on SoundCloud under The Scenic Root. He is currently recording an album of new material at Wally Cleaver’s Studio that should be out summer 2018.

photo by kathlee m. lewis Michelle Trampe at the Red Sand Project

Don’t miss this guy live. You will be glad you did and truly enjoy the show. Catch Mark at Cancun Margarita Bar August 11 in Fredericksburg and at The Carytown Watermelon Festival Sunday, August 13 in Richmond. You can follow Mark on Facebook at Vollten for more dates to be announced and listen to his recordings on SoundCloud at The Scenic Root. Ashleigh Chevalier is a Blues/Jazz/Rock Musican-Vocalist, Songwriter, Music & Media Journalist, Entertainment & Marketing Consultant, Events Management & Support and, a mother living in Fredericksburg

“I hope people can put my music on and it brightens their day…if it does that? I’m happy. Ya know? It isn’t about fame or money… I have to play music. It’s not a choice, ya know? I mean, I guess it is a choice… Be miserable [not playing music] or be happy [playing music].” He laughed expressing the realization of this personal truth. What may not be known, unless you have attended a show, is how comical Mark is while performing. Good vibes music, good vibes smiles, and good laughs all around.

26

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

dialogue not diatribe by bryn Pavek

Dawn Whitmore

by Ashleigh Chevalier He has been around ol’ Fredericksburg for a while now… cooking as a trained chef at restaurants like FoodE, Mercantile, and Legume. Now he cooks for the classic American fare restaurant Mason Dixon Café on Old Princess Street

Civility

The “People Are Not Products” art exhibit benefit will be held in November by the local group, Central Virginia Justice Initiative (CVJI) and is currently accepting entries until August 15th. The exhibit’s purpose, according to the call for entry, is to ‘Raise awareness of Human Trafficking.’

AWARENESS OF THE FACTS: ~ Human trafficking happens in the USA ~ VA, MD, and D.C., according to Humantraffickinghotline.org, ranks in the top 25 for reported human trafficking cases and even in the top 10. Michelle Trampe became aware of the issue, of human trafficking, in the VA and surrounding areas while working in Richmond. Trampe and another concerned citizen’s first event to raise awareness

would be a luncheon. The event drew 70 people. Two State Senators and local law enforcement agreed to speak during the luncheon. The event accomplished their goal and helped raise awareness of human trafficking. Yet, Trampe said, “She felt called by God to do more.” While researching, Trampe found Richmond Justice Initiative (RJI), a faithbased non-profit which had been fighting and raising awareness of human trafficking for several years. Trampe contacted Sara Pomeroy, the founder of RJI. Pomeroy shared with Trampe the pertinent information of how to create a similar organization in the Fredericksburg area. All the pieces were falling into place for CVJI. While Trampe worked through the paperwork of creating a non-profit, Kathleen Lewis, who had been aware of US-based trafficking, had begun volunteering with RJI in Richmond. Lewis explains in an email, “I had been volunteering for about month, when the woman who was the current RJI executive director referenced Trampe. She told me Trampe, who lived in Spotsylvania, was creating a non-profit in Fredericksburg to raise awareness for human trafficking.” Once talking to Trampe and learning Trampe’s vision, Lewis attended a CVJI meeting.. CJVI has been active in the community since inception; including monthly meetings open to the public. The group has had movie nights and several awareness events, including collaborating with Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault’s “Red Sand Project” to raise awareness of human trafficking to the UMW campus population. The “People Are Not Products” art exhibit, according to the ‘Call for Entry’, will raise awareness to the plight of human trafficking “through using subject matter to include entry (lures, lies, force or coercion), to daily survival (coping, hoping and/or giving up), to exit (freedom, ruin and or restoration) of human trafficking” through an artist eyes. All artwork in the exhibit will be for sale. Sales will benefit both CVJI and the contributing artist. To learn more about the exhibit, contact the curator, Leah Lewis at LLewisarts@gmail.com. To learn more about human trafficking and the mission of CVJI visit: http://www.centralvajusticeinitiative.com. Dawn Whitmore, The “Old Barn” Lady is a landscape photographer and writer www.dewphotographyva.com facebook.com/dewphotographypage

A Pathway to Civility in Communications a non-partisan workshop (Sept. 30, 1-5 5pm) has been developed to support conversation over conversion, dialogue instead of diatribe, and to give the average resident of the greater Fredericksburg area some new skills. Christopher Pavek (right), the workshop moderator, says “We want to add to participants’ toolbox of lifelong learning to help them communicate with open minds – and without fear.” According to Pavek, “Civil Discourse is a universal skill that can be used whenever one communicates with others—whether as a parent, employee, boss, or just as a friend or club member “We started creating this workshop because we had several people asking themselves (and us), ‘why am I feeling so hostile toward my neighbor; I thought I knew my friends values but now I’m not sure; I’m interested in talking to people I totally disagree with but don’t know how to start. . I do I talk to an elderly parent about quitting driving;....trying to get a teenager to talk about their screen time ; speaking with a spouse about their growing anger; and to a supervisor/employee about a problem at work without frustration or resentment. It became clear that ordinary people were feeling squeezed about the level – and intensity – of incivility they faced during their typical day.” Facilitating the workshop are four local professionals skilled in communications and teaching. Iris Coleman is a licensed Master Social Worker in clinical supervision and Therapist in Fredericksburg. She brings a military background and crisis counseling know-how with families, in addition to advocacy skills. Lena Gonzalez Berrios (right) is a public librarian with cross cultural communications proficiency. She has designed civic engagement programs for audiences in local, state and international settings. Brian Vaughn is a Mental Health Counselor in clinical supervision who works with adults and youth, including teens. He is also recognized for his leadership in restorative justice work. Jennifer Vaughan (left) is a school system Professional

Development Specialist. Coaching, training and supporting transformational change are her areas of expertise. She is also knowledgeable about research in the field. “With combined experience of close to a hundred years,“ notes Pavek “participants will benefit from the expertise of all four facilitators because they will learn from all of them at the event.” The free workshop is open to the first 100 registrants and you can register by sending an email to

civildiscourse17@aol.com, listing your name, and number in their party. The workshop will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (UUFF) building at 25 Chalice Drive in Fredericksburg, 22405. Onsite and accessible parking is available. Persons without access to email can call Chris or Bryn Pavek at 703-7160888 to register. Additionally, volunteers are able to drive participants without transportation, and child care to age 10 is available. Persons needing transportation and/or child care should indicate it when they register.

Sponsors include the League of Women Voters of the Fredericksburg area, the social justice committee of the UUFF, Front Porch and The Magazine Fredericksburg, . Partners in the event are the Central Regional Rappahannock Library and the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board. Bryn Pavek is a member of the workshop publicity committee.

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

27


Companions boomer’s story By Candice Armstrong

families." FredSPCA will be participating again this year on August 19th and we are hoping to top last year’s total of 80 adoptions by sending home 100 animals in ONE DAY! We need our community of supporters to help us spread the word and make this the most successful event yet! Adoption fees for Clear the Shelters on August 19th will be only

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

fredericksburg agricultural fair By kevin brown Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

$50. All SPCA adoptable animals are spayed/neutered, up to date on ageappropriate vaccines, healthy, and

Oldest Fair in the USA Here’s a trivia question for you. What is the oldest fair in the United States? If you guessed the Fredericksburg Agricultural Fair, you would be correct. According to the Fair website, the www.fredericksburgfair.org, Fredericksburg Agricultural Fair was

and lastly to its present location on the south side of town. Not unlike the American economy, our Fair has experienced periods of

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions

On June 13, 2017, our dog Boomer went to his forever home with the Carmine family! Though Boomer’s adoption alone is something to celebrate, we want to share a little more of his story prior to going home with the Carmines.

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Boomer was rescued from life on a chain in Tennessee by the Animal Rescue Corps with funding from the BISSELL Pet

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

socialized. Please LIKE our Facebook page and share our posts with your friends! Clear the Shelters Day Aug. 19th FredSPCA 10819 Courthouse Rd, FXBG, VA 22408 Phone:(540) 898-1 1500

Foundation. He got lots of love and care from the folks at ARC before he was transferred in to our care.

540-898-0737

photo by penny newton established in 1738 when the Virginia House of Burgess authorized, and directed, that “fairs should be held in Fredericksburg twice a year for the sale of cattle, provisions, goods, wares, and all kinds of merchandise”. It is the oldest fair in Virginia and even the United States. In 2017, the Fair will be 279 years old. Over the past few centuries, our Fair has entertained literally millions of Fredericksburg area citizens and visitors with circuses, comedians, horse races, auto races, tractor pulls, hot air balloon rides, helicopter rides, beauty pageants, live music, carnival rides, food concessions, and of course, livestock and homemaking exhibits. The Fair location has transitioned over the years from a livestock and produce exchange in the downtown vicinity horse racing along the riverfront,

boom and bust. After languished during the late the 1800s and early 1900s, some dedicated local farmers and the Jaycees decided to step up to the plate and fully reestablish the Fair in the 1940s. After reopening in 1949, “The carnival was provided for many years by Dell Travers. Local merchants, such as Southern States and Roxsbury Mills, sold tickets to the rides. The fair was kicked off by a reception at the old Princess Anne Hotel followed by a big parade down Caroline Street. At the time, the area was rural and there were many farms to provide entries for cattle, poultry, vegetables, etc. Suburbia took over in the late 1980’s and farms were sold off for for housing developments, but we still have livestock entries today." There were many people who

helped keep the fair going over the past 60 years. These include W. J. Wilkinson, Eleanor Deichman, George Rawlings, Russell Noland, Sam Garrett, Jimmy Pates, Tommy Goodloe, "Togo" Graves, Billy Ramey, Kathleen Goodloe, Lynnwood Garrett, Lucy Samuel, Butch Wimmer, Bill Orrock, Duval Dickinson, John Wayne Edwards, Gene Rowell, Kathleen Howard, Shirley Boggs, and Richard Limerick just to name a few. Interested in attending the Fair thru August 6th? It is open 5-10 PM Mon-Fri, and 12-10 PM Sat and Sunday. Tickets run from $4-8, and children under 3 are Free. August 1 is "Half-off Tuesday". Beyond main- event livestock and homemaking exhibits, this year's entertainment includes Children's

Activities in the Homemaker's Building; Wild Rides on the Razzle Dazzle Gyroscope and Raging Mechanical Bull; Magic Shows; A Petting Zoo, Pony and Camel Rides; a Chainsaw Artist; A Rabbit and Poultry Barn; a Demolition Derby, Lawnmower Racing, Diesel Truck and Tractor Pull; and multiple Musical Acts and Contests on the Fairway Stage. To obtain a complete list of prices and activities, you can download a 2017 Fair Catalog online at www.fredericksburgfair.org. FXBG Agricultural Fair thru August 6th Open: Mon-F Fri, 5-1 10pm Sat & Sun: 12-1 10pm

Though Boomer was found living in poor conditions, the transformation in his face is evident for the world to see in the pictures we took of him playing outside and smiling with his new family on his adoption day! We are so grateful to have been a part of Boomer's journey and a huge thank you to all those involved in his rescue!

Clearing the Shelter at the Fredericksburg SPCA Clear the Shelters is a nationwide effort where nearly 700 shelters team up with NBC Owned Television Stations and to find homes for animals across the country. Since its inception in 2015, 73,411 animals have found their "forever

28

August 2017

Candi Armstrong, MSW is the Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at FredSPCA Mobile: 270-250-5455

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

29


Companions boomer’s story By Candice Armstrong

families." FredSPCA will be participating again this year on August 19th and we are hoping to top last year’s total of 80 adoptions by sending home 100 animals in ONE DAY! We need our community of supporters to help us spread the word and make this the most successful event yet! Adoption fees for Clear the Shelters on August 19th will be only

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

fredericksburg agricultural fair By kevin brown Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

$50. All SPCA adoptable animals are spayed/neutered, up to date on ageappropriate vaccines, healthy, and

Oldest Fair in the USA Here’s a trivia question for you. What is the oldest fair in the United States? If you guessed the Fredericksburg Agricultural Fair, you would be correct. According to the Fair website, the www.fredericksburgfair.org, Fredericksburg Agricultural Fair was

and lastly to its present location on the south side of town. Not unlike the American economy, our Fair has experienced periods of

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions

On June 13, 2017, our dog Boomer went to his forever home with the Carmine family! Though Boomer’s adoption alone is something to celebrate, we want to share a little more of his story prior to going home with the Carmines.

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Boomer was rescued from life on a chain in Tennessee by the Animal Rescue Corps with funding from the BISSELL Pet

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

socialized. Please LIKE our Facebook page and share our posts with your friends! Clear the Shelters Day Aug. 19th FredSPCA 10819 Courthouse Rd, FXBG, VA 22408 Phone:(540) 898-1 1500

Foundation. He got lots of love and care from the folks at ARC before he was transferred in to our care.

540-898-0737

photo by penny newton established in 1738 when the Virginia House of Burgess authorized, and directed, that “fairs should be held in Fredericksburg twice a year for the sale of cattle, provisions, goods, wares, and all kinds of merchandise”. It is the oldest fair in Virginia and even the United States. In 2017, the Fair will be 279 years old. Over the past few centuries, our Fair has entertained literally millions of Fredericksburg area citizens and visitors with circuses, comedians, horse races, auto races, tractor pulls, hot air balloon rides, helicopter rides, beauty pageants, live music, carnival rides, food concessions, and of course, livestock and homemaking exhibits. The Fair location has transitioned over the years from a livestock and produce exchange in the downtown vicinity horse racing along the riverfront,

boom and bust. After languished during the late the 1800s and early 1900s, some dedicated local farmers and the Jaycees decided to step up to the plate and fully reestablish the Fair in the 1940s. After reopening in 1949, “The carnival was provided for many years by Dell Travers. Local merchants, such as Southern States and Roxsbury Mills, sold tickets to the rides. The fair was kicked off by a reception at the old Princess Anne Hotel followed by a big parade down Caroline Street. At the time, the area was rural and there were many farms to provide entries for cattle, poultry, vegetables, etc. Suburbia took over in the late 1980’s and farms were sold off for for housing developments, but we still have livestock entries today." There were many people who

helped keep the fair going over the past 60 years. These include W. J. Wilkinson, Eleanor Deichman, George Rawlings, Russell Noland, Sam Garrett, Jimmy Pates, Tommy Goodloe, "Togo" Graves, Billy Ramey, Kathleen Goodloe, Lynnwood Garrett, Lucy Samuel, Butch Wimmer, Bill Orrock, Duval Dickinson, John Wayne Edwards, Gene Rowell, Kathleen Howard, Shirley Boggs, and Richard Limerick just to name a few. Interested in attending the Fair thru August 6th? It is open 5-10 PM Mon-Fri, and 12-10 PM Sat and Sunday. Tickets run from $4-8, and children under 3 are Free. August 1 is "Half-off Tuesday". Beyond main- event livestock and homemaking exhibits, this year's entertainment includes Children's

Activities in the Homemaker's Building; Wild Rides on the Razzle Dazzle Gyroscope and Raging Mechanical Bull; Magic Shows; A Petting Zoo, Pony and Camel Rides; a Chainsaw Artist; A Rabbit and Poultry Barn; a Demolition Derby, Lawnmower Racing, Diesel Truck and Tractor Pull; and multiple Musical Acts and Contests on the Fairway Stage. To obtain a complete list of prices and activities, you can download a 2017 Fair Catalog online at www.fredericksburgfair.org. FXBG Agricultural Fair thru August 6th Open: Mon-F Fri, 5-1 10pm Sat & Sun: 12-1 10pm

Though Boomer was found living in poor conditions, the transformation in his face is evident for the world to see in the pictures we took of him playing outside and smiling with his new family on his adoption day! We are so grateful to have been a part of Boomer's journey and a huge thank you to all those involved in his rescue!

Clearing the Shelter at the Fredericksburg SPCA Clear the Shelters is a nationwide effort where nearly 700 shelters team up with NBC Owned Television Stations and to find homes for animals across the country. Since its inception in 2015, 73,411 animals have found their "forever

28

August 2017

Candi Armstrong, MSW is the Community Outreach & Volunteer Coordinator at FredSPCA Mobile: 270-250-5455

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

From My Porch

FXBG’ERS

rising, falling, rising again

Kassie Stevenson

www.gemstonecreations.org

“The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.” ~ Nelson Mandela

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." ~ Mother Teresa

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #34: The Star Building This is one of my favorite buildings in town. I’ve sketched parts of it a couple of times. Usually it has simply been “the building sitting next to Hyperion” in larger drawings of the corner of William and Princess Anne streets. But I had the happy opportunity to focus specifically on The Star Building recently Star. for a drawing presented to Jim Toler as a retirement gift from The Free Lance-S Jim spent 35 years with the local paper working his way up from cub reporter to being in charge of the editorial page. He didn’t actually work in this building during his tenure, but it has held a special spot in the hearts of locals since the days when “The Free Lance” and the “Fredericksburg Daily Star” were still two separate newspapers. I’ve seen photos from the late 1800s with newspaper folks standing proudly outside and the building still looks virtually the same. I’m told it was the first building built with cast iron in the area which was a big deal at the time. My favorite part, as an artist is that owners through the years have done such a great job preserving all those stars and intricate trim work that are so fun to draw. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

By Jo Loving

by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Have you ever visited some place and met people who were so kind, and good, who made you feel so welcome, valued and safe, that you wanted to come back again and again? This is Stafford Junction, and this is where I met Kassie Stevenson, the sixteen year old high school volunteer, with the beautiful, glistening and compassionate eyes,and welcoming smile.. She is one of the wonderful young people who volunteer to help the multitude of children who come to Stafford Junction,who are from low income, high risk homes.These children come to this non-profit organization for food and a wonderful educational programs, riding in donated vehicles, whose building was purchased by Doris Buffet many years ago, supported by hundreds of private citizens and organizations. Led by Pastor Carrie Evans, Executive Director and Lynn Hamilton, the Community Development Manager. Our Kassie is just a standout young lady, she knows who needs an extra hug, a smile, encouragement, always gentle, quietly finding out what might encourage each of our little ones. A hug, a taste of a new food, a game, some craft lesson. Kassie's complete devotion gives the children confidence and security. Lynn Johnson says Kassie smiles all the time, and is always eager to help..She always gets the job done perfectly. She is very detail oriented, and the kids love her. Kassie is the type of teenager that we hope all our teens grow up to be. Kassie is a sophomore at Forest Park HS, loves dogs,(she loves the Poodles

Carol and Billy Shelton bring for the reading program here at the Junction.) She is involved in her School Art Club, and hopes to be a teacher some day. Kassie also works with Jackie's baskets, and helps assemble gift bags for parents in need at the time of their child's birth. She belongs to the Rainbow Girls, who participate in a range of activities, from serving meals to the homeless, to visiting the elderly at the Masonic Home. She also is involved in a program preparing supplies for upcoming art classes. Kassie family is very involved with helping the Junction, and recently donated gifts to all the teenagers at Stafford Junction As I leave the Stafford Junction today, I look back and see Kassie, ever so lovingly, encouraging a little guy too scared to eat, urging him to take a first bite and step into his Stafford Junction day. I thank Stafford Junction, Carrie and Lynn, for giving me the opportunity to visit, and meet all the children and staff, and see your wonderful educational program,the amazing staff members and the teen volunteers. Also enjoyed meeting the creative staff member who collects thousands of dollars from coupons for free food, and not to forget, Carol and Billy Shelton and their so very beautiful, sweet and friendly poodles. Thanks Kassie for your loving work at the "Junction," and the wonderful role model you are for the children there.

I watched a lizard the other day. He darted about the porch rails, seemingly oblivious to the rest of the world around him. He paused, now and then, but his eyes were darting around, aware of what was going on. The birds were singing in the background. The scent of freshly mown grass was in the air. Suddenly, the lizard half leapt, half flew. His mouth opened, his tongue darted out, and he nabbed his prey: a wasp. I had never seen a lizard eat a wasp before. I’d seen them ingest flies, but that was commonplace. This was interesting. As he swallowed, he tilted his head to the left and right, his eyes bugged out, and he stretched his body, frantically at first, then languidly. I can only imagine what the wasp was doing, and, if they think, what he must have thought. After an hour, the lizard moved, slower than before, and made his way to his favorite spot atop one of the support beams of the porch. Life went on, at least for the lizard. My observation of the lizard made me think of life. We walk around, somewhat aware of what goes on around us; sometimes acutely aware, sometimes, focused on the moment or task at hand. Sometimes, we take a risk. We think we are carefully assessing the situation, and we plan. At some point, though, we take the leap. Sometimes, we leap into the familiar. We nab the fly. In the glory moments, we go for the wasp. When we do, we respond. Sometimes, our response is to conquer the challenge, to meet or exceed our own expectations. But then, there are times that we have bitten off more than we can chew. When that occurs, we have a choice. We can wallow in our

failure, we can accept that sometimes we will fail, we can give up, or try again. Any of these responses are acceptable. It’s fine to fail, it’s fine to give up, and it’s fine to try again, depending on who you are, your motivations, your stage of life, your inner fire, or whatever other qualities you wish to apply. You’re in charge. You can decide how to handle it. I have a lot of Don Quixote in me. I’ll keep tilting at those windmills. Sometimes, I succeed, sometimes I fail. But something that I’ve learned about myself through the years is that I am motivated by challenge. Sometimes, I must fail to move forward. That’s ok. So, that didn’t work. What did I learn? Can I regroup and try again? Should I let that one go and move on to the next challenge? Many options are there, I just need to think, then act. I can’t just sit and let life roll on by. Take the risk – try to calculate the risk, but take it. Do you sometimes regret trying something? Of course! But the successes are building blocks to confidence and selfassurance. It’s worth it. Sometimes we rise, sometimes we fall, sometimes we rise again. That keeps me going. How about you? What risks are you calculating? Where have you succeeded? Where have you failed? How did you respond? What will be your next challenge?

Jo Loving is on the porch today, watching the lizard again, wondering if he is going to nab a fly or a wasp. A storm outside is brewing, with rolling thunder in the distance, a flash or two of lightning, the scent of rain in the air. She thinks she spies a windmill in the distance . . .

This Downtown Girl will see you at the river, on my three-wheel bike..

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

From My Porch

FXBG’ERS

rising, falling, rising again

Kassie Stevenson

www.gemstonecreations.org

“The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.” ~ Nelson Mandela

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Give a Child Something to Think About

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." ~ Mother Teresa

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

SKETCH #34: The Star Building This is one of my favorite buildings in town. I’ve sketched parts of it a couple of times. Usually it has simply been “the building sitting next to Hyperion” in larger drawings of the corner of William and Princess Anne streets. But I had the happy opportunity to focus specifically on The Star Building recently Star. for a drawing presented to Jim Toler as a retirement gift from The Free Lance-S Jim spent 35 years with the local paper working his way up from cub reporter to being in charge of the editorial page. He didn’t actually work in this building during his tenure, but it has held a special spot in the hearts of locals since the days when “The Free Lance” and the “Fredericksburg Daily Star” were still two separate newspapers. I’ve seen photos from the late 1800s with newspaper folks standing proudly outside and the building still looks virtually the same. I’m told it was the first building built with cast iron in the area which was a big deal at the time. My favorite part, as an artist is that owners through the years have done such a great job preserving all those stars and intricate trim work that are so fun to draw. Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist and Realtor. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery in downtown Fredericksburg and at www.caseyshaw.com.

30

August 2017

Front porch fredericksburg

By Jo Loving

by georgia Lee Strentz

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Have you ever visited some place and met people who were so kind, and good, who made you feel so welcome, valued and safe, that you wanted to come back again and again? This is Stafford Junction, and this is where I met Kassie Stevenson, the sixteen year old high school volunteer, with the beautiful, glistening and compassionate eyes,and welcoming smile.. She is one of the wonderful young people who volunteer to help the multitude of children who come to Stafford Junction,who are from low income, high risk homes.These children come to this non-profit organization for food and a wonderful educational programs, riding in donated vehicles, whose building was purchased by Doris Buffet many years ago, supported by hundreds of private citizens and organizations. Led by Pastor Carrie Evans, Executive Director and Lynn Hamilton, the Community Development Manager. Our Kassie is just a standout young lady, she knows who needs an extra hug, a smile, encouragement, always gentle, quietly finding out what might encourage each of our little ones. A hug, a taste of a new food, a game, some craft lesson. Kassie's complete devotion gives the children confidence and security. Lynn Johnson says Kassie smiles all the time, and is always eager to help..She always gets the job done perfectly. She is very detail oriented, and the kids love her. Kassie is the type of teenager that we hope all our teens grow up to be. Kassie is a sophomore at Forest Park HS, loves dogs,(she loves the Poodles

Carol and Billy Shelton bring for the reading program here at the Junction.) She is involved in her School Art Club, and hopes to be a teacher some day. Kassie also works with Jackie's baskets, and helps assemble gift bags for parents in need at the time of their child's birth. She belongs to the Rainbow Girls, who participate in a range of activities, from serving meals to the homeless, to visiting the elderly at the Masonic Home. She also is involved in a program preparing supplies for upcoming art classes. Kassie family is very involved with helping the Junction, and recently donated gifts to all the teenagers at Stafford Junction As I leave the Stafford Junction today, I look back and see Kassie, ever so lovingly, encouraging a little guy too scared to eat, urging him to take a first bite and step into his Stafford Junction day. I thank Stafford Junction, Carrie and Lynn, for giving me the opportunity to visit, and meet all the children and staff, and see your wonderful educational program,the amazing staff members and the teen volunteers. Also enjoyed meeting the creative staff member who collects thousands of dollars from coupons for free food, and not to forget, Carol and Billy Shelton and their so very beautiful, sweet and friendly poodles. Thanks Kassie for your loving work at the "Junction," and the wonderful role model you are for the children there.

I watched a lizard the other day. He darted about the porch rails, seemingly oblivious to the rest of the world around him. He paused, now and then, but his eyes were darting around, aware of what was going on. The birds were singing in the background. The scent of freshly mown grass was in the air. Suddenly, the lizard half leapt, half flew. His mouth opened, his tongue darted out, and he nabbed his prey: a wasp. I had never seen a lizard eat a wasp before. I’d seen them ingest flies, but that was commonplace. This was interesting. As he swallowed, he tilted his head to the left and right, his eyes bugged out, and he stretched his body, frantically at first, then languidly. I can only imagine what the wasp was doing, and, if they think, what he must have thought. After an hour, the lizard moved, slower than before, and made his way to his favorite spot atop one of the support beams of the porch. Life went on, at least for the lizard. My observation of the lizard made me think of life. We walk around, somewhat aware of what goes on around us; sometimes acutely aware, sometimes, focused on the moment or task at hand. Sometimes, we take a risk. We think we are carefully assessing the situation, and we plan. At some point, though, we take the leap. Sometimes, we leap into the familiar. We nab the fly. In the glory moments, we go for the wasp. When we do, we respond. Sometimes, our response is to conquer the challenge, to meet or exceed our own expectations. But then, there are times that we have bitten off more than we can chew. When that occurs, we have a choice. We can wallow in our

failure, we can accept that sometimes we will fail, we can give up, or try again. Any of these responses are acceptable. It’s fine to fail, it’s fine to give up, and it’s fine to try again, depending on who you are, your motivations, your stage of life, your inner fire, or whatever other qualities you wish to apply. You’re in charge. You can decide how to handle it. I have a lot of Don Quixote in me. I’ll keep tilting at those windmills. Sometimes, I succeed, sometimes I fail. But something that I’ve learned about myself through the years is that I am motivated by challenge. Sometimes, I must fail to move forward. That’s ok. So, that didn’t work. What did I learn? Can I regroup and try again? Should I let that one go and move on to the next challenge? Many options are there, I just need to think, then act. I can’t just sit and let life roll on by. Take the risk – try to calculate the risk, but take it. Do you sometimes regret trying something? Of course! But the successes are building blocks to confidence and selfassurance. It’s worth it. Sometimes we rise, sometimes we fall, sometimes we rise again. That keeps me going. How about you? What risks are you calculating? Where have you succeeded? Where have you failed? How did you respond? What will be your next challenge?

Jo Loving is on the porch today, watching the lizard again, wondering if he is going to nab a fly or a wasp. A storm outside is brewing, with rolling thunder in the distance, a flash or two of lightning, the scent of rain in the air. She thinks she spies a windmill in the distance . . .

This Downtown Girl will see you at the river, on my three-wheel bike..

front porch fredericksburg

August 2017

31


Front Porch Fredericksburg -August 2017  
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